WorldWideScience

Sample records for kansas high-throughput screening

  1. High throughput screening operations at the University of Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Screening Laboratory at University of Kansas plays a critical role in advancing academic interest in the identification of chemical probes as tools to better understand the biological and biochemical basis of new therapeutic targets. The HTS laboratory has an open service policy and collaborates with internal and external academia as well as for-profit organizations to execute projects requiring HTS-compatible assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization.

  2. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening Laboratory. Part II: enabling collaborative drug-discovery partnerships through cutting-edge screening technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-07-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core was established in 2002 at the University of Kansas with support from an NIH grant and the state of Kansas. It collaborates with investigators from national and international academic, nonprofit and pharmaceutical organizations in executing HTS-ready assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization. This is part two of a contribution from the KU HTS laboratory.

  3. INTRODUCTION OF THE HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the system of high throughput screening (HTS). Its role in new drug study and current development is described. The relationship between research achievements of genome study and new type screening model of new drugs is emphasized. The personal opinions of current problems about HTS study in China are raised.

  4. INTRODUCTION OF THE HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the system of high throughput screening (HTS). Its role in new drug study and current development is described. The relationship between research achievements of genome study and new type screening model of new drugs is emphasized. The personal opinions of current problems about HTS study in China are raised.``

  5. High-throughput crystallization screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarina, Tatiana; Xu, Xiaohui; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography is dependent on obtaining a single protein crystal suitable for diffraction data collection. Due to this requirement, protein crystallization represents a key step in protein structure determination. The conditions for protein crystallization have to be determined empirically for each protein, making this step also a bottleneck in the structure determination process. Typical protein crystallization practice involves parallel setup and monitoring of a considerable number of individual protein crystallization experiments (also called crystallization trials). In these trials the aliquots of purified protein are mixed with a range of solutions composed of a precipitating agent, buffer, and sometimes an additive that have been previously successful in prompting protein crystallization. The individual chemical conditions in which a particular protein shows signs of crystallization are used as a starting point for further crystallization experiments. The goal is optimizing the formation of individual protein crystals of sufficient size and quality to make them suitable for diffraction data collection. Thus the composition of the primary crystallization screen is critical for successful crystallization.Systematic analysis of crystallization experiments carried out on several hundred proteins as part of large-scale structural genomics efforts allowed the optimization of the protein crystallization protocol and identification of a minimal set of 96 crystallization solutions (the "TRAP" screen) that, in our experience, led to crystallization of the maximum number of proteins.

  6. High Throughput Screening for Neurodegeneration and Complex Disease Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, Hemant; Lo, Donald C.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2008-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) for complex diseases is challenging. This stems from the fact that complex phenotypes are difficult to adapt to rapid, high throughput assays. We describe the recent development of high throughput and high-content screens (HCS) for neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on inherited neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease. We describe, among others, HTS assays based on protein aggregation, neuronal death, caspase activation and mutant protei...

  7. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  8. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  9. Virtual high throughput screening (vHTS) - A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Sangeetha; Mehrotra, Monica; Gupta, Dinesh,

    2008-01-01

    With the exponential rise in the number of viable novel drug targets, computational methods are being increasingly applied to accelerate the drug discovery process. Virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS) is one such established methodology to identify drug candidates from large collection of compound libraries. Although it complements the expensive and time consuming High Throughput Screening (HTS) of compound libraries, vHTS possess inherent challenges. The successful vHTS requires the car...

  10. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  11. High throughput combinatorial screening of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-11-01

    This article provides an overview of an advanced combinatorial material discovery platform developed recently for screening semiconductor materials with properties that may have applications ranging from radiation detectors to solar cells. Semiconductor thin-film libraries, each consisting of 256 materials of different composition arranged into a 16×16 matrix, were fabricated using laser-assisted evaporation process along with a combinatorial mechanism to achieve variations. The composition and microstructure of individual materials on each thin-film library were characterized with an integrated scanning micro-beam x-ray fluorescence and diffraction system, while the band gaps were determined by scanning optical reflection and transmission of the libraries. An ultrafast ultraviolet photon-induced charge probe was devised to measure the mobility and lifetime of individual thin-film materials on semiconductor libraries. Selected results on the discovery of semiconductors with desired band gaps and transport properties are illustrated.

  12. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such scr...

  13. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis...

  14. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  15. Systematic error detection in experimental high-throughput screening

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is a key part of the drug discovery process during which thousands of chemical compounds are screened and their activity levels measured in order to identify potential drug candidates (i.e., hits). Many technical, procedural or environmental factors can cause systematic measurement error or inequalities in the conditions in which the measurements are taken. Such systematic error has the potential to critically affect the hit selection proces...

  16. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  17. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  18. Creation of a small high-throughput screening facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flak, Tod

    2009-01-01

    The creation of a high-throughput screening facility within an organization is a difficult task, requiring a substantial investment of time, money, and organizational effort. Major issues to consider include the selection of equipment, the establishment of data analysis methodologies, and the formation of a group having the necessary competencies. If done properly, it is possible to build a screening system in incremental steps, adding new pieces of equipment and data analysis modules as the need grows. Based upon our experience with the creation of a small screening service, we present some guidelines to consider in planning a screening facility.

  19. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in 3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  20. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated...... maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content...... and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers...

  1. High-throughput screening in the C. elegans nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Holly E; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-06-03

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model organism in the field of neurobiology. The wiring of the C. elegans nervous system has been entirely mapped, and the animal's optical transparency allows for in vivo observation of neuronal activity. The nematode is also small in size, self-fertilizing, and inexpensive to cultivate and maintain, greatly lending to its utility as a whole-animal model for high-throughput screening (HTS) in the nervous system. However, the use of this organism in large-scale screens presents unique technical challenges, including reversible immobilization of the animal, parallel single-animal culture and containment, automation of laser surgery, and high-throughput image acquisition and phenotyping. These obstacles require significant modification of existing techniques and the creation of new C. elegans-based HTS platforms. In this review, we outline these challenges in detail and survey the novel technologies and methods that have been developed to address them.

  2. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for High-throughput Toxicity Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    High-throughput screening is extensively applied for identification of drug targets and drug discovery and recently it found entry into toxicity testing. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs) are used widespread for quantification of protein markers. We reasoned that RPPAs also can be utilized...... beneficially in automated high-throughput toxicity testing. An advantage of using RPPAs is that, in addition to the baseline toxicity readout, they allow testing of multiple markers of toxicity, such as inflammatory responses, which do not necessarily cumulate in cell death. We used transfection of si...... a robotic screening platform. Furthermore, we automated sample tracking and data analysis by developing a bundled bioinformatics tool named “MIRACLE”. Automation and RPPA-based viability/toxicity readouts enable rapid testing of large sample numbers, while granting the possibility for flexible consecutive...

  3. HTRF(®): pioneering technology for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degorce, François

    2006-12-01

    Cisbio international pioneered the field of homogeneous fluorescence methodologies and time-resolved fluorescence resonance in particular, through its proprietary technology, HTRF(®). The development was based on Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn's research on rare earth fluorescence properties (awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987) and on Cisbio's expertise in homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF). The technology is used in assay development and drug screening, most notably in high-throughput screening applications. This highly powerful technology is particularly applied to the areas of G-protein-coupled receptor and kinase screening, as well as a series of targets related to inflammation, metabolic diseases and CNS disorders.

  4. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  5. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B.; Demello, Andrew J.

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  6. High-throughput screening of cell responses to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliperttula, Marjo; Chung, Bong Geun; Navaladi, Akshay; Manbachi, Amir; Urtti, Arto

    2008-10-02

    Biomaterials have emerged as powerful regulators of the cellular microenvironment for drug discovery, tissue engineering research and chemical testing. Although biomaterial-based matrices control the cellular behavior, these matrices are still far from being optimal. In principle, efficacy of biomaterial development for the cell cultures can be improved by using high-throughput techniques that allow screening of a large number of materials and manipulate microenvironments in a controlled manner. Several cell responses such as toxicity, proliferation, and differentiation have been used to evaluate the biomaterials thus providing basis for further selection of the lead biomimetic materials or microenvironments. Although high-throughput techniques provide an initial screening of the desired properties, more detailed follow-up studies of the selected materials are required to understand the true value of a 'positive hit'. High-throughput methods may become important tools in the future development of biomaterials-based cell cultures that will enable more realistic pre-clinical prediction of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity. This is highly important, because predictive pre-clinical methods are needed to improve the high attrition rate of drug candidates during clinical testing.

  7. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  8. Discovery of novel targets with high throughput RNA interference screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, Paul D

    2008-03-01

    High throughput technologies have the potential to affect all aspects of drug discovery. Considerable attention is paid to high throughput screening (HTS) for small molecule lead compounds. The identification of the targets that enter those HTS campaigns had been driven by basic research until the advent of genomics level data acquisition such as sequencing and gene expression microarrays. Large-scale profiling approaches (e.g., microarrays, protein analysis by mass spectrometry, and metabolite profiling) can yield vast quantities of data and important information. However, these approaches usually require painstaking in silico analysis and low-throughput basic wet-lab research to identify the function of a gene and validate the gene product as a potential therapeutic drug target. Functional genomic screening offers the promise of direct identification of genes involved in phenotypes of interest. In this review, RNA interference (RNAi) mediated loss-of-function screens will be discussed and as well as their utility in target identification. Some of the genes identified in these screens should produce similar phenotypes if their gene products are antagonized with drugs. With a carefully chosen phenotype, an understanding of the biology of RNAi and appreciation of the limitations of RNAi screening, there is great potential for the discovery of new drug targets.

  9. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan KJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available KJ Allan,1,2 David F Stojdl,1–3 SL Swift1 1Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO Research Institute, 2Department of Biology, Microbiology and Immunology, 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, screen, high-throughput, cancer, chemical, genomic, immunotherapy

  10. A high-throughput cidality screen for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3 facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well 'spot-assay' for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets. The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808. An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process.

  11. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers.

  12. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  13. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  14. High-Throughput Screening Using Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sasmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient parallel screening of combinatorial libraries is one of the most challenging aspects of the high-throughput (HT heterogeneous catalysis workflow. Today, a number of methods have been used in HT catalyst studies, including various optical, mass-spectrometry, and gas-chromatography techniques. Of these, rapid-scanning Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR imaging is one of the fastest and most versatile screening techniques. Here, the new design of the 16-channel HT reactor is presented and test results for its accuracy and reproducibility are shown. The performance of the system was evaluated through the oxidation of CO over commercial Pd/Al2O3 and cobalt oxide nanoparticles synthesized with different reducer-reductant molar ratios, surfactant types, metal and surfactant concentrations, synthesis temperatures, and ramp rates.

  15. Hypothesis testing in high-throughput screening for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prummer, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Following the success of small-molecule high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, other large-scale screening techniques are currently revolutionizing the biological sciences. Powerful new statistical tools have been developed to analyze the vast amounts of data in DNA chip studies, but have not yet found their way into compound screening. In HTS, characterization of single-point hit lists is often done only in retrospect after the results of confirmation experiments are available. However, for prioritization, for optimal use of resources, for quality control, and for comparison of screens it would be extremely valuable to predict the rates of false positives and false negatives directly from the primary screening results. Making full use of the available information about compounds and controls contained in HTS results and replicated pilot runs, the Z score and from it the p value can be estimated for each measurement. Based on this consideration, we have applied the concept of p-value distribution analysis (PVDA), which was originally developed for gene expression studies, to HTS data. PVDA allowed prediction of all relevant error rates as well as the rate of true inactives, and excellent agreement with confirmation experiments was found.

  16. A high-throughput screen for antibiotic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Thomas C; Dostal, Sarah M; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-02-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ∼25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Stephan

    2002-06-01

    High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in its entirety is a valuable raw material for the drug-discovery process. It provides the most compete information about the biological activity of a company's compounds. However, its quantity, complexity and heterogeneity require novel, sophisticated approaches in data analysis. At GeneData, we are developing methods for large-scale, synoptical mining of screening data in a five-step analysis: (1) Quality Assurance: Checking data for experimental artifacts and eliminating low quality data. (2) Biological Profiling: Clustering and ranking of compounds based on their biological activity, taking into account specific characteristics of HTS data. (3) Rule-based Classification: Applying user-defined rules to biological and chemical properties, and providing hypotheses on the biological mode-of-action of compounds. (4) Joint Biological-Chemical Analysis: Associating chemical compound data to HTS data, providing hypotheses for structure- activity relationships. (5) integration with Genomic and Gene Expression Data: Linking into other components of GeneData's bioinformatics platform, and assessing the compounds' modes-of-action, toxicity, and metabolic properties. These analyses address issues that are crucial for a correct interpretation and full exploitation of screening data. They lead to a sound rating of assays and compounds at an early state of the lead-finding process.

  18. Assessing the utility and limitations of high throughput virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Daniel Phillips

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to low cost, speed, and unmatched ability to explore large numbers of compounds, high throughput virtual screening and molecular docking engines have become widely utilized by computational scientists. It is generally accepted that docking engines, such as AutoDock, produce reliable qualitative results for ligand-macromolecular receptor binding, and molecular docking results are commonly reported in literature in the absence of complementary wet lab experimental data. In this investigation, three variants of the sixteen amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin MII, were docked to a homology model of the a3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. DockoMatic version 2.0 was used to perform a virtual screen of each peptide ligand to the receptor for ten docking trials consisting of 100 AutoDock cycles per trial. The results were analyzed for both variation in the calculated binding energy obtained from AutoDock, and the orientation of bound peptide within the receptor. The results show that, while no clear correlation exists between consistent ligand binding pose and the calculated binding energy, AutoDock is able to determine a consistent positioning of bound peptide in the majority of trials when at least ten trials were evaluated.

  19. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  20. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test.

  1. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  2. Adaptation to high throughput batch chromatography enhances multivariate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gregory A; Calzada, Joseph; Herzer, Sibylle; Rieble, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    High throughput process development offers unique approaches to explore complex process design spaces with relatively low material consumption. Batch chromatography is one technique that can be used to screen chromatographic conditions in a 96-well plate. Typical batch chromatography workflows examine variations in buffer conditions or comparison of multiple resins in a given process, as opposed to the assessment of protein loading conditions in combination with other factors. A modification to the batch chromatography paradigm is described here where experimental planning, programming, and a staggered loading approach increase the multivariate space that can be explored with a liquid handling system. The iterative batch chromatography (IBC) approach is described, which treats every well in a 96-well plate as an individual experiment, wherein protein loading conditions can be varied alongside other factors such as wash and elution buffer conditions. As all of these factors are explored in the same experiment, the interactions between them are characterized and the number of follow-up confirmatory experiments is reduced. This in turn improves statistical power and throughput. Two examples of the IBC method are shown and the impact of the load conditions are assessed in combination with the other factors explored. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  4. High-throughput screening technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga; Finel, Moshe; Trubetskoy, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    A significant number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including many therapeutic agents, are metabolized in humans via glucuronidation, catalysed by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). The study of the UGTs is a growing field of research, with constantly accumulated and updated information regarding UGT structure, purification, substrate specificity and inhibition, including clinically relevant drug interactions. Development of reliable UGT assays for the assessment of individual isoform substrate specificity and for the discovery of novel isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors is crucial for understanding the function and regulation of the UGT enzyme family and its clinical and pharmacological relevance. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful technology used to search for novel substrates and inhibitors for a wide variety of targets. However, application of HTS in the context of UGTs is complicated because of the poor stability, low levels of expression, low affinity and broad substrate specificity of the enzymes, combined with difficulties in obtaining individual UGT isoforms in purified format, and insufficient information regarding isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors. This review examines the current status of HTS assays used in the search for novel UGT substrates and inhibitors, emphasizing advancements and challenges in HTS technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling, and discusses possible avenues for future advancement of the field.

  5. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  6. High-throughput mass spectrometric cytochrome P450 inhibition screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kheng B; Ozbal, Can C; Kassel, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a high-throughput assay to support rapid evaluation of drug discovery compounds for possible drug-drug interaction (DDI). Each compound is evaluated for its DDI potential by incubating over a range of eight concentrations and against a panel of six cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes: 1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The method utilizes automated liquid handling for sample preparation, and online solid-phase extraction/tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/MS/MS) for sample analyses. The system is capable of generating two 96-well assay plates in 30 min, and completes the data acquisition and analysis of both plates in about 30 min. Many laboratories that perform the CYP inhibition screening automate only part of the processes leaving a throughput bottleneck within the workflow. The protocols described in this chapter are aimed to streamline the entire process from assay to data acquisition and processing by incorporating automation and utilizing high-precision instrument to maximize throughput and minimize bottleneck.

  7. High-Throughput Screening Using Mass Spectrometry within Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Mattias; Wingfield, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In order to detect a biochemical analyte with a mass spectrometer (MS) it is necessary to ionize the analyte of interest. The analyte can be ionized by a number of different mechanisms, however, one common method is electrospray ionization (ESI). Droplets of analyte are sprayed through a highly charged field, the droplets pick up charge, and this is transferred to the analyte. High levels of salt in the assay buffer will potentially steal charge from the analyte and suppress the MS signal. In order to avoid this suppression of signal, salt is often removed from the sample prior to injection into the MS. Traditional ESI MS relies on liquid chromatography (LC) to remove the salt and reduce matrix effects, however, this is a lengthy process. Here we describe the use of RapidFire™ coupled to a triple-quadrupole MS for high-throughput screening. This system uses solid-phase extraction to de-salt samples prior to injection, reducing processing time such that a sample is injected into the MS ~every 10 s.

  8. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  9. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  10. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Soufan

    Full Text Available High-throughput screening (HTS experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  11. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  12. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  13. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter system for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Kawaguchi, Shin-ichi; Dan, Takashi; Baird, Liam; Miyata, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The induction of anti-hypoxic stress enzymes and proteins has the potential to be a potent therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of ischemic heart, kidney or brain diseases. To realize this idea, small chemical compounds, which mimic hypoxic conditions by activating the PHD-HIF-α system, have been developed. However, to date, none of these compounds were identified by monitoring the transcriptional activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Thus, to facilitate the discovery of potent inducers of HIF-α, we have developed an effective high-throughput screening (HTS) system to directly monitor the output of HIF-α transcription. We generated a HIF-α-dependent reporter system that responds to hypoxic stimuli in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This system was developed through multiple optimization steps, resulting in the generation of a construct that consists of the secretion-type luciferase gene (Metridia luciferase, MLuc) under the transcriptional regulation of an enhancer containing 7 copies of 40-bp hypoxia responsive element (HRE) upstream of a mini-TATA promoter. This construct was stably integrated into the human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-BE(2)c, to generate a reporter system, named SKN:HRE-MLuc. To improve this system and to increase its suitability for the HTS platform, we incorporated the next generation luciferase, Nano luciferase (NLuc), whose longer half-life provides us with flexibility for the use of this reporter. We thus generated a stably transformed clone with NLuc, named SKN:HRE-NLuc, and found that it showed significantly improved reporter activity compared to SKN:HRE-MLuc. In this study, we have successfully developed the SKN:HRE-NLuc screening system as an efficient platform for future HTS.

  14. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  15. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  16. Self-encoding Functional Resin Applying for Combinatorial Chemistry and High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lei; CHEN Tong-sheng

    2004-01-01

    A novel solid phase organic synthesis resin was synthesized for combinatorial high-throughput screening,which based on FTIR spectra self-encoding functional resin technology. A new deconvolution strategy termed position encoding deconvolution had illustrated and was compared with some popular combinatorial deconvolution strategies in efficiency and information content. The mimic high throughput screening of hexapeptide library successfully proved the applying of the self-encoding functional resin technology and the position encoding deconvolution strategy.

  17. Lessons from high-throughput protein crystallization screening: 10 years of practical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    JR, Luft; EH, Snell; GT, DeTitta

    2011-01-01

    Introduction X-ray crystallography provides the majority of our structural biological knowledge at a molecular level and in terms of pharmaceutical design is a valuable tool to accelerate discovery. It is the premier technique in the field, but its usefulness is significantly limited by the need to grow well-diffracting crystals. It is for this reason that high-throughput crystallization has become a key technology that has matured over the past 10 years through the field of structural genomics. Areas covered The authors describe their experiences in high-throughput crystallization screening in the context of structural genomics and the general biomedical community. They focus on the lessons learnt from the operation of a high-throughput crystallization screening laboratory, which to date has screened over 12,500 biological macromolecules. They also describe the approaches taken to maximize the success while minimizing the effort. Through this, the authors hope that the reader will gain an insight into the efficient design of a laboratory and protocols to accomplish high-throughput crystallization on a single-, multiuser-laboratory or industrial scale. Expert Opinion High-throughput crystallization screening is readily available but, despite the power of the crystallographic technique, getting crystals is still not a solved problem. High-throughput approaches can help when used skillfully; however, they still require human input in the detailed analysis and interpretation of results to be more successful. PMID:22646073

  18. Noise Reduction in High-Throughput Gene Perturbation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivation: Accurate interpretation of perturbation screens is essential for a successful functional investigation. However, the screened phenotypes are often distorted by noise, and their analysis requires specialized statistical analysis tools. The number and scope of statistical methods available...

  19. Microfluidics for cell-based high throughput screening platforms - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guansheng; Fang, Qun; den Toonder, Jaap M J

    2016-01-15

    In the last decades, the basic techniques of microfluidics for the study of cells such as cell culture, cell separation, and cell lysis, have been well developed. Based on cell handling techniques, microfluidics has been widely applied in the field of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), immunoassays, organ-on-chip, stem cell research, and analysis and identification of circulating tumor cells. As a major step in drug discovery, high-throughput screening allows rapid analysis of thousands of chemical, biochemical, genetic or pharmacological tests in parallel. In this review, we summarize the application of microfluidics in cell-based high throughput screening. The screening methods mentioned in this paper include approaches using the perfusion flow mode, the droplet mode, and the microarray mode. We also discuss the future development of microfluidic based high throughput screening platform for drug discovery.

  20. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High-throughput

  1. High-throughput screening: speeding up porous materials discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Philipp; Leistner, Matthias; Stoeck, Ulrich; Grünker, Ronny; Gedrich, Kristina; Klein, Nicole; Throl, Oliver; Grählert, Wulf; Senkovska, Irena; Dreisbach, Frieder; Kaskel, Stefan

    2011-05-14

    A new tool (Infrasorb-12) for the screening of porosity is described, identifying high surface area materials in a very short time with high accuracy. Further, an example for the application of the tool in the discovery of new cobalt-based metal-organic frameworks is given. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  2. High throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hong; Holmén, Anders G

    2009-03-01

    Current advances of new technologies with robotic automated assays combined with highly selective and sensitive LC-MS enable high-speed screening of lead series libraries in many in vitro assays. In this review, we summarize state of the art high throughput assays for screening of key physicochemical properties such as solubility, lipophilicity, pKa, drug-plasma protein binding and brain tissue binding as well as in vitro ADME profiling. We discuss two primary approaches for high throughput screening of solubility, i.e. an automated 96-well plate assay integrated with LC-MS and a rapid multi-wavelength UV plate reader. We address the advantages of newly developed miniaturized techniques for high throughput pKa screening by capillary electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) with automated data analysis flow. Several new lipophilicity approaches other than octanol-water partitioning are critically reviewed, including rapid liquid chromatographic retention based approach, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) partitioning and liposome, and potential microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for accurate screening of LogP. We highlight the sample pooling (namely cassette dosing, all-in-one, cocktail) as an efficient approach for high throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling with emphasis on the benefit of on-line quality control. This cassette dosing approach has been widely adapted in drug discovery for rapid screening of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters with significantly increased capacity and dramatically reduced animal usage.

  3. High throughput miniature drug-screening platform using bioprinting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I; Zhang, Bimeng; Reyna, Daniel; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-09-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, new drugs are tested to find appropriate compounds for therapeutic purposes for contemporary diseases. Unfortunately, novel compounds emerge at expensive prices and current target evaluation processes have limited throughput, thus leading to an increase of cost and time for drug development. This work shows the development of the novel inkjet-based deposition method for assembling a miniature drug-screening platform, which can realistically and inexpensively evaluate biochemical reactions in a picoliter-scale volume at a high speed rate. As proof of concept, applying a modified Hewlett Packard model 5360 compact disc printer, green fluorescent protein expressing Escherichia coli cells along with alginate gel solution have been arrayed on a coverslip chip under a repeatable volume of 180% ± 26% picoliters per droplet; subsequently, different antibiotic droplets were patterned on the spots of cells to evaluate the inhibition of bacteria for antibiotic screening. The proposed platform was compared to the current screening process, validating its effectiveness. The viability and basic function of the printed cells were evaluated, resulting in cell viability above 98% and insignificant or no DNA damage to human kidney cells transfected. Based on the reduction of investment and compound volume used by this platform, this technique has the potential to improve the actual drug discovery process at its target evaluation stage.

  4. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  5. Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced Axonal Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    COVERED 1 May 201 - 30 Apr 201 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE : Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced axonal...Introduction-page 1 Results- page 1,2,3 Conclusion-page 3 Introduction: Taxol is an antineoplastic agent, which is used for the treatment of

  6. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screens with HiTSeekR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle;

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an indispensable tool for drug (target) discovery that currently lacks user-friendly software tools for the robust identification of putative hits from HTS experiments and for the interpretation of these findings in the context of systems biology. We developed H...

  7. New approach for high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gego, A.; Silvie, O.; Franetich, J.F.; Farhati, K.; Hannoun, L.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Boucheix, C.; Rubinstein, E.; Mazier, D.

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stages represent potential targets for antimalarial prophylactic drugs. Nevertheless, there is a lack of molecules active on these stages. We have now developed a new approach for the high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages in vitro, based on an

  8. A practical fluorogenic substrate for high-throughput screening of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Morisaki, Fumika; Ogura, Asami; Morohashi, Kana; Enya, Sora; Niwa, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinji; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Hideshi

    2015-07-21

    We report a new fluorogenic substrate for glutathione S-transferase (GST), 3,4-DNADCF, enabling the assay with a low level of nonenzymatic background reaction. Inhibitors against Noppera-bo/GSTe14 from Drosophila melanogaster were identified by high throughput screening using 3,4-DNADCF, demonstrating the utility of this substrate.

  9. New approach for high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gego, A.; Silvie, O.; Franetich, J.F.; Farhati, K.; Hannoun, L.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Boucheix, C.; Rubinstein, E.; Mazier, D.

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stages represent potential targets for antimalarial prophylactic drugs. Nevertheless, there is a lack of molecules active on these stages. We have now developed a new approach for the high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages in vitro, based on an infrare

  10. An industrial engineering approach to laboratory automation for high throughput screening

    OpenAIRE

    Menke, Karl C.

    2000-01-01

    Across the pharmaceutical industry, there are a variety of approaches to laboratory automation for high throughput screening. At Sphinx Pharmaceuticals, the principles of industrial engineering have been applied to systematically identify and develop those automated solutions that provide the greatest value to the scientists engaged in lead generation.

  11. Development of automatic image analysis methods for high-throughput and high-content screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, Zi

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of image analysis methods for ultra-high content analysis of high-throughput screens where cellular phenotype responses to various genetic or chemical perturbations that are under investigation. Our primary goal is to deliver efficient and robust image analysis

  12. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  13. Development of automatic image analysis methods for high-throughput and high-content screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, Zi

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of image analysis methods for ultra-high content analysis of high-throughput screens where cellular phenotype responses to various genetic or chemical perturbations that are under investigation. Our primary goal is to deliver efficient and robust image analysis

  14. CrossCheck: an open-source web tool for high-throughput screen data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafov, Jamil; Najafov, Ayaz

    2017-07-19

    Modern high-throughput screening methods allow researchers to generate large datasets that potentially contain important biological information. However, oftentimes, picking relevant hits from such screens and generating testable hypotheses requires training in bioinformatics and the skills to efficiently perform database mining. There are currently no tools available to general public that allow users to cross-reference their screen datasets with published screen datasets. To this end, we developed CrossCheck, an online platform for high-throughput screen data analysis. CrossCheck is a centralized database that allows effortless comparison of the user-entered list of gene symbols with 16,231 published datasets. These datasets include published data from genome-wide RNAi and CRISPR screens, interactome proteomics and phosphoproteomics screens, cancer mutation databases, low-throughput studies of major cell signaling mediators, such as kinases, E3 ubiquitin ligases and phosphatases, and gene ontological information. Moreover, CrossCheck includes a novel database of predicted protein kinase substrates, which was developed using proteome-wide consensus motif searches. CrossCheck dramatically simplifies high-throughput screen data analysis and enables researchers to dig deep into the published literature and streamline data-driven hypothesis generation. CrossCheck is freely accessible as a web-based application at http://proteinguru.com/crosscheck.

  15. High-throughput screening of small-molecule adsorption in MOF

    OpenAIRE

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Arter, Calvin A.; Conwill, Eliot M.; Johnson, Daniel H.; Shoemaker, Brian A.; Soliman, Karim Z.; Thonhauser, T.

    2013-01-01

    Using high-throughput screening coupled with state-of-the-art van der Waals density functional theory, we investigate the adsorption properties of four important molecules, H_2, CO_2, CH_4, and H_2O in MOF-74-M with M = Be, Mg, Al, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ru, Rh, Pd, La, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. We show that high-throughput techniques can aid in speeding up the development and refinement of effective materials for hydrogen storage, carbon capture, and gas separation. ...

  16. Substrate-induced gene expression screening: a method for high-throughput screening of metagenome libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    The SIGEX (substrate-induced gene expression) method is a novel approach for the screening of gene (genome) libraries. In addition to the commonly used function- and sequence-driven approaches to screening, SIGEX provides a third option; in SIGEX, positives are identified using a reporter gene, and the library is constructed using an "operon-trap" vector. This vector contains the reporter gene immediately downstream of the cloning site for the genomic insert so that the expression of the inserted gene(s) is coupled with that of the reporter gene. This system is especially suitable for screening catabolic genes that are induced in response to metabolically relevant compounds, such as substrates. If expression of the inserted gene(s) is activated in response to the addition of these compounds, then positive clones can be identified based on the reporter signal. The most effective selection is obtained by the use of a FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) in conjunction with a FACS-compatible fluorescent reporter protein, such as GFP (green fluorescent protein). Activity-based screening of metagenomic libraries often suffers from low sensitivity and low throughput. In contrast, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and versatility of SIGEX make it a particularly suitable method for screening metagenomic libraries.

  17. Increasing the delivery of next generation therapeutics from high throughput screening libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Mark J; Murray, David C; Blackett, Carolyn J; Kossenjans, Michael; Nissink, J Willem M

    2015-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has historically relied on high throughput screening as a cornerstone to identify chemical equity for drug discovery projects. However, with pharmaceutical companies moving through a phase of diminished returns and alternative hit identification strategies proving successful, it is more important than ever to understand how this approach can be used more effectively to increase the delivery of next generation therapeutics from high throughput screening libraries. There is a wide literature that describes HTS and fragment based screening approaches which offer clear direction on the process for these two distinct activities. However, few people have considered how best to identify medium to low molecular weight compounds from large diversity screening sets and increase downstream success.

  18. A BSL-4 High-Throughput Screen Identifies Sulfonamide Inhibitors of Nipah Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-...

  19. ScreenMill: A freely available software suite for growth measurement, analysis and visualization of high-throughput screen data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothstein Rodney

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many high-throughput genomic experiments, such as Synthetic Genetic Array and yeast two-hybrid, use colony growth on solid media as a screen metric. These experiments routinely generate over 100,000 data points, making data analysis a time consuming and painstaking process. Here we describe ScreenMill, a new software suite that automates image analysis and simplifies data review and analysis for high-throughput biological experiments. Results The ScreenMill, software suite includes three software tools or "engines": an open source Colony Measurement Engine (CM Engine to quantitate colony growth data from plate images, a web-based Data Review Engine (DR Engine to validate and analyze quantitative screen data, and a web-based Statistics Visualization Engine (SV Engine to visualize screen data with statistical information overlaid. The methods and software described here can be applied to any screen in which growth is measured by colony size. In addition, the DR Engine and SV Engine can be used to visualize and analyze other types of quantitative high-throughput data. Conclusions ScreenMill automates quantification, analysis and visualization of high-throughput screen data. The algorithms implemented in ScreenMill are transparent allowing users to be confident about the results ScreenMill produces. Taken together, the tools of ScreenMill offer biologists a simple and flexible way of analyzing their data, without requiring programming skills.

  20. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  1. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses.

  2. Fully automatized high-throughput enzyme library screening using a robotic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Mark; Fibinger, Michael P C; Last, Daniel; Schmidt, Sandy; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Böttcher, Dominique; Hummel, Anke; Vickers, Clare; Voss, Moritz; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-07-01

    A fully automatized robotic platform has been established to facilitate high-throughput screening for protein engineering purposes. This platform enables proper monitoring and control of growth conditions in the microtiter plate format to ensure precise enzyme production for the interrogation of enzyme mutant libraries, protein stability tests and multiple assay screenings. The performance of this system has been exemplified for four enzyme classes important for biocatalysis such as Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, transaminase, dehalogenase and acylase in the high-throughput screening of various mutant libraries. This allowed the identification of novel enzyme variants in a sophisticated and highly reliable manner. Furthermore, the detailed optimization protocols should enable other researchers to adapt and improve their methods. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1421-1432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Adapting Cell-Based Assays to the High Throughput Screening Platform: Problems Encountered and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Clinton B; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, cell-based phenotypic assays have emerged as an effective and robust addition to the array of assay technologies available for drug discovery in the high throughput screening arena. Previously, biochemical target-based assays have been the technology of choice. With the emergence of stem cells as a basis for a new screening technology, it is important to keep in mind the lessons that have been learned from the adaptation of existing stable cell lines onto the high throughput screening drug discovery platform, with special consideration being given to assay miniaturization, liquid handling complications and instrument-introduced artifacts. We present an overview of the problems encountered with the implementation of multiple cell-based assays at the High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research Institute as well as empirically defined effective solutions to these problems. These include examples of artifacts induced by temperature differences throughout the screening campaign, cell plating conditions including the effect of room temperature incubation on assay consistency, DMSO carry-over, and incubator induced artifacts.

  4. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway.

  5. High-throughput screening in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic support of drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R E

    2000-01-01

    The application of rapid methods currently used for screening discovery drug candidates for metabolism and pharmacokinetic characteristics is discussed. General considerations are given for screening in this context, including the criteria for good screens, the use of counterscreens, the proper sequencing of screens, ambiguity in the interpretation of results, strategies for false positives and negatives, and the special difficulties encountered in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening. Detailed descriptions of the present status of screening are provided for absorption potential, blood-brain barrier penetration, inhibition and induction of cytochrome P450, pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and computer modeling. Although none of the systems currently employed for drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening can be considered truly high-throughput, several of them are rapid enough to be a practical part of the screening paradigm for modern, fast-moving discovery programs.

  6. Inhibitors of the Yersinia protein tyrosine phosphatase through high throughput and virtual screening approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Vujanac, Milos; Southall, Noel; Stebbins, C Erec

    2013-02-15

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia pestis and a potential antibacterial drug target. Here we report our studies of screening for small molecule inhibitors of YopH using both high throughput and in silico approaches. The identified inhibitors represent a diversity of chemotypes and novel pTyr mimetics, providing a starting point for further development and fragment-based design of multi-site binding inhibitors. We demonstrate that the applications of high throughput and virtual screening, when guided by structural binding mode analysis, is an effective approach for identifying potent and selective inhibitors of YopH and other protein phosphatases for rational drug design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High-throughput screening of small molecule libraries using SAMDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Scholle, Michael D; Eisenberg, Adam H; Mrksich, Milan

    2011-07-11

    High-throughput screening is a common strategy used to identify compounds that modulate biochemical activities, but many approaches depend on cumbersome fluorescent reporters or antibodies and often produce false-positive hits. The development of "label-free" assays addresses many of these limitations, but current approaches still lack the throughput needed for applications in drug discovery. This paper describes a high-throughput, label-free assay that combines self-assembled monolayers with mass spectrometry, in a technique called SAMDI, as a tool for screening libraries of 100,000 compounds in one day. This method is fast, has high discrimination, and is amenable to a broad range of chemical and biological applications.

  8. Human rhinovirus VPg uridylylation AlphaScreen for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Rock; Mekhssian, Kevork; Fenwick, Craig; White, Peter W; Thibeault, Diane

    2014-02-01

    As an obligate step for picornaviruses to replicate their genome, the small viral peptide VPg must first be specifically conjugated with uridine nucleotides at a conserved tyrosine hydroxyl group. The resulting VPg-pUpU serves as the primer for genome replication. The uridylylation reaction requires the coordinated activity of many components, including the viral polymerase, a conserved internal RNA stem loop structure, and additional viral proteins. Formation of this complex and the resulting conjugation reaction catalyzed by the polymerase, offers a number of biochemical targets for inhibition of an essential process in the viral life cycle. Therefore, an assay recapitulating uridylylation would provide multiple opportunities for discovering potential antiviral agents. Our goal was to identify inhibitors of human rhinovirus (HRV) VPg uridylylation, which might ultimately be useful to reduce or prevent HRV-induced lower airway immunologic inflammatory responses, a major cause of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. We have reconstituted the complex uridylylation reaction in an AlphaScreen suitable for high-throughput screening, in which a rabbit polyclonal antiserum specific for uridylylated VPg serves as a key reagent. Assay results were validated by quantitative mass spectrometric detection of uridylylation.

  9. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  10. NanoLuc luciferase - A multifunctional tool for high throughput antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eBoute

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the recent development of NanoLuc Luciferase a small (19 kDa, highly stable, ATP independent, bioluminescent protein, an extremely robust and ultra high sensitivity screening system has been developed whereby primary hits of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments could be characterized and quantified without purification. This system is very versatile allowing cellular and solid phase ELISA but also homogeneous BRET based screening assays, relative affinity determinations with competition ELISA and direct western blotting. The new NanoLuc Luciferase protein fusion represents a swiss army knife solution for today and future high throughput antibody drug screenings.

  11. High throughput screening to investigate the interaction of stem cells with their extracellular microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Ankam, Soneela; Teo, Benjamin KK; Kukumberg, Marek; Yim, Evelyn KF

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells in vivo are housed within a functional microenvironment termed the “stem cell niche.” As the niche components can modulate stem cell behaviors like proliferation, migration and differentiation, evaluating these components would be important to determine the most optimal platform for their maintenance or differentiation. In this review, we have discussed methods and technologies that have aided in the development of high throughput screening assays for stem cell research, including ...

  12. Antileishmanial High-Throughput Drug Screening Reveals Drug Candidates with New Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; Ok-Ryul Song; Hyunrim Oh; Jeong-Hun Sohn; Gyongseon Yang; Jiyoun Nam; Jiyeon Jang; Jonathan Cechetto; Chang Bok Lee; Seunghyun Moon; Auguste Genovesio; Eric Chatelain; Thierry Christophe; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Drugs currently available for leishmaniasis treatment often show parasite resistance, highly toxic side effects and prohibitive costs commonly incompatible with patients from the tropical endemic countries. In this sense, there is an urgent need for new drugs as a treatment solution for this neglected disease. Here we show the development and implementation of an automated high-throughput viability screening assay for the discovery of new drugs against Leishmania. Assa...

  13. Computational chemistry, data mining, high-throughput synthesis and screening - informatics and integration in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Manly, Charles J.

    2001-01-01

    Drug discovery today includes considerable focus of laboratory automation and other resources on both combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening, and computational chemistry has been a part of pharmaceutical research for many years. The real benefit of these technologies is beyond the exploitation of each individually. Only recently have significant efforts focused on effectively integrating these and other discovery disciplines to realize their larger potential. This technical not...

  14. High Throughput Screen for Novel Antimicrobials using a Whole Animal Infection Model

    OpenAIRE

    Moy, Terence I.; Annie L Conery; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Wu, Gang; Mazitschek, Ralph; Casadei, Gabriele; Lewis, Kim; Carpenter, Anne E.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2009-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a unique whole animal model system for identifying small molecules with in vivo anti-infective properties. C. elegans can be infected with a broad range of human pathogens, including Enterococcus faecalis, an important human nosocomial pathogen with a mortality rate of up to 37% that is increasingly acquiring resistance to antibiotics. Here, we describe an automated, high throughput screen of 37,200 compounds and natural product extracts for those that e...

  15. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Applications for High-Throughput Screening of Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, James R

    2016-02-01

    When acoustic droplet ejection technology was first introduced for high-throughput applications, it was used primarily for dispensing compounds dissolved in DMSO. The high precision and accuracy achieved for low-volume transfers in this application were noted by those working outside of the compound management area, and interest was generated in expanding the scope of the technology to include other liquid types. Later-generation instruments included calibrations for several aqueous buffers that were applicable to the life sciences. The High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research has made use of this range of liquid calibrations for the Infectious Disease Program. The original calibration for DMSO has allowed the preparation of assay-ready plates that can be sent to remote locations. This process was used as part of the collaboration between Southern Research and Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to develop high-throughput screening for biological safety level 4 containment and to provide compounds for two pilot screens that were run there with BSL-4-level pathogens. The aqueous calibrations have been instrumental in miniaturizing assays used for infectious disease, such as qPCR, tissue culture infectious dose 50, and bacterial motility, to make them compatible with HTS operations.

  16. A Cell-based High-throughput Screening Assay for Farnesoid X Recepter Agonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop a high-throughput screening assay for Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists based on mammalian one-hybrid system (a chimera receptor gene system) for the purpose of identifying new lead compounds for dyslipidaemia drug from the chemical library. Methods cDNA encoding the human FXR ligand binding domain (LBD) was amplified by RT-PCR from a human liver total mRNA and fused to the DNA binding domain (DBD) of yeast GAL4 of pBIND to construct a GAL4-FXR (LBD) chimera expression plasmid. Five copies of the GAL4 DNA binding site were synthesized and inserted into upstream of the SV40 promoter of pGL3-promoter vector to construct a reporter plasmid pG5-SV40 Luc. The assay was developed by transient co-transfection with pG5-SV40 Luc reporter plasmid and pBIND-FXR-LBD (189-472) chimera expression plasmid. Results After optimization, CDCA, a FXR natural agonist, could induce expression of the luciferase gene in a dose-dependent manner, and had a signal/noise ratio of 10 and Z'factor value of 0.65. Conclusion A stable and sensitive cell-based high-throughput screening model can be used in high-throughput screening for FXR agonists from the synthetic and natural compound library.

  17. Adaptation of high-throughput screening in drug discovery-toxicological screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Paweł; Markowicz, Magdalena; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the newest techniques used in drug design and may be applied in biological and chemical sciences. This method, due to utilization of robots, detectors and software that regulate the whole process, enables a series of analyses of chemical compounds to be conducted in a short time and the affinity of biological structures which is often related to toxicity to be defined. Since 2008 we have implemented the automation of this technique and as a consequence, the possibility to examine 100,000 compounds per day. The HTS method is more frequently utilized in conjunction with analytical techniques such as NMR or coupled methods e.g., LC-MS/MS. Series of studies enable the establishment of the rate of affinity for targets or the level of toxicity. Moreover, researches are conducted concerning conjugation of nanoparticles with drugs and the determination of the toxicity of such structures. For these purposes there are frequently used cell lines. Due to the miniaturization of all systems, it is possible to examine the compound's toxicity having only 1-3 mg of this compound. Determination of cytotoxicity in this way leads to a significant decrease in the expenditure and to a reduction in the length of the study.

  18. Adaptation of High-Throughput Screening in Drug Discovery—Toxicological Screening Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Szymański

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput screening (HTS is one of the newest techniques used in drug design and may be applied in biological and chemical sciences. This method, due to utilization of robots, detectors and software that regulate the whole process, enables a series of analyses of chemical compounds to be conducted in a short time and the affinity of biological structures which is often related to toxicity to be defined. Since 2008 we have implemented the automation of this technique and as a consequence, the possibility to examine 100,000 compounds per day. The HTS method is more frequently utilized in conjunction with analytical techniques such as NMR or coupled methods e.g., LC-MS/MS. Series of studies enable the establishment of the rate of affinity for targets or the level of toxicity. Moreover, researches are conducted concerning conjugation of nanoparticles with drugs and the determination of the toxicity of such structures. For these purposes there are frequently used cell lines. Due to the miniaturization of all systems, it is possible to examine the compound’s toxicity having only 1–3 mg of this compound. Determination of cytotoxicity in this way leads to a significant decrease in the expenditure and to a reduction in the length of the study.

  19. A Microfluidic Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Small Mutant Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Won; Shin, Kwang Soo; Moon, Jaemin; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung

    2016-05-17

    The screening and isolation of target microorganisms from mutated recombinant libraries are crucial for the advancement of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. However, conventional screening tools present several limitations in throughput, cost, and labor. Herein, we describe a novel microfluidic high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with several advantages. The platform utilizes a fluid array to compartmentalize bacterial cells in well-ordered separated microwells and allows long-term cell culture with high throughput. The platform enables the extraction of selected target cells from the fluid array for additional culture and postanalysis by using a capillary-driven sample relocation method. To confirm the feasibility of the platform, we demonstrated two different types of HTS methods based on the levels of reporter gene expression and cellular growth rate difference. For the reporter gene-based HTS, a spike recovery approach was taken to demonstrate that target cells are successfully screened out from a mixture containing nontarget cells by repeating the culture and extraction processes. Additionally, the same platform allowed us to screen and sort target cells according to their cellular growth rate difference, which seems hard in conventional screening methods. Hence, the platform could be used for various microbiological assays, including the detection of cell-excreted metabolites, microbial biosensors, and other HTS systems.

  20. Gradient Technology for High-Throughput Screening of Interactions between Cells and Nanostructured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Michelmore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel substrate suitable for the high-throughput analysis of cell response to variations in surface chemistry and nanotopography. Electrochemical etching was used to produce silicon wafers with nanopores between 10 and 100 nm in diameter. Over this substrate and flat silicon wafers, a gradient film ranging from hydrocarbon to carboxylic acid plasma polymer was deposited, with the concentration of surface carboxylic acid groups varying between 0.7 and 3% as measured by XPS. MG63 osteoblast-like cells were then cultured on these substrates and showed greatest cell spreading and adhesion onto porous silicon with a carboxylic acid group concentration between 2-3%. This method has great potential for high-throughput screening of cell-material interaction with particular relevance to tissue engineering.

  1. High-throughput screening and rapid inhibitor triage using an infectious chimeric Hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichroski, Michael J; Fang, Jie; Eggers, Betsy J; Rose, Ronald E; Mazzucco, Charles E; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Baldick, Carl J; Anthony, Monique N; Dowling, Craig J; Barber, Lauren E; Leet, John E; Beno, Brett R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Agler, Michele L; Cockett, Mark I; Tenney, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectious virus cell culture model system has facilitated the development of whole-virus screening assays which can be used to interrogate the entire virus life cycle. Here, we describe the development of an HCV growth assay capable of identifying inhibitors against all stages of the virus life cycle with assay throughput suitable for rapid screening of large-scale chemical libraries. Novel features include, 1) the use of an efficiently-spreading, full-length, intergenotypic chimeric reporter virus with genotype 1 structural proteins, 2) a homogenous assay format compatible with miniaturization and automated liquid-handling, and 3) flexible assay end-points using either chemiluminescence (high-throughput screening) or Cellomics ArrayScan™ technology (high-content screening). The assay was validated using known HCV antivirals and through a large-scale, high-throughput screening campaign that identified novel and selective entry, replication and late-stage inhibitors. Selection and characterization of resistant viruses provided information regarding inhibitor target and mechanism. Leveraging results from this robust whole-virus assay represents a critical first step towards identifying inhibitors of novel targets to broaden the spectrum of antivirals for the treatment of HCV.

  2. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibret A. Adissu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30 or without (n=20 clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3% in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14% presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  3. Primary cells and stem cells in drug discovery: emerging tools for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglen, Richard; Reisine, Terry

    2011-04-01

    Many drug discovery screening programs employ immortalized cells, recombinantly engineered to express a defined molecular target. Several technologies are now emerging that render it feasible to employ more physiologically, and clinically relevant, cell phenotypes. Consequently, numerous approaches use primary cells, which retain many functions seen in vivo, as well as endogenously expressing the target of interest. Furthermore, stem cells, of either embryonic or adult origin, as well as those derived from differentiated cells, are now finding a place in drug discovery. Collectively, these cells are expanding the utility of authentic human cells, either as screening tools or as therapeutics, as well as providing cells derived directly from patients. Nonetheless, the growing use of phenotypically relevant cells (including primary cells or stem cells) is not without technical difficulties, particularly when their envisioned use lies in high-throughput screening (HTS) protocols. In particular, the limited availability of homogeneous primary or stem cell populations for HTS mandates that novel technologies be developed to accelerate their adoption. These technologies include detection of responses with very few cells as well as protocols to generate cell lines in abundant, homogeneous populations. In parallel, the growing use of changes in cell phenotype as the assay readout is driving greater use of high-throughput imaging techniques in screening. Taken together, the greater availability of novel primary and stem cell phenotypes as well as new detection technologies is heralding a new era of cellular screening. This convergence offers unique opportunities to identify drug candidates for disorders at which few therapeutics are presently available.

  4. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adissu, Hibret A; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  5. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  6. Algorithm-driven high-throughput screening of colloidal nanoparticles under simulated physiological and therapeutic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Sindiri, Sivasish; Calco, Gina N; Aronova, Maria A; Beaucage, Serge L

    2017-02-09

    Colloidal nanoparticles have shown tremendous potential as cancer drug carriers and as phototherapeutics. However, the stability of nanoparticles under physiological and phototherapeutic conditions is a daunting issue, which needs to be addressed in order to ensure a successful clinical translation. The design, development and implementation of unique algorithms are described herein for high-throughput hydrodynamic size measurements of colloidal nanoparticles. The data obtained from such measurements provide clinically-relevant particle size distribution assessments that are directly related to the stability and aggregation profiles of the nanoparticles under putative physiological and phototherapeutic conditions; those profiles are not only dependent on the size and surface coating of the nanoparticles, but also on their composition. Uncoated nanoparticles showed varying degrees of association with bovine serum albumin, whereas PEGylated nanoparticles did not exhibit significant association with the protein. The algorithm-driven, high-throughput size screening method described in this report provides highly meaningful size measurement patterns stemming from the association of colloidal particles with bovine serum albumin used as a protein model. Noteworthy is that this algorithm-based high-throughput method can accomplish sophisticated hydrodynamic size measurement protocols within days instead of years it would take conventional hydrodynamic size measurement techniques to achieve a similar task.

  7. Adaptation and validation of DNA synthesis detection by fluorescent dye derivatization for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranall, Max V; Gabrielli, Brian G; Gonda, Thomas J

    2010-05-01

    Cellular proliferation is fundamental to organism development, tissue renewal, and diverse disease states such as cancer. In vitro measurement of proliferation by high-throughput screening allows rapid characterization of the effects of small-molecule or genetic treatments on primary and established cell lines. Current assays that directly measure the cell cycle are not amenable to high-throughput processing and analysis. Here we report the adaptation of the chemical method for detecting DNA synthesis by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation into both high-throughput liquid handling and high-content imaging analysis. We demonstrate that chemical detection of EdU incorporation is effective for high-resolution analysis and quantitation of DNA synthesis by high-content imaging. To validate this assay platform we used treatments of MCF10A cells with media supplements and pharmacological inhibitors that are known to affect cell proliferation. Treatments with specific kinase inhibitors indicate that EGF and serum stimulation employs both the mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling networks. As described here, this method is fast, reliable, and inexpensive and yields robust data that can be easily interpreted.

  8. A High-Throughput Screen Identifies a New Natural Product with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Cao, Shugeng; Sharp, Jared; Lambert, Kathleen G.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Husson, Robert N.; Tamayo, Giselle; Clardy, Jon; Watnick, Paula I.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inexorable invasion of our hospitals and communities by drug-resistant bacteria, there is a pressing need for novel antibacterial agents. Here we report the development of a sensitive and robust but low-tech and inexpensive high-throughput metabolic screen for novel antibiotics. This screen is based on a colorimetric assay of pH that identifies inhibitors of bacterial sugar fermentation. After validation of the method, we screened over 39,000 crude extracts derived from organisms that grow in the diverse ecosystems of Costa Rica and identified 49 with reproducible antibacterial effects. An extract from an endophytic fungus was further characterized, and this led to the discovery of three novel natural products. One of these, which we named mirandamycin, has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This demonstrates the power of simple high throughput screens for rapid identification of new antibacterial agents from environmental samples. PMID:22359585

  9. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  10. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L.; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  11. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-04-12

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer.

  12. Perfect high throughput screening assay: a crucial technique for drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-hua DU

    2005-01-01

    @@ Since being developed approximately 20 years ago, high throughput screening (HTS) has become one of the key techniques used in drug discovery[1]. However, three main problems are recognized with the use of HTS; namely, with the compound library, drug targets, and assay methods. Until now, the compound library has evolved based on the techniques of combinatorial chemistry and modern phytochemistry. Several functional proteins have emerged following the advance of genomics and proteomics. However,although many functional proteins have been discovered recently, they are not, as sometimes claimed, real drug targets;at best, they might be potential drug targets. The ideal targets selected for drug screening should qualify as drug targets[2]. The selection of targets for drug screening is a crucial procedure in drug screening.

  13. Mass spectrometric techniques for label-free high-throughput screening in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Thomas P; Horvath, Christopher R; Stout, Steven J; Kenney, Kristin L; Ho, Pei-I; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Vickers, Chad; Kaushik, Virendar; Hubbard, Brian; Wang, Y Karen

    2007-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an important tool for finding active compounds to initiate medicinal chemistry programs in pharmaceutical discovery research. Traditional HTS methods rely on fluorescent or radiolabeled reagents and/or coupling assays to permit quantitation of enzymatic target inhibition or activation. Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput screening (MS-HTS) is an alternative that is not susceptible to the limitations imposed by labeling and coupling enzymes. MS-HTS offers a selective and sensitive analytical method for unlabeled substrates and products. Furthermore, method development times are reduced without the need to incorporate labels or coupling assays. MS-HTS also permits screening of targets that are difficult or impossible to screen by other techniques. For example, enzymes that are challenging to purify can lead to the nonspecific detection of structurally similar components of the impure enzyme or matrix of membraneous enzymes. The high selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) enables these screens to proceed with low levels of background noise to sensitively discover interesting hits even with relatively weak activity. In this article, we describe three techniques that we have adapted for large-scale (approximately 175,000 sample) compound library screening, including four-way parallel multiplexed electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MUX-LC/MS/MS), four-way parallel staggered gradient liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and eight-way staggered flow injection MS/MS following 384-well plate solid-phase extraction (SPE). These methods are capable of analyzing a 384-well plate in 37 min, with typical analysis times of less than 2 h. The quality of the MS-HTS approach is demonstrated herein with screening data from two large-scale screens.

  14. Automated analysis of NF-κB nuclear translocation kinetics in high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Di

    Full Text Available Nuclear entry and exit of the NF-κB family of dimeric transcription factors plays an essential role in regulating cellular responses to inflammatory stress. The dynamics of this nuclear translocation can vary significantly within a cell population and may dramatically change e.g. upon drug exposure. Furthermore, there is significant heterogeneity in individual cell response upon stress signaling. In order to systematically determine factors that define NF-κB translocation dynamics, high-throughput screens that enable the analysis of dynamic NF-κB responses in individual cells in real time are essential. Thus far, only NF-κB downstream signaling responses of whole cell populations at the transcriptional level are in high-throughput mode. In this study, we developed a fully automated image analysis method to determine the time-course of NF-κB translocation in individual cells, suitable for high-throughput screenings in the context of compound screening and functional genomics. Two novel segmentation methods were used for defining the individual nuclear and cytoplasmic regions: watershed masked clustering (WMC and best-fit ellipse of Voronoi cell (BEVC. The dynamic NFκB oscillatory response at the single cell and population level was coupled to automated extraction of 26 analogue translocation parameters including number of peaks, time to reach each peak, and amplitude of each peak. Our automated image analysis method was validated through a series of statistical tests demonstrating computational efficient and accurate NF-κB translocation dynamics quantification of our algorithm. Both pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and short interfering RNAs targeting the inhibitor of NFκB, IκBα, demonstrated the ability of our method to identify compounds and genetic players that interfere with the nuclear transition of NF-κB.

  15. Curating and Preparing High-Throughput Screening Data for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Marlene T; Wang, Wenyi; Sedykh, Alexander; Zhu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Publicly available bioassay data often contains errors. Curating massive bioassay data, especially high-throughput screening (HTS) data, for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling requires the assistance of automated data curation tools. Using automated data curation tools are beneficial to users, especially ones without prior computer skills, because many platforms have been developed and optimized based on standardized requirements. As a result, the users do not need to extensively configure the curation tool prior to the application procedure. In this chapter, a freely available automatic tool to curate and prepare HTS data for QSAR modeling purposes will be described.

  16. Screening and Crystallization Plates for Manual and High-throughput Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Berejnov, Viatcheslav (Inventor); Kalinin, Yevgeniy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In one embodiment, a crystallization and screening plate comprises a plurality of cells open at a top and a bottom, a frame that defines the cells in the plate, and at least two films. The first film seals a top of the plate and the second film seals a bottom of the plate. At least one of the films is patterned to strongly pin the contact lines of drops dispensed onto it, fixing their position and shape. The present invention also includes methods and other devices for manual and high-throughput protein crystal growth.

  17. Considerations for the design and reporting of enzyme assays in high-throughput screening applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Acker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the key steps and methods which are used to develop enzyme assays suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS applications. The goals of HTS enzyme assays are defined relative to lower-throughput bench top assays and important aspects which go into constructing robust and sensitive enzyme assays are described. Methods that have been applied to common enzyme classes are reviewed and pitfalls related to assay artifacts are discussed. We also suggest a reporting format to describe the steps in HTS enzyme assays.

  18. Non-isotopic dual parameter competition assay suitable for high-throughput screening of histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Daniel; Hildmann, Christian; Haus, Patricia; Galetovic, Antonia; Schober, Andreas; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2009-07-01

    Histone deacetylases reside among the most important and novel target classes in oncology. Selective lead structures are intensively developed to improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects. The common assays used so far to identify new lead structures suffer from many false positive hits due to auto-fluorescence of compounds or triggering undesired signal transduction pathways. These drawbacks are eliminated by the dual parameter competition assay reported in this study. The assay involves a new fluorescent inhibitor probe that shows an increase in both, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime upon binding to the enzyme. The assay is well suited for high-throughput screening.

  19. High-Throughput Screening of the Asymmetric Decarboxylative Alkylation Reaction of Enolate-Stabilized Enol Carbonates

    KAUST Repository

    Stoltz, Brian

    2010-06-14

    The use of high-throughput screening allowed for the optimization of reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative alkylation reaction of enolate-stabilized enol carbonates. Changing to a non-polar reaction solvent and to an electron-deficient PHOX derivative as ligand from our standard reaction conditions improved the enantioselectivity for the alkylation of a ketal-protected,1,3-diketone-derived enol carbonate from 28% ee to 84% ee. Similar improvements in enantioselectivity were seen for a β-keto-ester derived- and an α-phenyl cyclohexanone-derived enol carbonate.

  20. High-Throughput Screening of the Asymmetric Decarboxylative Alkylation Reaction of Enolate-Stabilized Enol Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Nolan T; Virgil, Scott C; Stoltz, Brian M

    2010-01-01

    The use of high-throughput screening allowed for the optimization of reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative alkylation reaction of enolate-stabilized enol carbonates. Changing to a non-polar reaction solvent and to an electron-deficient PHOX derivative as ligand from our standard reaction conditions improved the enantioselectivity for the alkylation of a ketal-protected,1,3-diketone-derived enol carbonate from 28% ee to 84% ee. Similar improvements in enantioselectivity were seen for a β-keto-ester derived- and an α-phenyl cyclohexanone-derived enol carbonate.

  1. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  2. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities. PMID:20482787

  3. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucena Severino A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities is that the activity against commercial substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose, does not always correspond to the activity against the natural lignocellulosic material. Besides that, the macroscopic characteristics of the raw material, such as insolubility and heterogeneity, hinder its use for high throughput screenings. Results In this paper, we present the preparation of a colloidal suspension of particles obtained from sugarcane bagasse, with minimal chemical change in the lignocellulosic material, and demonstrate its use for high throughput assays of hydrolases using Brazilian termites as the screened organisms. Conclusions Important differences between the use of the natural substrate and commercial cellulase substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose or crystalline cellulose, were observed. This suggests that wood feeding termites, in contrast to litter feeding termites, might not be the best source for enzymes that degrade sugarcane biomass.

  4. Fast high-throughput screening of temoporfin-loaded liposomal formulations prepared by ethanol injection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kewei; Delaney, Joseph T; Schubert, Ulrich S; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-03-01

    A new strategy for fast, convenient high-throughput screening of liposomal formulations was developed, utilizing the automation of the so-called ethanol-injection method. This strategy was illustrated by the preparation and screening of the liposomal formulation library of a potent second-generation photosensitizer, temoporfin. Numerous liposomal formulations were efficiently prepared using a pipetting robot, followed by automated size characterization, using a dynamic light scattering plate reader. Incorporation efficiency of temoporfin and zeta potential were also detected in selected cases. To optimize the formulation, different parameters were investigated, including lipid types, lipid concentration in injected ethanol, ratio of ethanol to aqueous solution, ratio of drug to lipid, and the addition of functional phospholipid. Step-by-step small liposomes were prepared with high incorporation efficiency. At last, an optimized formulation was obtained for each lipid in the following condition: 36.4 mg·mL(-1) lipid, 13.1 mg·mL(-1) mPEG(2000)-DSPE, and 1:4 ethanol:buffer ratio. These liposomes were unilamellar spheres, with a diameter of approximately 50 nm, and were very stable for over 20 weeks. The results illustrate this approach to be promising for fast high-throughput screening of liposomal formulations.

  5. A BSL-4 high-throughput screen identifies sulfonamide inhibitors of Nipah virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

  6. High-throughput transformation method for Yarrowia lipolytica mutant library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leplat, Christophe; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Rossignol, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    As a microorganism of major biotechnological importance, the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is subjected to intensive genetic engineering and functional genomic analysis. Future advancements in this area, however, require a system that will generate a large collection of mutants for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a rapid and efficient method for high-throughput transformation of Y. lipolytica in 96-well plates. We developed plasmids and strains for the large-scale screening of overexpression mutant strains, using Gateway® vectors that were adapted for specific locus integration in Y. lipolytica. As an example, a collection of mutants that overexpressed the alkaline extracellular protease (AEP) was obtained in a single transformation experiment. The platform strain that we developed to receive the overexpression cassette was designed to constitutively express a fluorescent protein as a convenient growth reporter for screening in non-translucid media. An example of growth comparison in skim milk-based medium between AEP overexpression and deletion mutants is provided.

  7. An electrode probe for high-throughput screening of electrochemical libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong; Chu, Deryn

    2005-06-01

    A pen-shaped O2 electrode probe is designed for high-throughput screening of electrochemical libraries. The electrode probe consists of a large-area O2 electrode and a cylindrical electrolyte sponge with a short cone tip for screening. This type of design can easily minimize the probe resistance contributed by the electrolyte. A zinc electrode library is generated using a nonautomated method to deposit metal zinc on a graphite plate. The zinc electrode library and the O2-electrode probe form an electrochemical library containing 128 micro zinc/air batteries. High-throughput screening of the zinc/air batteries are carried out by moving the tip of the electrode probe under constant potential (1.0V) and measuring the current. A Gaussian distribution is used for statistical analysis of the experimental data. These data obtained with the combinatorial method have a relative standard deviation of 8.9% based on a nonautomated coating procedure. The O2 electrode probe is used to study the effect of addition of Cu in the anode on the performance of the zinc/air battery.

  8. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  9. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  10. Application of high-throughput affinity-selection mass spectrometry for screening of chemical compound libraries in lead discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehender, Hartmut; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2007-02-01

    High-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that interfere with a particular molecular target is among the most powerful methodologies applied in lead discovery at present. In this review, the authors describe a label-free, homogeneous, affinity-selection-based technology developed at Novartis, termed SpeedScreen, which is compared with similar technologies used for high-throughput screening in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The focus at present of SpeedScreen is twofold: first, this technology is applied to orphan genomic targets and to those targets that are non-tractable by a functional assay; second, this technology is applied complementary to the well-established traditional methodologies for the screening of molecular targets. In summary, the authors discuss the value of affinity-selection-based high-throughput screening as a complementary technology to the common functional screening platforms and the benefits as well as the limitations of this new technology are outlined.

  11. A Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Data Analysis Pipeline for Activity Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruili

    2016-01-01

    The US Tox21 program has developed in vitro assays to test large collections of environmental chemicals in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, using triplicate 15-dose titrations to generate over 50 million data points to date. Counter screens are also employed to minimize interferences from non-target-specific assay artifacts, such as compound auto fluorescence and cytotoxicity. New data analysis approaches are needed to integrate these data and characterize the activities observed from these assays. Here, we describe a complete analysis pipeline that evaluates these qHTS data for technical quality in terms of signal reproducibility. We integrate signals from repeated assay runs, primary readouts, and counter screens to produce a final call on on-target compound activity.

  12. Discovery of a novel competitive inhibitor of PTP1B by high-throughput screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SHI; Hai-ping YU; Yue-yang ZHOU; Jun-qin DU; Qiang SHEN; Jing-ya LI; Jia LI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to discover novel protein tyrosine phos-phatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors. We expressed and purified the human PTP1B catalytic domain and set up a molecular level high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to screen a set of 48 000 pure compounds. Results: HTS was finished with an averaged Z' factor of 0.63, and LGH00081, a competitive inhibitor of PTP1B with novel structure and relatively good selectivity for receptor-type protein ty-rosine phosphatases, was identified. Conclusion: We established a molecular level assay which is useful for the screening of PTP1B inhibitors with therapeutic potential. The novel competitive PTP1B inhibitor LGH00081 offers a good start for structure modification and cellular functional activity study.

  13. Drug Discovery Goes Three-Dimensional: Goodbye to Flat High-Throughput Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglen, Richard M; Randle, David H

    2015-06-01

    Immortalized cells, generated from two-dimensional cell culture techniques, are widely used in compound screening, lead optimization, and drug candidate selection. However, such cells lack many characteristics of cells in vivo. This could account for the high failure rates of lead candidates in clinical evaluation. New approaches from cell biology, materials science, and bioengineering are increasing the utility of three-dimensional (3D) culture. These approaches have become more compatible with automation and, thus, provide more physiologically relevant cells for high-throughput/high-content screening, notably in oncology drug discovery. Techniques range from simple 3D spheroids, comprising one or more cell types, to complex multitissue organoids cultured in extracellular matrix gels or microfabricated chips. Furthermore, each approach can be applied to stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, thereby providing additional phenotypic relevance and the exciting potential to enable screening in disease-specific cell types.

  14. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  15. An Automatic Quality Control Pipeline for High-Throughput Screening Hit Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yufeng; Chen, Kaisheng; Zhong, Yang; Zhou, Bin; Ainscow, Edward; Wu, Ying-Ta; Zhou, Yingyao

    2016-09-01

    The correction or removal of signal errors in high-throughput screening (HTS) data is critical to the identification of high-quality lead candidates. Although a number of strategies have been previously developed to correct systematic errors and to remove screening artifacts, they are not universally effective and still require fair amount of human intervention. We introduce a fully automated quality control (QC) pipeline that can correct generic interplate systematic errors and remove intraplate random artifacts. The new pipeline was first applied to ~100 large-scale historical HTS assays; in silico analysis showed auto-QC led to a noticeably stronger structure-activity relationship. The method was further tested in several independent HTS runs, where QC results were sampled for experimental validation. Significantly increased hit confirmation rates were obtained after the QC steps, confirming that the proposed method was effective in enriching true-positive hits. An implementation of the algorithm is available to the screening community.

  16. Introducing Bayesian thinking to high-throughput screening for false-negative rate estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Qian, Hong; Rowan, Karen; Mark, David; Peng, Zhengwei; Huang, Kuo-Sen

    2013-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been widely used to identify active compounds (hits) that bind to biological targets. Because of cost concerns, the comprehensive screening of millions of compounds is typically conducted without replication. Real hits that fail to exhibit measurable activity in the primary screen due to random experimental errors will be lost as false-negatives. Conceivably, the projected false-negative rate is a parameter that reflects screening quality. Furthermore, it can be used to guide the selection of optimal numbers of compounds for hit confirmation. Therefore, a method that predicts false-negative rates from the primary screening data is extremely valuable. In this article, we describe the implementation of a pilot screen on a representative fraction (1%) of the screening library in order to obtain information about assay variability as well as a preliminary hit activity distribution profile. Using this training data set, we then developed an algorithm based on Bayesian logic and Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the number of true active compounds and potential missed hits from the full library screen. We have applied this strategy to five screening projects. The results demonstrate that this method produces useful predictions on the numbers of false negatives.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screens with HiTSeekR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an indispensable tool for drug (target) discovery that currently lacks user-friendly software tools for the robust identification of putative hits from HTS experiments and for the interpretation of these findings in the context of systems biology. We developed Hi......TSeekR as a one-stop solution for chemical compound screens, siRNA knock-down and CRISPR/Cas9 knock-out screens, as well as microRNA inhibitor and -mimics screens. We chose three use cases that demonstrate the potential of HiTSeekR to fully exploit HTS screening data in quite heterogeneous contexts to generate...... novel hypotheses for follow-up experiments: (i) a genome-wide RNAi screen to uncover modulators of TNFα, (ii) a combined siRNA and miRNA mimics screen on vorinostat resistance and (iii) a small compound screen on KRAS synthetic lethality. HiTSeekR is publicly available at http...

  18. High-throughput screening of metal-porphyrin-like graphenes for selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyeonhu; Park, Minwoo; Jang, Byungryul; Kang, Yura; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Hosik; Chung, Haegeun; Chung, ChiHye; Hong, Suklyun; Kwon, Yongkyung; Yakobson, Boris I; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-02-23

    Nanostructured materials, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks, have been considered to capture CO2. However, their application has been limited largely because they exhibit poor selectivity for flue gases and low capture capacity under low pressures. We perform a high-throughput screening for selective CO2 capture from flue gases by using first principles thermodynamics. We find that elements with empty d orbitals selectively attract CO2 from gaseous mixtures under low CO2 pressures (~10(-3) bar) at 300 K and release it at ~450 K. CO2 binding to elements involves hybridization of the metal d orbitals with the CO2 π orbitals and CO2-transition metal complexes were observed in experiments. This result allows us to perform high-throughput screening to discover novel promising CO2 capture materials with empty d orbitals (e.g., Sc- or V-porphyrin-like graphene) and predict their capture performance under various conditions. Moreover, these findings provide physical insights into selective CO2 capture and open a new path to explore CO2 capture materials.

  19. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes.

  20. High-throughput virtual screening using quantum mechanical probes: discovery of selective kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2010-07-05

    A procedure based on semi-empirical quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of interaction energy is proposed for the rapid screening of compound poses generated by high-throughput docking. Small molecules (consisting of 2-10 atoms and termed "probes") are overlapped with polar groups in the binding site of the protein target. The interaction energy values between each compound pose and the probes, calculated by a semi-empirical Hamiltonian, are used as filters. The QM probe method does not require fixed partial charges and takes into account polarization and charge-transfer effects which are not captured by conventional force fields. The procedure is applied to screen approximately 100 million poses (of 2.7 million commercially available compounds) obtained by high-throughput docking in the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma receptor B4 (EphB4). Three QM probes on the hinge region and one at the entrance pocket are employed to select for binding affinity, while a QM probe on the side chain of the so-called gatekeeper residue (a hypervariable residue in the kinome) is used to enforce selectivity. The poses with favorable interactions with the five QM probes are filtered further for hydrophobic matching and low ligand strain. In this way, a single-digit micromolar inhibitor of EphB4 with a relatively good selectivity profile is identified in a multimillion-compound library upon experimental tests of only 23 molecules.

  1. High-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors using pseudotyped virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2010-12-01

    Virus entry into a host cell is an attractive target for therapy because propagation of virus can be blocked at an early stage, minimizing chances for the virus to acquire drug resistance. Anti-infective drug discovery for BSL-4 viruses like Ebola or Lassa hemorrhagic fever virus presents challenges due to the requirement for a BSL-4 laboratory containment facility. Pseudotyped viruses provide a surrogate model in which the native envelope glycoprotein of a BSL-2 level virus (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus) is replaced with envelope glycoprotein of a foreign BSL-4 virus (e.g., Ebola virus). Because the envelope glycoprotein determines interaction of virus with its cellular receptors, pseudotyped viruses can mimic the viral entry process of the original virus. Moreover, they are competent for only a single cycle of infection, and therefore can be used in BSL-2 facilities. Pseudotyped viruses have been used in high-throughput screening of entry inhibitors for a number of BSL-4 level viruses. This unit includes protocols for preparing pseudotyped viruses using lentiviral vectors and use of pseudotyped viruses for high-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors.

  2. Mechanisms of Antigen Adsorption Onto an Aluminum-Hydroxide Adjuvant Evaluated by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jully, Vanessa; Mathot, Frédéric; Moniotte, Nicolas; Préat, Véronique; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption mechanism of antigen on aluminum adjuvant can affect antigen elution at the injection site and hence the immune response. Our aim was to evaluate adsorption onto aluminum hydroxide (AH) by ligand exchange and electrostatic interactions of model proteins and antigens, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-casein, ovalbumin (OVA), hepatitis B surface antigen, and tetanus toxin (TT). A high-throughput screening platform was developed to measure adsorption isotherms in the presence of electrolytes and ligand exchange by a fluorescence-spectroscopy method that detects the catalysis of 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate by free hydroxyl groups on AH. BSA adsorption depended on predominant electrostatic interactions. Ligand exchange contributes to the adsorption of β-casein, OVA, hepatitis B surface antigen, and TT onto AH. Based on relative surface phosphophilicity and adsorption isotherms in the presence of phosphate and fluoride, the capacities of the proteins to interact with AH by ligand exchange followed the trend: OVA < β-casein < BSA < TT. This could be explained by both the content of ligands available in the protein structure for ligand exchange and the antigen's molecular weight. The high-throughput screening platform can be used to better understand the contributions of ligand exchange and electrostatic attractions governing the interactions between an antigen adsorbed onto aluminum-containing adjuvant. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  4. High-throughput screening assay for new ligands at human melatonin receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-hua YAN; Hao-ran SU; Jean A BOUTIN; M Pierre RENARD; Ming-wei WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Melatonin (MT) is a neurohormone produced and secreted primarily by the pineal gland in a circadian manner, and mainly acta through 2 receptor subtypes: MT1 and MT2 in humans. The diversity in their tissue distribution is in favor of different functions for each receptor subtype. Selective modulators are therefore required to determine the physiological roles of these melatonin receptor sub-types and their implications in pathological processes. Methods: A homogenous MT1/MT2 receptor binding assay was established for high-throughput screening of new ligands at the hMT1 and/or hMT2 receptors. The functional properties (agonists or antagonists) were assessed by a conventional guanosine-5'[γ-35S] triphosphate (GTP-γS) assay. Results: Three hMT, receptor-selective small mol-ecule antagonists and 1 hMT2 receptor-selective small molecule antagonist with novel structural features were identified following a high-throughput screening campaign of 48 240 synthetic and natural compounds. Conclusion: The findings may assist in the expansion of chemical probes to these 2 receptor subtypes.

  5. High-Throughput Screening and Optimization of Binary Quantum Dots Cosensitized Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; Xiao, Lina; Luo, Jianheng; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo; Mao, Bing-Wei; Zhan, Dongping

    2016-07-20

    Quantum dots (QDs) are considered as the alternative of dye sensitizers for solar cells. However, interfacial construction and evaluation of photocatalytic nanomaterials still remains challenge through the conventional methodology involving demo devices. We propose here a high-throughput screening and optimizing method based on combinatorial chemistry and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). A homogeneous TiO2 catalyst layer is coated on a FTO substrate, which is then covered by a dark mask to expose the photocatalyst array. On each photocatalyst spot, different successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) processes are performed by a programmed solution dispenser to load the binary PbxCd1-xS QDs sensitizers. An optical fiber is employed as the scanning tip of SECM, and the photocatalytic current is recorded during the imaging experiment, through which the optimized technical parameters are figured out. To verify the validity of the combinatorial SECM imaging results, the controlled trials are performed with the corresponding photovoltaic demo devices. The harmonious accordance proved that the methodology based on combinatorial chemistry and SECM is valuable for the interfacial construction, high-throughput screening, and optimization of QDSSCs. Furthermore, the PbxCd1-xS/CdS QDs cosensitized solar cell optimized by SECM achieves a short circuit current density of 24.47 mA/cm(2), an open circuit potential of 421 mV, a fill factor of 0.52, and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5.33%.

  6. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-05-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering.

  7. Efficient high-throughput biological process characterization: Definitive screening design with the ambr250 bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Mitchell; Ly, Amanda; Leung, Inne; Nayar, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    The burgeoning pipeline for new biologic drugs has increased the need for high-throughput process characterization to efficiently use process development resources. Breakthroughs in highly automated and parallelized upstream process development have led to technologies such as the 250-mL automated mini bioreactor (ambr250™) system. Furthermore, developments in modern design of experiments (DoE) have promoted the use of definitive screening design (DSD) as an efficient method to combine factor screening and characterization. Here we utilize the 24-bioreactor ambr250™ system with 10-factor DSD to demonstrate a systematic experimental workflow to efficiently characterize an Escherichia coli (E. coli) fermentation process for recombinant protein production. The generated process model is further validated by laboratory-scale experiments and shows how the strategy is useful for quality by design (QbD) approaches to control strategies for late-stage characterization. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. High-throughput screening for industrial enzyme production hosts by droplet microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Bai, Yunpeng; Huang, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    A high-throughput method for single cell screening by microfluidic droplet sorting is applied to a whole-genome mutated yeast cell library yielding improved production hosts of secreted industrial enzymes. The sorting method is validated by enriching a yeast strain 14 times based on its α...... in contrast to previous droplet-based directed evolution that has focused on improving enzyme protein structure. In the workflow presented, enzyme producing single cells are encapsulated in 20 pL droplets with a fluorogenic reporter substrate. The coupling of a desired phenotype (secreted enzyme concentration......) with the genotype (contained in the cell) inside a droplet enables selection of single cells with improved enzyme production capacity by droplet sorting. The platform has a throughput over 300 times higher than that of the current industry standard, an automated microtiter plate screening system. At the same time...

  9. High-throughput enzyme screening platform for the IPP-bypass mevalonate pathway for isopentenol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Aram; Meadows, Corey W.; Canu, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    of a mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (PMD) and demonstrated improved performance under aeration-limited conditions. However, relatively low activity of PMD toward the non-native substrate (mevalonate monophosphate, MVAP) was shown to limit flux through this new pathway. By inhibiting all IPP production from...... ATP requirements and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) toxicity pose immediate challenges for engineering bacterial strains to overproduce commodities utilizing IPP as an intermediate. To overcome these limitations, we developed an “IPP-bypass� isopentenol pathway using the promiscuous activity...... the endogenous non-mevalonate pathway, we developed a high-throughput screening platform that correlated promiscuous PMD activity toward MVAP with cellular growth. Successful identification of mutants that altered PMD activity demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of the screening platform. Strains...

  10. Upscaling and automation of electrophysiology: toward high throughput screening in ion channel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmild, Margit; Oswald, Nicholas; Krzywkowski, Karen M; Friis, Søren; Jacobsen, Rasmus B; Reuter, Dirk; Taboryski, Rafael; Kutchinsky, Jonathan; Vestergaard, Ras K; Schrøder, Rikke L; Sørensen, Claus B; Bech, Morten; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Willumsen, Niels J

    2003-01-01

    Effective screening of large compound libraries in ion channel drug discovery requires the development of new electrophysiological techniques with substantially increased throughputs compared to the conventional patch clamp technique. Sophion Bioscience is aiming to meet this challenge by developing two lines of automated patch clamp products, a traditional pipette-based system called Apatchi-1, and a silicon chip-based system QPatch. The degree of automation spans from semi-automation (Apatchi-1) where a trained technician interacts with the system in a limited way, to a complete automation (QPatch 96) where the system works continuously and unattended until screening of a full compound library is completed. The performance of the systems range from medium to high throughputs.

  11. An integrated bioanalytical platform for supporting high-throughput serum protein binding screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Shou, Wilson Z; Vath, Marianne; Kieltyka, Kasia; Maloney, Jennifer; Elvebak, Larry; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Weller, Harold N

    2010-12-30

    Quantification of small molecules using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has become a common practice in bioanalytical support of in vitro adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening. The bioanalysis process involves primarily three indispensable steps: MS/MS optimization for a large number of new chemical compounds undergoing various screening assays in early drug discovery, high-throughput sample analysis with LC/MS/MS for those chemically diverse compounds using the optimized MS/MS conditions, and post-acquisition data review and reporting. To improve overall efficiency of ADME bioanalysis, an integrated system was proposed featuring an automated and unattended MS/MS optimization, a staggered parallel LC/MS/MS for high-throughput sample analysis, and a sophisticated software tool for LC/MS/MS raw data review as well as biological data calculation and reporting. The integrated platform has been used in bioanalytical support of a serum protein binding screening assay with high speed, high capacity, and good robustness. In this new platform, a unique sample dilution scheme was also introduced. With this dilution design, the total number of analytical samples was reduced; therefore, the total operation time was reduced and the overall throughput was further improved. The performance of the protein binding screening assay was monitored with two controls representing high and low binding properties and an acceptable inter-assay consistency was achieved. This platform has been successfully used for the determination of serum protein binding in multiple species for more than 4000 compounds.

  12. High-throughput screening normalized to biological response: application to antiviral drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhara A; Patel, Anand C; Nolan, William C; Huang, Guangming; Romero, Arthur G; Charlton, Nichole; Agapov, Eugene; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The process of conducting cell-based phenotypic screens can result in data sets from small libraries or portions of large libraries, making accurate hit picking from multiple data sets important for efficient drug discovery. Here, we describe a screen design and data analysis approach that allow for normalization not only between quadrants and plates but also between screens or batches in a robust, quantitative fashion, enabling hit selection from multiple data sets. We independently screened the MicroSource Spectrum and NCI Diversity Set II libraries using a cell-based phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that uses an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-driven luciferase-reporter assay to identify interferon (IFN) signal enhancers. Inclusion of a per-plate, per-quadrant IFN dose-response standard curve enabled conversion of ISRE activity to effective IFN concentrations. We identified 45 hits based on a combined z score ≥2.5 from the two libraries, and 25 of 35 available hits were validated in a compound concentration-response assay when tested using fresh compound. The results provide a basis for further analysis of chemical structure in relation to biological function. Together, the results establish an HTS method that can be extended to screening for any class of compounds that influence a quantifiable biological response for which a standard is available.

  13. Use of cryopreserved cell aliquots in the high-throughput screening of small interfering RNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Elissa A; Fajardo, Flordeliza; Wang, Xiangyun; Watson, J E Vivienne; Quon, Kim C; Kassner, Paul D

    2010-06-01

    Screening small interfering RNA (siRNA) libraries holds the potential to elucidate gene function as well as discover new targets for the therapeutic treatment of disease. Since the inception of siRNA as a discovery tool, there have been progressive improvements in siRNA design algorithms, the transfection reagents used to deliver them, and the assay formats used to monitor phenotypic changes. These changes have helped to improve the quality of the data emerging from siRNA screens. One variable that introduces inconsistency into high-throughput screening (HTS) of siRNA libraries is the state of the cells used in the assays. Multiple factors can contribute to differences in transfection efficiency as well as the basic cell biology, which can lead to differences in the genes identified in siRNA screens. The authors have developed a system using frozen cell aliquots to use in siRNA HTS, so that a major source of variability introduced into cell-based screens can be standardized. In addition, by transiently transfecting plasmids into cell lines and then freezing these cells down to use in siRNA transfection experiments, they have used this same technology to create new cell lines. This process of using aliquots of frozen cells is logistically advantageous in an HTS setting, as it reduces the time spent maintaining cell lines, as well as reducing possible downtime in screening due to lack of cells or poor cell health.

  14. High Throughput Screening of Valganciclovir in Acidic Microenvironments of Polyester Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teilo Schaller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ganciclovir and valganciclor are antiviral agents used for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis. The conventional method for administering ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus retinitis patients is repeated intravitreal injections. In order to obviate the possible detrimental effects of repeated intraocular injections, to improve compliance and to eliminate systemic side-effects, we investigated the tuning of the ganciclovir pro-drug valganciclovir and the release from thin films of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polycaprolactone (PCL, or mixtures of both, as a step towards prototyping periocular valganciclovir implants. To investigate the drug release, we established and evaluated a high throughput fluorescence-based quantification screening assay for the detection of valganciclovir. Our protocol allows quantifying as little as 20 ng of valganciclovir in 96-well polypropylene plates and a 50× faster analysis compared to traditional HPLC measurements. This improvement can hence be extrapolated to other polyester matrix thin film formulations using a high-throughput approach. The acidic microenvironment within the polyester matrix was found to protect valganciclovir from degradation with resultant increases in the half-life of the drug in the periocular implant to 100 days. Linear release profiles were obtained using the pure polyester polymers for 10 days and 60 days formulations; however, gross phase separations of PCL and acid-terminated PLGA prevented tuning within these timeframes due to the phase separation of the polymer, valganciclovir, or both.

  15. High-throughput screening of small-molecule adsorption in MOF-74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonhauser, T.; Canepa, P.

    2014-03-01

    Using high-throughput screening coupled with state-of-the-art van der Waals density functional theory, we investigate the adsorption properties of four important molecules, H2, CO2, CH4, and H2O in MOF-74-  with  = Be, Mg, Al, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ru, Rh, Pd, La, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. We show that high-throughput techniques can aid in speeding up the development and refinement of effective materials for hydrogen storage, carbon capture, and gas separation. The exploration of the configurational adsorption space allows us to extract crucial information concerning, for example, the competition of water with CO2 for the adsorption binding sites. We find that only a few noble metals--Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, and Pt--favor the adsorption of CO2 and hence are potential candidates for effective carbon-capture materials. Our findings further reveal significant differences in the binding characteristics of H2, CO2, CH4, and H2O within the MOF structure, indicating that molecular blends can be successfully separated by these nano-porous materials. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-08ER46491.

  16. High-throughput flow cytometric screening of combinatorial chemistry bead libraries for proteomics and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; Reece, Lisa M.; Yang, Xian-Bin; Gorenstein, David

    2005-04-01

    For proteomics drug discovery applications, combinatorial microbead thioaptamer libraries (one thioaptamer sequence per bead) are being created by split synthesis method, creating a "proteomics library" of protein capture beads which can be analyzed by high-throughput screening methods in this case, flow cytometry and cell sorting. Thioaptamers, oligonucleotides with thiophosphate backbone substitutions, function like antibodies in terms of recognizing specific protein sequences but have a number of advantages over antibody libraries. These proteomics beads can then be analyzed by high-speed flow cytometry and sorted to single-bead level depending on relative fluorescence brightness of fluorescently-labeled proteins, or for a specific protein from all of the molecules of cell subpopulations being analyzed. The thioaptamer sequences on a given bead showing high affinity for that protein can then be sequenced. Alternatively, the protein-capturing beads can be analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for analysis of the bound proteins. The beads can be thought of as equivalent to single-element positions of a proteomics chip arrays but with the advantage of being able to much more rapidly analyze hundreds of millions of possible amino acid sequences/epitopes on the basis of thioaptamer sequence affinities to select single sequences of interest. Additionally, those beads can be manipulated and isolated at the single bead level by high-throughput flow cytometry/cell sorting for subsequent sequencing of the thioaptamer sequences.

  17. Nanoliter homogenous ultra-high throughput screening microarray for lead discoveries and IC50 profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haiching; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y; Wang, Yuan; Kucharewicz, Stefan A; Diamond, Scott L

    2005-04-01

    Microfluidic technologies offer the potential for highly productive and low-cost ultra-high throughput screening and high throughput selectivity profiling. Such technologies need to provide the flexibility of plate-based assays as well as be less expensive to operate. Presented here is a unique microarray system (the Reaction Biology [Malvern, PA] DiscoveryDot), which runs over 6,000 homogeneous reactions per 1" x 3" microarray using chemical libraries or compound dilutions printed in 1-nl volumes. A simple and rapid piezo-activation method delivers from 30 to 300 pl of biochemical targets and detector chemistries to each reaction. The fluorescent signals are detected and analyzed with conventional microarray scanners and software. The DiscoveryDot platform is highly customizable, and reduces consumption of targets and reaction chemistries by >40-fold and the consumption of compounds by >10,000-fold, compared to 384-well plate assay. We demonstrate here that the DiscoveryDot platform is compatible with conventional large-volume well-based reactions, with a Z' factor of >0.6 for many enzymes, such as the caspase family enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase, serine proteases, kinases, and histone deacetylases. The platform is well equipped for 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) profiling studies of enzyme inhibitors, with up to 10 dilution conditions of each test compound printed in duplicate, and each microarray chip can generate over 300 IC50 measurements against a given target.

  18. Better, Faster, Cheaper: Getting the Most Out of High-Throughput Screening with Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lisa; Simonich, Michael T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    The field of toxicology is undergoing a vast change with high-throughput (HT) approaches that rapidly query huge swaths of chemico-structural space for bioactivity and hazard potential. Its practicality is due in large part to switching from high-cost, low-throughput mammalian models to faster and cheaper alternatives. We believe this is an improved approach because the immense breadth of the resulting data sets a foundation for predictive structure-activity-based toxicology. Moreover, rapidly uncovering structure-related bioactivity drives better decisions about where to commit resources to drill down to a mechanism, or pursue commercial leads. While hundreds of different in vitro toxicology assays can collectively serve as an alternative to mammalian animal model testing, far greater efficiency and ultimately more relevant data are obtained from the whole animal. The developmental zebrafish, with its well-documented advantages over many animal models, is now emerging as a true biosensor of chemical activity. Herein, we draw on nearly a decade of experience developing high-throughput toxicology screens in the developmental zebrafish to summarize the best practices in fulfilling the better, faster, cheaper goals. We include optimization and harmonization of dosing volume, exposure paradigms, chemical solubility, chorion status, experimental duration, endpoint definitions, and statistical analysis.

  19. A high throughput screen for RGS proteins using steady state monitoring of free phosphate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Aaron Monroy

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors are a diverse group that are the target of over 50% of marketed drugs. Activation of these receptors results in the exchange of bound GDP for GTP in the Gα subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein. The Gα subunit dissociates from the β/γ subunits and both proceed to affect downstream signaling targets. The signal terminates by the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and is temporally regulated by Regulators of G-protein Signaling (RGS proteins that act as GTPase Activating Proteins (GAPs. This makes RGS proteins potentially desirable targets for "tuning" the effects of current therapies as well as developing novel pharmacotherapies. Current methods for evaluating RGS activity depend on laborious and/or expensive techniques. In this study we developed a simple and inexpensive assay for the steady state analysis of RGS protein GAP activity, using RGS4, RGS8 and RGS17 as models. Additionally, we report the use of RGS4 as a model for high throughput assay development. After initial setup, this assay can be conducted in a highly parallel fashion with a read time of less than 8 minutes for a 1536-well plate. The assay exhibited a robust Z-factor of 0.6 in a 1536-well plate. We conducted a pilot screen for inhibitors using a small, 2320 compound library. From this screen, 13 compounds were identified as compounds for further analysis. The successful development of this assay for high-throughput screening provides a low cost, high speed, simple method for assessing RGS protein activity.

  20. Intersection of toxicogenomics and high throughput screening in the Tox21 program: an NIEHS perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, B Alex; Paules, Richard S; Tice, Raymond R

    Humans are exposed to thousands of chemicals with inadequate toxicological data. Advances in computational toxicology, robotic high throughput screening (HTS), and genome-wide expression have been integrated into the Tox21 program to better predict the toxicological effects of chemicals. Tox21 is a collaboration among US government agencies initiated in 2008 that aims to shift chemical hazard assessment from traditional animal toxicology to target-specific, mechanism-based, biological observations using in vitro assays and lower organism models. HTS uses biocomputational methods for probing thousands of chemicals in in vitro assays for gene-pathway response patterns predictive of adverse human health outcomes. In 1999, NIEHS began exploring the application of toxicogenomics to toxicology and recent advances in NextGen sequencing should greatly enhance the biological content obtained from HTS platforms. We foresee an intersection of new technologies in toxicogenomics and HTS as an innovative development in Tox21. Tox21 goals, priorities, progress, and challenges will be reviewed.

  1. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor); Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  2. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Ming, X.; Cao, C.; Laing, B.; Yuan, A.; Porter, M. A.; Hull-Ryde, E. A.; Maddry, J.; Suto, M.; Janzen, W. P.; Juliano, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides has been constrained by the limited ability of these membrane-impermeable molecules to reach their intracellular sites of action. We sought to address this problem using small organic molecules to enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by modulating their intracellular trafficking and release from endosomes. A high-throughput screen of multiple small molecule libraries yielded several hits that markedly potentiated the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. These compounds also enhanced the effects of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides. The hit compounds preferentially caused release of fluorescent oligonucleotides from late endosomes rather than other intracellular compartments. Studies in a transgenic mouse model indicated that these compounds could enhance the in vivo effects of a splice-switching oligonucleotide without causing significant toxicity. These observations suggest that selected small molecule enhancers may eventually be of value in oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:25662226

  3. Solid electrodes in electroanalytical chemistry: present applications and prospects for high throughput screening of drug compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Bengi; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2007-08-01

    This review summarizes recent progress in the development and application of solid electrodes to the screening of pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological fluids. Recent trends and advances in the electroanalytical chemistry of solid electrodes, microelectrodes and electrochemical sensors are reviewed. The varieties of solid electrodes and their basic physico-chemical properties and some specific characteristics including some supramolecular phenomena at their surface are surveyed. This review also includes some selected designs and their applications. Despite many reviews about individual solid electrodes in the literature, this review offers the first comprehensive report on all forms of solid electrodes. Special attention is paid to the possibilities of solid electrodes in high throughput electroanalytical investigation of drug dosage forms and biological samples using modern electroanalytical techniques. Various selected studies on these subjects since 1996 are reviewed in this paper.

  4. Surface modification of thermoplastics--towards the plastic biochip for high throughput screening devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Quijada, Gerardo A; Peytavi, Régis; Nantel, André; Roy, Emmanuel; Bergeron, Michel G; Dumoulin, Michel M; Veres, Teodor

    2007-07-01

    Microarrays have become one of the most convenient tools for high throughput screening, supporting major advances in genomics and proteomics. Other important applications can be found in medical diagnostics, detection of biothreats, drug discovery, etc. Integration of microarrays with microfluidic devices can be highly advantageous in terms of portability, shorter analysis time and lower consumption of expensive biological analytes. Since fabrication of microfluidic devices using traditional materials such as glass is rather expensive, there is great interest in employing polymeric materials as a low cost alternative that is suitable for mass production. A number of commercially available plastic materials were reviewed for this purpose and poly(methylmethacrylate) Zeonor 1060R and Zeonex E48R were identified as promising candidates, for which methods for surface modification and covalent immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides were developed. In addition, we present proof-of-concept plastic-based microarrays with and without integration with microfluidics.

  5. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  6. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  7. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  8. Accessible high-throughput virtual screening molecular docking software for students and educators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed B Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We survey low cost high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS computer programs for instructors who wish to demonstrate molecular docking in their courses. Since HTVS programs are a useful adjunct to the time consuming and expensive wet bench experiments necessary to discover new drug therapies, the topic of molecular docking is core to the instruction of biochemistry and molecular biology. The availability of HTVS programs coupled with decreasing costs and advances in computer hardware have made computational approaches to drug discovery possible at institutional and non-profit budgets. This paper focuses on HTVS programs with graphical user interfaces (GUIs that use either DOCK or AutoDock for the prediction of DockoMatic, PyRx, DockingServer, and MOLA since their utility has been proven by the research community, they are free or affordable, and the programs operate on a range of computer platforms.

  9. Towards automated high-throughput screening of C. elegans on agar

    CERN Document Server

    Kabra, Mayank; O'Rourke, Eyleen J; Xie, Xin; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Jones, Thouis R; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ruvkun, Gary; Carpenter, Anne E; Freund, Yoav

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) using model organisms is a promising method to identify a small number of genes or drugs potentially relevant to human biology or disease. In HTS experiments, robots and computers do a significant portion of the experimental work. However, one remaining major bottleneck is the manual analysis of experimental results, which is commonly in the form of microscopy images. This manual inspection is labor intensive, slow and subjective. Here we report our progress towards applying computer vision and machine learning methods to analyze HTS experiments that use Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms grown on agar. Our main contribution is a robust segmentation algorithm for separating the worms from the background using brightfield images. We also show that by combining the output of this segmentation algorithm with an algorithm to detect the fluorescent dye, Nile Red, we can reliably distinguish different fluorescence-based phenotypes even though the visual differences are subtle....

  10. A high-throughput screening approach to discovering good forms of biologically inspired visual representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pinto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While many models of biological object recognition share a common set of "broad-stroke" properties, the performance of any one model depends strongly on the choice of parameters in a particular instantiation of that model--e.g., the number of units per layer, the size of pooling kernels, exponents in normalization operations, etc. Since the number of such parameters (explicit or implicit is typically large and the computational cost of evaluating one particular parameter set is high, the space of possible model instantiations goes largely unexplored. Thus, when a model fails to approach the abilities of biological visual systems, we are left uncertain whether this failure is because we are missing a fundamental idea or because the correct "parts" have not been tuned correctly, assembled at sufficient scale, or provided with enough training. Here, we present a high-throughput approach to the exploration of such parameter sets, leveraging recent advances in stream processing hardware (high-end NVIDIA graphic cards and the PlayStation 3's IBM Cell Processor. In analogy to high-throughput screening approaches in molecular biology and genetics, we explored thousands of potential network architectures and parameter instantiations, screening those that show promising object recognition performance for further analysis. We show that this approach can yield significant, reproducible gains in performance across an array of basic object recognition tasks, consistently outperforming a variety of state-of-the-art purpose-built vision systems from the literature. As the scale of available computational power continues to expand, we argue that this approach has the potential to greatly accelerate progress in both artificial vision and our understanding of the computational underpinning of biological vision.

  11. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  12. High-throughput screening for novel inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae penicillin-binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Fedarovich

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents.

  13. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Erdmann, Gerrit; Zhang, Xian; Fritzsche, Anja; Demir, Kubilay; Jaedicke, Andreas; Muehlenberg, Katja; Wanker, Erich E; Boutros, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  14. Polydiacetylene-Based High-Throughput Screen for Surfactin Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyan; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional mutation is still an attractive approach for strain improvement, it is tedious, time-consuming, and inefficient to screen for surfactin producing strains. To overcome this, we developed a high-throughput screening method for surfactin producing mutants by applying polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles as sensors with visible chromatic change from blue to red, detected as colorimetric response (CR%) signal, which can even semi-quantify the yields of surfactin. Bacillus subtilis 723 was used as parent strain and multiply mutated with atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP). Mutants were cultured in MicroFlask by Duetz (24 square deepwell plates, Applikon Biotechnology) and surfactin titers were tested in 96-well plates with PDA vesicles. Mutants with surfactin titers above150 mg/L (CR% value above 26%) were selected as high-yield strains and further quantified by HPLC. By integrating MicroFlask cultivation and the PDA vesicles detection, we screened 27,000 mutants and found 37 high-yield strains. From these, one mutant produced 473.6 mg/L surfactin (including 353.1 mg/L C15 surfactin), which was 5.4-fold than that of the parent strain. This method is efficient, cost-effective and provides wider application in screening for various surfactants. PMID:24498439

  15. Robotic Mammosphere Assay for High-Throughput Screening in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, P A; Akrap, N; Söderberg, E M V; Harrison, H; Thomson, G J; Landberg, G

    2017-02-01

    In order to identify novel treatment principles specifically affecting cancer stem cells in triple-negative breast cancer, we have developed a high-throughput screening method based on the mammosphere and anoikis resistance assays allowing us to screen compounds using a functional readout. The assay was validated against manual protocols and through the use of positive controls, such as the response to hypoxia and treatment with the known cancer stem cell-targeting compound salinomycin. Manual and robotic procedures were compared and produced similar results in cell handling, cell cultures, and counting techniques, with no statistically significant difference produced from either method. The variance between samples processed manually versus robotically was no greater than 0.012, while Levene's test of significance was 0.2, indicating no significant difference between mammosphere data produced manually or robotically. Through the screening of 989 FDA-approved drugs and a follow-up screen assessing the antineoplastic subgroup, we have identified three therapeutic compounds with the ability to modulate the breast cancer stem cell fraction in the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, highlighting their potential usage as stem cell-specific adjuvant treatments.

  16. Rapid identification of antifungal compounds against Exserohilum rostratum using high throughput drug repurposing screens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available A recent large outbreak of fungal infections by Exserohilum rostratum from contaminated compounding solutions has highlighted the need to rapidly screen available pharmaceuticals that could be useful in therapy. The present study utilized two newly-developed high throughput assays to screen approved drugs and pharmaceutically active compounds for identification of potential antifungal agents. Several known drugs were found that have potent effects against E. rostratum including the triazole antifungal posaconazole. Posaconazole is likely to be effective against infections involving septic joints and may provide an alternative for refractory central nervous system infections. The anti-E. rostratum activities of several other drugs including bithionol (an anti-parasitic drug, tacrolimus (an immunosuppressive agent and floxuridine (an antimetabolite were also identified from the drug repurposing screens. In addition, activities of other potential antifungal agents against E. rostratum were excluded, which may avoid unnecessary therapeutic trials and reveals the limited therapeutic alternatives for this outbreak. In summary, this study has demonstrated that drug repurposing screens can be quickly conducted within a useful time-frame. This would allow clinical implementation of identified alternative therapeutics and should be considered as part of the initial public health response to new outbreaks or rapidly-emerging microbial pathogens.

  17. Human Adenine Nucleotide Translocase (ANT) Modulators Identified by High-Throughput Screening of Transgenic Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujian; Tian, Defeng; Matsuyama, Hironori; Hamazaki, Takashi; Shiratsuchi, Takayuki; Terada, Naohiro; Hook, Derek J; Walters, Michael A; Georg, Gunda I; Hawkinson, Jon E

    2016-04-01

    Transport of ADP and ATP across mitochondria is one of the primary points of regulation to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. This process is mainly mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) located on the mitochondrial inner membrane. There are four human ANT isoforms, each having a unique tissue-specific expression pattern and biological function, highlighting their potential as drug targets for diverse clinical indications, including male contraception and cancer. In this study, we present a novel yeast-based high-throughput screening (HTS) strategy to identify compounds inhibiting the function of ANT. Yeast strains generated by deletion of endogenous proteins with ANT activity followed by insertion of individual human ANT isoforms are sensitive to cell-permeable ANT inhibitors, which reduce proliferation. Screening hits identified in the yeast proliferation assay were characterized in ADP/ATP exchange assays employing recombinant ANT isoforms expressed in isolated yeast mitochondria and Lactococcus lactis as well as by oxygen consumption rate in mammalian cells. Using this approach, closantel and CD437 were identified as broad-spectrum ANT inhibitors, whereas leelamine was found to be a modulator of ANT function. This yeast "knock-out/knock-in" screening strategy is applicable to a broad range of essential molecular targets that are required for yeast survival. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  18. DOVIS: an implementation for high-throughput virtual screening using AutoDock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuxing; Kumar, Kamal; Jiang, Xiaohui; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2008-02-27

    Molecular-docking-based virtual screening is an important tool in drug discovery that is used to significantly reduce the number of possible chemical compounds to be investigated. In addition to the selection of a sound docking strategy with appropriate scoring functions, another technical challenge is to in silico screen millions of compounds in a reasonable time. To meet this challenge, it is necessary to use high performance computing (HPC) platforms and techniques. However, the development of an integrated HPC system that makes efficient use of its elements is not trivial. We have developed an application termed DOVIS that uses AutoDock (version 3) as the docking engine and runs in parallel on a Linux cluster. DOVIS can efficiently dock large numbers (millions) of small molecules (ligands) to a receptor, screening 500 to 1,000 compounds per processor per day. Furthermore, in DOVIS, the docking session is fully integrated and automated in that the inputs are specified via a graphical user interface, the calculations are fully integrated with a Linux cluster queuing system for parallel processing, and the results can be visualized and queried. DOVIS removes most of the complexities and organizational problems associated with large-scale high-throughput virtual screening, and provides a convenient and efficient solution for AutoDock users to use this software in a Linux cluster platform.

  19. High-throughput screening for Survivin and Borealin interaction inhibitors in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Liyun; Li, Lu; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhuo; Han, Shuai; Chen, Ming; Lan, Shujue; Xu, Xiaojun; Hui, Lijian

    2017-03-11

    Survivin, a key member of the chromatin passenger complex (CPC), is often highly expressed in human cancers, making it a promising target for cancer treatment. Out of the numerous reported Survivin inhibitors, YM155 is only one entering clinical trial, but was recently failed in the Phase II trial. It is important to develop Survivin inhibitors with new strategies. We recently reported that both Survivin and its binding protein Borealin in the CPC complex are essential for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that disrupting the interaction between Survivin and Borealin would be a promising strategy. Here, we developed a high-throughput screening method based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technology in cultured cells, which allowed the identification of small chemical inhibitors specifically blocking the Survivin and Borealin interaction. Primary hits from BiFC were further validated in an in vitro AlphaScreen system, which detects the direct interactions of Survivin and Borealin. Etoposide was identified as one of the effective hits. Direct interaction between Survivin and Etoposide was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance assay, and molecular docking analysis suggested the structural information on how Etoposide inhibits the Survivin and Borealin interaction. These results demonstrate a screening system to identify small molecule chemicals inhibiting Survivin and Borealin interaction. In future, an even larger scale screening may lead to identification of better Survivin and Borealin inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    Full Text Available Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  1. High-throughput screening and scale-up of cocrystals using resonant acoustic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagapudi, Karthik; Umanzor, Evelyn Yanez; Masui, Colin

    2017-04-15

    This paper explores the effectiveness of resonant acoustic mixing RAM for screening and scale up of cocrystals. 16 cocrystal systems were selected as test cases based on previous literature precedent. A 96 well plate set up in conjunction with zirconia beads was used for cocrystal screening using RAM. A success rate of 80% was obtained in the screen for plates containing solvent or solvent plus Zirconia beads. A proof of concept production of hydrated and anhydrous cocrystals of 1:1 Theophylline Citric acid system at a 400mg scale was demonstrated using solvent and bead assisted RAM. Finally the parameters affecting the scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals was explored in a systematic fashion using a Design of Experiments DOE approach. The RAM parameters of acceleration and mixing time were optimized using the DOE approach. A quantitative XRPD method was developed to determine the extent of conversion to the cocrystal when using RAM Mixing time of 2h and an acceleration of 60G were determined to be optimal. The optimized parameters were used to demonstrate scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals at an 80 gram scale with a net yield of 94%. RAM is thus established as an environmentally friendly mechanochemical technique for both high throughput screening and scaled up production of cocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Integration of virtual and high throughput screening in lead discovery settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, Tímea; Keseru, György M

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade mass screening strategies became the main source of leads in drug discovery settings. Although high throughput (HTS) and virtual screening (VS) realize the same concept the different nature of these lead discovery strategies (experimental vs theoretical) results that they are typically applied separately. The majority of drug leads are still identified by hit-to-lead optimization of screening hits. Structural information on the target as well as on bound ligands, however, make structure-based and ligand-based virtual screening available for the identification of alternative chemical starting points. Although, the two techniques have rarely been used together on the same target, here we review the existing prominent studies on their true integration. Various approaches have been shown to apply the combination of HTS and VS and to better use them in lead generation. Although several attempts on their integration have only been considered at a conceptual level, there are numerous applications underlining its relevance that early-stage pharmaceutical drug research could benefit from a combined approach.

  3. Automated nutrient screening system enables high-throughput optimisation of microalgae production conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzun, Khairul Adzfa; Wolf, Juliane; Jakob, Gisela; Zhang, Eugene; Stephens, Evan; Ross, Ian; Hankamer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae provide an excellent platform for the production of high-value-products and are increasingly being recognised as a promising production system for biomass, animal feeds and renewable fuels. Here, we describe an automated screen, to enable high-throughput optimisation of 12 nutrients for microalgae production. Its miniaturised 1,728 multiwell format allows multiple microalgae strains to be simultaneously screened using a two-step process. Step 1 optimises the primary elements nitrogen and phosphorous. Step 2 uses Box-Behnken analysis to define the highest growth rates within the large multidimensional space tested (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, B, Se, V, Si) at three levels (-1, 0, 1). The highest specific growth rates and maximum OD750 values provide a measure for continuous and batch culture. The screen identified the main nutrient effects on growth, pairwise nutrient interactions (for example, Ca-Mg) and the best production conditions of the sampled statistical space providing the basis for a targeted full factorial screen to assist with optimisation of algae production.

  4. Evaluating the Impact of Uncertainties in Clearance and Exposure When Prioritizing Chemicals Screened in High-Throughput Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity-testing paradigm has evolved to include high-throughput (HT) methods for addressing the increasing need to screen hundreds to thousands of chemicals rapidly. Approaches that involve in vitro screening assays, in silico predictions of exposure concentrations, and phar...

  5. High-throughput bioaffinity mass spectrometry for screening and identification of designer anabolic steroids in dietary supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aqai, P.; Cevik, E.; Gerssen, A.; Haasnoot, W.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    A generic high-throughput bioaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (BioMS) approach was developed and applied for the screening and identification of known and unknown recombinant human sex hormone-binding globulin (rhSHBG)-binding designer steroids in dietary supplements. For screening,

  6. A sandwiched microarray platform for benchtop cell-based high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhui; Wheeldon, Ian; Guo, Yuqi; Lu, Tingli; Du, Yanan; Wang, Ben; He, Jiankang; Hu, Yiqiao; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of combinatorial chemistries and the increased discovery of natural compounds have led to the production of expansive libraries of drug candidates and vast numbers of compounds with potentially interesting biological activities. Despite broad interest in high throughput screening (HTS) across varied fields of biological research, there has not been an increase in accessible HTS technologies. Here, we present a simple microarray sandwich system suitable for screening chemical libraries in cell-based assays at the benchtop. The microarray platform delivers chemical compounds to isolated cell cultures by ‘sandwiching’ chemical-laden arrayed posts with cell-seeded microwells. In this way, an array of sealed cell-based assays was generated without cross-contamination between neighboring assays. After chemical exposure, cell viability was analyzed by fluorescence detection of cell viability indicator assays on a per microwell basis in a standard microarray scanner. We demonstrate the efficacy of the system by generating four hits from toxicology screens towards MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Three of the hits were identified in a combinatorial screen of a library of natural compounds in combination with verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor. A fourth hit, 9-methoxy-camptothecin, was identified by screening the natural compound library in the absence of verapamil. The method developed here miniaturizes existing HTS systems and enables the screening of a wide array of individual or combinatorial libraries in a reproducible and scalable manner. We anticipate broad application of such a system as it is amenable to combinatorial drug screening in a simple, robust and portable platform. PMID:20965560

  7. Corifungin, a new drug lead against Naegleria, identified from a high-throughput screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Tunac, Josefino B; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; McKerrow, James H

    2012-11-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rapidly fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. The drug of choice in treating PAM is the antifungal antibiotic amphotericin B, but its use is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, few patients treated with amphotericin B have survived PAM. Therefore, fast-acting and efficient drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of PAM. To facilitate drug screening for this pathogen, an automated, high-throughput screening methodology was developed and validated for the closely related species Naegleria gruberi. Five kinase inhibitors and an NF-kappaB inhibitor were hits identified in primary screens of three compound libraries. Most importantly for a preclinical drug discovery pipeline, we identified corifungin, a water-soluble polyene macrolide with a higher activity against Naegleria than that of amphotericin B. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated with different concentrations of corifungin showed disruption of cytoplasmic and plasma membranes and alterations in mitochondria, followed by complete lysis of amebae. In vivo efficacy of corifungin in a mouse model of PAM was confirmed by an absence of detectable amebae in the brain and 100% survival of mice for 17 days postinfection for a single daily intraperitoneal dose of 9 mg/kg of body weight given for 10 days. The same dose of amphotericin B did not reduce ameba growth, and mouse survival was compromised. Based on these results, the U.S. FDA has approved orphan drug status for corifungin for the treatment of PAM.

  8. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-03

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths.

  9. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Extracts in A Yeast Model of Polyglutamine Proteotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Gladis M.; Raveh, Avi; Mok, Sue-Ann; McQuade, Thomas J.; Arevang, Carl J.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Smith, Matthew C.; Asare, Samuel; Cruz, Patricia G.; Wisen, Susanne; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Sherman, David H.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) segments cause a number of fatal neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD). Previous high-throughput screens in cellular and biochemical models of HD have revealed compounds that mitigate polyQ aggregation and proteotoxicity, providing insight into the mechanisms of disease and leads for potential therapeutics. However, the structural diversity of natural products has not yet been fully mobilized toward these goals. Here, we have screened a collection of ~11 000 natural product extracts for the ability to recover the slow growth of ΔProQ103-expressing yeast cells in 384-well plates (Z’ ~ 0.7, CV ~ 8%). This screen identified actinomycin D as a strong inhibitor of polyQ aggregation and proteotoxicity at nanomolar concentrations (~50–500 ng/mL). We found that a low dose of actinomycin D increased the levels of the heat-shock proteins Hsp104, Hsp70 and Hsp26 and enhanced binding of Hsp70 to the polyQ in yeast. Actinomycin also suppressed aggregation of polyQ in mammalian cells, suggesting a conserved mechanism. These results establish natural products as a rich source of compounds with interesting mechanisms of action against polyQ disorders. PMID:24636344

  10. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Auxotrophy-based High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of Bacillus subtilis stringent response inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Liis; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Jimmy, Steffi; Lindberg, Stina; Tenson, Tanel; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a central adaptation mechanism that allows bacteria to adjust their growth and metabolism according to environmental conditions. The functionality of the stringent response is crucial for bacterial virulence, survival during host invasion as well as antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Therefore, specific inhibitors of the stringent response hold great promise as molecular tools for disarming and pacifying bacterial pathogens. By taking advantage of the valine amino acid auxotrophy of the Bacillus subtilis stringent response-deficient strain, we have set up a High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of stringent response inhibitors. By screening 17,500 compounds, we have identified a novel class of antibacterials based on the 4-(6-(phenoxy)alkyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole core. Detailed characterization of the hit compounds as well as two previously identified promising stringent response inhibitors – a ppGpp-mimic nucleotide Relacin and cationic peptide 1018 – showed that neither of the compounds is sufficiently specific, thus motivating future application of our screening assay to larger and more diverse molecular libraries. PMID:27775002

  12. High-Throughput Screening for Bioactive Molecules Using Primary Cell Culture of Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigen Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic zebrafish embryos expressing tissue-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP can provide an unlimited supply of primary embryonic cells. Agents that promote the differentiation of these cells may be beneficial for therapeutics. We report a high-throughput approach for screening small molecules that regulate cell differentiation using lineage-specific GFP transgenic zebrafish embryonic cells. After validating several known regulators of the differentiation of endothelial and other cell types, we performed a screen for proangiogenic molecules using undifferentiated primary cells from flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. Cells were grown in 384-well plates with 12,128 individual small molecules, and GFP expression was analyzed by means of an automated imaging system, which allowed us to screen thousands of compounds weekly. As a result, 23 molecules were confirmed to enhance angiogenesis, and 11 of them were validated to promote the proliferation of mammalian human umbilical vascular endothelial cells and induce Flk1+ cells from murine embryonic stem cells. We demonstrated the general applicability of this strategy by analyzing additional cell lineages using zebrafish expressing GFP in pancreatic, cardiac, and dopaminergic cells.

  13. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, Andrew R.; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery. PMID:27716809

  14. Duplex high-throughput flow cytometry screen identifies two novel formylpeptide receptor family probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan M; Bologa, Cristian M; Fara, Dan; Bryant, Bj K; Strouse, Juan Jacob; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Ye, Richard D; Oprea, Tudor I; Prossnitz, Eric R; Sklar, Larry A; Edwards, Bruce S

    2009-03-01

    Of recent, clinical interest have been two related human G-protein coupled receptors: formylpeptide receptor (FPR), linked to antibacterial inflammation and malignant glioma cell metastasis; and FPR like-1 (FPRL1), linked to chronic inflammation in systemic amyloidosis, Alzheimer's disease, and prion diseases. In association with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Library Screening Network, we implemented a flow-cytometry-based high-throughput screening (HTS) approach for identifying selective small molecule FPR and FPRL1 ligands. The screening assay measured the ability of test compounds to competitively displace a high-affinity, fluorescein- labeled peptide ligand from FPR, FPRL1, or both. U937 cells expressing FPR and rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells expressing FPRL1 were tested together in a "duplex" format. The U937 cells were color coded with red-fluorescent dye allowing their distinction during analysis. Compounds, cells, and fluorescent ligand were sequentially combined (no wash) in 15 microl assay volumes in 384-well plates. Throughput averaged approximately 11 min per plate to analyze approximately 4,000 cells ( approximately 2,000/receptor) in a 2 microl aspirate from each well. In primary single concentration HTS of 24,304 NIH Small Molecule Repository compounds, 253 resulted in inhibition >30% (181 for FPR, 72 for FPRL1) of which 40 had selective binding inhibition constants (K(i)) probes.

  15. Ferrous and ferric ions-based high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhi-Jian; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Lei, Li-Hua; Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2011-06-01

    Rapid and direct screening of nitrile-converting enzymes is of great importance in the development of industrial biocatalytic process for pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. In this paper, a combination of ferrous and ferric ions was used to establish a novel colorimetric screening method for nitrile hydratase and amidase with α-amino nitriles and α-amino amides as substrates, respectively. Ferrous and ferric ions reacted sequentially with the cyanide dissociated spontaneously from α-amino nitrile solution, forming a characteristic deep blue precipitate. They were also sensitive to weak basicity due to the presence of amino amide, resulting in a yellow precipitate. When amino amide was further hydrolyzed to amino acid, it gave a light yellow solution. Mechanisms of color changes were further proposed. Using this method, two isolates with nitrile hydratase activity towards 2-amino-2,3-dimethyl butyronitrile, one strain capable of hydrating 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethyl phosphiny) butyronitrile and another microbe exhibiting amidase activity against 2-amino-4-methylsulfanyl butyrlamide were obtained from soil samples and culture collections of our laboratory. Versatility of this method enabled it the first direct and inexpensive high-throughput screening system for both nitrile hydratase and amidase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An Efficient High Throughput Metabotyping Platform for Screening of Biomass Willows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia I. Corol

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Future improvement of woody biomass crops such as willow and poplar relies on our ability to select for metabolic traits that sequester more atmospheric carbon into biomass, or into useful products to replace petrochemical streams. We describe the development of metabotyping screens for willow, using combined 1D 1H-NMR-MS. A protocol was developed to overcome 1D 1H-NMR spectral alignment problems caused by variable pH and peak broadening arising from high organic acid levels and metal cations. The outcome was a robust method to allow direct statistical comparison of profiles arising from source (leaf and sink (stem tissues allowing data to be normalised to a constant weight of the soluble metabolome. We also describe the analysis of two willow biomass varieties, demonstrating how fingerprints from 1D 1H-NMR-MS vary from the top to the bottom of the plant. Automated extraction of quantitative data of 56 primary and secondary metabolites from 1D 1H-NMR spectra was realised by the construction and application of a Salix metabolite spectral library using the Chenomx software suite. The optimised metabotyping screen in conjunction with automated quantitation will enable high-throughput screening of genetic collections. It also provides genotype and tissue specific data for future modelling of carbon flow in metabolic networks.

  17. Freely accessible databases of commercial compounds for high- throughput virtual screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Barbosa, Arménio Jorge; Del Rio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades computer-aided drug design techniques have been successfully used to guide the selection of new hit compounds with biological activity. These methods, that include a broad range of chemoinformatic and computational chemistry algorithms, are still disciplines in full bloom. In particular, virtual screening procedures have celebrated a great popularity for the rapid and cost-effective assessment of large chemical libraries of commercial compounds. While the usage of in silico techniques promises an effective speed-up at the early-stage of the development of new active compounds, computational projects starting from scratch with raw chemical data are often associated with resource- and time-consuming preparation protocols, almost blunting the advantages of using these techniques. In order to help facing these difficulties, in the last years several chemoinformatic projects and tools have emerged in literature and have been useful in preparing curated databases of chemical compounds for high-throughput virtual screening purposes. The review will focus on the detailed analysis of free databases of commercial chemical compounds that are currently employed in virtual screening campaigns for drug design. The scope of this review is to compare such databases and suggest the reader on how and in which conditions the usage of these databases could be recommended.

  18. Adapting human pluripotent stem cells to high-throughput and high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbordes, Sabrina C; Studer, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of cells for drug discovery, cytotoxicity assessment and disease modeling requires their adaptation to large-scale culture conditions and screening formats. Here, we describe a simple and robust protocol for the adaptation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to high-throughput screening (HTS). This protocol can also be adapted to human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and high-content screening (HCS). We also describe a 7-d assay to identify compounds with an effect on hESC self-renewal and differentiation. This assay can be adapted to a variety of applications. The procedure involves the culture expansion of hESCs, their adaptation to 384-well plates, the addition of small molecules or other factors, and finally data acquisition and processing. In this protocol, the optimal number of hESCs plated in 384-well plates has been adapted to HTS/HCS assays of 7 d.

  19. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Libraries for Hsp90 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Davenport

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 has become the target of intensive investigation, as inhibition of its function has the ability to simultaneously incapacitate proteins that function in pathways that represent the six hallmarks of cancer. While a number of Hsp90 inhibitors have made it into clinical trials, a number of short-comings have been noted, such that the search continues for novel Hsp90 inhibitors with superior pharmacological properties. To identify new potential Hsp90 inhibitors, we have utilized a high-throughput assay based on measuring Hsp90-dependent refolding of thermally denatured luciferase to screen natural compound libraries. Over 4,000 compounds were screen with over 100 hits. Data mining of the literature indicated that 51 compounds had physiological effects that Hsp90 inhibitors also exhibit, and/or the ability to downregulate the expression levels of Hsp90-dependent proteins. Of these 51 compounds, seven were previously characterized as Hsp90 inhibitors. Four compounds, anthothecol, garcinol, piplartine, and rottlerin, were further characterized, and the ability of these compounds to inhibit the refolding of luciferase, and reduce the rate of growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells, correlated with their ability to suppress the Hsp90-dependent maturation of the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, and deplete cultured cells of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Thus, this screen has identified an additional 44 compounds with known beneficial pharmacological properties, but with unknown mechanisms of action as possible new inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone machine.

  20. High throughput screening assay for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 glucuronidation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, O V; Finel, M; Kurkela, M; Fitzgerald, M; Peters, N R; Hoffman, F M; Trubetskoy, V S

    2007-06-01

    Development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays for evaluation of a compound's toxicity and potential for drug-drug interactions is a critical step towards production of better drug candidates and cost reduction in the drug development process. HTS assays for drug metabolism mediated by cytochrome P450s are now routinely used in compound library characterization and for computer modeling studies. However, development and application of HTS assays involving UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are lagging behind. Here we describe the development of a fluorescence-based HTS assay for UGT1A1 using recombinant enzyme and fluorescent substrate in the presence of an aqueous solution of PreserveX-QML (QBI Life Sciences, Madison, WI) polymeric micelles, acting as a stabilizer and a blocker of nonspecific interactions. The data include assay characteristics in 384-well plate format obtained with robotic liquid handling equipment and structures of hits (assay modifiers) obtained from the screening of a small molecule library at the University of Wisconsin HTS screening facility. The application of the assay for predicting UGT-related drug-drug interactions and building pharmacophore models, as well as the effects of polymeric micelles on the assay performance and compound promiscuity, is discussed.

  1. Screening for Antifibrotic Compounds Using High Throughput System Based on Fluorescence Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Stefanovic

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibroproliferative diseases are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. They are characterized by reactive fibrosis caused by uncontrolled synthesis of type I collagen. There is no cure for fibrosis and development of therapeutics that can inhibit collagen synthesis is urgently needed. Collagen α1(I mRNA and α2(I mRNA encode for type I collagen and they have a unique 5' stem-loop structure in their 5' untranslated regions (5'SL. Collagen 5'SL binds protein LARP6 with high affinity and specificity. The interaction between LARP6 and the 5'SL is critical for biosynthesis of type I collagen and development of fibrosis in vivo. Therefore, this interaction represents is an ideal target to develop antifibrotic drugs. A high throughput system to screen for chemical compounds that can dissociate LARP6 from 5'SL has been developed. It is based on fluorescence polarization and can be adapted to screen for inhibitors of other protein-RNA interactions. Screening of 50,000 chemical compounds yielded a lead compound that can inhibit type I collagen synthesis at nanomolar concentrations. The development, characteristics, and critical appraisal of this assay are presented.

  2. Tribolium castaneum as a model for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Eileen; Bingsohn, Linda; Kanost, Michael R; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Coleopteran insects are a highly diverse and successful order, and many beetle species are significant agricultural pests. New biorational strategies for managing populations of beetles and other insect species are needed as pests develop resistance to chemical insecticides and Bt toxins. There is now an opportunity to use genome sequence data to identify genes that are essential for insect growth, development, or survival as new targets for designing control technology. This goal requires a method for high-throughput in vivo screening of thousands of genes to identify candidate genes that, when their expression is disrupted, have a phenotype that may be useful in insect pest control. Tribolium castaneum, the red flour beetle, is a model organism that offers considerable advantages for such screening, including ease of rearing in large numbers, a sequenced genome, and a strong, systemic RNAi response for specific depletion of gene transcripts. The RNAi effect in T. castaneum can be elicited in any tissue and any stage by the injection of dsRNA into the hemocoel, and injection of dsRNA into adult females can even be used to identify phenotypes in offspring. A pilot RNAi screen (iBeetle) is underway. Several T. castaneum genes with promising RNAi phenotypes for further development as mechanisms for plant protection have been identified. These include heat shock protein 90, chitin synthase, the segmentation gene hairy, and a matrix metalloprotease. Candidate genes identified in T. castaneum screens can then be tested in agricultural pest species (in which screening is not feasible), to evaluate their effectiveness for use in potential plant-based RNAi control strategies. Delivery of dsRNA expressed by genetically modified crops to the midgut of phytophagous insects is under investigation as a new tool for very specific protection of plants from insect pest species. The T. castaneum screening platform offers a system for discovery of candidate genes with high potential

  3. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7-15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases.We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts, and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds, we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi.We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between human and filarial enzymes. Hence, we are confident

  4. Micro-X-ray fluorescence as a general high-throughput screening method for catalyst discovery and small molecule recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomasin C; Mann, Grace; Havrilla, George J; Wells, Cyndi A; Warner, Benjamin P; Baker, R Tom

    2003-01-01

    A powerful high-throughput screening technique is described for the rapid screening of bead-based libraries for catalyst discovery and molecular recognition. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) screens materials for elemental composition with mesoscale analysis. This method is nondestructive and requires minimal sample preparation and no special tags for analysis, and the screening time is dependent on the desired sensitivity. The speed, sensitivity, and simplicity of MXRF as a high-throughput screening technique were applied to screen bead-based libraries of oligopeptides for phosphate hydrolysis catalysts and molecular recognition of selective receptors for the degradation products and analogues of chemical warfare agents. This paper demonstrates the analytical or HTS capability of MXRF for combinatorial screening. It is meant only to show the capabilities of MXRF and is not meant as an exhaustive study of the catalyst and molecular recognition systems presented.

  5. A high-throughput screen for teratogens using human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameoka, Sei; Babiarz, Joshua; Kolaja, Kyle; Chiao, Eric

    2014-01-01

    There is need in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries for high-throughput human cell-based assays for identifying hazardous chemicals, thereby reducing the overall reliance on animal studies for predicting the risk of toxic responses in humans. Despite instances of human-specific teratogens such as thalidomide, the use of human cell-teratogenicity assays has just started to be explored. Herein, a human pluripotent stem cell test (hPST) for identifying teratogens is described, benchmarking the in vitro findings to traditional preclinical toxicology teratogenicity studies and when available to teratogenic outcomes in humans. The hPST method employs a 3-day monolayer directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. The teratogenic risk of a compound is gauged by measuring the reduction in nuclear translocation of the transcription factor SOX17 in mesendodermal cells. Decreased nuclear SOX17 in the hPST model was strongly correlated with in vivo teratogenicity. Specifically, 71 drug-like compounds with known in vivo effects, including thalidomide, were examined in the hPST. A threshold of 5 μM demonstrated 94% accuracy (97% sensitivity and 92% specificity). Furthermore, 15 environmental toxicants with physicochemical properties distinct from small molecule pharmaceutical agents were examined and a similarly strong concordance with teratogenicity outcomes from in vivo studies was observed. Finally, to assess the suitability of the hPST for high-throughput screens, a small library of 300 kinase inhibitors was tested, demonstrating the hPST platform's utility for interrogating teratogenic mechanisms and drug safety prediction. Thus, the hPST assay is a robust predictor of teratogenicity and appears to be an improvement over existing in vitro models.

  6. Development of a phenotyping platform for high throughput screening of nodal root angle in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dinesh C; Singh, Vijaya; Hunt, Colleen; Mace, Emma; van Oosterom, Erik; Sulman, Richard; Jordan, David; Hammer, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    In sorghum, the growth angle of nodal roots is a major component of root system architecture. It strongly influences the spatial distribution of roots of mature plants in the soil profile, which can impact drought adaptation. However, selection for nodal root angle in sorghum breeding programs has been restricted by the absence of a suitable high throughput phenotyping platform. The aim of this study was to develop a phenotyping platform for the rapid, non-destructive and digital measurement of nodal root angle of sorghum at the seedling stage. The phenotyping platform comprises of 500 soil filled root chambers (50 × 45 × 0.3 cm in size), made of transparent perspex sheets that were placed in metal tubs and covered with polycarbonate sheets. Around 3 weeks after sowing, once the first flush of nodal roots was visible, roots were imaged in situ using an imaging box that included two digital cameras that were remotely controlled by two android tablets. Free software (openGelPhoto.tcl) allowed precise measurement of nodal root angle from the digital images. The reliability and efficiency of the platform was evaluated by screening a large nested association mapping population of sorghum and a set of hybrids in six independent experimental runs that included up to 500 plants each. The platform revealed extensive genetic variation and high heritability (repeatability) for nodal root angle. High genetic correlations and consistent ranking of genotypes across experimental runs confirmed the reproducibility of the platform. This low cost, high throughput root phenotyping platform requires no sophisticated equipment, is adaptable to most glasshouse environments and is well suited to dissect the genetic control of nodal root angle of sorghum. The platform is suitable for use in sorghum breeding programs aiming to improve drought adaptation through root system architecture manipulation.

  7. A high-throughput screen for aggregation-based inhibition in a large compound library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Brian Y; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Babaoglu, Kerim; Inglese, James; Shoichet, Brian K; Austin, Christopher P

    2007-05-17

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is the primary technique for new lead identification in drug discovery and chemical biology. Unfortunately, it is susceptible to false-positive hits. One common mechanism for such false-positives is the congregation of organic molecules into colloidal aggregates, which nonspecifically inhibit enzymes. To both evaluate the feasibility of large-scale identification of aggregate-based inhibition and quantify its prevalence among screening hits, we tested 70,563 molecules from the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) library for detergent-sensitive inhibition. Each molecule was screened in at least seven concentrations, such that dose-response curves were obtained for all molecules in the library. There were 1274 inhibitors identified in total, of which 1204 were unambiguously detergent-sensitive. We identified these as aggregate-based inhibitors. Thirty-one library molecules were independently purchased and retested in secondary low-throughput experiments; 29 of these were confirmed as either aggregators or nonaggregators, as appropriate. Finally, with the dose-response information collected for every compound, we could examine the correlation between aggregate-based inhibition and steep dose-response curves. Three key results emerge from this study: first, detergent-dependent identification of aggregate-based inhibition is feasible on the large scale. Second, 95% of the actives obtained in this screen are aggregate-based inhibitors. Third, aggregate-based inhibition is correlated with steep dose-response curves, although not absolutely. The results of this screen are being released publicly via the PubChem database.

  8. A high-throughput platform for lentiviral overexpression screening of the human ORFeome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Škalamera

    Full Text Available In response to the growing need for functional analysis of the human genome, we have developed a platform for high-throughput functional screening of genes overexpressed from lentiviral vectors. Protein-coding human open reading frames (ORFs from the Mammalian Gene Collection were transferred into lentiviral expression vector using the highly efficient Gateway recombination cloning. Target ORFs were inserted into the vector downstream of a constitutive promoter and upstream of an IRES controlled GFP reporter, so that their transfection, transduction and expression could be monitored by fluorescence. The expression plasmids and viral packaging plasmids were combined and transfected into 293T cells to produce virus, which was then used to transduce the screening cell line. We have optimised the transfection and transduction procedures so that they can be performed using robotic liquid handling systems in arrayed 96-well microplate, one-gene-per-well format, without the need to concentrate the viral supernatant. Since lentiviruses can infect both dividing and non-dividing cells, this system can be used to overexpress human ORFs in a broad spectrum of experimental contexts. We tested the platform in a 1990 gene pilot screen for genes that can increase proliferation of the non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A after removal of growth factors. Transduced cells were labelled with the nucleoside analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to detect cells progressing through S phase. Hits were identified using high-content imaging and statistical analysis and confirmed with vectors using two different promoters (CMV and EF1α. The screen demonstrates the reliability, versatility and utility of our screening platform, and identifies novel cell cycle/proliferative activities for a number of genes.

  9. High-throughput Screening:Synthesis of a Novel Fluorescent Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-Jun; LIU Bai-ling

    2004-01-01

    As one of efficient analytes, fluorescent microspheres have shown much usability on many biochemical and biomedical processes. Recent applications with fluorescent microspheres have included cytokine quantitation, single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, phosphorylated protein detection, and characterization of the molecular interaction of nuclear receptors. These,coupled with the rapid advances in molecular biology and synthesis techniques of drugs, have presented a basis for drug screening in a high-throughput format. Based on fluorescent microspheres,earlier assay formats of HTS relied mainly on proximity-dependent energy transfer including scintillation proximity assay (SPA) (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech) and FlashPlatesTM (NEN Life Science Products, Boston, MA). Indeed, drug screening-based such fluorescent emission is still accounting for about 20~50% of current content of high-throughput screening (HTS). Now, SPA is almost a standard technique in common HTS-lab. In literature, SPA microspheres is generally prepared from inorganic scintillators such as yttrium silicate and hydrophobic polymers such as polyvinyl toluene. However, in HTS research, such microspheres often show the disadvantages of strong hydrophobicity and low quantum efficiency. The strong hydrophobicity is mainly attributed to the hydrophobic monomer, vinyl toluene. The low quantum efficiency can be as a result of low transparence of the polymer, polyvinyl toluene. Thus, the subsequent treatments for such microspheres, so as coat a polyhydroxy film to decrease the hydrophobicity, are actually considerably complicated.It has been well known that poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), a good biocompatible polymer with not only adequate mechanical strength but also excellent transparence, can be regarded as an ideal candidate material for fluorescent matrix. In present study, methyl methacrylate as monomer and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (DPO) as fluorescent dye were used to the fluorescent microspheres. In

  10. High-Throughput Chemical Screens Identify Disulfiram as an Inhibitor of Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothi, Parvinder; Martins, Timothy J.; Chen, LiPing; Deleyrolle, Loic; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Reynolds, Brent; Foltz, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) continues to have a poor patient prognosis despite optimal standard of care. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been implicated as the presumed cause of tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy. With this in mind, we screened a diverse chemical library of 2,000 compounds to identify therapeutic agents that inhibit GSC proliferation and therefore have the potential to extend patient survival. High-throughput screens (HTS) identified 78 compounds that repeatedly inhibited cellular proliferation, of which 47 are clinically approved for other indications and 31 are experimental drugs. Several compounds (such as digitoxin, deguelin, patulin and phenethyl caffeate) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) in the low nanomolar range. In particular, the FDA approved drug for the treatment of alcoholism, disulfiram (DSF), was significantly potent across multiple patient samples (IC50 of 31.1 nM). The activity of DSF was potentiated by copper (Cu), which markedly increased GSC death. DSF–Cu inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity in cultured GSCs, consistent with inactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the subsequent induction of tumor cell death. Given that DSF is a relatively non-toxic drug that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, we suggest that DSF should be tested (as either a monotherapy or as an adjuvant) in pre-clinical models of human GBM. Data also support targeting of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of GBM. PMID:23165409

  11. Learning from the data: mining of large high-throughput screening databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S Frank; King, Frederick J; He, Yun; Caldwell, Jeremy S; Zhou, Yingyao

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns in pharmaceutical companies have accumulated a large amount of data for several million compounds over a couple of hundred assays. Despite the general awareness that rich information is hidden inside the vast amount of data, little has been reported for a systematic data mining method that can reliably extract relevant knowledge of interest for chemists and biologists. We developed a data mining approach based on an algorithm called ontology-based pattern identification (OPI) and applied it to our in-house HTS database. We identified nearly 1500 scaffold families with statistically significant structure-HTS activity profile relationships. Among them, dozens of scaffolds were characterized as leading to artifactual results stemming from the screening technology employed, such as assay format and/or readout. Four types of compound scaffolds can be characterized based on this data mining effort: tumor cytotoxic, general toxic, potential reporter gene assay artifact, and target family specific. The OPI-based data mining approach can reliably identify compounds that are not only structurally similar but also share statistically significant biological activity profiles. Statistical tests such as Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) can then be applied to the discovered scaffolds for effective assignment of relevant biological information. The scaffolds identified by our HTS data mining efforts are an invaluable resource for designing SAR-robust diversity libraries, generating in silico biological annotations of compounds on a scaffold basis, and providing novel target family specific scaffolds for focused compound library design.

  12. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories.

  13. Liquid marbles for high-throughput biological screening of anchorage-dependent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Correia, Clara R; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-01-28

    Stable liquid marbles (LM) are produced by coating liquid droplets with a hydrophobic powder. The used hydrophobic powder is produced by fluorosi-lanization of diatomaceous earth, used before to produce superhydrophobic structures. Here, the use of LM is proposed for high-throughput drug screening on anchorage-dependent cells. To provide the required cell adhesion sites inside the liquid environment of LM, surface-modified poly(l-lactic acid) microparticles are used. A simple method that takes advantage from LM appealing features is presented, such as the ability to inject liquid on LM without disrupting (self-healing ability), and to monitor color changes inside of LM. After promoting cell adhesion, a cytotoxic screening test is performed as a proof of concept. Fe(3+) is used as a model cytotoxic agent and is injected on LM. After incubation, AlamarBlue reagent is injected and used to assess the presence of viable cells, by monitoring color change from blue to red. Color intensity is measured by image processing and the analysis of pictures takes using an ordinary digital camera. The proposed method is fully validated in counterpoint to an MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carbo​xymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-te​trazolium) colorimetric assay, a well-known method used for the cytotoxicity assessment.

  14. 3D high throughput screening and profiling of embryoid bodies in thermoformed microwell plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrij, E J; Espinoza, S; Heilig, M; Kolew, A; Schneider, M; van Blitterswijk, C A; Truckenmüller, R K; Rivron, N C

    2016-02-21

    3D organoids using stem cells to study development and disease are now widespread. These models are powerful to mimic in vivo situations but are currently associated with high variability and low throughput. For biomedical research, platforms are thus necessary to increase reproducibility and allow high-throughput screens (HTS). Here, we introduce a microwell platform, integrated in standard culture plates, for functional HTS. Using micro-thermoforming, we form round-bottom microwell arrays from optically clear cyclic olefin polymer films, and assemble them with bottom-less 96-well plates. We show that embryonic stem cells aggregate faster and more reproducibly (centricity, circularity) as compared to a state-of-the-art microwell array. We then run a screen of a chemical library to direct differentiation into primitive endoderm (PrE) and, using on-chip high content imaging (HCI), we identify molecules, including regulators of the cAMP pathway, regulating tissue size, morphology and PrE gene activity. We propose that this platform will benefit to the systematic study of organogenesis in vitro.

  15. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for ATM kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kexiao; Shelat, Anang A; Guy, R Kiplin; Kastan, Michael B

    2014-04-01

    The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein kinase is a major regulator of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA lesions that can be caused by ionizing irradiation (IR), oxidative damage, or exposure to certain chemical agents. In response to DSBs, the ATM kinase is activated and subsequently phosphorylates numerous downstream substrates, including p53, Chk2, BRCA1, and KAP1, which affect processes such as cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Numerous studies have demonstrated that loss of ATM function results in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing irradiation in clinically relevant dose ranges, suggesting that ATM kinase is an attractive therapeutic target for enhancing tumor cell kill with radiotherapy. Previously identified small-molecule ATM kinase inhibitors, such as CP466722 and Ku55933, were identified using in vitro kinase assays carried out with recombinant ATM kinase isolated from mammalian cells. Since it has not been feasible to express full-length recombinant ATM in bacterial or baculovirus systems, a robust in vitro screening tool has been lacking. We have developed a cell-based assay that is robust, straightforward, and sensitive. Using this high-throughput assay, we screened more than 7000 compounds and discovered additional small molecules that inhibit the ATM kinase and further validated these hits by secondary assays.

  16. Benchmarking Ligand-Based Virtual High-Throughput Screening with the PubChem Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Butkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapidly increasing availability of High-Throughput Screening (HTS data in the public domain, such as the PubChem database, methods for ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery (LB-CADD have the potential to accelerate and reduce the cost of probe development and drug discovery efforts in academia. We assemble nine data sets from realistic HTS campaigns representing major families of drug target proteins for benchmarking LB-CADD methods. Each data set is public domain through PubChem and carefully collated through confirmation screens validating active compounds. These data sets provide the foundation for benchmarking a new cheminformatics framework BCL::ChemInfo, which is freely available for non-commercial use. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR models are built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, Support Vector Machines (SVMs, Decision Trees (DTs, and Kohonen networks (KNs. Problem-specific descriptor optimization protocols are assessed including Sequential Feature Forward Selection (SFFS and various information content measures. Measures of predictive power and confidence are evaluated through cross-validation, and a consensus prediction scheme is tested that combines orthogonal machine learning algorithms into a single predictor. Enrichments ranging from 15 to 101 for a TPR cutoff of 25% are observed.

  17. High-throughput synthesis and screening of hydrogen-storage alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Samuel; Hayden, Brian E; Smith, Duncan C A

    2008-01-01

    Libraries of mixed-metal hydride materials are synthesized on a silicon microfabricated array of "hot-plate" MEMS devices, which allow high-throughput screening using temperature programmed desorption and infrared thermography. The heating plate of the MEMS device is a membrane with low heat capacity, allowing fast and localized temperature control and the extraction of calorimetric data from thermography. The combination of the synthetic method and screening chip allows a fast determination of the desorption temperature and hydrogen content of the materials. Mixed metal hydrides are synthesized directly. The potential of the method is exemplified by presenting results for the sorption properties of Mg xNi 1- x hydride thin-film materials. The results are consistent with the literature, showing the highest hydrogen capacity and desorption temperature for the MgH 2 phase in Mg-rich compositions and the promotion of a lower temperature desorption from the Mg 2NiH 4 phase, with a concomitant reduction in hydrogen capacity.

  18. High-throughput screening for growth inhibitors using a yeast model of familial paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Irina; Bida, John Paul; Tian, Defeng; Bundrick, Mary; John, Kristen; Holte, Molly Nelson; Her, Yeng F; Evans, Debra; Saenz, Dyana T; Poeschla, Eric M; Hook, Derek; Georg, Gunda; Maher, L James

    2013-01-01

    Classical tumor suppressor genes block neoplasia by regulating cell growth and death. A remarkable puzzle is therefore presented by familial paraganglioma (PGL), a neuroendocrine cancer where the tumor suppressor genes encode subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of central metabolism. Loss of SDH initiates PGL through mechanisms that remain unclear. Could this metabolic defect provide a novel opportunity for chemotherapy of PGL? We report the results of high throughput screening to identify compounds differentially toxic to SDH mutant cells using a powerful S. cerevisiae (yeast) model of PGL. Screening more than 200,000 compounds identifies 12 compounds that are differentially toxic to SDH-mutant yeast. Interestingly, two of the agents, dequalinium and tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), are anti-malarials with the latter reported to be a glycolysis inhibitor. We show that four of the additional hits are potent inhibitors of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Because alcohol dehydrogenase regenerates NAD(+) in glycolytic cells that lack TCA cycle function, this result raises the possibility that lactate dehydrogenase, which plays the equivalent role in human cells, might be a target of interest for PGL therapy. We confirm that human cells deficient in SDH are differentially sensitive to a lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor.

  19. A synthetic suicide riboswitch for the high-throughput screening of metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Woo; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    Artificial devices such as the synthetic riboswitch have shown potential to introduce unnatural phenotypic perturbation because its synthetic traits are distinct from that of innate metabolism. In this study, a riboswitch, a small regulatory element found in RNAs, was employed to reprogram microorganisms to produce valuable metabolites. A self-cleaving ribozyme glmS, found in gram-positive bacteria, cleaves its own transcript in response to the intracellular glucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcN6P) concentration. The glmS ribozyme was integrated into the 3'-untranslated region of FCY1, which encodes cytosine deaminase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to construct a suicide riboswitch for evolutionary engineering. Growth of the strain harboring the suicide riboswitch was hampered by the addition of fluorocytosine, and was recovered as metabolite level increased. By using this riboswitch, we isolated a N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) producer strain by screening an efficient glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (Gfa1p) and haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatases (HAD phosphatases) originated from Escherichia coli. The suicide riboswitch was also applied to different metabolite by using artificial allosteric ribozyme. Since the mechanisms used in this work are universal in microorganisms, our synthetic suicide riboswitch can be applied to a wide range of organisms and can be exploited to the efficient and high-throughput screening of inconspicuous phenotypes.

  20. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Laccase Engineering toward Lignosulfonate Valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Escribano, David; de Salas, Felipe; Pardo, Isabel; Camarero, Susana

    2017-08-01

    Lignin valorization is a pending issue for the integrated conversion of lignocellulose in consumer goods. Lignosulfonates (LS) are the main technical lignins commercialized today. However, their molecular weight should be enlarged to meet application requirements as additives or dispersing agents. Oxidation of lignosulfonates with fungal oxidoreductases, such as laccases, can increase the molecular weight of lignosulfonates by the cross-linking of lignin phenols. To advance in this direction, we describe here the development of a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for the directed evolution of laccases, with lignosulfonate as substrate and the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (FCR), to detect the decrease in phenolic content produced upon polymerization of lignosulfonate by the enzyme. Once the reaction conditions were adjusted to the 96-well-plate format, the enzyme for validating the assay was selected from a battery of high-redox-potential laccase variants functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae (the preferred host for the directed evolution of fungal oxidoreductases). The colorimetric response (absorbance at 760 nm) correlated with laccase activity secreted by the yeast. The HTS assay was reproducible (coefficient of variation (CV) = 15%) and sensitive enough to detect subtle differences in activity among yeast clones expressing a laccase mutant library obtained by error-prone PCR (epPCR). The method is therefore feasible for screening thousands of clones during the precise engineering of laccases toward valorization of lignosulfonates.

  1. Hierarchical dose-response modeling for high-throughput toxicity screening of environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ander; Reif, David M; Reich, Brian J

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of environmental chemicals is used to identify chemicals with high potential for adverse human health and environmental effects from among the thousands of untested chemicals. Predicting physiologically relevant activity with HTS data requires estimating the response of a large number of chemicals across a battery of screening assays based on sparse dose-response data for each chemical-assay combination. Many standard dose-response methods are inadequate because they treat each curve separately and under-perform when there are as few as 6-10 observations per curve. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian model that borrows strength across chemicals and assays. Our method directly parametrizes the efficacy and potency of the chemicals as well as the probability of response. We use the ToxCast data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as motivation. We demonstrate that our hierarchical method provides more accurate estimates of the probability of response, efficacy, and potency than separate curve estimation in a simulation study. We use our semiparametric method to compare the efficacy of chemicals in the ToxCast data to well-characterized reference chemicals on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) assays, then estimate the probability that other chemicals are active at lower concentrations than the reference chemicals.

  2. High-throughput screening of novel antagonists on melanin-concentrat-ing hormone receptor-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-hua YAN; Qun-yi LI; Jean A BOUTIN; M Pierre RENARD; Yi-xiang DING; Xiao-jiang HAO; Wei-min ZHAO; Ming-wei WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To find new antagonists on human melanin-concentrating hormone recep-tor- 1 (MCHR-1) through high-throughput screening (HTS) of a diverse com-pound library. Methods: MCHR-1, [3H]SNAP7941, and FlashBlue G-protein-coupled receptor beads were used to measure the receptor-binding activities of various compounds based on scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology. The guanosine 5' (γ-[35S]thio) triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding assay was sub-sequently applied to functionally characterize the "hits" identified by the HTS campaign. Results: Of the 48 240 compounds screened with the SPA method, 12 hits were confirmed to possess MCHR-1 binding activities, 8 were function-ally studied subsequently with the [35S]GTPγS binding assay, and only 1 com-pound (NC 127816) displayed moderate human MCHR- 1 binding affinity (Ki=115.7 nmol/L) and relatively potent antagonism (KB=23.8 nmol/L). This compound shares a novel scaffold (1-ethoxy-2H-2-aza-1-phospha-naphthalene 1-oxide) with 3 other analogs in the group. Conclusion: Considering the marked difference in molecular shape and electrostatic status between NC127816 and the structures reported elsewhere, we anticipate that its derivatives may repre-sent a new class of potent MCHR-1 modulators.

  3. High-Throughput Screening Methodology to Identify Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujols, Jordi; Peña-Díaz, Samuel; Conde-Giménez, María; Pinheiro, Francisca; Navarro, Susanna; Sancho, Javier; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-03-02

    An increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases are being found to be associated with the abnormal accumulation of aggregated proteins in the brain. In Parkinson's disease, this process involves the aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) into intraneuronal inclusions. Thus, compounds that inhibit α-syn aggregation represent a promising therapeutic strategy as disease-modifying agents for neurodegeneration. The formation of α-syn amyloid aggregates can be reproduced in vitro by incubation of the recombinant protein. However, the in vitro aggregation of α-syn is exceedingly slow and highly irreproducible, therefore precluding fast high throughput anti-aggregation drug screening. Here, we present a simple and easy-to-implement in-plate method for screening large chemical libraries in the search for α-syn aggregation modulators. It allows us to monitor aggregation kinetics with high reproducibility, while being faster and requiring lower protein amounts than conventional aggregation assays. We illustrate how the approach enables the identification of strong aggregation inhibitors in a library of more than 14,000 compounds.

  4. Using the BioAssay Ontology for analyzing high-throughput screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander Balderud, Linda; Murray, David; Larsson, Niklas; Vempati, Uma; Schürer, Stephan C; Bjäreland, Marcus; Engkvist, Ola

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is the main starting point for hit identification in drug discovery programs. This has led to a rapid increase of available screening data both within pharmaceutical companies and the public domain. We have used the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) 2.0 for assay annotation within AstraZeneca to enable comparison with external HTS methods. The annotated assays have been analyzed to identify technology gaps, evaluate new methods, verify active hits, and compare compound activity between in-house and PubChem assays. As an example, the binding of a fluorescent ligand to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1, involved in inflammation, for example) in an in-house HTS was measured by fluorescence intensity. In total, 155 active compounds were also tested in an external ligand binding flow cytometry assay, a method not used for in-house HTS detection. Twelve percent of the 155 compounds were found active in both assays. By the annotation of assay protocols using BAO terms, internal and external assays can easily be identified and method comparison facilitated. They can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different assay methods, design appropriate confirmatory and counterassays, and analyze the activity of compounds for identification of technology artifacts.

  5. Magnetic Alignment of Microelements Containing Cultured Neuronal Networks for High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kent R; Wang, Yuli; Allbritton, Nancy L; Taylor, Anne Marion

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) on neurons presents unique difficulties because they are postmitotic, limited in supply, and challenging to harvest from animals or generate from stem cells. These limitations have hindered neurological drug discovery, leaving an unmet need to develop cost-effective technology for HTS using neurons. Traditional screening methods use up to 20,000 neurons per well in 384-well plates. To increase throughput, we use "microraft" arrays, consisting of 1600 square, releasable, paramagnetic, polystyrene microelements (microrafts), each providing a culture surface for 500-700 neurons. These microrafts can be detached from the array and transferred to 384-well plates for HTS; however, they must be centered within wells for automated imaging. Here, we developed a magnet array plate, compatible with HTS fluid-handling systems, to center microrafts within wells. We used finite element analysis to select an effective size of the magnets and confirmed that adjacent magnetic fields do not interfere. We then experimentally tested the plate's centering ability and found a centering efficiency of 100%, compared with 4.35% using a flat magnet. We concluded that microrafts could be centered after settling randomly within the well, overcoming friction, and confirmed these results by centering microrafts containing hippocampal neurons cultured for 8 days.

  6. High Throughput Screening Identifies a Novel Compound Protecting Cardiomyocytes from Doxorubicin-Induced Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antracyclines are effective antitumor agents. One of the most commonly used antracyclines is doxorubicin, which can be successfully used to treat a diverse spectrum of tumors. Application of these drugs is limited by their cardiotoxic effect, which is determined by a lifetime cumulative dose. We set out to identify by high throughput screening cardioprotective compounds protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced injury. Ten thousand compounds of ChemBridge’s DIVERSet compound library were screened to identify compounds that can protect H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced cell death. The most effective compound proved protective in doxorubicin-treated primary rat cardiomyocytes and was further characterized to demonstrate that it significantly decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and inhibited doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK MAP kinase without having considerable radical scavenging effect or interfering with the antitumor effect of doxorubicin. In fact the compound identified as 3-[2-(4-ethylphenyl-2-oxoethyl]-1,2-dimethyl-1H-3,1-benzimidazol-3-ium bromide was toxic to all tumor cell lines tested even without doxorubicine treatment. This benzimidazole compound may lead, through further optimalization, to the development of a drug candidate protecting the heart from doxorubicin-induced injury.

  7. A high throughput screen for biomining cellulase activity from metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, Keith; Taupp, Marcus; Hallam, Steven J

    2011-02-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant source of organic carbon on the planet, has wide-ranging industrial applications with increasing emphasis on biofuel production (1). Chemical methods to modify or degrade cellulose typically require strong acids and high temperatures. As such, enzymatic methods have become prominent in the bioconversion process. While the identification of active cellulases from bacterial and fungal isolates has been somewhat effective, the vast majority of microbes in nature resist laboratory cultivation. Environmental genomic, also known as metagenomic, screening approaches have great promise in bridging the cultivation gap in the search for novel bioconversion enzymes. Metagenomic screening approaches have successfully recovered novel cellulases from environments as varied as soils (2), buffalo rumen (3) and the termite hind-gut (4) using carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) agar plates stained with congo red dye (based on the method of Teather and Wood (5)). However, the CMC method is limited in throughput, is not quantitative and manifests a low signal to noise ratio (6). Other methods have been reported (7,8) but each use an agar plate-based assay, which is undesirable for high-throughput screening of large insert genomic libraries. Here we present a solution-based screen for cellulase activity using a chromogenic dinitrophenol (DNP)-cellobioside substrate (9). Our library was cloned into the pCC1 copy control fosmid to increase assay sensitivity through copy number induction (10). The method uses one-pot chemistry in 384-well microplates with the final readout provided as an absorbance measurement. This readout is quantitative, sensitive and automated with a throughput of up to 100X 384-well plates per day using a liquid handler and plate reader with attached stacking system.

  8. Evaluation of high throughput screening methods in picking up differences between cultivars of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindedam, Jane; Bruun, Sander; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique evaluation of three advanced high throughput pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis systems (HTPH-systems) for screening of lignocellulosic biomass for enzymatic saccharification. Straw from 20 cultivars of winter wheat from two sites in Denmark was hydrothermally pretreated an...

  9. A Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe for lipid droplets and its application in image-based high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunha; Lee, Sanghee; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-02-25

    We developed a novel fluorescent bioprobe (SF44) that can specifically visualize the cellular lipid droplets in in vitro and in vivo systems and illustrated the mechanistic rationale of its fluorogenic property. Its application to image-based high throughput screening led us to the identification of a new small-molecule modulator of lipid droplet formation.

  10. Method with high-throughput screening potential for antioxidative substances using Escherichia coli biosensor katG'::lux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienaho, Jenni; Sarjala, Tytti; Franzén, Robert; Karp, Matti

    2015-11-01

    A new method is described for the rapid real-time screening of antioxidative properties using a recombinant Escherichia coli DPD2511 biosensor. This microplate technique, without time-consuming pre-incubations and handling, has potential for a high-throughput search of bioactive compounds. Special emphasis was given to obtaining highly reliable and repeatable results.

  11. Evaluation of Compatibility of ToxCast High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  12. Plate-based diversity subset screening generation 2: an improved paradigm for high-throughput screening of large compound files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew S; Bradley, Joseph; Everett, Jeremy R; Loesel, Jens; McLoughlin, David; Mills, James; Peakman, Marie-Claire; Sharp, Robert E; Williams, Christine; Zhu, Hongyao

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an effective method for lead and probe discovery that is widely used in industry and academia to identify novel chemical matter and to initiate the drug discovery process. However, HTS can be time consuming and costly and the use of subsets as an efficient alternative to screening entire compound collections has been investigated. Subsets may be selected on the basis of chemical diversity, molecular properties, biological activity diversity or biological target focus. Previously, we described a novel form of subset screening: plate-based diversity subset (PBDS) screening, in which the screening subset is constructed by plate selection (rather than individual compound cherry-picking), using algorithms that select for compound quality and chemical diversity on a plate basis. In this paper, we describe a second-generation approach to the construction of an updated subset: PBDS2, using both plate and individual compound selection, that has an improved coverage of the chemical space of the screening file, whilst only selecting the same number of plates for screening. We describe the validation of PBDS2 and its successful use in hit and lead discovery. PBDS2 screening became the default mode of singleton (one compound per well) HTS for lead discovery in Pfizer.

  13. Development of a facile method for high throughput screening with reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, A S; Andrews, J L; Littleton, T R; Ignar, D M

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a facile methodology for high throughput screening with stable mammalian cell reporter gene assays. We have adapted a 96-well adherent cell method to an assay in which cells propagated in suspension are dispensed into 96- or 384-well plates containing test compounds in 100% DMSO. The validation of a stable CHO cell line that expresses 6xCRE-luciferase for use as a reporter gene host cell line is described. The reporter gene, when expressed in this particular CHO cell line, appears to respond specifically to modulation of cAMP levels, thus the cell line is appropriate for screening and pharmacological analysis of Galpha(s)- and Galpha(i)-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors. The development of the new suspension cell assay in both 96- and 384-well formats was performed using a derivative of the CHO host reporter cell line that was stably transfected with human melanocortin-1 receptor. The response of this cell line to NDP-alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and forskolin was nearly identical between the adherent and suspension methods. The new method offers improvements in cost, throughput, cell culture effort, compound stability, accuracy of compound delivery, and hands-on time. The 384-well assay can be performed at high capacity in any laboratory without the use of expensive automation systems such that a single person can screen 100 plates per day with 3.5-4 h hands-on time. Although the system has been validated using Galpha(s)-coupled receptor-mediated activation of a cAMP response element, the method can be applied to other types of targets and/or transcriptional response elements.

  14. Quantitative high-throughput screening identifies 8-hydroxyquinolines as cell-active histone demethylase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver N F King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. N(ε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. N(ε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4 family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation.

  15. BioAssay Ontology (BAO: a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Robin P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening (HTS is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference.

  16. Discovery of bile salt hydrolase inhibitors using an efficient high-throughput screening system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Smith

    Full Text Available The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH, an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth.

  17. Discovery of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors Using an Efficient High-Throughput Screening System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  18. A high throughput genetic screen identifies new early meiotic recombination functions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud De Muyt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs catalysed by the widely conserved Spo11 protein. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spo11 requires nine other proteins for meiotic DSB formation; however, unlike Spo11, few of these are conserved across kingdoms. In order to investigate this recombination step in higher eukaryotes, we took advantage of a high-throughput meiotic mutant screen carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A collection of 55,000 mutant lines was screened, and spo11-like mutations, characterised by a drastic decrease in chiasma formation at metaphase I associated with an absence of synapsis at prophase, were selected. This screen led to the identification of two populations of mutants classified according to their recombination defects: mutants that repair meiotic DSBs using the sister chromatid such as Atdmc1 or mutants that are unable to make DSBs like Atspo11-1. We found that in Arabidopsis thaliana at least four proteins are necessary for driving meiotic DSB repair via the homologous chromosomes. These include the previously characterised DMC1 and the Hop1-related ASY1 proteins, but also the meiotic specific cyclin SDS as well as the Hop2 Arabidopsis homologue AHP2. Analysing the mutants defective in DSB formation, we identified the previously characterised AtSPO11-1, AtSPO11-2, and AtPRD1 as well as two new genes, AtPRD2 and AtPRD3. Our data thus increase the number of proteins necessary for DSB formation in Arabidopsis thaliana to five. Unlike SPO11 and (to a minor extent PRD1, these two new proteins are poorly conserved among species, suggesting that the DSB formation mechanism, but not its regulation, is conserved among eukaryotes.

  19. Small-molecule activators of insulin-degrading enzyme discovered through high-throughput compound screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Cabrol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypocatabolism of the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD, making pharmacological activation of IDE an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, it has not been established whether the proteolytic activity of IDE can be enhanced by drug-like compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the finding that ATP and other nucleotide polyphosphates modulate IDE activity at physiological concentrations, we conducted parallel high-throughput screening campaigns in the absence or presence of ATP and identified two compounds--designated Ia1 and Ia2--that significantly stimulate IDE proteolytic activity. Both compounds were found to interfere with the crosslinking of a photoaffinity ATP analogue to IDE, suggesting that they interact with a bona fide ATP-binding domain within IDE. Unexpectedly, we observed highly synergistic activation effects when the activity of Ia1 or Ia2 was tested in the presence of ATP, a finding that has implications for the mechanisms underlying ATP-mediated activation of IDE. Notably, Ia1 and Ia2 activated the degradation of Abeta by approximately 700% and approximately 400%, respectively, albeit only when Abeta was presented in a mixture also containing shorter substrates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes the first examples of synthetic small-molecule activators of IDE, showing that pharmacological activation of this important protease with drug-like compounds is achievable. These novel activators help to establish the putative ATP-binding domain as a key modulator of IDE proteolytic activity and offer new insights into the modulatory action of ATP. Several larger lessons abstracted from this screen will help inform the design of future screening campaigns and facilitate the eventual development of IDE activators with therapeutic utility.

  20. Development of Drugs for Epstein - Barr virus using High-Throughput in silico Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Thompson, Scott; Jiang, Hualiang; Lieberman, Paul M.; Luo, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitious human herpesvirus that is causally associated with endemic forms of Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed individuals. On a global scale, EBV infects over 90% of the adult population and is responsible for ~1% of all human cancers. To date, there is no efficacious drug or therapy for the treatment of EBV infection and EBV-related diseases. Areas covered in this review In this review, we discuss the existing anti-EBV inhibitors and those under development. We discuss the value of different molecular targets, including EBV lytic DNA replication enzymes, as well as proteins that are expressed exclusively during latent infection, like EBNA1 and LMP1. Since the atomic structure of the EBNA1 DNA binding domain has been described, it is an attractive target for in silico methods of drug design and small molecule screening. We discuss the use of computational methods that can greatly facilitate the development of novel inhibitors and how in silico screening methods can be applied to target proteins with known structures, like EBNA1, to treat EBV infection and disease. What the reader will gain The reader will be familiarized with the problems in targeting of EBV for inhibition by small molecules and how computational methods can greatly facilitate this process. Take home message Despite the impressive efficacy of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of herpesvirus lytic infection, there remain few effective treatments for latent infections. Since EBV-latent infection persists within and contributes to the formation of EBV-associated cancers, targeting EBV latent proteins is an unmet medical need. High throughput in silico screening can accelerate the process of drug discovery for novel and selective agents that inhibit EBV latent infection and associated disease. PMID:22822721

  1. High throughput screening in duchenne muscular dystrophy: from drug discovery to functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintjee, Thomas J J; Magh, Alvin S H; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-11-14

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD.

  2. High Throughput Screening in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Drug Discovery to Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.J. Gintjee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD.

  3. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach.

  4. Live Cell Bioluminescence Imaging in Temporal Reaction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor for High-Throughput Screening and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are notable targets of basic therapeutics. Many screening methods have been established to identify novel agents for GPCR signaling in a high-throughput manner. However, information related to the temporal reaction of GPCR with specific ligands remains poor. We recently developed a bioluminescence method for the quantitative detection of the interaction between GPCR and β-arrestin using split luciferase complementation. To monitor time-course variation of the interactions, a new imaging system contributes to the accurate evaluation of drugs for GPCRs in a high-throughput manner.

  5. High throughput drug profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Entzeroth, Michael; Chapelain, Béatrice; Guilbert, Jacques; Hamon, Valérie

    2000-01-01

    High throughput screening has significantly contributed to advances in drug discovery. The great increase in the number of samples screened has been accompanied by increases in costs and in the data required for the investigated compounds. High throughput profiling addresses the issues of compound selectivity and specificity. It combines conventional screening with data mining technologies to give a full set of data, enabling development candidates to be more fully compared.

  6. High-throughput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine eMichelet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to increased travel, climatic, and environmental changes, the incidence of tick-borne disease in both humans and animals is increasing throughout Europe. Therefore, extended surveillance tools are desirable. To accurately screen tick-borne pathogens, a large scale epidemiological study was conducted on 7050 Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected from France, Denmark, and the Netherlands using a powerful new high-throughput approach. This advanced methodology permitted the simultaneous detection of 25 bacterial, and 12 parasitic species (including; Borrelia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Bartonella, Candidatus Neoehrlichia, Coxiella, Francisella, Babesia, and Theileria genus across 94 samples. We successfully determined the prevalence of expected (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Babesia divergens, Babesia venatorum, unexpected (Borrelia miyamotoi and rare (Bartonella henselae pathogens in the three European countries. Moreover we detected Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Babesia divergens, and Babesia venatorum for the first time in Danish ticks. This surveillance method represents a major improvement in epidemiological studies, able to facilitate comprehensive testing of tick-borne pathogens, and which can also be customized to monitor emerging diseases.

  7. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of 500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri.

  8. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; el Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products. PMID:26735308

  9. Lab-on-a-chip-based high-throughput screening of the genotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Giuseppe; Fenech, Michael; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-07-09

    The continuous increasing of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in our environment, their combinatorial diversity, and the associated genotoxic risks, highlight the urgent need to better define the possible toxicological effects of ENMs. In this context, we present a new high-throughput screening (HTS) platform based on the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, lab-on-chip cell sorting, and automated image analysis. This HTS platform has been successfully applied to the evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2NPs). In particular, our results demonstrate the high cyto- and genotoxicity induced by AgNPs and the biocompatibility of SiO2NPs, in primary human lymphocytes. Moreover, our data reveal that the toxic effects are also dependent on size, surface coating, and surface charge. Most importantly, our HTS platform shows that AgNP-induced genotoxicity is lymphocyte sub-type dependent and is particularly pronounced in CD2+ and CD4+ cells.

  10. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiomar Pérez-Moreno

    Full Text Available Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products.

  11. Identification of New ATG4B Inhibitors Based on a Novel High-Throughput Screening Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Danqing; Xu, Zhiheng; Han, Li; Liu, Cheng; Zhou, Zheng; Qiu, Zongxing; Lin, Xianfeng; Tang, Guozhi; Shen, Hong; Aebi, Johannes; Riemer, Claus; Kuhn, Bernd; Stahl, Martin; Mark, David; Qin, Ning; Ding, Haiyuan

    2017-04-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostasis process through which aggregated proteins or damaged organelles are enveloped in a double-membrane structure called an autophagosome and then digested in a lysosome-dependent manner. Growing evidence suggests that malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including cancer, viral infection, and neurodegeneration. However, autophagy is a complicated process, and understanding of the relevance of autophagy to disease is limited by lack of specific and potent autophagy modulators. ATG4B, a Cys-protease that cleaves ATG8 family proteins, such as LC3B, is a key protein in autophagosome formation and maturation process. A novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay measuring protease activity of ATG4B was developed, validated, and adapted into a high-throughput screening (HTS) format. HTS was then conducted with a Roche focus library of 57,000 compounds. After hit confirmation and a counterscreen to filter out fluorescence interference compounds, 267 hits were confirmed, constituting a hit rate of 0.49%. Furthermore, among 65 hits with an IC50 drug discovery.

  12. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; El Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products.

  13. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  14. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  15. A high-throughput strategy to screen 2D crystallization trials of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Martin; Derr, Kd; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2007-12-01

    Electron microscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has demonstrated potential for structure determination of membrane proteins. Technical limitations in large-scale crystallization screens have, however, prevented a major breakthrough in the routine application of this technology. Dialysis is generally used for detergent removal and reconstitution of the protein into a lipid bilayer, and devices for testing numerous conditions in parallel are not readily available. Furthermore, the small size of resulting 2D crystals requires electron microscopy to evaluate the results and automation of the necessary steps is essential to achieve a reasonable throughput. We have designed a crystallization block, using standard microplate dimensions, by which 96 unique samples can be dialyzed simultaneously against 96 different buffers and have demonstrated that the rate of detergent dialysis is comparable to those obtained with conventional dialysis devices. A liquid-handling robot was employed to set up 2D crystallization trials with the membrane proteins CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and light-harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. For CopA, 1 week of dialysis yielded tubular crystals and, for LH2, large and well-ordered vesicular 2D crystals were obtained after 24 h, illustrating the feasibility of this approach. Combined with a high-throughput procedure for preparation of EM-grids and automation of the subsequent negative staining step, the crystallization block offers a novel pipeline that promises to speed up large-scale screening of 2D crystallization and to increase the likelihood of producing well-ordered crystals for analysis by electron crystallography.

  16. High-Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li; Omary, M Bishr

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high-throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green fluorescent protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug "hits" that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wild-type-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. "Hits" of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients.

  17. Activity in vivo of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds selected from a high throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiella Andriani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel technologies that include recombinant pathogens and rapid detection methods are contributing to the development of drugs for neglected diseases. Recently, the results from the first high throughput screening (HTS to test compounds for activity against Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote infection of host cells were reported. We have selected 23 compounds from the hits of this HTS, which were reported to have high anti-trypanosomal activity and low toxicity to host cells. These compounds were highly purified and their structures confirmed by HPLC/mass spectrometry. The compounds were tested in vitro, where about half of them confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity reported in the HTS, with IC50 values lower than 5 µM. We have also adapted a rapid assay to test anti-T. cruzi compounds in vivo using mice infected with transgenic T. cruzi expressing luciferase as a model for acute infection. The compounds that were active in vitro were also tested in vivo using this assay, where we found two related compounds with a similar structure and low in vitro IC50 values (0.11 and 0.07 µM that reduce T. cruzi infection in the mouse model more than 90% after five days of treatment. Our findings evidence the benefits of novel technologies, such as HTS, for the drug discovery pathway of neglected diseases, but also caution about the need to confirm the results in vitro. We also show how rapid methods of in vivo screening based in luciferase-expressing parasites can be very useful to prioritize compounds early in the chain of development.

  18. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisan Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H. Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT or higher (R201C and R201H cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  19. Development of a central nervous system axonal myelination assay for high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-04-22

    Regeneration of new myelin is impaired in persistent multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, leaving neurons unable to function properly and subject to further degeneration. Current MS therapies attempt to ameliorate autoimmune-mediated demyelination, but none directly promote the regeneration of lost and damaged myelin of the central nervous system (CNS). Development of new drugs that stimulate remyelination has been hampered by the inability to evaluate axonal myelination in a rapid CNS culture system. We established a high throughput cell-based assay to identify compounds that promote myelination. Culture methods were developed for initiating myelination in vitro using primary embryonic rat cortical cells. We developed an immunofluorescent phenotypic image analysis method to quantify the morphological alignment of myelin characteristic of the initiation of myelination. Using γ-secretase inhibitors as promoters of myelination, the optimal growth, time course and compound treatment conditions were established in a 96 well plate format. We have characterized the cortical myelination assay by evaluating the cellular composition of the cultures and expression of markers of differentiation over the time course of the assay. We have validated the assay scalability and consistency by screening the NIH clinical collection library of 727 compounds and identified ten compounds that promote myelination. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for these compounds were determined to rank them according to potency. We have designed the first high capacity in vitro assay that assesses myelination of live axons. This assay will be ideal for screening large compound libraries to identify new drugs that stimulate myelination. Identification of agents capable of promoting the myelination of axons will likely lead to the development of new therapeutics for MS patients.

  20. Fluorescence imaging-based high-throughput screening of fast- and slow-cycling LOV proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuun Kawano

    Full Text Available Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV domains function as blue light-inducible molecular switches. The photosensory LOV domains derived from plants and fungi have provided an indispensable tool for optogenetics. Here we develop a high-throughput screening system to efficiently improve switch-off kinetics of LOV domains. The present system is based on fluorescence imaging of thermal reversion of a flavin cofactor bound to LOV domains. We conducted multi site-directed random mutagenesis of seven amino acid residues surrounding the flavin cofactor of the second LOV domain derived from Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2. The gene library was introduced into Escherichia coli cells. Then thermal reversion of AsLOV2 variants, respectively expressed in different bacterial colonies on agar plate, was imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Based on the mutagenesis and imaging-based screening, we isolated 12 different variants showing substantially faster thermal reversion kinetics than wild-type AsLOV2. Among them, AsLOV2-V416T exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 2.6 s, 21-fold faster than wild-type AsLOV2. With a slight modification of the present approach, we also have efficiently isolated 8 different decelerated variants, represented by AsLOV2-V416L that exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 4.3 × 10(3 s (78-fold slower than wild-type AsLOV2. The present approach based on fluorescence imaging of the thermal reversion of the flavin cofactor is generally applicable to a variety of blue light-inducible molecular switches and may provide a new opportunity for the development of molecular tools for emerging optogenetics.

  1. Fluorescence imaging technology (FI) for high-throughput screening of selenide-modified nano-TiO2 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Lee, Jianchao; Zhang, Meijuan; Duan, Qiannan; Zhang, Jiarui; Qi, Hailang

    2016-02-18

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on fluorescence imaging (FI) was implemented to evaluate the catalytic performance of selenide-modified nano-TiO2. Chemical ink-jet printing (IJP) technology was reformed to fabricate a catalyst library comprising 1405 (Ni(a)Cu(b)Cd(c)Ce(d)In(e)Y(f))Se(x)/TiO2 (M6Se/Ti) composite photocatalysts. Nineteen M6Se/Tis were screened out from the 1405 candidates efficiently.

  2. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  4. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-11-10

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann–Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing

  5. Quantitative high-throughput screen identifies inhibitors of the Schistosoma mansoni redox cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Simeonov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease associated with high morbidity and mortality, currently affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel is the only drug used to treat the disease, and with its increased use the probability of developing drug resistance has grown significantly. The Schistosoma parasites can survive for up to decades in the human host due in part to a unique set of antioxidant enzymes that continuously degrade the reactive oxygen species produced by the host's innate immune response. Two principal components of this defense system have been recently identified in S. mansoni as thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR and peroxiredoxin (Prx and as such these enzymes present attractive new targets for anti-schistosomiasis drug development. Inhibition of TGR/Prx activity was screened in a dual-enzyme format with reducing equivalents being transferred from NADPH to glutathione via a TGR-catalyzed reaction and then to hydrogen peroxide via a Prx-catalyzed step. A fully automated quantitative high-throughput (qHTS experiment was performed against a collection of 71,028 compounds tested as 7- to 15-point concentration series at 5 microL reaction volume in 1536-well plate format. In order to generate a robust data set and to minimize the effect of compound autofluorescence, apparent reaction rates derived from a kinetic read were utilized instead of end-point measurements. Actives identified from the screen, along with previously untested analogues, were subjected to confirmatory experiments using the screening assay and subsequently against the individual targets in secondary assays. Several novel active series were identified which inhibited TGR at a range of potencies, with IC(50s ranging from micromolar to the assay response limit ( approximately 25 nM. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a large-scale HTS to identify lead compounds for a helminthic disease, and provides a paradigm that can be used to jump

  6. High-throughput library screening identifies two novel NQO1 inducers in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Marquardt, Gaby; Massimi, Aldo B; Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2012-03-01

    Many phytochemicals possess antioxidant and cancer-preventive properties, some putatively through antioxidant response element-mediated phase II metabolism, entailing mutagen/oxidant quenching. In our recent studies, however, most candidate phytochemical agents were not potent in inducing phase II genes in normal human lung cells. In this study, we applied a messenger RNA (mRNA)-specific gene expression-based high throughput in vitro screening approach to discover new, potent plant-derived phase II inducing chemopreventive agents. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were exposed to 800 individual compounds in the MicroSource Natural Products Library. At a level achievable in humans by diet (1.0 μM), 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-4'-ethoxybenzophenone (DMEBP), triacetylresveratrol (TRES), ivermectin, sanguinarine sulfate, and daunorubicin induced reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) mRNA and protein expression in NHBE cells. DMEBP and TRES were the most attractive agents as coupling potency and low toxicity for induction of NQO1 (mRNA level, ≥3- to 10.8-fold that of control; protein level, ≥ two- to fourfold that of control). Induction of glutathione S-transferase pi mRNA expression was modest, and none was apparent for glutathione S-transferase pi protein expression. Measurements of reactive oxygen species and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio showed an antioxidant effect for DMEBP, but no definite effect was found for TRES in NHBE cells. Exposure of NHBE cells to H(2)O(2) induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, but this translocation was not significantly inhibited by TRES and DMEBP. These studies show that potency and low toxicity may align for two potential NQO1-inducing agents, DMEBP and TRES.

  7. DockoMatic 2.0: high throughput inverse virtual screening and homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Casey; Cornia, Nic; Jacob, Reed; Remm, Andrew; Peavey, Thomas; Weekes, Ken; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia T; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Timothy L

    2013-08-26

    DockoMatic is a free and open source application that unifies a suite of software programs within a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to facilitate molecular docking experiments. Here we describe the release of DockoMatic 2.0; significant software advances include the ability to (1) conduct high throughput inverse virtual screening (IVS); (2) construct 3D homology models; and (3) customize the user interface. Users can now efficiently setup, start, and manage IVS experiments through the DockoMatic GUI by specifying receptor(s), ligand(s), grid parameter file(s), and docking engine (either AutoDock or AutoDock Vina). DockoMatic automatically generates the needed experiment input files and output directories and allows the user to manage and monitor job progress. Upon job completion, a summary of results is generated by Dockomatic to facilitate interpretation by the user. DockoMatic functionality has also been expanded to facilitate the construction of 3D protein homology models using the Timely Integrated Modeler (TIM) wizard. The wizard TIM provides an interface that accesses the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) and MODELER programs and guides the user through the necessary steps to easily and efficiently create 3D homology models for biomacromolecular structures. The DockoMatic GUI can be customized by the user, and the software design makes it relatively easy to integrate additional docking engines, scoring functions, or third party programs. DockoMatic is a free comprehensive molecular docking software program for all levels of scientists in both research and education.

  8. A new non-radioactive deoxyhypusine synthase assay adaptable to high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Hee; Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Wolff, Edith C

    2017-08-17

    Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) catalyzes the post-translational modification of eukaryotic translation factor 5A (eIF5A) by the polyamine, spermidine, that converts one specific lysine residue to deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)], which is subsequently hydroxylated to hypusine [N (ε) -4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl(lysine)]. Hypusine synthesis represents the most critical function of polyamine. As eIF5A has been implicated in various human diseases, identification of specific inhibitors of hypusine modification is of vital importance. DHS catalyzes a complex reaction that occurs in two stages, first, the NAD-dependent cleavage of spermidine to form an enzyme-butylimine intermediate and enzyme-bound NADH, and second, the transfer of the butylimine moiety from the enzyme intermediate to the eIF5A precursor and subsequent reduction of the eIF5A-butylimine intermediate by enzyme-bound NADH to form deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)]. Our data demonstrate that there is a measurable release of enzyme-bound NADH in the absence of eIF5A precursor and that the DHS activity can be determined by coupling the first phase reaction with the NADH-Glo assay in which the generation of luminescence is dependent on NADH derived from the DHS partial reaction. The conventional DHS assay that measures the incorporation of radioactivity from [1,8-(3)H]spermidine into the eIF5A precursor in the complete reaction cannot be readily adapted for high throughput screening (HTS). In contrast, the non-radioactive DHS/NADH-Glo coupled assay is highly specific, sensitive and reproducible and could be configured for HTS of small molecule libraries for the identification of new inhibitors of DHS. Furthermore, the coupled assay provides new insights into the dynamics of the DHS reaction especially regarding the fate of NADH.

  9. NSC23925, identified in a high-throughput cell-based screen, reverses multidrug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Duan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major factor which contributes to the failure of cancer chemotherapy, and numerous efforts have been attempted to overcome MDR. To date, none of these attempts have yielded a tolerable and effective therapy to reverse MDR; thus, identification of new agents would be useful both clinically and scientifically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify small molecule compounds that can reverse chemoresistance, we developed a 96-well plate high-throughput cell-based screening assay in a paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cell line. Coincubating cells with a sublethal concentration of paclitaxel in combination with each of 2,000 small molecule compounds from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set Library, we identified a previously uncharacterized molecule, NSC23925, that inhibits Pgp1 and reverses MDR1 (Pgp1 but does not inhibit MRP or BCRP-mediated MDR. The cytotoxic activity of NSC23925 was further evaluated using a panel of cancer cell lines expressing Pgp1, MRP, and BCRP. We found that at a concentration of >10 microM NSC23925 moderately inhibits the proliferation of both sensitive and resistant cell lines with almost equal activity, but its inhibitory effect was not altered by co-incubation with the Pgp1 inhibitor, verapamil, suggesting that NSC23925 itself is not a substrate of Pgp1. Additionally, NSC23925 increases the intracellular accumulation of Pgp1 substrates: calcein AM, Rhodamine-123, paclitaxel, mitoxantrone, and doxorubicin. Interestingly, we further observed that, although NSC23925 directly inhibits the function of Pgp1 in a dose-dependent manner without altering the total expression level of Pgp1, NSC23925 actually stimulates ATPase activity of Pgp, a phenomenon seen in other Pgp inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ability of NSC23925 to restore sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy or to prevent resistance could significantly benefit cancer patients.

  10. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  11. DockoMatic 2.0: High Throughput Inverse Virtual Screening and Homology Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Casey; Cornia, Nic; Jacob, Reed; Remm, Andrew; Peavey, Thomas; Weekes, Ken; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia T.; McDougal, Owen M.; Andersen, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    DockoMatic is a free and open source application that unifies a suite of software programs within a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to facilitate molecular docking experiments. Here we describe the release of DockoMatic 2.0; significant software advances include the ability to: (1) conduct high throughput Inverse Virtual Screening (IVS); (2) construct 3D homology models; and (3) customize the user interface. Users can now efficiently setup, start, and manage IVS experiments through the DockoMatic GUI by specifying a receptor(s), ligand(s), grid parameter file(s), and docking engine (either AutoDock or AutoDock Vina). DockoMatic automatically generates the needed experiment input files and output directories, and allows the user to manage and monitor job progress. Upon job completion, a summary of results is generated by Dockomatic to facilitate interpretation by the user. DockoMatic functionality has also been expanded to facilitate the construction of 3D protein homology models using the Timely Integrated Modeler (TIM) wizard. The wizard TIM provides an interface that accesses the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) and MODELLER programs, and guides the user through the necessary steps to easily and efficiently create 3D homology models for biomacromolecular structures. The DockoMatic GUI can be customized by the user, and the software design makes it relatively easy to integrate additional docking engines, scoring functions, or third party programs. DockoMatic is a free comprehensive molecular docking software program for all levels of scientists in both research and education. PMID:23808933

  12. Inhibitors of the salicylate synthase (MbtI) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis discovered by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Neres, João; Williams, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Remmel, Rory P; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2010-12-03

    A simple steady-state kinetic high-throughput assay was developed for the salicylate synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis. The mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators produced by M. tuberculosis, and their biosynthesis has been identified as a promising target for the development of new antitubercular agents. The assay was miniaturized to a 384-well plate format and high-throughput screening was performed at the National Screening Laboratory for the Regional Centers of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NSRB). Three classes of compounds were identified comprising the benzisothiazolones (class I), diarylsulfones (class II), and benzimidazole-2-thiones (class III). Each of these compound series was further pursued to investigate their biochemical mechanism and structure-activity relationships. Benzimidazole-2-thione 4 emerged as the most promising inhibitor owing to its potent reversible inhibition.

  13. Session 6: High Throughput Screening of VOC Removal Catalysts in Scanning Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaccato, K.; Hagemeyer, A.; Lefort, L.; Turner, H.; Volpe, A.; Weinberg, H. [Symyx Technologies Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered an important group of air pollutants. We have targeted more efficient VOC removal catalysts with high activity for total combustion at low temperature, negligible organics slip, high selectivity to CO{sub 2} without production of intermediate CO, oxygenates or cracking products. Butane was used as the model feed for VOC in Symyx' high-throughput Scanning Mass Spectrometer. The screening protocol encompassed bulk (unsupported) mixed metal oxides calcined in air at 400 C. Transition metals M{sub 1} known to have some oxidation activity M{sub 1}=Ti, V, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Re, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Ag, were combined with each other into binaries as well as doped with M{sub 2} = K, Cs, Mg, Sr, Sc, Y, Ce, Sm, Zr, Nb, Ta, Zn, Cd, B, Al, In, Sn, Pb, P, Sb, Bi and Te, using 5- point compositional gradients (5 different compositions per binary). Five M/Z values were monitored, namely 44, 68, 70, 72 and 98. CO{sub 2} at M/Z equal to 44 is the dominant product, and only traces of oxygenates are formed. Co, Cr, Ni, Mn, Cu are identified as the most active metals. Subsequently, CoCrM{sub 3} and CrZnM{sub 3} ternaries were synthesized and screened with M{sub 3} selected from M{sub 3} Li, K, Cs, Mg, Sr, Y, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, Ag, Zn, Al, Ga, In, Sn, Pb, P, Sb and Bi, (M{sub 3} {<=} 10%, 15 different compositions/ternaries; 3 copies: (a) unsupported, calcined at 400 C, (b) unsupported, calcined at 600 C, (c) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, calcined at 400 C). CoCr ternaries from Symyx' library archive were also screened. High CO{sub 2} production for the CoCr/400 C systems was observed. Catalyst compositions were then optimized in focus libraries. An example for a CoCrTi/CoVSi bis-ternary focus library will be discussed in detail. VPO catalysts were used as 'standards' to establish the correlation between primary and tertiary screening. High CO{sub 2} signals were also observed for Co-rich CoCr and CoCrTi systems. The best Co

  14. Microfluidic Plastic Devices for Single-use Applications in High-Throughput Screening and DNA-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach, Andreas; Knebel, Günther; Guber, A. E.; Heckele, M.; Herrmann, D; Muslija, A.; Schaller, T.

    2001-01-01

    Microfluidic devices fabricated by mass production offer an immense potential of applications such as high-throughput drug screening, clinical diagnostics and gene analysis [1]. The low unit production costs of plastic substrates make it possible to produce single-use devices, eliminating the need for cleaning and reuse [2]. Fabrication of microfluidic devices can be applied by microtechnical fabrication processes in combination with plastic molding techniques [3]. Basically, replication...

  15. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  16. High-Throughput Screening Strategies for Targeted Identification Small-Molecule Compounds Towards Activated Pathways in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bialkowska, Agnieszka B.; Yang, Vincent W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advancement in understanding the role of both the genetics and molecular pathways in the formation and progression of colorectal cancer allowed the identification of factors that may be targeted for drug discovery. For the past decade various approaches have been developed to target specific steps or components of these pathways in order to prevent the development or progression of colorectal cancer. The innovation and optimization of high-throughput screening methods as well as the re...

  17. High-throughput screening of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes using novel insoluble chromogenic substrate assay kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schückel, Julia; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Willats, William George Tycho

    2016-01-01

    for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay...

  18. Development and implementation of a high-throughput compound screening assay for targeting disrupted ER calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Honarnejad

    Full Text Available Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease.

  19. Fluorescence High-Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of TonB Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, Brittany L; Eliasson, Olivia S; Hyder, Dallas R; Long, Noah J; Majumdar, Aritri; Chakravorty, Somnath; McDonald, Peter; Roy, Anuradha; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2017-05-15

    .IMPORTANCE Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has spurred efforts to find novel compounds against new targets. The CRE/ESKAPE pathogens are resistant bacteria that include Acinetobacter baumannii, a common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and sepsis. We performed fluorescence high-throughput screening (FLHTS) against Escherichia coli to find inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron transport, tested them against A. baumannii, and then adapted the FLHTS technology to allow direct screening against A. baumannii This methodology is expandable to other drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Compounds that block TonB action may interfere with iron acquisition from eukaryotic hosts and thereby constitute bacteriostatic antibiotics that prevent microbial colonization of human and animals. The FLHTS method may identify both species-specific and broad-spectrum agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Candida albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) for high-throughput antifungal drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2012-07-18

    Candida albicans remains the main etiological agent of candidiasis, which currently represents the fourth most common nosocomial bloodstream infection in US hospitals. These opportunistic infections pose a growing threat for an increasing number of compromised individuals, and carry unacceptably high mortality rates. This is in part due to the limited arsenal of antifungal drugs, but also to the emergence of resistance against the most commonly used antifungal agents. Further complicating treatment is the fact that a majority of manifestations of candidiasis are associated with the formation of biofilms, and cells within these biofilms show increased levels of resistance to most clinically-used antifungal agents. Here we describe the development of a high-density microarray that consists of C. albicans nano-biofilms, which we have named CaBChip. Briefly, a robotic microarrayer is used to print yeast cells of C. albicans onto a solid substrate. During printing, the yeast cells are enclosed in a three dimensional matrix using a volume as low as 50 nL and immobilized on a glass substrate with a suitable coating. After initial printing, the slides are incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours to allow for biofilm development. During this period the spots grow into fully developed "nano-biofilms" that display typical structural and phenotypic characteristics associated with mature C. albicans biofilms (i.e. morphological complexity, three dimensional architecture and drug resistance). Overall, the CaBChip is composed of ~750 equivalent and spatially distinct biofilms; with the additional advantage that multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Cell viability is estimated by measuring the fluorescent intensity of FUN1 metabolic stain using a microarray scanner. This fungal chip is ideally suited for use in true high-throughput screening for antifungal drug discovery. Compared to current standards (i.e. the 96-well microtiter plate model of biofilm formation

  1. web cellHTS2: a web-application for the analysis of high-throughput screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, Oliver; Gilsdorf, Moritz; Boutros, Michael

    2010-04-12

    The analysis of high-throughput screening data sets is an expanding field in bioinformatics. High-throughput screens by RNAi generate large primary data sets which need to be analyzed and annotated to identify relevant phenotypic hits. Large-scale RNAi screens are frequently used to identify novel factors that influence a broad range of cellular processes, including signaling pathway activity, cell proliferation, and host cell infection. Here, we present a web-based application utility for the end-to-end analysis of large cell-based screening experiments by cellHTS2. The software guides the user through the configuration steps that are required for the analysis of single or multi-channel experiments. The web-application provides options for various standardization and normalization methods, annotation of data sets and a comprehensive HTML report of the screening data analysis, including a ranked hit list. Sessions can be saved and restored for later re-analysis. The web frontend for the cellHTS2 R/Bioconductor package interacts with it through an R-server implementation that enables highly parallel analysis of screening data sets. web cellHTS2 further provides a file import and configuration module for common file formats. The implemented web-application facilitates the analysis of high-throughput data sets and provides a user-friendly interface. web cellHTS2 is accessible online at http://web-cellHTS2.dkfz.de. A standalone version as a virtual appliance and source code for platforms supporting Java 1.5.0 can be downloaded from the web cellHTS2 page. web cellHTS2 is freely distributed under GPL.

  2. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  4. One-step seeding of neural stem cells with vitronectin-supplemented medium for high throughput screening assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to the human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate pre-coating, hampering its applications in high throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate pre-coating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research. PMID:27647668

  5. High-throughput screening for integrative biomaterials design: exploring advances and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mariana B; Mano, João F

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing need for biomaterials and tissue engineering alternatives, more accurate, rapid, and cost-saving methods and models to study biomaterial-cell interactions must be developed. We review the evolution of microarray platforms used for such studies in order to meet the criteria of complex tissue engineering biological environments. Particular aspects regarding biomaterials processing, data acquisition, and treatment are addressed. Apart from in vitro array-based strategies, we also address emerging in vivo high-throughput approaches and their associated trends, such as the role of inflammation in regeneration. The up-scaling of high-throughput methods using single cell encapsulation systems is also explored. Possible limitations related to the use of such methods, such as spot-to-spot crosstalk, are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  7. High-throughput screening of B factor saturation mutated Rhizomucor miehei lipase thermostability based on synthetic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-hui; Lin, Ying; Sun, Yu-fei; Ye, Yan-rui; Zheng, Sui-ping; Han, Shuang-yan

    2012-05-10

    Conventional lipase screening methods are mostly based on hydrolytic activity, which may not always be the best method to assess the enzyme activity, especially for evaluating synthetic activity. Here we developed a high throughput and visual method to screen clones with high synthetic activity and used it to assess lipases thermostability. All mutants' lipase synthetic activity were identified through esterification of caprylic acid and ethanol with methyl red as the pH indicator adding in the substrates on according to the color change halo around the colony on culture plates since synthetic reaction was often accompanied with a rise in pH. After two rounds operation with the pH indicator screening method, we obtained a double mutant Asn120Lys/Lys131Phe from the Rhizomucor miehei lipase saturation mutated library based on amino acid residue B factors. The mutant's initial synthetic activity was a little higher than wild type and its thermostability in synthetic reaction was enhanced, which remained 63.1% residual activity after being heated at 70°C for 5h comparing to 51.0% of wild type. The double mutant with the two residue replacements balanced well between stability and activity. Yeast surface display technology and the pH indicator method, combined with colony screening were shown to facilitate high-throughput screening for lipase synthetic activity.

  8. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10to20mA/cm2. The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150mA/cm2, respectively.

  9. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively.

  10. Versatile assays for high throughput screening for activators or inhibitors of intracellular proteases and their cellular regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteases constitute a class of promising drug discovery targets. Methods for high throughput screening against these targets are generally limited to in vitro biochemical assays that can suffer many technical limitations, as well as failing to capture the biological context of proteases within the cellular pathways that lead to their activation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;We describe here a versatile system for reconstituting protease activation networks in yeast and assaying the activity of these pathways using a cleavable transcription factor substrate in conjunction with reporter gene read-outs. The utility of these versatile assay components and their application for screening strategies was validated for all ten human Caspases, a family of intracellular proteases involved in cell death and inflammation, including implementation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS of chemical libraries and functional screening of cDNA libraries. The versatility of the technology was also demonstrated for human autophagins, cysteine proteases involved in autophagy.Altogether, the yeast-based systems described here for monitoring activity of ectopically expressed mammalian proteases provide a fascile platform for functional genomics and chemical library screening.

  11. Label-free high-throughput screening via mass spectrometry: a single cystathionine quantitative method for multiple applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Tom G; Choi, Bernard K; Geoghagen, Neil S; Jensen, Kristian K; Luo, Qi; LaMarr, William A; Makara, Gergely M; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Ozbal, Can C; Xiong, Yusheng; Dufresne, Claude; Luo, Ming-Juan

    2009-10-01

    Label-free mass spectrometric (MS) technologies are particularly useful for enzyme assay design for drug discovery screens. MS permits the selective detection of enzyme substrates or products in a wide range of biological matrices without need for derivatization, labeling, or capture technologies. As part of a cardiovascular drug discovery effort aimed at finding modulators of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), we used the RapidFire((R)) label-free high-throughput MS (HTMS) technology to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CBS activity. The in vitro assay used HTMS to quantify the unlabeled product of the CBS reaction, cystathionine. Cystathionine HTMS analyses were carried out with a throughput of 7 s per sample and quantitation over a linear range of 80-10,000 nM. A compound library of 25,559 samples (or 80 384-well plates) was screened as singlets using the HTMS assay in a period of 8 days. With a hit rate of 0.32%, the actives showed a 90% confirmation rate. The in vitro assay was applied to secondary screens in more complex matrices with no additional analytical development. Our results show that the HTMS method was useful for screening samples containing serum, for cell-based assays, and for liver explants. The novel extension of the in vitro analytical method, without modification, to secondary assays resulted in a significant and advantageous economy of development time for the drug discovery project.

  12. Development and Application of a High-Throughput Screening Method to Evaluate Antifungal Activity against Trichophyton tonsurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuett, Barry; Leeder, J Steven; Abdel-Rahman, Susan

    2015-10-01

    There exist relatively few drug classes on the market to treat dermatophyte infections. This investigation was designed to develop and validate high-throughput methodology for screening and confirmation of chemicals for activity against Trichophyton tonsurans. Growth characteristics were examined on two platforms (96- and 384-well) in three media at eight spore concentrations over a period of up to 120 h. Microspectrophotometry was used to automate plate reads. The 384-well platform was used to screen more than 7000 compounds from six chemical libraries. Z-scores for optical density relative to positive growth controls were used to flag compounds of interest and activity confirmed in separate assays. The final conditions selected for both screening and confirmation with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination were growth for 48 h at 32 °C in SabDex with 1 × 10(4) spores per reaction. Sensitivity and specificity averaged 99.2% (range, 95.2%-100%) and 99.8% (range, 99.1%-100%), respectively. MICs for known antifungals were similar to those reported by others using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. Several novel compound classes were identified to have activity against T. tonsurans with potency comparable to known antifungals. A robust, reproducible assay is described that permits high-throughput screening in T. tonsurans.

  13. High-throughput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelet, Lorraine; Delannoy, Sabine; Devillers, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    , Bartonella, Candidatus Neoehrlichia, Coxiella, Francisella, Babesia, and Theileria genus) across 94 samples. We successfully determined the prevalence of expected (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Babesia divergens, Babesia...... was conducted on 7050 Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected from France, Denmark, and the Netherlands using a powerful new high-throughput approach. This advanced methodology permitted the simultaneous detection of 25 bacterial, and 12 parasitic species (including; Borrelia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia...... venatorum), unexpected (Borrelia miyamotoi) and rare (Bartonella henselae) pathogens in the three European countries. Moreover we detected Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Babesia divergens, and Babesia venatorum for the first time in Danish ticks. This surveillance method represents a major...

  14. Overview of liquid handling instrumentation for high-throughput screening applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Stewart; Johnston, Sean

    2009-12-01

    Liquid handling in the laboratory has unique challenges specific to the types of research being performed. The devices employed for purposes of performing liquid handling can be broken down into three general categories: bulk reagent dispensers, transfer devices, and plate washers. An overview of these types of liquid handlers, as well as common features and relevance to high-throughput applications, are discussed in this article. Important topics such as sterility, ease of use, cost, and instrument design advantages and disadvantages are also covered. Curr. Protoc. Chem Biol. 1:43-54. © 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  16. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  17. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures.

  18. A Bayesian Approach to Calibrating High-Throughput Virtual Screening Results and Application to Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for calibrating quantum-chemical properties determined as part of a high-throughput virtual screen to experimental analogs is presented. Information on the molecular graph is extracted through the use of extended connectivity fingerprints, and exploited using a Gaussian process to calibrate both electronic properties such as frontier orbital energies, and optical gaps and device properties such as short circuit current density, open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency. The Bayesian nature of this process affords a value for uncertainty in addition to each calibrated value. This allows the researcher to gain intuition about the model as well as the ability to respect its bounds.

  19. Illustration of SSMD, z score, SSMD*, z* score, and t statistic for hit selection in RNAi high-throughput screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2011-08-01

    Hit selection is the ultimate goal in many high-throughput screens. Various analytic methods are available for this purpose. Some commonly used ones are z score, z* score, strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD), SSMD*, and t statistic. It is critical to know how to use them correctly because the misusage of them can readily produce misleading results. Here, the author presents basic concepts, elaborates their commonality and difference, describes some common misusage that people should avoid, and uses simulated simple examples to illustrate how to use them correctly.

  20. High-Throughput Screening Platform for the Discovery of New Immunomodulator Molecules from Natural Product Extract Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Annang, Frederick; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; González-Menéndez, Víctor; de Pedro, Nuria; Tormo, José R; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that central nervous system inflammation and systemic inflammation play a significant role in the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke, paraneoplastic disorders, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, it seems reasonable to propose that the use of anti-inflammatory drugs might diminish the cumulative effects of inflammation. Indeed, some epidemiological studies suggest that sustained use of anti-inflammatory drugs may prevent or slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory drugs and biologics used clinically have the disadvantage of causing side effects and a high cost of treatment. Alternatively, natural products offer great potential for the identification and development of bioactive lead compounds into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases with an improved safety profile. In this work, we present a validated high-throughput screening approach in 96-well plate format for the discovery of new molecules with anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory activity. The in vitro models are based on the quantitation of nitrite levels in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset of 5976 noncytotoxic crude microbial extracts from the MEDINA microbial natural product collection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an high-throughput screening of microbial natural product extracts for the discovery of immunomodulators.

  1. A High-Throughput Screening System for Arabidopsis Transcription Factors and Its Application to Med25-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Ou; Minami Matsui; Hong-Ya Gu; Li-Jia Qu; Kang-Quan Yin; Sai-Nan Liu; Yan Yang; Tren Gu; Jennifer Man Wing Hui; Li Zhang; Jin Miao; Youichi Kondou

    2011-01-01

    T The activities of transcription factors (TFs) require interactions with specific DNA sequences and other regulatory proteins. To detect such interactions in Arabidopsis, we developed a high-throughput screening system with a Gateway-compatible Gal4-AD-TF library of 1589 Arabidopsis TFs, which can be easily screened by mating-based yeast-one-hybrid (Y1H) and yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) methods. The efficiency of the system was validated by examining two well-characterized TF-DNA and TF-protein interactions: the CHE-CCA1 promoter interaction by Y1H and NPR1-TGAs interactions by Y2H. We used this system to identify eight TFs that interact with a Mediator subunit, Med25, a key regulator in JA signaling. We identified five TFs that interacted with the GCC-box cis-element in the promoter of PDF1.2, a downstream gene of Med25. We found that three of these TFs, all from the AP2-EREBP family, interact directly both with Med25 and the GCC-box of PDF1.2, suggesting that Med25 regulates PDF1.2 expression through these three TFs.These results demonstrate that this high-throughput Y1H/Y2H screening system is an efficient tool for studying transcriptional regulation networks in Arabidopsis. This system will be available for other Arabidopsis researchers, and thus it provides a vital resource for the Arabidopsis community.

  2. A high-throughput screening assay for assessing the viability of Cryptococcus neoformans under nutrient starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashti, Seameen J; Abbott, Jennifer; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C; Williamson, Peter R; Zheng, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes an estimated 600,000 AIDS-related deaths annually that occur primarily in resource-limited countries. Fluconazole and amphotericin B are currently available for the treatment of cryptococcal-related infections. However, fluconazole has limited clinical efficacy and amphotericin B requires intravenous infusion and is associated with high renal toxicity. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a new orally administrable anti-cryptococcal drug. We have developed a high-throughput screening assay for the measurement of C. neoformans viability in 1,536-well plate format. The signal-to-basal ratio of the ATP content assay was 21.9 fold with a coefficient of variation and Z' factor of 7.1% and 0.76, respectively. A pilot screen of 1,280 known compounds against the wild-type C. neoformans (strain H99) led to the identification of four active compounds including niclosamide, malonoben, 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, and 5-[(4-ethylphenyl)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone. These compounds were further tested against nine clinical isolates of C. neoformans, and their fungicidal activities were confirmed. The results demonstrate that this miniaturized C. neoformans assay is advantageous for the high-throughput screening of large compound collections to identify lead compounds for new anti-cryptococcal drug development.

  3. High-throughput cell-based screening reveals a role for ZNF131 as a repressor of ERalpha signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Peige

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα is a transcription factor whose activity is affected by multiple regulatory cofactors. In an effort to identify the human genes involved in the regulation of ERα, we constructed a high-throughput, cell-based, functional screening platform by linking a response element (ERE with a reporter gene. This allowed the cellular activity of ERα, in cells cotransfected with the candidate gene, to be quantified in the presence or absence of its cognate ligand E2. Results From a library of 570 human cDNA clones, we identified zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131 as a repressor of ERα mediated transactivation. ZNF131 is a typical member of the BTB/POZ family of transcription factors, and shows both ubiquitous expression and a high degree of sequence conservation. The luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that ZNF131 inhibits ligand-dependent transactivation by ERα in a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay clearly demonstrated that the interaction between ZNF131 and ERα interrupts or prevents ERα binding to the estrogen response element (ERE. In addition, ZNF131 was able to suppress the expression of pS2, an ERα target gene. Conclusion We suggest that the functional screening platform we constructed can be applied for high-throughput genomic screening candidate ERα-related genes. This in turn may provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ERα regulation in mammalian cells.

  4. High-Throughput Screening for a Moderately Halophilic Phenol-Degrading Strain and Its Salt Tolerance Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yan Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A high-throughput screening system for moderately halophilic phenol-degrading bacteria from various habitats was developed to replace the conventional strain screening owing to its high efficiency. Bacterial enrichments were cultivated in 48 deep well microplates instead of shake flasks or tubes. Measurement of phenol concentrations was performed in 96-well microplates instead of using the conventional spectrophotometric method or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The high-throughput screening system was used to cultivate forty-three bacterial enrichments and gained a halophilic bacterial community E3 with the best phenol-degrading capability. Halomonas sp. strain 4-5 was isolated from the E3 community. Strain 4-5 was able to degrade more than 94% of the phenol (500 mg·L−1 starting concentration over a range of 3%–10% NaCl. Additionally, the strain accumulated the compatible solute, ectoine, with increasing salt concentrations. PCR detection of the functional genes suggested that the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O were active in the phenol degradation process.

  5. New classes of alanine racemase inhibitors identified by high-throughput screening show antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G Anthony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an effort to discover new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB we chose alanine racemase as the target of our drug discovery efforts. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, alanine racemase plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis as it racemizes L-alanine into D-alanine, a key building block in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Good antimicrobial effects have been achieved by inhibition of this enzyme with suicide substrates, but the clinical utility of this class of inhibitors is limited due to their lack of target specificity and toxicity. Therefore, inhibitors that are not substrate analogs and that act through different mechanisms of enzyme inhibition are necessary for therapeutic development for this drug target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain non-substrate alanine racemase inhibitors, we developed a high-throughput screening platform and screened 53,000 small molecule compounds for enzyme-specific inhibitors. We examined the 'hits' for structural novelty, antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis, general cellular cytotoxicity, and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We identified seventeen novel non-substrate alanine racemase inhibitors that are structurally different than any currently known enzyme inhibitors. Seven of these are active against M. tuberculosis and minimally cytotoxic against mammalian cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlights the feasibility of obtaining novel alanine racemase inhibitor lead compounds by high-throughput screening for development of new anti-TB agents.

  6. Growth-Based Bacterial Viability Assay for Interference-Free and High-Throughput Toxicity Screening of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian A; Nguyen, Thu Ha Thi; Hudson-Smith, Natalie V; Clement, Peter L; Forester, Dona-Carla; Frew, Hilena; Hang, Mimi N; Murphy, Catherine J; Hamers, Robert J; Feng, Z Vivian; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-07

    Current high-throughput approaches evaluating toxicity of chemical agents toward bacteria typically rely on optical assays, such as luminescence and absorbance, to probe the viability of the bacteria. However, when applied to toxicity induced by nanomaterials, scattering and absorbance from the nanomaterials act as interferences that complicate quantitative analysis. Herein, we describe a bacterial viability assay that is free of optical interference from nanomaterials and can be performed in a high-throughput format on 96-well plates. In this assay, bacteria were exposed to various materials and then diluted by a large factor into fresh growth medium. The large dilution ensured minimal optical interference from the nanomaterial when reading optical density, and the residue left from the exposure mixture after dilution was confirmed not to impact the bacterial growth profile. The fractions of viable cells after exposure were allowed to grow in fresh medium to generate measurable growth curves. Bacterial viability was then quantitatively correlated to the delay of bacterial growth compared to a reference regarded as 100% viable cells; data analysis was inspired by that in quantitative polymerase chain reactions, where the delay in the amplification curve is correlated to the starting amount of the template nucleic acid. Fast and robust data analysis was achieved by developing computer algorithms carried out using R. This method was tested on four bacterial strains, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, showing great potential for application to all culturable bacterial strains. With the increasing diversity of engineered nanomaterials being considered for large-scale use, this high-throughput screening method will facilitate rapid screening of nanomaterial toxicity and thus inform the risk assessment of nanoparticles in a timely fashion.

  7. High throughput surface characterization: A review of a new tool for screening prospective biomedical material arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Hook, Andrew L; Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Taylor, Michael; Urquhart, Andrew J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2010-12-01

    The application of high throughput surface characterization (HTSC) to the analysis of polymeric biomaterial libraries is an important advancement for the discovery and development of new biomedical materials and is the focus of this review. The potential for HTSC to identify structure/activity relationships for large libraries of materials can be utilized to accelerate materials discovery as well as providing insight into the underlying biological-material interactions. Furthermore, the correlations identified between surface chemical structure and cellular behavior could not have been predicted by a rational design approach based simply on review of bulk structure, which demonstrates the importance of HTSC in the assessment of cell-material and cell-biomolecular interactions that are dependent on surface properties.

  8. Toward high-throughput screening of NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases using boron-doped diamond microelectrodes and microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyobiki, Ryo; Kato, Taisuke; Katayama, Michinobu; Sugitani, Ai; Watanabe, Takeshi; Einaga, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Horisawa, Kenichi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2014-10-07

    Although oxidoreductases are widely used in many applications, such as biosensors and biofuel cells, improvements in the function of existing oxidoreductases or the discovery of novel oxidoreductases with greater activities is desired. To increase the activity of oxidoreductases by directed evolution, a powerful screening technique for oxidoreductases is required. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of boron-doped diamond (BDD) microelectrodes for quantitative and potentially high-throughput measurement of the activity of NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases. We first confirmed that BDD microelectrodes can quantify the activity of low concentrations (10-100 pM) of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase with a measuring time of 1 ms per sample. In addition, we found that poisoning of BDD microelectrodes can be repressed by optimizing the pH and by adding l-arginine to the enzyme solution as an antiaggregation agent. Finally, we fabricated a microfluidic device containing a BDD electrode for the first time and observed the elevation of the oxidation current of NADH with increasing flow rate. These results imply that the combination of a BDD microelectrode and microfluidics can be used for high-throughput screening of an oxidoreductase library containing a large number (>10(6)) of samples, each with a small (nanoliter) sample volume.

  9. Laterally orienting C. elegans using geometry at microscale for high-throughput visual screens in neurodegeneration and neuronal development studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan de Carlos Cáceres

    Full Text Available C. elegans is an excellent model system for studying neuroscience using genetics because of its relatively simple nervous system, sequenced genome, and the availability of a large number of transgenic and mutant strains. Recently, microfluidic devices have been used for high-throughput genetic screens, replacing traditional methods of manually handling C. elegans. However, the orientation of nematodes within microfluidic devices is random and often not conducive to inspection, hindering visual analysis and overall throughput. In addition, while previous studies have utilized methods to bias head and tail orientation, none of the existing techniques allow for orientation along the dorso-ventral body axis. Here, we present the design of a simple and robust method for passively orienting worms into lateral body positions in microfluidic devices to facilitate inspection of morphological features with specific dorso-ventral alignments. Using this technique, we can position animals into lateral orientations with up to 84% efficiency, compared to 21% using existing methods. We isolated six mutants with neuronal development or neurodegenerative defects, showing that our technology can be used for on-chip analysis and high-throughput visual screens.

  10. A high throughput gas exchange screen for determining rates of photorespiration or regulation of C4 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Burgess, Steven J; Griffiths, Howard; Hibberd, Julian M

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale research programmes seeking to characterize the C4 pathway have a requirement for a simple, high throughput screen that quantifies photorespiratory activity in C3 and C4 model systems. At present, approaches rely on model-fitting to assimilatory responses (A/C i curves, PSII quantum yield) or real-time carbon isotope discrimination, which are complicated and time-consuming. Here we present a method, and the associated theory, to determine the effectiveness of the C4 carboxylation, carbon concentration mechanism (CCM) by assessing the responsiveness of V O/V C, the ratio of RuBisCO oxygenase to carboxylase activity, upon transfer to low O2. This determination compares concurrent gas exchange and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorescence under ambient and low O2, using widely available equipment. Run time for the procedure can take as little as 6 minutes if plants are pre-adapted. The responsiveness of V O/V C is derived for typical C3 (tobacco, rice, wheat) and C4 (maize, Miscanthus, cleome) plants, and compared with full C3 and C4 model systems. We also undertake sensitivity analyses to determine the impact of R LIGHT (respiration in the light) and the effectiveness of the light saturating pulse used by fluorescence systems. The results show that the method can readily resolve variations in photorespiratory activity between C3 and C4 plants and could be used to rapidly screen large numbers of mutants or transformants in high throughput studies.

  11. Identification of potent inhibitors of the Trypanosoma brucei methionyl-tRNA synthetase via high-throughput orthogonal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedró-Rosa, Laura; Buckner, Frederick S; Ranade, Ranae M; Eberhart, Christina; Madoux, Franck; Gillespie, J Robert; Koh, Cho Yeow; Brown, Steven; Lohse, Jacqueline; Verlinde, Christophe L M; Fan, Erkang; Bannister, Thomas; Scampavia, Louis; Hol, Wim G J; Spicer, Timothy; Hodder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Improved therapies for the treatment of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of the neglected tropical disease human African trypanosomiasis, are urgently needed. We targeted T. brucei methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS), an aminoacyl-tRNA synthase (aaRS), which is considered an important drug target due to its role in protein synthesis, cell survival, and its significant differences in structure from its mammalian ortholog. Previous work using RNA interference of MetRS demonstrated growth inhibition of T. brucei, further validating it as an attractive target. We report the development and implementation of two orthogonal high-throughput screening assays to identify inhibitors of T. brucei MetRS. First, a chemiluminescence assay was implemented in a 1536-well plate format and used to monitor adenosine triphosphate depletion during the aminoacylation reaction. Hit confirmation then used a counterscreen in which adenosine monophosphate production was assessed using fluorescence polarization technology. In addition, a miniaturized cell viability assay was used to triage cytotoxic compounds. Finally, lower throughput assays involving whole parasite growth inhibition of both human and parasite MetRS were used to analyze compound selectivity and efficacy. The outcome of this high-throughput screening campaign has led to the discovery of 19 potent and selective T. brucei MetRS inhibitors.

  12. A high-throughput liquid bead array-based screening technology for Bt presence in GMO manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Wang, Huiyu; Wang, Chenguang; Mei, Lin; Lin, Xiangmei; Han, Xueqing; Zhu, Shuifang

    2016-03-15

    The number of species and planting areas of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has been rapidly developed during the past ten years. For the purpose of GMO inspection, quarantine and manipulation, we have now devised a high-throughput Bt-based GMOs screening method based on the liquid bead array. This novel method is based on the direct competitive recognition between biotinylated antibodies and beads-coupled antigens, searching for Bt presence in samples if it contains Bt Cry1 Aa, Bt Cry1 Ab, Bt Cry1 Ac, Bt Cry1 Ah, Bt Cry1 B, Bt Cry1 C, Bt Cry1 F, Bt Cry2 A, Bt Cry3 or Bt Cry9 C. Our method has a wide GMO species coverage so that more than 90% of the whole commercialized GMO species can be identified throughout the world. Under our optimization, specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and availability validation, the method shows a high specificity and 10-50 ng/mL sensitivity of quantification. We then assessed more than 1800 samples in the field and food market to prove capacity of our method in performing a high throughput screening work for GMO manipulation. Our method offers an applicant platform for further inspection and research on GMO plants.

  13. Human IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Benjamin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing a suitable level of exogenous gene expression in mammalian cells in general, and embryonic stem (ES cells in particular, is an important aspect of understanding pathways of cell differentiation, signal transduction and cell physiology. Despite its importance, this process remains challenging because of the poor correlation between the presence of introduced exogenous DNA and its transcription. Consequently, many transfected cells must be screened to identify those with an appropriate level of expression. To improve the screening process, we investigated the utility of the human interleukin 12 (IL-12 p40 cDNA as a reporter gene for studies of mammalian gene expression and for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells. Results A series of expression plasmids were used to study the utility of IL-12 p40 as an accurate reporter of gene activity. These studies included a characterization of the IL-12 p40 expression system in terms of: (i a time course of IL-12 p40 accumulation in the medium of transfected cells; (ii the dose-response relationship between the input DNA and IL-12 p40 mRNA levels and IL-12 p40 protein secretion; (iii the utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for analyzing the activity of cis-acting genetic elements; (iv expression of the IL-12 p40 reporter protein driven by an IRES element in a bicistronic mRNA; (v utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene in a high-throughput screening strategy to identify successful transformed mouse embryonic stem cells; (vi demonstration of pluripotency of IL-12 p40 expressing ES cells in vitro and in vivo; and (vii germline transmission of the IL-12 p40 reporter gene. Conclusion IL-12 p40 showed several advantages as a reporter gene in terms of sensitivity and ease of the detection procedure. The IL-12 p40 assay was rapid and simple, in as much as the reporter protein secreted from the transfected cells was accurately measured by ELISA using

  14. Searching for resistance genes to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus using high throughput screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Carla S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pine wilt disease (PWD, caused by the pinewood nematode (PWN; Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, damages and kills pine trees and is causing serious economic damage worldwide. Although the ecological mechanism of infestation is well described, the plant’s molecular response to the pathogen is not well known. This is due mainly to the lack of genomic information and the complexity of the disease. High throughput sequencing is now an efficient approach for detecting the expression of genes in non-model organisms, thus providing valuable information in spite of the lack of the genome sequence. In an attempt to unravel genes potentially involved in the pine defense against the pathogen, we hereby report the high throughput comparative sequence analysis of infested and non-infested stems of Pinus pinaster (very susceptible to PWN and Pinus pinea (less susceptible to PWN. Results Four cDNA libraries from infested and non-infested stems of P. pinaster and P. pinea were sequenced in a full 454 GS FLX run, producing a total of 2,083,698 reads. The putative amino acid sequences encoded by the assembled transcripts were annotated according to Gene Ontology, to assign Pinus contigs into Biological Processes, Cellular Components and Molecular Functions categories. Most of the annotated transcripts corresponded to Picea genes-25.4-39.7%, whereas a smaller percentage, matched Pinus genes, 1.8-12.8%, probably a consequence of more public genomic information available for Picea than for Pinus. The comparative transcriptome analysis showed that when P. pinaster was infested with PWN, the genes malate dehydrogenase, ABA, water deficit stress related genes and PAR1 were highly expressed, while in PWN-infested P. pinea, the highly expressed genes were ricin B-related lectin, and genes belonging to the SNARE and high mobility group families. Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed the differential gene expression between the two pine species

  15. Comparative study of machine-learning and chemometric tools for analysis of in-vivo high-throughput screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kirk; Kinney, John; Owens, Aaron; Kleier, Dan; Bloch, Karen; Argentar, Dave; Walsh, Alicia; Vaidyanathan, Ganesh

    2008-08-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become a central tool of many pharmaceutical and crop-protection discovery operations. If HTS screening is carried out at the level of the intact organism, as is commonly done in crop protection, this strategy has the potential of uncovering a completely new mechanism of actions. The challenge in running a cost-effective HTS operation is to identify ways in which to improve the overall success rate in discovering new biologically active compounds. To this end, we describe our efforts directed at making full use of the data stream arising from HTS. This paper describes a comparative study in which several machine learning and chemometric methodologies were used to develop classifiers on the same data sets derived from in vivo HTS campaigns and their predictive performances compared in terms of false negative and false positive error profiles.

  16. A new versatile microarray-based method for high-throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Schückel, Julia;

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatic tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate degrading and modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases...... and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high-throughput and versatile...... semi-quantitative enzyme-screening technique which requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme cocktails and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures and biomass samples. Moreover, we show...

  17. A new implementation of high-throughput five-dimensional clone pooling strategy for BAC library screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deal Karin R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A five-dimensional (5-D clone pooling strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones with molecular markers utilizing highly-parallel Illumina GoldenGate assays and PCR facilitates high-throughput BAC clone and BAC contig anchoring on a genetic map. However, this strategy occasionally needs manual PCR to deconvolute pools and identify truly positive clones. Results A new implementation is reported here for our previously reported clone pooling strategy. Row and column pools of BAC clones are divided into sub-pools with 1~2× genome coverage. All BAC pools are screened with Illumina's GoldenGate assay and the BAC pools are deconvoluted to identify individual positive clones. Putative positive BAC clones are then further analyzed to find positive clones on the basis of them being neighbours in a contig. An exhaustive search or brute force algorithm was designed for this deconvolution and integrated into a newly developed software tool, FPCBrowser, for analyzing clone pooling data. This algorithm was used with empirical data for 55 Illumina GoldenGate SNP assays detecting SNP markers mapped on Aegilops tauschii chromosome 2D and Ae. tauschii contig maps. Clones in single contigs were successfully assigned to 48 (87% specific SNP markers on the map with 91% precision. Conclusion A new implementation of 5-D BAC clone pooling strategy employing both GoldenGate assay screening and assembled BAC contigs is shown here to be a high-throughput, low cost, rapid, and feasible approach to screening BAC libraries and anchoring BAC clones and contigs on genetic maps. The software FPCBrowser with the integrated clone deconvolution algorithm has been developed and is downloadable at http://avena.pw.usda.gov/wheatD/fpcbrowser.shtml.

  18. Rapid screening of classic galactosemia patients: a proof-of-concept study using high-throughput FTIR analysis of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Caroline; Untereiner, Valérie; Gobinet, Cyril; Zater, Mokhtar; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Garnotel, Roselyne

    2015-04-07

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease involving the galactose pathway, caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Galactose accumulation induces in newborns many symptoms, such as liver disease, cataracts, and sepsis leading to death if untreated. Neonatal screening is developed and applied in many countries using several methods to detect galactose or its derived product accumulation in blood or urine. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy was investigated as a potential tool in the current screening methods. IR spectra were obtained from blood plasma of healthy, diabetic, and galactosemic patients. The major spectral differences were in the carbohydrate region, which was first analysed in an exploratory manner using principal component analysis (PCA). PCA score plots showed a clear discrimination between diabetic and galactosemic patients and this was more marked as a function of the glucose and galactose increased concentration in these patients' plasma respectively. Then, a support vector machine leave-one-out cross-validation (SVM-LOOCV) classifier was built with the PCA scores as the input and the model was tested on median, mean and all spectra from the three population groups. This classifier was able to discriminate healthy/diabetic, healthy/galactosemic, and diabetic/galactosemic patients with sensitivity and specificity rates ranging from 80% to 94%. The total accuracy rate ranged from 87% to 96%. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy combined with the SVM-LOOCV classification procedure appears to be a promising tool in the screening of galactosemia patients, with good sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, this approach presents the advantages of being cost-effective, fast, and straightforward in the screening of galactosemic patients.

  19. A novel high throughput screening assay for binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl iodide for estrogen receptor alpha and beta isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenting; Zhao, Lixia; Sun, Zhendong; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-12-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern are continuously increasing, which makes it important to develop high throughput screening techniques for the evaluation of their potential biological effects, especially endocrine disrupting effects, which would directly influence the population dynamics in environment. A novel competitive binding assay based on enzyme fragmentation complementation technology was established to screen the binding affinities of emerging chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) α or β isoforms. Exogenous compounds could compete with the fragment (ED-ES) of genetically engineered β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal) for the binding to ERα or β, thus quantitatively altering the formation of enzymatically active β-gal and the hydrolysis of luminescent substrate. According to the monitoring of luminescence curves and the optimization of ERα or β concentrations, it was found that luminescent signals were sustainably emitted for 9h, and 40nM ERα or β in the system would lead to the most sensitive luminescence response. Using 17β-estrodiol (E2) and genistein as the representative estrogenic hormones, their binding affinities for ERα and β were evaluated. The results were consistent with those determined by traditional methods, which confirmed the reliability of this competitive binding assay based on β-gal. Four polyfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) with specific structural characteristics in iodine substitution and carbon chain length were screened, and the results showed diverse binding affinities and different preferences of these chemicals to ERα or β isoforms. The binding affinities of PFIs for ERα were consistent with the result from MVLN transcriptional reporter assay. Overall, the competitive binding assay presented in this study provided a promising alternative to high throughput screening of emerging chemicals with estrogenic effects, which would be important in explanation of their potential toxicological effects and human exposure risks

  20. High-Throughput Screening of Chemical Effects on Steroidogenesis Using H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmaus, Agnes L; Toole, Colleen M; Filer, Dayne L; Lewis, Kenneth C; Martin, Matthew T

    2016-04-01

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via high-performance liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a 3 stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; ≥ 70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC whereas the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were prestimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for 6-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into 5 distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A distinct pattern was observed between imidazole and triazole fungicides suggesting potentially distinct mechanisms of action. From a chemical testing and prioritization perspective, this assay platform provides a robust model for high-throughput screening of chemicals for effects on steroidogenesis.

  1. Implementation of a high-throughput screen for identifying small molecules to activate the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Connie Wu

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces a battery of cytoprotective genes involved in antioxidant defense through binding to Antioxidant Response Elements (ARE located in the promoter regions of these genes. To identify Nrf2 activators for the treatment of oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced diseases, the present study developed a high-throughput assay to evaluate Nrf2 activation using AREc32 cells that contain a luciferase gene under the control of ARE promoters. Of the 47,000 compounds screened, 238 (top 0.5% hits of the chemicals increased the luminescent signal more than 14.4-fold and were re-tested at eleven concentrations in a range of 0.01-30 µM. Of these 238 compounds, 231 (96% increased the luminescence signal in a concentration-dependent manner. Chemical structure relationship analysis of these 231 compounds indicated enrichment of four chemical scaffolds (diaryl amides and diaryl ureas, oxazoles and thiazoles, pyranones and thiapyranones, and pyridinones and pyridazinones. In addition, 30 of these 231 compounds were highly effective and/or potent in activating Nrf2, with a greater than 80-fold increase in luminescence, or an EC50 lower than 1.6 µM. These top 30 compounds were also screened in Hepa1c1c7 cells for an increase in Nqo1 mRNA, the prototypical Nrf2-target gene. Of these 30 compounds, 17 increased Nqo1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study documents the development, implementation, and validation of a high-throughput screen to identify activators of the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway. Results from this screening identified Nrf2 activators, and provide novel insights into chemical scaffolds that might prevent oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  2. High-throughput screen detects calcium signaling dysfunction in typical sporadic autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmunk, Galina; Nguyen, Rachel L.; Ferguson, David L.; Kumar, Kenny; Parker, Ian; Gargus, J. Jay

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders without any defined uniting pathophysiology. Ca2+ signaling is emerging as a potential node in the genetic architecture of the disorder. We previously reported decreased inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in several rare monogenic syndromes highly comorbid with autism – fragile X and tuberous sclerosis types 1 and 2 syndromes. We now extend those findings to a cohort of subjects with sporadic ASD without any known mutations. We developed and applied a high throughput Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR) assay to monitor agonist-evoked Ca2+ signals in human primary skin fibroblasts. Our results indicate that IP3 -mediated Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in response to activation of purinergic receptors is significantly depressed in subjects with sporadic as well as rare syndromic forms of ASD. We propose that deficits in IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling represent a convergent hub function shared across the spectrum of autistic disorders – whether caused by rare highly penetrant mutations or sporadic forms – and holds promise as a biomarker for diagnosis and novel drug discovery. PMID:28145469

  3. Predictive Modeling of Tacrolimus Dose Requirement Based on High-Throughput Genetic Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, C; Luck, M; Toullec, L; Etienne, I; Buchler, M; Hurault de Ligny, B; Choukroun, G; Thierry, A; Vigneau, C; Moulin, B; Heng, A-E; Subra, J-F; Legendre, C; Monnot, A; Yartseva, A; Bateson, M; Laurent-Puig, P; Anglicheau, D; Beaune, P; Loriot, M A; Thervet, E; Pallet, N

    2017-04-01

    Any biochemical reaction underlying drug metabolism depends on individual gene-drug interactions and on groups of genes interacting together. Based on a high-throughput genetic approach, we sought to identify a set of covariant single-nucleotide polymorphisms predictive of interindividual tacrolimus (Tac) dose requirement variability. Tac blood concentrations (Tac C0 ) of 229 kidney transplant recipients were repeatedly monitored after transplantation over 3 mo. Given the high dimension of the genomic data in comparison to the low number of observations and the high multicolinearity among the variables (gene variants), we developed an original predictive approach that integrates an ensemble variable-selection strategy to reinforce the stability of the variable-selection process and multivariate modeling. Our predictive models explained up to 70% of total variability in Tac C0 per dose with a maximum of 44 gene variants (p-value <0.001 with a permutation test). These models included molecular networks of drug metabolism with oxidoreductase activities and the multidrug-resistant ABCC8 transporter, which was found in the most stringent model. Finally, we identified an intronic variant of the gene encoding SLC28A3, a drug transporter, as a key gene involved in Tac metabolism, and we confirmed it in an independent validation cohort. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Introducing Discrete Frequency Infrared Technology for High-Throughput Biofluid Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caryn; Clemens, Graeme; Bird, Benjamin; Dawson, Timothy; Ashton, Katherine M.; Jenkinson, Michael D.; Brodbelt, Andrew; Weida, Miles; Fotheringham, Edeline; Barre, Matthew; Rowlette, Jeremy; Baker, Matthew J.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate early diagnosis is critical to patient survival, management and quality of life. Biofluids are key to early diagnosis due to their ease of collection and intimate involvement in human function. Large-scale mid-IR imaging of dried fluid deposits offers a high-throughput molecular analysis paradigm for the biomedical laboratory. The exciting advent of tuneable quantum cascade lasers allows for the collection of discrete frequency infrared data enabling clinically relevant timescales. By scanning targeted frequencies spectral quality, reproducibility and diagnostic potential can be maintained while significantly reducing acquisition time and processing requirements, sampling 16 serum spots with 0.6, 5.1 and 15% relative standard deviation (RSD) for 199, 14 and 9 discrete frequencies respectively. We use this reproducible methodology to show proof of concept rapid diagnostics; 40 unique dried liquid biopsies from brain, breast, lung and skin cancer patients were classified in 2.4 cumulative seconds against 10 non-cancer controls with accuracies of up to 90%.

  5. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth.

  6. SNP high-throughput screening in grapevine using the SNPlex™ genotyping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, only a small number of low- and mid-throughput methods have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP discovery and genotyping in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.. However, following completion of the sequence of the highly heterozygous genome of Pinot Noir, it has been possible to identify millions of electronic SNPs (eSNPs thus providing a valuable source for high-throughput genotyping methods. Results Herein we report the first application of the SNPlex™ genotyping system in grapevine aiming at the anchoring of an eukaryotic genome. This approach combines robust SNP detection with automated assay readout and data analysis. 813 candidate eSNPs were developed from non-repetitive contigs of the assembled genome of Pinot Noir and tested in 90 progeny of Syrah × Pinot Noir cross. 563 new SNP-based markers were obtained and mapped. The efficiency rate of 69% was enhanced to 80% when multiple displacement amplification (MDA methods were used for preparation of genomic DNA for the SNPlex assay. Conclusion Unlike other SNP genotyping methods used to investigate thousands of SNPs in a few genotypes, or a few SNPs in around a thousand genotypes, the SNPlex genotyping system represents a good compromise to investigate several hundred SNPs in a hundred or more samples simultaneously. Therefore, the use of the SNPlex assay, coupled with whole genome amplification (WGA, is a good solution for future applications in well-equipped laboratories.

  7. High throughput physiological screening of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Álamo, Juan C; Lemons, Derek; Serrano, Ricardo; Savchenko, Alex; Cerignoli, Fabio; Bodmer, Rolf; Mercola, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac drug discovery is hampered by the reliance on non-human animal and cellular models with inadequate throughput and physiological fidelity to accurately identify new targets and test novel therapeutic strategies. Similarly, adverse drug effects on the heart are challenging to model, contributing to costly failure of drugs during development and even after market launch. Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac tissue represents a potentially powerful means to model aspects of heart physiology relevant to disease and adverse drug effects, providing both the human context and throughput needed to improve the efficiency of drug development. Here we review emerging technologies for high throughput measurements of cardiomyocyte physiology, and comment on the promises and challenges of using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to model disease and introduce the human context into early stages of drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  8. High throughput screens yield small molecule inhibitors of Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 cyclin-dependent kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick G Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania species are parasitic protozoa that have a tightly controlled cell cycle, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. Cdc2-related kinase 3 (CRK3, an essential CDK in Leishmania and functional orthologue of human CDK1, can form an active protein kinase complex with Leishmania cyclins CYCA and CYC6. Here we describe the identification and synthesis of specific small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 using a high throughput screening assay and iterative chemistry. We also describe the biological activity of the molecules against Leishmania parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to obtain an active Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 protein kinase complex, we developed a co-expression and co-purification system for Leishmania CRK3 and CYC6 proteins. This active enzyme was used in a high throughput screening (HTS platform, utilising an IMAP fluorescence polarisation assay. We carried out two chemical library screens and identified specific inhibitors of CRK3:CYC6 that were inactive against the human cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2:CycA. Subsequently, the best inhibitors were tested against 11 other mammalian protein kinases. Twelve of the most potent hits had an azapurine core with structure activity relationship (SAR analysis identifying the functional groups on the 2 and 9 positions as essential for CRK3:CYC6 inhibition and specificity against CDK2:CycA. Iterative chemistry allowed synthesis of a number of azapurine derivatives with one, compound 17, demonstrating anti-parasitic activity against both promastigote and amastigote forms of L. major. Following the second HTS, 11 compounds with a thiazole core (active towards CRK3:CYC6 and inactive against CDK2:CycA were tested. Ten of these hits demonstrated anti-parasitic activity against promastigote L. major. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pharmacophores identified from the high throughput screens, and the derivatives synthesised, selectively

  9. Data-Driven Derivation of an "Informer Compound Set" for Improved Selection of Active Compounds in High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-09-26

    Despite the usefulness of high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, for some systems, low assay throughput or high screening cost can prohibit the screening of large numbers of compounds. In such cases, iterative cycles of screening involving active learning (AL) are employed, creating the need for smaller "informer sets" that can be routinely screened to build predictive models for selecting compounds from the screening collection for follow-up screens. Here, we present a data-driven derivation of an informer compound set with improved predictivity of active compounds in HTS, and we validate its benefit over randomly selected training sets on 46 PubChem assays comprising at least 300,000 compounds and covering a wide range of assay biology. The informer compound set showed improvement in BEDROC(α = 100), PRAUC, and ROCAUC values averaged over all assays of 0.024, 0.014, and 0.016, respectively, compared to randomly selected training sets, all with paired t-test p-values <10(-15). A per-assay assessment showed that the BEDROC(α = 100), which is of particular relevance for early retrieval of actives, improved for 38 out of 46 assays, increasing the success rate of smaller follow-up screens. Overall, we showed that an informer set derived from historical HTS activity data can be employed for routine small-scale exploratory screening in an assay-agnostic fashion. This approach led to a consistent improvement in hit rates in follow-up screens without compromising scaffold retrieval. The informer set is adjustable in size depending on the number of compounds one intends to screen, as performance gains are realized for sets with more than 3,000 compounds, and this set is therefore applicable to a variety of situations. Finally, our results indicate that random sampling may not adequately cover descriptor space, drawing attention to the importance of the composition of the training set for predicting actives.

  10. poolHiTS: A Shifted Transversal Design based pooling strategy for high-throughput drug screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Peter J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key goal of drug discovery is to increase the throughput of small molecule screens without sacrificing screening accuracy. High-throughput screening (HTS in drug discovery involves testing a large number of compounds in a biological assay to identify active compounds. Normally, molecules from a large compound library are tested individually to identify the activity of each molecule. Usually a small number of compounds are found to be active, however the presence of false positive and negative testing errors suggests that this one-drug one-assay screening strategy can be significantly improved. Pooling designs are testing schemes that test mixtures of compounds in each assay, thereby generating a screen of the whole compound library in fewer tests. By repeatedly testing compounds in different combinations, pooling designs also allow for error-correction. These pooled designs, for specific experiment parameters, can be simply and efficiently created using the Shifted Transversal Design (STD pooling algorithm. However, drug screening contains a number of key constraints that require specific modifications if this pooling approach is to be useful for practical screen designs. Results In this paper, we introduce a pooling strategy called poolHiTS (Pooled High-Throughput Screening which is based on the STD algorithm. In poolHiTS, we implement a limit on the number of compounds that can be mixed in a single assay. In addition, we show that the STD-based pooling strategy is limited in the error-correction that it can achieve. Due to the mixing constraint, we show that it is more efficient to split a large library into smaller blocks of compounds, which are then tested using an optimized strategy repeated for each block. We package the optimal block selection algorithm into poolHiTS. The MATLAB codes for the poolHiTS algorithm and the corresponding decoding strategy are also provided. Conclusion We have produced a practical version

  11. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Kathy Qian, E-mail: kluo@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  12. High throughput nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry screening of microbial growth conditions for maximal β-glucosidase production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang eCheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production of biofuels via enzymatic hydrolysis of complex plant polysaccharides is a subject of intense global interest. Microbial communities are known to express a wide range of enzymes necessary for the saccharification of lignocellulosic feedstocks and serve as a powerful reservoir for enzyme discovery. However, the growth temperature and conditions that yield high cellulase activity vary widely, and the throughput to identify optimal conditions has been limited by the slow handling and conventional analysis. A rapid method that uses small volumes of isolate culture to resolve specific enzyme activity is needed. In this work, a high throughput nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS based approach was developed for screening a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete, Thermobispora bispora, for β-glucosidase production under various growth conditions. Media that produced high β-glucosidase activity were found to be I/S + glucose or microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Medium 84 + rolled oats, and M9TE + MCC at 45 °C. Supernatants of cell cultures grown in M9TE + 1% MCC cleaved 2.5 times more substrate at 45 °C than at all other temperatures. While T. bispora is reported to grow optimally at 60 °C in Medium 84 + rolled oats and M9TE + 1% MCC, approximately 40% more conversion was observed at 45 °C. This high throughput NIMS approach may provide an important tool in discovery and characterization of enzymes from environmental microbes for industrial and biofuel applications.

  13. A paper-based microbial fuel cell array for rapid and high-throughput screening of electricity-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gihoon; Hassett, Daniel J; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-06-21

    There is a large global effort to improve microbial fuel cell (MFC) techniques and advance their translational potential toward practical, real-world applications. Significant boosts in MFC performance can be achieved with the development of new techniques in synthetic biology that can regulate microbial metabolic pathways or control their gene expression. For these new directions, a high-throughput and rapid screening tool for microbial biopower production is needed. In this work, a 48-well, paper-based sensing platform was developed for the high-throughput and rapid characterization of the electricity-producing capability of microbes. 48 spatially distinct wells of a sensor array were prepared by patterning 48 hydrophilic reservoirs on paper with hydrophobic wax boundaries. This paper-based platform exploited the ability of paper to quickly wick fluid and promoted bacterial attachment to the anode pads, resulting in instant current generation upon loading of the bacterial inoculum. We validated the utility of our MFC array by studying how strategic genetic modifications impacted the electrochemical activity of various Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant strains. Within just 20 minutes, we successfully determined the electricity generation capacity of eight isogenic mutants of P. aeruginosa. These efforts demonstrate that our MFC array displays highly comparable performance characteristics and identifies genes in P. aeruginosa that can trigger a higher power density.

  14. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  15. Development and Validation of a High Throughput Screen for Compounds with Antiviral Activity Against Encephalitic Alphaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    determined the compounds as cytotoxic if the viability is less than 85% in the screening. 1. Single dose study A. Small library screening We have...run on two independent days and the results are shown below (Table 8). The assay metrics meet the requirement for a successful HTS assay for a library ... screening . The assay performance was ascertained by testing plate-to-plate variation (data not shown). Table 8. Assay performance of the assay

  16. Improvement and scale-down of a Trichoderma reesei shake flask protocol to microtiter plates enables high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Heiner; Kruithof, Paulien; Meier, Kristina; Sieben, Michaela; Antonov, Elena; Hommes, Ronald W J; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, high-throughput screening is essential for determining the best microbial strains and fermentation conditions. Although microtiter plates allow higher throughput in screening than shake flasks, they do not guarantee sufficient oxygen supply if operated at unsuitable conditions. This is especially the case in viscous fermentations, potentially leading to poor liquid movement and surface growth. Therefore, in this study, two aims were pursued. First, an industrial Trichoderma reesei shake flask protocol is improved with respect to oxygen supply and production. Second, this improved shake flask protocol is scaled down into microtiter plate under consideration of similar oxygen supply. For this purpose, the respiration activity monitoring system (RAMOS) was applied. An approach based on a sulfite system was introduced to ensure equal maximum oxygen transfer capacities (OTRmax) in microtiter plates and shake flasks. OTRmax-values of 250 mL shake flasks and 24-well microtiter plates were determined in a wide range of operating conditions. These sulfite datasets were used to identify operating conditions leading to the same oxygen supply for T. reesei in shake flasks and 24-well microtiter plates. For 24-well microtiter plates, the shake flask OTRmax of 20 mmol/L/h of an industrial protocol was obtained under the following optimal operating conditions: 1 mL filling volume per well, 200 rpm shaking frequency and 50 mm shaking diameter. With these conditions almost identical oxygen transfer rates and product concentrations were measured in both scales. The proposed approach is a fast and accurate means to scale-down established screening procedures into microtiter plates to achieve high-throughput.

  17. Development of a New High-throughput Screening Model for Human High Density Lipoprotein Receptor (CLA-1) Agonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To develop a new high-throughput screening model for human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor (CD36 and LIMPII analogous-1, CLA-1) agonists using CLA-1-expressing insect cells. Methods With the total RNA of human hepatoma cells BEL-7402 as template, the complementary DNA (cDNA) of CLA-1 was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system was used to express CLA-1 in insect cells. CLA-1 cDNA was cloned downstream of polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) into donor vector pFastBac1 and recombinant pFastBac1-CLA-1 was transformed into E. coli DH10Bac to transpose CLA-1 cDNA to bacmid DNA. Recombinant bacmid-CLA-1 was transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells to produce recombinant baculovirus particles. Recombinant CLA-1 was expressed on the membrane of Sf9 cells infected with the recombinant baculoviruses. A series of parameters of DiI-lipoprotein binding assays of CLA-1-expressing Sf9 cells in 96-well plates were optimized. Results Western blot analysis and DiI-lipoprotein binding assays confirmed that CLA-1 expressed in insect cells had similar immunoreactivity and ligand binding activity as its native counterpart. A reliable and sensitive in vitro cell-based assay was established to assess the activity of CLA-1 and used to screen agonists from different sample libraries. Conclusion Human HDL receptor CLA-1 was successfully expressed in Sf9 insect cells and a novel high-throughput screening model for CLA-1 agonists was developed. Utilization of this model allows us to identify potent and selective CLA-1 agonists which might possibly be used as therapeutics for atherosclerosis.

  18. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer's-Associated Aβ Oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Wilcox

    Full Text Available Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs. AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer's dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs. This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL--a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer's model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can

  19. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9. Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9, a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2 and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel

  20. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  1. Novel Approach for High-Throughput Metabolic Screening of Whole Plants by Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dersch, Lisa Maria; Beckers, Veronique; Rasch, Detlev; Melzer, Guido; Bolten, Christoph; Kiep, Katina; Becker, Horst; Bläsing, Oliver Ernst; Fuchs, Regine; Ehrhardt, Thomas; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate whole-plant metabolic profiling by stable isotope labeling and combustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometry for precise quantification of assimilation, translocation, and molecular reallocation of (13)CO2 and (15)NH4NO3 The technology was applied to rice (Oryza sativa) plants at different growth stages. For adult plants, (13)CO2 labeling revealed enhanced carbon assimilation of the flag leaf from flowering to late grain-filling stage, linked to efficient translocation into the panicle. Simultaneous (13)CO2 and (15)NH4NO3 labeling with hydroponically grown seedlings was used to quantify the relative distribution of carbon and nitrogen. Two hours after labeling, assimilated carbon was mainly retained in the shoot (69%), whereas 7% entered the root and 24% was respired. Nitrogen, taken up via the root, was largely translocated into the shoot (85%). Salt-stressed seedlings showed decreased uptake and translocation of nitrogen (69%), whereas carbon metabolism was unaffected. Coupled to a gas chromatograph, labeling analysis provided enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids. This revealed significant protein synthesis in the panicle of adult plants, whereas protein biosynthesis in adult leaves was 8-fold lower than that in seedling shoots. Generally, amino acid enrichment was similar among biosynthetic families and allowed us to infer labeling dynamics of their precursors. On this basis, early and strong (13)C enrichment of Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates indicated high activity of these routes. Applied to mode-of-action analysis of herbicides, the approach showed severe disturbance in the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids upon treatment with imazapyr. The established technology displays a breakthrough for quantitative high-throughput plant metabolic phenotyping.

  2. Optimization of random PEGylation reactions by means of high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiser, Benjamin; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Since the first FDA approval of a PEGylated product in 1990, so called random PEGylation reactions are still used to increase the efficacy of biopharmaceuticals and represent the major technology of all approved PEG-modified drugs. However, the great influence of process parameters on PEGylation degree and the PEG-binding site results in a lack of reaction specificity which can have severe impact on the product profile. Consequently, reproducible and well characterized processes are essential to meet increasing regulative requirements resulting from the quality-by-design (QbD) initiative, especially for this kind of modification type. In this study we present a general approach which combines the simple chemistry of random PEGylation reactions with high throughput experimentation (HTE) to achieve a well-defined process. Robotic based batch experiments have been established in a 96-well plate format and were analyzed to investigate the influence of different PEGylation conditions for lysozyme as model protein. With common SEC analytics highly reproducible reaction kinetics were measured and a significant influence of PEG-excess, buffer pH, and reaction time could be investigated. Additional mono-PEG-lysozyme analytics showed the impact of varying buffer pH on the isoform distribution, which allowed us to identify optimal process parameters to get a maximum concentration of each isoform. Employing Micrococcus lysodeikticus based activity assays, PEG-lysozyme33 was identified to be the isoform with the highest residual activity, followed by PEG-lysozyme1 . Based on these results, a control space for a PEGylation reaction was defined with respect to an optimal overall volumetric activity of mono-PEG-lysozyme isoform mixtures.

  3. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Peter; Makwana, Neel M; Tighe, Christopher J; Gruar, Robert I; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2016-02-08

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under standard synthetic conditions, either the cubic In2O3 phase, or a mixture of InO(OH) and In2O3 phases were observed in the as-synthesized materials. These materials were pressed into compacts and heat-treated in an inert atmosphere, and their electrical resistivities were then measured using the Van der Pauw method. Sn doping yielded resistivities of ∼ 10(-2) Ω cm for most samples with the lowest resistivity of 6.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm (exceptionally conductive for such pressed nanopowders) at a Sn concentration of 10 at %. Thereafter, the optimized lab-scale composition was scaled-up using a pilot-scale continuous hydrothermal synthesis process (at a rate of 100 g/hour by dry mass), and a comparable resistivity of 9.4 × 10(-3) Ω cm was obtained. The use of the synthesized TCO nanomaterials for thin film fabrication was finally demonstrated by deposition of a transparent, conductive film using a simple spin-coating process.

  4. High-Throughput Screening by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HTS by NMR) for the Identification of PPIs Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K; Wei, Jun; Purves, Angela; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the ever so complex field of drug discovery has embraced novel design strategies based on biophysical fragment screening (fragment-based drug design; FBDD) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and/or structure-guided approaches, most often using X-ray crystallography and computer modeling. Experience from recent years unveiled that these methods are more effective and less prone to artifacts compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds in designing protein inhibitors. Hence these strategies are increasingly becoming the most utilized in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Nonetheless, there is still an impending need to develop innovative and effective strategies to tackle other more challenging targets such as those involving protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While HTS strategies notoriously fail to identify viable hits against such targets, few successful examples of PPIs antagonists derived by FBDD strategies exist. Recently, we reported on a new strategy that combines some of the basic principles of fragment-based screening with combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening. The approach, termed HTS by NMR, combines the advantages of combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening to rapidly and unambiguously identify bona fide inhibitors of PPIs. This review will reiterate the critical aspects of the approach with examples of possible applications.

  5. High-throughput screening system based on phenolics-responsive transcription activator for directed evolution of organophosphate-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Su; Choi, Su-Lim; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Kim, Eui-Joong; Pan, Jae-Gu; Rha, Eugene; Song, Jae Jun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2012-11-01

    Synthetic organophosphates (OPs) have been used as nerve agents and pesticides due to their extreme toxicity and have caused serious environmental and human health problems. Hence, effective methods for detoxification and decontamination of OPs are of great significance. Here we constructed and used a high-throughput screening (HTS) system that was based on phenolics-responsive transcription activator for directed evolution of OP-degrading enzymes. In the screening system, phenolic compounds produced from substrates by OP-degrading enzymes bind a constitutively expressed transcription factor DmpR, initiating the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein located at the downstream of the DmpR promoter. Fluorescence intensities of host cells are proportional to the levels of phenolic compounds, enabling the screening of OP-degrading enzymes with high catalytic activities by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Methyl parathion hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. WBC-3 and p-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphate were used as a model enzyme and an analogue of G-type nerve agents, respectively. The utility of the screening system was demonstrated by generating a triple mutant with a 100-fold higher k(cat)/K(m) than the wild-type enzyme after three rounds of directed evolution. The contributions of individual mutations to the catalytic efficiency were elucidated by mutational and structural analyses. The DmpR-based screening system is expected to be widely used for developing OP-degrading enzymes with greater potential.

  6. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  7. IspE inhibitors identified by a combination of in silico and in vitro high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tidten-Luksch

    Full Text Available CDP-ME kinase (IspE contributes to the non-mevalonate or deoxy-xylulose phosphate (DOXP pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis found in many species of bacteria and apicomplexan parasites. IspE has been shown to be essential by genetic methods and since it is absent from humans it constitutes a promising target for antimicrobial drug development. Using in silico screening directed against the substrate binding site and in vitro high-throughput screening directed against both, the substrate and co-factor binding sites, non-substrate-like IspE inhibitors have been discovered and structure-activity relationships were derived. The best inhibitors in each series have high ligand efficiencies and favourable physico-chemical properties rendering them promising starting points for drug discovery. Putative binding modes of the ligands were suggested which are consistent with established structure-activity relationships. The applied screening methods were complementary in discovering hit compounds, and a comparison of both approaches highlights their strengths and weaknesses. It is noteworthy that compounds identified by virtual screening methods provided the controls for the biochemical screens.

  8. Development of a Novel Nonradiometric Assay for Nucleic Acid Binding to TDP-43 Suitable for High-Throughput Screening Using AlphaScreen® Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cassel, Joel A.; Blass, Benjamin E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Pawlyk, Aaron C.

    2010-01-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nucleic acid binding protein that is associated with the pathology of cystic fibrosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. We have developed a robust, quantitative, nonradiometric high-throughput assay measuring oligonucleotide binding to TDP-43 using AlphaScreen® technology. Biotinylated single-stranded TAR DNA (bt-TAR-32) and 6 TG repeats (bt-TG6) bound with high affinity to TDP-43, w...

  9. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates.

  10. A novel bioassay for high-throughput screening microorganisms with N-acyl homoserine lactone degrading activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfu; Gao, Yang; Huang, Wei; Shao, Zongze; Shi, Jiping; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-05-01

    A novel biosensor strain (Escherichia coli ALM403) that responded to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) was constructed using a luxR-Plux cassette as a regulatory sequence and β-mannanase as a reporter gene. Dinitrosalicylic acid method was used to detect the response of the sensor strain to N-acyl homoserine lactone. By investigating the response to a range of concentrations of N-β-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL), it was demonstrated that the expression of mannanase in E. coli ALM403 could be greatly enhanced by OOHL and resulted in an assayable phenotype. A high-throughput screening approach was developed to isolate AHL-degrading microorganisms, and a marine Halomonas sp. S66-4 showing a marked AHL-degrading ability was successfully isolated. In conclusion, the bioassay system provided a simple and efficient approach to isolate AHL-degrading bacteria.

  11. A High-affinity Activator of G551D-CFTR Chloride Channel Identified By High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lu; HE Cheng-yan; LIU Yan-li; ZHOU Hong-lan; ZHOU Jin-song; SHANG De-jing; YANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    A stably transfected CHO cell line coexpressing G551D-CFTR and iodide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein mutant EYFP-H148Q-I152L was successfully established and used as assay model to identify small-molecule activators of G551D-CFTR chloride channel from 100000 diverse combinatorial compounds by high throughput screening on a customized Beckman robotic system. A bicyclooctane compound was identified to activate G551D-CFTR chloride channel with high-affinity(Kd=1.8 μmol/L). The activity of the bicyclooctane compound is G551D-CFTR-specific, reversible and non-toxic. The G551D-CFTR activator may be useful as a tool to study the mutant G551D-CFTR chloride channel structure and transport properties and as a candidate drug to cure cystic fibrosis caused by G551D-CFTR mutation.

  12. Predicting high-throughput screening results with scalable literature-based discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, T; Widdows, D; Stephan, C; Zinner, R; Kim, J; Rindflesch, T; Davies, P

    2014-10-08

    The identification of new therapeutic uses for existing agents has been proposed as a means to mitigate the escalating cost of drug development. A common approach to such repurposing involves screening libraries of agents for activities against cell lines. In silico methods using knowledge from the biomedical literature have been proposed to constrain the costs of screening by identifying agents that are likely to be effective a priori. However, results obtained with these methods are seldom evaluated empirically. Conversely, screening experiments have been criticized for their inability to reveal the biological basis of their results. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of a scalable literature-based approach, discovery-by-analogy, to identify a small number of active agents within a large library screened for activity against prostate cancer cells. The methods used permit retrieval of the knowledge used to infer their predictions, providing a plausible biological basis for predicted activity.

  13. Upscaling and automation of electrophysiology: toward high throughput screening in ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Margit; Oswald, Nicholas; Krzywkowski, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    Effective screening of large compound libraries in ion channel drug discovery requires the development of new electrophysiological techniques with substantially increased throughputs compared to the conventional patch clamp technique. Sophion Bioscience is aiming to meet this challenge...

  14. Ultra-high-throughput screening of an in vitro-synthesized horseradish peroxidase displayed on microbeads using cell sorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro) DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence) via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT) and inactive mutant (MUT) genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT) library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases.

  15. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03

  16. Ultra-high-throughput screening of an in vitro-synthesized horseradish peroxidase displayed on microbeads using cell sorter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    Full Text Available The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT and inactive mutant (MUT genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases.

  17. A High Throughput, 384-Well, Semi-Automated, Hepatocyte Intrinsic Clearance Assay for Screening New Molecular Entities in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, Lance; Peterkin, Vincent; de Morais, Sonia M; Jenkins, Gary J; Badagnani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput, semi-automated clearance screening assay in hepatocytes was developed allowing a scientist to generate data for 96 compounds in one week. The 384-well format assay utilizes a Thermo Multidrop Combi and an optimized LC-MS/MS method. The previously reported LCMS/ MS method reduced the analytical run time by 3-fold, down to 1.2 min injection-to-injection. The Multidrop was able to deliver hepatocytes to 384-well plates with minimal viability loss. Comparison of results from the new 384-well and historical 24-well assays yielded a correlation of 0.95. In addition, results obtained for 25 marketed drugs with various metabolism pathways had a correlation of 0.75 when compared with literature values. Precision was maintained in the new format as 8 compounds tested in ≥39 independent experiments had coefficients of variation ≤21%. The ability to predict in vivo clearances using the new stability assay format was also investigated using 22 marketed drugs and 26 AbbVie compounds. Correction of intrinsic clearance values with binding to hepatocytes (in vitro data) and plasma (in vivo data) resulted in a higher in vitro to in vivo correlation when comparing 22 marketed compounds in human (0.80 vs 0.35) and 26 AbbVie Discovery compounds in rat (0.56 vs 0.17), demonstrating the importance of correcting for binding in clearance studies. This newly developed high throughput, semi-automated clearance assay allows for rapid screening of Discovery compounds to enable Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) analysis based on high quality hepatocyte stability data in sufficient quantity and quality to drive the next round of compound synthesis.

  18. High throughput screening for small molecule therapy for Gaucher disease using patient tissue as the source of mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Goldin

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, results from the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Previously, wildtype GCase was used for high throughput screening (HTS of large collections of compounds to identify small molecule chaperones that could be developed as new therapies for GD. However, the compounds identified from HTS usually showed reduced potency later in confirmatory cell-based assays. An alternate strategy is to perform HTS on mutant enzyme to identify different lead compounds, including those enhancing mutant enzyme activities. We developed a new screening assay using enzyme extract prepared from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S. In tissue extracts, GCase is in a more native physiological environment, and is present with the native activator saposin C and other potential cofactors. Using this assay, we screened a library of 250,000 compounds and identified novel modulators of mutant GCase including 14 new lead inhibitors and 30 lead activators. The activities of some of the primary hits were confirmed in subsequent cell-based assays using patient-derived fibroblasts. These results suggest that primary screening assays using enzyme extracted from tissues is an alternative approach to identify high quality, physiologically relevant lead compounds for drug development.

  19. Aqueous biphasic cancer cell migration assay enables robust, high-throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Nasrollahi, Samila; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a fundamental event implicated in metastatic progression of cancer. Therapeutic compounds with the ability to inhibit the motility of cancer cells are critical for preventing cancer metastasis. Achieving this goal requires new technologies that enable high-throughput drug screening against migration of cancer cells and expedite drug discovery. We report an easy-to-implement, robotically operated, cell migration microtechnology with the capability of simultaneous screening of multiple compounds. The technology utilizes a fully biocompatible polymeric aqueous two-phase system to pattern a monolayer of cells containing a cell-excluded gap that serves as the migration niche. We adapted this technology to a standard 96-well plate format and parametrically optimized it to generate highly consistent migration niches. The analysis of migration is done automatically using computerized schemes. We use statistical metrics and show the robustness of this assay for drug screening and its sensitivity to identify effects of different drug compounds on migration of cancer cells. This technology can be employed in core centers, research laboratories, and pharmaceutical industries to evaluate the efficacy of compounds against migration of various types of metastatic cancer cells prior to expensive animal tests and thus, streamline anti-migratory drug screening.

  20. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-Jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-07-28

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes.

  1. High-throughput screening identifies idarubicin as a preferential inhibitor of smooth muscle versus endothelial cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakti A Goel

    Full Text Available Intimal hyperplasia is the cause of the recurrent occlusive vascular disease (restenosis. Drugs currently used to treat restenosis effectively inhibit smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation, but also inhibit the growth of the protective luminal endothelial cell (EC lining, leading to thrombosis. To identify compounds that selectively inhibit SMC versus EC proliferation, we have developed a high-throughput screening (HTS format using human cells and have employed this to screen a multiple compound collection (NIH Clinical Collection. We developed an automated, accurate proliferation assay in 96-well plates using human aortic SMCs and ECs. Using this HTS format we screened a 447-drug NIH Clinical Library. We identified 11 compounds that inhibited SMC proliferation greater than 50%, among which idarubicin exhibited a unique feature of preferentially inhibiting SMC versus EC proliferation. Concentration-response analysis revealed this differential effect most evident over an ∼10 nM-5 µM window. In vivo testing of idarubicin in a rat carotid injury model at 14 days revealed an 80% reduction of intimal hyperplasia and a 45% increase of lumen size with no significant effect on re-endothelialization. Taken together, we have established a HTS assay of human vascular cell proliferation, and identified idarubicin as a selective inhibitor of SMC versus EC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Screening of larger and more diverse compound libraries may lead to the discovery of next-generation therapeutics that can inhibit intima hyperplasia without impairing re-endothelialization.

  2. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limi...

  3. Receptor-based high-throughput screening and identification of estrogens in dietary supplements using bioaffinity liquid-chromatography ion mobility mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aqai, P.; Gómez Blesa, N.; Major, H.; Pedotti, P.; Varani, L.; Ferrero, V.E.V.; Haasnoot, W.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput bioaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (BioMS) approach was developed and applied for the screening and identification of recombinant human estrogen receptor a (ERa) ligands in dietary supplements. For screening, a semi-automated mass spectrometric ligand binding assay

  4. Selecting, Acquiring, and Using Small Molecule Libraries for High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandapani, Sivaraman; Rosse, Gerard; Southall, Noel; Salvino, Joseph M; Thomas, Craig J

    The selection, acquisition and use of high quality small molecule libraries for screening is an essential aspect of drug discovery and chemical biology programs. Screening libraries continue to evolve as researchers gain a greater appreciation of the suitability of small molecules for specific biological targets, processes and environments. The decisions surrounding the make-up of any given small molecule library is informed by a multitude of variables and opinions vary on best-practices. The fitness of any collection relies upon upfront filtering to avoiding problematic compounds, assess appropriate physicochemical properties, install the ideal level of structural uniqueness and determine the desired extent of molecular complexity. These criteria are under constant evaluation and revision as academic and industrial organizations seek out collections that yield ever improving results from their screening portfolios. Practical questions including cost, compound management, screening sophistication and assay objective also play a significant role in the choice of library composition. This overview attempts to offer advice to all organizations engaged in small molecule screening based upon current best practices and theoretical considerations in library selection and acquisition.

  5. A whole-cell assay for the high throughput screening of calmodulin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2008-04-01

    Cell-based screening systems for pharmaceuticals are desired over molecular biosensing systems because of the information they provide on toxicity and bioavailability. However, the majority of sensing systems developed are molecular biosensing type screening systems and cannot be easily adapted to cell-based screening. In this study, we demonstrate that protein-based molecular sensing systems that employ a fluorescent protein as a signal transducer are amenable to cell-based sensing by expressing the protein molecular sensing system in the cell and employing these cells for screening of desired molecules. To achieve this, we expressed a molecular sensing system based on the fusion protein of calmodulin (CaM) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in bacterial cells, and utilized these cells for the screening of CaM antagonists. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM undergoes a conformational change exposing a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with CaM-binding proteins, peptides, and drugs. This conformational change induced in CaM leads to a change in the microenvironment of EGFP, resulting in a change in its fluorescence intensity. The observed change in fluorescence intensity of EGFP can be correlated to the concentration of the analyte present in the sample. Dose-response curves for various tricyclic antidepressants were generated using cells containing CaM-EGFP fusion protein. Additionally, we demonstrate the versatility of our system for studying protein-protein interactions by using cells to study the binding of a peptide to CaM. The study showed that the CaM-EGFP fusion protein within the intact cells responds similarly to that of the isolated fusion protein, hence eliminating the need for any isolation and purification steps. We have demonstrated that this system can be used for the rapid screening of various CaM antagonists that are potential antipsychotic drugs.

  6. Utilizing high throughput screening data for predictive toxicology models: protocols and application to MLSCN assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2008-06-01

    Computational toxicology is emerging as an encouraging alternative to experimental testing. The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap has recently started generating large and diverse screening datasets, which are publicly available in PubChem. In this report, we investigate various aspects of developing computational models to predict cell toxicity based on cell proliferation screening data generated in the MLSCN. By capturing feature-based information in those datasets, such predictive models would be useful in evaluating cell-based screening results in general (for example from reporter assays) and could be used as an aid to identify and eliminate potentially undesired compounds. Specifically we present the results of random forest ensemble models developed using different cell proliferation datasets and highlight protocols to take into account their extremely imbalanced nature. Depending on the nature of the datasets and the descriptors employed we were able to achieve percentage correct classification rates between 70% and 85% on the prediction set, though the accuracy rate dropped significantly when the models were applied to in vivo data. In this context we also compare the MLSCN cell proliferation results with animal acute toxicity data to investigate to what extent animal toxicity can be correlated and potentially predicted by proliferation results. Finally, we present a visualization technique that allows one to compare a new dataset to the training set of the models to decide whether the new dataset may be reliably predicted.

  7. Semi-High Throughput Screening for Potential Drought-tolerance in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Germplasm Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Caleb; Mou, Beiquan

    2015-04-17

    This protocol describes a method by which a large collection of the leafy green vegetable lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) germplasm was screened for likely drought-tolerance traits. Fresh water availability for agricultural use is a growing concern across the United States as well as many regions of the world. Short-term drought events along with regulatory intervention in the regulation of water availability coupled with the looming threat of long-term climate shifts that may lead to reduced precipitation in many important agricultural regions has increased the need to hasten the development of crops adapted for improved water use efficiency in order to maintain or expand production in the coming years. This protocol is not meant as a step-by-step guide to identifying at either the physiological or molecular level drought-tolerance traits in lettuce, but rather is a method developed and refined through the screening of thousands of different lettuce varieties. The nature of this screen is based in part on the streamlined measurements focusing on only three water-stress indicators: leaf relative water content, wilt, and differential plant growth following drought-stress. The purpose of rapidly screening a large germplasm collection is to narrow the candidate pool to a point in which more intensive physiological, molecular, and genetic methods can be applied to identify specific drought-tolerant traits in either the lab or field. Candidates can also be directly incorporated into breeding programs as a source of drought-tolerance traits.

  8. Integrated Automation of High-Throughput Screening and Reverse Phase Protein Array Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    multiplexing readouts, but this has a natural limitation. High-content screening via image acquisition and analysis allows multiplexing of few parameters, but is connected to substantial time consumption and complex logistics. We report on integration of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA)-based readouts...

  9. High-Throughput Screening for Readthrough Modulators of CFTR PTC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Shang, Haibo; Jordan, Nikole J; Wong, Eric; Mercadante, Dayna; Saltz, Josef; Mahiou, Jerome; Bihler, Hermann J; Mense, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). A large number of nearly 2000 reported mutations, including the premature termination codon (PTC) mutations, urgently require new and personalized medicines. We have developed cell-based assays for readthrough modulators of CFTR PTC mutations (or nonsense mutation suppressors), based on the trafficking and surface expression of CFTR. Approximately 85,000 compounds have been screened for two PTC mutations (Y122X and W1282X). The hit rates at the threshold of 50% greater than vehicle response are 2% and 1.4% for CFTR Y122X and CFTR W1282X, respectively. The overlap of the two hit sets at this stringent hit threshold is relatively small. Only ~28% of the hits from the W1282X screen were also hits in the Y122X screen. The overlap increases to ~50% if compounds are included that in the second screen achieve only a less stringent hit criterion, that is, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity greater than three standard deviations above the mean of the vehicle. Our data suggest that personalization may not need to address individual genotypes, but that patients with different CFTR PTC mutations could benefit from the same medicines.

  10. High-throughput screens in mammalian cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jingyu; Zhou, Yuexin; Zhu, Shiyou; Wei, Wensheng

    2015-06-01

    As a powerful genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been quickly developed into a large-scale function-based screening strategy in mammalian cells. This new type of genetic library is constructed through the lentiviral delivery of single-guide RNA collections that direct Cas9 or inactive dead Cas9 fused with effectors to interrogate gene function or regulate gene transcription in targeted cells. Compared with RNA interference screening, the CRISPR-Cas9 system demonstrates much higher levels of effectiveness and reliability with respect to both loss-of-function and gain-of-function screening. Unlike the RNA interference strategy, a CRISPR-Cas9 library can target both protein-coding sequences and regulatory elements, including promoters, enhancers and elements transcribing microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs. This powerful genetic tool will undoubtedly accelerate the mechanistic discovery of various biological processes. In this mini review, we summarize the general procedure of CRISPR-Cas9 library mediated functional screening, system optimization strategies and applications of this new genetic toolkit. © 2015 FEBS.

  11. High-Throughput Behavioral Screens: the First Step towards Finding Genes Involved in Vertebrate Brain Function Using Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gerlai

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish has been in the forefront of developmental biology for three decades and has become a favorite of geneticists. Due to the accumulated genetic knowledge and tools developed for the zebrafish it is gaining popularity in other disciplines, including neuroscience. The zebrafish offers a compromise between system complexity (it is a vertebrate similar in many ways to our own species and practical simplicity (it is small, easy to keep, and prolific. Such features make zebrafish an excellent choice for high throughput mutation and drug screening. For the identification of mutation or drug induced alteration of brain function arguably the best methods are behavioral test paradigms. This review does not present experimental examples for the identification of particular genes or drugs. Instead it describes how behavioral screening methods may enable one to find functional alterations in the vertebrate brain. Furthermore, the review is not comprehensive. The behavioral test examples presented are biased according to the personal interests of the author. They will cover research areas including learning and memory, fear and anxiety, and social behavior. Nevertheless, the general principles will apply to other functional domains and should represent a snapshot of the rapidly evolving behavioral screening field with zebrafish.

  12. Discovery of structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds by high-throughput screening of a fragment library with dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Thomas W; Fast, Walter

    2012-09-15

    Potent and selective inhibitors of the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) are useful as molecular probes to better understand cellular regulation of nitric oxide. Inhibitors are also potential therapeutic agents for treatment of pathological states associated with the inappropriate overproduction of nitric oxide, such as septic shock, selected types of cancer, and other conditions. Inhibitors with structures dissimilar to substrate may overcome limitations inherent to substrate analogs. Therefore, to identify structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds, high-throughput screening (HTS) of a 4000-member library of fragment-sized molecules was completed using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa DDAH and human DDAH-1 isoforms. Use of a substrate concentration equal to its K(M) value during the primary screen allowed for the detection of inhibitors with different modes of inhibition. A series of validation tests were designed and implemented in the identification of four inhibitors of human DDAH-1 that were unknown prior to the screen. Two inhibitors share a 4-halopyridine scaffold and act as quiescent affinity labels that selectively and covalently modify the active-site Cys residue. Two inhibitors are benzimidazole-like compounds that reversibly and competitively inhibit human DDAH-1 with Ligand Efficiency values ≥0.3 kcal/mol/heavy (non-hydrogen) atom, indicating their suitability for further development. Both inhibitor scaffolds have available sites to derivatize for further optimization. Therefore, use of this fragment-based HTS approach is demonstrated to successfully identify two novel scaffolds for development of DDAH-1 inhibitors.

  13. Three classes of glucocerebrosidase inhibitors identified by quantitative high-throughput screening are chaperone leads for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Padia, Janak; Urban, Daniel J; Jadhav, Ajit; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Simeonov, Anton; Goldin, Ehud; Auld, Douglas; LaMarca, Mary E; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Sidransky, Ellen

    2007-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene. Missense mutations result in reduced enzyme activity that may be due to misfolding, raising the possibility of small-molecule chaperone correction of the defect. Screening large compound libraries by quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) provides comprehensive information on the potency, efficacy, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of active compounds directly from the primary screen, facilitating identification of leads for medicinal chemistry optimization. We used qHTS to rapidly identify three structural series of potent, selective, nonsugar glucocerebrosidase inhibitors. The three structural classes had excellent potencies and efficacies and, importantly, high selectivity against closely related hydrolases. Preliminary SAR data were used to select compounds with high activity in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Compounds from two of these structural series increased N370S mutant glucocerebrosidase activity by 40-90% in patient cell lines and enhanced lysosomal colocalization, indicating chaperone activity. These small molecules have potential as leads for chaperone therapy for Gaucher disease, and this paradigm promises to accelerate the development of leads for other rare genetic disorders.

  14. An exposure:activity profiling method for interpreting high-throughput screening data for estrogenic activity--proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Richard A; Friedman, Katie Paul; Simon, Ted W; Marty, M Sue; Patlewicz, Grace; Rowlands, J Craig

    2015-04-01

    Rapid high throughput in vitro screening (HTS) assays are now available for characterizing dose-responses in assays that have been selected for their sensitivity in detecting estrogen-related endpoints. For example, EPA's ToxCast™ program recently released endocrine assay results for more than 1800 substances and the interagency Tox21 consortium is in the process of releasing data for approximately 10,000 chemicals. But such activity measurements alone fall short for the purposes of priority setting or screening because the relevant exposure context is not considered. Here, we extend the method of exposure:activity profiling by calculating the exposure:activity ratios (EARs) using human exposure estimates and AC50 values for a range of chemicals tested in a suite of seven estrogenic assays in ToxCast™ and Tox21. To provide additional context, relative estrogenic exposure:activity quotients (REEAQ) were derived by comparing chemical-specific EARs to the EAR of the ubiquitous dietary phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN). Although the activity of a substance in HTS-endocrine assays is not a measure of health hazard or risk, understanding how such a dose compares to human exposures provides a valuable additional metric that can be used in decision-making; substances with small EARs and REEAQs would indicate low priority for further endocrine screening or testing.

  15. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Walker

    Full Text Available Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv. ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1 Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day, 2 Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5, and 3 Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1 Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors, 2 Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3 Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  16. A new approach to drug discovery: high-throughput screening of microbial natural extracts against Aspergillus fumigatus using resazurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Maria Cândida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Cantizani, Juan; Moreno, Catalina; Tormo, José R; Mellado, Emilia; De Lucas, J Ramón; Asensio, Francisco; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca

    2012-04-01

    Natural products are an inexhaustible source for drug discovery. However, the validation and selection of primary screening assays are vital to guarantee a selection of extracts or molecules with relevant pharmacological action and worthy of following up. The assay must be rapid, simple, easy to implement, and produce quick results and preferably at a low cost. In this work, we developed and validated a colorimetric microtiter assay using the resazurin viability dye. The parameters of the resazurin method for high-throughput screening (HTS) using natural extracts against Aspergillus fumigatus were optimized and set up. The extracts plus RPMI-1640 modified medium containing the spores and 0.002% resazurin were added per well. The fluorescence was read after 24 to 30 h of incubation. The resazurin proved to be as suitable as Alamar Blue for determining the minimal inhibitory concentration of different antifungals against A. fumigatus and effective to analyze fungicidal and fungistatic compounds. An HTS of 12 000 microbial extracts was carried out against two A. fumigatus strains, and 2.7% of the extracts displayed antifungal activity. Our group has been the first to use this methodology for screening a collection of natural extracts to identify compounds with antifungal activity against the medically important human pathogen A. fumigatus.

  17. High-throughput platform for design and screening of peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Chandra, Divya; Sosa, Ricardo D.; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Crystal growth modifiers present a versatile tool for controlling crystal shape and size. Our work described here focuses on the design and screening of short peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals using high-throughput approaches. We designed a small library of 13 peptides containing Ala and Asp amino acids arranged in varying sequences that mimic ubiquitous motifs in natural calcium-binding proteins. Peptides were screened using a quick assay to measure their efficacy for inhibiting COM crystallization. Our results show that subtle variations in the placement of Ala and Asp residues in the peptide sequence can have a profound effect on their inhibition potential. We were able to discover peptide sequences that inhibit COM crystallization more effectively than some of the well-known COM inhibitors, such as citrate. Our results also demonstrate that peptides can be engineered to bind to specific faces of COM crystals. Peptide sequences identified in this work are promising candidates for further development as therapies for biomineral-related diseases, such as kidney stone disease. Collectively, our work establishes new paradigms for the design, synthesis, and screening of peptides for controlling crystal habit with the potential to impact a variety of fields, including drug discovery, advanced materials, catalysis and separations.

  18. ARQiv-HTS, a versatile whole-organism screening platform enabling in vivo drug discovery at high-throughput rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David T; Eroglu, Arife Unal; Wang, Guohua; Zhang, Liyun; Sengupta, Sumitra; Ding, Ding; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Walker, Steven L; Ji, Hongkai; Qian, Jiang; Mumm, Jeff S

    2016-12-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model for whole-organism small-molecule screening. However, most zebrafish-based chemical screens have achieved only mid-throughput rates. Here we describe a versatile whole-organism drug discovery platform that can achieve true high-throughput screening (HTS) capacities. This system combines our automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv) system with customized robotics, and is termed 'ARQiv-HTS'. We detail the process of establishing and implementing ARQiv-HTS: (i) assay design and optimization, (ii) calculation of sample size and hit criteria, (iii) large-scale egg production, (iv) automated compound titration, (v) dispensing of embryos into microtiter plates, and (vi) reporter quantification. We also outline what we see as best practice strategies for leveraging the power of ARQiv-HTS for zebrafish-based drug discovery, and address technical challenges of applying zebrafish to large-scale chemical screens. Finally, we provide a detailed protocol for a recently completed inaugural ARQiv-HTS effort, which involved the identification of compounds that elevate insulin reporter activity. Compounds that increased the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells represent potential new therapeutics for diabetic patients. For this effort, individual screening sessions took 1 week to conclude, and sessions were performed iteratively approximately every other day to increase throughput. At the conclusion of the screen, more than a half million drug-treated larvae had been evaluated. Beyond this initial example, however, the ARQiv-HTS platform is adaptable to almost any reporter-based assay designed to evaluate the effects of chemical compounds in living small-animal models. ARQiv-HTS thus enables large-scale whole-organism drug discovery for a variety of model species and from numerous disease-oriented perspectives.

  19. Large-scale plasmonic microarrays for label-free high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Huang, Min; Yanik, Ahmet Ali; Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Shi, Peng; Aksu, Serap; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Altug, Hatice

    2011-11-07

    Microarrays allowing simultaneous analysis of thousands of parameters can significantly accelerate screening of large libraries of pharmaceutical compounds and biomolecular interactions. For large-scale studies on diverse biomedical samples, reliable, label-free, and high-content microarrays are needed. In this work, using large-area plasmonic nanohole arrays, we demonstrate for the first time a large-scale label-free microarray technology with over one million sensors on a single microscope slide. A dual-color filter imaging method is introduced to dramatically increase the accuracy, reliability, and signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors in a highly multiplexed manner. We used our technology to quantitatively measure protein-protein interactions. Our platform, which is highly compatible with the current microarray scanning systems can enable a powerful screening technology and facilitate diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  20. Identification and validation of vesicant therapeutic targets using a high, throughput siRNA screening approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-24

    CONTRACT NUMBER siRNA screening approach 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ruff, AL, Beach, S, Lehman , J, Rothwell, C...Sarah Beach · John Lehman · Cristin Rothwell · James F. Dillman Received: 15 September 2014 / Accepted: 25 November 2014 / Published online: 24...Defense, or the US Government. A. L. Ruff (*) · S. Beach · J. Lehman · C. Rothwell · J. F. Dillman Cell and Molecular Biology Branch, Research

  1. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities is that th...

  2. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities is that t...

  3. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities i...

  4. Expanding the mammalian phenotype ontology to support automated exchange of high throughput mouse phenotyping data generated by large-scale mouse knockout screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    A vast array of data is about to emerge from the large scale high-throughput mouse knockout phenotyping projects worldwide. It is critical that this information is captured in a standardized manner, made accessible, and is fully integrated with other phenotype data sets for comprehensive querying and analysis across all phenotype data types. The volume of data generated by the high-throughput phenotyping screens is expected to grow exponentially, thus, automated methods and standards to exchange phenotype data are required. The IMPC (International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium) is using the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) ontology in the automated annotation of phenodeviant data from high throughput phenotyping screens. 287 new term additions with additional hierarchy revisions were made in multiple branches of the MP ontology to accurately describe the results generated by these high throughput screens. Because these large scale phenotyping data sets will be reported using the MP as the common data standard for annotation and data exchange, automated importation of these data to MGI (Mouse Genome Informatics) and other resources is possible without curatorial effort. Maximum biomedical value of these mutant mice will come from integrating primary high-throughput phenotyping data with secondary, comprehensive phenotypic analyses combined with published phenotype details on these and related mutants at MGI and other resources.

  5. High-throughput screening of high Monascus pigment-producing strain based on digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Meng-lei; Wang, Lan; Yang, Zhi-xia; Chen, Hong-zhang

    2016-04-01

    This work proposed a new method which applied image processing and support vector machine (SVM) for screening of mold strains. Taking Monascus as example, morphological characteristics of Monascus colony were quantified by image processing. And the association between the characteristics and pigment production capability was determined by SVM. On this basis, a highly automated screening strategy was achieved. The accuracy of the proposed strategy is 80.6 %, which is compatible with the existing methods (81.1 % for microplate and 85.4 % for flask). Meanwhile, the screening of 500 colonies only takes 20-30 min, which is the highest rate among all published results. By applying this automated method, 13 strains with high-predicted production were obtained and the best one produced as 2.8-fold (226 U/mL) of pigment and 1.9-fold (51 mg/L) of lovastatin compared with the parent strain. The current study provides us with an effective and promising method for strain improvement.

  6. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Jiang, Yiyue; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel) within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy–a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary) and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated) E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production. PMID:27846239

  7. High-throughput screen for the chemical inhibitors of antiapoptotic bcl-2 family proteins by multiplex flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curpan, Ramona F; Simons, Peter C; Zhai, Dayong; Young, Susan M; Carter, Mark B; Bologa, Cristian G; Oprea, Tudor I; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Reed, John C; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    The human Bcl-2 family includes six antiapoptotic members (Bcl-2, Bcl-B, Bcl-W, Bcl-X(L), Bfl-1, and Mcl-1) and many proapoptotic members, wherein a balance between the two determines cell life or death in many physiological and disease contexts. Elevated expression of various antiapoptotic Bcl-2 members is commonly observed in cancers, and chemical inhibitors of these proteins have been shown to promote apoptosis of malignant cells in culture, in animal models, and in human clinical trials. All six antiapoptotic members bind a helix from the proapoptotic family member Bim, thus quenching Bim's apoptotic signal. Here, we describe the use of a multiplex, high-throughput flow cytometry assay for the discovery of small molecule modulators that disrupt the interaction between the antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family and Bim. The six antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins and bound individually to six glutathione bead sets, with each set having a different intensity of red fluorescence. A fluorescein-conjugated Bcl-2 homology region 3 (BH3) peptide from Bim was employed as a universal ligand. Flow cytometry measured the amount of green peptide bound to each bead set in a given well, with inhibitory compounds resulting in a decrease of green fluorescence on one or more bead set(s). Hits and cheminformatically selected analogs were retested in a dose-response series, resulting in three "active" compounds for Bcl-B. These three compounds were validated by fluorescence polarization and isothermal titration calorimetry. We discuss some of the lessons learned about screening a chemical library provided by the National Institutes of Health Small Molecule Repository (∼195,000 compounds) using high-throughput flow cytometry.

  8. Leishmania genome analysis and high-throughput immunological screening identifies tuzin as a novel vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Bhavana Sethu; Wang, Ruobing; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-06-24

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania species. It is a major health concern affecting 88 countries and threatening 350 million people globally. Unfortunately, there are no vaccines and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. The emerging cases of drug-resistance further aggravate the situation, demanding rapid drug and vaccine development. The genome sequence of Leishmania, provides access to novel genes that hold potential as chemotherapeutic targets or vaccine candidates. In this study, we selected 19 antigenic genes from about 8000 common Leishmania genes based on the Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum genome information available in the pathogen databases. Potential vaccine candidates thus identified were screened using an in vitro high throughput immunological platform developed in the laboratory. Four candidate genes coding for tuzin, flagellar glycoprotein-like protein (FGP), phospholipase A1-like protein (PLA1) and potassium voltage-gated channel protein (K VOLT) showed a predominant protective Th1 response over disease exacerbating Th2. We report the immunogenic properties and protective efficacy of one of the four antigens, tuzin, as a DNA vaccine against Leishmania donovani challenge. Our results show that administration of tuzin DNA protected BALB/c mice against L. donovani challenge and that protective immunity was associated with higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 production in comparison to IL-4 and IL-10. Our study presents a simple approach to rapidly identify potential vaccine candidates using the exhaustive information stored in the genome and an in vitro high-throughput immunological platform.

  9. Application of parallel liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for high throughput microsomal stability screening of compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongda; Nemes, Csaba; Jenkins, Kelly M; Rourick, Robyn A; Kassel, Daniel B; Liu, Charles Z C

    2002-02-01

    Solution-phase and solid-phase parallel synthesis and high throughput screening have enabled biologically active and selective compounds to be identified at an unprecedented rate. The challenge has been to convert these hits into viable development candidates. To accelerate the conversion of these hits into lead development candidates, early assessment of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of these compounds is being made. In particular, in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) assays are being conducted at earlier and earlier stages of discovery with the goal of reducing the attrition rate of these potential drug candidates as they progress through development. In this report, we present an eight-channel parallel liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) system in combination with custom Visual Basic and Applescript automated data processing applications for high throughput early ADME. The parallel LC/MS system was configured with one set of gradient LC pumps and an eight-channel multiple probe autosampler. The flow was split equivalently into eight streams before the multiple probe autosampler and recombined after the eight columns and just prior to the mass spectrometer ion source. The system was tested for column-to-column variation and for reproducibility over a 17 h period (approximately 500 injections per column). The variations in retention time and peak area were determined to be less than 2 and 10%, respectively, in both tests. The parallel LC/MS system described permits time-course microsomal incubations (t(o), t5, t15, t30) to be measured in triplicate and enables estimations of t 1/2 microsomal stability. The parallel LC/MS system is capable of analyzing up to 240 samples per hour and permits the complete profiling up to two microtiter plates of compounds per day (i.e., 176 test substrate compounds + sixteen controls).

  10. A novel high throughput assay for anthelmintic drug screening and resistance diagnosis by real-time monitoring of parasite motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Smout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC(50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and -resistant isolates of H. contortus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing.

  11. High-throughput system for screening of high L-lactic acid-productivity strains in deep-well microtiter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiangyun; Song, Jiali; Yu, Bo; Liu, Huilan; Li, Chao; Zhuang, Yingping; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-11-01

    For strain improvement, robust and scalable high-throughput cultivation systems as well as simple and rapid high-throughput detection methods are crucial. However, most of the screening methods for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were conducted in shake flasks and detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the screening program laborious, time-consuming and costly. In this study, an integrated strategy for high-throughput screening of high L-lactic acid-productivity strains by Bacillus coagulans in deep-well microtiter plates (MTPs) was developed. The good agreement of fermentation results obtained in the MTPs platform with shake flasks confirmed that 24-well U-bottom MTPs could well alternate shake flasks for cell cultivation as a scale-down tool. The high-throughput pH indicator (bromocresol green) and L-lactate oxidase (LOD) assays were subsequently developed to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze L-lactic acid concentration. Together with the color halos method, the pH indicator assay and LOD assay, the newly developed three-step screening strategy has greatly accelerated the screening process for LAB strains with low cost. As a result, two high L-lactic acid-productivity mutants, IH6 and IIIB5, were successfully screened out, which presented, respectively, 42.75 and 46.10 % higher productivities than that of the parent strain in a 5-L bioreactor.

  12. TLC bioautography: high throughput technique for screening of bioactive natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhihong; Wu, Tao

    2013-06-28

    TLC bioautography is a method that combines chromatographic separation and in situ biological activity determination. The antimicrobial, antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities can be performed on TLC bioautography. This method is mainly used for preliminary screening natural products possessing these biological activities and for the bioactivity-directed fractionation and isolation of active components from complex extracts. This review covers the mechanisms and methodology of the antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibition adopted on TLC. It will be in particular discuss the recent advances in these technologies and assess their applications in targeting natural products.

  13. A High-Throughput Screening Model of the Tumor Microenvironment for Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Guha, Rajarshi; Lengyel, Ernst; Kenny, Hilary A; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-06-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the processes of tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. We have used a multilayered 3D primary cell culture model that reproduces the human ovarian cancer metastatic microenvironment to study the effect of the microenvironment on the pharmacological responses of different classes of drugs on cancer cell proliferation. A collection of oncology drugs was screened to identify compounds that inhibited the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells growing as monolayers or forming spheroids, on plastic and on a 3D microenvironment culture model of the omentum metastatic site, and also cells already in preformed spheroids. Target-based analysis of the pharmacological responses revealed that several classes of targets were more efficacious in cancer cells growing in the absence of the metastatic microenvironment, and other target classes were less efficacious in cancer cells in preformed spheres compared to forming spheroid cultures. These findings show that both the cellular context of the tumor microenvironment and cell adhesion mode have an essential role in cancer cell drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to perform screens for new drugs using model systems that more faithfully recapitulate the tissue composition at the site of tumor growth and metastasis.

  14. Development of a High Throughput Platform for Screening Glycoside Hydrolases Based on Oxime-NIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Guenther, Joel M.; Gao, Jian; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Tran, Huu; Reyes-Ortiz, Vimalier; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Heins, Richard; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik; Deutsch, Samuel; Loqué, Dominique; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake A.; Adams, Paul D.; Singh, Anup K.; Fox, Brian G.; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective hydrolysis of biomass into sugars for biofuel production requires high-performance low-cost glycoside hydrolase (GH) cocktails that are active under demanding process conditions. Improving the performance of GH cocktails depends on knowledge of many critical parameters, including individual enzyme stabilities, optimal reaction conditions, kinetics, and specificity of reaction. With this information, rate- and/or yield-limiting reactions can be potentially improved through substitution, synergistic complementation, or protein engineering. Given the wide range of substrates and methods used for GH characterization, it is difficult to compare results across a myriad of approaches to identify high performance and synergistic combinations of enzymes. Here, we describe a platform for systematic screening of GH activities using automatic biomass handling, bioconjugate chemistry, robotic liquid handling, and nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS). Twelve well-characterized substrates spanning the types of glycosidic linkages found in plant cell walls are included in the experimental workflow. To test the application of this platform and substrate panel, we studied the reactivity of three engineered cellulases and their synergy of combination across a range of reaction conditions and enzyme concentrations. We anticipate that large-scale screening using the standardized platform and substrates will generate critical datasets to enable direct comparison of enzyme activities for cocktail design. PMID:26528471

  15. Discovery of selective inhibitors against EBNA1 via high throughput in silico virtual screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV latent infection is associated with several human malignancies and is a causal agent of lymphoproliferative diseases during immunosuppression. While inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA polymerases, like gancyclovir, reduce EBV lytic cycle infection, these treatments have limited efficacy for treating latent infection. EBNA1 is an EBV-encoded DNA-binding protein required for viral genome maintenance during latent infection. METHODOLOGY: Here, we report the identification of a new class of small molecules that inhibit EBNA1 DNA binding activity. These compounds were identified by virtual screening of 90,000 low molecular mass compounds using computational docking programs with the solved crystal structure of EBNA1. Four structurally related compounds were found to inhibit EBNA1-DNA binding in biochemical assays with purified EBNA1 protein. Compounds had a range of 20-100 microM inhibition of EBNA1 in fluorescence polarization assays and were further validated for inhibition using electrophoresis mobility shift assays. These compounds exhibited no significant inhibition of an unrelated DNA binding protein. Three of these compounds inhibited EBNA1 transcription activation function in cell-based assays and reduced EBV genome copy number when incubated with a Burkitt lymphoma cell line. CONCLUSIONS: These experiments provide a proof-of-principle that virtual screening can be used to identify specific inhibitors of EBNA1 that may have potential for treatment of EBV latent infection.

  16. Predictive models for anti-tubercular molecules using machine learning on high-throughput biological screening datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periwal Vinita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, affecting more than two billion people around the globe and is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Recent reports suggest that Mtb has been developing resistance to the widely used anti-tubercular drugs resulting in the emergence and spread of multi drug-resistant (MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains throughout the world. In view of this global epidemic, there is an urgent need to facilitate fast and efficient lead identification methodologies. Target based screening of large compound libraries has been widely used as a fast and efficient approach for lead identification, but is restricted by the knowledge about the target structure. Whole organism screens on the other hand are target-agnostic and have been now widely employed as an alternative for lead identification but they are limited by the time and cost involved in running the screens for large compound libraries. This could be possibly be circumvented by using computational approaches to prioritize molecules for screening programmes. Results We utilized physicochemical properties of compounds to train four supervised classifiers (Naïve Bayes, Random Forest, J48 and SMO on three publicly available bioassay screens of Mtb inhibitors and validated the robustness of the predictive models using various statistical measures. Conclusions This study is a comprehensive analysis of high-throughput bioassay data for anti-tubercular activity and the application of machine learning approaches to create target-agnostic predictive models for anti-tubercular agents.

  17. An efficient detection agent for the high throughput screening of recombinant manufacturing cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger, Valérie; Sauvage, Christophe; Kobr, Michel; Imhof, Markus O

    2013-12-31

    To ensure the selection of high producing recombinant cell lines, a number of screening processes were developed in the presence of detection agents. Here, CHO cell lines secreting recombinant antibodies were detected in semi-solid medium containing detection agents. The aim was to compare two protein A-derived detection agents to two commercial fluorescent antibodies directed against the Fc part of the antibody of interest: the protein A derived Z domain fused to the red fluorescent protein and protein A labelled with a fluorescent Dylight™ 488 dye. All of these agents were compatible with cell recovery and colony formation, and specifically detected colonies secreting recombinant antibodies. Optimisation of the concentration of the fluorescent protein A allowed the identification of a higher number of good producers. Thus these data demonstrate that fluorescently labelled protein A-derivatives can be used for the selection of high producer cells.

  18. Screening of Bacillus coagulans strains in lignin supplemented minimal medium with high throughput turbidity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Glaser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to extend the options for screening and characterization of microorganism through kinetic growth parameters. In order to obtain data, automated turbidimetric measurements were accomplished to observe the response of strains of Bacillus coagulans. For the characterization, it was decided to examine the influence of varying concentrations of lignin with respect to bacterial growth. Different mathematical models are used for comparison: logistic, Gompertz, Baranyi and Richards and Stannard. The growth response was characterized by parameters like maximum growth rate, maximum population, and the lag time. In this short analysis we present a mathematical approach towards a comparison of different microorganisms. Furthermore, it can be demonstrated that lignin in low concentrations can have a positive influence on the growth of B. coagulans.

  19. High-throughput screening of inorganic compounds for the discovery of novel dielectric and optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis, Ioannis; Mrdjenovich, David; Ballouz, Eric; Liu, Miao; Winston, Donald; Chen, Wei; Graf, Tanja; Schladt, Thomas D.; Persson, Kristin A.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2017-01-01

    Dielectrics are an important class of materials that are ubiquitous in modern electronic applications. Even though their properties are important for the performance of devices, the number of compounds with known dielectric constant is on the order of a few hundred. Here, we use Density Functional Perturbation Theory as a way to screen for the dielectric constant and refractive index of materials in a fast and computationally efficient way. Our results constitute the largest dielectric tensors database to date, containing 1,056 compounds. Details regarding the computational methodology and technical validation are presented along with the format of our publicly available data. In addition, we integrate our dataset with the Materials Project allowing users easy access to material properties. Finally, we explain how our dataset and calculation methodology can be used in the search for novel dielectric compounds. PMID:28140408

  20. High-throughput quantum chemistry and virtual screening for OLED material components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Giesen, David J.; Hughes, Thomas F.; Goldberg, Alexander; Cao, Yixiang

    2013-09-01

    Computational structure enumeration, analysis using an automated simulation workflow and filtering of large chemical structure libraries to identify lead systems, has become a central paradigm in drug discovery research. Transferring this paradigm to challenges in materials science is now possible due to advances in the speed of computational resources and the efficiency and stability of chemical simulation packages. State-of-the-art software tools that have been developed for drug discovery can be applied to efficiently explore the chemical design space to identify solutions for problems such as organic light-emitting diode material components. In this work, virtual screening for OLED materials based on intrinsic quantum mechanical properties is illustrated. Also, a new approach to more reliably identify candidate systems is introduced that is based on the chemical reaction energetics of defect pathways for OLED materials.

  1. High-throughput screening using patient-derived tumor xenografts to predict clinical trial drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Korn, Joshua M; Ferretti, Stéphane; Monahan, John E; Wang, Youzhen; Singh, Mallika; Zhang, Chao; Schnell, Christian; Yang, Guizhi; Zhang, Yun; Balbin, O Alejandro; Barbe, Stéphanie; Cai, Hongbo; Casey, Fergal; Chatterjee, Susmita; Chiang, Derek Y; Chuai, Shannon; Cogan, Shawn M; Collins, Scott D; Dammassa, Ernesta; Ebel, Nicolas; Embry, Millicent; Green, John; Kauffmann, Audrey; Kowal, Colleen; Leary, Rebecca J; Lehar, Joseph; Liang, Ying; Loo, Alice; Lorenzana, Edward; Robert McDonald, E; McLaughlin, Margaret E; Merkin, Jason; Meyer, Ronald; Naylor, Tara L; Patawaran, Montesa; Reddy, Anupama; Röelli, Claudia; Ruddy, David A; Salangsang, Fernando; Santacroce, Francesca; Singh, Angad P; Tang, Yan; Tinetto, Walter; Tobler, Sonja; Velazquez, Roberto; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Von Arx, Fabian; Wang, Hui Qin; Wang, Zongyao; Wiesmann, Marion; Wyss, Daniel; Xu, Fiona; Bitter, Hans; Atadja, Peter; Lees, Emma; Hofmann, Francesco; Li, En; Keen, Nicholas; Cozens, Robert; Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Pryer, Nancy K; Williams, Juliet A; Sellers, William R

    2015-11-01

    Profiling candidate therapeutics with limited cancer models during preclinical development hinders predictions of clinical efficacy and identifying factors that underlie heterogeneous patient responses for patient-selection strategies. We established ∼1,000 patient-derived tumor xenograft models (PDXs) with a diverse set of driver mutations. With these PDXs, we performed in vivo compound screens using a 1 × 1 × 1 experimental design (PDX clinical trial or PCT) to assess the population responses to 62 treatments across six indications. We demonstrate both the reproducibility and the clinical translatability of this approach by identifying associations between a genotype and drug response, and established mechanisms of resistance. In addition, our results suggest that PCTs may represent a more accurate approach than cell line models for assessing the clinical potential of some therapeutic modalities. We therefore propose that this experimental paradigm could potentially improve preclinical evaluation of treatment modalities and enhance our ability to predict clinical trial responses.

  2. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, H; Kruijswijk, Z; Molenaar, D; Kleerebezem, M; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T

    2009-12-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing protocols are cumbersome. To reduce screening costs, several models have been developed to miniaturize the cheese manufacturing process. However, these models are not able to accommodate the throughputs required for systematic screening programs. Here, we describe a protocol that allows the parallel manufacturing of approximately 600 cheeses in individual cheese vats each with individual process specifications. Protocols for the production of miniaturized Gouda- and Cheddar-type cheeses have been developed. Starting with as little as 1.7 mL of milk, miniature cheeses of about 170 mg can be produced and they closely resemble conventionally produced cheese in terms of acidification profiles, moisture and salt contents, proteolysis, flavor profiles, and microstructure. Flavor profiling of miniature cheeses manufactured with and without mixed-strain adjunct starter cultures allowed the distinguishing of the different cheeses. Moreover, single-strain adjunct starter cultures engineered to overexpress important flavor-related enzymes revealed effects similar to those described in industrial cheese. Benchmarking against industrial cheese produced from the same raw materials established a good correlation between their proteolytic degradation products and their flavor profiles. These miniature cheeses, referred to as microcheeses, open new possibilities to study many aspects of cheese production, which will not only accelerate product development but also allow a more systematic approach to investigate the complex biochemistry and microbiology of cheese making.

  3. A high-throughput screen for quorum-sensing inhibitors that target acyl-homoserine lactone synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Quin H; Grove, Tyler L; Booker, Squire J; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-08-20

    Many Proteobacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing to control specific genes. Acyl-HSL synthesis requires unique enzymes that use S-adenosyl methionine as an acyl acceptor and amino acid donor. We developed and executed an enzyme-coupled high-throughput cell-free screen to discover acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors. The three strongest inhibitors were equally active against two different acyl-HSL synthases: Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 and Yersinia pestis YspI. Two of these inhibitors showed activity in whole cells. The most potent compound behaves as a noncompetitive inhibitor with a Ki of 0.7 µM and showed activity in a cell-based assay. Quorum-sensing signal synthesis inhibitors will be useful in attempts to understand acyl-HSL synthase catalysis and as a tool in studies of quorum-sensing control of gene expression. Because acyl-HSL quorum-sensing controls virulence of some bacterial pathogens, anti-quorum-sensing chemicals have been sought as potential therapeutic agents. Our screen and identification of acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors serve as a basis for efforts to target quorum-sensing signal synthesis as an antivirulence approach.

  4. High-Throughput siRNA Screening to Reveal GATA-2 Upstream Transcriptional Mechanisms in Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Saito

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell types. The transcription factor GATA-2 is expressed in both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and is essential for cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recently, evidence from studies of aplastic anemia, MonoMAC syndrome, and lung cancer has demonstrated a mechanistic link between GATA-2 and human pathophysiology. GATA-2-dependent disease processes have been extensively analyzed; however, the transcriptional mechanisms upstream of GATA-2 remain less understood. Here, we conducted high-throughput small-interfering-RNA (siRNA library screening and showed that YN-1, a human erythroleukemia cell line, expressed high levels of GATA-2 following the activation of the hematopoietic-specific 1S promoter. As transient luciferase reporter assay in YN-1 cells revealed the highest promoter activity in the 1S promoter fused with GATA-2 intronic enhancer (+9.9 kb/1S; therefore, we established a cell line capable of stably expressing +9.9 kb/1S-Luciferase. Subsequently, we screened 995 transcription factor genes and revealed that CITED2 acts as a GATA-2 activator in human hematopoietic cells. These results provide novel insights into and further identify the regulatory mechanism of GATA-2.

  5. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for chemical library screening against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Dayong; Godoi, Paulo; Sergienko, Eduard; Dahl, Russell; Chan, Xochella; Brown, Brock; Rascon, Justin; Hurder, Andrew; Su, Ying; Chung, Thomas D Y; Jin, Chaofang; Diaz, Paul; Reed, John C

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins occurs commonly in human cancers. Bfl-1 is highly expressed in some types of malignant cells, contributing significantly to tumor cell survival and chemoresistance. Therefore, it would be desirable to have chemical antagonists of Bfl-1. To this end, we devised a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using Bfl-1 protein and fluorescein-conjugated Bid BH3 peptide, which was employed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. Approximately 66 000 compounds were screened for the ability to inhibit BH3 peptide binding to Bfl-1, yielding 14 reproducible hits with ≥50% displacement. After dose-response analysis and confirmation using a secondary assay based on time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), two groups of Bfl-1-specific inhibitors were identified, including chloromaleimide and sulfonylpyrimidine series compounds. FPAs generated for each of the six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins demonstrated selective binding of both classes of compounds to Bfl-1. Analogs of the sulfonylpyrimidine series were synthesized and compared with the original hit for Bfl-1 binding by both FPAs and TR-FRET assays. The resulting structure-activity relation analysis led to the chemical probe compound CID-2980973 (ML042). Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the HTS assay for discovery of selective chemical inhibitors of Bfl-1.

  6. Use of activity-based probes to develop high throughput screening assays that can be performed in complex cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Deu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High throughput screening (HTS is one of the primary tools used to identify novel enzyme inhibitors. However, its applicability is generally restricted to targets that can either be expressed recombinantly or purified in large quantities. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we described a method to use activity-based probes (ABPs to identify substrates that are sufficiently selective to allow HTS in complex biological samples. Because ABPs label their target enzymes through the formation of a permanent covalent bond, we can correlate labeling of target enzymes in a complex mixture with inhibition of turnover of a substrate in that same mixture. Thus, substrate specificity can be determined and substrates with sufficiently high selectivity for HTS can be identified. In this study, we demonstrate this method by using an ABP for dipeptidyl aminopeptidases to identify (Pro-Arg2-Rhodamine as a specific substrate for DPAP1 in Plasmodium falciparum lysates and Cathepsin C in rat liver extracts. We then used this substrate to develop highly sensitive HTS assays (Z'>0.8 that are suitable for use in screening large collections of small molecules (i.e >300,000 for inhibitors of these proteases. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use broad-spectrum ABPs to identify target-specific substrates. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this approach will have value for many enzymatic systems where access to large amounts of active enzyme is problematic.

  7. A high throughput screen identifies Nefopam as targeting cell proliferation in β-catenin driven neoplastic and reactive fibroproliferative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Poon

    Full Text Available Fibroproliferative disorders include neoplastic and reactive processes (e.g. desmoid tumor and hypertrophic scars. They are characterized by activation of β-catenin signaling, and effective pharmacologic approaches are lacking. Here we undertook a high throughput screen using human desmoid tumor cell cultures to identify agents that would inhibit cell viability in tumor cells but not normal fibroblasts. Agents were then tested in additional cell cultures for an effect on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and β-catenin protein level. Ultimately they were tested in Apc1638N mice, which develop desmoid tumors, as well as in wild type mice subjected to full thickness skin wounds. The screen identified Neofopam, as an agent that inhibited cell numbers to 42% of baseline in cell cultures from β-catenin driven fibroproliferative disorders. Nefopam decreased cell proliferation and β-catenin protein level to 50% of baseline in these same cell cultures. The half maximal effective concentration in-vitro was 0.5 uM and there was a plateau in the effect after 48 hours of treatment. Nefopam caused a 45% decline in tumor number, 33% decline in tumor volume, and a 40% decline in scar size when tested in mice. There was also a 50% decline in β-catenin level in-vivo. Nefopam targets β-catenin protein level in mesenchymal cells in-vitro and in-vivo, and may be an effective therapy for neoplastic and reactive processes driven by β-catenin mediated signaling.

  8. Adaptation of the bivalve embryotoxicity assay for the high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Rita; Montagna, Michele; Balbi, Teresa; Raffo, Enrico; Palumbo, Franca; Canesi, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Emerging contaminants (such as Endocrine disrupting chemicals-EDCs, brominated and perfluorinated compounds-BFRs and PFCs, pharmaceuticals) are chemicals currently not included in regulatory monitoring programs, and whose fate and biological impacts are poorly understood. Assessment of ecosystem health with respect to these chemicals is of particular concern also in the marine environment: in this respect, data on the effects on early life stages are important to establish the sensitivity of marine species. In this work, the acute (48 h) bivalve embryo toxicity test was applied for screening the developmental effects of different emerging contaminants in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The assay was adapted to 96-microwell plates, and standardized in order to obtain to normal D-shaped larvae with acceptability of test results based on negative control and positive control (copper) comparable with those reported in literature for Mytilus spp. The effects of different model compounds representative of EDCs (Nonylphenol-NP and Bisphenol A-BPA), BFRs (Tetrabromobisphenol A-TBBPA), PFCs (perfluorooctanoid acid-PFOA and perfluorooctane sulphonate-PFOAS) and pharmaceuticals (Ibuprofen-IBU, Diclofenac-DCF, Bezafibrate-BEZA) in a wide concentration range (0.01-0.1-1-10-100-1000 μg/L) were evaluated. The assay proved as a sensitive tool for high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in a marine species, leading to production of significant amounts of data that may be useful for regulatory purposes.

  9. High-throughput screening assays for CYP2B6 metabolism and inhibition using fluorogenic vivid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Bryan D; Goossens, Tony A; Braun, Heidi A; Ozers, Mary S; Smith, Ronald W; Lebakken, Connie; Trubetskoy, Olga V

    2003-01-01

    CYP2B6 is a highly polymorphic P450 isozyme involved in the metabolism of endo- and xenobiotics with known implications for the activation of many procarcinogens resulting in carcinogenesis. However, lack of validated high-throughput screening (HTS) CYP2B6 assays has limited the current understanding and full characterization of this isozyme's involvement in human drug metabolism. Here, we have developed and characterized a fluorescence-based HTS assay employing recombinant human CYP2B6 and 2 novel fluorogenic substrates (the Vivid CYP2B6 Blue and Cyan Substrates). Assay validation included testing the inhibitory potency of a panel of drugs and compounds known to be metabolized by this isozyme, including CYP2B6 substrates, inhibitors, and known inducers. Compound rankings based on inhibitory potency in the Vivid CYP2B6 Blue and Cyan Assays matched compound rankings based on relative affinity measurements from previously published data (K(i), K(d), or K(m) values) for the CYP2B6 isozyme. In conclusion, these assays are proven to be robust and sensitive, with broad dynamic ranges and kinetic parameters allowing screening in HTS mode of a large panel of compounds for CYP2B6 metabolism and inhibition, and are a valuable new tool for CYP2B6 studies.

  10. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Shimada

    Full Text Available The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish. This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf, knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1, and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  11. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J V; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Bocciardi, Renata

    2016-06-01

    The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification.

  12. Discovery of novel BRD4 inhibitors by high-throughput screening, crystallography, and cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongya; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhifeng; Xie, Yiqian; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Limin; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Cheng

    2017-03-09

    As an epigenetic reader, BRD4 regulates the transcription of important downstream genes that are essential for the survival of tumor cells. Small molecular inhibitors targeting the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-BD1) have showed promising potentials in the therapies of BRD4-related cancers. Through AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screening assay, a novel small molecular inhibitor was identified, and named DCBD-005, which inhibited the binding between BRD4-BD1 and acetylated lysines with an IC50 value of 0.81±0.03μM. The compound DCBD-005 effectively inhibited the viability, caused cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis in human leukemia MV4-11 cells. Moreover, the crystal structure of compound DCBD-005 with the BRD4-BD1 was determined at 1.72Å resolution, which revealed the binding mechanism of the leading compound, and also provided solid basis for further structure-based optimization. These results indicated that this novel BRD4-BD1 inhibitor DCBD-005 is promising to be developed into a drug candidate in the treatment of BRD4-related diseases.

  13. A simple, robust enzymatic-based high-throughput screening method for antimicrobial peptides discovery against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppuswamy; Roy, Arpita; Sanikommu, Suma; Arockiaraj, Jesu; Pasupuleti, Mukesh

    2014-05-01

    The indiscriminate usage of antibiotics has created a major problem in the form of antibiotic resistance. Even though new antimicrobial drug discovery programs have been in place from the last two decades, still we are unsuccessful in identifying novel molecules that have a potential to become new therapeutic agents for the treatment of microbial infections. A major problem in most screening studies is the requirement of high-throughput techniques. Given this, we present here an enzyme-based robust method for screening antimicrobial agent's active against Escherichia coli. This method is based upon the ability of the intracellular innate enzyme to cleave o-nitrophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside (non-chromogenic) to o-nitrophenolate (ONP) (chromogenic) upon the membrane damage or disruption. In comparison with the other currently available methods, we believe that our method provides an opportunity for real-time monitoring of the antimicrobial agents action by measuring the ONP generation in a user-friendly manner. Even though this method can be applied to other strain, our experience shows that one has to be careful especially when the pigments or metabolites present in the bacteria have the same wavelength absorbance.

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis for high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jun Gao; Ya-Jing Chen; Duo Zuo; Ming-Ming Xiao; Ying Li; Hua Guo; Ning Zhang; Rui-Bing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Novel serum biomarkers are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of serum screening for early HCC diagnosis. This study employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to analyze the differential expression of serum glycoproteins between HCC and normal control serum samples. Methods:Lectin affnity chromatography (LAC) was used to enrich glycoproteins from the serum samples. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis combined with stable isotope dimethyl labeling and 2D liquid chromatography (LC) separations were performed to examine the differential levels of the detected proteins between HCC and control serum samples. Western blot was used to analyze the differential expression levels of the three serum proteins. Results:A total of 2,280 protein groups were identiifed in the serum samples from HCC patients by using the 2D LC-MS/MS method. Up to 36 proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum, whereas 19 proteins were down-regulated. Three differential glycoproteins, namely, fibrinogen gamma chain (FGG), FOS-like antigen 2 (FOSL2), and α-1, 6-mannosylglycoprotein 6-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase B (MGAT5B) were validated by Western blot. All these three proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum samples. Conclusion:A quantitative glycoproteomic method was established and proven useful to determine potential novel biomarkers for HCC.

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis for high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hua-Jun; Chen, Ya-Jing; Zuo, Duo; Xiao, Ming-Ming; Li, Ying; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Rui-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Novel serum biomarkers are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of serum screening for early HCC diagnosis. This study employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to analyze the differential expression of serum glycoproteins between HCC and normal control serum samples. Methods Lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) was used to enrich glycoproteins from the serum samples. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis combined with stable isotope dimethyl labeling and 2D liquid chromatography (LC) separations were performed to examine the differential levels of the detected proteins between HCC and control serum samples. Western blot was used to analyze the differential expression levels of the three serum proteins. Results A total of 2,280 protein groups were identified in the serum samples from HCC patients by using the 2D LC-MS/MS method. Up to 36 proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum, whereas 19 proteins were down-regulated. Three differential glycoproteins, namely, fibrinogen gamma chain (FGG), FOS-like antigen 2 (FOSL2), and α-1,6-mannosylglycoprotein 6-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase B (MGAT5B) were validated by Western blot. All these three proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum samples. Conclusion A quantitative glycoproteomic method was established and proven useful to determine potential novel biomarkers for HCC. PMID:26487969

  16. Development of a homogeneous calcium mobilization assay for high throughput screening of mas-related gene receptor agonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui ZHANG; Pang-ke YAN; Cai-hong ZHOU; Jia-yu LIAO; Ming-wei WANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop homogeneous calcium mobilization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of mas-related gene (Mrg) receptor agonists. Methods: CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the full-length MrgD receptor and a calcium-sensitive dye were used to develop an HTS assay based on intracellular calcium influx. This method was applied to large-scale screening of a library containing 8000 synthetic compounds and natural product extracts, cAMP measurements were camed out to verify the bioactivities of the hits found by the calcium mobilization assay. Similar approaches were also employed in the identification of the MrgA1 recep-tor agonists following HTS of 16 000 samples. Results: EC50 values of the positive control compounds (β-alanine for MrgD receptor and dynorphin A for MrgA1 receptor) determined by the calcium mobilization assay were consistent with those reported in the literature, and the Z' factors were 0.65 and 0.50 for MrgD and MrgA1 receptor assay, respectively. About 31 compounds for the MrgD receptor and 48 compounds for the MrgA1 receptor showing ≥20% of the maximal agonist activities found in the controls were initially identified as hits. Secondary screen- ing confirmed that 2 compounds for each receptor possessed specific agonist activities. Intracellular cAMP level measurements indicated that the 2 confirmed hits displayed the functionality of the MrgD receptor agonists. Conclusion: A series of validation studies demonstrated that the homogeneous calcium mobili-zation assay developed was highly efficient, amenable to automation and a robust tool to screen potential MrgD and MrgA1 receptor agonists. Its application may be expanded to other G-protein coupled receptors that mobilize calcium influx upon activation.

  17. Targeting acetylcholinesterase: identification of chemical leads by high throughput screening, structure determination and molecular modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Berg

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is an essential enzyme that terminates cholinergic transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Compounds inhibiting this enzyme can be used (inter alia to treat cholinergic deficiencies (e.g. in Alzheimer's disease, but may also act as dangerous toxins (e.g. nerve agents such as sarin. Treatment of nerve agent poisoning involves use of antidotes, small molecules capable of reactivating AChE. We have screened a collection of organic molecules to assess their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of AChE, aiming to find lead compounds for further optimization leading to drugs with increased efficacy and/or decreased side effects. 124 inhibitors were discovered, with considerable chemical diversity regarding size, polarity, flexibility and charge distribution. An extensive structure determination campaign resulted in a set of crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. Overall, the ligands have substantial interactions with the peripheral anionic site of AChE, and the majority form additional interactions with the catalytic site (CAS. Reproduction of the bioactive conformation of six of the ligands using molecular docking simulations required modification of the default parameter settings of the docking software. The results show that docking-assisted structure-based design of AChE inhibitors is challenging and requires crystallographic support to obtain reliable results, at least with currently available software. The complex formed between C5685 and Mus musculus AChE (C5685•mAChE is a representative structure for the general binding mode of the determined structures. The CAS binding part of C5685 could not be structurally determined due to a disordered electron density map and the developed docking protocol was used to predict the binding modes of this part of the molecule. We believe that chemical modifications of our discovered inhibitors, biochemical and biophysical

  18. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deu John M Cruz

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne arthrogenic alphavirus that causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting weeks to years. The re-emergence of CHIKV has resulted in numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere, and threatens to expand in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the use of resazurin in a cell-based high-throughput assay, and an image-based high-content assay to identify and characterize inhibitors of CHIKV-infection in vitro. CHIKV is a highly cytopathic virus that rapidly kills infected cells. Thus, cell viability of HuH-7 cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of compounds was determined by measuring metabolic reduction of resazurin to identify inhibitors of CHIKV-associated cell death. A kinase inhibitor library of 4,000 compounds was screened against CHIKV infection of HuH-7 cells using the resazurin reduction assay, and the cell toxicity was also measured in non-infected cells. Seventy-two compounds showing ≥50% inhibition property against CHIKV at 10 µM were selected as primary hits. Four compounds having a benzofuran core scaffold (CND0335, CND0364, CND0366 and CND0415, one pyrrolopyridine (CND0545 and one thiazol-carboxamide (CND3514 inhibited CHIKV-associated cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values between 2.2 µM and 7.1 µM. Based on image analysis, these 6 hit compounds did not inhibit CHIKV replication in the host cell. However, CHIKV-infected cells manifested less prominent apoptotic blebs typical of CHIKV cytopathic effect compared with the control infection. Moreover, treatment with these compounds reduced viral titers in the medium of CHIKV-infected cells by up to 100-fold. In conclusion, this cell-based high-throughput screening assay using resazurin, combined with the image-based high content assay approach identified compounds against

  19. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  20. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  1. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  2. Flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network: a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canard Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Flavivirus encompasses more than 50 distinct species of arthropod-borne viruses, including several major human pathogens, such as West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and the four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV type 1-4. Each year, flaviviruses cause more than 100 million infections worldwide, some of which lead to life-threatening conditions such as encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. Among the viral proteins, NS3 and NS5 proteins constitute the major enzymatic components of the viral replication complex and are essential to the flavivirus life cycle. Results We report here the results of a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify the interactions between human host proteins and the flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins. Using our screen results and literature curation, we performed a global analysis of the NS3 and NS5 cellular targets based on functional annotation with the Gene Ontology features. We finally created the first flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network and analysed the topological features of this network. Our proteome mapping screen identified 108 human proteins interacting with NS3 or NS5 proteins or both. The global analysis of the cellular targets revealed the enrichment of host proteins involved in RNA binding, transcription regulation, vesicular transport or innate immune response regulation. Conclusions We proposed that the selective disruption of these newly identified host/virus interactions could represent a novel and attractive therapeutic strategy in treating flavivirus infections. Our virus-host interaction map provides a basis to unravel fundamental processes about flavivirus subversion of the host replication machinery and/or immune defence strategy.

  3. Algorithmic approach to high-throughput molecular screening for alpha interferon-resistant genotypes in hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreevatsan, S; Bookout, J B; Ringpis, F M; Pottathil, M R; Marshall, D J; De Arruda, M; Murvine, C; Fors, L; Pottathil, R M; Barathur, R R

    1998-07-01

    This study was designed to analyze the feasibility and validity of using Cleavase Fragment Length Polymorphism (CFLP) analysis as an alternative to DNA sequencing for high-throughput screening of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in a high-volume molecular pathology laboratory setting. By using a 244-bp amplicon from the 5' untranslated region of the HCV genome, 61 clinical samples received for HCV reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were genotyped by this method. The genotype frequencies assigned by the CFLP method were 44.3% for type 1a, 26.2% for 1b, 13.1% for type 2b, and 5% type 3a. The results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis provided 100% concordance with those obtained by CFLP analysis at the major genotype level, with resolvable differences as to subtype designations for five samples. CFLP analysis-derived HCV genotype frequencies also concurred with the national estimates (N. N. Zein et al., Ann. Intern. Med. 125:634-639, 1996). Reanalysis of 42 of these samples in parallel in a different research laboratory reproduced the CFLP fingerprints for 100% of the samples. Similarly, the major subtype designations for 19 samples subjected to different incubation temperature-time conditions were also 100% reproducible. Comparative cost analysis for genotyping of HCV by line probe assay, CFLP analysis, and automated DNA sequencing indicated that the average cost per amplicon was lowest for CFLP analysis, at $20 (direct costs). On the basis of these findings we propose that CFLP analysis is a robust, sensitive, specific, and an economical method for large-scale screening of HCV-infected patients for alpha interferon-resistant HCV genotypes. The paper describes an algorithm that uses as a reflex test the RT-PCR-based qualitative screening of samples for HCV detection and also addresses genotypes that are ambiguous.

  4. State-of-the-art automated patch clamp devices: Heat activation, action potentials and high throughput in ion channel screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eStoelzle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are essential in a wide range of cellular functions and their malfunction underlies many disease states making them important targets in drug discovery. Diverse automated patch clamp systems with high-throughput capabilities are available for drug screening, but there are limitations in the application range. For example, solution exchange time, temperature control and the availability of the current clamp mode can be limiting factors. However, further development of existing devices and introduction of new systems widen the range of possible experiments and increase throughput. Here we introduce new features and platforms that meet the needs of drug discovery researchers and basic researchers alike.The Patchliner is an automated patch clamp system capable of recording up to 8 cells simultaneously with high success rates. Novel features such as temperature control and recordings in the current clamp mode are described here. Standard cell lines and excitable cells such as stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have been used in the voltage clamp and current clamp modes with the view to finding new drug candidates and safety testing methods in a more physiologically relevant environment. The SyncroPatch 96, is a screening platform capable of recording from 96 cells in parallel and offers a throughput of 5000 data points per day. Full dose response curves can be acquired from individual cells reducing the cost per data point. The system is an ideal tool for secondary screening efforts and for safety testing on ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels.The Patchliner and SyncroPatch 96 are ideal platforms for drug discovery, ion channel research and safety testing, combining long awaited features such as parallel action potential recordings and temperature control with extensively increased throughput.

  5. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Tran, Huu M; Karaoz, Ulas; Weihe, Claudia; Hadi, Masood Z; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Martiny, Adam C; Brodie, Eoin L

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26%) cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase (GH) families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency (TNF) binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts.

  6. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eNyyssönen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26 % cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts.

  7. HNF4α Antagonists Discovered by a High-Throughput Screen for Modulators of the Human Insulin Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyuk, Alice; Lee, Seung-Hee; Farber-Katz, Suzette; Zhang, Mingjun; Athavankar, Sonalee; Cohen, Tom; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Ye, Mao; Bushway, Paul; Richardson, Adam D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Rodriguez-Lee, Mariam; Huang, Li; Spangler, Benjamin; Smith, Layton; Higginbotham, Jennifer; Cashman, John; Freeze, Hudson; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela; Dawson, Marcia I.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Cang, Yong; Mercola, Mark; Levine, Fred

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor (HNF)4α is a central regulator of gene expression in cell types that play a critical role in metabolic homeostasis, including hepatocytes, enterocytes, and pancreatic β-cells. Although fatty acids were found to occupy the HNF4α ligand-binding pocket and proposed to act as ligands, there is controversy about both the nature of HNF4α ligands as well as the physiological role of the binding. Here, we report the discovery of potent synthetic HNF4α antagonists through a high-throughput screen for effectors of the human insulin promoter. These molecules bound to HNF4α with high affinity and modulated the expression of known HNF4α target genes. Notably, they were found to be selectively cytotoxic to cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, although in vivo potency was limited by suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. The discovery of bioactive modulators for HNF4α raises the possibility that diseases involving HNF4α, such as diabetes and cancer, might be amenable to pharmacologic intervention by modulation of HNF4α activity. PMID:22840769

  8. High-throughput screen identifies disulfiram as a potential therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler JW; Pai, Melody; Liu, Jeff C; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Sun, Thomas; Egan, Sean E; Datti, Alessandro; Huang, Jing; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an aggressive subtype, for which radiation and chemotherapy are the only options. Here we describe the identification of disulfiram, an FDA-approved drug used to treat alcoholism, as well as the related compound thiram, as the most potent growth inhibitors following high-throughput screens of 3185 compounds against multiple TNBC cell lines. The average IC50 for disulfiram was ~300 nM. Drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) analysis identified IQ motif-containing factors IQGAP1 and MYH9 as direct binding targets of disulfiram. Indeed, knockdown of these factors reduced, though did not completely abolish, cell growth. Combination treatment with 4 different drugs commonly used to treat TNBC revealed that disulfiram synergizes most effectively with doxorubicin to inhibit cell growth of TNBC cells. Disulfiram and doxorubicin cooperated to induce cell death as well as cellular senescence, and targeted the ESA+/CD24-/low/CD44+ cancer stem cell population. Our results suggest that disulfiram may be repurposed to treat TNBC in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:23974104

  9. A cell-based luciferase assay amenable to high-throughput screening of inhibitors of arenavirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2008-12-05

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans for which there are no licensed vaccines, and current therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin (Rib) that is only partially effective and associated with significant side effects. In addition, compelling evidence indicates that the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Therefore, it is important to develop novel and effective anti-arenaviral drugs. The arenavirus Z protein is the driving force of arenavirus budding, and PPPY and PTAP late (L) domain motifs within Z are critical for Z-mediated budding, which involves the interaction of Z with a variety of host cellular factors. Compounds capable of inhibiting these virus-host cell interactions represent candidate anti-arenaviral drugs. The identification of these candidate compounds would be facilitated by the availability of a Z budding assay amenable to high-throughput screens (HTS). To this end, we have developed a novel assay that allows for rapid and quantitative assessment of Z-mediated budding. We provide evidence that this novel assay is amenable to HTS to identify small molecule inhibitors of Z-mediated budding, as well as to uncover cellular genes contributing to arenavirus budding.

  10. High-Throughput Screening of Recalcitrance Variations in Lignocellulosic Biomass: Total Lignin, Lignin Monomers, and Enzymatic Sugar Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Stephen R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sykes, Robert W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turner, Geoffrey B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lupoi, Jason S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Doepkke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tucker, Melvin P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schuster, Logan A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mazza, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Himmel, Michael E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davis, Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gjersing, Erica [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, chemicals, and other commodities has been explored as one possible pathway toward reductions in the use of non-renewable energy sources. In order to identify which plants, out of a diverse pool, have the desired chemical traits for downstream applications, attributes, such as cellulose and lignin content, or monomeric sugar release following an enzymatic saccharification, must be compared. The experimental and data analysis protocols of the standard methods of analysis can be time-consuming, thereby limiting the number of samples that can be measured. High-throughput (HTP) methods alleviate the shortcomings of the standard methods, and permit the rapid screening of available samples to isolate those possessing the desired traits. This study illustrates the HTP sugar release and pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry pipelines employed at the National Renewable Energy Lab. These pipelines have enabled the efficient assessment of thousands of plants while decreasing experimental time and costs through reductions in labor and consumables.

  11. High-Throughput Lipolysis in 96-Well Plates for Rapid Screening of Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip J; Mu, Huiling; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2017-04-01

    The high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model (HTP) applicable for rapid and low-scale screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDSs) was optimized and adjusted as to be conducted in 96-well plates (HTP-96). Three different LbDDSs (I-III) loaded with danazol or cinnarizine were used as model systems. The distributions of cinnarizine and danazol in the aqueous and precipitated digestion phases generated during lipolysis in HTP-96 were compared with previously published data obtained from HTP. The final HTP-96 setup resulted in the same rank order as the original HTP model with regard to solubilization in the aqueous phase during digestion: LbDDS III > LbDDS II > LbDDS I for danazol and LbDDS III ≈ LbDDS II ≈ LbDDS I for cinnarizine. HTP-96 is a useful model for fast performance assessment of LbDDS in a small scale. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening and Identification of DNA Aptamers to Tyramine Using in Vitro Selection and High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Stefania; De Girolamo, Annalisa; DeRosa, Maria C; McKeague, Maureen; Schena, Roberto; Catucci, Lucia; Pascale, Michelangelo

    2016-06-13

    Aptamers are synthetic single-stranded DNA or RNA sequences that can fold into tertiary structures allowing them to interact with and bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes the first selection and identification of DNA aptamers able to recognize the biogenic amine tyramine. To successfully isolate aptamers to this challenging small molecule target, the SELEX methodology was adapted by combining a systematic strategy to increase the selection stringency and monitor enrichment success. As the benefits of applying high-throughput sequencing (HTS) in SELEX experiments is becoming more clear, this method was employed in combination with bioinformatics analysis to evaluate the utility of the selection strategy and to uncover new potential high affinity sequences. On the basis of the presence of consensus regions (sequence families) and family similarities (clusters), 15 putative aptamers to tyramine were identified. A recently described workflow approach to perform a primary screening and characterization of the aptamer candidates by microequilibrium dialysis and by microscale thermophoresis was next leveraged. These candidate aptamers exhibited dissociation constant (Kd) values in the range of 0.2-152 μM with aptamer Tyr_10 as the most promising one followed by aptamer Tyr_14. These aptamers could be used as promising molecular recognition tools for the development of inexpensive, robust and innovative biosensor platforms for the detection of tyramine in food and beverages.

  13. A fluorescence-based assay to monitor autopalmitoylation of zDHHC proteins applicable to high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Laura D; Deschenes, Robert J; Mitchell, David A

    2014-09-01

    Palmitoylation, the posttranslational thioester-linked modification of a 16-carbon saturated fatty acid onto the cysteine residue of a protein, has garnered considerable attention due to its implication in a multitude of disease states. The signature DHHC motif (Asp-His-His-Cys) identifies a family of protein acyltransferases (PATs) that catalyze the S-palmitoylation of target proteins via a two-step mechanism. In the first step, autopalmitoylation, palmitate is transferred from palmitoyl-CoA to the PAT, creating a palmitoyl:PAT intermediate and releasing reduced CoA. The palmitoyl moiety is then transferred to a protein substrate in the second step of the reaction. We have developed an in vitro, single-well, fluorescence-based enzyme assay that monitors the first step of the PAT reaction by coupling the production of reduced CoA to the reduction of NAD(+) using the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. This assay is suitable for determining PAT kinetic parameters, elucidating lipid donor specificity and measuring PAT inhibition by 2-bromopalmitate. Finally, it can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for modulators of protein palmitoylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2017-07-24

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112 -113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets peroxisome proliferator activated and other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  15. In situ analysis and structural elucidation of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) tannins for high-throughput germplasm screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, An; Stringano, Elisabetta; Brown, Ron H; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2011-01-26

    A rapid thiolytic degradation and cleanup procedure was developed for analyzing tannins directly in chlorophyll-containing sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia ) plants. The technique proved suitable for complex tannin mixtures containing catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, and epigallocatechin flavan-3-ol units. The reaction time was standardized at 60 min to minimize the loss of structural information as a result of epimerization and degradation of terminal flavan-3-ol units. The results were evaluated by separate analysis of extractable and unextractable tannins, which accounted for 63.6-113.7% of the in situ plant tannins. It is of note that 70% aqueous acetone extracted tannins with a lower mean degree of polymerization (mDP) than was found for tannins analyzed in situ. Extractable tannins had between 4 and 29 lower mDP values. The method was validated by comparing results from individual and mixed sample sets. The tannin composition of different sainfoin accessions covered a range of mDP values from 16 to 83, procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) ratios from 19.2/80.8 to 45.6/54.4, and cis/trans ratios from 74.1/25.9 to 88.0/12.0. This is the first high-throughput screening method that is suitable for analyzing condensed tannin contents and structural composition directly in green plant tissue.

  16. Identification of differentially expressed genes in esophageal cancer through SSH in com- bination with high throughput reverse Northern screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis of esophagus and to isolate genes with different expression levels in esophageal cancer, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was combined with PCR-based cDNA synthesis and reverse Northern on the cancer tissues and matched almost normal mucosa using 5 microgram of total RNA as starting marterial. Eight genes were found expressed differentially in esophageal cancer, in which 5 were known genes and 3 were novel ones; and 6 were down-regulated in cancer tissues, while 2 were up-regulated; 6 were of mid-high abundance and 2 were of low abundance in esophagus. The results revealed that alteration in expression level of multiple genes underlied the initiation and development of esophageal cancer. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study such as liporcotinⅠ, cystatin A, cystatin B, cytokeratin 13 may play roles in dedifferentiation, transformation and malignant proliferation of esophageal cancer. The combination of SSH with PCR-based double- strand cDNA synthesis and high throughput reverse Northern screening is an efficient way to isolate differentially expressed genes from microgram of total RNA.

  17. Identification of genes that promote or antagonize somatic homolog pairing using a high-throughput FISH-based screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Joyce

    Full Text Available The pairing of homologous chromosomes is a fundamental feature of the meiotic cell. In addition, a number of species exhibit homolog pairing in nonmeiotic, somatic cells as well, with evidence for its impact on both gene regulation and double-strand break (DSB repair. An extreme example of somatic pairing can be observed in Drosophila melanogaster, where homologous chromosomes remain aligned throughout most of development. However, our understanding of the mechanism of somatic homolog pairing remains unclear, as only a few genes have been implicated in this process. In this study, we introduce a novel high-throughput fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technology that enabled us to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors involved in the robust somatic pairing observed in Drosophila. We identified both candidate "pairing promoting genes" and candidate "anti-pairing genes," providing evidence that pairing is a dynamic process that can be both enhanced and antagonized. Many of the genes found to be important for promoting pairing are highly enriched for functions associated with mitotic cell division, suggesting a genetic framework for a long-standing link between chromosome dynamics during mitosis and nuclear organization during interphase. In contrast, several of the candidate anti-pairing genes have known interphase functions associated with S-phase progression, DNA replication, and chromatin compaction, including several components of the condensin II complex. In combination with a variety of secondary assays, these results provide insights into the mechanism and dynamics of somatic pairing.

  18. Zebrafish high-throughput screening to study the impact of dissolvable metal oxide nanoparticles on the hatching enzyme, ZHE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sijie; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Ear, Jason; Chang, Chong Hyun; Zhang, Haiyuan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Yamada, Kristin; Meng, Huan; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Godwin, Hilary A; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E

    2013-05-27

    The zebrafish is emerging as a model organism for the safety assessment and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials. In this Communication, the implementation of a roboticized high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with automated image analysis is demonstrated to assess the impact of dissolvable oxide nanoparticles on embryo hatching. It is further demonstrated that this hatching interference is mechanistically linked to an effect on the metalloprotease, ZHE 1, which is responsible for degradation of the chorionic membrane. The data indicate that 4 of 24 metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, Cr2 O3 , and NiO) could interfere with embryo hatching by a chelator-sensitive mechanism that involves ligation of critical histidines in the ZHE1 center by the shed metal ions. A recombinant ZHE1 enzymatic assay is established to demonstrate that the dialysates from the same materials responsible for hatching interference also inhibit ZHE1 activity in a dose-dependent fashion. A peptide-based BLAST search identifies several additional aquatic species that express enzymes with homologous histidine-based catalytic centers, suggesting that the ZHE1 mechanistic paradigm could be used to predict the toxicity of a large number of oxide nanoparticles that pose a hazard to aquatic species.

  19. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R.; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants. PMID:28303128

  20. Peptide reactivity assay using spectrophotometric method for high-throughput screening of skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yun Hyeok; An, Susun; Shin, Kyeho; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2013-02-01

    Haptens must react with cellular proteins to be recognized by antigen presenting cells. Therefore, monitoring reactivity of chemicals with peptide/protein has been considered an in vitro skin sensitization testing method. The reactivity of peptides with chemicals (peptide reactivity) has usually been monitored by chromatographic methods like HPLC or LC/MS, which are robust tools for monitoring common chemical reactions but are rather expensive and time consuming. Here, we examined the possibility of using spectrophotometric methods to monitor peptide reactivity. Two synthetic peptides, Ac-RWAACAA and Ac-RWAAKAA, were reacted with 48 chemicals (34 sensitizers and 14 non-sensitizers). Peptide reactivity was measured by monitoring unreacted peptides with UV-Vis spectrophotometer using 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid as a detection reagent for the free thiol group of cysteine-containing peptide or fluorometer using fluorescamine™ as a detection reagent for the free amine group of lysine-containing peptide. Chemicals were categorized as sensitizers when they induced more than 10% depletion of cysteine-containing peptide or 20% depletion of lysine-containing peptide. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this method were 82.4%, 85.7%, and 83.3%, respectively. These results demonstrate that spectrophotometric methods can be easy, fast, and high-throughput screening tools for the prediction of the skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2016-12-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines.

  2. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. A Class of High-affinity Bicyclooctane G551D-CFTR Activators Identified by High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cheng-yan; ZHAO Lu; LIU Yan-li; XU Li-na; SHANG De-jing; YANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    The glycine-to-aspartic acid missense mutation at the codon 551(G551D) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR) is one of the five most frequent cystic fibrosis(CF) mutations associated with a severe CF phenotype. To explore the feasibility of pharmacological correction of disrupted activation of CFTR chloride channel caused by G551D mutation, we developed a halide-sensitive fluorescence miniassay for G551D-CFTR in Fisher rat thyroid(FRT) epithelial cells for the discovery of novel activators of G551D-CFTR. A class of bicyclooctane small molecule compounds that efficiently stimulate G551D-CFTR chloride channel activity was identified by high throughput screening via the FRT cell-based assay. This class of compounds selectively activates G551D-CFTR with a high affinity, whereas little effect of the compounds on wildtype CFTR can be seen. The discovery of a class of bicyclooctane G551D-CFTR activators will permit the analysis of structure-activity relationship of the compounds to identify ideal leads for in vivo therapeutic studies.

  4. Estimating Potency in High-Throughput Screening Experiments by Maximizing the Rate of Change in Weighted Shannon Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Keith R

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput in vitro screening experiments can be used to generate concentration-response data for large chemical libraries. It is often desirable to estimate the concentration needed to achieve a particular effect, or potency, for each chemical tested in an assay. Potency estimates can be used to directly compare chemical profiles and prioritize compounds for confirmation studies, or employed as input data for prediction modeling and association mapping. The concentration for half-maximal activity derived from the Hill equation model (i.e., AC50) is the most common potency measure applied in pharmacological research and toxicity testing. However, the AC50 parameter is subject to large uncertainty for many concentration-response relationships. In this study we introduce a new measure of potency based on a weighted Shannon entropy measure termed the weighted entropy score (WES). Our potency estimator (Point of Departure, PODWES) is defined as the concentration producing the maximum rate of change in weighted entropy along a concentration-response profile. This approach provides a new tool for potency estimation that does not depend on the assumption of monotonicity or any other pre-specified concentration-response relationship. PODWES estimates potency with greater precision and less bias compared to the conventional AC50 assessed across a range of simulated conditions.

  5. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  6. High-throughput Screening of New Antimitotic Compounds Based on Potential of Virtual Organization CSLabGrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpov, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frameworks of virtual organization CSLabGrid using Grid calculations the repository of 3-D models of cytoskeletal proteins (tubulins and FtsZ-proteins verified by stereochemistry, is described. The repository of structures of canonical antimicrotubular compounds (inhibitors of tubulin polymerization as well as library of ligands, suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS in Grid were created. According to the results of the library HTS 1,164 compounds that demonstrated an elevated affinity to tubulin molecules: 205 — to α-tubulin and 959 — to β-tubulin were selected. It was found that among 2,886 compounds synthesized in the Institute of Organic Chemistry of NAS of Ukraine, 6 were perspective inhibitors of α- and β-tubulin polymerization in such human pathogens as Pneumocystis carinii, Giardia intestinalis Ajellomyces capsulatus, Neosartorya fumigata and Candida albicans. Respectively, these compounds were recommended for subsequent experimental evaluation of their biological activity for use as new pharmacological agents.

  7. A Novel Dual Expression Platform for High Throughput Functional Screening of Phage Libraries in Product like Format.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available High throughput screenings of single chain Fv (scFv antibody phage display libraries are currently done as soluble scFvs produced in E.coli. Due to endotoxin contaminations from bacterial cells these preparations cannot be reliably used in mammalian cell based assays. The monovalent nature and lack of Fc in soluble scFvs prevent functional assays that are dependent on target cross linking and/or Fc functions. A convenient approach is to convert scFvs into scFv.Fc fusion proteins and express them in mammalian cell lines for screening. This approach is low throughput and is only taken after primary screening of monovalent scFvs that are expressed in bacteria. There is no platform at present that combines the benefits of both bacterial and mammalian expression system for screening phage library output. We have, therefore, developed a novel dual expression vector, called pSplice, which can be used to express scFv.Fc fusion proteins both in E.coli and mammalian cell lines. The hallmark of the vector is an engineered intron which houses the bacterial promoter and signal peptide for expression and secretion of scFv.Fc in E.coli. When the vector is transfected into a mammalian cell line, the intron is efficiently spliced out resulting in a functional operon for expression and secretion of the scFv.Fc fusion protein into the culture medium. By applying basic knowledge of mammalian introns and splisosome, we designed this vector to enable screening of phage libraries in a product like format. Like IgG, the scFv.Fc fusion protein is bi-valent for the antigen and possesses Fc effector functions. Expression in E.coli maintains the speed of the bacterial expression platform and is used to triage clones based on binding and other assays that are not sensitive to endotoxin. Triaged clones are then expressed in a mammalian cell line without the need for any additional cloning steps. Conditioned media from the mammalian cell line containing the fusion proteins

  8. High-throughput virtual screening with e-pharmacophore and molecular simulations study in the designing of pancreatic lipase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramachaneni GK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ganesh Kumar Veeramachaneni, K Kranthi Raj, Leela Madhuri Chalasani, Jayakumar Singh Bondili, Venkateswara Rao Talluri Department of Biotechnology, K L University, Guntur, India Background: Obesity is a progressive metabolic disorder in the current world population, and is characterized by the excess deposition of fat in the adipose tissue. Pancreatic lipase is one of the key enzymes in the hydrolysis of triglycerides into monoglycerides and free fatty acids, and is thus considered a promising target for the treatment of obesity. The present drugs used for treating obesity do not give satisfactory results, and on prolonged usage result in severe side effects. In view of the drastic increase in the obese population day-to-day, there is a greater need to discover new drugs with lesser side effects.Materials and methods: High-throughput virtual screening combined with e-pharmacophore screening and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds filters were applied to screen out the ligand molecules from the ZINC natural molecule database. The screened molecules were subjected to Glide XP docking to study the molecular interactions broadly. Further, molecular dynamic simulations were used to validate the stability of the enzyme–ligand complexes. Finally, the molecules with better results were optimized for in vitro testing.Results: The screening protocols identified eight hits from the natural molecule database, which were further filtered through pharmacological filters. The final four hits were subjected to extra precision docking, and the complexes were finally studied with molecular dynamic simulations. The results pointed to the zinc 85893731 molecule as the most stable in the binding pocket, producing consistent H-bond interaction with Ser152 (G=-7.18. The optimized lead molecule exhibited good docking score, better fit, and improved ADME profile.Conclusion: The present study specifies

  9. Novel high-throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine [AZT (azidothymidine)] is associated with selection of the mutations M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in RT (reverse transcriptase). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT's ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-MP (AZT-monophosphate) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme's polymerase active site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. In the present study, we have developed a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based high-throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z' factor of 0.69. We screened three chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified APEX57219 {3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxybenzoic acid]} as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate.

  10. Mapping quantum yield for (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox photoabsorbers using a high throughput photoelectrochemical screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Haber, Joel; Marcin, Martin; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2014-03-10

    Combinatorial synthesis and screening of light absorbers are critical to material discoveries for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. One of the most effective ways to evaluate the energy-conversion properties of a semiconducting light absorber is to form an asymmetric junction and investigate the photogeneration, transport and recombination processes at the semiconductor interface. This standard photoelectrochemical measurement is readily made on a semiconductor sample with a back-side metallic contact (working electrode) and front-side solution contact. In a typical combinatorial material library, each sample shares a common back contact, requiring novel instrumentation to provide spatially resolved and thus sample-resolved measurements. We developed a multiplexing counter electrode with a thin layer assembly, in which a rectifying semiconductor/liquid junction was formed and the short-circuit photocurrent was measured under chopped illumination for each sample in a material library. The multiplexing counter electrode assembly demonstrated a photocurrent sensitivity of sub-10 μA cm(-2) with an external quantum yield sensitivity of 0.5% for each semiconductor sample under a monochromatic ultraviolet illumination source. The combination of cell architecture and multiplexing allows high-throughput modes of operation, including both fast-serial and parallel measurements. To demonstrate the performance of the instrument, the external quantum yields of 1819 different compositions from a pseudoquaternary metal oxide library, (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox, at 385 nm were collected in scanning serial mode with a throughput of as fast as 1 s per sample. Preliminary screening results identified a promising ternary composition region centered at Fe0.894Sn0.103Ti0.0034Ox, with an external quantum yield of 6.7% at 385 nm.

  11. A novel high-throughput screening assay for HCN channel blocker using membrane potential-sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Lee, Yan T; Soloveva, Veronica; Nawoschik, Stanley P; Kaftan, Edward J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott C; Bowlby, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation nonselective (HCN) channels represent an interesting group of targets for drug development. In this study, the authors report the development of a novel membrane potential-sensitive dye (MPSD) assay for HCN channel modulators that has been miniaturized into 384-well fluorescent imaging plate reader (FLIPR) high-throughput screening (HTS) format. When optimized (by cell plating density, plate type, cell recovery from cryopreservation), the well-to-well signal variability was low, with a Z' = 0.73 and coefficient of variation = 6.4%, whereas the MPSD fluorescence signal amplitude was -23,700 +/- 1500 FLIPR(3) relative fluorescence units (a linear relationship was found between HCN1 MPSD fluorescence signal and the cell plating density) and was completely blocked by 30 microM ZD7288. The assay tolerated up to 1% DMSO, inclusion of which did not significantly change the signal kinetics or amplitude. A single-concentration screening of an ion channel-focused library composed of 4855 compounds resulted in 89 HCN1 blocker hits, 51 of which were subsequently analyzed with an 8-point concentration-response analysis on the IonWorks HT electrophysiology platform. The correlation between MPSD and the electrophysiology assay was moderate, as shown by the linear regression analysis (r(2) = 0.56) between the respective IC(50)s obtained using these 2 assays. The reported HTS-compatible HCN channel blocker assay can serve as a tool in drug discovery in the pursuit of HCN channel isoform-selective small molecules that could be used in the development of clinically relevant compounds.

  12. Protic ionic liquids (PILs) nanostructure and physicochemical properties: development of high-throughput methodology for PIL creation and property screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Tamar L; Ha, Krystal; Muir, Benjamin W; Howard, Shaun C; Weerawardena, Asoka; Kirby, Nigel; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-28

    A high-throughput approach was developed in order to prepare and dry a series of protic ionic liquids (PILs) from 48 Brønsted acid-base combinations. Many combinations comprised an alkyl carboxylic acid paired with an alkyl amine. Visual screens were developed to identify which acid-base combinations formed PILs, and of those, which PILs were likely to have high surface tensions, low viscosities, and low melting points. The surface tension screen was validated through pendant drop surface tension measurements. Karl Fischer coulometric titration was used to obtain the water contents, and it was noted that there is a considerable difference in the drying rate throughout this series of PILs. It was observed that an octyl chain present on either the cation or anion was detrimental to the formation of a PIL with a low melting point, and instead increased the likelihood of a gel or solid forming. The nanostructure of the PILs was determined, using synchrotron small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), to consist of polar and non-polar domains, with the alkyl chains on the cation and anion intercalating. The results indicate that both the alkyl chain on the cation and/or anion contribute to the correlation distance, for the intermediate range order, with the expectation that there is charge alternation of the ions in the polar region. The maximum correlation distance was observed when there was an alkyl chain present on only one ion. This correlation distance could be significantly reduced by varying the alkyl chain length present on the other ion, which was attributed to increased disorder and interdigitation of chains, and to toe-to-toe alignment of the chains. To the best of our knowledge this is the first PIL report into the effect of having an alkyl chain present on both the cation and the anion.

  13. An in silico high-throughput screen identifies potential selective inhibitors for the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirson T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tomer Meirson, Abraham O Samson, Hava Gil-Henn Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel Abstract: The non-receptor tyrosine kinase proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 is a critical mediator of signaling from cell surface growth factor and adhesion receptors to cell migration, proliferation, and survival. Emerging evidence indicates that signaling by Pyk2 regulates hematopoietic cell response, bone density, neuronal degeneration, angiogenesis, and cancer. These physiological and pathological roles of Pyk2 warrant it as a valuable therapeutic target for invasive cancers, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and inflammatory cellular response. Despite its potential as a therapeutic target, no potent and selective inhibitor of Pyk2 is available at present. As a first step toward discovering specific potential inhibitors of Pyk2, we used an in silico high-throughput screening approach. A virtual library of six million lead-like compounds was docked against four different high-resolution Pyk2 kinase domain crystal structures and further selected for predicted potency and ligand efficiency. Ligand selectivity for Pyk2 over focal adhesion kinase (FAK was evaluated by comparative docking of ligands and measurement of binding free energy so as to obtain 40 potential candidates. Finally, the structural flexibility of a subset of the docking complexes was evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation, followed by intermolecular interaction analysis. These compounds may be considered as promising leads for further development of highly selective Pyk2 inhibitors. Keywords: virtual screen, efficiency metrics, MM-GBSA, molecular dynamics

  14. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  15. Advance of bioassay methods used in high throughput screening%高通量药物筛选生物活性分析技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 张海霞; 任德成; 杜冠华

    2001-01-01

    A variety of technologies continue to develop for high-throughput screening. This review summarized recent advances of bioassay techniques used in high-throughput screening. The principles, applications, characteristics and other parameters of these methods were described such as homogeneous time resolved fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and scintillation proximity assay.

  16. A Perspective on the Future of High-Throughput RNAi Screening: Will CRISPR Cut Out the Competition or Can RNAi Help Guide the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jessica; Woodcock, Simon

    2015-09-01

    For more than a decade, RNA interference (RNAi) has brought about an entirely new approach to functional genomics screening. Enabling high-throughput loss-of-function (LOF) screens against the human genome, identifying new drug targets, and significantly advancing experimental biology, RNAi is a fast, flexible technology that is compatible with existing high-throughput systems and processes; however, the recent advent of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas, a powerful new precise genome-editing (PGE) technology, has opened up vast possibilities for functional genomics. CRISPR-Cas is novel in its simplicity: one piece of easily engineered guide RNA (gRNA) is used to target a gene sequence, and Cas9 expression is required in the cells. The targeted double-strand break introduced by the gRNA-Cas9 complex is highly effective at removing gene expression compared to RNAi. Together with the reduced cost and complexity of CRISPR-Cas, there is the realistic opportunity to use PGE to screen for phenotypic effects in a total gene knockout background. This review summarizes the exciting development of CRISPR-Cas as a high-throughput screening tool, comparing its future potential to that of well-established RNAi screening techniques, and highlighting future challenges and opportunities within these disciplines. We conclude that the two technologies actually complement rather than compete with each other, enabling greater understanding of the genome in relation to drug discovery.

  17. A cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen for inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme L Dahlin

    Full Text Available The lysine acetyltransferase (KAT Rtt109 forms a complex with Vps75 and catalyzes the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56ac in the Asf1-H3-H4 complex. Rtt109 and H3K56ac are vital for replication-coupled nucleosome assembly and genotoxic resistance in yeast and pathogenic fungal species such as Candida albicans. Remarkably, sequence homologs of Rtt109 are absent in humans. Therefore, inhibitors of Rtt109 are hypothesized as potential and minimally toxic antifungal agents. Herein, we report the development and optimization of a cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen (HTS for small-molecule inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation. The KAT component of the assay consists of the yeast Rtt109-Vps75 complex, while the histone substrate complex consists of full-length Drosophila histone H3-H4 bound to yeast Asf1. Duplicated assay runs of the LOPAC demonstrated day-to-day and plate-to-plate reproducibility. Approximately 225,000 compounds were assayed in a 384-well plate format with an average Z' factor of 0.71. Based on a 3σ cut-off criterion, 1,587 actives (0.7% were identified in the primary screen. The assay method is capable of identifying previously reported KAT inhibitors such as garcinol. We also observed several prominent active classes of pan-assay interference compounds such as Mannich bases, catechols and p-hydroxyarylsulfonamides. The majority of the primary active compounds showed assay signal interference, though most assay artifacts can be efficiently removed by a series of straightforward counter-screens and orthogonal assays. Post-HTS triage demonstrated a comparatively small number of confirmed actives with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. This assay, which utilizes five label-free proteins involved in H3K56 acetylation in vivo, can in principle identify compounds that inhibit Rtt109-catalyzed H3K56 acetylation via different mechanisms. Compounds discovered via this assay or adaptations thereof could

  18. Supplementary Material for: DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemannâ Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between

  19. Facile Alkaline Lysis of Escherichia coli Cells in High-Throughput Mode for Screening Enzyme Mutants: Arylsulfatase as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mei; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Yuwei; Liu, Hongbo; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Facile alkaline lysis of Escherichia coli cells in high-throughput (HTP) mode for screening enzyme mutants was tested with Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS). The alkaline lysis buffer was 1.0 M Tris-HCl at pH 9.0 plus 0.1 % Tween-20 and 2.0 mM 4-aminobenzamidine, mixed with cell suspension at 8:1 to 12:1 ratio for continuous agitation of mixtures in 96-well plates under room temperature; enzymatic activity in lysates was measured with 96-well microplate. PAAS activity tolerated final 0.1 % Tween-20. Individual clones were amplified for 12 h in 0.50 mL TB medium with 48-well plates to enhance the repeatability of induced expression. During continuous agitation of the mixture of cells and the lysis buffer, PAAS activities in lysates were steady from 3 to 9 h and comparable to sonication treatment but better than freezing-thawing. Coefficients of variation of activities of PAAS/mutants in lysates after treatment for 7 h reached ∼22 %. The mutant M72Q had specific activity 2-fold of G138S. By HTP lysis of cells, M72Q was recognized as a positive mutant over G138S with the area under the curve of 0.873. Therefore, for enzymes tolerating concentrated alkaline buffers, the proposed alkaline lysis approach may be generally applicable for HTP lysis of host cells during directed evolution.

  20. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yonghua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  1. A novel high-throughput in vivo molecular screen for shade avoidance mutants identifies a novel phyA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Khan, Safina; Shanahan, Hugh; Quail, Peter H; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Devlin, Paul F

    2011-05-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows plants to anticipate and avoid shading by neighbouring plants by initiating an elongation growth response. The phytochrome photoreceptors are able to detect a reduction in the red:far red ratio in incident light, the result of selective absorption of red and blue wavelengths by proximal vegetation. A shade-responsive luciferase reporter line (PHYB::LUC) was used to carry out a high-throughput screen to identify novel SAS mutants. The dracula 1 (dra1) mutant, that showed no avoidance of shade for the PHYB::LUC response, was the result of a mutation in the PHYA gene. Like previously characterized phyA mutants, dra1 showed a long hypocotyl in far red light and an enhanced hypocotyl elongation response to shade. However, dra1 additionally showed a long hypocotyl in red light. Since phyB levels are relatively unaffected in dra1, this gain-of-function red light phenotype strongly suggests a disruption of phyB signalling. The dra1 mutation, G773E within the phyA PAS2 domain, occurs at a residue absolutely conserved among phyA sequences. The equivalent residue in phyB is absolutely conserved as a threonine. PAS domains are structurally conserved domains involved in molecular interaction. Structural modelling of the dra1 mutation within the phyA PAS2 domain shows some similarity with the structure of the phyB PAS2 domain, suggesting that the interference with phyB signalling may be the result of non-functional mimicry. Hence, it was hypothesized that this PAS2 residue forms a key distinction between the phyA and phyB phytochrome species.

  2. Effects of genetic mutations and chemical exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans feeding: evaluation of a novel, high-throughput screening assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neuromuscular activity, i.e., feeding. Current feeding methodologies, however, are labor intensive and only semi-quantitative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here a high-throughput assay is described that uses flow cytometry to measure C. elegans feeding by determining the size and intestinal fluorescence of hundreds of nematodes after exposure to fluorescent-labeled microspheres. This assay was validated by quantifying fluorescence in feeding-defective C. elegans (eat mutants, and by exposing wild-type nematodes to the neuroactive compounds, serotonin and arecoline. The eat mutations previously determined to cause slow pumping rates exhibited the lowest feeding levels with our assay. Concentration-dependent increases in feeding levels after serotonin exposures were dependent on food availability, while feeding levels decreased in arecoline-exposed nematodes regardless of the presence of food. The effects of the environmental contaminants, cadmium chloride and chlorpyrifos, on wild-type C. elegans feeding were then used to demonstrate an application of the feeding assay. Cadmium exposures above 200 microM led to a sharp drop in feeding levels. Feeding of chlorpyrifos-exposed nematodes decreased in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC(50 of 2 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C. elegans fluorescence microsphere feeding assay is a rapid, reliable method for the assessment of neurotoxic effects of pharmaceutical drugs, industrial chemicals or

  3. Identification of novel radiosensitizers in a high-throughput, cell-based screen for DSB repair inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, Alexander G; Delsite, Robert; Luz, Antonio N; Shahbazian, David; Salem, Ahmed F; Sundaram, Ranjini K; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Hendrikx, Petrus J; Wilshire, Jennifer A; Jasin, Maria; Kluger, Harriet M; Glickman, J Fraser; Powell, Simon N; Bindra, Ranjit S

    2015-02-01

    Most cancer therapies involve a component of treatment that inflicts DNA damage in tumor cells, such as double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered the most serious threat to genomic integrity. Complex systems have evolved to repair these lesions, and successful DSB repair is essential for tumor cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and other DNA-damaging agents. As such, inhibition of DNA repair is a potentially efficacious strategy for chemo- and radiosensitization. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) represent the two major pathways by which DSBs are repaired in mammalian cells. Here, we report the design and execution of a high-throughput, cell-based small molecule screen for novel DSB repair inhibitors. We miniaturized our recently developed dual NHEJ and HR reporter system into a 384-well plate-based format and interrogated a diverse library of 20,000 compounds for molecules that selectively modulate NHEJ and HR repair in tumor cells. We identified a collection of novel hits that potently inhibit DSB repair, and we have validated their functional activity in a comprehensive panel of orthogonal secondary assays. A selection of these inhibitors was found to radiosensitize cancer cell lines in vitro, which suggests that they may be useful as novel chemo- and radio sensitizers. Surprisingly, we identified several FDA-approved drugs, including the calcium channel blocker mibefradil dihydrochloride, that demonstrated activity as DSB repair inhibitors and radiosensitizers. These findings suggest the possibility for repurposing them as tumor cell radiosensitizers in the future. Accordingly, we recently initiated a phase I clinical trial testing mibefradil as a glioma radiosensitizer.

  4. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  5. New technologies for high throughput screening of effective traditional Chinese medicine components%中药活性成分的高通量筛选新技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁璇; 洪战英; 柴逸峰

    2015-01-01

    The research progress on new technologies for high throughput screening of effective traditional Chinese med-icine (TCM) components was summarized based on the recent documents at home and abroad ,among which bio-chromatogra-phy ,chip-technology and computer-aided virtual screen technology were widely used .Compared with traditional screening technology ,those new ones had shown advantages in efficiency ,automation and high-throughput ,providing new ways to screen effective components of TCM with high throughput .%以近年来国内外研究文献为基础,总结概括了近5年来中药活性成分的高通量筛选新技术的进展情况。其中生物色谱技术、芯片技术和计算机辅助虚拟筛选等技术得到了广泛应用。这些新技术在中药活性成分筛选方面,比起传统方法具有效率高、自动化、通量高的优点,可以为中药活性成分的高通量筛选提供新思路。

  6. A simpler sampling interface of venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry for high-throughput screening enzyme inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Yang; Yang, YuHan; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2016-03-24

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is often required in enzyme inhibitor drugs screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful method for high-throughput screening enzyme inhibitors because its high speed, sensitivity and property of lable free. However, most of the MS methods need complicated sampling interface system. Overall throughput was limited by sample loading in these cases. In this study, we develop a simple interface which coupled droplet segmented system to a venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometer. It is fabricated by using a single capillary to act as both sampling probe and the emitter, which simplifies the construction, reduces the cost and shorten the sampling time. Samples sucked by venturi effect are segmented to nanoliter plugs by air, then the plugs can be detected by MS directly. This system eliminated the need for flow injection which was popular used in classic scheme. The new system is applied to screen angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. High-throughput was achieved in analyzing 96 samples at 1.6 s per sample. The plugs formation was at 0.5s per sample. Carry-over between samples was less than 5%, the peak height RSD was 2.92% (n = 15). Dose-response curves of 3 known inhibitors were also measured to validate its potential in drug discovery. The calculated IC50 agreed well with reported values.

  7. Yeast-based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Plasmodium falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 Inhibitors That Kill Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, I. J.; Deniskin, Roman; Rinderspacher, Alison; Katz, Francine; Deng, Shi-Xian; Moir, Robyn D.; Adjalley, Sophie H.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A.; Willis, Ian M.; Landry, Donald W.; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative transporters are potential drug targets, however most functional assays involve radioactive substrate uptake that is unsuitable for high-throughput screens (HTS). We developed a robust yeast-based growth assay that is potentially applicable to many equilibrative transporters. As proof of principle, we applied our approach to Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENT1). PfENT1 inhibitors might serve as novel antimalarial drugs since PfENT1-mediated purine import is essential for parasite proliferation. To identify PfENT1 inhibitors, we screened 64,560 compounds and identified 171 by their ability to rescue the growth of PfENT1-expressing fui1Δ yeast in the presence of a cytotoxic PfENT1 substrate, 5-fluorouridine (5-FUrd). In secondary assays, nine of the highest activity compounds inhibited PfENT1-dependent growth of a purine auxotrophic yeast strain with adenosine as the sole purine source (IC50 0.2–2 µM). These nine compounds completely blocked [3H]adenosine uptake into PfENT1-expressing yeast and erythrocyte-free trophozoite-stage parasites (IC50 5–50 nM), and inhibited chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasite proliferation (IC50 5–50 µM). Wild-type (WT) parasite IC50 values were up to four-fold lower compared to PfENT1-knockout (pfent1Δ) parasites. pfent1Δ parasite killing showed a delayed-death phenotype not observed with WT. We infer that in parasites, the compounds inhibit both PfENT1 and a secondary target with similar efficacy. The secondary target identity is unknown, but its existence may reduce the likelihood of parasites developing resistance to PfENT1 inhibitors. Our data support the hypothesis that blocking purine transport through PfENT1 may be a novel and compelling approach for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25602169

  8. A High Throughput Phenotypic Screening reveals compounds that counteract premature osteogenic differentiation of HGPS iPS-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Tournois, Johana; Brinon, Benjamin; Pitrez, Patricia R.; Ferreira, Lino; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Nissan, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare fatal genetic disorder that causes systemic accelerated aging in children. Thanks to the pluripotency and self-renewal properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), HGPS iPSC-based modeling opens up the possibility of access to different relevant cell types for pharmacological approaches. In this study, 2800 small molecules were explored using high-throughput screening, looking for compounds that could potentially reduce the alkaline phosphatase activity of HGPS mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) committed into osteogenic differentiation. Results revealed seven compounds that normalized the osteogenic differentiation process and, among these, all-trans retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, that also decreased progerin expression. This study highlights the potential of high-throughput drug screening using HGPS iPS-derived cells, in order to find therapeutic compounds for HGPS and, potentially, for other aging-related disorders. PMID:27739443

  9. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on steroidogenesis using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples...

  10. Drug discovery for male subfertility using high-throughput screening: a new approach to an unsolved problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins da Silva, Sarah J; Brown, Sean G; Sutton, Keith; King, Louise V; Ruso, Halil; Gray, David W; Wyatt, Paul G; Kelly, Mark C; Barratt, Christopher L R; Hope, Anthony G

    2017-05-01

    Can pharma drug discovery approaches be utilized to transform investigation into novel therapeutics for male infertility? High-throughput screening (HTS) is a viable approach to much-needed drug discovery for male factor infertility. There is both huge demand and a genuine clinical need for new treatment options for infertile men. However, the time, effort and resources required for drug discovery are currently exorbitant, due to the unique challenges of the cellular, physical and functional properties of human spermatozoa and a lack of appropriate assay platform. Spermatozoa were obtained from healthy volunteer research donors and subfertile patients undergoing IVF/ICSI at a hospital-assisted reproductive techniques clinic between January 2012 and November 2016. A HTS assay was developed and validated using intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) as a surrogate for motility in human spermatozoa. Calcium fluorescence was detected using a Flexstation microplate reader (384-well platform) and compared with responses evoked by progesterone, a compound known to modify a number of biologically relevant behaviours in human spermatozoa. Hit compounds identified following single point drug screen (10 μM) of an ion channel-focussed library assembled by the University of Dundee Drug D