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Sample records for kangaroo rat species

  1. Botfly (Diptera:Oestridae) parasitism of Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) at Suffield National Wildlife Area, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummer, D L; Forbes, M R; Bender, D J; Barclay, R M

    1997-08-01

    During field study of Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) at Suffield National Wildlife Area, Alberta, Canada, a high prevalence of parasitism by botfly (Diptera: Oestridae) larvae was observed. Botflies have not previously been documented as parasites of kangaroo rats. Botfly parasitism could have a significant impact on the growth, survival, and reproduction of Ord's kangaroo rat, which is considered a vulnerable species in Canada. Therefore, it is important to investigate how botfly parasitism varies with season and with gender or age of host. In 1995, 525 individual kangaroo rats were caught by nightlighting and live trapping for a total of 952 capture records. Upon capture, each kangaroo rat was ear-tagged and thoroughly examined for parasites and wounds. Third-instar botfly (Cuterebra polita) larvae were observed in kangaroo rats between 16 June and 23 August. Prevalence was 34% based on 454 kangaroo rats sampled during that time, whereas the mean intensity was 2.3 larvae per infested host (n = 156, range = 1-11). In contrast to some other studies of botfly parasitism of rodents, there were no gender or age biases in either prevalence or intensity of infestation. The index of dispersion was 2.8, indicating that the parasites were aggregated in hosts. Botfly parasitism could be an important factor affecting northern populations of kangaroo rats; future investigations into the potential effects of botfly larvae on host fitness are warranted.

  2. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

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    Andrew J Edelman

    Full Text Available Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m. Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  3. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  4. Derivation of soil screening thresholds to protect chisel-toothed kangaroo rat from uranium mine waste in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Otton, James K.; Finger, Susan E.; Little, Edward E.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical data from soil and weathered waste material samples collected from five uranium mines north of the Grand Canyon (three reclaimed, one mined but not reclaimed, and one never mined) were used in a screening-level risk analysis for the Arizona chisel-toothed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys microps leucotis); risks from radiation exposure were not evaluated. Dietary toxicity reference values were used to estimate soil-screening thresholds presenting risk to kangaroo rats. Sensitivity analyses indicated that body weight critically affected outcomes of exposed-dose calculations; juvenile kangaroo rats were more sensitive to the inorganic constituent toxicities than adult kangaroo rats. Species-specific soil-screening thresholds were derived for arsenic (137 mg/kg), cadmium (16 mg/kg), copper (1,461 mg/kg), lead (1,143 mg/kg), nickel (771 mg/kg), thallium (1.3 mg/kg), uranium (1,513 mg/kg), and zinc (731 mg/kg) using toxicity reference values that incorporate expected chronic field exposures. Inorganic contaminants in soils within and near the mine areas generally posed minimal risk to kangaroo rats. Most exceedances of soil thresholds were for arsenic and thallium and were associated with weathered mine wastes.

  5. Monitoring the Stephen's kangaroo rat: An analysis of monitoring methods and recommendations for future monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document covers a series of analyses to explore and summarize previous monitoring efforts of Stephens Kangaroo Rats (SKR) and make recommendations for future...

  6. Draft De Novo Transcriptome of the Rat Kangaroo Potorous tridactylus as a Tool for Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udy, Dylan B; Voorhies, Mark; Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M; Dumont, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The rat kangaroo (long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus) is a marsupial native to Australia. Cultured rat kangaroo kidney epithelial cells (PtK) are commonly used to study cell biological processes. These mammalian cells are large, adherent, and flat, and contain large and few chromosomes-and are thus ideal for imaging intra-cellular dynamics such as those of mitosis. Despite this, neither the rat kangaroo genome nor transcriptome have been sequenced, creating a challenge for probing the molecular basis of these cellular dynamics. Here, we present the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the draft rat kangaroo de novo transcriptome. We sequenced 679 million reads that mapped to 347,323 Trinity transcripts and 20,079 Unigenes. We present statistics emerging from transcriptome-wide analyses, and analyses suggesting that the transcriptome covers full-length sequences of most genes, many with multiple isoforms. We also validate our findings with a proof-of-concept gene knockdown experiment. We expect that this high quality transcriptome will make rat kangaroo cells a more tractable system for linking molecular-scale function and cellular-scale dynamics.

  7. Ord's kangaroo rats living in floodplain habitats: Factors contributing to habitat attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.S.; Wilson, K.R.; Andersen, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    High densities of an aridland granivore, Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii), have been documented in floodplain habitats along the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado. Despite a high probability of inundation and attendant high mortality during the spring flood period, the habitat is consistently recolonized. To understand factors that potentially make riparian habitats attractive to D. ordii, we compared density and spatial pattern of seeds, density of a competitor (western harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis), and digging energetics within floodplain habitats and between floodplain and adjacent upland habitats. Seed density within the floodplain was greatest in the topographically high (rarely flooded) floodplain and lowest immediately after a spring flood in the topographically low (frequently flooded) floodplain. Seed densities in adjacent upland habitat that never floods were higher than the lowest floodplain habitat. In the low floodplain prior to flooding, seeds had a clumped spatial pattern, which D. ordii is adept at exploiting; after spring flooding, a more random pattern resulted. Populations of the western harvester ant were low in the floodplain relative to the upland. Digging by D. ordii was energetically less expensive in floodplain areas than in upland areas. Despite the potential for mortality due to annual spring flooding, the combination of less competition from harvester ants and lower energetic costs of digging might promote the use of floodplain habitat by D. ordii.

  8. A new species of Near-shore Marine Goby (Pisces: Gobiidae: Nesogobius) from Kangaroo Island, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael P; Hoese, Douglass F; Bertozzi, Terry

    2015-12-11

    Nesogobius is one of two goby genera with all species wholly restricted to temperate Australian waters. Described here is a new member of the genus discovered during near-shore marine and estuarine fish sampling along the central southern Australian coastline. The tiger sandgoby Nesogobius tigrinus sp. nov. is distinguished from other congeners by a combination of colouration including four prominent vertical black bars on males; morphological characters involving body scales (large), head scales (naked), body depth (slender) and gill opening (wide); meristic counts including a lack of second dorsal and anal fin spines; and mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence. The species appears to be a narrow range endemic, restricted to specific sub-tidal habitat in the unique sheltered embayments of northeast Kangaroo Island. This study forms part of ongoing investigations to more fully describe the biodiversity and conservation requirements of the regional ichthyofauna.

  9. Locomotion in extinct giant kangaroos: were sthenurines hop-less monsters?

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    Janis, Christine M; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These "short-faced browsers" first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the "normal" allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was no longer

  10. A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships.

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    Karen H Black

    Full Text Available Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal "kangaroo", and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade--Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.

  11. Thermal implications of interactions between insulation, solar reflectance, and fur structure in the summer coats of diverse species of kangaroo.

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    Dawson, Terence J; Maloney, Shane K

    2017-04-01

    Not all of the solar radiation that impinges on a mammalian coat is absorbed and converted into thermal energy at the coat surface. Some is reflected back to the environment, while another portion is reflected further into the coat where it is absorbed and manifested as heat at differing levels. Substantial insulation in a coat limits the thermal impact at the skin of solar radiation, irrespective where in the coat it is absorbed. In coats with low insulation, the zone where solar radiation is absorbed may govern the consequent heat load on the skin (HL-SR). Thin summer furs of four species of kangaroo from differing climatic zones were used to determine how variation in insulation and in coat spectral and structural characteristics influence the HL-SR. Coat depth, structure, and solar reflectance varied between body regions, as well as between species. The modulation of solar radiation and resultant heat flows in these coats were measured at low (1 m s(-1)) and high (6 m s(-1)) wind speeds by mounting them on a heat flux transducer/temperature-controlled plate apparatus in a wind tunnel. A lamp with a spectrum similar to solar radiation was used as a proxy for the sun. We established that coat insulation was largely determined by coat depth at natural fur lie, despite large variations in fibre density, fibre diameter, and fur mass. Higher wind speed decreased coat insulation, but depth still determined the overall level. A multiple regression analysis that included coat depth (insulation), fibre diameter, fibre density, and solar reflectance was used to determine the best predictors of HL-SR. Only depth and reflectance had significant impacts and both factors had negative weights, so, as either insulation or reflectance increased, HL-SR declined, the larger impact coming from coat reflectance. This reverses the pattern observed in deep coats where insulation dominates over effects of reflectance. Across all coats, as insulation declined, reflectance increased

  12. HYPOALDOSTERONISM IN A MATSCHIE'S TREE KANGAROO (DENDROLAGUS MATSCHIEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whoriskey, Sophie T; Bartlett, Susan L; Baitchman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    A 20-yr-old female Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was diagnosed with hypoaldosteronism, a rare condition in which the body fails to produce normal amounts of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone. Aldosterone plays a key role in body salt homeostasis, increasing sodium reabsorption and promoting excretion of potassium. Hypoaldosteronism resulted in decreased appetite, lethargy, and weight loss in conjunction with hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia in this tree kangaroo. The animal was successfully managed with mineralocorticoid replacement using desoxycorticosterone pivalate. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of hypoaldosteronism in a tree kangaroo and one of the few reports in the veterinary literature in any species.

  13. (Kangaroo grass) at various growth stages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... Key words: Kangaroo grass, biomass, dry matter, rangeland, growth stages. INTRODUCTION ... Soil organic matter, soil porosity and nutrient ... as soil moisture approaches field capacity (Nolan, 1994). Because Kangaroo ...

  14. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

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    ... Size Email Print Share About Skin-to-Skin Care Page Content Article Body You may be able ... care, also called kangaroo care. What is Kangaroo Care? Kangaroo care was developed in South America as ...

  15. Phylogeny of kangaroo apples (Solanum subg. Archaesolanum, Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczai, Péter; Hyvönen, Jaakko; Symon, David E

    2011-11-01

    Kangaroo apples, subgenus Archaesolanum, are a unique and still poorly known group within the genus Solanum. Here we aimed to reveal phylogeny, historical biogeography and age of diversification of Archaesolanum. We sampled all recognized species of the group and sequenced three chloroplast regions, the trnT-trnL spacer, trnL intron and trnL-trnF spacer to calibrate a molecular clock to estimate the age of the group. Distributional data were combined with the results of phylogenetic analysis to track the historical processes responsible for the current range of the group. Our analysis supported the monophyly of the kangaroo apples and the biogeographical disjunction between the two subclades within the group. Based on the divergence time estimates the most recent common ancestor of kangaroo apples is from the late Miocene age (~9 MYA). Based on the age estimate the common ancestors of the kangaroo apples are presumed to have arrived in Australia by long-distance dispersal. The two distinct lineages within the group have separated during the aridification of the continent and further speciated in the brief resurgence of rainforests during the Pliocene.

  16. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

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    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  17. Spatial requirements of free-ranging Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei (Macropodidae, in upper montane forest.

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    Gabriel Porolak

    Full Text Available Tree kangaroos (Macropodidae, Dendrolagus are some of Australasia's least known mammals. However, there is sufficient evidence of population decline and local extinctions that all New Guinea tree kangaroos are considered threatened. Understanding spatial requirements is important in conservation and management. Expectations from studies of Australian tree kangaroos and other rainforest macropodids suggest that tree kangaroos should have small discrete home ranges with the potential for high population densities, but there are no published estimates of spatial requirements of any New Guinea tree kangaroo species. Home ranges of 15 Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei, were measured in upper montane forest on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The home range area was an average of 139.6±26.5 ha (100% MCP; n = 15 or 81.8±28.3 ha (90% harmonic mean; n = 15, and did not differ between males and females. Home ranges of D. matschiei were 40-100 times larger than those of Australian tree kangaroos or other rainforest macropods, possibly due to the impact of hunting reducing density, or low productivity of their high altitude habitat. Huon tree kangaroos had cores of activity within their range at 45% (20.9±4.1 ha and 70% (36.6±7.5 ha harmonic mean isopleths, with little overlap (4.8±2.9%; n = 15 pairs between neighbouring females at the 45% isopleth, but, unlike the Australian species, extensive overlap between females (20.8±5.5%; n = 15 pairs at the complete range (90% harmonic mean. Males overlapped each other and females to a greater extent than did pairs of females. From core areas and overlap, the density of female D. matschiei was one per 19.4 ha. Understanding the cause of this low density is crucial in gaining greater understanding of variations in density of tree kangaroos across the landscape. We consider the potential role of habitat fragmentation, productivity and hunting pressure in limiting tree kangaroo

  18. Circulating levels of prolactin and progesterone in a wild population of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) Marsupialia: Macropodidae

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    Muths, E.; Hinds, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Circulating progesterone and prolactin levels were measured in shot and live-caught wild red kangaroos using radioimmunoassays validated for the red kangaroo. The objective of the study was to correlate hormone profiles with reproductive status and determine if red kangaroos follow the general pattern elucidated for other macropodids. During Phase 2a lactation (600 pg/ml (n= 32) during the transition to Phase 3 lactation (181 to 235 days) when the quiescent corpus luteum and embryo were reactivated. Progesterone concentrations then decreased to prolactin during Phase 2a were prolactin concentrations increased to 15 ng/ml (n= 32), then decreased and remained low through the subsequent stage of dual lactation. These results indicate that progesterone and prolactin profiles in wild red kangaroos follow patterns found previously in other macropodid species, the tammar and Bennett's wallabies.

  19. Parents\\' lived experience of providing kangaroo care to their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents\\' lived experience of providing kangaroo care to their preterm infants. ... While there is good evidence to demonstrate the benefits of kangaroo care in low ... experience of birth; anxiety and barriers; an intimate connection; adjustments, ...

  20. Functional morphology of the forelimb of living and extinct tree-kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Natalie M; Harvey, Kathryn J; Prideaux, Gavin J; O'Shea, James E

    2011-10-01

    Tree-kangaroos are a unique group of arboreal marsupials that evolved from terrestrial ancestors. The recent discovery of well-preserved specimens of extinct tree-kangaroo species (genus Bohra) within Pleistocene cave deposits of south-central Australia provides a unique opportunity to examine adaptive evolution of tree-kangaroos. Here, we provide the first detailed description of the functional anatomy of the forelimb, a central component of the locomotor complex, in the extant Dendrolagus lumholtzi, and compare its structure and function with representatives of other extant marsupial families. Several features were interpreted as adaptations for coping with a discontinuous, uneven and three-dimensional arboreal substrate through enhanced muscular strength and dexterity for propulsion, grasping, and gripping with the forelimbs. The forelimb musculoskeletal anatomy of Dendrolagus differed from terrestrial kangaroos in the following principal ways: a stronger emphasis on the development of muscles groups responsible for adduction, grasping, and gripping; the enlargement of muscles that retract the humerus; and modified shape of the scapula and bony articulations of the forelimb bones to allow improved mobility. Many of these attributes are convergent with other arboreal marsupials. Tree-kangaroos, however, still retain the characteristic bauplan of their terrestrial ancestors, particularly with regard to skeletal morphology, and the muscular anatomy of the forelimb highlights a basic conservatism within the group. In many instances, the skeletal remains of Bohra have similar features to Dendrolagus that suggest adaptations to an arboreal habit. Despite the irony of their retrieval from deposits of the Nullarbor "Treeless" Plain, forelimb morphology clearly shows that the species of Bohra were well adapted to an arboreal habitat.

  1. Hopping Down the Main Street: Eastern Grey Kangaroos at Home in an Urban Matrix

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    Graeme Coulson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most urban mammals are small. However, one of the largest marsupials, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus, occurs in some urban areas. In 2007, we embarked on a longitudinal study of this species in the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have captured and tagged 360 individuals to date, fitting each adult with a collar displaying its name. We have monitored survival, reproduction and movements by resighting, recapture and radio-tracking, augmented by citizen science reports of collared individuals. Kangaroos occurred throughout the town, but the golf course formed the nucleus of this urban population. The course supported a high density of kangaroos (2–5/ha, and approximately half of them were tagged. Total counts of kangaroos on the golf course were highest in summer, at the peak of the mating season, and lowest in winter, when many males but not females left the course. Almost all tagged adult females were sedentary, using only part of the golf course and adjacent native vegetation and residential blocks. In contrast, during the non-mating season (autumn and winter, many tagged adult males ranged widely across the town in a mix of native vegetation remnants, recreation reserves, vacant blocks, commercial properties and residential gardens. Annual fecundity of tagged females was generally high (≥70%, but survival of tagged juveniles was low (54%. We could not determine the cause of death of most juveniles. Vehicles were the major (47% cause of mortality of tagged adults. Road-kills were concentrated (74% in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females. We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

  2. Effects of rodent species, seed species, and predator cues on seed fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivy, Kelly J.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Durham, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Seed selection, removal and subsequent management by granivorous animals is thought to be a complex interaction of factors including qualities of the seeds themselves (e.g., seed size, nutritional quality) and features of the local habitat (e.g. perceived predator risk). At the same time, differential seed selection and dispersal is thought to have profound effects on seed fate and potentially vegetation dynamics. In a feeding arena, we tested whether rodent species, seed species, and indirect and direct predation cues influence seed selection and handling behaviors (e.g., scatter hoarding versus larder hoarding) of two heteromyid rodents, Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) and the Great Basin pocket mouse (Perognathus parvus). The indirect cue was shrub cover, a feature of the environment. Direct cues, presented individually, were (1) control, (2) coyote (Canis latrans) vocalization, (3) coyote scent, (4) red fox (Vulpes vulpes) scent, or (5) short-eared owl (Asio flammeus) vocalization. We offered seeds of three sizes: two native grasses, Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) and bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata), and the non-native cereal rye (Secale cereale), each in separate trays. Kangaroo rats preferentially harvested Indian ricegrass while pocket mice predominately harvested Indian ricegrass and cereal rye. Pocket mice were more likely to scatter hoard preferred seeds, whereas kangaroo rats mostly consumed and/or larder hoarded preferred seeds. No predator cue significantly affected seed preferences. However, both species altered seed handling behavior in response to direct predation cues by leaving more seeds available in the seed pool, though they responded to different predator cues. If these results translate to natural dynamics on the landscape, the two rodents are expected to have different impacts on seed survival and plant recruitment via their different seed selection and seed handling behaviors.

  3. Effects of rodent species, seed species, and predator cues on seed fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivy, Kelly J.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Durham, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Seed selection, removal and subsequent management by granivorous animals is thought to be a complex interaction of factors including qualities of the seeds themselves (e.g., seed size, nutritional quality) and features of the local habitat (e.g. perceived predator risk). At the same time, differential seed selection and dispersal is thought to have profound effects on seed fate and potentially vegetation dynamics. In a feeding arena, we tested whether rodent species, seed species, and indirect and direct predation cues influence seed selection and handling behaviors (e.g., scatter hoarding versus larder hoarding) of two heteromyid rodents, Ord's kangaroo rat ( Dipodomys ordii) and the Great Basin pocket mouse ( Perognathus parvus). The indirect cue was shrub cover, a feature of the environment. Direct cues, presented individually, were (1) control, (2) coyote ( Canis latrans) vocalization, (3) coyote scent, (4) red fox ( Vulpes vulpes) scent, or (5) short-eared owl ( Asio flammeus) vocalization. We offered seeds of three sizes: two native grasses, Indian ricegrass ( Achnatherum hymenoides) and bluebunch wheatgrass ( Pseudoroegneria spicata), and the non-native cereal rye ( Secale cereale), each in separate trays. Kangaroo rats preferentially harvested Indian ricegrass while pocket mice predominately harvested Indian ricegrass and cereal rye. Pocket mice were more likely to scatter hoard preferred seeds, whereas kangaroo rats mostly consumed and/or larder hoarded preferred seeds. No predator cue significantly affected seed preferences. However, both species altered seed handling behavior in response to direct predation cues by leaving more seeds available in the seed pool, though they responded to different predator cues. If these results translate to natural dynamics on the landscape, the two rodents are expected to have different impacts on seed survival and plant recruitment via their different seed selection and seed handling behaviors.

  4. Setting up Kangaroo Mother Care at Queen Elizabeth Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Hospital, Blantyre - A practical approach .... It is not sustainable .... This is a very distressing event for the mother, other mothers and .... management of well preterm infants: a pilot study. ... Kangaroo Mother Care — A practical guide.

  5. Mothers’ Experiences with Premature Neonates about Kangaroo Care: Qualitative Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahere Salimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Premature neonates admitted in NICU besides being separated from their mothers are prone to inevitably painful and stressful situations. Kangaroo care is the most effective method to get rid of this separation and its negative consequences. This study was performed to determine the experiences of mothers having premature neonates concerning Kangaroo care.   Material and Methods: The present study is a qualitative research in which focus group discussion method is used for data collection. Research society consisted of mothers having premature neonates Research group reread and categorized the qualitative findings. Contents of interviews were analyzed using the conventional interpretation approach introduced by Dicklman Method.   Results: Through content analysis of information emerged two major categories including mothers’ experiences about advantages of kangaroo care in interaction with neonate, and, feeling of physical-mental healthiness of neonate. Executive obstacles of kangaroo care from mothers’ standpoint were also discussed, which will be subsequently presented.   Discussion: According to the obtained results, it seems vital to highlight kangaroo care as a safe and effective clinical care-taking treatment in nursery of premature neonates in all hospitals. Nurses shall provide all mothers with the needed instructions for holding the premature and lower-weight neonate properly on their chests and shall promote their knowledge level concerning positive effects of kangaroo care including induction of tranquil sleep, optimization of physiological conditions of neonate, and removal of suckling obstacles.

  6. Studies on the in vitro cultivation of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehority, Burk A; Wright, André-Denis G

    2014-08-01

    The methods used for culturing rumen protozoa were found to be unsatisfactory for growth of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach. Based on published measurements of physical parameters in the marsupial forestomach, several modifications were incorporated into the procedure, i.e., an increase in % hydrogen in the gas phase, adjustment of initial pH of the medium to 6.9-7.0 range, feed only forage as a substrate and incubate at a lower temperature (33-36 °C). Only incubation at the lower temperature increased survival time of the kangaroo protozoa. Two species of Bitricha were still viable after 28 d in culture. Cultures had to be terminated at that time. One of the species differed considerably in size and shape from previously described species and based on 18S rRNA data, may represent a new species of Bitricha. The second species, present in low numbers was identified as Bitricha oblata. In a separate trial, Macropodinium yalanbense survived for 11 d, at which time these cultures also had to be terminated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  8. The role of inspections in the commercial kangaroo industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keely Boom

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an assessment of the enforcement of the law governing commercial kangaroo killing, focusing particularly upon inspectorial practices. Australia’s kangaroo industry is the largest commercial kill of land-based wildlife in the world. Professional shooters hunt kangaroos in rural and remote locations at night. Due to the remote and decentralised nature of the killing, the industry presents unique challenges to law enforcement agencies that are responsible for the enforcement of animal welfare standards. This article focuses upon the role that inspections have in detecting offences within the commercial kangaroo industry. It provides a comparative analysis across the states, highlighting key differences in terms of inspectorial practices and the resulting outcomes. A common theme across all of the jurisdictions is that none of the agencies responsible for enforcement regularly conduct inspections of shooters, making it impossible to ensure that these parties are complying with the National Code of Practice for the Humane Shooting of Kangaroos and Wallabies. Recommendations for reform are offered, including stronger compliance policy, higher rates of inspection, increased resourcing and the introduction of alternative methods of inspection.

  9. Bartonella species in invasive rats and indigenous rodents from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Borchert, Jeff N; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph T; Gage, Kenneth L; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2014-03-01

    The presence of bartonellae in invasive rats (Rattus rattus) and indigenous rodents (Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus) from two districts in Uganda, Arua and Zombo, was examined by PCR detection and culture. Blood from a total of 228 R. rattus, 31 A. niloticus, and 5 C. gambianus was screened using genus-specific primers targeting the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Furthermore, rodent blood was plated on brain heart infusion blood agar, and isolates were verified as Bartonella species using citrate synthase gene- (gltA) specific primers. One hundred and four fleas recovered from R. rattus were also tested for the presence of Bartonella species using the same gltA primer set. An overall prevalence of 1.3% (three of 228) was obtained in R. rattus, whereas 61.3% of 31 A. niloticus and 60% of five C. gambianus were positive for the presence of Bartonella species. Genotypes related to Bartonella elizabethae, a known zoonotic pathogen, were detected in three R. rattus and one C. gambianus. Bartonella strains, similar to bacteria detected in indigenous rodents from other African countries, were isolated from the blood of A. niloticus. Bartonellae, similar to bacteria initially cultured from Ornithodorus sonrai (soft tick) from Senegal, were found in two C. gambianus. Interestingly, bartonellae detected in fleas from invasive rats were similar to bacteria identified in indigenous rodents and not their rat hosts, with an overall prevalence of 6.7%. These results suggest that if fleas are competent vectors of these bartonellae, humans residing in these two districts of Uganda are potentially at greater risk for exposure to Bartonella species from native rodents than from invasive rats. The low prevalence of bartonellae in R. rattus was quite surprising, in contrast, to the detection of these organisms in a large percentage of Rattus species from other geographical areas. A possible reason for this disparity is discussed.

  10. What is kangaroo mother care? Systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace J Chan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kangaroo mother care (KMC, often defined as skin–to–skin contact between a mother and her newborn, frequent or exclusive breastfeeding, and early discharge from the hospital has been effective in reducing the risk of mortality among preterm and low birth weight infants. Research studies and program implementation of KMC have used various definitions.

  11. Kangaroo Care: Experiences and Needs of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care: A Systematic Review ‘Parents’ Experience of Kangaroo Care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriels, karlijn; Brouwer, AJ; maat, Jessica; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review is focusing on the experiences and needs of parents with infants within NICU regarding Kangaroo Care. Ten studies with qualitative designs were included. Kangaroo Care was overall experienced as positive; giving parents the opportunity to get to know their babies and (re-) const

  12. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  13. Invasive rats on tropical islands: Their population biology and impacts on native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A. Harper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most invasive rat species, black or ship rat Rattus rattus, brown or Norway rats, R. norvegicus and Pacific rat, R. exulans have been incrementally introduced to islands as humans have explored the world’s oceans. They have caused serious deleterious effects through predation and competition, and extinction of many species on tropical islands, many of which are biodiversity hotspots. All three rat species are found in virtually all habitat types, including mangrove and arid shrub land. Black rats tend to dominate the literature but despite this the population biology of invasive rats, particularly Norway rats, is poorly researched on tropical islands. Pacific rats can often exceed population densities of well over 100 rats ha−1 and black rats can attain densities of 119 rats ha−1, which is much higher than recorded on most temperate islands. High densities are possibly due to high recruitment of young although the data to support this are limited. The generally aseasonally warm climate can lead to year-round breeding but can be restricted by either density-dependent effects interacting with resource constraints often due to aridity. Apparent adverse impacts on birds have been well recorded and almost all tropical seabirds and land birds can be affected by rats. On the Pacific islands, black rats have added to declines and extinctions of land birds caused initially by Pacific rats. Rats have likely caused unrecorded extinctions of native species on tropical islands. Further research required on invasive rats on tropical islands includes the drivers of population growth and carrying capacities that result in high densities and how these differ to temperate islands, habitat use of rats in tropical vegetation types and interactions with other tropical species, particularly the reptiles and invertebrates, including crustaceans.

  14. Reproductive strategies of the kangaroo leech, Marsupiobdella africana (Glossiphoniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kruger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kangaroo Leech, Marsupiobdella africana, is a hermaphroditic organism, with insemination taking place by the planting of a spermatophore on another leech. Spermatophores are mostly planted on the anterior of the recipient leech, but not always. Several spermatophores may be planted by different leeches on a single recipient. The spermatophore consists of two side by side lobes. Within minutes from planting of the spermatophore, the contents are squeezed out and into the body of the recipient. Sperm are believed to find the way to the ova by following chemical cues. Kangaroo Leeches display advanced parental care by transferring fertilized eggs from the reproductive opening to a brood pouch on the ventral side. Fully developed leeches may copulate after detaching from the amphibian host Xenopus laevis, or from the Cape River Crab Potamonautes perlatus with which it maintains a phoretic association.

  15. Peters anomaly in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedmeyer, Wm Kirk; Pearce, Jacqueline; Persky, Meredith; Houck, Marlys L

    2014-09-01

    A 10-mo-old female red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented with a unilateral congenital corneal opacity OD. Complete ophthalmic examination revealed a shallow anterior chamber and a focal area of corneal edema with multiple persistent pupillary membranes extending from the iris colarette to the corneal endothelium adjacent to the edematous area of cornea. High-resolution B-scan ultrasound of the anterior segment showed an area consistent with thinning of Descemet's membrane in the area of corneal edema. Ophthalmic examination and ultrasound findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Peters anomaly, a form of anterior segment dysgenesis. An electroretinogram performed on the affected animal did not reveal any specific abnormalities. Karyotype analyses revealed a normal diploid number (2n = 20, -XX), with an abnormal pericentric inversion in the second largest chromosomal pair. The kangaroo exhibits mild compensated vision deficits in the affected eye. The maternal and paternal adult pairing has been discontinued in an effort to prevent future offspring anomalies.

  16. Kangaroo Mother Method: Mothers' Experiences and Contributions to Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    João Carlos Arivabene; Maria Antonieta Rubio Tyrrell

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to describe mothers' experiences, analyzing them in the light of the principles of the Kangaroo Mother Method (KMM), and discuss the mothers' contributions based on the meanings of these experiences for nursing actions. In data collection, a questionnaire was used that characterized the mothers' socioeconomic profile and, through focus groups, stories were obtained about the benefits of these experiences, which supported the construction of the following categories: surviv...

  17. Kangaroo – A pattern-matching program for biological sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betel Doron

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists are often interested in performing a simple database search to identify proteins or genes that contain a well-defined sequence pattern. Many databases do not provide straightforward or readily available query tools to perform simple searches, such as identifying transcription binding sites, protein motifs, or repetitive DNA sequences. However, in many cases simple pattern-matching searches can reveal a wealth of information. We present in this paper a regular expression pattern-matching tool that was used to identify short repetitive DNA sequences in human coding regions for the purpose of identifying potential mutation sites in mismatch repair deficient cells. Results Kangaroo is a web-based regular expression pattern-matching program that can search for patterns in DNA, protein, or coding region sequences in ten different organisms. The program is implemented to facilitate a wide range of queries with no restriction on the length or complexity of the query expression. The program is accessible on the web at http://bioinfo.mshri.on.ca/kangaroo/ and the source code is freely distributed at http://sourceforge.net/projects/slritools/. Conclusion A low-level simple pattern-matching application can prove to be a useful tool in many research settings. For example, Kangaroo was used to identify potential genetic targets in a human colorectal cancer variant that is characterized by a high frequency of mutations in coding regions containing mononucleotide repeats.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  19. The physics of articulated toys - a jumping and rotating kangaroo

    CERN Document Server

    Güémez, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe the physics of an articulated toy with an internal source of energy provided by a spiral spring. The toy is a funny low cost kangaroo which jumps and rotates. The study consists of a mechanical and a thermodynamical analysis which makes use of the Newton and center of mass equations, the rotational equations and the first law of thermodynamics. This amazing toy provides a nice demonstrative example how new physics insights can be brought about when links with thermodynamics are established in the study of mechanical systems.

  20. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades.

  1. Molecular characterization of Eimeria species in macropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongchang; Fenwick, Stan; Potter, Abbey; Elliot, Aileen; Power, Michelle; Beveridge, Ian; Ryan, Una

    2012-10-01

    A total of 597 faecal samples were collected from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Euros (M. robustus), red kangaroos (M. rufus) in Western Australia and Eastern Grey Kangaroos (M. giganteus) from Victoria and screened for the presence of Eimeria by PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus. The overall prevalence was 24.3% (145/597). At the 18S rRNA locus, sequences were obtained for 25 of the 145 positives. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the macropod-derived Eimeria species grouped in a separate marsupial clade that included Eimeria trichosuri from brushtail possums. At least 6 different clades were identified within the marsupial isolates and many of the genotypes identified are likely to be valid species, however morphological and biological data need to be collected to match sequences to previously characterized Eimeria species or identify if they are new species.

  2. impact of partial kangaroo mother care on growth rates and duration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... rates and duration of hospital stay of Low Birth Weight (LBW) infants. Design: ... Intervention: Kangaroo mother care was practised over an eight hour period per day ... settings, as well as its benefits and limitations. These.

  3. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johanson da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management.METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed.RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (demotivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method.CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (discontinuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model.

  4. Toxoplasmosis in the Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Macropus giganteus and the Cape Hyrax, Procavis capensis in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohamed El-Dakhly1,4, Nagwan El-Habashi2, El-Shaymaa El-Nahass3,4, Hiroki Sakai4 and Tokuma Yanai4,*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis was investigated in an eastern grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus, and four cape hyraxes, Procavia capensis, in a Japanese zoo. Clinically, the kangaroo showed neurological signs, emaciation, diarrhea, elevated AST and CK, and subjected to coma before death. One young cape hyrax had severe anorexia, while the other three died without exhibiting clinical signs. Grossly, lungs of the kangaroo were dark red in color, while hyraxes, besides, showed hepatic multifocal white foci, and intestinal multifocal hemorrhages. Histologically, the kangaroo had frequent Toxoplasma gondii pseudocysts in brain, heart and skeletal muscles. All hyraxes had multifocal necrosis with cysts containing numerous bradyzoites in liver and spleen, along with necrotic gastroenteritis and intestinal hemorrhages. Immunohistochemically, cysts showed positive reaction to anti-T. gondii antibodies. These findings indicate possible outbreaks of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes, zoo habitants; therefore, they could be susceptible intermediate hosts for T. gondii in terms of zoonosis. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes in Japanese zoos.

  5. Chronic Co-species Housing Mice and Rats Increased the Competitiveness of Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Juan; Li, Lai-Fu; Zhang, Yao-Hua; Guo, Hui-Fen; Xia, Min; Zhang, Meng-Wei; Jing, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Xu

    2017-03-01

    Rats are predators of mice in nature. Nevertheless, it is a common practice to house mice and rats in a same room in some laboratories. In this study, we investigated the behavioral and physiological responsively of mice in long-term co-species housing conditions. Twenty-four male mice were randomly assigned to their original raising room (control) or a rat room (co-species-housed) for more than 6 weeks. In the open-field and light-dark box tests, the behaviors of the co-species-housed mice and controls were not different. In a 2-choice test of paired urine odors [rabbit urine (as a novel odor) vs. rat urine, cat urine (as a natural predator-scent) vs. rabbit urine, and cat urine vs. rat urine], the co-species-housed mice were more ready to investigate the rat urine odor compared with the controls and may have adapted to it. In an encounter test, the rat-room-exposed mice exhibited increased aggression levels, and their urines were more attractive to females. Correspondingly, the levels of major urinary proteins were increased in the co-species-housed mouse urine, along with some volatile pheromones. The serum testosterone levels were also enhanced in the co-species-housed mice, whereas the corticosterone levels were not different. The norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-HT levels in the right hippocampus and striatum were not different between the 2. Our findings indicate that chronic co-species housing results in adaptation in male mice; furthermore, it appears that long-term rat-odor stimuli enhance the competitiveness of mice, which suggests that appropriate predator-odor stimuli may be important to the fitness of prey animals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of genetic variation in Labiostrongylus longispicularis from kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby-Chilton, F; Beveridge, I; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-06-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was employed to screen for sequence heterogeneity in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of ribosomal (r) DNA of Labiostrongylus longispicularis, a parasitic strongylid nematode occuring in some species of kangaroo in different geographical regions of Australia. The results showed that most of the nematodes screened had different SSCP profiles, which were subsequently shown to correspond to polymorphisms and/or an indel in the ITS-2 sequence. These variable sites related mainly to unpaired regions of the predicted secondary structure of the precursor rRNA molecule. SSCP profiles could be used to distinguish L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus robustus (New South Wales) from L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus erubescens and Macropus rufus (South Australia). This difference corresponded to a transversional change in the ITS-2 sequence at alignment position 82. The study demonstrated clearly the effectiveness of SSCP analysis for future large-scale population genetic studies of L. longispicularis in order to test the hypothesis that L. longispicularis from different geographical regions represents multiple sibling species.

  7. Understanding kangaroo care and its benefits to preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Yeo ML

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marsha L Campbell-Yeo,1–4 Timothy C Disher,1 Britney L Benoit,1 C Celeste Johnston,2,4,5 1School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, 2Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, 3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 4Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, 5Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: The holding of an infant with ventral skin-to-skin contact typically in an upright position with the swaddled infant on the chest of the parent, is commonly referred to as kangaroo care (KC, due to its simulation of marsupial care. It is recommended that KC, as a feasible, natural, and cost-effective intervention, should be standard of care in the delivery of quality health care for all infants, regardless of geographic location or economic status. Numerous benefits of its use have been reported related to mortality, physiological (thermoregulation, cardiorespiratory stability, behavioral (sleep, breastfeeding duration, and degree of exclusivity domains, as an effective therapy to relieve procedural pain, and improved neurodevelopment. Yet despite these recommendations and a lack of negative research findings, adoption of KC as a routine clinical practice remains variable and underutilized. Furthermore, uncertainty remains as to whether continuous KC should be recommended in all settings or if there is a critical period of initiation, dose, or duration that is optimal. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the benefits of KC for infants born preterm, highlighting differences and similarities across low and higher resource countries and in a non-pain and pain context. Additionally, implementation considerations and unanswered questions for future research are addressed. Keywords: kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, infant, preterm, review

  8. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo, along with a control (water. If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous, western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones. Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5. Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2 = 83.8; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been

  9. Genetic evaluation of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) captive breeding program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) is an endangered species that has been bred in captivity since the 1970s. In 1992, the Tree Kangaroo Species Survival Plan(®) (TKSSP) was established to coordinate the captive management of Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) D. matschiei. The TKSSP makes annual breeding recommendations primarily based on the mean kinship (MK) strategy. Captive breeding programs often use the MK strategy to preserve genetic diversity in small populations-to avoid the negative consequences of inbreeding and retain their adaptive potential. The ability of a captive breeding program to retain the population's genetic diversity over time can be evaluated by comparing the genetic diversity of the captive population to wild populations. We analyzed DNA extracted from blood and fecal samples from AZA (n = 71), captive (n = 28), and wild (n = 22) D. matschiei using eight microsatellite markers and sequenced the partial mitochondrial DNA control region gene. AZA D. matschiei had a similar expected heterozygosity (H(e) = 0.595 ± 0.184) compared with wild D. matschiei (H(e) = 0.628 ± 0.143), but they had different allelic frequencies (F(ST) = 0.126; P < 0.001). AZA D. matschiei haplotype diversity was almost two times lower than wild D. matschiei Ĥ = 0.740 ± 0.063. These data will assist management of AZA D. matschiei and serve as a baseline for AZA and wild D. matschiei genetic diversity values that could be used to monitor future changes in their genetic diversity. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lactobacillus species shift in distal esophagus of high-fatdiet-fed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhao; Xiao-Wei Liu; Ning Xie; Xue-Hong Wang; Yi Cui; Jun-Wen Yang; Lin-Lin Chen; Fang-Gen Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the microbiota shift in the distal esophagus of Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet. METHODS: Twenty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into high-fat diet and normal control groups of 10 rats each. The composition of microbiota in the mucosa from the distal esophagus was analyzed based on selective culture. A variety of Lactobacillus species were identified by molecular biological techniques. Bacterial DNA from Lactobacillus colonies was extracted, and 16S rDNA was amplified by PCR using bacterial universal primers. The amplified 16S rDNA products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Every single band was purified from the gel and sent to be sequenced. RESULTS: Based on mucosal bacterial culturing in the distal esophagus, Staphylococcus aureus was absent, and total anaerobes and Lactobacillus species were decreased significantly in the high-fat diet group compared with the normal control group (P < 0.01). Detailed DGGE analysis on the composition of Lactobacillus species in the distal esophagus revealed that Lactobacillus crispatus , Lactobacillus gasseri (L. gasseri ) and Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri ) comprised the Lactobacillus species in the high-fat diet group, while the composition of Lactobacillus species in the normal control group consisted of L. gasseri , Lactobacillus jensenii and L. reuteri . CONCLUSION: High-fat diet led to a mucosal microflora shift in the distal esophagus in rats, especially the composition of Lactobacillus species.

  11. Interpersonal relationships between professionals and mothers of premature from Kangaroo-Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Eliene de Oliveira Callou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the interpersonal relationships between professionals and mothers of premature newborns of the Kangaroo Unit. Methods: This was an exploratory study of qualitative approach. The interviews were conducted with 10 mothers and 7 professionals who joined in Kangaroo Program and then analyzed by the content analysis technique. The guiding questions used were related to feelings perceived in relation to the Kangaroo method, related to mother-child dyad and interpersonal relationships. Results: Mothers reported on their speeches: “safe to be with the baby in Kangaroo Method” and “sense of maternal feeling during breastfeeding”, while in the professionals’ discourses have emerged: “guidelines on caring for the babies”, “the embracement by the team” and “the importance of family support.” Conclusions: The interaction between professionals and mothers of Kangaroo Unit facilitates the permanence of the binomial in the method, therefore develops feelings of security, tranquility and confidence to take care of the baby. It is important that the team be aware of the difficulties, supporting them in the weakest moments and sharing their fears, doubts and concerns over the baby’s hospitalization.

  12. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Jadhav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE (Ders. Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects.

  13. Multi-proxy monitoring approaches at Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Bronwyn; Drysdale, Russell; Tyler, Jonathan; Goodwin, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Interpretations of geochemical signals preserved in young speleothems are greatly enhanced by comprehensive cave-site monitoring. In the light of this, a cave monitoring project is being conducted concurrently with the development of a new palaeoclimate record from Kelly Hill Cave (Kangaroo Island, South Australia). The site is strategically located because it is situated between longer-lived monitoring sites in southeastern and southwestern Australia, as well as being climatically 'upstream' from major population and agricultural centres. This study aims to understand possible controls on speleothem δ18O in Kelly Hill Cave through i. identification of local and regional δ18O drivers in precipitation; and ii. preservation and modification of climatic signals within the epikarst as indicated by dripwater δ18O. These aims are achieved through analysis of a five-year daily rainfall (amount and δ18O) dataset in conjunction with in-cave drip monitoring. Drivers of precipitation δ18O were identified through linear regression between δ18O values and local meteorological variables, air-parcel back trajectories, and synoptic-typing. Synoptically driven moisture sources were identified through the use of NCEP/NCAR climate reanalysis sea-level pressure, precipitable moisture, and outgoing longwave radiation data in order to trace moisture sources and travel mechanisms from surrounding ocean basins. Local controls on δ18O at Kelly Hill Cave are consistent with published interpretations of southern Australia sites, with oxygen isotopes primarily controlled by rainfall amount on both daily and monthly time scales. Back-trajectory analysis also supports previous observations that the Southern Ocean is the major source for moisture-bearing cold-front systems. However, synoptic typing of daily rainfall δ18O and amount extremes reveals a previously unreported tropical connection and moisture source. This tropical connection appears to be strongest in summer and autumn, but

  14. Bartonella species and trombiculid mites of rats from the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loan, Hoang Kim; Cuong, Nguyen Van; Takhampunya, Ratree; Klangthong, Kewalin; Osikowicz, Lynn; Kiet, Bach Tuan; Campbell, James; Bryant, Juliet; Promstaporn, Sommai; Kosoy, Michael; Hoang, Nguyen Van; Morand, Serge; Chaval, Yannick; Hien, Vo Be; Carrique-Mas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    A survey of Bartonella spp. from 275 rats purchased in food markets (n=150) and trapped in different ecosystems (rice field, forest, and animal farms) (n=125) was carried out during October, 2012-March, 2013, in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. The overall Bartonella spp. prevalence detected by culture and PCR in blood was 14.9% (10.7-19.1%), the highest corresponding to Rattus tanezumi (49.2%), followed by Rattus norvegicus (20.7%). Trapped rats were also investigated for the presence and type of chiggers (larvae of trombiculid mites), and Bartonella spp. were investigated on chigger pools collected from each rat by RT-PCR. A total of five Bartonella spp. were identified in rats, three of which (B. elizabethae, B. rattimassiliensis, and B. tribocorum) are known zoonotic pathogens. Among trapped rats, factors independently associated with increased prevalence of Bartonella spp. included: (1) Rat species (R. tanezumi); (2) the number of Trombiculini-Blankaartia and Schoengastiini-Ascoschoengastia mites found on rats; and (3) the habitat of the rat (i.e., forest/fields vs. animal farms). The prevalence of Bartonella infection among chiggers from Bartonella spp.-positive R. tanezumi rats was 5/25 (25%), compared with 1/27 (3.7%) among Bartonella spp.-negative R. tanezumi rats (relative risk [RR]=5.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-43.09). The finding of Bartonella spp.-positive chiggers on Bartonella spp.-negative rats is strongly suggestive of a transovarial transmission cycle. Rats are ubiquitous in areas of human activity and farms in the Mekong Delta; in addition, trapping and trading of rats for food is common. To correctly assess the human risks due to rat trapping, marketing, and carcass dressing, further studies are needed to establish the routes of transmission and cycle of infection. The widespread presence of these zoonotic pathogens in rats and the abundance of human-rat interactions suggest that surveillance efforts should be enhanced to detect any human

  15. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  16. Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chong [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Meng, Qin, E-mail: mengq@zju.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang, Guoliang [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China)

    2012-01-01

    Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ► Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ► 3D hepatocytes in 21 days’ long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ► Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

  17. Advantages of kangaroo Mother care in Less Than 2000 Grams Low Birth Weight Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Jafarzadeh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:The aim of study was to compare the effect of Kangaroo mother care (KMC and conventional methods of care (CMC in low birth weight babies less than 2000 grams.Method: One hundred babies with birth weight less than 2000 grams and without clinical problem were randomized in two groups; the tervention group (N=50 who received Kangaroo mother care and the control group (N=50 with conventional care. Two groups were compared in daily weight gaining, self confidence of mother, duration of hospitalization, clinical cyanosis and nosocomial infection. Collected data was analyzed by SPSS 11.5 software . Irct ID: IRCT201101091162N16.Results: The KMC babies had better daily weight gaining average [18.31±7.57gm vs. 4.8±16.57gm (P0.05.Conclusions: In this study Kangaroo mother care had better effect on daily weight gaining, mother confidence and shorter duration of hospitalization.

  18. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  19. Leptospirosis risk increases with changes in species composition of rat populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuerkauf, Jörn; Perez, Julie; Taugamoa, Alefosio; Niutoua, Iasinito; Labrousse, Didier; Gula, Roman; Bogdanowicz, Wieslaw; Jourdan, Hervé; Goarant, Cyrille

    2013-04-01

    Rats are major reservoirs of leptospirosis and considered as a main threat to biodiversity. A recent introduction of Rattus rattus to the island of Futuna (Western Polynesia) provided the opportunity to test if a possible change in species composition of rat populations would increase the risk of leptospirosis to humans. We trapped rodents on Wallis and Futuna and assessed Leptospira carriage in 357 rodents ( Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus, Rattus exulans, and Mus domesticus) from 2008 to 2012. While Leptospira prevalence in rodents and the composition of rat populations on Futuna fluctuated with rainfall, the biomass of Leptospira-carrying rodents has been continuously rising from 2008 to 2012. Our results suggest that the introduction of R. rattus increases the risk to humans being infected with leptospirosis by rats.

  20. Leptospirosis risk increases with changes in species composition of rat populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuerkauf, Jörn; Perez, Julie; Taugamoa, Alefosio; Niutoua, Iasinito; Labrousse, Didier; Gula, Roman; Bogdanowicz, Wieslaw; Jourdan, Hervé; Goarant, Cyrille

    2013-04-01

    Rats are major reservoirs of leptospirosis and considered as a main threat to biodiversity. A recent introduction of Rattus rattus to the island of Futuna (Western Polynesia) provided the opportunity to test if a possible change in species composition of rat populations would increase the risk of leptospirosis to humans. We trapped rodents on Wallis and Futuna and assessed Leptospira carriage in 357 rodents (Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus, Rattus exulans, and Mus domesticus) from 2008 to 2012. While Leptospira prevalence in rodents and the composition of rat populations on Futuna fluctuated with rainfall, the biomass of Leptospira-carrying rodents has been continuously rising from 2008 to 2012. Our results suggest that the introduction of R. rattus increases the risk to humans being infected with leptospirosis by rats.

  1. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  2. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A Coghlan

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus. The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation.

  3. Alterations in the molecular species of rat liver lecithin by corn-oil feeding to essential fatty acid-deficient rats as a function of time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Pieterson, W.A.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1968-01-01

    The present paper describes, as a function of time, the qualitative and quantitative alterations in the molecular species pattern of rat liver lecithin which are observed when corn oil is fed to essential fatty acid-deficient rats. One of the most important changes observed was a very rapid

  4. Preterm newborns at Kangaroo Mother Care: a cohort follow-up from birth to six months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alexsandra da S. Menezes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To evaluate clinical outcomes, growth and exclusive breastfeeding rates in premature infants assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care at birth, at discharge and at six months of life.METHODS: Prospective study of a premature infants cohort assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care in a tertiary public maternity in Northeast Brazil with birth weight ≤1750g and with clinical conditions for Kangaroo care.RESULTS: The sample was composed by 137 premature infants, being 62.8% female, with average birth weight of 1365±283g, average gestational age of 32±3 weeks and 26.2% were adequate for gestational age. They have been admitted in the Kangaroo Ward with a median of 13 days of life, weighing 1430±167g and, at this time, 57.7% were classified as small for corrected gestational age. They were discharged with 36.8±21.8 days of chronological age, weighing 1780±165g and 67.9% were small for corrected gestational age. At six months of life (n=76, they had an average weight of 5954±971g, and 68.4% presented corrected weight for gestational age between percentiles 15 and 85 of the World Health Organization (WHO weight curve. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at discharge was 56.2% and, at six months of life, 14.4%.CONCLUSIONS: In the studied sample, almost two thirds of the children assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care were, at six months of life, between percentiles 15 and 85 of the WHO weight curves. The frequency of exclusive breastfeeding at six months was low.

  5. Leptospira Species in Feral Cats and Black Rats from Western Australia and Christmas Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybing, Narelle A; Jacobson, Caroline; Irwin, Peter; Algar, David; Adams, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected, re-emerging bacterial disease with both zoonotic and conservation implications. Rats and livestock are considered the usual sources of human infection, but all mammalian species are capable of carrying Leptospira spp. and transmitting pathogenic leptospires in their urine, and uncertainty remains about the ecology and transmission dynamics of Leptospira in different regions. In light of a recent case of human leptospirosis on tropical Christmas Island, this study aimed to investigate the role of introduced animals (feral cats and black rats) as carriers of pathogenic Leptospira spp. on Christmas Island and to compare this with two different climatic regions of Western Australia (one island and one mainland). Kidney samples were collected from black rats (n = 68) and feral cats (n = 59) from Christmas Island, as well as feral cats from Dirk Hartog Island (n = 23) and southwest Western Australia (n = 59). Molecular (PCR) screening detected pathogenic leptospires in 42.4% (95% confidence interval 29.6-55.9) of cats and 2.9% (0.4-10.2) of rats from Christmas Island. Sequencing of cat- and rat-positive samples from Christmas Island showed 100% similarity for Leptospira interrogans. Pathogenic leptospires were not detected in cats from Dirk Hartog Island or southwest Western Australia. These findings were consistent with previous reports of higher Leptospira spp. prevalence in tropical regions compared with arid and temperate regions. Despite the abundance of black rats on Christmas Island, feral cats appear to be the more important reservoir species for the persistence of pathogenic L. interrogans on the island. This research highlights the importance of disease surveillance and feral animal management to effectively control potential disease transmission.

  6. Species and sex differences in propofol glucuronidation in liver microsomes of humans, monkeys, rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, M; Isobe, T; Okada, K; Murata, M; Shigeyama, M; Hanioka, N

    2015-07-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a short-acting anesthetic commonly used in clinical practice, and is rapidly metabolized into glucuronide by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). In the present study, propofol glucuronidation was examined in the liver microsomes of male and female humans, monkeys, rats, and mice. The kinetics of propofol glucuronidation by liver microsomes fit the substrate inhibition model for humans and mice, the Hill model for monkeys, and the isoenzyme (biphasic) model for rats. The K(m), V(max), and CL(int) values of human liver microsomes were 50 μM, 5.6 nmol/min/mg protein, and 110 μL/min/mg protein, respectively, for males, and 46 μM, 6.0 nmol/min/mg protein, and 130 μL/min/mg protein, respectively, for females. The rank order of the CL(int) or CL(max) (in vitro clearance) values of liver microsomes was mice humans > monkeys > rats (high-affinity phase) rats (low-affinity phase) in both males and females. Although no significant sex differences were observed in the values of kinetic parameters in any animal species, the in vitro clearance values of liver microsomes were males females in monkeys, rats (high-affinity phase), and mice. These results demonstrated that the kinetic profile of propofol glucuronidation by liver microsomes markedly differed among humans, monkeys, rats, and mice, and suggest that species and sex differences exist in the roles of UGT isoform(s), including UGT1A9, involved in its metabolism.

  7. Age-related changes in reactive oxygen species production in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, A S; Kodavanti, P R; Mundy, W R

    2000-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and resultant oxidative stress have been implicated in the mechanism of brain dysfunction due to age-related neurodegenerative diseases or exposure to environmental chemicals. We have investigated intrinsic age-related differences in the ability of the various brain regions to generate ROS in the absence and presence of Fe(2)+. ROS production in crude brain homogenates from adult rats was linear with respect to time and tissue concentration, and was stimulated to a greater extent by Fe(2)+ than was TBARS production. ROS production was then determined in homogenates from cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum of 7-day-old, 14-day-old, 21-day-old, adult (3-6-month old), and aged (24-month-old) rats using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH). Basal levels of ROS production were similar in 7-, 14-, and 21-day olds, increased in adults, and highest in aged rats, and did not differ between brain regions. ROS production was stimulated by Fe(2)+ (0. 3-30 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner in all brain regions. However, the stimulation of ROS production by Fe(2)+ varied with age. ROS production was greater in 14- and 21-day-old rats compared with adult and aged animals. ROS production in 7-day-old rats was decreased at low Fe(2)+ concentrations and increased at high Fe(2)+ concentrations compared to adult and aged rats. These data show that brain homogenates from neonatal rats respond differently to Fe(2)+, and suggest that developing animals may be more sensitive to oxidative stress in the brain after exposure to toxicants. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  8. Strategic rat control for restoring populations of native species in forest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Doug P; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Kreigenhofer, Brigitte; McArthur, Nikki; Govella, Susanne; Barrett, Paul; Richard, Yvan

    2014-06-01

    Forest fragments have biodiversity value that may be enhanced through management such as control of non-native predators. However, such efforts may be ineffective, and research is needed to ensure that predator control is done strategically. We used Bayesian hierarchical modeling to estimate fragment-specific effects of experimental rat control on a native species targeted for recovery in a New Zealand pastoral landscape. The experiment was a modified BACI (before-after-control-impact) design conducted over 6 years in 19 forest fragments with low-density subpopulations of North Island Robins (Petroica longipes). The aim was to identify individual fragments that not only showed clear benefits of rat control, but also would have a high probability of subpopulation growth even if they were the only fragment managed. We collected data on fecundity, adult and juvenile survival, and juvenile emigration, and modeled the data in an integrated framework to estimate the expected annual growth rate (λ) of each subpopulation with and without rat control. Without emigration, subpopulation growth was estimated as marginal (λ = 0.95-1.05) or negative (λ = 0.74-0.90) without rat control, but it was estimated as positive in all fragments (λ = 1.4-2.1) if rats were controlled. This reflected a 150% average increase in fecundity and 45% average increase in adult female survival. The probability of a juvenile remaining in its natal fragment was 0.37 on average, but varied with fragment connectivity. With juvenile emigration added, 6 fragments were estimated to have a high (>0.8) probability of being self-sustaining (λ > 1) with rat control. The key factors affecting subpopulation growth rates under rat control were low connectivity and stock fencing because these factors were associated with lower juvenile emigration and higher fecundity, respectively. However, there was also substantial random variation in adult survival among fragments, illustrating the importance of

  9. Sitagliptin attenuates sympathetic innervation via modulating reactive oxygen species and interstitial adenosine in infarcted rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yang, Chen-Chia; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Nen-Chung

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, attenuates arrhythmias through inhibiting nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in post-infarcted normoglycemic rats, focusing on adenosine and reactive oxygen species production. DPP-4 bound adenosine deaminase has been shown to catalyse extracellular adenosine to inosine. DPP-4 inhibitors increased adenosine levels by inhibiting the complex formation. Normoglycemic male Wistar rats were subjected to coronary ligation and then randomized to either saline or sitagliptin in in vivo and ex vivo studies. Post-infarction was associated with increased oxidative stress, as measured by myocardial superoxide, nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium fluorescent staining. Measurement of myocardial norepinephrine levels revealed a significant elevation in vehicle-treated infarcted rats compared with sham. Compared with vehicle, infarcted rats treated with sitagliptin significantly increased interstitial adenosine levels and attenuated oxidative stress. Sympathetic hyperinnervation was blunted after administering sitagliptin, as assessed by immunofluorescent analysis and western blotting and real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NGF. Arrhythmic scores in the sitagliptin-treated infarcted rats were significantly lower than those in vehicle. Ex vivo studies showed a similar effect of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (an adenosine deaminase inhibitor) to sitagliptin on attenuated levels of superoxide and NGF. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of sitagliptin on superoxide anion production and NGF levels can be reversed by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropulxanthine (adenosine A1 receptor antagonist) and exogenous hypoxanthine. Sitagliptin protects ventricular arrhythmias by attenuating sympathetic innervation via adenosine A1 receptor and xanthine oxidase-dependent pathways, which converge through the attenuated formation of superoxide in the non-diabetic infarcted rats.

  10. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP. Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05. The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05. Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05. In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05. Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways.

  11. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Meng, Xianghu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Niu, Yonghua; Cui, Kai; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED) in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05). The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05). Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05). In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:27168996

  12. BACE1 across species: a comparison of the in vivo consequences of BACE1 deletion in mice and rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wu, Tiffany; Meilandt, William J.; Dominguez, Sara L.; Solanoy, Hilda O.; Maloney, Janice A.; Ngu, Hai; Baca, Miriam; Kung, Chung; Lima, Lisa; Earr, Timothy K.; Fleck, Daniel; Shields, Shannon D.; Forrest, William F.; Foreman, Oded; Warming, Søren; Watts, Ryan J.; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Assessing BACE1 (β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1) knockout mice for general health and neurological function may be useful in predicting risks associated with prolonged pharmacological BACE1 inhibition, a treatment approach currently being developed for Alzheimer’s disease. To determine whether BACE1 deletion-associated effects in mice generalize to another species, we developed a novel Bace1−/− rat line using zinc-finger nuclease technology and compared Bace1−/− mice and rats with their Bace1+/+ counterparts. Lack of BACE1 was confirmed in Bace1−/− animals from both species. Removal of BACE1 affected startle magnitude, balance beam performance, pain response, and nerve myelination in both species. While both mice and rats lacking BACE1 have shown increased mortality, the increase was smaller and restricted to early developmental stages for rats. Bace1−/− mice and rats further differed in body weight, spontaneous locomotor activity, and prepulse inhibition of startle. While the effects of species and genetic background on these phenotypes remain difficult to distinguish, our findings suggest that BACE1’s role in myelination and some sensorimotor functions is consistent between mice and rats and may be conserved in other species. Other phenotypes differ between these models, suggesting that some effects of BACE1 inhibition vary with the biological context (e.g. species or background strain). PMID:28281673

  13. BACE1 across species: a comparison of the in vivo consequences of BACE1 deletion in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wu, Tiffany; Meilandt, William J; Dominguez, Sara L; Solanoy, Hilda O; Maloney, Janice A; Ngu, Hai; Baca, Miriam; Kung, Chung; Lima, Lisa; Earr, Timothy K; Fleck, Daniel; Shields, Shannon D; Forrest, William F; Foreman, Oded; Warming, Søren; Watts, Ryan J; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly

    2017-03-10

    Assessing BACE1 (β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1) knockout mice for general health and neurological function may be useful in predicting risks associated with prolonged pharmacological BACE1 inhibition, a treatment approach currently being developed for Alzheimer's disease. To determine whether BACE1 deletion-associated effects in mice generalize to another species, we developed a novel Bace1(-/-) rat line using zinc-finger nuclease technology and compared Bace1(-/-) mice and rats with their Bace1(+/+) counterparts. Lack of BACE1 was confirmed in Bace1(-/-) animals from both species. Removal of BACE1 affected startle magnitude, balance beam performance, pain response, and nerve myelination in both species. While both mice and rats lacking BACE1 have shown increased mortality, the increase was smaller and restricted to early developmental stages for rats. Bace1(-/-) mice and rats further differed in body weight, spontaneous locomotor activity, and prepulse inhibition of startle. While the effects of species and genetic background on these phenotypes remain difficult to distinguish, our findings suggest that BACE1's role in myelination and some sensorimotor functions is consistent between mice and rats and may be conserved in other species. Other phenotypes differ between these models, suggesting that some effects of BACE1 inhibition vary with the biological context (e.g. species or background strain).

  14. Molecular detection and identification of Bartonella species in rat fleas from northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Colton, Leah; Sangmaneedet, Somboon; Suksawat, Fanan; Evans, Brian P; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2013-09-01

    The presence of Bartonella species in Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Rattus spp. (R. exulans, R. norvegicus, and R. rattus) in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand was investigated. One hundred ninety-three fleas obtained from 62 rats, were screened by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region, and the presence of Bartonella DNA was confirmed by using the citrate synthase gene. Bartonella DNA was detected in 59.1% (114 of 193) of fleas examined. Sequencing demonstrated the presence of Bartonella spp. similar to B. elizabethae, B. rattimassiliensis, B. rochalimae, and B. tribocorum in the samples tested with a cutoff for sequence similarity ≥ 96% and 4 clustered together with the closest match with B. grahamii (95.5% identity). If X. cheopis proves to be a competent vector of these species, our results suggest that humans and animals residing in this area may be at risk for infection by several zoonotic Bartonella species.

  15. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation on the reactive oxygen species in acute necrotizing pancreatitic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Long; Na Song; Xi-Ping Liu; Ke-Jian Guo; Ren-Xuan Guo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation on the reactive oxygen species in rat acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) and to assess the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB).METHODS: Rat ANP model was established by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct. Rats were randomly assigned to three groups (10rats each): Control group, ANP group and PDTC group. At the 6th h of the model, the changes of the serum amylase,nitric oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and pancreatic morphological damage were observed. The expressions of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) were observed by SP immunohistochemistry. And the expressions of NF-κB p65 subunit mRNA were observed by hybridization in situ.RESULTS: Serum amylase and NO level decreased significantly in ANP group as compared with PDTC administrated group [(7 170.40±1 308.63) U/L vs(4 074.10±1 719.78) U/L,P<0.05], [(76.95±9.04) μmol/L vs (65.18±9.02) μmol/L,P<0.05] respectively. MDA in both ANP and PDTC group rose significantly over that in control group [(9.88±1.52)nmol/L, (8.60±1.41) nmol/L, vs (6.04±1.78) nmol/L,P<0.05], while there was no significant difference between them. SOD levels in both ANP and PDTC group underwent a significant decrease as compared with that in control [(3 214.59±297.74) NU/mL, (3 260.62±229.44) NU/mL,vs (3 977.80±309.09) NU/mL, P<0.05], but there was no significant difference between them. Though they were still higher than those in Control group, pancreas destruction was slighter in PDTC group, iNOS expression and NF-κB p65 subunit mRNA expression were lower in PDTC group as compared with ANP group.CONCLUSION: We conclude that correlation among NF-κB activation, serum amylase, reactive oxygen species level and tissue damage suggests a key role of NF-κB in the pathogenesis of ANP. Inhibition of NF-κB activation may reverse the pancreatic damage

  16. Transparency and communication can improve wildlife welfare outcomes: A case of kangaroos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All countries manage human and wildlife coexistence. Where traditionally humans may have killed animals perceived to be a problem, this is often no longer legal or socially acceptable. Decision-makers tend to feel less strongly about coexistence issues than the people who attempt to influence them on behalf of human or wildlife interests. It has been argued that links between human interests and decisions affecting wildlife should be transparent, and that open decision making processes involving a range of local stakeholders will improve outcomes for humans and wildlife. This paper examines one case incident in an ongoing conflict between an international car racing track and kangaroos that have occasionally been found on the track during a race, causing danger to themselves and race participants. A secret local government report and plan to cull kangaroos was obtained using Freedom of Information legislation. When released to the media the subsequent public discussion showed a much greater concern for kangaroo stress, harm and right to live than the official report, and called for consideration of a range of alternatives to culling. This led to postponement of culling plans, and commitment to a more open community discussion of options. The case clearly supports claims that greater transparency and local stakeholder participation in management decision processes can improve welfare outcomes for non-human animals.

  17. Asbestos inhalation induces reactive nitrogen species and nitrotyrosine formation in the lungs and pleura of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S; Choe, N; Hemenway, D R; Zhu, S; Matalon, S; Kagan, E

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether asbestos inhalation induces the formation of reactive nitrogen species, three groups of rats were exposed intermittently over 2 wk to either filtered room air (sham-exposed) or to chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos fibers. The rats were killed at 1 or 6 wk after exposure. At 1 wk, significantly greater numbers of alveolar and pleural macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats demonstrated inducible nitric oxide synthase protein immunoreactivity. Alveolar macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats also generated significantly greater nitrite formation than did macrophages from sham-exposed rats. Strong immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite formation, was evident in lungs from chrysotile- and crocidolite-exposed rats at 1 and 6 wk. Staining was most evident at alveolar duct bifurcations and within bronchiolar epithelium, alveolar macrophages, and the visceral and parietal pleural mesothelium. Lungs from sham-exposed rats demonstrated minimal immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine. Significantly greater quantities of nitrotyrosine were detected by ELISA in lung extracts from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats. These findings suggest that asbestos inhalation can induce inducible nitric oxide synthase activation and peroxynitrite formation in vivo, and provide evidence of a possible alternative mechanism of asbestos-induced injury to that thought to be induced by Fenton reactions. PMID:9664087

  18. Monitoring of Federally Threatened and Endangered Species on U.S. Army Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Clam E 0 1 0 Dipodomys stephensi Stephen’s Kangaroo Rat Mammal E 0 1 0 Dromus dromas Dromedary Pearlymussel Clam E 0 1 0 Epioblasma florentina...N Onsite Dromus dromas Dromedary Pearlymussel Clam E Contiguous Epioblasma florentina walkeri Tan Riffleshell Clam E Contiguous Myotis grisescens

  19. The induction of species-specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of rats to ultra-violet attenuated cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N A; Webbe, G; Hinchcliffe, P

    1987-02-01

    Single percutaneous immunizations of Fischer rats with 1000 ultra-violet attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae induced 52-88% resistance to challenge 4 weeks later. Increasing this to 3 immunizations induced 90% resistance to challenge, and this level of protection remained undiminished for up to 40 weeks after vaccination. Rats vaccinated with gamma-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to challenge with S. mansoni but not S. japonicum. Similarly rats vaccinated with u.v.-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae were not resistant to heterologous challenge. Thus irradiated vaccines are species-specific in both permissive and non-permissive hosts.

  20. Induction of species-specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of rats to ultra-violet attenuated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloney, N.A.; Webbe, G.; Hinchcliffe, P.

    1987-02-01

    Single percutaneous immunizations of Fischer rats with 1000 ultra-violet attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae induced 52-88% resistance to challenge 4 weeks later. Increasing this to 3 immunizations induced 90% resistance to challenge, and this level of protection remained undiminished for up to 40 weeks after vaccination. Rats vaccinated with gamma-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to challenge with S. mansoni but not S. japonicum. Similarly rats vaccinated with u.v.-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae were not resistant to heterologous challenge. Thus irradiated vaccines are species-specific in both permissive and non-permissive hosts.

  1. Species Abundance Distribution of Ectoparasites on Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus from a Localized Area in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Guo Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The species of ectoparasites that live on a specific host in a geographical region form an ectoparasite community. Species abundance distributions describe the number of individuals observed for each different species that is encountered within a community. Based on properties of the species abundance distribution, the expected total number of species present in the community can be estimated.Methods: Preston’s lognormal distribution model was used to fit the expected species abundance distribution curve. Using the expected species abundance distribution curve, we estimated the total number of expected parasite species present and the amount of species that were likely missed by our sampling in the field.Results: In total, 8040 ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, gamasid mites and chigger mites were collected from 431 Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus from a localized area in southwest China. These ectoparasites were identified to be 47 species from 26 genera in 10 families. The majority of ectoparasite species were chigger mites (family Trombicu­lidae while the majority of individuals were sucking lice in the family Polyplacidae. The expected species abun­dance distribution curve demonstrated the classic pattern that the majority of ectoparasite species were rare and that there were a few common species. The total expected number of ectoparasite species on R. norvegicus was estimated to be 85 species, and 38 species were likely missed by our sampling in the field.Conclusions: Norway rats harbor a large suite of ectoparasites. Future field investigations should sample large num­bers of host individuals to assess ectoparasite populations.

  2. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species.

  3. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species. PMID:26895178

  4. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Kierdorf

    Full Text Available Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species.

  5. Passage marker excretion in red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) and colobine monkeys (Colobus angolensis, C. polykomos, Trachypithecus johnii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarm, Angela; Ortmann, Sylvia; Wolf, Christian; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2009-11-01

    Ruminants are characterized by an efficient particle-sorting mechanism in the forestomach (FRST) followed by selective rechewing of large food particles. For the nonruminating foregut fermenter pygmy hippo it was demonstrated that large particles are excreted as fast as, or faster than, the small particles. The same has been suggested for other nonruminating foregut fermenters. We determined the mean retention time of fluids and different-sized particles in six red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), seven collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) and three colobine monkeys (Colobus angolensis, C. polykomos, Trachypithecus johnii). We fed Co-EDTA as fluid and mordanted fiber as particle markers (Cr, Ce). Mean (+ or - SD) total tract retention time for fluids, small and large particles was 14 + or - 2, 29 + or - 10 and 30 + or - 9 hr in red kangaroos, 26 + or - 2, 34 + or - 5 and 32 + or - 3 hr in collared peccaries and 57 + or - 17, 55 + or - 19 and 54 + or - 19 hr in colobine monkeys, respectively. Large and small particles were excreted simultaneously in all species. There was no difference in the excretion of fluids and particles in the colobine monkeys, in contrast to the other foregut fermenters. In the nonprimate, nonruminant foregut fermenters, the difference in the excretion of fluids and small particles decreases with increasing food intake. On the contrary, ruminants keep this differential excretion constant at different intake levels. This may be a prerequisite for the sorting of particles in their FRST and enable them to achieve higher food intake rates. The functional significance of differential excretion of fluids and particles from the FRST requires further investigations.

  6. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Fuss and Crying Time in Colicky Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Akbarian Rad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infantile colic is a common complaint in the first few weeks of life. On the other hand, because of its unknown etiology, there is not a specific therapy for this complaint, but various therapeutic options for reducing pain and restlessness of these infants are recommended. Skin to skin contact by Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC increases in pain threshold and it seems to be a suitable method for the care of these infants. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of KMC on infantile colic. Methods: This case- control study was performed between March 2012 and March 2013. Subjects were 55 infants with exclusive breast fed infant, aged 15-60 days with excessive fuss and crying, referred to Infant and Child Clinic in Ayatollah Rohani Hospital in Babol, north of Iran. Babies whose weights were less than 2500 Grams and with inheritance and clinical diseases excluded from the study. Infants were subjected to KMC at least 2 hours a day. Standard questionnaire and Barr Scale were filled by interview. Data was analyzed by SPSS v.11.5 and T-test, a P- value less than 0.05 considered being significant. Results: The fuss and crying time before the KMC was 2.21±1.54 hours per day and decreased to 1.16±1.3 hours per day after the implementation of KMC. (p=0.001 Conclusions: Kangaroo mother care at home can be used as a simple and safe method for decreasing of cry and fussiness in colicky infants. Keywords: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC, fussiness, Colicky Infants, colic

  7. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Fuss and Crying Time in Colicky Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Akbarian Rad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Infantile colic is a common complaint in the first few weeks of life. On the other hand, because of its unknown etiology, there is not a specific therapy for this complaint, but various therapeutic options for reducing pain and restlessness of these infants are recommended. Skin to skin contact by Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC increases in pain threshold and it seems to be a suitable method for the care of these infants. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of KMC on infantile colic.Methods: This case- control study was performed between March 2012 and March 2013. Subjects were 55 infants with exclusive breast fed infant, aged 15-60 days with excessive fuss and crying, referred to Infant and Child Clinic in Ayatollah Rohani Hospital in Babol, north of Iran. Babies whose weights were less than 2500 Grams and with inheritance and clinical diseases excluded from the study. Infants were subjected to KMC at least 2 hours a day. Standard questionnaire and Barr Scale were filled by interview. Data was analyzed by SPSS v.11.5 and T-test, a P- value less than 0.05 considered being significant.Results:The fuss and crying time before the KMC was 2.21±1.54 hours per day and decreased to 1.16±1.3 hours per day after the implementation of KMC. (p=0.001Conclusions:Kangaroo mother care at home can be used as a simple and safe method for decreasing of cry and fussiness in colicky infants. Keywords: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC, fussiness, Colicky Infants, colic

  8. A Reproductive Management Program for an Urban Population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tribe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, culling has been the expedient, most common, and in many cases, the only tool used to control free-ranging kangaroo populations. We applied a reproductive control program to a population of eastern grey kangaroos confined to a golf course in South East Queensland. The program aimed to reduce fecundity sufficiently for the population to decrease over time so that overgrazing of the fairways and the frequency of human–animal conflict situations were minimised. In 2003, 92% of the female kangaroos above 5 kg bodyweight were implanted with the GnRH agonist deslorelin after darting with a dissociative anaesthetic. In 2007, 86% of the females above 5 kg were implanted with deslorelin and also 87% of the males above 5 kg were sterilised by either orchidectomy or vasectomy. In 2005, 2008 and 2009, the population was censused to assess the effect of each treatment. The 2003 deslorelin program resulted in effective zero population growth for approximately 2.5 years. The combined deslorelin–surgery program in 2007 reduced the birth rate from 0.3 to 0.06%/year for 16 months, resulting in a 27% population reduction by November 2009. The results were consistent with implants conferring contraception to 100% of implanted females for at least 12 months. The iatrogenic mortality rates for each program were 10.5% and 4.9%, respectively, with 50% of all mortalities due to darting-related injuries, exertional myopathy/hyperthermia or recovery misadventure. The short term sexual and agonistic behaviour of the males was assessed for the 2007 program: no significant changes were seen in adult males given the vasectomy procedure, while sexual behaviours’ were decreased in adult males given the orchidectomy procedure. It is concluded that female reproduction was effectively controlled by implantation with deslorrelin and male reproductive behaviour was reduced by orchidectomy, which together achieved population control.

  9. Use of “Kangaroo Care” to Alleviate the Intensity of Vaccination Pain in Newborns

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    Mahboobe Gholami Robatsangi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:It has been demonstrated that newborns feel pain completely. Thus, they should be treated with this in mind. Recent research showed that non-pharmacological interventions such as "Kangaroo Care" may be useful for decreasing pain in newborns. We tried to determine the effect of kangaroo care on the pain intensity of vaccination in healthy newborns. Methods:This study was a randomized case-control clinical trial. Subjects were 60 healthy full-term newborns delivered in a general Hospital, in Iran, from March to July 2006. They were randomly assigned to case and control groups. The case group received 30 minutes skin to skin contact, whereas infants in the control group were put, wrapped in a blanket, aside the mothers. Behavioral changes of newborns were evaluated and observed 2 minutes before, during, and 3 minutes after the intervention. All procedures were filmed. An assistant who was blinded to the study, scored behavior changes using Neonatal/Infant Pain Scale. Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels as displayed on the pulse monitor and duration of crying were recorded using a stopwatch. Findings:Mean pain intensity during the intervention v was significantly lower in the case group (P<0.006. Mean pain intensity 3 minutes after intervention was also significantly lower in the case group (P<0.021. Mean duration of crying was significantly lower in case group as well (P<0.001. Conclusion:Kangaroo care may be used to decrease pain intensity in newborns undergoing painful procedures.

  10. [Pathology of the digestive tract in kangaroos. A review based on our own study results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, H A; Murmann, W

    1985-01-01

    The present paper describes spontaneous pathological findings including etiological aspects in digestive tracts of kangaroos, which have been detected in 166 necropsies during the last 20 years. Protozoan - infections, herpes virus infections, gastroenteritis of unknown etiology and especially the occurrence of the so called "lumpy-jaw" turned out to be of special importance. These findings are discussed with reference to the literature, completed as well by short literature reviews, sub-divided into the different organs and the variable etiology of the diseases, as by a brief description of digestive tract physiology and anatomy in marsupials.

  11. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Growth and Morbidity Pattern in Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerti Swarnkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is dened as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby derived from practical similarities to marsupial care giving, proximately exclusive breastfeeding and early discharge from hospital. This concept was proposed as an alternative to conventional methods of care for low birth weight (LBW infants, and in replication to quandaries of earnest overcrowding in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. KMC essentially utilizes the mother as a natural incubator Aim and Objectives: The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and the effectiveness of KMC in LBW infants. It avoids agitation routinely experienced in busy ward. Material and Methods: A pilot open-labeled quasi-randomised clinical trial was conducted in Level III NICU of a teaching institution. 60 newborn infants <2500 g, meeting inclusion criteria were alternatively randomised into two groups: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC and Conventional Methods of Care (CMC. Kangaroo mother care was practiced with minimum total period of eight hours a day intermittently for the intervention group while the controls remained in incubators or cots. Weight, head circumference, length, morbidity episodes, hospital stay, feeding patterns were monitored for all infants till postmenstrual age of 42 weeks in preterm babies or till a weight of 2500 g is achieved in term SGA babies. Results: The pilot study conrmed that trial processes were efcient, the intervention was acceptable (to mothers and nurses and that the outcome measures were appropriate; KMC babies achieved signicantly better growth at the end of the study (For preterm babies, weight, length and head circumference gain were signicantly higher in the KMC group (weight 19.28±2.9g/day, length 0.99±0.56cm/week and head circumference 0.72±0.07 cm/week than in the CMC group (P <0.001. A signicantly higher number of babies in the CMC group suffered from hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and

  12. High prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella species in rats and fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Falay, Dadi; Amundala, Nicaise; Akaibe, Dudu; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Van Houtte, Natalie; Breno, Matteo; Verheyen, Erik; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Socolovschi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the cosmopolitan rat species, Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus that were infested by a majority of Xenopsylla cheopis fleas. Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella elizabethae, and three Bartonella genotypes were identified by sequencing in rat specimens, mostly in R. rattus. Rickettsia typhi was detected in 72% of X. cheopis pools, the main vector and reservoir of this zoonotic pathogen. Co-infections were observed in rodents, suggesting a common mammalian host shared by R. typhi and Bartonella spp. Thus, both infections are endemic in DRC and the medical staffs need to be aware knowing the high prevalence of impoverished populations or immunocompromised inhabitants in this area.

  13. High prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella species in rats and fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laudisoit, A.; Falay, D.; Amundala, N.; de Bellock, J.G.; van Houtte, N.; Breno, M.; Verheven, E.; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, P.; Raoult, D.; C., Socolovschi

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the co

  14. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon stimulation with fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Voelkel; H F Krug; S Diabaté

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash was used as a model for ambient particulate matter which is under suspicion to cause adverse pulmonary health effects. The fly ash was pre-sized and contained only particles < 20 m including an ultrafine fraction (< 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the formation of ROS with regard to the mass of particles applied. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) added as a co-stimulus did not increase the formation of ROS induced by fly ash. Furthermore, in LPS (0.1 g/ml) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 1 ng/ml) pre-treated cells no increase in reactive oxygen species comparable to fly ash alone is observable. In presence of the metal chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), ROS formation can be significantly reduced. Neither fly ash nor LPS induced a significant NO release in RLE-6TN cells.

  15. The species translation challenge-a systems biology perspective on human and rat bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussin, Carine; Mathis, Carole; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Messinis, Dimitris E; Dulize, Rémi H J; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Melas, Ioannis N; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bilal, Erhan; Meyer, Pablo; Talikka, Marja; Boué, Stéphanie; Norel, Raquel; Rice, John J; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The biological responses to external cues such as drugs, chemicals, viruses and hormones, is an essential question in biomedicine and in the field of toxicology, and cannot be easily studied in humans. Thus, biomedical research has continuously relied on animal models for studying the impact of these compounds and attempted to 'translate' the results to humans. In this context, the SBV IMPROVER (Systems Biology Verification for Industrial Methodology for PROcess VErification in Research) collaborative initiative, which uses crowd-sourcing techniques to address fundamental questions in systems biology, invited scientists to deploy their own computational methodologies to make predictions on species translatability. A multi-layer systems biology dataset was generated that was comprised of phosphoproteomics, transcriptomics and cytokine data derived from normal human (NHBE) and rat (NRBE) bronchial epithelial cells exposed in parallel to more than 50 different stimuli under identical conditions. The present manuscript describes in detail the experimental settings, generation, processing and quality control analysis of the multi-layer omics dataset accessible in public repositories for further intra- and inter-species translation studies.

  16. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotohira, Yukari; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Haruka; Sano, Tadashi; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yohko; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsukano, Kenji; Sato, Ayano; Yokota, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTS(TM)) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTS(TM) was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTS(TM) correlated with those using KT (r(2)=0.963, PPTS(TM) is applicable as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in macropods. In the present study, we demonstrated the diagnostic value of plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods.

  17. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  18. Morphological and morphometric characteristics of gastric mucosa in western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Badran Shoeib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the morphology and histomorphometry of stomach and gastric mucosa in western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus. The stomach was composed of three indistinctive separate parts namely sacciform forestomach, tubiform forestomach, and hindstomach. The tubiform forestomach was the main tubular section of the organ. The stomach had a compound lining. The non-glandular mucosa occupied the medial blind sac (MBS of the sacciform forestomach; the layer covered about one-third of the tubiform forestomach (non-glandular region and the entire length of the gastric sulcus. The glandular part lined the parietal blind sac (PBS of sacciform forestomach and the cardiac gland region of tubiform forestomach as well as fundic and pyloric gland regions of the hindstomach. The cardiac mucosa had smooth and folded areas; these were filled with mixed glands. In the fundic glands, the parietal cells outnumbered the chief cells. The pyloric glands were of serous-like in characteristics. In conclusion, gross and histological structures of the stomach of western grey kangaroo are adaptive with its food habitat, which allows thorough mixing of highly fibrous grasses.

  19. Perch size and structure have species-dependent effects on the arboreal locomotion of rat snakes and boa constrictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayne, Bruce C; Herrmann, Michael P

    2011-07-01

    Arboreal habitats create diverse challenges for animal locomotion, but the numerical and phylogenetic diversity of snakes that climb trees suggest that their overall body plan is well suited for this task. Snakes have considerable diversity of axial anatomy, but the functional consequences of this diversity for arboreal locomotion are poorly understood because of the lack of comparative data. We simulated diverse arboreal surfaces to test whether environmental structure had different effects on the locomotion of snakes belonging to two distantly related species with differences in axial musculature and stoutness. On most cylindrical surfaces lacking pegs, both species used concertina locomotion, which always involved periodic stopping and gripping but was kinematically distinct in the two species. On horizontal cylinders that were a small fraction of body diameter, the boa constrictors used a balancing form of lateral undulation that was not observed for rat snakes. For all snakes the presence of pegs elicited lateral undulation and enhanced speed. For both species maximal speeds decreased with increased incline and were greatest on cylinders with intermediate diameters that approximated the diameter of the snakes. The frictional resistances that we studied had small effects compared with those of cylinder diameter, incline and the presence of pegs. The stouter and more muscular boa constrictors were usually faster than the rat snakes when using the gripping gait, whereas rat snakes were faster when using lateral undulation on the surfaces with pegs. Thus, variation in environmental structure had several highly significant effects on locomotor mode, performance and kinematics that were species dependent.

  20. Comparison of Translocation and Transformation from Soil to Rice and Metabolism in Rats for Four Arsenic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Geng, Anjing; Dong, Yan; Fu, Chongyun; Li, Hanmin; Zhao, Yarong; Li, Qing X; Wang, Fuhua

    2017-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is ubiquitously present in the environment. The toxicity of As is related to its forms. This study was designed to compare the translocation and transformation of four As species from soil to rice, and metabolism in rats for four arsenic species. A set of 26550 data was obtained from pot experiments of rice plants grown in soil fortified with four As species and 4050 data were obtained from experiments of 81 rats administered with the four As species. The concentration of total As in grain from the methyl arsenate fortified soil was 6.1, 4.9, and 5.2 times of that from As(III)-, As(V)-, and dimethyl arsenate-fortified soil, respectively. The concentration of total As in husk was 1.2-7.8 times greater than that in grain. After oral administration each As species to rats, 83-96% was accumulatively secreted via feces and urine, while 0.1-16% was detected in blood.

  1. Parents’ lived experience of providing kangaroo care to their preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Leonard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Premature and low birthweight infants pose particular challenges to health services in South Africa. While there is good evidence to demonstrate the benefits of kangaroo care in low birthweight infants, limited research has been conducted locally on the experiences of parents who provide kangaroo care to their preterm infants. This phenomenological study explores the lived experience of parents who provided their preterm infants with kangaroo care at a tertiary-level maternity centre in the Western Cape. In-depth interviews were conducted with six parents: four mothers and two fathers. Data was analysed using an adaptation of the approaches described by Colaizzi (1978:48-71 and Hycner (1985:280-294. To ensure trustworthiness, the trustworthiness criteria described by Guba and Lincoln (1989:242-243 were applied. Kangaroo care is a phased process, each phase bringing a unique set of experiences. The eight themes that emerged are described: unforeseen, unprepared and uncertain - the experience of birth; anxiety and barriers; an intimate connection; adjustments, roles and responsibilities; measuring success; a network of encouragement and support; living-in challenges; and living with the infant outside of hospital. Challenges facing health care providers are described and recommendations for information about kangaroo care and support for parents are made. Opsomming Vroeggebore babas en babas met ’n lae geboortegewig stel besondere uitdagings vir Suid-Afrikaanse gesondhiedsdienste. Daar bestaan goeie bewyse dat die kangaroesorgmetode voordelig is vir babas met ’n laegeboortegewig, dog is minimale plaaslike navorsing gedoen oor die ondervindinge van ouers wat hierdie metode gebruik om vir hul vroeggebore babas te sorg. Hierdie fenomenologiese studie verken die geleefde ervaringe van ouers wat vir hulle vroeggebore babas deur middel van die kangaroesorgmetode in ’n tersiêre kraamsentrum in die Weskaap gesorg het. Data is ingesamel deur in

  2. The effect of kangaroo ward care in comparison with "intermediate intensive care" on the growth velocity in preterm infant with birth weight control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Oleti Tejo

    2016-10-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces neonatal mortality, neonatal sepsis and improves growth outcome in preterm infants. In this study, we compared the efficacy of "baby care in kangaroo ward (KWC)" with "baby care in intermediate intensive care (IIC)" in stable preterm infants (birth weight birth weight <1100 g) infants at term gestational age. Clinical trial registry of India CTRI/2014/05/004625 WHAT IS KNOWN: • Kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces neonatal mortality, neonatal sepsis and improves growth outcome in VLBW infants. What is new: • Baby care by mother can be given safely in kangaroo ward from a weight of 1150 g in stable preterm infants without any adverse effects.

  3. Reactive oxygen species are involved in insulin-dependent regulation of autophagy in primary rat podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audzeyenka, Irena; Rogacka, Dorota; Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rychlowski, Michal; Bierla, Joanna Beata; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular defense mechanism responsible for the turnover of damaged or non-functional cellular constituents. This process provides cells with energy and essential compounds under unfavorable environmental conditions-such as oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are both observed in diabetes. The most common diabetes complication is diabetic nephropathy (DN), which can lead to renal failure. This condition often includes impaired podocyte function. Here we investigated autophagic activity in rat podocytes cultured with a high insulin concentration (300nM). Autophagy was activated after 60min of insulin stimulation. Moreover, this effect was abolished following pharmacological (apocynin) or genetic (siRNA) inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase activity, indicating that insulin-dependent autophagy stimulation involved reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also observed a continuous and time-dependent increase of podocyte albumin permeability in response to insulin, and this process was slightly improved by autophagy inhibition following short-term insulin exposure. Our results suggest that insulin may be a factor affecting the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Exogenous reactive oxygen species deplete the isolated rat heart of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaage, J; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; Irtun, O; DeBlasi, R A; Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Semb, A G

    1997-01-01

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on myocardial antioxidants and on the activity of oxidative mitochondrial enzymes were investigated in the following groups of isolated, perfused rat hearts. I: After stabilization the hearts freeze clamped in liquid nitrogen (n = 7). II: Hearts frozen after stabilization and perfusion for 10 min with xanthine oxidase (XO) (25 U/l) and hypoxanthine (HX) (1 mM) as a ROS-producing system (n = 7). III: Like group II, but recovered for 30 min after perfusion with XO + HX (n = 9). IV: The hearts were perfused and freeze-clamped as in group III, but without XO + HX (n = 7). XO + HX reduced left ventricular developed pressure and coronary flow to approximately 50% of the baseline value. Myocardial content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased at the end of XO + HX perfusion, indicating that generation of ROS and lipid peroxidation occurred. Levels of H2O2 and MDA normalized during recovery. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and alpha-tocopherol were all reduced after ROS-induced injury. ROS did not significantly influence the tissue content of coenzyme Q10 (neither total, oxidized, nor reduced), cytochrome c oxidase, and succinate cytochrome c reductase. The present findings indicate that the reduced contractile function was not correlated to reduced activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS depleted the myocardium of antioxidants, leaving the heart more sensitive to the action of oxidative injury.

  5. Assessment of reward responsiveness in the response bias probabilistic reward task in rats: implications for cross-species translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der-Avakian, A; D'Souza, M S; Pizzagalli, D A; Markou, A

    2013-08-27

    Mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder, are characterized by abnormal reward responsiveness. The Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task (hereafter referred to as probabilistic reward task (PRT)) quantifies reward responsiveness in human subjects, and an equivalent animal assessment is needed to facilitate preclinical translational research. Thus, the goals of the present studies were to develop, validate and characterize a rat analog of the PRT. Adult male Wistar and Long-Evans rats were trained in operant testing chambers to discriminate between two tone stimuli that varied in duration (0.5 and 2 s). During a subsequent test session consisting of 100 trials, the two tones were made ambiguous (0.9 and 1.6 s) and correct identification of one tone was reinforced with a food pellet three times more frequently than the other tone. In subsequent experiments, Wistar rats were administered either a low dose of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist pramipexole (0.1 mg kg(-1), subcutaneous) or the psychostimulant amphetamine (0.5 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneal) before the test session. Similar to human subjects, both rat strains developed a response bias toward the more frequently reinforced stimulus, reflecting robust reward responsiveness. Mirroring prior findings in humans, a low dose of pramipexole blunted response bias. Moreover, in rats, amphetamine potentiated response bias. These results indicate that in rats, reward responsiveness can be quantified and bidirectionally modulated by pharmacological manipulations that alter striatal dopamine transmission. Thus, this new procedure in rats, which is conceptually and procedurally analogous to the one used in humans, provides a reverse translational platform to investigate abnormal reward responsiveness across species.

  6. Species differences in toxicokinetic parameters of glycidol after a single dose of glycidol or glycidol linoleate in rats and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Kurata, Yoshimasa; Harada, Tomoo; Tamaki, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Glycidol fatty acid esters (GEs) have been identified as contaminants in refined edible oils. Although the possible release of glycidol (G) from GEs is a concern, little is known about the conversion of GEs to G in the human body. This study addressed the toxicokinetics of glycidol linoleate (GL) and G in male Crl:CD(SD) rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Equimolar amounts of GL (341 mg/kg) or G (75 mg/kg) were administered by gavage to each animal. G was found in both species after the G and GL administration, while plasma GL concentrations were below the lower limit of quantification (5 ng/ml) in both species. In rats, the administration of GL or G produced similar concentration-time profiles for G. In monkeys, the C(max) and AUC values after GL administration were significantly lower than those after G administration. The oral bioavailability of G in monkeys (34.3%) was remarkably lower than that in rats (68.8%) at 75 mg/kg G administration. In addition, plasma G concentrations after oral administration at three lower doses of GL or G were measured in both species. In monkeys, G was detected only at the highest dose of G. In contrast, the rats exhibited similar plasma G concentration-time profiles after GL or G administration with significantly higher G levels than those in monkeys. In conclusion, these results indicate that there are remarkable species differences in the toxicokinetics of GEs and G between rodents and primates, findings that should be considered when assessing the human risk of GEs.

  7. [Social representations on breastfeeding according to preterm infants' mothers in Kangaroo Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorski, Marly; Caetano, Laise Conceição; Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena de; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the social representations on premature infants' breastfeeding at a Kangaroo Care Unit, from the perspective of mothers who are breastfeeding and describe the conflicts and contradictions they experience in this context. A qualitative approach was adopted, using the first stage of enunciation analysis in the light of social representations theory to identify the meanings assigned to breastfeeding. We found the following representations: healthy babies are breastfed, mother's milk provides protection and preserves the premature child's life, breastfeeding is the complement of motherhood and breastfeeding a premature infant is a hard and exhausting experience. The conflicts resulted from the assimilation of technical contents and discourse, late sucking and representations on breastfeeding.

  8. Cross-species analysis of thyroperoxidase inhibition by xenobiotics demonstrates conservation of response between pig and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Macherla, Chitralekha; Filer, Dayne L; Burgess, Emily; Simmons, Steven O; Crofton, Kevin M; Hornung, Michael W

    2013-10-04

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of thyroid hormone, is a known target for thyroid-disrupting chemicals. In vivo toxicological evidence supporting TPO-inhibition as one molecular-initiating event that leads to thyroid disruption is derived largely from rat models; however, a significant fraction of research on the inhibition of TPO by xenobiotics has been conducted using porcine TPO. The current work tested the hypothesis that porcine and rat thyroid microsomes exposed to TPO-inhibiting chemicals would demonstrate different responses in a guaiacol oxidation assay. A primary objective of this work is to establish the degree of concordance between rat and porcine TPO inhibition data. Microsomes were isolated from both rat and pig thyroid glands, and the guaiacol oxidation assay was performed for a training set of 12 chemicals, including previously reported TPO inhibitors, thyroid-disrupting chemicals thought to perturb other targets, and several previously untested chemicals, to determine the relative TPO inhibition responses across species. Concentration-response curves were derived for methimazole (MMI), dibutylphthalate (DBP), diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP), diethylphthalate (DEP), 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol (DPM), iopanoic acid (IOA), 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), sodium perchlorate (PERC), p-nonylphenol (PNP), 4-propoxyphenol (4POP), 6-propylthiouracil (PTU), and triclosan (TCS). MMI, PTU, MBT, DPM, 4POP, and at extremely high concentrations, PERC, inhibited TPO activity. Results demonstrated a strong qualitative concordance of response between the two species. All chemicals that inhibited TPO in porcine microsomes also inhibited TPO in rat microsomes. Hill model-derived IC50 values revealed approximate 1.5- to 50-fold differences in relative potency to MMI between species for positive chemicals. DPM, MBT, 4POP, and PTU exhibited greater relative potency to MMI using rat TPO versus porcine TPO, but rank order potency for

  9. The colonic groove or furrow: a comparative morphological study of six species of African mole-rats (Rodentia, Bathyergidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, S H; van der Merwe, E L; Ndou, R; O'Riain, M J; Bennett, N C

    2009-08-01

    Herbivorous mammals such as nutrias, guinea pigs, chinchillas, and mole-rats have a longitudinal mucosal colonic groove (furrow) in their ascending colon, which is thought to play a role in the colonic separation mechanism (CSM). It is not known whether this groove is structurally modified to adapt to this function in mole-rat species. The morphology of this groove was studied in 32 mol-rats, four species, one of which consisted of three subspecies, endemic to southern Africa and two species found in eastern Africa. The macroscopic morphology of the groove was documented, and samples for histological examination were taken. The groove was wide at its origin at the cecocolic junction and was lined on either side by a row of papillae with the opposing papillae slightly offset in arrangement. The papillated groove gradually decreased in size toward the distal part of the ascending colon where it disappeared. This pattern was similar in all species except in Heterocephalus glaber, where the papillae were absent and the groove was lined by two longitudinal ridges. A histological examination of cross sections revealed that the mucosa covering the inner and outer walls of the groove was rich in mucous-secreting goblet cells. The walls of the groove contained smooth muscle extending from the inner circular smooth muscle layer at the base to the tips of the papillae in all species examined as well as arteries, lymphatic vessels, and prominent sinusoid-like veins. The groove could be demonstrated both macroscopically and histologically in three Bathyergus suillus fetuses of varying sizes. The sinusoid-like veins present in all grooves, regardless of macroscopic shape, suggest that they have a role in the functioning of the groove. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  11. Camels, Cormorants, and Kangaroo Rats: Integration and Synthesis in Organismal Biology After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Joel B

    2015-01-01

    During the decades following World War II diverse groups of American biologists established a variety of distinctive approaches to organismal biology. Rhetorically, organismal biology could be used defensively to distinguish established research traditions from perceived threats from newly emerging fields such as molecular biology. But, organismal biologists were also interested in integrating biological disciplines and using a focus on organisms to synthesize levels of organization from molecules and cells to populations and communities. Part of this broad movement was the development of an area of research variously referred to as physiological ecology, environmental physiology, or ecophysiology. This area of research was distinctive in its self-conscious blend of field and laboratory practices and its explicit integration with other areas of biology such as ecology, animal behavior, and evolution in order to study adaptation. Comparing the intersecting careers of Knut Schmidt-Nielsen and George Bartholomew highlights two strikingly different approaches to physiological ecology. These alternative approaches to studying the interactions of organisms and environments also differed in important ways from the organismal biology championed by leading figures in the modern synthesis.

  12. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  13. Laboratory Investigations of African Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus as a Potential Reservoir Host Species for Monkeypox Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Hutson

    Full Text Available Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease endemic to central and western Africa, where it is a major public health concern. Although Monkeypox virus (MPXV and monkeypox disease in humans have been well characterized, little is known about its natural history, or its maintenance in animal populations of sylvatic reservoir(s. In 2003, several species of rodents imported from Ghana were involved in a monkeypox outbreak in the United States with individuals of three African rodent genera (Cricetomys, Graphiurus, Funisciurus shown to be infected with MPXV. Here, we examine the course of MPXV infection in Cricetomys gambianus (pouched Gambian rats and this rodent species' competence as a host for the virus. We obtained ten Gambian rats from an introduced colony in Grassy Key, Florida and infected eight of these via scarification with a challenge dose of 4X104 plaque forming units (pfu from either of the two primary clades of MPXV: Congo Basin (C-MPXV: n = 4 or West African (W-MPXV: n = 4; an additional 2 animals served as PBS controls. Viral shedding and the effect of infection on activity and physiological aspects of the animals were measured. MPXV challenged animals had significantly higher core body temperatures, reduced activity and increased weight loss than PBS controls. Viable virus was found in samples taken from animals in both experimental groups (C-MPXV and W-MPXV between 3 and 27 days post infection (p.i. (up to 1X108 pfu/ml, with viral DNA found until day 56 p.i. The results from this work show that Cricetomys gambianus (and by inference, probably the closely related species, Cricetomys emini can be infected with MPXV and shed viable virus particles; thus suggesting that these animals may be involved in the maintenance of MPXV in wildlife mammalian populations. More research is needed to elucidate the epidemiology of MPXV and the role of Gambian rats and other species.

  14. Species specific behavioural patterns (digging and swimming and reaction to novel objects in wild type, Wistar, Sprague-Dawley and Brown Norway rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Stryjek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to analyse species-specific forms of behaviour (digging and swimming and response to novelty in laboratory rats and their wild type counterparts at a very early stage of laboratorization. Three behavioural phenomena were taken into account: burrowing, spontaneous swimming, and neophobic behaviour. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild-type rats and three strains of laboratory rats were involved in experiments: Warsaw-Wild-Captive-Pisula-Stryjek (WWCPS, Wistar, Sprague-Dawley, and Brown Norway rats were compared in spontaneous swimming test, while WWCPS and Wistar rats were studied in burrowing and neophobia experiments. Wild rats were found to be faster at building tunnels than Wistar rats and at constructing more complex burrow systems. The experiment on neophobia showed that Wistar rats exhibited less neophobic responses and were more often trapped. WWCPS rats showed highly neophobic behaviour and were rarely trapped in this experiment. The experiment on swimming showed that WWCPS rats showed more complex water tank related activity than their laboratory counterparts. They swam and explored under surface environment. CONCLUSIONS: The three experiments showed profound behavioural differences in quasi-natural forms of behaviour between wild type rats (WWCPS and three laboratory strains frequently used in behavioural studies.

  15. Brain thermal inertia, but no evidence for selective brain cooling, in free-ranging western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2009-04-01

    Marsupials reportedly can implement selective brain cooling despite lacking a carotid rete. We measured brain (hypothalamic) and carotid arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for 5, 17, and 63 days in spring in three free-living western grey kangaroos. Body temperature was highest during the night, and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00. The highest body temperatures recorded occurred sporadically in the afternoon, presumably associated with exercise. Hypothalamic temperature consistently exceeded arterial blood temperature, by an average 0.3 degrees C, except during these afternoon events when hypothalamic temperature lagged behind, and was occasionally lower than, the simultaneous arterial blood temperature. The reversal in temperatures resulted from the thermal inertia of the brain; changes in the brain to arterial blood temperature difference were related to the rate of change of arterial blood temperature on both heating and cooling (P cooling in kangaroos. The effect of thermal inertia on brain temperature is larger than might be expected in the grey kangaroo, a discrepancy that we speculate derives from the unique vascular anatomy of the marsupial brain.

  16. Mother-offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Wendy J; Garant, Dany; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission-fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2 years at Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia, and found weak fine-scale genetic structure among adult females in both years but no structure among adult males. Immature male kangaroos moved away from their mothers at 18-25 months of age, while immature females remained near their mothers until older. A higher proportion of male (34%) than female (6%) subadults and young adults were observed to disperse, although median distances of detected dispersals were similar for both sexes. Adult females had overlapping ranges that were far wider than the maximum extent of spatial genetic structure found. Female kangaroos, although weakly philopatric, mostly encounter nonrelatives in fission-fusion groups at high density, and therefore kinship is unlikely to strongly affect sociality.

  17. Mother–offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Wendy J; Garant, Dany; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission–fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2 years at Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia, and found weak fine-scale genetic structure among adult females in both years but no structure among adult males. Immature male kangaroos moved away from their mothers at 18–25 months of age, while immature females remained near their mothers until older. A higher proportion of male (34%) than female (6%) subadults and young adults were observed to disperse, although median distances of detected dispersals were similar for both sexes. Adult females had overlapping ranges that were far wider than the maximum extent of spatial genetic structure found. Female kangaroos, although weakly philopatric, mostly encounter nonrelatives in fission–fusion groups at high density, and therefore kinship is unlikely to strongly affect sociality. PMID:26045958

  18. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care Immediately after Delivery on Mother-infant Attachment 3 Months after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zahra Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background  The aim of this study was determine the effect of kangaroo mother care (KMC immediately after delivery on mother-infant attachment 3-month after delivery. Materials and Methods: In this RCT study, 72 mother-infant pairs were randomly divided in to kangaroo mother care and routine care groups.The intervention group received kangaroo mother care (KMC in the first two hours post birth. The control group just received routine hospital care. Mothers in the intervention group were encouraged to keep the baby in KMC as much as possible during the day and night throughout the neonatal period. Participants were followed up for three months after birth. The Main outcome measure was mother-infant attachment at 3 months postpartum and maternal anxiety about the baby at the same time. The data was collected by questionnaire (demographic information of parents and neonates and maternal attachment scale. Analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 14. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding their baseline data. Mean maternal attachment score in the KMC group and in the routine care group at three months after delivery was 52.40±3.30 and 49.86±4.18 respectively, which was significantly higher in the KMC group (P

  19. Bringing compassion to the ethical dilemma in killing kangaroos for conservation: comment on "Conservation through sustainable use" by Rob Irvine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramp, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Ethical debate on the killing of kangaroos has polarised conservation and animal welfare science, yet at the heart of these scientific disciplines is the unifying aim of reducing harm to non-human animals. This aim provides the foundation for common ground, culminating in the development of compassionate conservation principles that seek to provide mechanisms for achieving both conservation and welfare goals. However, environmental decision-making is not devoid of human interests, and conservation strategies are commonly employed that suit entrenched positions and commercial gain, rather than valuing the needs of the non-human animals in need of protection. The case study on the wild kangaroo harvest presents just such a dilemma, whereby a conservation strategy is put forward that can only be rationalised by ignoring difficulties in the potential for realising conservation benefits and the considerable welfare cost to kangaroos. Rather than an open debate on the ethics of killing game over livestock, in this response I argue that efforts to bring transparency and objectivity to the public debate have to date been obfuscated by those seeking to maintain entrenched interests. Only by putting aside these interests will debate about the exploitation of wildlife result in humane, compassionate, and substantive conservation benefits.

  20. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium triggers neuroinflammation and reactive species generation in organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ana Paula; Bernardi, Andressa; Luiz Frozza, Rudimar; Grudzinski, Patrícia Bencke; Hoppe, Juliana Bender; de Souza, Luiz Fernando; Chagastelles, Pedro; de Souza Wyse, Angela Terezinha; Bernard, Elena Aida; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Campos, Maria Martha; Lenz, Guido; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Salbego, Christianne

    2011-07-01

    Cell therapy using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seems to be a new alternative for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite several promising results with their use, possible side effects are still unknown. In a previous work, we have shown that MSC-conditioned medium is toxic to hippocampal slice cultures and aggravates cell death induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation. In this work, we investigated whether the inflammatory response and/or reactive species formation could be involved in that toxicity. Rat organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed for 24 h to conditioned medium from MSCs isolated from rat bone marrow. A marked glial activation was observed after exposure of cultures to MSC-conditioned medium, as evidenced by glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and isolectin B(4) increase. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels were increased in the culture medium, and 2,7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation (indicating reactive species generation) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunocontent were also higher after exposure of cultures to MSC-conditioned medium. Antioxidants (ascorbic acid and TROLOX(®)), N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, and anti-inflammatory drugs (indomethacin and dexamethasone) reduced cell death in hippocampal organotypic cultures after their exposure to MSC-conditioned medium. The results obtained here suggest that MSC-secreted factors trigger reactive species generation and neuroinflammation in organotypic cultures of hippocampus, introducing a note of caution in the use of these cells for neurological application.

  2. Mercuric chloride-induced reactive oxygen species and its effect on antioxidant enzymes in different regions of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S; Rodgers, D A; Duhart, H M; Ali, S F

    1997-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if in vitro exposure to mercuric chloride produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the synaptosomes prepared from various regions of rat brain. The effects of in vivo exposure to mercury on antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in different regions of rat brain were also investigated. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats were dosed with 0, 1, 2.0 or 4.0 mg HgCl2/kg body weight, for 7 days. One week after the last dose, animals were sacrificed by decapitation, their brains were removed and dissected and frozen in dry ice prior to measuring the activities of these enzymes. The results demonstrated that in vitro exposure to mercury produced a concentration-dependent increase of ROS in different regions of the rat brain. In vivo exposure to mercury produced a significant decrease of total SOD, Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities in the cerebellum of rats treated with different doses of mercury. SOD activity did not vary significantly in cerebral cortex and brain stem. GPx activity declined in a dose-dependent manner in the cerebellum with a significant reduction in animals receiving the 4 mg HgCl2/kg body weight. The activity of GPx increased in the brain stem while unchanged in the cerebral cortex. The results demonstrate that inorganic mercury decreased SOD activity significantly in the cerebellum while GPx activity was affected in both cerebellum and brain stem. Therefore, it can be concluded that oxidative stress may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders caused by mercury intoxication.

  3. Schisandrin B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection are mediated by reactive oxidant species production in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Ko, Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of reactive oxidant species (ROS), presumably arising from cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-catalyzed metabolism of schisandrin B (Sch B), in triggering glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B induced reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent and CYP-catalyzed reaction and associated ROS production were examined in rat heart microsomes. Sch B analogs were also studied for comparison. Using rat heart microsomes as a source of CYP, Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate (an intermediate compound derived from the synthesis of Sch C), were found to serve as co-substrate for the CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction, with concomitant production of ROS. The stimulation of CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction and/or ROS production by Sch B or Sch C correlated with the increase in mitochondrial reduced glutathione level and protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. The involvement of ROS in Sch B-induced cardioprotection was further confirmed by the suppressive effect produced by N-acetylcysteine or alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Taken together, these results suggest that Sch B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection may be mediated by ROS arising from CYP-catalyzed reaction.

  4. From ratites to rats: the size of fleshy fruits shapes species' distributions and continental rainforest assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Maurizio; Kooyman, Robert; Yap, Jia-Yee S; Laffan, Shawn W

    2015-12-01

    Seed dispersal is a key process in plant spatial dynamics. However, consistently applicable generalizations about dispersal across scales are mostly absent because of the constraints on measuring propagule dispersal distances for many species. Here, we focus on fleshy-fruited taxa, specifically taxa with large fleshy fruits and their dispersers across an entire continental rainforest biome. We compare species-level results of whole-chloroplast DNA analyses in sister taxa with large and small fruits, to regional plot-based samples (310 plots), and whole-continent patterns for the distribution of woody species with either large (more than 30 mm) or smaller fleshy fruits (1093 taxa). The pairwise genomic comparison found higher genetic distances between populations and between regions in the large-fruited species (Endiandra globosa), but higher overall diversity within the small-fruited species (Endiandra discolor). Floristic comparisons among plots confirmed lower numbers of large-fruited species in areas where more extreme rainforest contraction occurred, and re-colonization by small-fruited species readily dispersed by the available fauna. Species' distribution patterns showed that larger-fruited species had smaller geographical ranges than smaller-fruited species and locations with stable refugia (and high endemism) aligned with concentrations of large fleshy-fruited taxa, making them a potentially valuable conservation-planning indicator.

  5. The effect of dietary fat on the molecular species of lecithin from rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1966-01-01

    1. 1. Lecithins from the liver of rats maintained on diets devoid of essential fatty acids or supplemented with coconut oil or corn oil revealed significant differences in fatty acid composition, whilst monomolecular films of these lecithin samples exhibited only limited differences in force-area ch

  6. The effect of dietary fat on the molecular species of lecithin from rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1966-01-01

    1. 1. Lecithins from the liver of rats maintained on diets devoid of essential fatty acids or supplemented with coconut oil or corn oil revealed significant differences in fatty acid composition, whilst monomolecular films of these lecithin samples exhibited only limited differences in force-area

  7. Species-Related Differences in the Proteome of Rat and Human Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Martens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The core proteomes of human and rat pancreatic beta cells were compared by label-free LC-MS/MS: this resulted in quantification of relative molar abundances of 707 proteins belonging to functional pathways of intermediary metabolism, protein synthesis, and cytoskeleton. Relative molar abundances were conserved both within and between pathways enabling the selection of a housekeeping network for geometric normalization and the analysis of potentially relevant differential expressions. Human beta cells differed from rat beta cells in their lower level of enzymes involved in glucose sensing (MDH1, PC, and ACLY and upregulation of lysosomal enzymes. Human cells also expressed more heat shock proteins and radical scavenging systems: apart from SOD2, they expressed high levels of H2O2-scavenger peroxiredoxin 3 (PRDX3, confirmed by microarray, Western blotting, and microscopy. Besides conferring lower susceptibility to oxidative stress to human cells PRDX3 might also play a role in physiological redox regulation as, in rat, its expression was restricted to a beta cell subset with higher metabolic glucose responsiveness. In conclusion, although their core proteomic architecture is conserved, human and rat beta cells differ in their molar expression of key enzymes involved in glucose sensing and redox control.

  8. The effect of dietary fat on the molecular species of lecithin from rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1966-01-01

    1. 1. Lecithins from the liver of rats maintained on diets devoid of essential fatty acids or supplemented with coconut oil or corn oil revealed significant differences in fatty acid composition, whilst monomolecular films of these lecithin samples exhibited only limited differences in force-area ch

  9. Antidiabetic effect of a black mangrove species Aegiceras corniculatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gurudeeban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier ethnopharmacological records divulged the traditional usages of mangrove Aegiceras corniculatum (Linn. Blanco distributed in coastal and estuarine areas of Southeast India. Excluding scientific knowledge of A. corniculatum against diabetes an upgrowing endocrinal disorder, our present study evaluated the effect on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in adult rats of the Wistar strain by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate. The experimental rats were administered with leaf suspension of A. corniculatum post orally using an intragastric tube. On completion of the 60-day treatment, a range of biochemical parameters were tested including liver hexokinase, glucose-6phosphatase and fructose 1, 6 bisphosphatase in the liver of control and allaxon-diabetic rats. As a result, A. corniculatum leaf suspension showed moderate reduction in blood glucose (from 382 ± 34 to 105 ± 35, glycosylated hemoglobin, a decrease in the activities of glucose-6 phosphatase and fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase, and an increase activity of liver hexokinase achieved through the oral administration of extract on 100 mg/kg. The present findings support promising results in terms of antidiabetic activities establishing its candidacy for further purification of individual compound in order to understand their mechanism of action.

  10. Speed cameras, section control, and kangaroo jumps-a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Alena

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted of the effects of speed cameras and section control (point-to-point speed cameras) on crashes. 63 effect estimates from 15 speed camera studies and five effect estimates from four section control studies were included in the analysis. Speed cameras were found to reduce total crash numbers by about 20%. The effect declines with increasing distance from the camera location. Fatal crashes were found to be reduced by 51%, this result may however be affected by regression to the mean (RTM). Section control was found to have a greater crash reducing effect than speed cameras (-30% for total crash numbers and -56% for KSI crashes). There is no indication that these results (except the one for the effect of speed cameras on fatal crashes) are affected by regression to the mean, publication bias or outlier bias. The results indicate that kangaroo driving (braking and accelerating) occurs, but no adverse effects on speed or crashes were found. Crash migration, i.e., an increase of crash numbers on other roads due to rerouting of traffic, may occur in some cases at speed cameras, but the results do not indicate that such effects are common. Both speed cameras and section control were found to achieve considerable speed reductions and the crash effects that were found in meta-analysis are of a similar size or greater than one might expect based on the effects on speed.

  11. Maternal singing during kangaroo care led to autonomic stability in preterm infants and reduced maternal anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shmuel; Diamant, Chagit; Bauer, Sofia; Regev, Rivka; Sirota, Gisela; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2014-10-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) and maternal singing benefit preterm infants, and we investigated whether combining these benefitted infants and mothers. A prospective randomised, within-subject, crossover, repeated-measures study design was used, with participants acting as their own controls. We evaluated the heart rate variability (HRV) of stable preterm infants receiving KC, with and without maternal singing. This included low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and the LF/HF ratio during baseline (10 min), singing or quiet phases (20 min) and recovery (10 min). Physiological parameters, maternal anxiety and the infants' behavioural state were measured. We included 86 stable preterm infants, with a postmenstrual age of 32-36 weeks. A significant change in LF and HF, and lower LF/HF ratio, was observed during KC with maternal singing during the intervention and recovery phases, compared with just KC and baseline (all p-values singing than just KC (p = 0.04). No differences in the infants' behavioural states or physiological parameters were found, with or without singing. Maternal singing during KC reduces maternal anxiety and leads to autonomic stability in stable preterm infants. This effect is not detected in behavioural state or physiological parameters commonly used to monitor preterm infants. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effect of formal, neonatal communication-intervention training on mothers in kangaroo care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alta Kritzinger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to low-birth-weight, preterm birth, HIV and/or AIDS and poverty-related factors, South Africa presents with an increased prevalence of infants at risk of language delay. A Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC unit offers unique opportunities for training.Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine if formal, neonatal communication-intervention training had an effect on mothers’ knowledge and communication interaction with their high-risk infants.Methods: Three groups of mothers participated: Group 1 was trained whilst practicing KMC; Group 2 was not trained but practiced KMC; and Group 3 was also not trained but practiced sporadic KMC. Ten mothers per group were matched for age, education level and birth order of their infants. The individual training was based on graded sensory stimulation and responsive mother-infant communication interaction, which emphasised talking and singing by the mother.Results: Significant differences were found in mother-infant communication interaction between all three groups, which indicated a positive effect on Group 1 with training. Group 2, KMC without training, also had a positive effect on interaction. However, Group 1 mothers with training demonstrated better knowledge of their infants and were more responsive during interaction than the other two groups.Conclusion: The present study suggests that neonatal communication-intervention training adds value to a KMC programme. Normal 0 false false false EN-ZA X-NONE X-NONE

  13. The effect of kangaroo mother care on mental health of mothers with low birth weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Badiee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mothers of premature infants are at risk of psychological stress because of separation from their infants. One of the methods influencing the maternal mental health in the postpartum period is kangaroo mother care (KMC. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of KMC of low birth weight infants on their maternal mental health. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Premature infants were randomly allocated into two groups. The control group received standard caring in the incubator. In the experimental group, caring with three sessions of 60 min KMC daily for 1 week was practiced. Mental health scores of the mothers were evaluated by using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed by the analysis of covariance using SPSS. Results: The scores of 50 infant-mother pairs were analyzed totally (25 in KMC group and 25 in standard care group. Results of covariance analysis showed the positive effects of KMC on the rate of maternal mental health scores. There were statistically significant differences between the mean scores of the experimental group and control subjects in the posttest period (P < 0.001. Conclusion: KMC for low birth weight infants is a safe way to improve maternal mental health. Therefore, it is suggested as a useful method that can be recommended for improving the mental health of mothers.

  14. Enhanced kangaroo mother care for heel lance in preterm neonates: a crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C C; Filion, F; Campbell-Yeo, M; Goulet, C; Bell, L; McNaughton, K; Byron, J

    2009-01-01

    To test if enhancing maternal skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo mother care (KMC) by adding rocking, singing and sucking is more efficacious than simple KMC for procedural pain in preterm neonates. Preterm neonates (n=90) between 32 0/7 and 36 0/7 weeks' gestational age participated in a single-blind randomized crossover design. The infant was held in KMC with the addition of rocking, singing and sucking or the infant was held in KMC without additional stimulation. The Premature Infant Pain Profile was the primary outcome with time to recover as the secondary outcome. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance was employed for analyses. There were no significant differences in any of the 30 s time periods over the 2 min of blood sampling nor in time to return to baseline. Compared to historical controls of the same age in incubator, the pain scores were lower and comparable to other studies of KMC. There were site differences related to lower scores with the use of sucrose in one site and higher scores in younger, sicker infants in another site. The sensorial stimulations from skin-to-skin contact that include tactile, olfactory sensations from the mother are sufficient to decrease pain response in premature neonates. Other studies showing that rocking, sucking and music were efficacious were independent of skin-to-skin contact, which, when used alone has been shown to be effective as reported across studies.

  15. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Neonatal Outcomes in Iranian Hospitals: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sarparast

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is a supportive technique that beings at the neonatal period and is one of the skin-to-skin contact methods of holding neonate by mother. This method has an important role in exclusive breastfeeding and thermal care of neonates. This study aimed to investigate the application of KMC and evaluate the effect of this technique in different neonatal outcomes, particularly in Iranian neonates. Moreover, this review can be a tool for formative evaluation for this newly introduced treatment intervention in Iran. Evidence Acquisition: This review was conducted in national and international databases concerning experience with KMC on term and preterm neonates admitted in Iranian hospitals from 2006 to 2014. The measured outcomes included physiologic, psychologic, and clinical effects of this practice on newborn infants. Results: In this study, 42 Persian and English language papers were reviewed and finally 26 articles were selected. Various effects of KMC on different factors such as analgesia; physiological effects, breastfeeding, icterus, length of hospitalization, infection, psychologic effects, and weight gain were found. Conclusions: The results showed that as a simple and suitable strategy for increasing the health status of the mothers and newborns, KMC had an important role in improvement of neonatal outcomes in neonatal wards of Iranian hospitals in recent ten years. Therefore, promoting this technique in all neonatal wards of the country can promote health status of this population.

  16. Reactive oxygen species in pregnant rats: effects of exercise and thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, R A L; Christofani, J S; D'Almeida, V; Russo, A K; Piçarro, I C

    2003-05-01

    With the aim of evaluating the effect of interaction between physical training or exercise only during pregnancy and thermal stress on oxidative stress, and antioxidant mechanism sedentary pregnant rats (PS), exercised pregnant rats only during pregnancy (PE) and trained rats submitted to also exercise during pregnancy (PT) were compared (N=63). Exercise sessions consisted of swimming at 80% of maximal work load supported into water at 28 degrees C (hypothermia, PS 28, PE28, PT28) or 35 degrees C (thermal neutrality, PS35, PE35, PT35) or 39 degrees C (hyperthermia, PS39, PE39, PT39), for 30 min. The initial body weight in all groups of rats was from 177 to 207 g. On the 20th day of pregnancy, 24 h after the last immersion or swimming session venous blood was collected to determine oxidative stress. Plasma concentrations of means malondialdehyde (MDA) values measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS); total glutathione (GSH) and vitamin E were determined. The oxidative stress index was calculated from the ratio TBARS/GSH and TBARS/Vitamin E. TBARS did not change on the group PE at different temperatures of water; TBARS were higher for PS28 than PS35 and PS39; PT35 had higher values than PT28 and PT39. For GSH, PS39 was lower than PS35; PE28 was higher than PE35 and PE39 and PT35 were lower than PT28 and PT39. Plasma concentration of vitamin E did not present any difference for sedentary rats at different water temperatures, but for PE28, the values were lower than for PE35 and PE39, whereas PT39 was lower than PT35 and PT28. In relation to TBARS/GSH, it was verified an increase in oxidative stress for PS28 (in relation to PS35 and PS39), PE35, and PT35 (in relation to PE28 and PE39 or PT28 and PT39); regarding the ratio TBARS/vitamin E, the highest values were obtained at 35 degrees C for PS and PT groups and at 39 for PE group. These results have shown the great complexity of the interaction between physical training, thermal stress and pregnancy

  17. Molecular Survey of Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Rodent Fleas (Siphonaptera) From Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Adriana M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Rubio, André V; Graham, Christine B; Montenieri, John A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Bai, Ying; Acosta-Gutiérrez, Roxana; Ávila-Flores, Rafael; Gage, Kenneth L; Suzán, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Rodent fleas from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed for the presence of Bartonella and Yersinia pestis. In total, 760 fleas belonging to 10 species were tested with multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the gltA (338-bp) and pla genes (478-bp) of Bartonella and Y. pestis, respectively. Although none was positive for Y. pestis, 307 fleas were infected with Bartonella spp., resulting in an overall prevalence of 40.4%. A logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of Bartonella is more likely to occur in some flea species. From a subset of Bartonella-positive fleas, phylogenetic analyses of gltA gene sequences revealed 13 genetic variants clustering in five phylogroups (I–V), two of which were matched with known pathogenic Bartonella species (Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis and Bartonella washoensis) and two that were not related with any previously described species or subspecies of Bartonella. Variants in phylogroup V, which were mainly obtained from Meringis spp. fleas, were identical to those reported recently in their specific rodent hosts (Dipodomys spp.) in the same region, suggesting that kangaroo rats and their fleas harbor other Bartonella species not reported previously. Considering the Bartonella prevalence and the flea genotypes associated with known pathogenic Bartonella species, we suggest that analysis of rodent and flea communities in the region should continue for their potential implications for human health. Given that nearby locations in the United States have reported Y. pestis in wild animals and their fleas, we suggest conducting larger-scale studies to increase our knowledge of this bacterium.

  18. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Targeting Myocardial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Rats With Ischemic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Widder, Julian D

    2015-11-01

    Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to progression of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ischemic heart failure. Clinical use of organic nitrates as nitric oxide donors is limited by development of nitrate tolerance and reactive oxygen species formation. We investigated the effects of long-term therapy with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an organic nitrate devoid of tolerance, in rats with congestive heart failure after extensive myocardial infarction. Seven days after coronary artery ligation, rats were randomly allocated to treatment with PETN (80 mg/kg BID) or placebo for 9 weeks. Long-term PETN therapy prevented the progressive left ventricular dilatation and improved left ventricular contractile function and relaxation in rats with congestive heart failure. Mitochondrial superoxide anion production was markedly increased in the failing left ventricular myocardium and nearly normalized by PETN treatment. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PETN beneficially modulated the dysregulation of mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, paralleled by prevention of uncoupling protein-3, thioredoxin-2, and superoxide dismutase-2 downregulation. Moreover, PETN provided a remarkable protective effect against reactive fibrosis in chronically failing hearts. Mechanistically, induction of heme oxygenase-1 by PETN prevented mitochondrial superoxide generation, NOX4 upregulation, and ensuing formation of extracellular matrix proteins in fibroblasts from failing hearts. In summary, PETN targeting reactive oxygen species generation prevented the changes of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and progressive fibrotic remodeling, leading to amelioration of cardiac functional performance. Therefore, PETN might be a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases involving oxidative stress and impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity.

  19. Ecosystem services from keystone species: diversionary seeding and seed-caching desert rodents can enhance Indian ricegrass seedling establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longland, William; Ostoja, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides), a native bunchgrass common to sandy soils on arid western rangelands, are naturally dispersed by seed-caching rodent species, particularly Dipodomys spp. (kangaroo rats). These animals cache large quantities of seeds when mature seeds are available on or beneath plants and recover most of their caches for consumption during the remainder of the year. Unrecovered seeds in caches account for the vast majority of Indian ricegrass seedling recruitment. We applied three different densities of white millet (Panicum miliaceum) seeds as “diversionary foods” to plots at three Great Basin study sites in an attempt to reduce rodents' over-winter cache recovery so that more Indian ricegrass seeds would remain in soil seedbanks and potentially establish new seedlings. One year after diversionary seed application, a moderate level of Indian ricegrass seedling recruitment occurred at two of our study sites in western Nevada, although there was no recruitment at the third site in eastern California. At both Nevada sites, the number of Indian ricegrass seedlings sampled along transects was significantly greater on all plots treated with diversionary seeds than on non-seeded control plots. However, the density of diversionary seeds applied to plots had a marginally non-significant effect on seedling recruitment, and it was not correlated with recruitment patterns among plots. Results suggest that application of a diversionary seed type that is preferred by seed-caching rodents provides a promising passive restoration strategy for target plant species that are dispersed by these rodents.

  20. Species' traits help predict small mammal responses to habitat homogenization by an invasive grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceradini, Joseph P; Chalfoun, Anna D

    2017-07-01

    Invasive plants can negatively affect native species, however, the strength, direction, and shape of responses may vary depending on the type of habitat alteration and the natural history of native species. To prioritize conservation of vulnerable species, it is therefore critical to effectively predict species' responses to invasive plants, which may be facilitated by a framework based on species' traits. We studied the population and community responses of small mammals and changes in habitat heterogeneity across a gradient of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) cover, a widespread invasive plant in North America. We live-trapped small mammals over two summers and assessed the effect of cheatgrass on native small mammal abundance, richness, and species-specific and trait-based occupancy, while accounting for detection probability and other key habitat elements. Abundance was only estimated for the most common species, deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). All species were pooled for the trait-based occupancy analysis to quantify the ability of small mammal traits (habitat association, mode of locomotion, and diet) to predict responses to cheatgrass invasion. Habitat heterogeneity decreased with cheatgrass cover. Deer mouse abundance increased marginally with cheatgrass. Species richness did not vary with cheatgrass, however, pocket mouse (Perognathus spp.) and harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys spp.) occupancy tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with cheatgrass cover, suggesting a shift in community composition. Cheatgrass had little effect on occupancy for deer mice, 13-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), and Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii). Species' responses to cheatgrass primarily corresponded with our a priori predictions based on species' traits. The probability of occupancy varied significantly with a species' habitat association but not with diet or mode of locomotion. When considered within the context of a rapid habitat change

  1. Effect of different forms of acute stress in the generation of reactive oxygen species in albino Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, K K; Mukkadan, J K

    2014-01-01

    Stress is common for all organisms either in the form of eustress (beneficial) or as distress (harmful). Stress is highly diverse in present world and its effects in organisms are well studied. This study is a comparative effect of stress in the generation of reactive oxygen species in albino Wistar rats, which are seldom reported. Here animals were grouped into four and the test animals of each group were administered with any one of the following stress, namely forced swimming induced stress (FS), and noise induced stress (NS), immobilization stress (IS) and overcrowding stress (OS). After stress administration, serum cortisol was estimated as a bio marker of stress in the albino rats, and the liver homogenate were used to estimate superoxide dismutase (SOD) by using rat Elisa kit in the spectrophotometer. The data were processed with unpaired 't' test. The cortisol levels were found to be increased in a highly significant level (P < 0.001) in all the groups as compared to the normal control. And the stress level was found to be maximum in the FS group in comparison with other groups. The mean cortisol level in different stress groups such as FS, NS, IS and OS were found to be 4.15, 3.7, 3.63, 3.62 μ gm/dl respectively. Among all the stressed groups, the SOD level in the FS group were found to be increased in a highly significant level (P < 0.001) in comparison with normal control group. The SOD level in FS group was (30.75 U/mgm. protein) followed by OS (28.96), noise (28.88) and IS (28.77).

  2. Rolling out of kangaroo mother care in secondary level facilities in Bihar-Some experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa B Neogi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preterm birth is one of the leading causes of under-five child deaths worldwide and in India. Kangaroo mother care (KMC is a powerful and easy-to-use method to promote health and well-being and reduce morbidity and mortality in preterm/low birth weight (LBW babies. Objective: As the part of the roll-out of India Newborn Action Plan interventions, we implemented KMC in select facilities with an objective to assess the responsiveness of public health system to roll out KMC. Methods: KMC intervention was implemented in two select high priority districts, Gaya and Purnea in Bihar over the duration of 8 months from August 2015 to March 2016. The implementation of intervention was phased out into; situation analysis, implementation of intervention, and interim assessment. KMC model, as envisaged keeping in mind the building blocks of health system, was established in 6 identified health-care facilities. A pretested simple checklist was used to assess the awareness, knowledge, skills, and practice of KMC during baseline situational analysis and interim assessment phases for comparison. Results: The intervention clearly seemed to improve the awareness among auxiliary nurse midwives/nurses about KMC. Improvements were also observed in the availability of infrastructure required for KMC and support logistics like facility for manual expression of breast milk, cups/suitable devices such as paladi cups for feeding small babies and digital weighing scale. Although the recording of information regarding LBW babies and KMC practice improved, still there is scope for much improvement. Conclusion: There is a commitment at the national level to promote KMC in every facility. The present experience shows the possibility of rolling out KMC in secondary level facilities with support from government functionaries.

  3. Randomized controlled trial of music during kangaroo care on maternal state anxiety and preterm infants' responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chia-Jung; Peng, Tai-Chu; Chang, Fwu-Mei; Hsieh, Mei-Lin; Huang, Hsiao-Yen; Chang, Shu-Chuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the influences of music during kangaroo care (KC) on maternal anxiety and preterm infants' responses. There are no experimental studies that explore the influences of combination of music and KC on psychophysiological responses in mother-infant dyads. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 30 hospitalized preterm infants body weight 1500 gm and over, gestational age 37 weeks and lower from two NICUs. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to the treatment and the control group using permuted block randomization stratified on gender. There were 15 mother-infant dyads in each group. Subjects in the treatment dyads listened to their choice of a lullaby music during KC for 60 min/section/day for three consecutive days. Control dyads received routine incubator care. Using a repeated measures design with a pretest and three posttests, the responses of treatment dyads including maternal anxiety and infants' physiologic responses (heart rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation) as well as behavioural state were measured. The results revealed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on infants' physiologic responses and the values were all in the normal range. However, infants in the treatment group had more occurrence of quiet sleep states and less crying (pMusic during KC also resulted in significantly lower maternal anxiety in the treatment group (peffect. The findings provide evidence for the use of music during KC as an empirically-based intervention for bahavioural state stability and maternal anxiety in mother-infant dyads.

  4. Supporting factors and barriers in implementing kangaroo mother care in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Pratomo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC was introduced to Indonesia in the 1990s. Since then, KMC has not been widely implemented and has not received national policy support. Objective The objectives of this case study were to implement KMC by an intervention that would ultimately benefit ten hospitals in Java, Indonesia, as well as identify supporting factors and barriers to KMC implementation. Methods An intervention with four phases was conducted in ten hospitals. Two teaching hospitals were supported to serve as training centers, six hospitals were supported to implement KMC and two other hospitals were supported to strengthen existing KMC practices. The four phases were comprised of a baseline assessment, a five-day training workshop, two supervisory visits to each hospital, and an end-line assessment. Results A total of 344 low birth weight infants received KMC during the intervention period. Good progress with regards to implementation was observed in most hospitals between the first and second supervisory visits. Supporting factors for KMC were the following: support received from hospital management, positive attitudes of healthcare providers, patients, families and communities, as well as the availability of resources. The most common challenges were record keeping and data collection, human resources and staff issues, infrastructure and budgets, discharge and follow-up, as well as family issues. Challenges related to the family were the inability of the mother or family to visit the infant frequently to provide KMC, and the affordability of hospital user fees for the infant to stay in the hospital for a sufficient period of time. Conclusion KMC appeared to be well accepted in most hospitals. For an intervention to have maximum impact, it is important to integrate services and maintain a complex network of communication systems. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:43-50].

  5. The Effects of New Alibernet Red Wine Extract on Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Alexey; Vranková, Stanislava; Dovinová, Ima; Ševčík, Rudolf; Parohová, Jana; Barta, Andrej; Pecháňová, Olga; Kovacsová, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE) and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day) for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR. PMID:22720118

  6. Changing patterns of meat consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Australia: Will kangaroo meat make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasiri, Shyama; Bandara, Jayatilleke

    2017-01-01

    The Australian per capita consumption of ruminant meat such as beef and lamb has declined over the last two decades. Over the same period, however, per capita consumption of non-ruminant meat such as chicken and pork has continued to increase. Furthermore, it is now observed that the human consumption of kangaroo meat is on the rise. This study investigates the implications of these changes in meat consumption patterns on Green House Gases (GHGs) emission mitigation in Australia using a Vector Auto Regression (VAR) forecasting approach. Our results suggest that the increase will continue in non-ruminant meat consumption and this will not only offset the decline in ruminant meat consumption, but will also raise the overall per capita meat consumption by approximately 1% annually. The per capita GHGs emissions will likely decrease by approximately 2.3% per annum, due to the inclusion of non-ruminant meat in Australian diets. The GHGs emissions can further be reduced if the average Australian consumer partially replaces ruminant meat with kangaroo meat.

  7. Changing patterns of meat consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Australia: Will kangaroo meat make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasiri, Shyama; Bandara, Jayatilleke

    2017-01-01

    The Australian per capita consumption of ruminant meat such as beef and lamb has declined over the last two decades. Over the same period, however, per capita consumption of non-ruminant meat such as chicken and pork has continued to increase. Furthermore, it is now observed that the human consumption of kangaroo meat is on the rise. This study investigates the implications of these changes in meat consumption patterns on Green House Gases (GHGs) emission mitigation in Australia using a Vector Auto Regression (VAR) forecasting approach. Our results suggest that the increase will continue in non-ruminant meat consumption and this will not only offset the decline in ruminant meat consumption, but will also raise the overall per capita meat consumption by approximately 1% annually. The per capita GHGs emissions will likely decrease by approximately 2.3% per annum, due to the inclusion of non-ruminant meat in Australian diets. The GHGs emissions can further be reduced if the average Australian consumer partially replaces ruminant meat with kangaroo meat. PMID:28196141

  8. Aerobic characteristics of red kangaroo skeletal muscles: is a high aerobic capacity matched by muscle mitochondrial and capillary morphology as in placental mammals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; Mifsud, Brock; Raad, Matthew C; Webster, Koa N

    2004-07-01

    Marsupials and placentals together comprise the Theria, the advanced mammals, but they have had long independent evolutionary histories, with the last common ancestor occurring more than 125 million years ago. Although in the past the marsupials were considered to be metabolically 'primitive', the red kangaroo Macropus rufus has been reported to have an aerobic capacity (VO2max) comparable to that of the most 'athletic' of placentals such as dogs. However, kangaroos travel at moderate speeds with lower relative cost than quadrupedal placentals. Given the long independent evolution of the two therian groups, and their unusual locomotor energetics, do kangaroos achieve their high aerobic capacity using the same structural and functional mechanisms used by (athletic) placentals? Red kangaroo skeletal muscle morphometry matched closely the general aerobic characteristics of placental mammals. The relationship between total mitochondrial volume in skeletal muscle and VO2max during exercise was identical to that in quadrupedal placentals, and differed from that in bipedal humans. As for placentals generally, red kangaroo mitochondrial oxygen consumption at VO2max was 4.7 ml O2 min(-1) ml(-1) of mitochondria. Also, the inner mitochondrial membrane densities were 35.8 +/- 0.7 m2 ml(-1) of mitochondria, which is the same as for placental mammals, and the same pattern of similarity was seen for capillary densities and volumes. The overall data for kangaroos was equivalent to that seen in athletic placentals such as dogs and pronghorns. Total skeletal muscle mass was high, being around 50% of body mass, and was concentrated around the pelvis and lower back. The majority of the muscles sampled had relatively high mitochondrial volume densities, in the range 8.8-10.6% in the major locomotor muscles. Again, capillary densities and capillary blood volumes followed the pattern seen for mitochondria. Our results indicate that the red kangaroo, despite its locomotion and extreme

  9. Analysis of reactive oxygen species generating systems in rat epididymal spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, P; Fulton, N; Wallace, C; Aitken, R J

    2001-10-01

    Epididymal sperm maturation culminates in the acquisition of functional competence by testicular spermatozoa. The expression of this functional state is dependent upon a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated signal transduction cascade that controls the tyrosine phosphorylation status of the spermatozoa during capacitation. Analysis of superoxide anion (O2(-.)) generation by rat epididymal spermatozoa has revealed a two-component process involving electron leakage from the sperm mitochondria at complexes I and II and a plasma membrane NAD(P)H oxidoreductase. Following incubation in a glucose-, lactate-, and pyruvate-free medium (-GLP), O2(-.) generation was suppressed by 86% and 96% in caput and cauda spermatozoa, respectively. The addition of lactate, malate, or succinate to spermatozoa incubated in medium -GLP stimulated O2(-.) generation. This increase could be blocked by rotenone and oligomycin (R/O) in the presence of malate or lactate but not succinate. Stimulation with all three substrates, as well as spontaneous O2(-.) production in +GLP medium, was blocked by the flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium. Diphenylene iodonium, but not R/O, suppressed NAD(P)H-induced lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. This NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme resided in the sperm plasma membrane and its activity was regulated by zinc and uncharacterized cytosolic factors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the sperm NAD(P)H oxidoreductase complex is quite distinct from the equivalent leukocyte system.

  10. Kangaroo mother care diminishes pain from heel lance in very preterm neonates: A crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNaughton Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo mother care (KMC has been shown to be efficacious in diminishing pain response to heel lance in full term and moderately preterm neonates. The purpose of this study was to determine if KMC would also be efficacious in very preterm neonates. Methods Preterm neonates (n = 61 between 28 0/7 and 31 6/7 weeks gestational age in three Level III NICU's in Canada comprised the sample. A single-blind randomized crossover design was employed. In the experimental condition, the infant was held in KMC for 15 minutes prior to and throughout heel lance procedure. In the control condition, the infant was in prone position swaddled in a blanket in the incubator. The primary outcome was the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP, which is comprised of three facial actions, maximum heart rate, minimum oxygen saturation levels from baseline in 30-second blocks from heel lance. The secondary outcome was time to recover, defined as heart rate return to baseline. Continuous video, heart rate and oxygen saturation monitoring were recorded with event markers during the procedure and were subsequently analyzed. Repeated measures analysis-of-variance was employed to generate results. Results PIPP scores at 90 seconds post lance were significantly lower in the KMC condition (8.871 (95%CI 7.852–9.889 versus 10.677 (95%CI 9.563–11.792 p CI 103–142 versus 193 seconds (95%CI 158–227. Facial actions were highly significantly lower across all points in time reaching a two-fold difference by 120 seconds post-lance and heart rate was significantly lower across the first 90 seconds in the KMC condition. Conclusion Very preterm neonates appear to have endogenous mechanisms elicited through skin-to-skin maternal contact that decrease pain response, but not as powerfully as in older preterm neonates. The shorter recovery time in KMC is clinically important in helping maintain homeostasis. Trial Registration (Current

  11. Kangaroo mother care: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is now the leading cause of under-five child deaths worldwide with one million direct deaths plus approximately another million where preterm is a risk factor for neonatal deaths due to other causes. There is strong evidence that kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces mortality among babies with birth weight hospital discharge with follow-up. The World Health Organization has endorsed KMC for stabilised newborns in health facilities in both high-income and low-resource settings. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) use a 12-country analysis to explore health system bottlenecks affecting the scale-up of KMC; (2) propose solutions to the most significant bottlenecks; and (3) outline priority actions for scale-up. Methods The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks", factors that hinder the scale-up, of maternal-newborn intervention packages. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, combined with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for KMC. Results Marked differences were found in the perceived severity of health system bottlenecks between Asian and African countries, with the former reporting more significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC with respect to all the health system building blocks. Community ownership and health financing bottlenecks were significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC in both low and high mortality contexts, particularly in South Asia. Significant bottlenecks were also reported for leadership and governance and health workforce building blocks. Conclusions There are at least a dozen countries worldwide with national KMC programmes, and we identify three pathways to scale: (1

  12. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  13. Zerumbone protects INS-1 rat pancreatic beta cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyin; Zou, Shibo; Cui, Zhengjun; Guo, Pengfei; Meng, Qingnan; Shi, Xun; Gao, Ya; Yang, Gaoyuan; Han, Zhaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of zerumbone, a natural sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet Smith, on high glucose-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic β cells. INS-1 rat pancreatic β cells were treated with 33 mM glucose with or without different concentrations of zerumbone and cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the action of zerumbone was examined. Notably, zerumbone significantly (P in a concentration-dependent fashion up to 60 μM of zerumbone. Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis showed that zerumbone impaired the apoptotic response of high glucose-treated INS-1 cells, which was coupled with a significant decline in cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9. Pretreatment with the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine abrogated the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK induced by high glucose. Zerumbone significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. Pharmacological activation of p38 and JNK with anisomycin reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of zerumbone. Additionally, simultaneous inhibition of p38 and JNK significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. In conclusion, zerumbone confers protection against high glucose-induced apoptosis of INS-1 pancreatic β cells, largely through interfering with ROS production and p38 and JNK activation. Zerumbone may have potential therapeutic effects against hyperglycemia-induced β cell damage in diabetes.

  14. Reduction of reactive oxygen species ameliorates metabolism-secretion coupling in islets of diabetic GK rats by suppressing lactate overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Sato, Yuichi; Nishi, Yuichi; Mukai, Eri; Yamano, Gen; Sato, Hiroki; Tahara, Yumiko; Ogura, Kasane; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion (IS) and ATP elevation in islets of Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a nonobese model of diabetes, were significantly restored by 30-60-min suppression of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. In this study, we investigated the effect of a longer (12 h) suppression of ROS on metabolism-secretion coupling in β-cells by exposure to tempol, a superoxide (O2(-)) dismutase mimic, plus ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic (TE treatment). In GK islets, both H2O2 and O2(-) were sufficiently reduced and glucose-induced IS and ATP elevation were improved by TE treatment. Glucose oxidation, an indicator of Krebs cycle velocity, also was improved by TE treatment at high glucose, whereas glucokinase activity, which determines glycolytic velocity, was not affected. Lactate production was markedly increased in GK islets, and TE treatment reduced lactate production and protein expression of lactate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). These results indicate that the Warburg-like effect, which is characteristic of aerobic metabolism in cancer cells by which lactate is overproduced with reduced linking to mitochondria metabolism, plays an important role in impaired metabolism-secretion coupling in diabetic β-cells and suggest that ROS reduction can improve mitochondrial metabolism by suppressing lactate overproduction through the inhibition of HIF1α stabilization.

  15. Postnatal intermittent hypoxia and developmental programming of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats: the role of reactive oxygen species and L-Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukhova-O'Hare, Galia K; Ortines, Roger V; Gu, Yan; Nozdrachev, Alexander D; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Gozal, David

    2008-07-01

    Obstructive and central apneas during sleep are associated with chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exposed to CIH during postnatal days 4 to 30 develop exaggerated hypertension as adults. We hypothesized that reactive oxygen species and altered L-Ca(2+) channel activity may underlie the postnatal programming of exaggerated blood pressure and cardiac remodeling. Newborn male spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed to CIH (10% and 21% O(2) alternating every 90 seconds, 12 h/d, for postnatal days 4 to 30) or normoxia (room air). In each condition, spontaneously hypertensive rats received daily (SC) 1 of 3 treatments: L-calcium channel blocker nifedipine (5 mg/kg), superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTMPyP pentachloride (10 mg/kg), or vehicle (polyethylene glycol). Blood pressure was evaluated monthly for 6 months after birth, and echocardiographic assessments were conducted at 6 months of age. CIH vehicle-treated rats presented higher systolic blood pressure (187+/-5 mm Hg) as compared with normoxic vehicle treated controls (163+/-2 mm Hg; Preactive oxygen species-mediated signaling during intermittent hypoxia are critical mechanisms underlying postnatal programming of an increased severity of hypertension and hypertrophic cardiac remodeling in a genetically susceptible rodent model.

  16. Propolis, a Constituent of Honey, Inhibits the Development of Sugar Cataracts and High-Glucose-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Shibata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study investigated the effects of oral propolis on the progression of galactose-induced sugar cataracts in rats and the in vitro effects of propolis on high-glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell death in cultured rat lens cells (RLECs. Methods. Galactose-fed rats and RLECs cultured in high glucose (55 mM medium were treated with propolis or vehicle control. Relative lens opacity was assessed by densitometry and changes in lens morphology by histochemical analysis. Intracellular ROS levels and cell viability were measured. Results. Oral administration of propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of cataract in 15% and 25% of galactose-fed rats, respectively. RLECs cultured with high glucose showed a significant increase in ROS expression with reduced cell viability. Treatment of these RLECs with 5 and 50 μg/mL propolis cultured significantly reduced ROS levels and increased cell viability, indicating that the antioxidant activity of propolis protected cells against ROS-induced damage. Conclusion. Propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of sugar cataract in rats and mitigated high-glucose-induced ROS production and cell death. These effects may be associated with the ability of propolis to inhibit hyperglycemia-evoked oxidative or osmotic stress-induced cellular insults.

  17. Propolis, a Constituent of Honey, Inhibits the Development of Sugar Cataracts and High-Glucose-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Teppei; Shibata, Shinsuke; Shibata, Naoko; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Singh, Dhirendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the effects of oral propolis on the progression of galactose-induced sugar cataracts in rats and the in vitro effects of propolis on high-glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in cultured rat lens cells (RLECs). Methods. Galactose-fed rats and RLECs cultured in high glucose (55 mM) medium were treated with propolis or vehicle control. Relative lens opacity was assessed by densitometry and changes in lens morphology by histochemical analysis. Intracellular ROS levels and cell viability were measured. Results. Oral administration of propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of cataract in 15% and 25% of galactose-fed rats, respectively. RLECs cultured with high glucose showed a significant increase in ROS expression with reduced cell viability. Treatment of these RLECs with 5 and 50 μg/mL propolis cultured significantly reduced ROS levels and increased cell viability, indicating that the antioxidant activity of propolis protected cells against ROS-induced damage. Conclusion. Propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of sugar cataract in rats and mitigated high-glucose-induced ROS production and cell death. These effects may be associated with the ability of propolis to inhibit hyperglycemia-evoked oxidative or osmotic stress-induced cellular insults. PMID:27242920

  18. Technical note: Detection of cat, dog, and rat or mouse tissues in food and animal feed using species-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, I; García, T; Fajardo, V; Rojas, M; Hernández, P E; González, I; Martín, R

    2007-10-01

    A PCR method based on the nucleotide sequence variation in the 12S ribosomal RNA, mitochondrial gene has been developed for the specific and qualitative detection and identification of cat, dog, and rat or mouse tissue in food and feedstuffs. The primers designed generated specific fragments of 108, 101, and 96 bp in length for cat, dog, and rat or mouse tissues, respectively. Specificity of the primers was tested against 32 nontarget species including mammals, birds, fish, and plant species. This PCR method allowed detection of raw and heated cat, dog, and rat or mouse tissues in meat/oats mixtures even when the concentration of the target species was reduced to 0.1%. Furthermore, the performance of the method was not affected by prolonged heat-treatment (up to 133 degrees C for 20 min at 300 kPa), and consequently, it could be very useful to verify the origin of raw materials in food and feedstuffs submitted to denaturing technologies, for which other methods cannot be applied.

  19. Inhibition of rat gut reperfusion injury with an agent developed for the mouse. Evidence that amplification of injury by innate immunity is conserved between two animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, Jalil; Ahmadi-Yazdi, Cyrus; Sheu, Eric G; Oakes, Sean M; Moore, Francis D

    2010-06-01

    Murine reperfusion injury follows binding of specific IgM natural antibodies to neo-antigens exposed in ischemic tissue. Peptides that mimic the site of antibody binding in the injury prevent IgM binding when administered intravenously before reperfusion. To determine whether this pathogenic sequence is restricted to mice, we have tested the ability of the peptide to prevent reperfusion injury in a dissimilar species, the rat. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 40 min of mesenteric ischemia followed by 180 min of reperfusion. The peptide mimic was administered intravenously prior to reperfusion. Gut injury was quantified using a scoring system based on the hematoxylin-and-eosin section. (125)I-labeled albumin was used to assess local (gut) and remote (lung) injury. The macroscopic appearance of bowel from peptide-treated animals was less edematous and hemorrhagic. Microscopic analysis showed a significantly reduced injury score in peptide-treated animals. Permeability data indicated a significant reduction in local and remote injury in peptide-treated animals. The data demonstrate attenuation of rat gut microvillus injury, of gut edema, and of remote injury following mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion due to administration of an intravenous peptide mimic of a murine ischemia neo-antigen, indicating a second species uses a similar ischemia neo-antigen and corresponding natural antibody specificity to amplify reperfusion injury to the point of necrosis. This mechanism of inflammation is potentially applicable to higher species.

  20. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

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    Bo He

    Full Text Available Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  1. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  2. Eight new species of Macvicaria Gibson and Bray, 1982 (Digenea: Opecoelidae from temperate marine fishes of Australia

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    Thelma Aken’Ova

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nine morphologically distinct species of Macvicaria Gibson & Bray, 1982 were recovered from six families, ten genera and twelve species of marine fishes in the waters off the coast of Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia: M. shotteri n. sp. in Apogon fasciatus (type-host, Sillaginodes punctatus and Sillago bassensis from Moreton Bay (type-locality, off southern Western Australia and off Kangaroo Island, South Australia; M. mekistomorphe n. sp. in Sillago maculata from Moreton Bay; M. mutovitellina n. sp. in Dactylophora nigricans from off southern Western Australia; M. flexuomeatus n. sp. in Goniistius gibbosus (type-host and Cheilodactylus rubrolabiatus from southern Western Australia; M. vitellocopiosa n. sp. in Sillaginodes punctatus from off Kangaroo Island, South Australia; M. dextrocaula n. sp. in Notolabrus parilus (type-host and N. fucicola (Richardson (Labridae from off southern Western Australia (type-locality and Kangaroo Island, South Australia; M. heronensis Bray & Cribb, 1989 in Trachinotus coppingeri off Stradbroke Island, Queensland; M. adomeae n. sp. in Sillaginodes punctatus off Kangaroo Island, South Australia; M. kingscotensis n. sp. in Neoodax balteatus (type-host and Haletta semifasciata off Kangaroo Island, South Australia. We have used the following characters to distinguish between the species of Macvicaria: general body form; length/width ratio; size of cirrussac; length of forebody; post-testicular extent of caeca; egg size; and the position of the genital pore. Most of the species of Macvicaria showed interspecific differences in all of the characters enumerated, the most dramatic being in the position of the genital pore in one species. All 11 specimens recovered from 2 species of Notolabrus were found to have a dextral genital pore. This is the second report of amphitypy in the Opecoelidae. All of the host species, apart from Apogon fasciatus, are endemic to Australian or Australian and New Zealand

  3. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rat model of pleurisy: The effects of hesperidin on ectoenzymes activity, apoptosis, cell cycle and reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Leal, Daniela Bitencourt Rosa; Doleski, Pedro Henrique; Ledur, Pauline Christ; Ecker, Assis

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigates the effect of hesperidin; a flavonone commonly found in citrus fruits, on the ectoenzymes (ectonucleotidase and ecto-adenosine deaminase) activity, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from rat model of pleurisy. Wistar rats were pretreated with either saline or hesperidin (80mg/kg) by oral gavage for 21days and injected intrapleurally with 2% carrageenan or saline on the 22nd day. PBMCs were subsequently prepared after 4h of carrageenan induction. The results revealed that hesperidin may exhibit its anti-inflammatory effects through possible modulation of ectonucleotidase (E-NTPDase) and ecto-adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activities, reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species, prevention of DNA damage and modulation of apoptosis as well as activation of cell cycle arrest. This study suggests some possible underlying anti-inflammatory mechanisms of hesperidin on PBMCs in acute inflammatory condition. Furthermore, hesperidin may minimize oxidative injury mediated pleurisy in rat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyphenols of Camellia sinenesis decrease mortality, hepatic injury and generation of cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species after hemorrhage/resuscitation in rats

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    Lehnert Mark

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS are produced during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (H/R, which may contribute to multiple organ failure. The Aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that green tea (Camellia sinenesis extract containing 85% polyphenols decreases injury after H/R in rats by scavenging ROS and RNS. Methods Female Sprague Dawley rats were given 100 mg polyphenol extract/kg body weight or vehicle 2 h prior to hemorrhagic shock. H/R was induced by two protocols: 1 withdrawal of blood to a mean arterial pressure of 40 mm Hg followed by further withdrawals to decrease blood pressure progressively to 28 mm Hg over 1 h (severe, and 2 withdrawal of blood to a sustained hypotension of 40 mm Hg for 1 h (moderate. Rats were then resuscitated over 1 h with 60% of the shed blood volume plus twice the shed blood volume of lactated Ringer's solution. Serum samples were collected at 10 min and 2 h after resuscitation. At 2 or 18 h, livers were harvested for cytokine and 3-nitrotyrosine quantification, immunohistochemical detection of 4-hydroxynonenol (4-HNE and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein expression. Results After severe H/R, 18-h survival increased from 20% after vehicle to 70% after polyphenols (p Conclusion Polyphenols decrease ROS/RNS formation and are beneficial after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

  5. Método Mãe-Canguru Método Madre Canguro Kangaroo Mother Method

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    Roberta Costa

    2005-12-01

    conocimientos lo hace difícil, también, una adecuada evaluación de esta práctica con relación al recién-nacido y su familia pero, principalmente, en lo que concierne a la aplicación del MMC junto al equipo neonatal.Study of a qualitative nature, whose objective is to identify the knowledge that comes out produced and propagated in Brazilians and foreigners periodic, about Kangaroo Mother Method (KMM. An incursion for literature was carried through, from the databases Medline and Lilacs, as well as direct search to main the nursing periodic, during the period from 1995 through 2004. Eight five articles were selected, later catalogued and submitted to categorizes. After analysis of the articles, four categories were extracted on the thematic. The results had led to the conclusion that despite the KMM being configuring itself as a paradigmatic change in the care to the newborn, it does not have total correspondence with the theoretical production, taking the one that the practical one is developed, many times, without had theoretical sustentation. This gap of knowledge makes it difficult, also, one adequate evaluation of this practical with relation to newborn and its family but, mainly, in whom it says respect to the application of KMM together to the neonatal team.

  6. Scaling up kangaroo mother care in South Africa: 'on-site' versus 'off-site' educational facilitation

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    van Rooyen Elise

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up the implementation of new health care interventions can be challenging and demand intensive training or retraining of health workers. This paper reports on the results of testing the effectiveness of two different kinds of face-to-face facilitation used in conjunction with a well-designed educational package in the scaling up of kangaroo mother care. Methods Thirty-six hospitals in the Provinces of Gauteng and Mpumalanga in South Africa were targeted to implement kangaroo mother care and participated in the trial. The hospitals were paired with respect to their geographical location and annual number of births. One hospital in each pair was randomly allocated to receive either 'on-site' facilitation (Group A or 'off-site' facilitation (Group B. Hospitals in Group A received two on-site visits, whereas delegates from hospitals in Group B attended one off-site, 'hands-on' workshop at a training hospital. All hospitals were evaluated during a site visit six to eight months after attending an introductory workshop and were scored by means of an existing progress-monitoring tool with a scoring scale of 0–30. Successful implementation was regarded as demonstrating evidence of practice (score >10 during the site visit. Results There was no significant difference between the scores of Groups A and B (p = 0.633. Fifteen hospitals in Group A and 16 in Group B demonstrated evidence of practice. The median score for Group A was 16.52 (range 00.00–23.79 and that for Group B 14.76 (range 07.50–23.29. Conclusion A previous trial illustrated that the implementation of a new health care intervention could be scaled up by using a carefully designed educational package, combined with face-to-face facilitation by respected resource persons. This study demonstrated that the site of facilitation, either on site or at a centre of excellence, did not influence the ability of a hospital to implement KMC. The choice of outreach

  7. Hydrogen-rich water inhibits glucose and α,β -dicarbonyl compound-induced reactive oxygen species production in the SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rat kidney

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    Katakura Masanori

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS production induced by α,β-dicarbonyl compounds and advanced glycation end products causes renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Hydrogen-rich water (HRW increases the H2 level in blood and tissues, thus reducing oxidative stress in animals as well as humans. In this study, we investigated the effects of HRW on glucose- and α,β-dicarbonyl compound-induced ROS generation in vitro and in vivo. Methods Kidney homogenates from Wistar rats were incubated in vitro with glucose and α,β-dicarbonyl compounds containing HRW, following which ROS levels were measured. In vivo animal models of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats, were treated with HRW for 16 weeks, following which renal ROS production and plasma and renal α,β-dicarbonyl compound levels were measured by liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Results HRW inhibited glucose- and α,β-dicarbonyl compound-induced ROS production in kidney homogenates from Wistar rats in vitro. Furthermore, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats treated with HRW showed a 34% decrease in ROS production. Moreover, their renal glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone levels decreased by 81%, 77%, and 60%, respectively. Positive correlations were found between renal ROS levels and renal glyoxal (r = 0.659, p = 0.008 and methylglyoxal (r = 0.782, p = 0.001 levels. Conclusion These results indicate that HRW inhibits the production of α,β-dicarbonyl compounds and ROS in the kidneys of SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats. Therefore, it has therapeutic potential for renal dysfunction in patient with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Species- and tissue-specific relationships between mitochondrial permeability transition and generation of ROS in brain and liver mitochondria of rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Dikalov, Sergey; Shalbuyeva, Natalia; Hemendinger, Richelle; Greenamyre, John T; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey

    2007-02-01

    In animal models of neurodegenerative diseases pathological changes vary with the type of organ and species of the animals. We studied differences in the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the liver (LM) and brain (BM) of Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl mice. In the presence of ADP mouse LM and rat LM required three times less Ca(2+) to initiate mPT than the corresponding BM. Mouse LM and BM sequestered 70% and 50% more Ca(2+) phosphate than the rat LM and BM. MBM generated 50% more ROS with glutamate than the RBM, but not with succinate. With the NAD substrates, generation of ROS do not depend on the energy state of the BM. Organization of the respiratory complexes into the respirasome is a possible mechanism to prevent ROS generation in the BM. With BM oxidizing succinate, 80% of ROS generation was energy dependent. Induction of mPT does not affect ROS generation with NAD substrates and inhibit with succinate as a substrate. The relative insensitivity of the liver to systemic insults is associated with its high regenerative capacity. Neuronal cells with low regenerative capacity and a long life span protect themselves by minimizing ROS generation and by the ability to withstand very large Ca(2+) insults. We suggest that additional factors, such as oxidative stress, are required to initiate neurodegeneration. Thus the observed differences in the Ca(2+)-induced mPT and ROS generation may underlie both the organ-specific and species-specific variability in the animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Relic populations of Fukomys mole-rats in Tanzania: description of two new species F. livingstoni sp. nov. and F. hanangensis sp. nov.

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    Chris G. Faulkes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of African mole-rats of the genera Heliophobius and Fukomys (Bathyergidae in the regions of East and south central Africa have revealed a diversity of species and vicariant populations, with patterns of distribution having been influenced by the geological process of rifting and changing patterns of drainage of major river systems. This has resulted in most of the extant members of the genus Fukomys being distributed west of the main Rift Valley. However, a small number of isolated populations are known to occur east of the African Rift Valley in Tanzania, where Heliophobius is the most common bathyergid rodent. We conducted morphological, craniometric and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b sequences of two allopatric populations of Tanzanian mole-rats (genus Fukomys at Ujiji and around Mount Hanang, in comparison with both geographically adjacent and more distant populations of Fukomys. Our results reveal two distinct evolutionary lineages, forming clades that constitute previously unnamed species. Here, we formally describe and designate these new species F. livingstoni and F. hanangensis respectively. Molecular clock-based estimates of divergence times, together with maximum likelihood inference of biogeographic range evolution, offers strong support for the hypothesis that vicariance in the Western Rift Valley and the drainage patterns of major river systems has subdivided populations of mole-rats. More recent climatic changes and tectonic activity in the “Mbeya triple junction” and Rungwe volcanic province between Lakes Rukwa and Nyasa have played a role in further isolation of these extra-limital populations of Fukomys in Tanzania.

  10. Species-specific regulation of PXR/CAR/ER-target genes in the mouse and rat liver elicited by o, p'-DDT

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    Burgoon Lyle D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT is a persistent estrogenic organochlorine pesticide that is a rodent hepatic tumor promoter, with inconclusive carcinogenicity in humans. We have previously reported that o, p'-DDT elicits primarily PXR/CAR-mediated activity, rather than ER-mediated hepatic responses, and suggested that CAR-mediated effects, as opposed to ER-mediated effects, may be more important in tumor promotion in the rat liver. To further characterize species-specific hepatic responses, gene expression analysis, with complementary histopathology and tissue level analyses were investigated in immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice treated with 300 mg/kg o, p'-DDT, and compared to Sprague-Dawley rat data. Results Rats and mice exhibited negligible histopathology with rapid o, p'-DDT metabolism. Gene expression profiles were also similar, exhibiting PXR/CAR regulation with the characteristic induction of Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11. However, PXR-specific target genes such as Apoa4 or Insig2 exhibited more pronounced induction compared to CAR-specific genes in the mouse. In addition, mouse Car mRNA levels decreased, possibly contributing to the preferential activation of mouse PXR. ER-regulated genes Cyp17a1 and Cyp7b1 were also induced, suggesting o, p'-DDT also elicits ER-mediated gene expression in the mouse, while ER-mediated effects were negligible in the rat, possibly due to the inhibitory effects of CAR on ER activities. In addition, o, p'-DDT induced Gadd45a, Gadd45b and Cdkn1, suggesting DNA damage may be an additional risk factor. Furthermore, elevated blood DHEA-S levels at 12 h after treatment in the mouse may also contribute to the endocrine-related effects of o, p'-DDT. Conclusion Although DDT is known to cause rodent hepatic tumors, the marked species differences in PXR/CAR structure, expression patterns and ligand preference as well as significant species-specific differences in steroidogenesis, especially CYP17A1

  11. Identification and evolutionary analysis of novel exons and alternative splicing events using cross-species EST-to-genome comparisons in human, mouse and rat

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    Ho Jar-Yi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing (AS is important for evolution and major biological functions in complex organisms. However, the extent of AS in mammals other than human and mouse is largely unknown, making it difficult to study AS evolution in mammals and its biomedical implications. Results Here we describe a cross-species EST-to-genome comparison algorithm (ENACE that can identify novel exons for EST-scanty species and distinguish conserved and lineage-specific exons. The identified exons represent not only novel exons but also evolutionarily meaningful AS events that are not previously annotated. A genome-wide AS analysis in human, mouse and rat using ENACE reveals a total of 758 novel cassette-on exons and 167 novel retained introns that have no EST evidence from the same species. RT-PCR-sequencing experiments validated ~50 ~80% of the tested exons, indicating high presence of exons predicted by ENACE. ENACE is particularly powerful when applied to closely related species. In addition, our analysis shows that the ENACE-identified AS exons tend not to pass the nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratio test and not to contain protein domain, implying that such exons may be under positive selection or relaxed negative selection. These AS exons may contribute to considerable inter-species functional divergence. Our analysis further indicates that a large number of exons may have been gained or lost during mammalian evolution. Moreover, a functional analysis shows that inter-species divergence of AS events may be substantial in protein carriers and receptor proteins in mammals. These exons may be of interest to studies of AS evolution. The ENACE programs and sequences of the ENACE-identified AS events are available for download. Conclusion ENACE can identify potential novel cassette exons and retained introns between closely related species using a comparative approach. It can also provide information regarding lineage- or species

  12. Downstream signaling of reactive oxygen species, protein kinase C epsilon translocation and delayed neuroprotection in sevoflurane preconditioned rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Ye; Qulian Guo; E Wang; Yundan Pan; Qing Li; Honghao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brief exposure to the anesthetic sevoflurane results in delayed neuroprotection.However, few studies have addressed delayed neuroprotection after preconditioning with a single administration of sevoflurane.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between a single preconditioning administration of sevoflurane and reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKC- ε ) translocation.DESIGN, TIME, AND SETTING: The randomized, controlled, animal experiment was conducted at the Central Laboratory, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, China from November 2007 to April 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 120 healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats were equally and randomly assigned into five groups: sham operation, ischemia/reperfusion, sevoflurane, 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (2-MPG, a selective reactive oxygen species scavenger) + sevoflurane (MPG + sevoflurane), and MPG. Sevoflurane (Baxter, USA) and MPG (Sigma, USA) were used in this study.METHODS: Intervention consisted of three procedures. (1) MPG injection: a selective reactive oxygen species scavenger, MPG (20 mg/kg), was infused into the rat caudal vein in the MPG and MPG + sevoflurane groups. (2) Sevoflurane preconditioning: 30 minutes following MPG injection,rats in the sevoflurane and MPG + sevoflurane groups breathed a mixed gas of 2.4% sevoflurane and 97.6% oxygen for 60 minutes. Rats in the sham operation, ischemia/reperfusion, and MPG groups breathed 100% pure oxygen for 60 minutes. (3) Ischemia/reperfusion: 24 hours after sevoflurane or pure oxygen preconditioning, middle cerebral artery occlusion models were established in the ischemia/reperfusion, sevoflurane, MPG + sevoflurane, and MPG groups.Following 2 hours ischemia/6 hours and 24 hours reperfusion, the carotid artery was separated, but the middle cerebral artery was not occluded, in the sham operation group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In the ischemic hemisphere, PKC-ε translocation in the rat parietal cortex was measured by Western

  13. Evalvacija šolskega matematičnega tekmovanja Kenguru = Evaluation of the Kangaroo School Mathematical Competition

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    Barbara Komel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year Slovene students of secondary vocational schools, among them also the Construction and Service School in Kranj (Economics and Service Educational Centre Kranj, compete in knowledge in the Kangaroo International Mathematical Competition . We decided to evaluate two points of view of the competition, namely processional in the sense of extra-curricular activities, i.e. preparation for the competition, and interpersonal in the sense of deepening the relations between teachers and students. One of the main aims of our evaluation, besides deepening the relations, was to motivate and prepare as many students as possible for the competition. While carrying out the project, there was a growing conviction that the process of evaluation is more important than its results, because it has united and brought closer all the participants, students as well as teacher-mentors. An extremely positive consequence of evaluation is the fact that the understanding of the competition itself has improved and it has also boosted its own efficiency. School climate has become friendlier, while the project group of mathematicians gained new guidelines for further work.

  14. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, K.R.; Fisher, J.A.; Muths, E.; Trott, J.; Janssens, P.A.; Reich, C.; Shaw, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of ??-lactalbumin, ??-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Kangaroo care and behavioral and physiologic pain responses in very-low-birth-weight twins: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Cusson, Regina M; Hussain, Naveed; Zhang, Di; Kelly, Sharon P

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe pain responses in three study conditions: longer (30 minutes) kangaroo care (KC) before and throughout heel stick (KC30), shorter (15 minutes) KC before and throughout heel stick (KC15), and incubator care throughout heel stick (IC) in 28-week gestational age twins. Pain responses were measured by crying time, Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), and heart rate variability indexes, including low-frequency power (LF, representing sympathetic activity), high-frequency power (HF, parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF ratio (sympathetic-parasympathetic balance). Both twins cried more and had higher PIPP pain scores and tachycardia during heel stick in the IC condition. Infant B had an incident of apnea and tachycardia by the end of the heel stick and a bradycardia episode during recovery in the IC condition. The twins had lower LF/HF ratios (better autonomic nervous system balance) during recovery in both longer and shorter KC conditions compared with the IC condition. Infant B had difficulty returning to LF/HF ratio baseline level after the painful procedure in the IC condition. These data suggest that both longer and shorter KC before and throughout painful procedures can be helpful in reducing behavioral and physiologic pain responses in preterm infants.

  16. An endemic rat species complex is evidence of moderate environmental changes in the terrestrial biodiversity centre of China through the late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Deyan; Lu, Liang; Cheng, Jilong; Xia, Lin; Chang, Yongbin; Wen, Zhixin; Lv, Xue; Du, Yuanbao; Liu, Qiyong; Yang, Qisen

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms that allow the Hengduan Mountains (HDM), the terrestrial biodiversity centre of China, to harbour high levels of species diversity remain poorly understood. Here, we sought to explore the biogeographic history of the endemic rat, Niviventer andersoni species complex (NASC), and to understand the long-term persistence of high species diversity in this region. In contrast to previous studies that have proposed regional refuges in eastern or southern of the HDM and emphasized the influence of climatic oscillations on local vertebrates, we found that HDM as a whole acted as refuge for the NASC and that the historical range shifts of NASC mainly occurred in the marginal regions. Demographic analyses revealed slight recent population decline in Yunnan and south-eastern Tibet, whereas of the populations in Sichuan and of the entire NASC were stable. This pattern differs greatly from classic paradigms of temperate or alpine and holarctic species. Interestingly, the mean elevation, area and climate of potential habitats of clade a (N. excelsior), an alpine inhabitant, showed larger variations than did those of clade b (N. andersoni), a middle-high altitude inhabitant. These species represent the evolutionary history of montane small mammals in regions that were less affected by the Quaternary climatic changes. PMID:28393882

  17. [Nanocerium restores the erythrocytes stability to acid hemolysis by inhibition of oxygen and nitrogen reactive species in old rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuruba, A V; Kopjak, B S; Sagach, V F; Spivak, N Ja

    2015-01-01

    In experiments in vivo the effect of nanocerium (cerium oxide nanoparticles) on the stability of red blood cells to acid hemolysis, levels of both ROS and RNS generation and H2S pools in plasma and erythrocytes of old rats were investigated. In red blood cells of old rats the proton penetration into the matrix of erythrocytes showed a significant raising and the fate of labile "aging" erythrocytes in old animals compared with adult were up- regulated. These phenomena paralleled with significant up-regulation of ROS and RNS generation. Introduction for 14 days per os to old rats 0.1 mg/kg of nanocerium fully restored resistance of erythrocytes to acid hemolysis by ROS and RNS in both plasma and erythrocytes reduction. Nanocerium decreased the erythrocytes and, conversely, significantly increased the plasma's pools of H2S.

  18. Production of reactive oxygen species and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat isolated Kupffer cells stimulated by Leptospira interrogans and Borrelia burgdorferi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonella Marangoni; Silvia Accardo; Rita Aldini; Massimo Guardigli; Francesca Cavrini; Vittorio Sambri; Marco Montagnani; Aldo Roda; Roberto Cevenini

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the expression of indudble nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in rat isolated Kupffer cells (KCs) stimulated by Leptospira interrogans and Borrelia burgdorferi.METHODS: Rat Kupffer cells were separated by perfusion of the liver with 0.05% collagenase, and purified by Percoll gradients. Purified Kupffer cells were tested in vitro with alive L.interogans and B. burgdorferi preparations. The production of ROS was determined by chemiluminescence, whereas iNOS protein expression was evaluated by Western blot assay using anti-iNOS antibodies.RESULTS: B. burgdorferi and to a less extent L. interrogans induced ROS production with a peak 35 min after infection. The chemiluminescence signal progressively diminished and was undetectable by 180 min of incubation. Leptospirae and borreliae induced an increased iNOS expression in Kupffer cells that peaked at 6 hours and was still evident 22 h after infection.CONCLUSION: Both genera of spirochetes induced ROS and iNOS production in rat Kupffer cells. Since the cause of liver damage both in leptospiral as well as in borrelial infections are still unknown, we suggest that leptospira and borrelia damage of the liver can be initially mediated by oxygen radicals, and is then maintained at least in part by nitric oxide.

  19. Enhanced neuropeptide Y synthesis during intermittent hypoxia in the rat adrenal medulla: role of reactive oxygen species-dependent alterations in precursor peptide processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Kalari, Apeksha; Dhingra, Rishi; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with recurrent apneas often leads to cardiovascular abnormalities. Previously, we showed that IH treatment elevates blood pressure and increases plasma catecholamines (CAs) in rats via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent enhanced synthesis and secretion from the adrenal medulla (AM). Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter that colocalizes with CA in the AM, has been implicated in blood pressure regulation during persistent stress. Here, we investigated whether IH facilitates NPY synthesis in the rat AM and assessed the role of ROS signaling. IH increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in many dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing chromaffin cells with a parallel increase in preproNPY mRNA and protein. IH increased the activities of proNPY-processing enzymes, which were due, in part, to elevated protein expression and increased proteolytic processing. IH increased ROS generation, and antioxidants reversed IH-induced increases in ROS, preproNPY, and its processing to bioactive NPY in the AM. IH treatment increased blood pressure and antioxidants and inhibition of NPY amidation prevented this response. These findings suggest that IH-induced elevation in NPY expression in the rat AM is mediated by ROS-dependent augmentation of preproNPY mRNA expression and proNPY-processing enzyme activities and contributes to IH-induced elevation of blood pressure.

  20. Insulin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase underlie the cerebrovascular insulin resistance in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Snipes, James A; Steed, Mesia M; Busija, David W

    2012-05-01

    Hyperinsulinemia accompanying insulin resistance (IR) is an independent risk factor for stroke. The objective is to examine the cerebrovascular actions of insulin in Zucker obese (ZO) rats with IR and Zucker lean (ZL) control rats. Diameter measurements of cerebral arteries showed diminished insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO compared with ZL. Endothelial denudation revealed vasoconstriction to insulin that was greater in ZO compared with ZL. Nonspecific inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) paradoxically improved vasodilation in ZO. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), supplementation of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) precursor, and inhibition of neuronal NOS or NADPH oxidase or cyclooxygenase (COX) improved insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO. Immunoblot experiments revealed that insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial NOS, and expression of GTP cyclohydrolase-I (GTP-CH) were diminished, but phosphorylation of PKC and ERK was enhanced in ZO arteries. Fluorescence studies showed increased ROS in ZO arteries in response to insulin that was sensitive to NOS inhibition and BH(4) supplementation. Thus, a vicious cycle of abnormal insulin-induced ROS generation instigating NOS uncoupling leading to further ROS production underlies the cerebrovascular IR in ZO rats. In addition, decreased bioavailability and impaired synthesis of BH(4) by GTP-CH induced by insulin promoted NOS uncoupling.

  1. Avaliação dos resultados neonatais do método canguru no Brasil Evaluation of the neonatal outcomes of the kangaroo mother method in Brazil

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    Fernando Lamy Filho

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados do método canguru no Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo comparando 16 unidades que possuíam ou não a segunda fase do método canguru: oito eram centros nacionais de referência para o método canguru (grupo estudo, e oito faziam parte da Rede Brasileira de Pesquisas Neonatais (grupo controle. Foram incluídos 985 recém-nascidos pesando entre 500 e 1.749 g. Na análise multivariada, utilizou-se a regressão linear múltipla e a regressão de Poisson com ajuste robusto. RESULTADOS: Na análise ajustada (para peso de nascimento, idade gestacional, Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology Perinatal Extension II, Neonatal Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System, idade e escolaridade maternas, o tempo médio de internação (p = 0,14 e intercorrências clínicas na unidade intermediária ou canguru foram iguais entre os grupos. Peso (p = 0,012, comprimento (p = 0,039 e perímetro cefálico (p = 0,006 com 36 semanas de idade gestacional corrigida foram menores nas unidades canguru. As unidades canguru tiveram desempenho superior em relação ao aleitamento materno exclusivo na alta (69,2 versus 23,8%, p = 0,022. CONCLUSÃO: As evidências sugerem que a estratégia de humanização adotada pelo Ministério da Saúde é uma alternativa segura ao tratamento convencional e uma boa estratégia para a promoção do aleitamento materno.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the kangaroo mother method in Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study comparing 16 units that have or do not have the second phase of the kangaroo mother method: eight were national centers of excellence for the kangaroo mother method (study group and eight were part of the Brazilian Neonatal Research Network (control group. A total of 985 newborn infants with birth weights of 500 to 1,749 g were enrolled. Multivariate analyses employed multiple linear regression and Poisson regression with robust adjustment. RESULTS: The adjusted analysis

  2. Hepatobiliary Clearance Prediction: Species Scaling From Monkey, Dog, and Rat, and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes Using 17 Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Emi; Bi, Yi-An; Kosa, Rachel E; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena V S

    2017-09-01

    Hepatobiliary elimination can be a major clearance pathway dictating the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Here, we first compared the dose eliminated in bile in preclinical species (monkey, dog, and rat) with that in human and further evaluated single-species scaling (SSS) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance. Six compounds dosed in bile duct-cannulated (BDC) monkeys showed biliary excretion comparable to human; and the SSS of hepatobiliary clearance with plasma fraction unbound correction yielded reasonable predictions (within 3-fold). Although dog SSS also showed reasonable predictions, rat overpredicted hepatobiliary clearance for 13 of 24 compounds. Second, we evaluated the translatability of in vitro sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance for 17 drugs. For drugs with no significant active uptake in SCHH studies (i.e., with or without rifamycin SV), measured intrinsic biliary clearance was directly scalable with good predictability (absolute average fold error [AAFE] = 1.6). Drugs showing significant active uptake in SCHH, however, showed improved predictability when scaled based on extended clearance term (AAFE = 2.0), which incorporated sinusoidal uptake along with a global scaling factor for active uptake and the canalicular efflux clearance. In conclusion, SCHH is a useful tool to predict human hepatobiliary clearance, whereas BDC monkey model may provide further confidence in the prospective predictions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative study of activities in reactive oxygen species production/defense system in mitochondria of rat brain and liver, and their susceptibility to methylmercury toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, N.; Hirayama, K. [Kumamoto University, School of Health Science, Kumamoto (Japan); Yasutake, A. [National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    The involvement of oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism for neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg), but the mechanism for MeHg selective toxicity in the central nervous system is still unclear. In this research, to clarify the mechanism of selective neurotoxicity caused by MeHg, the oxygen consumption levels, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates and several antioxidant levels in mitochondria were compared among the cerebrum, cerebellum and liver of male Wistar rats. In addition, the alterations of these indexes were examined in MeHg-intoxicated rats (oral administration of 10 mg/kg day, for 5 days). Although the cerebrum and cerebellum in intact rats showed higher mitochondrial oxygen consumption levels and ROS production rates than the liver, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were much lower in the cerebrum and cerebellum than in the liver. Especially, the cerebellum showed the highest oxygen consumption and ROS production rate and the lowest mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) levels among the tissues examined. In the MeHg-treated rats, decrease in the oxygen consumption and increase in the ROS generation were found only in the cerebellum mitochondria, despite a lower Hg accumulation in the mitochondrial fraction compared to the liver. Since MeHg treatment produced an enhancement of ROS generation in cerebellum mitochondria supplemented with succinate substrates, MeHg-induced oxidative stress might affect the complex II-III mediated pathway in the electron transfer chain in the cerebellum mitochondria. Our study suggested that inborn factors, high production system activity and low defense system activity of ROS in the brain, would relate to the high susceptibility of the central nervous system to MeHg toxicity. (orig.)

  4. Comparative Effect of Massage Therapy versus Kangaroo Mother Care on Body Weight and Length of Hospital Stay in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangey, Priya Singh; Sheth, Megha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massage therapy (MT) and kangaroo mother care (KMC) are both effective in increasing the weight and reducing length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm infants but they have not been compared. Aim. Comparison of effectiveness of MT and KMC on body weight and length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm (LBWPT) infants. Method. 30 LBWPT infants using convenience sampling from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, V.S. hospital, were randomly divided into 2 equal groups. Group 1 received MT and Group 2 received KMC for 15 minutes, thrice daily for 5 days. Medically stable babies with gestational age Limitation. Long term follow-up was not taken.

  5. Trial gain of weight and hospital length stay of the low birth weight preterm infant in assistance for kangaroo mother care

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Aparecida Giacomini Rodrigues; Maria Aparecida Tedeschi Cano

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) interferes in the gain of weight and in the hospital length stay of the low birth weight preterm newborn (LWBPTN). For this, it was realized an analytic retrospective study, through the evaluation of the medical records of 60 LWBPTN with born weight less than 2000 g that received assistance by KMC, for a period of 2 hours per day and, 60 LWBPTN that received assistance by the Traditional Method of Care (TMC), admitted in ...

  6. Platelet hyperaggregability in high-fat fed rats: A role for intraplatelet reactive-oxygen species production

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    Monteiro Priscila F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiposity greatly increases the risk of atherothrombotic events, a pathological condition where a chronic state of oxidative stress is reported to play a major role. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of (NO-soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC signaling pathway in the platelet dysfunction from high fat-fed (HFF rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were fed for 10 weeks with standard chow (SCD or high-fat diet (HFD. ADP (10 μM- and thrombin (100 mU/ml-induced washed platelet aggregation were evaluated. Measurement of intracellular levels of ROS levels was carried out using flow cytometry. Cyclic GMP levels were evaluated using ELISA kits. Results High-fat fed rats exhibited significant increases in body weight, epididymal fat, fasting glucose levels and glucose intolerance compared with SCD group. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP (n = 8 and thrombin from HFD rats (n = 8 were significantly greater (P n = 6. N-acetylcysteine (NAC; 1 mM and PEG-catalase (1000 U/ml fully prevented the increased ROS production and platelet hyperaggregability in HFD group. The NO donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10 μM and SNAP (10 μM, as well as the NO-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 (10 μM inhibited the platelet aggregation in HFD group with lower efficacy (P P n = 4. Conclusions Metabolic abnormalities as consequence of HFD cause platelet hyperaggregability involving enhanced intraplatelet ROS production and decreased NO bioavailability that appear to be accompanied by potential defects in the prosthetic haem group of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

  7. A sedge plant as the source of Kangaroo Island propolis rich in prenylated p-coumarate ester and stilbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Colin C; Tran, Van H; Duke, Rujee K; Abu-Mellal, Abdallah; Plunkett, George T; King, Douglas I; Hamid, Kaiser; Wilson, Karen L; Barrett, Russell L; Bruhl, Jeremy J

    2017-02-01

    Propolis samples from Kangaroo Island, South Australia, were investigated for chemical constituents using high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectral profiling. A type of propolis was found containing a high proportion of prenylated hydroxystilbenes. Subsequently, the botanical origin of this type of propolis was identified using a beehive propolis depletion method and analysis of flora. Ligurian honey bees, Apis mellifera ligustica Spinola, were found to produce propolis from resin exuded by the Australian native sedge plant Lepidosperma sp. Montebello (Cyperaceae). The plants, commonly known as sword sedge, were found to have resin that matched with the propolis samples identified as the most abundant propolis type on the island containing C- and O-prenylated tetrahydroxystilbenes (pTHOS) in addition to a small amount of prenylated p-coumarate. The isolation of five pTHOS not previously characterized are reported: (E)-4-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene, (E)-2,4-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,3',4',5-tetrahydroxystilbene, (E)-2-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)-3',4',5-trihydroxystilbene, (E)-2,6-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxystilbene and (E)-2,6-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene. A National Cancer Institute 60 human cell line anticancer screen of three of these compounds showed growth inhibitory activity. The large Australasian genus Lepidosperma is identified as a valuable resource for the isolation of substances with medicinal potential. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Early kangaroo mother care vs. conventional method in stabilizing low birth weight infant: physiologic parameters (preliminary report

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    Rulina Suradi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC has been accepted as an effective method in nursing low birth weight infant (LBWI. However, the application of this method in the early life of infants has not been studied in Indonesia. Objective To evaluate some physiologic parameters of LBWI treated with early KMC compared to conventional method. Methods This was a randomized clinical-trial, which compared early KMC to conventional method in stabilizing LBWI in the first 4 hours of life. All LBWI (birth weight 1500-2499 g bom at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Budi Kemuliaan Matemity Hospital Jakarta were recruited consecutively in the period of November 2001 until March 2002. The inclusion criteria were spontaneous delivery, APGAR scores 13t and 5th minute 37, and parental consent. Results Sixty-four subjects distributed evenly into early KMC group and control group. One subject in the KMC group and three subjects in the control group were excluded due to respiratory distress. The mean birth weight was 2091 (SO 299.4 g in the KMC group and 2184 (SO 214.9 g inthe control group. The mean gestational-age in both groups was 35.6 (SO 3.0 weeks. There were no statistical differences in mean temperature (P=0.281, heart rate (P=0.956, and respiratory rate (P=0.898 between the two groups during the first 4 hours of life. We found a larger proportion of infants reaching the temperature of 36.5QC in the KMC group, especially at one hour (49% vs. 7%; the difference of proportion was 0.42 (95%CI 0.22 to 0.61. Conclusion Early KMC method is proved to be as safe as conventional method in stabilizing healthy LBWI.

  9. Research Progress of Kangaroo Nursing Care Applied in Neonatal Pain Management%袋鼠式护理应用于新生儿疼痛管理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖苑红; 沈永珍; 黄晓睿

    2016-01-01

    袋鼠式护理已被广泛应用于新生儿护理中,在新生儿疼痛管理中的应用更受关注。本文通过综述袋鼠式护理应用于新生儿疼痛管理的应用机制、现状及效果,对今后开展袋鼠式护理应用于新生儿疼痛管理的研究提出建议。%Kangaroo care has been widely used in neonatal care,and more attention has been paid in the application of neonatal pain management. This article reviewed the mechanism of kangaroo care used in neonatal pain management,the current situation,and the effectiveness of kangaroo care used in neonatal pain management. Suggestions about how to apply kangaroo care in neonatal pain management were presented.

  10. Kangaroo mother program: physical growth and morbidity in a cohort of children, followed from 40 weeks of postconceptional age until first year.

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    Diana Palencia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Up to 40 weeks of postconceptional age, the kangaroo mother program at the Hospital Universitario del Valle has proved to be a safe alternative for premature babies’ management with a low birth weight. Objectives: To evaluate the physical growth and morbidity in children followed since 40 weeks up to 1 year in the program. Material and methods: A cohort study was performed in newborn infants admitted to the kangaroo mother program in the newborn unit at the Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, Colombia, with birth weight lower than 2000 g, from 40 weeks postconceptional age up to one year age, between August 2002 and July 2006. Information was collected about maternal age and morbidity, prenatal control, type of birth, gender, birth weight, gestational age, breastfeeding, thick motor development, physical growth, morbidity, readmissions, mortality and tests results. Results: A total of 390 infants were admitted to the program, with a 61% of captation. 65% of theirs mothers did not have prenatal control. Before completing the 40 weeks, 5.3% were readmitted due to anaemia and apnoea. After 40 weeks, 13% were readmitted by bronchopneumonia and acute diarrhoea. Most of them were allocated in the reference percentiles for weight and size. Size had a better growth than weight. The cumulated low weight incidence for age at 13 months was 22%. Conclusions: To increase the coverage of prenatal control program and to watch that the children receive prescribed iron and formulated folic acid.

  11. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis

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    Shannon L. Donahoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi in Western Australia.

  12. Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract, an indigenous drug preparation, modulates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species levels and antioxidative system in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasath, Vanu Ramkumar; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2005-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are highly reactive transient chemical species, which play an important role in the etiology of tissue injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The effects of milk extract of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut (SA) was studied on adjuvant arthritis in rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml of heat killed mycobacterium tuberculosis (10 mg/ml of paraffin oil) intradermally into the left hind paw. A significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides (LPO), ROS (superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical, H(2)O(2) and myeloperoxidase) and RNS (nitrate+nitrite) observed in adjuvant arthritic animals were found to be significantly decreased on administration of the drug at 150 mg/kg body weight/day. The antioxidant defense system studied in arthritic animals were altered significantly as evidenced by the decrease in antioxidants. Treatment with SA recouped the altered antioxidant defense components to near normal levels. These evidences suggest that the free radical mediated damage during arthritis could have been controlled by SA by its free radical quenching and antioxidative potential. (Mol Cell Biochem 276: 97-104, 2005).

  13. Involvement of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8) in menthol-induced calcium entry, reactive oxygen species production and cell death in rheumatoid arthritis rat synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Pan, Leiting; Yang, Shuang; Sun, Yonglin; Wang, Xinyu; Hu, Fen

    2014-02-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is most prominently characterized by synoviocyte hyperplasia which therefore serves as an important target for clinical therapy. In the present study, it was observed that menthol, the specific agonist of transient receptor potential melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8), could induce sustained increases of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in synoviocytes isolated from collagen-induced arthritis rats in dose-dependent manner, which was evidently blocked by applying an extracellular Ca(2+)-free buffer. Menthol-induced [Ca(2+)]c increase was also significantly inhibited by potent TRPM8 antagonist capsazepine (CZP), indicating that this [Ca(2+)]c elevation was mostly attributed to TRPM8-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Besides, RT-PCR indeed demonstrated presence of TRPM8 in the synoviocytes. Meanwhile, it was found that menthol evoked production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which could be abolished by Ca(2+) free solutions or CZP. Further experiments showed that menthol reduced the cell numbers and survival of synoviocytes. This reduction was associated with apoptosis as suggested by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, nuclear condensation and a caspase 3/7 apoptotic assay. Menthol-induced death and apoptosis of synoviocytes both were obviously inhibited by CZP, intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, and reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, respectively. Taken together, our data indicated that menthol resulted in synoviocyte death associated with apoptosis via calcium entry and reactive oxygen species production depending on TRPM8 activation.

  14. Ebselen protects against behavioral and biochemical toxicities induced by 3-nitropropionic acid in rats: correlations between motor coordination, reactive species levels, and succinate dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Jesse, Cristiano R; Luchese, Cristiane

    2014-12-01

    The protective effect of ebselen was investigated against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced behavioral and biochemical toxicities in rats. Ebselen (10 or 25 mg/kg, intragastrically) was administered to rats 30 min before 3-NP (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) once a day for a period of 4 days. Locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight gain were determined. The striatal content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AA), and protein carbonyl as well as catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities was determined 24 h after the last dose of 3-NP. Na(+)/ K(+)-ATPase, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and δ-aminolevulinic dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activities were also determined. The results demonstrated that ebselen at a dose of 25 mg/kg, but not at 10 mg/kg, protected against (1) a decrease in locomotor activity, motor coordination impairment, and body weight loss; (2) striatal oxidative damage, which was characterized by an increase in ROS levels, protein carbonyl content, and GR activity, an inhibition of CAT and GPx activities, and a decrease in GSH levels; and (3) an inhibition of SDH and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities, induced by 3-NP. GST activity and AA levels were not modified by ebselen or 3-NP. Ebselen was not effective against the inhibition of δ-ALA-D activity induced by 3-NP. The results revealed a significant correlation between SDH activity and ROS levels, and SDH activity and latency to fall (rotarod test). The present study highlighted the protective effect of ebselen against 3-NP-induced toxicity in rats.

  15. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A2-mediated metabolism and production of reactive oxygen species by heme oxygenase-1 in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James R; Cawley, George F; Backes, Wayne L

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in most cell types by many forms of environmental stress and is believed to play a protective role in cells exposed to oxidative stress. Metabolism by cytochromes P450 (P450) is highly inefficient as the oxidation of substrate is associated with the production of varying proportions of hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. This study tests the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role against oxidative stress by competing with P450 for binding to the common redox partner, the NADPH P450 reductase (CPR) and in the process, diminishing P450 metabolism and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Liver microsomes were isolated from uninduced rats and rats that were treated with cadmium and/or β-napthoflavone (BNF) to induce HO-1 and/or CYP1A2. HO-1 induction was associated with slower rates of metabolism of the CYP1A2-specific substrate, 7-ethoxyresorufin. Furthermore, HO-1 induction also was associated with slower rates of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical production by microsomes from rats induced for CYP1A2. The inhibition associated with HO-1 induction was not dependent on the addition of heme to the microsomal incubations. The effects of HO-1 induction were less dramatic in the absence of substrate for CYP1A2, suggesting that the enzyme was more effective in inhibiting the CYP1A2-related activity than the CPR-related production of superoxide (that dismutates to form hydrogen peroxide).

  16. Reduction of prohibitin expression contributes to left ventricular hypertrophy via enhancement of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species formation in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H; Lu, G M

    2015-02-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in hypertension is characterized by thickening of myocardium and decrease in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. In this work, we investigate whether mitochondrial prohibitin (PHB) was involved in the progression of LVH in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). First, it was found that mitochondrial dysfunction occurred in left ventricles of SHR. Through analysis using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, it was found that PHB mRNA and mitochondrial PHB levels in left ventricles of SHR were significantly lower than that in Wistar-Kyoto rats. Furthermore, PHB mRNA levels were negatively correlated to left ventricles weight-to-body weight ratio in SHR. Knockdown of PHB led to increased formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced activities of complex I, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured cardiomyocytes. Knockdown of PHB contributed to the cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which could be attenuated by treatment with the Tempol. Angiotensin II (AngII) was increased in plasma and left ventricles of SHR. Incubation with AngII reduced mitochondrial PHB expression in cardiomyocytes, which was reversed when pretreated with losartan. In conclusion, reduction of PHB expression in left ventricles in SHR contributed to LVH, at least in part, through promoting mitochondrial ROS formation.

  17. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the labeling of the various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Turpeenoja, L.; Ingrao, F.; Reale, S.; Ragusa, N.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.

    1988-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the labeling of various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. After 12 hours of EGF treatment in serum-free medium or chemically defined medium, significant increase in RNA labeling, and also in acid-soluble radioactivity and RNA content, was observed. The ratio RNA/DNA was significantly higher in EGF-treated cultures compared with controls. Ribosomal RNAs (28S and 18S), polyadenylated, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs showed a higher specific radioactivity in EGF-treated cultures. Among the nuclear proteins, the labeling of basic proteins was enhanced by EGF treatment, whereas that of total nuclear acidic protein (NHPs) was less modified, except for some NHPs separated by gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight (MW) approximately 95-83 and 44 kd, which were significantly more labeled in EGF-treated cultures.

  18. Exercise training provides cardioprotection via a reduction in reactive oxygen species in rats submitted to myocardial infarction induced by isoproterenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Marisa J S; Justo, Simoni L; Da Luz, Gabrielle; Da Silva, Sabrina; Medeiros, Cleber; Barbosa, Viviane A; Silva, Luciano A; Boeck, Carina R; De Pinho, Ricardo A; De Souza, Claudio T

    2009-10-01

    Exercise training has demonstrated cardioprotection effects. However, the exact mechanism behind this effect is not is clear. The present study evaluated the effects of 12 weeks of previous treadmill training on the levels of oxidative damage, antioxidant enzyme activity and injury in the myocardium of rats submitted to infarction induced by isoproterenol (ISO). Isoproterenol treatment (80 mg/kg given over 2 days in two equal doses) caused arrhythmias and 60% mortality within 24 h of the last injection in the control group (C + ISO) group when compared with the saline control group (saline). Creatine Kinase--MB levels were markedly increased in hearts from ISO-treated animals in the C + ISO group. Twelve weeks of treadmill training reduced superoxide production, lipid peroxidation levels and protein carbonylation in these animals, as well as increasing the activities and expressions of SOD and CAT. Previous training also reduced CK-MB levels and numbers of deaths by 40%, preventing the deleterious effects of ISO. Based on the data obtained in this study, it is suggested that 12-week treadmill training increases antioxidant enzymes, decreases oxidative damage and reduces the degree of infarction induced by ISO in the hearts of male rats.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Impairment of Endothelium-Dependent Relaxations in Rat Aortic Rings: Protection by Methanolic Extracts of Phoebe grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Rais Mustafa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Generation of reactive oxygen species plays a pivotal role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study describes the effects of the methanolic extract of Phoebe grandis (MPG stem bark on reactive oxygen species-induced endothelial dysfunction in vitro. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh and -independent relaxation (sodium nitroprusside, SNP was investigated from isolated rat aorta of Sprague-Dawley (SD in the presence of the β-NADH (enzymatic superoxide inducer and MPG extract. Superoxide anion production in aortic vessels was measured by lucigen chemiluminesence. Thirty minutes incubation of the rat aorta in vitro with β-NADH increased superoxide radical production and significantly inhibited ACh-induced relaxations. Pretreatment with MPG (0.5, 5 and 50 μg/mL restored the ACh-induced relaxations (Rmax: 92.29% ± 2.93, 91.02% ± 4.54 and 88.31 ± 2.36, respectively in the presence of β-NADH. MPG was ineffective in reversing the impaired ACh-induced relaxations caused by pyrogallol, a non-enzymatic superoxide generator. Superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger, however, reversed the impaired ACh relaxations induced by both β-NADH and pyrogallol. MPG also markedly inhibited the β-NADH-induced generation of the superoxide radicals. Furthermore, MPG scavenging peroxyl radicals generated by tBuOOH (10−4 M.These results indicate that MPG may improve the endothelium dependent relaxations to ACh through its scavenging activity as well as by inhibiting the NADH/NADPH oxidase induced generation of superoxide anions.

  20. The crucial role of particle surface reactivity in respirable quartz-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species formation and APE/Ref-1 induction in rat lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haberzettl Petra

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Persistent inflammation and associated excessive oxidative stress have been crucially implicated in quartz-induced pulmonary diseases, including fibrosis and cancer. We have investigated the significance of the particle surface reactivity of respirable quartz dust in relation to the in vivo generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS and the associated induction of oxidative stress responses in the lung. Therefore, rats were intratracheally instilled with 2 mg quartz (DQ12 or quartz whose surface was modified by either polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide (PVNO or aluminium lactate (AL. Seven days after instillation, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was analysed for markers of inflammation (total/differential cell counts, levels of pulmonary oxidants (H2O2, nitrite, antioxidant status (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, as well as for markers of lung tissue damage, e.g. total protein, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. Lung homogenates as well as sections were investigated regarding the induction of the oxidative DNA-lesion/oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG using HPLC/ECD analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Homogenates and sections were also investigated for the expression of the bifunctional apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1 by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Significantly increased levels of H2O2 and nitrite were observed in rats treated with non-coated quartz, when compared to rats that were treated with either saline or the surface-modified quartz preparations. In the BALF, there was a strong correlation between the number of macrophages and ROS, as well as total cells and RNS. Although enhanced oxidant generation in non-coated DQ12-treated rats was paralleled with an increased total antioxidant capacity in the BALF, these animals also showed significantly enhanced lung tissue damage. Remarkably however, elevated ROS levels were

  1. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide radicals in activation and proliferation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Saccomanno, S; van Goor, H; Jansen, P; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce HSCs activation, proliferation and collagen gene expression in vitro. Nitric oxide (NO) represents a reactive molecule that reacts with ROS, yielding peroxynitrite. We thus verified the effect of NO on ROS-induced HSCs proliferation in vitro and

  2. Effects of quercetin on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol through the reactive oxygen species-nitric oxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Li Liu; Jun Du; Ling-Ling Fan; Xiao-Yan Liu; Luo Gu; Ying-Bin Ge

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of quercetin (3,3,4',5,7-pentahydroxy flavone),a major flavonoid in human diet,on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol.METHODS:Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 200-250 g,were randomly divided into control group (tap water ad//b/tum),ethanol treatment group (6 mL/L ethanol),quercetin treatment group (intragastric garage with 100 mg/kg of quercetin per day),and ethanol plus quercetin treatment group (quercetin and 6 mL/L ethanol).Expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 were detected by Western blot to assay gastric mucosal cell proliferation in rats.To demonstrate the influence of quercetin on the production of extra-cellular reactive oxygen species/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in rats,changes in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBAR5),protein carbonyl,nitrite and nitrate (NOx) and nitrotyrosine (NT) were determined.The activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) including iNOS and nNOS was also detected by Western blot,RESULTS:Compared to control animals,cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of animals subjected to ethanol treatment for 7 days was significant increased (increased to 290% for PCNA density P < 0.05,increased to150 for Cyclin D1 density P < 0.05 and 21.6 + 0.8 vs 42.3 + 0.7 for PCNA positive cells per view field),accompanied by an increase in ROS generation (1.298 ± 0.135 μmol vs 1.772 ± 0.078 μmol for TBARS P < 0.05;4.36 + 0.39 mmol vs 7.48 4- 0.40 mmol for carbonyl contents P < 0.05) and decrease in NO generation (11.334 + 0.467 μmol vs 7.978 ± 0.334 μmol P < 0.01 for NOx;8.986 ± 1.351 μmol vs 6.854 ± 0.460 μmol for nitrotyrosine P < 0.01) and nNOS activity (decreased to 43% P < 0.05).This function was abolished by the co-administration of quercetin.CONCLUSION:The antioxidant action of quercetin relies,in part,on its ability to stimulate nNOS and enhance production of NO that

  3. Rat mesangial cells in vitro synthesize a spectrum of proteoglycan species including those of the basement membrane and interstitium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, G J; Shewring, L; McCarthy, K J;

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix within the mesangium is an important event in the development of glomerular disease. In this report we have used indirect immunofluorescence to positively identify a number of constituents of the mesangial matrix synthesized by rat mesangial cells (RMC) in vitro...... including laminin, fibronectin, type IV collagen and the basement membrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan (BM-HSPG) known as perlecan. In addition, using Mab 2B5 we demonstrate that RMC synthesize a specific basement membrane chondroitin sulfate (BM-CSPG), a matrix component that in normal animals...... is localized in the mesangium but is not found in the pericapillary glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Further characterization of the proteoglycans synthesized by RMC in vitro revealed: (i) a second large CSPG, identified as versican; (ii) two small dermatan sulphate proteoglycans identified as biglycan...

  4. 袋鼠式护理对足月新生儿疼痛的护理效果%Kangaroo Care for Neonatal Pain Nursing Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗小敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss kangaroo care for neonatal pain nursing effect, evaluation of its clinical application value. Methods From 2010 September to 2011 June in our hospital was born in 98 full-term neonates were divided randomly into two groups, the control group (n=49 ) using the routine nursing care, observation group (n=49 ) using a kangaroo care, two groups of neonatal pain, heart rate, oxygen saturation and crying time comparison. Results The observation group of neonatal pain score lower than those in the control group, the difference between the two groups was significant (P < 0.05 ); study group of neonatal heart rate lower than that of the control group, while the oxygen saturation is higher than that of control group, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05 ); observation group of neonatal crying time shorter than the control group, the difference between the two groups was significant (P < 0.05 ). Conclusion Kangaroo care helps to reduce neonatal pain, promote stable vital signs, it is worth of application.%目的 讨论袋鼠式护理对于足月新生儿疼痛的护理效果,评价其临床应用价值.方法 将2010年9月-2011年6月在本院出生的98例足月新生儿随机分为两组,其中对照组(49例)采用常规护理方法,观察组(49例)采用袋鼠式护理,对两组新生儿的疼痛程度、心率、血氧饱和度及啼哭时间进行比较.结果 观察组新生儿疼痛评分低于对照组,两组差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组新生儿心率低于对照组,而血氧饱和度高于对照组,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组新生儿啼哭时间短于对照组,两组间差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论袋鼠式护理有助于降低新生儿的疼痛感,促进生命体征稳定,临床应用效果好.

  5. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paino I.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 µM, indomethacin (12 µM, naproxen (160 µM, piroxicam (13 µM, and tenoxicam (30 µM were incubated at 37ºC in PBS (10 mM, pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6 cells/ml stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM. The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 ± 2% diclofenac, 90 ± 2% indomethacin, 33 ± 3% piroxicam, and 45 ± 6% tenoxicam (N = 6. For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 ± 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 ± 60% (N = 6. Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 ± 10, 45 ± 3%, indomethacin (97 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, naproxen (56 ± 8, 76 ± 3%, piroxicam (77 ± 5, 99 ± 1%, and tenoxicam (90 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, respectively (N = 3. These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  6. Relations between social status and the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system in females of two cooperatively breeding species of African mole-rats, Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus and Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae: neuroanatomical and neuroendocrinological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, Lydia; Bennett, Nigel C; Katz, Arieh A; Kalló, Imre; Coen, Clive W

    2006-01-10

    In common (Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus) and highveld (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae) mole-rats, reproduction is subject to two forms of regulation in addition to incest avoidance. These are the only social bathyergids known to restrict breeding to a particular season; furthermore, subordinate members of their colonies show suppressed reproduction throughout the year. Females from both species were assessed and compared for social and seasonal effects on the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system. GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) structures were visualized immunohistochemically; GnRH content was determined by radioimmunoassay. In both species, GnRH-ir cell bodies and processes are loosely distributed along the septopreopticoinfundibular continuum, with dense fiber aggregations in the region of the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median eminence. The two species differ in the rostrocaudal distribution of their GnRH-ir cell bodies. In highveld mole-rats, most of these cells are in the septal/preoptic area; in common mole-rats, more than half of them are in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Compared with common mole-rats, highveld mole-rats have a greater total number of GnRH-ir cell bodies, higher GnRH content, and more intense GnRH immunoreactivity in the median eminence. Within highveld colonies, the nonreproductive females have larger GnRH-ir cell bodies, more intense GnRH immunoreactivity in the median eminence, and higher GnRH content than the reproductive females; these findings suggest inhibited release of GnRH in the nonreproductive, subordinate females. In contrast, in common mole-rat females, neither status nor season appears to affect the investigated parameters of the GnRH system; this suggests a predominantly behavioral basis to their suppressed reproduction.

  7. Species-specific differences in peroxisome proliferation, catalase, and SOD2 upregulation as well as toxicity in human, mouse, and rat hepatoma cells induced by the explosive and environmental pollutant 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Ekaterina Anatolevna; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-03-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been widely used as an explosive substance and its toxicity is still of interest as it persisted in polluted areas. TNT is metabolized in hepatocytes which are prone to its toxicity. Since analysis of the human liver or hepatocytes is restricted due to ethical reasons, we investigated the effects of TNT on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, peroxisome proliferation, and antioxidative enzymes in human (HepG2), mouse (Hepa 1-6), and rat (H4IIEC3) hepatoma cell lines. Under control conditions, hepatoma cells of all three species were highly comparable exhibiting identical proliferation rates and distribution of their cell cycle phases. However, we found strong differences in TNT toxicity with the lowest IC50 values (highest cell death rate) for rat cells, whereas human and mouse cells were three to sevenfold less sensitive. Moreover, a strong decrease in cellular dehydrogenase activity (MTT assay) and increased ROS levels were noted. TNT caused peroxisome proliferation with rat hepatoma cells being most responsive followed by those from mouse and human. Under control conditions, rat cells contained fivefold higher peroxisomal catalase and mitochondrial SOD2 activities and a twofold higher capacity to reduce MTT than human and mouse cells. TNT treatment caused an increase in catalase and SOD2 mRNA and protein levels in human and mouse, but not in rat cells. Similarly, human and mouse cells upregulated SOD2 activity, whereas rat cells failed therein. We conclude that TNT induced oxidative stress, peroxisome proliferation and mitochondrial damage which are highest in rat cells rendering them most susceptible toward TNT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 989-1006, 2017.

  8. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINATION OF KANGAROO MOTHER CARE METHOD AND LULLABY MUSIC THERAPY ON VITAL SIGN CHANGE IN INFANTS WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuuva Yusuf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo mother care (KMC and lullaby music methods have been considered as the alternative treatment for vital sign changes in low birth weight infants. However, little is known about the combination of the two methods. Objective: To identify effectiveness of combinations of Kangaroo mother care and Lullaby music methods on changes in vital signs in low birth weight infants. Methods: A quasi experiment with non-equivalent control group design. This study was conducted on October– December 2016 at the General Hospital of Ambarawa and General Hospital of Ungaran, Semarang. There were 36 samples selected using consecutive sampling divided into three groups, namely: 1 a group of LBW infants with the combination of KMC and lullaby music, 2 a LBW infant group with the lullaby music intervention, and 3 a control group given standard care in LBW infants by KMC method. Paired t-test and MANOVA test were used to analyzed the data. Results: Findings revealed that there were significant differences between the combination group, lullaby music group, and control group in temperature (p=0.003, pulse (p=0.001, respiration (p=0.001, and oxygen saturation (p=0.014 with significant value of <0.05, which indicated that there was a statistically significant difference in vital sign changes among the three groups. Conclusion: The combination of KMC method and Lullaby music intervention was effective on vital sign changes (temperature, pulse, respiration, and oxygen saturation compared with the lullaby music group alone and control group with KMC method in low birth weight infants. It is suggested that the combination of KMC and Lullaby music methods can be used as an alternative to improve LBW care for mothers in the NICU and at home and to reach the stability of the baby's vital signs.

  9. Novel antioxidative nanotherapeutics in a rat periodontitis model: Reactive oxygen species scavenging by redox injectable gel suppresses alveolar bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Makiko; Kaneko, Junya; Sato, Takenori; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in a variety of disorders, but to date, ROS scavengers have not been widely used for local treatment of inflammation, because they are rapidly eliminated from the inflamed site. We have designed a novel redox injectable gel (RIG) that is formed at 37 °C after disintegration of nano-assembled flower micelles allowing nitroxide radicals to act locally as specific ROS scavengers for the treatment of periodontitis. In the present study, we have confirmed retention of the RIG in the periodontal region, along with its antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory effects, and we have subsequently evaluated the inhibitory effect of the RIG against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)-induced alveolar bone loss attributed to ROS. Alveolar bone loss was estimated by morphometry, gingival blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry, and osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The results show that the RIG can inhibit P. gingivalis-induced bone loss by antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory actions, and this suggests that the RIG is a promising novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis.

  10. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Yong; Huang, Ren-qiang; Gu, Jin-mao; Dong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH. PMID:28053989

  11. Acute exposure to 930 MHz CW electromagnetic radiation in vitro affects reactive oxygen species level in rat lymphocytes treated by iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmyślony, Marek; Politanski, Piotr; Rajkowska, Elzbieta; Szymczak, Wieslaw; Jajte, Jolanta

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the 930 MHz continuous wave (CW) electromagnetic field, which is the carrier of signals emitted by cellular phones, affects the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in living cells. Rat lymphocytes were used in the experiments. A portion of the lymphocytes was treated with iron ions to induce oxidative processes. Exposures to electromagnetic radiation (power density 5 W/m2, theoretical calculated SAR = 1.5 W/kg) were performed within a GTEM cell. Intracellular ROS were measured by the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF-DA). The results show that acute (5 and 15 min) exposure does not affect the number of produced ROS. If, however, FeCl2 with final concentration 10 microg/ml was added to the lymphocyte suspensions to stimulate ROS production, after both durations of exposure, the magnitude of fluorescence (ROS level during the experiment) was significantly greater in the exposed lymphocytes. The character of the changes in the number of free radicals observed in our experiments was qualitatively compatible with the theoretical prediction from the model of electromagnetic radiation effect on radical pairs.

  12. Sensitization by pulmonary reactive oxygen species of rat vagal lung C-fibers: the roles of the TRPV1, TRPA1, and P2X receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ruan

    Full Text Available Sensitization of vagal lung C-fibers (VLCFs induced by mediators contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hypersensitivity, which is characterized by exaggerated sensory and reflex responses to stimulants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are mediators produced during airway inflammation. However, the role of ROS in VLCF-mediated airway hypersensitivity has remained elusive. Here, we report that inhalation of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated apneic responses to intravenous capsaicin (a TRPV1 receptor agonist, α,β-methylene-ATP (a P2X receptor agonist, and phenylbiguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist in anesthetized rats. The apneic responses to these three stimulants were abolished by vagatomy or by perivagal capsaicin treatment, a procedure that blocks the neural conduction of VLCFs. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to these VLCF stimulants was prevented by catalase (an enzyme that degrades H2O2 and by dimethylthiourea (a hydroxyl radical scavenger. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to capsaicin was attenuated by HC-030031 (a TRPA1 receptor antagonist and by iso-pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',5'-disulphonate (a P2X receptor antagonist. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to α,β-methylene-ATP was reduced by capsazepine (a TRPV1 receptor antagonist, and by HC-030031. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to phenylbiguanide was totally abolished when all three antagonists were combined. Consistently, our electrophysiological studies revealed that airway delivery of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated the VLCF responses to intravenous capsaicin, α,β-methylene-ATP, and phenylbiguanide. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the VLCF responses to phenylbiguanide was totally prevented when all antagonists were combined. Inhalation of 0.05% H2O2 indeed increased the level of ROS in the lungs. These results suggest that 1 increased lung ROS sensitizes

  13. Normal luminal bacteria, especially Bacteroides species, mediate chronic colitis, gastritis, and arthritis in HLA-B27/human beta2 microglobulin transgenic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, H. C.; Herfarth, H H; Ikeda, J S; Grenther, W B; Hamm, T. E.; Balish, E.; Taurog, J D; Hammer, R. E.; Wilson, K. H.; Sartor, R B

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental chronic intestinal inflammation. We investigated the influence of normal luminal bacteria and several groups of selected bacterial strains on spontaneous gastrointestinal and systemic inflammation in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Rats maintained germfree for 3-9 mo were compared with littermates conventionalized with specific pathogen-free bacteria. Subsequently, germfree transgenic rats were colonized...

  14. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Indoxyl sulfate potentiates endothelial dysfunction via reciprocal role for reactive oxygen species and RhoA/ROCK signaling in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shuang; Mao, Xiaodong; Guo, Hengjiang; Wang, Li; Li, Zezheng; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yunman; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2017-03-13

    Accumulative indoxyl sulfate (IS) retained in chronic kidney disease (CKD) can potentiate vascular endothelial dysfunction, and herein, we aim at elucidating the underlying mechanisms from the perspective of possible association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RhoA/ROCK pathway. IS-treated nephrectomized rats are administered with antioxidants including NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, SOD analog tempol, and mitochondrion-targeted SOD mimetic mito-TEMPO to scavenge ROS, or ROCK inhibitor fasudil to obstruct RhoA/ROCK pathway. First, we find in response to IS stimulation, antioxidants treatments suppress increased aortic ROCK activity and expression levels. Additionally, ROCK blockade prevent IS-induced increased NADPH oxidase expression (mainly p22phox and p47phox), mitochondrial and intracellular ROS (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide) generation, and decreased Cu/Zn-SOD expression in thoracic aortas. Apocynin, mito-TEMPO, and tempol also reverse these markers of oxidative stress. These results suggest that IS induces excessive ROS production and ROCK activation involving a circuitous relationship in which ROS activate ROCK and ROCK promotes ROS overproduction. Finally, ROS and ROCK depletion attenuate IS-induced decrease in nitric oxide (NO) production and eNOS expression levels, and alleviate impaired vasomotor responses including increased vasocontraction to phenylephrine and decreased vasorelaxation to acetylcholine, thereby preventing cardiovascular complications accompanied by CKD. Taken together, excessive ROS derived from NADPH oxidase and mitochondria coordinate with RhoA/ROCK activation in a form of positive reciprocal relationship to induce endothelial dysfunction through disturbing endothelium-dependent NO signaling upon IS stimulation in CKD status.

  16. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  17. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activities in a chemiluminescence model and neuroprotection in rat pheochromocytoma cells by astaxanthin, beta-carotene, and canthaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Sen; Chang, Chia-Lin; Lai, Guia-Hung

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine chemiluminescence (CL) antioxidant activities and neuroprotective effects of astaxanthin, beta-carotene (β-carotene), and canthaxanthin on undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We performed three CL antioxidant assays, and the three carotenoids showed varying degrees of antioxidant activity, with astaxanthin exhibiting the highest antioxidant activity than the other two samples. Results of a pyrogallol-luminol assay revealed β-carotene to have higher antioxidant activity than canthaxanthin, whereas cupric sulfate-Phen-Vc-hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) assay showed canthaxanthin to have higher antioxidant activity than β-carotene. Luminol-H₂O₂ assay showed the antioxidant activity series as canthaxanthin > β-carotene at 62.5-1000 μg/mL and β-carotene > canthaxanthin at 1000-4000 μg/mL. Astaxanthin exhibited partial neuroprotective activity against H₂O₂ and the strongest neuroprotective activity against amyloid beta-peptide(25-35) [(Aβ)(25-35)]-induced undifferentiated PC12 cell deaths at 0.5-5.0 μM. Canthaxanthin showed partial neuroprotective activity in Aβ(25-35)-induced undifferentiated PC12 cell deaths at 1.0-5.0 μM. Astaxanthin protected undifferentiated PC12 cells from the damaging effects of H₂O₂ and Aβ(25-35) by the following ways: (1) scavenging superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals, and H₂O₂; (2) securing cell viability; (3) suppressing the production of reactive oxygen species; and (4) eliminating calcium ion influx. Our results conclusively show that astaxanthin has the merit as a potential neuron protectant.

  18. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase-2-activity by nitric oxide-derived species in rat chondrocyte: lack of contribution to loss of cartilage anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, E; Abid, A; Cipolletta, C; Presle, N; Terlain, B; Netter, P; Jouzeau, J

    2001-04-15

    Cross-talk between inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was investigated in rat chondrocytes. In monolayers, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced COX-2 and NOS II expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, to produce high prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) levels in an apparently coordinated fashion. COX-2 mRNA was induced earlier (30 min. versus 4 hr) and less markedly (4-fold versus 12-fold at 24 hr) than NOS II, and was poorly affected by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX). IL-1beta did not stabilize COX-2 mRNA in contrast to CHX. Indomethacin and NS-398 lacked any effect on NO(2)(-) levels whereas L-NMMA and SMT reduced PGE(2) levels at concentration inhibiting NO(2)(-) production from 50 to 90%, even when added at a time allowing a complete expression of both enzymes (8 hr). Basal COX activity was unaffected by NO donors. The SOD mimetic, CuDips inhibited COX-2 activity by more than 75% whereas catalase did not. Inhibition of COX-2 by CuDips was not sensitive to catalase, consistent with a superoxide-mediated effect. In tridimensional culture, IL-1beta inhibited radiolabelled sodium sulphate incorporation while stimulating COX-2 and NOS II activities. Cartilage injury was corrected by L-NMMA or CuDips but not by NSAIDs, consistent with a peroxynitrite-mediated effect. These results show that in chondrocytes: (i) COX2 and NOS II genes are induced sequentially and distinctly by IL-1beta; (ii) COX-1 and COX-2 activity are affected differently by NO-derived species; (iii) peroxynitrite accounts likely for stimulation of COX-2 activity and inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis induced by IL-1beta.

  19. 袋鼠式护理对足月新生儿疼痛的护理效果%Kangaroo Care for Nursing Effect of Neonatal Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游李平

    2013-01-01

      目的:探究袋鼠式护理对足月新生儿疼痛的护理效果及其临床意义。方法:将本院2012年10月-2013年2月内足月出生的58例新生儿随机平均分为两组,各29例。研究组采用袋鼠式护理,对照组采用常规护理,比较两组新生儿疼痛程度、心率和血氧饱和度方面的差异。结果:在疼痛程度和心率方面,研究组明显低于对照组比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);在血氧饱和度方面,研究组明显高于对照组,比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:袋鼠式护理对比较于足月新生儿疼痛的护理效果显著,能够有效降低足月新生儿的疼痛感,对于新生儿的心理和生理均有良好的促进作用。%Objective:To explore the kangaroo care for nursing effect of neonatal pain and its clinical significance. Method:In our hospital from 2012 October to 2013 February 58 cases of newborn infants born at term were randomly divided into two groups,each of 29 cases. Study group received kangaroo care,and the control group received routine nursing care.To compare the differences in neonatal pain,heart rate and blood oxygen saturation between the two groups. Result:The degree of pain and heart rate of the study group was significantly lower than that of the control group,the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05);in the blood oxygen saturation of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group,with statistically significant differences(P<0.05). Conclusion:Kangaroo care for nursing effect of neonatal pain significantly,can effectively reduce the full-term newborn pain,to promote the role of newborn’s psychological and physical have good. As a kind of high quality nursing methods,get recognition and promotion in clinic.

  20. Dose-dependent effects of cisplatin on the severity of testicular injury in Sprague Dawley rats: reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni KK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kiran Kumar Soni,1 Hye Kyung Kim,2 Bo Ram Choi,1 Keshab Kumar Karna,1 Jae Hyung You,1 Jai Seong Cha,1 Yu Seob Shin,1 Sung Won Lee,3 Chul Young Kim,4 Jong Kwan Park1 1Department of Urology, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University Medical School – Biomedical Research and Institute and Clinical Trial Center for Medical Devices, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, 2College of Pharmacy, Kyungsung University, Busan, 3Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University Medical School, Seoul, 4College of Pharmacy, Hanyang University, Ansan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Cisplatin (CIS is used in the treatment of cancer, but its nonspecific systemic actions lead to toxic effects on other parts of the body. This study investigated the severity of CIS toxicity by increasing its dose over a constant time period. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five treatment groups and control group with CIS (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally for 5 days. The body and organs were weighed, epididymal sperm was counted, and sperm motility and sperm apoptosis were evaluated. Blood samples were evaluated for complete blood count, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, malondialdehyde levels, and total testosterone. The testicular tissue was examined for steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and endoplasmic reticulum stress protein. Epididymal sperm was collected for CatSper Western blot. The toxic effects of different doses of CIS on the testis and kidney were compared histologically. The weights of body, testis, epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicle, and kidney; sperm count; sperm motility; steroidogenic acute regulatory protein level; and epididymal sperm count were significantly lower in the CIS-treated groups than in the control group. In contrast, sperm apoptosis, plasma reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and malondialdehyde, testosterone, red blood cell

  1. Effect of kangaroo mother care on growth and development of low birthweight babies up to 12 months of age: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Alpanamayi; Ghosh, Jagabandhu; Singh, Arun K; Hazra, Avijit; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Mukherjee, Ranajit

    2014-06-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a nonconventional low-cost method of newborn care. Our aim was to assess the effect of sustained KMC on the growth and development of low birthweight Indian babies up to the age of 12 months. We enrolled 500 mother and baby pairs, in groups of five, in a parallel group controlled clinical trial. The three infants with the lowest birthweight in each group received KMC, while the other two received conventional care. All babies were exclusively breastfed for 6 months. Babies in the intervention group were provided KMC until the infant was 40 weeks of corrected gestation or weighed 2500 g. Weight, length and head, chest and arm circumferences were evaluated at birth and at the corrected ages of 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Development was assessed using the Developmental Assessment Scales for Indian Infants (DASII) at 12 months. The KMC babies rapidly achieved physical growth parameters similar to the control babies at 40 weeks of corrected age. But after that, they surpassed them, despite being smaller at birth. DASII motor and mental development quotients were also significantly better for KMC babies. The infants in the KMC group showed better physical growth and development than the conventional control group. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The impact of the method Kangaroo Mother Care in the learning process of low-birth-weight preterm infants: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Paiva Franco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technology advances and scientific studies in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU have contributed significantly to reduce mortality and morbidity of at-risk newborns (NB. However, they are more likely to present neurological and/or developmental psychomotor delay with neurological and sensory alterations. Therefore, proposals for neonatal intervention were developed with the aim of protecting the baby and offering appropriate incentives to minimize the effects of hospital intervention. To this end, programs of protective measures such as the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC were developed. Given the relevance of the issue described, this systematic review critically appraises articles from the national and international literature, published in recent years (from 2000 to 2011, that describe whether the KMC can be a protective factor for the development of writing in premature infants. The textual search was conducted using the Virtual Health Library (VHL, a website that covers publications worldwide, allowing access to articles from health science, including LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and SciELO, as database. The findings revealed that infants who participated in the KMC program showed improvements in their development and that factors such as low-birth-weight prematurity and learning disorders have close relationship with the onset of motor impairments and changes in psychomotor development. The findings showed no articles describing the KMC as a protective factor for the incidence of dysgraphia. Thus, we emphasize the importance of conducting further studies on these topics.

  3. Comparative Effect of Massage Therapy versus Kangaroo Mother Care on Body Weight and Length of Hospital Stay in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Singh Rangey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Massage therapy (MT and kangaroo mother care (KMC are both effective in increasing the weight and reducing length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm infants but they have not been compared. Aim. Comparison of effectiveness of MT and KMC on body weight and length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm (LBWPT infants. Method. 30 LBWPT infants using convenience sampling from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, V.S. hospital, were randomly divided into 2 equal groups. Group 1 received MT and Group 2 received KMC for 15 minutes, thrice daily for 5 days. Medically stable babies with gestational age < 37 weeks and birth weight < 2500 g were included. Those on ventilators and with congenital, orthopedic, or genetic abnormality were excluded. Outcome measures, body weight and length of hospital stay, were taken before intervention day 1 and after intervention day 5. Level of significance was 5%. Result. Data was analyzed using SPSS16. Both MT and KMC were found to be effective in improving body weight (P = 0.001, P = 0.001. Both were found to be equally effective for improving body weight (P = 0.328 and reducing length of hospital stay (P = 0.868. Conclusion. MT and KMC were found to be equally effective in improving body weight and reducing length of hospital stay. Limitation. Long term follow-up was not taken.

  4. 不同属种肉类对大鼠血清生化指标与抗氧化能力的影响%Effects of different species meats on serum biochemical parameters and antioxidant status in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓宇; 高峰; 周光宏

    2011-01-01

    探讨了不同属种肉类对大鼠血清生化指标和抗氧化机能的影响.试验选取体重约177 g的雄性SD大鼠90只,随机分为3组即狗肉组、羊肉组、鸭肉组,分别将日粮中的主要蛋白源替换为狗肉、羊肉、鸭肉(CP 31%).试验期为4周.结果表明:饲喂狗肉和羊肉能显著提高大鼠生长性能,且前者使得大鼠血清碱性磷酸酶(ALP)活性极显著升高(P<0.01);而饲喂鸭肉使得大鼠血清丙氨酸转移酶(ALT)活性显著升高(P<0.05),天冬氨酸转移酶(AST)、血清尿素氮(BUN)活性极显著升高(P<0.01).不同属种的肉之间,鸭肉组肝脏和肾脏中谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GSH-Px)活性均极显著升高(P<0.01).结果提示:饲喂狗肉和羊肉能促进机体蛋白质合成,有利于蛋白质沉积;饲喂鸭肉则具有增强机体抗氧化的能力.%The experiment was conducted to study the effect of different species meats on serum biochemical parameters and antioxidant status in rats. A total of 90 male SD rats with body weight of about 177 g were divided into dog meat group, mutton group and duck meat group in a randomized complete block design, and these three groups were respectively replaced the main dietary protein source with dog meat. mutton, duck meat ( CP% : 31%). The experimental stage was 4 weeks. The results were shown as follows : the growth performance of rats was markedly enhanced by feeding dog meat and mutton, and the activity of alkaline phosphatase ( ALP) of rats in dog meat group was enhanced significandy ( P<0. 01). But with the rats in duck meat group, the activity of alanine aminotransferase ( ALT) was increased significantly (P<0. 05) . the activity of aspartate aminotransferase ( AST) and serum urea nitrogen ( BUN) was enhanced significantly (P<0. 01). Among the groups of different species meats, the activity of glutathione peroxidase ( GSH) in liver and kidney of rats in duck meat group was significantly higher ( P<0. 01). The

  5. Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    distinguished: Pinyon juniper, Mesa grassland, Black grama grasslands, Whitethorn acacia , Creosotebush, Sandsage, and Mes- quite (Pidgeon 2000). However, a GIS...Granivory Insects Rodents kangaroo rats Ants IV.5. Digging Rodents kangaroo rats Lagomorphs IV.6. Extreme events Drought

  6. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Quantitation of species differences in albumin–ligand interactions for bovine, human and rat serum albumins using fluorescence spectroscopy: A test case with some Sudlow's site I ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poór, Miklós [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Li, Yin; Matisz, Gergely [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kiss, László [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kunsági-Máté, Sándor [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kőszegi, Tamás, E-mail: koszegit@freemail.hu [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary)

    2014-01-15

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein is an approximately 67 kDa sized water-soluble macromolecule. Since several drugs and xenobiotics circulate in the blood at least partially in albumin-bound form, albumin plays a key role in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of these chemicals. Most of the drugs and xenobiotics are Sudlow's site I ligands. In numerous studies, bovine serum albumin (BSA) is used for modeling albumin–ligand interactions and the results are extrapolated to human serum albumin (HSA). Furthermore, only limited information is available related to albumin–ligand interactions of different albumin species. Therefore, in our study, we have focused on the quantification of differences between bovine, human and rat serum albumin (RSA) using four Sudlow's site I ligands (luteolin, ochratoxin A, phenylbutazone and warfarin). Interactions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability constants as well as competing capacities of the ligands were determined, and thermodynamic study was also performed. Our results highlight that there could be major differences between BSA, HSA and RSA in their ligand binding properties. Based on our observations we emphasize that in molecular aspects BSA behaves considerably differently from HSA or from albumins of other species therefore, it is strongly recommended to apply at least some confirmatory measurements when data obtained from other species are attempted to be extrapolated to HSA. -- Highlights: • Albumin–ligand interactions of human, bovine and rat albumins were studied. • Four Sudlow's site I ligands were tested by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Substantial differences were found in stability constants among albumin complexes. • Competing capacity of ligands showed major differences in the studied species. • Data obtained for BSA cannot be directly extrapolated to human albumin.

  8. Influence of sex hormones on relative quantities of multiple species of cytochrome P-450 in rat liver microsomes. A possible answer to the sexual differences in metabolic activities of rat liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, S.; Peisach, J. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA)); Chevion, M. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Cellular Biochemistry; Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Hadassah Medical School)

    1981-01-01

    EPR spectra of rat liver microsomes from male, female and hormonally-treated castrated hepatectomized rats were studied. The spectra, especially in the region of gsub(max) suggested a heterogeneity of local environments of the low spin ferric heme indicative of multiple structures for cytochrome P-450. Certain features in the spectrum correlated with sexual differences. It is suggested that the changes in the relative amplitudes of the EPR features represent differences in the relative abundance of the individual proteins in the mixture that, in turn, are related to the sexual differences of metabolic patterns for reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P-450.

  9. Trial gain of weight and hospital length stay of the low birth weight preterm infant in assistance for kangaroo mother care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aparecida Giacomini Rodrigues

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate if the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC interferes in the gain of weight and in the hospital length stay of the low birth weight preterm newborn (LWBPTN. For this, it was realized an analytic retrospective study, through the evaluation of the medical records of 60 LWBPTN with born weight less than 2000 g that received assistance by KMC, for a period of 2 hours per day and, 60 LWBPTN that received assistance by the Traditional Method of Care (TMC, admitted in the unity of neonatal intensive care and unity of premature of a private maternity in the city of Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil, comparing the gain of weight and the hospital length stay. We did not find differences statistically significant in relation to the gain of weight of the LWBPTN assisted by KMC, in relation to LWBPTN assisted by the TMC, 15,8 and 14,9 g/per day, respectively. In relation to the time of admission, we also did not find differences statistically significant, 27,3 and 26,2 days, for the LWBPTN in the KMC and TMC, respectively, although in the stratification of the sample, the LBWPTN with pregnancy age < 30 weeks or birth weight < 1500 g left the hospital 3 days earlier in the KMC. It was concluded that the KMC, in the conditions of this study, it seems not to interfere significatively in the gain of weight and in the time of admission of LWBPTN. We emphasize that the utilization of KMC in the assistance to the LWBPTN of low weight is a viable model, even for the private health institution.

  10. Kangaroo mother method: randomised controlled trial of an alternative method of care for stabilised low-birthweight infants. Maternidad Isidro Ayora Study Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, N L; Camacho, L W; Rojas, E P; Stern, C

    1994-09-17

    Because resources for care of low-birthweight (LBW) infants in developing countries are scarce, the Kangaroo mother method (KMM) was developed. The infant is kept upright in skin-to-skin contact with the mother's breast. Previous studies reported several benefits with the KMM but interpretation of their findings is limited by small size and design weaknesses. We have done a longitudinal, randomised, controlled trial at the Isidro Ayora Maternity Hospital in Quito, Ecuador. Infants with LBW (< 2000 g) who satisfied out-of-risk criteria of tolerance of food and weight stabilisation were randomly assigned to KMM and control (standard incubator care) groups (n = 128 and 147, respectively). During 6 months of follow-up the KMM group had a significantly lower rate than the control group of serious illness (lower-respiratory-tract disorders, apnoea, aspiration, pneumonia, septicaemia, general infections; 7 [5%] vs 27 [18%], p < 0.002), although differences between the groups in less severe morbidity were not significant. There was no significant difference in growth or in the proportion of women breastfeeding, perhaps because the proportion breastfeeding was high in both groups owing to strong promotion. Mortality was the same in both groups; most deaths occurred during the stabilisation period before randomisation. KMM mothers made more unscheduled clinic visits than control mothers but their infants had fewer re-admissions and so the cost of care was lower with the KMM. Since the eligibility criteria excluded nearly 50% of LBW infants from the study, the KMM is not universally applicable to these infants. The benefits might be greater in populations where breastfeeding is not so common.

  11. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections.

  12. Glucuronidation of deoxynivalenol (DON) by different animal species: identification of iso-DON glucuronides and iso-deepoxy-DON glucuronides as novel DON metabolites in pigs, rats, mice, and cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi E; Hametner, Christian; Nagl, Veronika; Fiby, Iris; Macheiner, Lukas; Winkler, Janine; Dänicke, Sven; Clark, Erica; Pestka, James J; Berthiller, Franz

    2017-06-21

    The Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a frequent contaminant of cereal-based food and feed. Mammals metabolize DON by conjugation to glucuronic acid (GlcAc), the extent and regioselectivity of which is species-dependent. So far, only DON-3-glucuronide (DON-3-GlcAc) and DON-15-GlcAc have been unequivocally identified as mammalian DON glucuronides, and DON-7-GlcAc has been proposed as further DON metabolite. In the present work, qualitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis of urine samples of animals treated with DON (rats: 2 mg/kg bw, single bolus, gavage; mice: 1 mg/kg bw, single i.p. injection; pigs: 74 µg/kg bw, single bolus, gavage; cows: 5.2 mg DON/kg dry mass, oral for 13 weeks) revealed additional DON and deepoxy-DON (DOM) glucuronides. To elucidate their structures, DON and DOM were incubated with human (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM). Besides the expected DON/DOM-3- and 15-GlcAc, minor amounts of four DON- and four DOM glucuronides were formed. Isolation and enzymatic hydrolysis of four of these compounds yielded iso-DON and iso-DOM, the identities of which were eventually confirmed by NMR. Incubation of iso-DON and iso-DOM with RLM and HLM yielded two main glucuronides for each parent compound, which were isolated and identified as iso-DON/DOM-3-GlcAc and iso-DON/DOM-8-GlcAc by NMR. Iso-DON-3-GlcAc, most likely misidentified as DON-7-GlcAc in the literature, proved to be a major DON metabolite in rats and a minor metabolite in pigs. In addition, iso-DON-8-GlcAc turned out to be one of the major DON metabolites in mice. DOM-3-GlcAc was the dominant DON metabolite in urine of cows and an important DON metabolite in rat urine. Iso-DOM-3-GlcAc was detected in urine of DON-treated rats and cows. Finally, DON-8,15-hemiketal-8-glucuronide, a previously described by-product of DON-3-GlcAc production by RLM, was identified in urine of DON-exposed mice and rats. The discovery of several novel DON-derived glucuronides in animal urine requires adaptation of

  13. Specific Paucity of Unmyelinated C-Fibers in Cutaneous Peripheral Nerves of the African Naked-Mole Rat: Comparative Analysis Using Six Species of Bathyergidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ewan S; Purfürst, Bettina; Grigoryan, Tamara; Park, Thomas J; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian peripheral nerves, unmyelinated C-fibers usually outnumber myelinated A-fibers. By using transmission electron microscopy, we recently showed that the saphenous nerve of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) has a C-fiber deficit manifested as a substantially lower C:A-fiber ratio compared with other mammals. Here we determined the uniqueness of this C-fiber deficit by performing a quantitative anatomical analysis of several peripheral nerves in five further members of the Bathyergidae mole-rat family: silvery (Heliophobius argenteocinereus), giant (Fukomys mechowii), Damaraland (Fukomys damarensis), Mashona (Fukomys darlingi), and Natal (Cryptomys hottentotus natalensis) mole-rats. In the largely cutaneous saphenous and sural nerves, the naked mole-rat had the lowest C:A-fiber ratio (∼1.5:1 compared with ∼3:1), whereas, in nerves innervating both skin and muscle (common peroneal and tibial) or just muscle (lateral/medial gastrocnemius), this pattern was mostly absent. We asked whether lack of hair follicles alone accounts for the C-fiber paucity by using as a model a mouse that loses virtually all its hair as a consequence of conditional deletion of the β-catenin gene in the skin. These β-catenin loss-of function mice (β-cat LOF mice) displayed only a mild decrease in C:A-fiber ratio compared with wild-type mice (4.42 compared with 3.81). We suggest that the selective cutaneous C-fiber deficit in the cutaneous nerves of naked mole-rats is unlikely to be due primarily to lack of skin hair follicles. Possible mechanisms contributing to this unique peripheral nerve anatomy are discussed. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:2785–2803, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22528859

  14. Differential anatomical expression of ganglioside GM1 species containing d18:1 or d20:1 sphingosine detected by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry in mature rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eWeishaupt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available GM1 ganglioside plays a role in essential neuronal processes, including differentiation, survival and signaling. Yet, little is known about GM1 species with different sphingosine bases, such as the most abundant species containing 18 carbon atoms in the sphingosine chain (GM1d18:1, and the less abundant containing 20 carbon atoms (GM1d20:1. While absent in the early fetal brain, GM1d20:1 continues to increase throughout pre- and postnatal development and into old age, raising questions about the functional relevance of the GM1d18:1 to GM1d20:1 ratio. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry is a novel technology that allows differentiation between these two GM1 species and quantification of their expression within an anatomical context. Using this technology, we find GM1d18:1/d20:1 expression ratios are highly specific to defined anatomical brain regions in adult rats. Thus, the ratio was significantly different among different thalamic nuclei and between the corpus callosum and internal capsule. Differential GM1d18:1/GM1d20:1 ratios measured in hippocampal subregions in rat brain complement previous studies conducted in mice. Across layers of the sensory cortex, opposing expression gradients were found for GM1d18:1 and GM1d20:1. Superficial layers demonstrated lower GM1d18:1 and higher GM1d20:1 signal than other layers, while in deep layers GM1d18:1 expression was relatively high and GM1d20:1 expression low. By far the highest GM1d18:1/d20:1 ratio was found in the amygdala. Differential expression of GM1 with d18:1- or d20:1-sphingosine bases in the adult rat brain suggests tight regulation of expression and points toward a distinct functional relevance for each of these GM1 species in neuronal processes.

  15. Ticks of Australia. The species that infest domestic animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Stephen C; Walker, Alan R

    2014-06-18

    The book Australian Ticks by F.H.S. Roberts (1970) is a land-mark in Australian tick biology. But it is time for a new and improved book on the ticks of Australia. The present book has identification guides and accounts of the biology and diseases associated with the 16 species of ticks that may feed on domestic animals and humans in Australia. These comprise five argasid (soft) ticks: Argas persicus (poultry tick), Argas robertsi (Robert's bird tick), Ornithodoros capensis (seabird soft tick), O. gurneyi (kangaroo soft tick), Otobius megnini (spinose ear tick); and 11 ixodid (hard) ticks, Amblyomma triguttatum (ornate kangaroo tick), Bothriocroton auruginans (wombat tick), B. hydrosauri (southern reptile tick), Haemaphysalis bancrofti (wallaby tick), H. longicornis (bush tick), Ixodes cornuatus (southern paralysis tick), I. hirsti (Hirst's marsupial tick), I. holocyclus (paralysis tick), I. tasmani (common marsupial tick), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) australis (Australian cattle tick) and R. sanguineus (brown dog tick).  We use an image-matching system to identify ticks, much like the image-matching systems used in field-guides for birds and flowers. Ticks may be identified by drawings that emphasise unique matrices of uniformly defined morphological characters that, together, allow these 16 ticks to be identified by morphology unequivocally. The species accounts have seven sections: (i) General; (ii)  Differential diagnosis; (iii) Hosts; (iv) Life-cycle and seasonality; (v) Disease; (vi) Habitat and geographic distribution; (vii) Genes and genomes; and (viii) Other information. There are 71 figures and tables, including a glossary character matrices, drawings of life-cycles, drawings of genera, species, and colour photographs of tick biology.

  16. Further characterisation of two Eimeria species (Eimeria quokka and Eimeria setonicis) in quokkas (Setonix brachyurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, J M; Friend, J A; Yang, R; Ryan, U M

    2014-03-01

    The identification and characterisation of novel Eimeria species has largely been based on sporulated oocyst and sporocyst morphology, the host species and the geographical range. Variation in the size and shape of Eimeria oocysts across their host range however, make the identification and characterisation of novel species using traditional methodologies alone problematic. The use of molecular markers and phylogenetic analysis has greatly advanced our ability to characterise Eimeria species and has recently been applied to understand evolutionary relationships among Eimeria species from Australian marsupials. In the present study, Eimeria species isolated from quokkas (Setonix brachyurus) captured from Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island, Western Australia, were morphologically identified as Eimeria quokka and Eimeria setonicis. Both Eimeria species were identified as being polymorphic in nature with regards to sporulated oocyst and sporocyst morphometrics. Phylogenetic analysis using 18S rRNA and COI (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) genes, grouped E. quokka and E. setonicis within the Eimeria marsupial clade together with Eimeria trichosuri from brushtail possums, Eimeria macropodis from tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) and several unidentified macropod Eimeria species from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus). This study is the first to characterise E. quokka and E. setonicis by molecular analysis, enabling more extensive resolution of evolutionary relationships among marsupial-derived Eimeria species.

  17. Efeitos do Método Mãe Canguru nos sinais vitais de recém-nascidos pré-termo de baixo peso Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on the vital signs of low-weight preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Almeida

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as freqüências cardíaca e respiratória, a pressão arterial média, a temperatura e a saturação periférica de oxigênio dos recém-nascidos pré-termo (RNPT de baixo peso, antes e após a aplicação do MMC. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 22 RNPT de baixo peso, saudáveis, de ambos os sexos, não portadores de deficiências neurológicas, cardíacas e/ou respiratórias. A avaliação foi realizada após trinta minutos de permanência do RNPT em berço comum e após trinta minutos de aplicação do MMC, por 3 dias consecutivos. Para a avaliação, foram utilizados monitor cardíaco com dispositivo para medida da pressão arterial média de forma não invasiva e sensor para a oximetria de pulso, termômetro e cronômetro. RESULTADOS: Os resultados não mostraram alterações significativas quanto à pressão arterial média (p> 0,05 e freqüência cardíaca (p> 0,05 após a aplicação do MMC, mas, por outro lado, houve aumento significativo da temperatura axilar (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the heart and respiration rates, mean arterial pressure, temperature and peripheral oxygen saturation of low-weight preterm newborns, before and after the application of kangaroo mother care. METHOD: Twenty-two healthy low-weight preterm newborns of both sexes were studied. None of them had neurological, cardiac and/or respiratory deficiencies. Assessments were made after the newborn had been left in an ordinary cot for 30 minutes and after 30 minutes of kangaroo mother care, on three consecutive days. For these evaluations, a heart monitor with a device for non-invasively measuring mean arterial pressure, a sensor for pulse oximetry, a thermometer and a chronometer were utilized. RESULTS: There were no significant changes in mean arterial pressure (p> 0.05 or heart rate (p> 0.05 after applying kangaroo mother care. However, there were significant increases in axillary temperature (p< 0.05 and peripheral oxygen

  18. Comparative study of two types of herbal capsules with different Epimedium species for the prevention of ovariectomised-induced osteoporosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Hui Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The significance of the current preclinical experimental study was that these two Epimedium species used for formulating XLGB capsules were equally effective for the prevention of oestrogen-depletion induced osteoporosis.

  19. CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE METABOLITES USING RAT AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCHLORHYNCHUS MYKISS) HEPATIC MICROSOMES AND PURIFIED HUMAN CYP 3A4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological risk assessment frequently relies on cross-species extrapolation to predict acute toxicity from chemical exposures. A major concern for environmental risk characterization is the degree of uncertainty in assessing xenobiotic biotansformation processes. Although inheren...

  20. Worsening of memory deficit induced by energy-dense diet in a rat model of early-Alzheimer's disease is associated to neurotoxic Aβ species and independent of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Galeano, Pablo; Wallinger, Marina L; Quijano, Celia; Rabossi, Alejandro; Pagano, Eleonora S; Olivar, Natividad; Reyes Toso, Carlos; Cardinali, Daniel; Brusco, Luis I; Do Carmo, Sonia; Radi, Rafael; Gevorkian, Goar; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2017-03-01

    Diet is a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms linking alterations in peripheral metabolism and cognition remain unclear. Since it is especially difficult to study long-term effects of high-energy diet in individuals at risk for AD, we addressed this question by using the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat model (Tg(+/-)) that mimics presymptomatic AD. Wild-type and Tg(+/-) rats were exposed during 6months to a standard diet or a Western diet (WD), high in saturated fat and sugar. Results from peripheral and hippocampal biochemical analysis and in situ respirometry showed that WD induced a metabolic syndrome and decreased presynaptic bioenergetic parameters without alterations in hippocampal insulin signaling or lipid composition. Cognitive tests, ELISA multiplex, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR indicated that WD worsened cognition in Tg(+/-) rats, increased hippocampal levels of monomeric Aβ isoforms and oligomeric species, promoted deposits of N-Terminal pyroglutamate-Aβ (AβN3(pE)) in CA1 pyramidal neurons and interneurons, decreased transcript levels of genes involved in neuroprotective pathways such as Sirtuin-1 and increased nitrated proteins. Our results support the concept that in the presence of early Aβ pathology, diet-induced metabolic dysfunctions may contribute as a "second hit" to impair cognition. Noteworthy, such effect is not mediated by higher microglia activation or disruption of blood brain barrier. However, it may be attributed to increased amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein, generation of AβN3(pE) and dysregulation of pathways governed by Sirtuin-1. This evidence reinforces the implementation of prophylactic interventions in individuals at risk for AD.

  1. Species- and dose-specific pancreatic responses and progression in single- and repeat-dose studies with GI181771X: a novel cholecystokinin 1 receptor agonist in mice, rats, and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, James R; Romach, Elizabeth H; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2014-01-01

    Compound-induced pancreatic injury is a serious liability in preclinical toxicity studies. However, its relevance to humans should be cautiously evaluated because of interspecies variations. To highlight such variations, we evaluated the species- and dose-specific pancreatic responses and progression caused by GI181771X, a novel cholecystokinin 1 receptor agonist investigated by GlaxoSmithKline for the treatment of obesity. Acute (up to 2,000 mg/kg GI181771X, as single dose) and repeat-dose studies in mice and/or rats (0.25-250 mg/kg/day for 7 days to 26 weeks) showed wide-ranging morphological changes in the pancreas that were dose and duration dependent, including necrotizing pancreatitis, acinar cell hypertrophy/atrophy, zymogen degranulation, focal acinar cell hyperplasia, and interstitial inflammation. In contrast to rodents, pancreatic changes were not observed in cynomolgus monkeys given GI181771X (1-500 mg/kg/day with higher systemic exposure than rats) for up to 52 weeks. Similarly, no GI181771X treatment-associated abnormalities in pancreatic structure were noted in a 24-week clinical trial with obese patients (body mass index >30 or >27 kg/m(2)) as assessed by abdominal ultrasound or by magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanisms for interspecies variations in the pancreatic response to CCK among rodents, monkeys, and humans and their relevance to human risk are discussed.

  2. Enzyme characteristics of recombinant poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases-1 of rat and human origin mirror the correlation between cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity and species-specific life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, Sascha; Scherr, Anna-Lena; Ponath, Viviane; Popp, Oliver; Bürkle, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification, which is involved in many cellular functions, including DNA repair and maintenance of genomic stability, and has also been implicated in cellular and organismal ageing. We have previously reported that maximum poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in mononuclear blood cells is correlated with mammalian life span. Here we show that the difference between a long-lived and a short-lived species tested (i.e. man and rat) is directly mirrored by the enzymatic parameters of recombinant poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), i.e. substrate affinity and reaction velocity. In addition, we have characterized two human PARP-1 alleles and assign their activity difference to their respective initial velocity and not substrate affinity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of a rat model to evaluate the in vivo toxicity and wound healing activity of selected Combretum and Terminalia (Combretaceae) species extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoko, Peter; Picard, Jackie; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2010-10-01

    Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury and several natural products have been shown to accelerate the healing process. The present study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of the topical treatment of acetone leaf extracts of Combretum imberbe, Combretum nelsonii,Combretum albopuntactum and Terminalia sericea based on their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Four circular full-thickness skin wounds were made on the backs of eight anaesthetised Wistar rats using aseptic techniques. The treatments were administrated topically using 10% and 20% concentrations of each extract in aqueous cream in separate treatments. Indications of erythema, exudate, crust formation,swelling and ulceration were used to determine the wound healing process. All of the wounds closed completely within 17 days. Throughout the experiment, a subcutaneous probe was used to determine that the body temperature and body weight of the rats were within the normal range. C. imberbe and C. nelsonii extracts accelerated wound healing, but there was no significant difference in wound contraction using 10% and 20% concentrations of the extracts in cream. The results also showed the potential usefulness of this model to measure accelerating wound healing.The extracts could perhaps overcome defects associated with healing failure in chronic wounds and prevent secondary bacterial and fungal infections.

  4. Evaluation of Antifertility Effect and Recovery of the Seed Oil Constituents of Iranian Species of Melia Azadrach L. in Male Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parandin R; Sadeghipour HR; Haeri Rohani SA

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the fertility effects of seed extract of Melia azadarach L.treatment effects on fertility indices in male Wistar rats. Methods The seed oil extract had been prepared according to conventional methods.The rats were randomly divided into three study groups.Groups A and B received graded doses of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract oil,respectively on daily basis for 60 d.Animals in control group received 1 ml of maize oil.At the end of 60 d and 3 months treatment period,6 animals per group were randomly selected and fertility was evaluated with mating test.GSI(gonadosomatic index)sperm motility,sperm viability,ESR(epididymal sperm reserves),DSP(daily sperm production)and testosterone concentration were also assessed. Results In the first stage,a significant reduction in fertility indices especially in higher dose was observed compared with the control.During the next stage,the significant increase in fertility indices are the indication of reasonable recovery and reversibility of extract activity. Conclusion The seed oil of Melia azadarach L.Has antifertility activity,but its effects is reversible.

  5. Research on dynamics coupling for underactuated bionic kangaroo-hopping robot%欠驱动仿袋鼠跳跃机器人动力学耦合研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈朋威; 葛文杰; 李岩

    2012-01-01

    根据袋鼠的生物结构及运动特点,建立了具有欠驱动关节的仿袋鼠跳跃机器人模型.以此模型为基础,分析系统的主动关节与被动关节之间的加速度耦合效应.采用拉格朗日方方法建立了机构的动力学方程.结合实例,运用Matlab软件对机器人进行仿真分析,给出了机器人全局单关节耦合变化规律.结果表明:仿袋鼠跳跃机器人的踝关节与欠驱动关节间存在足够大的耦合并且通过动力学耦合来控制欠驱动关节的位置是可能的.动力学耦合指标对欠驱动机器人的结构设计和驱动装置位置有重要作用.%According to the biological structure and kinematic characteristics of kangaroo, we establish a model for uniped hopping mechanism of bionic kangaroo with underactuated joint.Based on this model,the dynamic coupling effects of the acceleration coupling between active joints and passive ones are an-alyzed,and dynamics equations are established with adopting lagrange method.Wuh practical example and using Matlab simulation analysis for the robot is made so that the changing rule of the global individual joint coupling are obtained.The result indicates that a large coupling between the ankle joint and underactuated joint of the hopping kangaroo robot is available, thus it is possible to control the position of the under-actuated joint via the dynamics coupling, which index plays an important role in structure design and actuator placement of underactuated robots system.

  6. 76 FR 12683 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Texas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... resembled D. ornatus based on bacular (penis bone) measurements. Measurements taken from the baculum, a bone found in the penis of some mammals, varies in shape and size by species and its characteristics are... kangaroo rat has an average total length of approximately 290 millimeters (mm) (11.4 inches (in))...

  7. The contraction induced increase in gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and hexokinase II (HKII) in primary rat skeletal muscle cells is dependent on reactive oxygen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pilegaard, Henriette; Kusuhara, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for the contraction induced increase in expression of PGC-1alpha, HKII and UCP3 mRNA. Rat skeletal muscle cells were subjected to acute or repeated electrostimulation in the presence and absence of antioxidants. Contraction of muscle cells le...

  8. Complementary DNA sequences encoding the multimammate rat MHC class II DQ α and β chains and cross-species sequence comparison in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goüy de Bellocq, J; Leirs, H

    2009-01-01

    Sequences of the complete open reading frame (ORF) for rodents major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes are rare. Multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the alpha and beta chains of MHC class II DQ gene was cloned from a rapid amplifications of c......DNA Emds (RACE) cDNA library. The ORFs consist of 801 and 771 bp encoding 266 and 256 amino acid residues for DQB and DQA, respectively. The genomic structure of Mana-DQ genes is globally analogous to that described for other rodents except for the insertion of a serine residue in the signal peptide...... of Mana-DQB, which is unique among known rodents....

  9. Candidatus Bartonella antechini: a novel Bartonella species detected in fleas and ticks from the yellow-footed antechinus (Antechinus flavipes), an Australian marsupial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; Owen, Helen; Fleming, Patricia A; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-05-05

    Bartonella are fastidious, Gram-negative, aerobic bacilli belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria group. In the last ten years, the discovery of new Bartonella species from a variety of mammalian hosts, arthropod vectors and geographical areas has increased. More than 20 species of Bartonella have been identified, of which approximately thirteen are associated with disease in humans and animals. Recently, four novel species of Bartonella were isolated from mammalian hosts in Australia: Bartonella australis from eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and Bartonella rattaustraliani, Bartonella queenslandensis and Bartonella coopersplainsensis from rodents. Bartonella-like organisms have also been detected from Ixodes tasmani ticks collected from koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). However, very little is known about Bartonella spp. in other marsupials in Australia. We report the identification of a novel Bartonella species detected from fleas (Acanthopsylla jordani) and ticks (Ixodes antechini) collected from a small carnivorous marsupial, Antechinus flavipes (Mardos or Yellow-footed antechinus) in the southwest of Western Australia. New nested-PCRs targeting the gltA gene and the ribosomal ITS region were developed as part of the present study. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA, gltA, ftsZ and rpoB genes and the ribosomal ITS region revealed that this detection is a distinct Bartonella species and is related to B. australis isolated from kangaroos. This is the first report of two different possible arthropod vectors in Australia (ticks and fleas) being infected with the same species of Bartonella. We propose the name Candidatus Bartonella antechini n. sp. for the recently characterized organism.

  10. Research progress on kangaroo mother care in nursing of preterm infants%袋鼠式护理在早产儿护理中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田莉; 丁晓华; 武玉蓉

    2011-01-01

    With the development of perinatology and neonatology,the survival rate of preterm infants was improved a lot,the preterm infants become one of the important study in nowdays.there have been many studies about nursing of preterm infants,This article summarizes research progress on kangaroo mother care in nursing of preterm infants.%随着围产医学和新生儿医学的迅速发展,早产儿的存活率得到极大提高,早产儿成为当今研究的重要内容之一.有关早产儿护理干预的研究也很多,现就袋鼠式护理在早产儿护理中的研究进展综述如下.

  11. A specific and sensitive double-immunofluorescence method for the demonstration of S-antigen and serotonin in trout and rat pinealocytes by means of primary antibodies from the same donor species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeber, S; Schomerus, C; Korf, H W

    1998-04-01

    Immunocytochemical double-labeling methods are important tools in cell and neurobiology. Here we describe a method which is based on double immunofluorescence and allows specific detection of two different antigens located in the same cell compartment by two primary antibodies raised in the same species. As an example, we present the double-immunolabeling method for the S-antigen (SAg), a photoreceptor-specific protein, and the indoleamine serotonin (5HT) in dissociated trout and rat pineal cells immobilized on coverslipped and in frozen sections of the trout pineal organ. As a first step, the preparations on the slides or coverslips were sequentially incubated with the first primary antibody (rabbit anti-SAg), the fluorescein-labeled (anti-rabbit) secondary antibody, and then with normal rabbit serum. Meanwhile, the second primary antibody (rabbit anti-5HT) was coupled to a Cy3-labeled secondary (anti-rabbit) antibody in a reaction tube and excess binding sites were quenched with normal rabbit serum. This complex was applied to the specimens after completion of the first (SAg) immunoreaction on the slide. For control experiments, the first (anti-SAg) or the second (anti-5HT) primary antibody were omitted. Most of the rat and trout pinealocytes were double immunolabeled for SAg and 5HT. In the trout, few cells contained SAg or 5HT immunoreaction only. This underlines the selectivity of each immunoreaction. The results show that the method can be used for the analysis of whole cells and tissue sections by means of conventional fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  12. Reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative stress and astrogliosis provoked by in vivo administration of phytanic acid in cerebellum of adolescent rats: A potential contributing pathomechanism of cerebellar injury in peroxisomal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, C G; Canani, C R; Fernandes, C G; Zanatta, Â; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Vargas, C R; Wajner, M

    2015-09-24

    Phytanic acid (Phyt) accumulates in various peroxisomal diseases including Refsum disease (RD) and Zellweger syndrome (ZS). Since the pathogenesis of the neurological symptoms and especially the cerebellar abnormalities in these disorders are poorly known, we investigated the effects of in vivo intracerebral administration of Phyt on a large spectrum of redox homeostasis parameters in the cerebellum of young rats. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, sulfhydryl oxidation, carbonyl content, nitrite and nitrate concentrations, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, total (tGS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and the activities of important antioxidant enzymes were determined at different periods after Phyt administration. Immunohistochemical analysis was also carried out in the cerebellum. Phyt significantly increased MDA and nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased GSH levels, without altering tGS, DCFH oxidation, sulfhydryl oxidation, carbonyl content and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Phyt caused astrogliosis and protein nitrosative damage in the cerebellum. It was also observed that the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented the increase of MDA and NO production as well as the decrease of GSH and the immunohistochemical alterations caused by Phyt, strongly suggesting that reactive nitrogen species (RNS) were involved in these effects. The present data provide in vivo solid evidence that Phyt disrupts redox homeostasis and causes astrogliosis in rat cerebellum probably mediated by RNS production. It is therefore presumed that disequilibrium of redox status may contribute at least in part to the cerebellum alterations characteristic of patients affected by RD and other disorders with Phyt accumulation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by

  13. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) stimulates PTGS2 expression and PGF2α synthesis through NFKB activation via reactive oxygen species in the corpus luteum of pseudopregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ken; Matsuoka, Aki; Kizuka, Fumie; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Maekawa, Ryo; Asada, Hiromi; Taketani, Toshiaki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2010-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate how prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) increases PGF(2α) synthesis and PTGS2 expression in the corpus luteum of pseudopregnant rats. We further investigated the molecular mechanism by which PGF(2α) stimulates PTGS2 expression. PGF(2α) (3 mg/kg) or phosphate buffer as a control was injected s.c. on day 7 of pseudopregnancy. Ptgs2 mRNA expression and PGF(2α) concentrations in the corpus luteum were measured at 2, 6, and 24 h after PGF(2α) injection. PGF(2α) significantly increased Ptgs2 mRNA expression at 2 h and luteal PGF(2α) concentrations at 24 h. PGF(2α) significantly decreased serum progesterone levels at all of the times studied. Simultaneous administration of a selective PTGS2 inhibitor (NS-398, 10 mg/kg) completely abolished the increase in luteal PGF(2α) concentrations induced by PGF(2α). PGF(2α) increased NFKB p65 protein expression in the nucleus of luteal cells 30 min after PGF(2α) injection, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that PGF(2α) increased binding activities of NFKB to the NFKB consensus sequence of the Ptgs2 gene promoter. Simultaneous administration of both superoxide dismutase and catalase to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibited the increases of nuclear NFKB p65 protein expression, lipid peroxide levels, and Ptgs2 mRNA expression induced by PGF(2α). In conclusion, PGF(2α) stimulates Ptgs2 mRNA expression and PGF(2α) synthesis through NFKB activation via ROS in the corpus luteum of pseudopregnant rats.

  14. A three-variable chaotic system for the epidemic of bubonic plague in Bombay by the end of the 19th century and its coupling to the epizootics of the two main species of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A plague epidemic broke out in Bombay by the end of the 19th century. A committee was first appointed by the Bombay City [1] in order to stop the epidemic before the rain season started. Unfortunately, the disease could not be stopped and the epidemic became endemic. After several years, another Advisory Committee [2] was appointed that tried to investigate the causes of plague in all possible directions. An impressing quantity of information was gathered during the period 1907-1911 and published. In particular, it was noticed that the epidemic was systematically preceded by epizootics of rats. For this reason, the populations of the main species of rodents were systematically monitored. This data set is revisited here by using a multivariate version of the global modeling technique [3]. The aim of this technique is to obtain a set of Ordinary Differential Equations directly from time series. Three observational time series are considered: the number of person died of bubonic plague per half month (1), and the number of captured infected black rats Mus rattus (2) and brown rats Mus decumanus (3). Several models are obtained, all based on the same algebraic basic structure. These models are, either directly chaotic, or close to chaos (chaos could easily be obtained by tuning one model parameter). The algebraic structure of the simplest model obtained is analyzed in more details. Surprisingly, it is found that the interpretation of the coupling between the three variables can be done term by term. This interpretation is in quite good coherence with the conclusions of the Advisory Committee published one hundred years ago. This structure also shows that the human action to slow down the disease during this period was obviously effective, although insufficient to stop the epidemic drastically. This result suggests that the global modeling technique can be a powerful tool to detect causal couplings in epidemiology, and, more generally, among observational variables from

  15. Effects of moderate electrical stimulation on reactive species production by primary rat skeletal muscle cells: cross talk between superoxide and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertucci, Rafael Herling; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Curi, Rui; Sweeney, Gary; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The effects of a moderate electrical stimulation on superoxide and nitric oxide production by primary cultured skeletal muscle cells were evaluated. The involvement of the main sites of these reactive species production and the relationship between superoxide and nitric oxide production were also examined. Production of superoxide was evaluated by cytochrome c reduction and dihydroethidium oxidation assays. Electrical stimulation increased superoxide production after 1 h incubation. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor caused a partial decrease of superoxide generation and a significant amount of mitochondria-derived superoxide was also observed. Nitric oxide production was assessed by nitrite measurement and by using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2-DA) assay. Using both methods an increased production of nitric oxide was obtained after electrical stimulation, which was also able to induce an increase of iNOS content and NF-κB activation. The participation of superoxide in nitric oxide production was investigated by incubating cells with DAF-2-DA in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation, a superoxide generator system (xanthine-xanthine oxidase), a mixture of NOS inhibitors and SOD-PEG. Our data show that the induction of muscle contraction by a moderate electrical stimulation protocol led to an increased nitric oxide production that can be controlled by superoxide generation. The cross talk between these reactive species likely plays a role in exercise-induced maintenance and adaptation by regulating muscular glucose metabolism, force of contraction, fatigue, and antioxidant systems activities.

  16. CLIMBING BEHAVIOUR IN THREE AFRICAN RODENT SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Saccostomus came from the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and one from the ..... Of the three species tested, Thallomys shows the best psychological and ... The biology and behaviour of a free living population of black rats (Rattus.

  17. Species concepts and species delimitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Queiroz, Kevin

    2007-12-01

    The issue of species delimitation has long been confused with that of species conceptualization, leading to a half century of controversy concerning both the definition of the species category and methods for inferring the boundaries and numbers of species. Alternative species concepts agree in treating existence as a separately evolving metapopulation lineage as the primary defining property of the species category, but they disagree in adopting different properties acquired by lineages during the course of divergence (e.g., intrinsic reproductive isolation, diagnosability, monophyly) as secondary defining properties (secondary species criteria). A unified species concept can be achieved by treating existence as a separately evolving metapopulation lineage as the only necessary property of species and the former secondary species criteria as different lines of evidence (operational criteria) relevant to assessing lineage separation. This unified concept of species has several consequences for species delimitation, including the following: First, the issues of species conceptualization and species delimitation are clearly separated; the former secondary species criteria are no longer considered relevant to species conceptualization but only to species delimitation. Second, all of the properties formerly treated as secondary species criteria are relevant to species delimitation to the extent that they provide evidence of lineage separation. Third, the presence of any one of the properties (if appropriately interpreted) is evidence for the existence of a species, though more properties and thus more lines of evidence are associated with a higher degree of corroboration. Fourth, and perhaps most significantly, a unified species concept shifts emphasis away from the traditional species criteria, encouraging biologists to develop new methods of species delimitation that are not tied to those properties.

  18. Precise control of miR-125b levels is required to create a regeneration-permissive environment after spinal cord injury: a cross-species comparison between salamander and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Tsai, Eve; Coyle, Matthew; Sehm, Tina; Echeverri, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Most spinal cord injuries lead to permanent paralysis in mammals. By contrast, the remarkable regenerative abilities of salamanders enable full functional recovery even from complete spinal cord transections. The molecular differences underlying this evolutionary divergence between mammals and amphibians are poorly understood. We focused on upstream regulators of gene expression as primary entry points into this question. We identified a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) that are conserved between the Mexican axolotl salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum) and mammals but show marked cross-species differences in regulation patterns following spinal cord injury. We found that precise post-injury levels of one of these miRNAs (miR-125b) is essential for functional recovery, and guides correct regeneration of axons through the lesion site in a process involving the direct downstream target Sema4D in axolotls. Translating these results to a mammalian model, we increased miR-125b levels in the rat through mimic treatments following spinal cord transection. These treatments downregulated Sema4D and other glial-scar-related genes, and enhanced the animal's functional recovery. Our study identifies a key regulatory molecule conserved between salamander and mammal, and shows that the expression of miR-125b and Sema4D must be carefully controlled in the right cells at the correct level to promote regeneration. We also show that these molecular components of the salamander's regeneration-permissive environment can be experimentally harnessed to improve treatment outcomes for mammalian spinal cord injuries.

  19. HT-2 toxin 4-glucuronide as new T-2 toxin metabolite: enzymatic synthesis, analysis, and species specific formation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides by rat, mouse, pig, and human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Tanja; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-10-10

    Glucuronides of the mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its phase I metabolite HT-2 toxin are important phase II metabolites under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Since standard substances are essential for the direct quantitation of these glucuronides, a method for the enzymatic synthesis of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides employing liver microsomes was optimized. Structure elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry revealed that besides T-2 toxin glucuronide and HT-2 toxin 3-glucuronide also the newly identified isomer HT-2 toxin 4-glucuronide was formed. Glucuronidation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin in liver microsomes of rat, mouse, pig, and human was compared and metabolites were analyzed directly by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A distinct, species specific pattern of glucuronidation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin was observed with interesting interindividual differences. Until recently, glucuronides have frequently been analyzed indirectly by quantitation of the aglycone after enzymatic cleavage of the glucuronides by β-glucuronidase. Therefore, the hydrolysis efficiencies of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides using β-glucuronidases from Helix pomatia, bovine liver, and Escherichia coli were compared.

  20. The Meta Analysis of Alleviatory Effect of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Painful Caused by Invasive Operation%袋鼠式护理缓解侵入性操作所致新生儿疼痛的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴海善; 王松; 李胜玲

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过对袋鼠式护理缓解侵入性操作所致新生儿疼痛的随机对照试验和(或)临床对照试验文献进行Meta分析,客观评价袋鼠式护理的效果,为临床新生儿疼痛的管理提供理论依据.方法 联机检索在线PUBMED、EBSCO、OVID、EMBASE、Cochrane library、中国知网、中国生物医学文献数据库,并以手工检索和引文检索为辅助,全面获取有关袋鼠式护理缓解侵入性操作所致新生儿疼痛的中英文文献.对符合纳入标准的文献,由两名研究者独立进行方法学质量评价和资料提取.采用RevMan5.0.25统计软件进行meta分析.结果 经筛选共纳入7篇临床对照试验文献.Meta分析结果显示:袋鼠式护理和襁褓包裹比较,更能稳定新生儿侵入性操作期间和操作后恢复期的心率及血氧饱和度(P<0.01),可缩短新生儿侵入性操作时和操作后恢复期啼哭和疼痛面容的持续时间(P<0.01),可减少新生儿侵入性操作时的NFCS评分(P<0.01).结论 袋鼠式护理可以有效缓解新生儿对疼痛的生理反应和行为反应,减轻新生儿疼痛.由于相关研究较少,今后尚需纳入更多设计严格的大样本随机对照试验以进一步评价袋鼠式护理缓解新生儿疼痛的效果.%Objective To evaluate the alleviatory effect of kangaroo care on neonatal pain caused by invasive operation using Meta analysis. Methods With the computer retrieval of PUBMED/MEDLINE , EBSCO, OVID, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CNKI, CMBI and auxiliary manual retrieval, citation retrieval as well, the author tried to gain the documents comprehensively in both Chinese and English on the kangaroo care easing neonatal pain caused by invasive operation. To the included documents fit for standard, two researchers were planned to screen them and then to make a methodological quality evaluation and material extraction independently. The RevMan5.0.25 statistical software for Meta analysis was used. Results After

  1. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  2. Microcystin-LR Induced Apoptosis in Rat Sertoli Cells via the Mitochondrial Caspase-Dependent Pathway: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Liu, Chuanrui; Fu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shenshen; Xin, Yongjuan; Li, Yang; Xue, Lijian; Cheng, Xuemin; Zhang, Huizhen

    2016-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs), the secondary metabolites of blue-green algae, are ubiquitous and major cyanotoxin contaminants. Besides the hepatopancreas/liver, the reproductive system is regarded as the most important target organ for MCs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in MCs-induced reproductive toxicity, the role of MCs in this pathway remains unclear. In the present study, Sertoli cells were employed to investigate apoptotic death involved in male reproductive toxicity of microcystin-LR (MC-LR). After exposure to various concentrations of MC-LR for 24 h, the growth of Sertoli cells was concentration-dependently decreased with an IC50 of ~32 μg/mL. Mitochondria-mediated apoptotic changes were observed in Sertoli cells exposed to 8, 16, and 32 μg/mL MC-LR including the increased expression of caspase pathway proteins, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and generation of ROS. Pretreatment with a global caspase inhibitor was found to depress the activation of caspases, and eventually increased the survival rate of Sertoli cells, implying that the mitochondrial caspases pathway is involved in MC-LR-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, N-acetyl-l-cysteine attenuated the MC-LR-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and cytochrome c release, resulting in the inhibition of apoptosis. Taken together, the observed results suggested that MC-LR induced apoptotic death of Sertoli cells by the activation of mitochondrial caspases cascade, while its effects on the ROS-mediated signaling pathway may contribute toward the initiation of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27667976

  3. Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  4. Precise control of miR-125b levels is required to create a regeneration-permissive environment after spinal cord injury: a cross-species comparison between salamander and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most spinal cord injuries lead to permanent paralysis in mammals. By contrast, the remarkable regenerative abilities of salamanders enable full functional recovery even from complete spinal cord transections. The molecular differences underlying this evolutionary divergence between mammals and amphibians are poorly understood. We focused on upstream regulators of gene expression as primary entry points into this question. We identified a group of microRNAs (miRNAs that are conserved between the Mexican axolotl salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum and mammals but show marked cross-species differences in regulation patterns following spinal cord injury. We found that precise post-injury levels of one of these miRNAs (miR-125b is essential for functional recovery, and guides correct regeneration of axons through the lesion site in a process involving the direct downstream target Sema4D in axolotls. Translating these results to a mammalian model, we increased miR-125b levels in the rat through mimic treatments following spinal cord transection. These treatments downregulated Sema4D and other glial-scar-related genes, and enhanced the animal’s functional recovery. Our study identifies a key regulatory molecule conserved between salamander and mammal, and shows that the expression of miR-125b and Sema4D must be carefully controlled in the right cells at the correct level to promote regeneration. We also show that these molecular components of the salamander’s regeneration-permissive environment can be experimentally harnessed to improve treatment outcomes for mammalian spinal cord injuries.

  5. Método Mãe Canguru: aplicação no Brasil, evidências científicas e impacto sobre o aleitamento materno Kangaroo Mother Care: scientific evidences and impact on breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Isoyama Venancio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o histórico do Método Mãe Canguru e apresentar evidências científicas sobre os benefícios dessa prática para os bebês de baixo peso no tocante a morbimortalidade, desenvolvimento psicoafetivo, neurossensorial e amamentação. FONTES DE DADOS: Foram consultadas publicações sobre o Método Mãe Canguru abrangendo o período de 1983 até 2004, identificadas nas bases de dados MEDLINE e Lilacs, bem como livros, teses e publicações técnicas do Ministério da Saúde. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Desde sua primeira descrição, o Método Mãe Canguru tem sido amplamente estudado. A análise de experimentos randomizados mostrou que o mesmo consiste em fator de proteção para a amamentação exclusiva no momento da alta hospitalar (RR 0,41; IC95% 0,25-0,68. O método também está associado a redução do risco de infecção hospitalar com 41 semanas de idade gestacional corrigida (RR 0,49; IC95% 0,25-0,93; redução de enfermidades graves (RR 0,30; IC95% 0,14-0,67; redução de infecções do trato respiratório inferior aos 6 meses (RR 0,37; IC95% 0,15-0,89; e maior ganho ponderal diário (diferença de médias de 3,6 g/dia; IC95% 0,8-6,4. O desenvolvimento psicomotor foi semelhante entre bebês submetidos ao Método Mãe Canguru e controles aos 12 meses, e não houve evidências de impacto sobre a mortalidade infantil. CONCLUSÃO: Há evidências de impacto positivo do Método Mãe Canguru sobre a prática da amamentação. Embora o método pareça reduzir a morbidade infantil, as evidências são ainda insuficientes para que o mesmo seja recomendado rotineiramente. Por outro lado, não existem relatos sobre efeitos deletérios da aplicação do método. Há a necessidade de se realizar estudos sobre a efetividade, aplicabilidade e aceitabilidade do Método Mãe Canguru em nosso meio.OBJECTIVE: To describe the history of the Kangaroo Mother Care and present scientific evidence about benefits of this practice on morbidity and

  6. 考虑尾巴的六刚体仿袋鼠跳跃机器人的落地稳定性研究%Stance Stability of a Hopping Robot Based on the Six-rigid-body Kangaroo Model Considering Its Tail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜兴长; 杨方; 葛文杰; 杨静

    2011-01-01

    根据袋鼠的生物结构及跳跃的特点,建立了具有尾巴和脚趾的仿袋鼠跳跃机器人六刚体模型。应用拉格朗日方法,建立了机构在着地阶段的运动学和动力学方程。运用Matlab7.0对机器人进行仿真计算分析,给出了机器人在着地阶段的各关节转角、关节驱动力矩、质心轨迹、着地压力和ZMP随时间的变化规律。仿真结果表明:考虑尾巴的六刚体仿袋鼠跳跃机器人能显著提高机构的落地稳定性。%Bsaed on the bionic structure and the motion feature of a kangaroo, we estamlsn a mouel ior unlpeu hopping mechanism of a six-rigid-body bionic kangaroo with tail and toe. We adopt Lagrange method to establish the dynamics and kinematics equations for its stance phase. Taking the hopping robot with parameters as an example and using Matlab 7.0 for simulation ,we obtain the changing rule of each joint angle ,joint driving torque, the centroid trajectory, the ground pressure and ZMP with time of the stance phase. The result shows that the tail can greatly improve the stance stability of the bionic kangaroo robot.

  7. Invasive species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of management activities and research related to invasive species on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. As part of the...

  8. Serum testosterone concentration in chloroquine- treated rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... male reproductive functions. For instance ... had been observed to protect human epididymis and ... Animal model ... to the development of resistance against it induced by ... and differentiation in rats and other animal species.

  9. Differing impact of a major biogeographic barrier on genetic structure in two large kangaroos from the monsoon tropics of Northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Mark D B; Potter, Sally; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G

    2014-03-01

    Tropical savannas cover 20-30% of the world's land surface and exhibit high levels of regional endemism, but the evolutionary histories of their biota remain poorly studied. The most extensive and unmodified tropical savannas occur in Northern Australia, and recent studies suggest this region supports high levels of previously undetected genetic diversity. To examine the importance of barriers to gene flow and the environmental history of Northern Australia in influencing patterns of diversity, we investigated the phylogeography of two closely related, large, vagile macropodid marsupials, the antilopine wallaroo (Macropus antilopinus; n = 78), and the common wallaroo (Macropus robustus; n = 21). Both species are widespread across the tropical savannas of Australia except across the Carpentarian Barrier (CB) where there is a break in the distribution of M. antilopinus. We determined sequence variation in the hypervariable Domain I of the mitochondrial DNA control region and genotyped individuals at 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci to assess the historical and contemporary influence of the CB on these species. Surprisingly, we detected only limited differentiation between the disjunct Northern Territory and QueenslandM. antilopinus populations. In contrast, the continuously distributedM. robustus was highly divergent across the CB. Although unexpected, these contrasting responses appear related to minor differences in species biology. Our results suggest that vicariance may not explain well the phylogeographic patterns in Australia's dynamic monsoonal environments. This is because Quaternary environmental changes in this region have been complex, and diverse individual species' biologies have resulted in less predictable and idiosyncratic responses.

  10. Atenção humanizada ao recém-nascido de baixo-peso. Método Canguru e cuidado centrado na família: correspondências e especificidades Humanized care for low birth weight newborns. The Kangaroo care Method and family-centered care: correspondence and specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Abreu e Silva Hennig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta a Atenção Humanizada ao Recém-Nascido de Baixo-Peso - Método Canguru - como uma diretriz clínica na assistência neonatal, e busca traçar um paralelo com outro importante componente do cuidado infantil descrito na literatura internacional: o cuidado centrado na família. O artigo propõe que a Atenção Humanizada ao Recém-Nascido de Baixo-Peso - Método Canguru seja vista como uma boa prática e seja considerada também no campo das tecnologias em saúde.The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the Human Attention of Low Birth Weight-Kangaroo Care as clinical guidelines in neonatal intensive care. It will also try to link this clinical guideline and another component of neonatal infant care: the Family-Centered Care. Based on this relationship, this paper proposes that Human Attention of Low Birth Weight-Kangaroo Care should be catalogued as a Potentially Better Practices and also, considered as a Health Care Technology.

  11. O Método Mãe Canguru em hospitais públicos do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil: uma análise do processo de implantação Kangaroo Mother Care in public hospitals in the State of São Paulo, Brazil: an analysis of the implementation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Júlia Colameo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi elaborado para analisar a implantação do Método Mãe Canguru em 28 diferentes hospitais públicos do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Os hospitais escola, os amigos da criança, os com banco de leite humano e os com mais de 12 profissionais treinados obtiveram melhores escores de implantação. A resistência dos profissionais de saúde à participação da família tem dado um caráter intra-hospitalar ao método. Mudanças no treinamento, incluir os gestores no programa e prever recursos orçamentários para a adoção, avaliação e controle do Método Mãe Canguru são necessários.This study analyzed the implementation of the Kangaroo Mother method in 28 different São Paulo State public hospitals. Teaching hospitals, Baby-Friendly Hospitals, hospitals with human milk banks, and those with more than 12 trained health professionals showed higher implementation scores. Because of staff resistance to family participation in neonatal care, the Kangaroo Mother method is basically applied in-hospital. Changes in the initial training, including manager awareness-raising and proper financial resource allocation, are necessary for implementation, follow-up, assessment, and feedback.

  12. Teratology studies in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Mariline; Allais, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the rodent species of choice for the regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics, such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. Many decades of experience and extensive data have accumulated for both general and developmental toxicology investigations in this species. The high fertility and large litter size of the rat are advantages for teratogenicity testing. The study designs are well defined in the regulatory guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world. Teratology studies address maternal- and embryo-toxicity following exposure during the period of organogenesis. This chapter describes the design and conduct of a teratology study in the rat in compliance with the regulatory guidelines. The procedures for the handling and housing of the pregnant animals, the caesarean examinations and the sampling of fetuses for morphological examinations are described. The utility and design of preliminary studies and the inclusion of satellite animals in the main study for toxicokinetic sampling are discussed.

  13. Differentiation of meat according to species by the electrophoretic separation of muscle lactate dehydrogenase and esterase isoenzymes and isoelectric focusing of soluble muscle proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W J; Sinclair, A J

    1983-02-01

    Species identification of fresh meat can be readily achieved by serological techniques with the limitation that closely related species, such as sheep/goat, cattle/buffalo and horse/donkey, cannot be differentiated. We have examined electrophoretic techniques with particular reference to the identification of meat from closely related species. The results showed that beef and buffalo meat and meat from red and grey kangaroos could be clearly distinguished by isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gel or agarose in the pH range 5.5 to 8.5. Sheep and goat meat, and horse and donkey meat could not be differentiated by this technique, but were clearly distinguished from each other by their esterase isoenzyme profiles obtained after electrophoretic separation on cellulosic membrane strips. Results from this latter technique were available in one hour. We believe that species identification of fresh meat should involve an initial screening test by serological techniques followed by confirmation of the identity of suspect samples by electrophoretic techniques.

  14. treated rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Our results show, for the first time, that oral administration of C. edulis ... the exact mechanisms of these hematological changes produced by .... Hematological analysis .... rats are subjected to the additional stress of hypoxia to.

  15. Mammals from ‘down under’: a multi-gene species-level phylogeny of marsupial mammals (Mammalia, Metatheria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C. William; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2015-01-01

    Marsupials or metatherians are a group of mammals that are distinct in giving birth to young at early stages of development and in having a prolonged investment in lactation. The group consists of nearly 350 extant species, including kangaroos, koala, possums, and their relatives. Marsupials are an old lineage thought to have diverged from early therian mammals some 160 million years ago in the Jurassic, and have a remarkable evolutionary and biogeographical history, with extant species restricted to the Americas, mostly South America, and to Australasia. Although the group has been the subject of decades of phylogenetic research, the marsupial tree of life remains controversial, with most studies focusing on only a fraction of the species diversity within the infraclass. Here we present the first Methaterian species-level phylogeny to include 80% of the extant marsupial species and five nuclear and five mitochondrial markers obtained from Genbank and a recently published retroposon matrix. Our primary goal is to provide a summary phylogeny that will serve as a tool for comparative research. We evaluate the extent to which the phylogeny recovers current phylogenetic knowledge based on the recovery of “benchmark clades” from prior studies—unambiguously supported key clades and undisputed traditional taxonomic groups. The Bayesian phylogenetic analyses recovered nearly all benchmark clades but failed to find support for the suborder Phalagiformes. The most significant difference with previous published topologies is the support for Australidelphia as a group containing Microbiotheriidae, nested within American marsupials. However, a likelihood ratio test shows that alternative topologies with monophyletic Australidelphia and Ameridelphia are not significantly different than the preferred tree. Although further data are needed to solidify understanding of Methateria phylogeny, the new phylogenetic hypothesis provided here offers a well resolved and detailed tool

  16. [Lectins of Dryopteris Adans fern species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheka, O V; Stetsenko, N M; Pogorila, N F

    1999-01-01

    Lectin activity of three ferns species (Dryopteris bushiana Fom., D. laeta (Kom.) C. Chr, D. pseudomas (Wollaston) Holub et Pouzar) has been studied. We used hemagglutination reaction albumin and globulin fractions of fronds and rhizomes extracts with rat erythrocytes. The frond extract of D. pseudomas have shown higher activity as compared with other extracts. The lectin activity of D. laeta leaves was absent. The rhizomes of all three fern species could be characterized as high activity. Based on lectin activity the species were placed as follows order: D. buschiana > D. pseudomas > D. laeta. The dependence with lectin activity and elements (Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Rb, Sr) content were not found.

  17. Percepção dos pais sobre a vivência no método mãe-canguru La percepción de los padres en la vivencia del método madre-canguro Perception of parents in experiencing the kangaroo mother method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Elisângela Fernandes Bis Furlan

    2003-08-01

    institucional del equipo de salud como de la relación con la clientela, posibilitando la comprensión de las dificultades y significados atribuidos a la vivencia y a la optimización del cuidado de enfermería.This study aimed at analyzing the perception of pre-term babies' parents in experiencing the Kangaroo Mother Method. It is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with 10 parents, held in the first 60 days after the discharge of the pre-term baby from the Kangaroo method, in a philanthropic hospital in the interior of São Paulo State. The parents' perception concerning the experience was grouped in four thematic units: making maternal stay in the Kangaroo Method flexible; favoring the mother-child and family relationship; completing the pre-term newborn's growth and development and developing skills in caring for the child. The obtained data provided information for the organization of care in the Kangaroo Mother Method, from the institutional perspective of the health care team as well as the relationship with clients, which enabled understanding about the difficulties and meanings attributed to the experience and optimization of nursing care.

  18. New Helicobacter species in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L P

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade several new Helicobacter species have been isolated from human gastric mucosa, fecal samples, liver, and gallbladder. Gastric corkscrew-shaped Helicobacter species: H. heilmannii is usually seen in the gastric foveolae in 0.2-0.6% of histological sections from the gastric mucosa of patients with dyspepsia in Western Europe, but it has only been cultured once. It is genetically and morphologically closely related to H. bizzozeronii and H. salmonis which are common in dogs and cats. It causes constantly active chronic gastritis and is regularly associated with peptic ulcer. Intestinal Helicobacter species: H. cinaedi, H. fennelliae, H. pullorum, H. westmeadii, H. canadensis, and 'H. rappini' have been isolated from patients with enteritis and proctitis. H. fennelliae, H. cinaedi, H. westmeadii, and 'H. rappini' have been isolated also from patients with septicemia. Studies indicate that H. cinaedi is transmitted from hamsters and that H. pullorum is common in chickens. 'H. rappini' has been isolated from sheep, dogs, and mice, whereas no animal reservoir has been found for H. fennelliae. Except for the cases of septicemia, none of these Helicobacter species have yet been proven to cause human disease, but they are suspected to play a role in inflammatory bowel diseases. Hepatobiliary Helicobacter species include several Helicobacter species isolated from bile and liver of animals, but only H. bilis has been isolated from the human gallbladder and H. pylori from the human liver. H. bilis has been isolated from dogs, cats, mice, and rats. Nonpylori Helicobacter species are usually difficult to culture and may be more frequently causes of human disease than realized today.

  19. Evaluación auditiva neurosensorial en un grupo de prematuros del programa madre conguro Sensorineural auditory evaluation in a group of preterm neonates from the "Kangaroo mother" program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Hernández

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre agosto de 1989 y diciembre de 1991 se buscó asociación entre algunos factores de riesgo comunes a los prematuros con peso menor de 1.500 g al nacer y el hecho de presentar disminución de la agudeza auditiva, medida con los potenciales evocados del tallo cerebral a los 4 meses y luego entre los 8 y los 14 meses. Los factores de riesgo tenidos en cuenta en 133 prematuros del ";Programa madre canguro"; del Instituto de los Seguros Sociales, en Medellín, fueron: Peso inferior a 1.500 g, hiperbilirrubinemia superior a 10 mg/ml, sufrimiento fetal, membranas hialinas, uso de aminoglicósidos, hipoglucemia, hemorragia del tercer trimestre e hipertensión arterial materna. Se halló pérdida de la agudeza auditiva en la evaluación inicial en 54 nifíos (40.6% mientras en la final sólo la presentaban 10 (7.5%; no pudo detectarse asociación entre los factores de riesgo y la disminución de la agudeza auditiva en la evaluación inicial ni en la final. La mejoría de resultados de agudeza auditiva entre las pruebas iniciales y las finales puede explicarse, entre otras razones, por la maduración cerebral del prematuro. Se debe investigar más la razón de los déficits finales y, ojalá, establecer programas de seguimiento con pruebas auditivas en este grupo de niños en riesgo. A study was carried out to investigate the association between risk factors commonly found in preterm neonates with very low birth-weight (Iess than 1.500 g and decreased auditory acuteness; the latter was measured according to brain stem evoked potentiaJs (BERA test In 133 preterm neonates belonging to the "Kangaroo mother program", in 'Medellín,Colombla. The following risk factors we~ evaluated: Hyperbilirrubinemia, hyaline membrane, birth weight lower than 1.500g, fetal distress, hypoglycemia, use of aminoglycosldes, thlrd trimester hemorrhage, and maternal high blood presssure. Abnormal results in BERA test were found in 54 cases (40.6% at 4 months and in only 10 (7

  20. Planes, kangaroos, and the CAPD manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, D M; Whishaw, J M; Thomas, M; Thatcher, G

    1996-01-01

    The Western Australian (WA) Remote Area Dialysis Programme was developed in 1988 due to the cultural need to dialyze an increasing number of aboriginal patients in their own communities, rather than relocating them up to 3000 km away in Perth. The success of the program relies on remote area health services (RAHS), which have no prior experience in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), providing consistent routine and emergency medical care to the patients. Our aim was to standardize the care of all CAPD patients in remote WA by providing the RAHS with an easy-to-follow manual. Although the RAHS received treatment protocols, and in-service education, consistent care was not always provided. We confirmed this by: (1) examining the existing quality assurance tools, peritonitis and hospital admission rates, (2) discussion with remote area staff regarding patients, and (3) informal assessment of remote area staff receptiveness to in-service education by a CAPD nurse. We identified the causes of the inconsistent care to be: (1) high remote area staff turnover (six months average for a registered nurse), (2) the protocols were difficult to follow, and (3) confusion for the RAHS as to the appropriate contact person at our hospital. In 1994, the situation was exacerbated by the dramatic increase in the number of patients and RAHS involved (14 new patients, bringing the total to 20 patients in 12 centers) plus the introduction of a second treating hospital (with differing protocols). A team of two CAPD nurses and two nephrologists was established, to collaborate with two remote area hospitals and the second treating hospital to produce the "Remote Area CAPD Manual." The manual is an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide for the management of CAPD by non-dialysis personnel. It has led to improved management of CAPD, improvement in communication with RAHS, and the increased confidence of remote area staff in the management of CAPD patients. In conclusion, RAHS can give consistent care if provided with clear, concise guidelines.

  1. Efficient single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in laboratory rat strains using wild rat-derived SNP candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedrich Hans J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus is an important model for studying many aspects of human health and disease. Detailed knowledge on genetic variation between strains is important from a biomedical, particularly pharmacogenetic point of view and useful for marker selection for genetic cloning and association studies. Results We show that Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in commonly used rat strains are surprisingly well represented in wild rat isolates. Shotgun sequencing of 814 Kbp in one wild rat resulted in the identification of 485 SNPs as compared with the Brown Norway genome sequence. Genotyping 36 commonly used inbred rat strains showed that 84% of these alleles are also polymorphic in a representative set of laboratory rat strains. Conclusion We postulate that shotgun sequencing in a wild rat sample and subsequent genotyping in multiple laboratory or domesticated strains rather than direct shotgun sequencing of multiple strains, could be the most efficient SNP discovery approach. For the rat, laboratory strains still harbor a large portion of the haplotypes present in wild isolates, suggesting a relatively recent common origin and supporting the idea that rat inbred strains, in contrast to mouse inbred strains, originate from a single species, R. norvegicus.

  2. Do rats have orgasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Pfaus

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Method: Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs in other species: 1 physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2 short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3 long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Results: Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. Conclusions: The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research.

  3. Do rats have orgasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaus, James G.; Scardochio, Tina; Parada, Mayte; Gerson, Christine; Quintana, Gonzalo R.; Coria-Avila, Genaro A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Method Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs) in other species: 1) physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2) short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3) long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Results Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. Conclusions The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research. PMID:27799081

  4. 脑内活性氧抑制对醋酸去氧皮质酮-盐型高血压大鼠交感神经活动的影响%Effect of inhibiting brain reactive oxygen species on sympathetic nerve activity in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琪; 谭颖颖

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨脑内活性氧是否介导醋酸去氧皮质酮(DOCA)-盐型高血压大鼠的交感神经活动增强效应。方法雄性SD大鼠,行左肾切除术后皮下注射DOCA,并饮用1%氯化钠溶液4周,建立DOCA-盐型高血压模型。轻度麻醉状态下,记录大鼠平均动脉压(MAP)、心率(HR)和肾交感神经活动(RSNA);记录基础值后,静脉注射六烃季胺,观察MAP的变化;侧脑室注射tempol(20μmol/L,10μl)或对照液,观察MAP、HR和RSNA的变化。酶联免疫法(ELISA)分析血浆去甲肾上腺素(NE)水平;化学发光法检测下丘脑超氧阴离子水平和NAD(P)H氧化酶活性。结果 DOCA-盐型大鼠的MAP和血浆NE水平较对照组均显著增加(P<0.01);静脉注射神经节阻滞剂六烃季胺,在DOCA-盐型大鼠引起的血压降低是对照大鼠的240%;DOCA-盐型大鼠的下丘脑超氧阴离子水平和NAD(P)H氧化酶活性显著增加(P<0.01);侧脑室微注射tempol在DOCA-盐型大鼠的MAP、HR和RSNA降低与对照组存在显著差异(P<0.01)。结论 DOCA-盐型高血压大鼠可能通过增加下丘脑内NAD(P)H氧化酶来源的活性氧水平,提高交感神经活性,参与高血压的形成和进展。%Objective To investigate whether brain reactive oxygen species mediate sympathoexcitation and arterial pressure elevation in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Methods DOCA-salt hypertensive model was established in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of DOCA after uninephrectomy and drinking 1%NaCl solution for 4 weeks. The baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were recorded in the rats under mild anesthesia, and MAP changes following intravenous hexamethonium injection were observed. The responses of MAP, HR and RSNA to intracerebroventricular administration of tempol (20 μmol/L in 10 μl) were evaluated; plasma NE level was measured with ELISA, and ROS

  5. Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus and Black Rats (Rattus rattus as Possible Reservoirs of Leishmania spp. in Lara State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lima Hector

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 519 wild animals belonging to eleven species were collected during a two year study in a cutaneous leishmaniasis endemic area in Venezuela (La Matica, Lara State. The animals were captured in home-made Tomahawk-like traps baited with maize, bananas or other available local fruits, and parasites were isolated from 27 specimens. Two different species were found naturally infected with flagellates, i.e., cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus and black rats (Rattus rattus. Characterization of the parasites using PCR, kDNA restriction pattern and hybridization with species-specific probes revealed the presence of Leishmania (L. mexicana in three of the black rats and Leishmania (V. braziliensis in two others. The latter species was also identified in the single positive specimen of S. hispidus. The results suggested both species of animals as possible reservoirs of Leishmania sp.

  6. Species accounts. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret K. Trani; W. Mark Ford; Brian R., eds. Chapman

    2007-01-01

    Narrative accounts for each species are presented by several authors in a consistent format to convey specific information relative to that mammal. The orders are arranged phylogenetically; families and species are arranged alphabetically to facilitate finding a particular species.

  7. Male rat sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems.

  8. Conhecimentos e práticas dos profissionais de saúde sobre a "atenção humanizada ao recém-nascido de baixo peso - método canguru" Health professional's knowledge and practices about "human attention of low birth weight- kangaroo care"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Abreu e Silva Hennig

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: identificar os conhecimentos e as práticas sobre a Atenção Humanizada ao Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso - Método Canguru (AHRNBP-MC de profissionais médicos e de enfermagem em maternidades públicas da cidade do Rio de Janeiro. MÉTODO: estudo descritivo transversal realizado através de questionário. Participaram das entrevistas 148 médicos e enfermeiros atuantes nestas unidades. Destes, os 116 profissionais que atuam exclusivamente na unidade intensiva responderam sobre quesitos específicos das práticas assistenciais sobre a perspectiva da AHRNBP-MC. RESULTADOS: em relação às estratégias apontadas para minimizar ruído e luminosidade, 39% dos profissionais referiram atender rapidamente aos alarmes/cuidados no uso dos equipamentos e 88% apontaram a diminuição da luminosidade em pelo menos 1 período em 24h. Como estratégias para dor/desconforto, 34% referiram usar a sucção não-nutritiva e 9% citaram utilizar glicose. Oitenta e três porcento relataram serem as informações do quadro clínico as principais informações aos pais na 1ª visita. O exame físico é o procedimento em que é permitida a presença da mãe para 73% dos entrevistados. Cinquenta e nove porcento usavam a estabilidade clínica como critério para a ida do bebê ao colo materno pela primeira vez. CONCLUSÃO: apesar do conhecimento teórico sobre a Atenção Humanizada, os profissionais ainda não o utilizam plenamente em sua prática clínica, sugerindo que ainda não está completamente assimilada a abrangência dessa forma de cuidado neonatal.OBJECTIVE: to identify knowledge and practices related to Low Weight Newborn Humane Care - the Kangaroo Method by the medical and nursing staff in public maternity hospitals located in the city of Rio de Janeiro. METHOD: a cross cutting descriptive method performed by questionnaire application aiming at the management of eleven public maternity hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, selected for the

  9. 袋鼠式护理减轻新生儿足跟采血疼痛的效果观察*%Effect of Kangaroo care on diminishing neonatal pain during heel lancing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪芬; 刘敏; 鲍柳春; 蒋洁; 赵丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of Kangaroo care(KC)on diminishing neonatal pain during heel lancing. Methods Sixty neonates were divided randomly into two equal groups:intervention group and control group,which 30 cases in each group.In the intervention group,neonates were treated with KC(neonates were put in direct and continuous skin-to-skin contact with his/her mom)from 20 mins before heel lancing to 1 mins after the end of the lancing.In the control group,neonates were treated with regular care.The differences in heart rate,blood oxygen saturation,facial pain expression,crying duration and DAN(Douleur Aigue Nouveaune)scores between two groups were compared at 7 time points from 10s before the heel lancing to 10s after the lancing. Results The results of repeated measu te at 7 time points after heel lancing.There were significant interaction effect between time and main effect(P Heel lancing could lead to moderate to severe pain of neonates.KC could effectively diminish the neonatal pain degree caused by heel lancing.%  目的探讨袋鼠式护理在减轻新生儿足跟采血疼痛的效果。方法将行足跟采血的60例新生儿随机分为干预组与对照组,每组各30例,干预组从足跟采血前20 min至足跟采血结束后1 min实施袋鼠式护理,对照组按常规护理。比较从足跟采血前10 s至足跟采血结束后10 s 8个时间点两组新生儿心率、血氧饱和度、面部疼痛表情、啼哭持续时间和新生儿急性疼痛行为评分量表(douleur aigue nouveaune,DAN)评分情况。结果足跟采血后7个时间点新生儿心率重复测量资料分析结果:时间与主效应的交互效应比较,P<0.01,说明两组新生儿不同时间点心率是不相等的;时间效应比较,P<0.01,说明随着时间的延长,两组新生儿心率具有加快的趋势;两组新生儿穿刺后7个时间点心率比较,差异具有统计学意义(均P<0.05),干预组新生儿心率

  10. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  11. Utilization of molecular species of diglycerides in the synthesis of lecithin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudd, J.B.; Golde, L.M.G. van; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1969-01-01

    1. 1. The synthesis of lecithin by rat liver microsomes was measured in the presence of [14C]CDP-choline and three molecular species of diglycerides derived from rat liver lecithin containing four, two and one double bond. The rate of synthesis of lecithin was the same regardless of the fatty acid

  12. Utilization of molecular species of diglycerides in the synthesis of lecithin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudd, J.B.; Golde, L.M.G. van; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1969-01-01

    1. 1. The synthesis of lecithin by rat liver microsomes was measured in the presence of [14C]CDP-choline and three molecular species of diglycerides derived from rat liver lecithin containing four, two and one double bond. The rate of synthesis of lecithin was the same regardless of the fatty acid c

  13. Agroforestry Species Switchboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt, R.; John, I.; Ordonez, J.;

    2016-01-01

    The current version of the Agroforestry Species Switchboard documents the presence of a total of 26,135 plant species (33,813 species including synonyms) across 19 web-based databases. When available, hyperlinks to information on the selected species in particular databases are provided. In total...

  14. Agroforestry Species Switchboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt, R.; John, I.; Ordonez, J.

    2016-01-01

    The current version of the Agroforestry Species Switchboard documents the presence of a total of 26,135 plant species (33,813 species including synonyms) across 19 web-based databases. When available, hyperlinks to information on the selected species in particular databases are provided. In total...

  15. The role of reactive oxygen species in the neuroprotective effect of sevoflurane preconditioning against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury in rat hippocampal slices%活性氧在七氟醚预处理减轻大鼠海马脑片氧糖缺失损伤中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志萍; 张永华; 江山; 夏鹏; 曾因明

    2008-01-01

    目的 评价活性氧(ROS)在七氟醚预处理减轻大鼠海马脑片氧糖缺失损伤中的作用.方法 雄性SD大鼠,体重80~100 g,断头处死,剥离海马,符合标准的40片海马脑片随机分为4组(n=10):氧糖缺失组(OGD组)、4%七氟醚预处理组(Sevo组)、ROS清除剂组(MPG组)和4%七氟醚预处理+ROS清除剂组(SM组),采用脑片灌流及电生理技术,细胞外记录海马CAI区缺氧期间和复氧1 h期间的顺向群锋电位(OPS);采用2,3,5-三苯基氯化四氮唑(TYC)染色定量比色法分析脑片损伤程度.结果 与OGD组相比,Sevo组OPS消失时间缩短,OPS恢复程度、OPS恢复率均升高,组织损伤百分率降低(P<0.01);与Sevo组相比,MPG组和SM组OPS消失时间缩短,OPS恢复程度、OPS恢复率降低,组织损伤百分率升高(Pspecies (ROS) is involved in the neuroprotective effect of sevoflurane preconditioning (Sevo-P) against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) injury in rat hippocampal slices.Methods Male SD rats weighing 80-100 g were anesthetized with ether and decapitated. The hippicampi were removed and sngittaUy sliced (400 μm thick) and placed in artificial CSF aerated with 95% O2-5% CO2 Forty hippocampal slices were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 each) : group I OGD; group ⅡSevo-P; group ⅢROS scavenger (MPG) and group Ⅳ Sevo-P + MPG. Electrophysiolngical technique was used to record the amplitude of orthodromic population spike (OPS) in the stratum pyramidale of CAI region during OGD and 1 h reoxygenation. TIC staining was used to determine the degree of tissue injury. Results The amplitude of OPS was rapidly abolished during hypoxia and the degree and rate of recovery of OPS were low after 1 h reoxygenation in OGD group (group Ⅰ). In Sevo-P group (group Ⅱ) the time from the start of OGD to complete

  16. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  17. Aboriginal and invasive rats of genus Rattus as hosts of infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoy, Michael; Khlyap, Lyudmila; Cosson, Jean-Francois; Morand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    From the perspective of ecology of zoonotic pathogens, the role of the Old World rats of the genus Rattus is exceptional. The review analyzes specific characteristics of rats that contribute to their important role in hosting pathogens, such as host-pathogen relations and rates of rat-borne infections, taxonomy, ecology, and essential factors. Specifically the review addresses recent taxonomic revisions within the genus Rattus that resulted from applications of new genetic tools in understanding relationships between the Old World rats and the infectious agents that they carry. Among the numerous species within the genus Rattus, only three species-the Norway rat (R. norvegicus), the black or roof rat (R. rattus), and the Asian black rat (R. tanezumi)-have colonized urban ecosystems globally for a historically long period of time. The fourth invasive species, R. exulans, is limited to tropical Asia-Pacific areas. One of the points highlighted in this review is the necessity to discriminate the roles played by rats as pathogen reservoirs within the land of their original diversification and in regions where only one or few rat species were introduced during the recent human history.

  18. Xenograft survival in two species combinations using total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1987-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has profound immunosuppressive actions and has been applied successfully to allotransplantation but not xenotransplantation. Cyclosporine (CsA) has not generally permitted successful xenotransplantation of organs but has not been used in combination with TLI. TLI and CsA were given alone and in combination to rats that were recipients of hamster or rabbit cardiac xenografts. Combined TLI and CsA prolonged survival of hamster-to-rat cardiac xenografts from three days in untreated controls to greater than 100 days in most recipients. TLI alone significantly prolonged rabbit to rat xenograft survival with doubling of survival time. However, combined treatment did not significantly prolong rabbit-to-rat cardiac xenograft survival compared with TLI alone. The hamster and rat are phylogenetically closely related. Transplants from hamsters to rat are concordant xenografts since the time course of unmodified rejection is similar to first-set rejection of allografts. Although the rabbit-to-rat transplant is also between concordant species (average survival of untreated controls: 3.2 days) the rabbit and rat are more distantly related. These results suggest that TLI is an effective immunosuppressant when applied to cardiac xenotransplants in these animal models; that the choice of species critically affects xenograft survival when TLI and/or CsA are used for immunosuppression; and that the closely related species combination tested has markedly prolonged (greater than 100 days) survival using combined TLI and CsA.

  19. Stable isotope analysis as an early monitoring tool for community-scale effects of rat eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Katherine M.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wegmann, Alex; Miller-ter Kuile, Ana; Fisher, Robert N.; Young, Hillary S.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive rats have colonized most of the islands of the world, resulting in strong negative impacts on native biodiversity and on ecosystem functions. As prolific omnivores, invasive rats can cause local extirpation of a wide range of native species, with cascading consequences that can reshape communities and ecosystems. Eradication of rats on islands is now becoming a widespread approach to restore ecosystems, and many native island species show strong numerical responses to rat eradication. However, the effect of rat eradication on other consumers can extend beyond direct numerical effects, to changes in behavior, dietary composition, and other ecological parameters. These behavioral and trophic effects may have strong cascading impacts on the ecology of restored ecosystems, but they have rarely been examined. In this study, we explore how rat eradication has affected the trophic ecology of native land crab communities. Using stable isotope analysis of rats and crabs, we demonstrate that the diet or trophic position of most crabs changed subsequent to rat eradication. Combined with the numerical recovery of two carnivorous land crab species (Geograpsus spp.), this led to a dramatic widening of the crab trophic niche following rat eradication. Given the established importance of land crabs in structuring island communities, particularly plants, this suggests an unappreciated mechanism by which rat eradication may alter island ecology. This study also demonstrates the potential for stable isotope analysis as a complementary monitoring tool to traditional techniques, with the potential to provide more nuanced assessments of the community- and ecosystem-wide effects of restoration.

  20. Invasive forest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Illman

    2006-01-01

    Nonnative organisms that cause a major change to native ecosystems-once called foreign species, biological invasions, alien invasives, exotics, or biohazards–are now generally referred to as invasive species or invasives. invasive species of insects, fungi, plants, fish, and other organisms present a rising threat to natural forest ecosystems worldwide. Invasive...

  1. Genetic diversity, recombination, and divergence in animal associated Penicillium dipodomyis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Henk

    Full Text Available Penicillium dipodomyis is thought to be an exclusively asexual fungus associated with Kangaroo Rats, Dipodomys species, and is unique among Penicillium species in growing at 37°C but producing no known toxins. Lack of recombination within P. dipodomyis would result in limited adaptive flexibility but possibly enhance local adaptation and host selection via maintenance of favourable genotypes. Here, analysis of DNA sequence data from five protein-coding genes shows that recombination occurs within P. dipodomyis on a small spatial scale. Furthermore, detection of mating-type alleles supports outcrossing and a sexual cycle in P. dipodomyis. P. dipodomyis was a weaker competitor in in vitro assays with other Penicillium species found in association with Kanagaroo rats. Bayesian species level analysis suggests that the P. dipodomyis lineage diverged from closely related species also found in cheek pouches of Kangaroo Rats and their stored seeds about 11 million years ago, a similar divergence time as Dipodomys from its sister rodent taxa.

  2. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  3. Species choice, provenance and species trials among native Brazilian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumond, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Six papers from the conference are presented. Drumond, M.A., Potential of species native to the semi-arid tropics, 766-781, (Refs. 18), reports on Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa species, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Spondias tuberosa, Ziziphus joazeiro, Cnidoscolus phyllacanthus, Bursera leptophleos (leptophloeos), Tabebuia impetiginosa, Astronium urundeuva, and Mimosa caesalpinia. Monteiro, R.F.R., Speltz, R.M., Gurgel, J.T. do A.; Silvicultural performance of 24 provenances of Araucaria angustifolia in Parana, 814-824, (Refs. 8). Pires, C.L. da S., Kalil Filho, A.N., Rosa, P.R.F. da, Parente, P.R., Zanatto, A.C.S.; Provenance trials of Cordia alliodora in the State of Sao Paulo, 988-995, (Refs. 9). Nogueira, J.C.B., Siqueira, A.C.M.F., Garrido, M.A.O., Gurgel Garrido, L.M. do A., Rosa, P.R.F., Moraes, J.L. de, Zandarin, M.A., Gurgel Filho, O.A., Trials of some native species in various regions of the State of Sao Paulo, 1051-1063, (Refs. 9) describes Centrolobium tomentosum, Peltophorum dubium, Tabebuia vellosoi, Cariniana legalis, and Balfourodendron riedelianum. Batista, M.P., Borges, J.F., Franco, M.A.B.; Early growth of a native species in comparison with exotics in northeastern Para, Brazil, 1105-1110, (Refs. 3). Jacaranda copaia is compared with Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea various hondurensis, Eucalyptus deglupta, and E. urophylla. Lima, P.C.F., Souza, S.M. de, Drumond, M.A.; Trials of native forest species at Petrolina, Pernambuco, 1139-1148, (Refs. 8), deals with Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Piptadenia obliqua, Pithecellobium foliolosum, Astronium urundeuva, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Cassia excelsa, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Parkia platycephala, Pseudobombax simplicifolium, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Caesalpinia ferrea, and Aspidosperma pyrifolium. 18 references.

  4. Atenção humanizada ao recém-nascido de baixo-peso (método Mãe Canguru: percepções de puérperas La atención humanizada al recién nascido de bajo peso (método madre canguru: percepción de mujeres en posparto Humane care newborn low-weight (kangaroo mother method: mother's perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Nicoletti Neves

    2010-03-01

    todo Canguru. Concluyó que la enfermería desempeña un papel central en la inserción del método con la familia, con los cuidados.Breastfeeding is one of the key practices which promote health, being associated with a reduction of diseases and mortality in childhood. Thus, from the course conclusive work, the present article was structured, which aimed to recognize the perceptions of mothers in the face of the use of the mother kangaroo method. With a qualitative, descriptive and field approach, it was held at the Philanthropic Hospital of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil, by the months of August to October 2006, in which six mothers were included in the kangaroo mother method during the admission of the baby. For the gathering, semi-structured interviews were made and data were analyzed by the content analysis. This article analyzed two categories, maternal experience with the mother kangaroo method, with the subcategories: mother kangaroo method and maternal breastfeeding and experiences at the kangaroo practice; and knowing the kangaroo method. As a conclusion, nursing plays an essential role in the insertion of the family to the method, from the provided cares.

  5. Adaptive training diminishes distractibility in aging across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jyoti; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Merzenich, Michael; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-12-03

    Aging is associated with deficits in the ability to ignore distractions, which has not yet been remediated by any neurotherapeutic approach. Here, in parallel auditory experiments with older rats and humans, we evaluated a targeted cognitive training approach that adaptively manipulated distractor challenge. Training resulted in enhanced discrimination abilities in the setting of irrelevant information in both species that was driven by selectively diminished distraction-related errors. Neural responses to distractors in auditory cortex were selectively reduced in both species, mimicking the behavioral effects. Sensory receptive fields in trained rats exhibited improved spectral and spatial selectivity. Frontal theta measures of top-down engagement with distractors were selectively restrained in trained humans. Finally, training gains generalized to group and individual level benefits in aspects of working memory and sustained attention. Thus, we demonstrate converging cross-species evidence for training-induced selective plasticity of distractor processing at multiple neural scales, benefitting distractor suppression and cognitive control.

  6. Epidemiology of blood parasitic infections in the urban rat population in peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, S N; Sahimin, N; Edah, M A; Mohd-Zain, S N

    2014-06-01

    A total of 719 wild rats were captured from four localities representing the west (Kuala Lumpur), east (Kuantan), north (Georgetown) and south (Malacca) to determine the diversity of blood protozoan from the urban wild rat population in peninsular Malaysia. Five rat species were recovered with Rattus rattus diardii being the most dominant species, followed by Rattus norvegicus, Rattus exulans, Rattus annandalei and Rattus argentiventer. Two blood protozoan species were found infecting the rodent population namely, Plasmodium sp. (42.1%) and Trypanosoma lewisi (25.0%). This study reports the presence of Plasmodium sp. for the first time in the rodent population in Malaysia. Two main intrinsic factors were identified affecting the parasitic infections. Trypanosoma lewisi infections were influenced by host age and sex with infections observed higher in male and juvenile rats meanwhile Plasmodium sp. infections were observed almost similar in both sexes. However, infections were higher in sub-adult rats.

  7. Over-invasion by functionally equivalent invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James C; Sataruddin, Nurul S; Heard, Allison D

    2014-08-01

    Multiple invasive species have now established at most locations around the world, and the rate of new species invasions and records of new invasive species continue to grow. Multiple invasive species interact in complex and unpredictable ways, altering their invasion success and impacts on biodiversity. Incumbent invasive species can be replaced by functionally similar invading species through competitive processes; however the generalized circumstances leading to such competitive displacement have not been well investigated. The likelihood of competitive displacement is a function of the incumbent advantage of the resident invasive species and the propagule pressure of the colonizing invasive species. We modeled interactions between populations of two functionally similar invasive species and indicated the circumstances under which dominance can be through propagule pressure and incumbent advantage. Under certain circumstances, a normally subordinate species can be incumbent and reject a colonizing dominant species, or successfully colonize in competition with a dominant species during simultaneous invasion. Our theoretical results are supported by empirical studies of the invasion of islands by three invasive Rattus species. Competitive displacement is prominent in invasive rats and explains the replacement of R. exulans on islands subsequently invaded by European populations of R. rattus and R. norvegicus. These competition outcomes between invasive species can be found in a broad range of taxa and biomes, and are likely to become more common. Conservation management must consider that removing an incumbent invasive species may facilitate invasion by another invasive species. Under very restricted circumstances of dominant competitive ability but lesser impact, competitive displacement may provide a novel method of biological control.

  8. CNS active potentials of some Hypericum species of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P K; Suresh, B; Verpoorte, R

    2001-09-01

    Hypericum is a large genus comprising 200 species, wide spread on temperate region and tropical mountains. Several different species are available in Indian subcontinent. Psychopharmacological profiles of the two different Hypericum species e.g., H. hookerianum and H. patulum available in Nilgiris, India were investigated at two different doses (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) in different animal models viz. Spontaneous motor activity (SMA) test in mice; Exploratory behaviour test by Head dip test in mice and Y-maze test in rats; Effects on pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in mice and study of the effects on body temperature in rats. All the extracts tested showed enhancement in spontaneous motor activity (SMA) in mice and exploratory behavior by head dip test in mice and Y-maze test in rats. The extracts reduce significantly the pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in mice. When tested for their effect on body temperature in rats, the extract of H. hookerianum showed significant reduction in yeast induced pyrexia with no effect on normal body temperature, while H. patulum showed no activity in this experimental model.

  9. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Sheila L.; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R.B.; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R.; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals—depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles—varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ∼120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  10. Verbascum kurdistanicum (Scrophulariaceae, a new species from Hakkâri, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fırat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Verbascum kurdistanicum Fırat (Scrophulariaceae, is described and illustrated as a new species that is located in Hakkâri, Turkey. In this study, diagnostic morphological characters of this and closely related species (V. oreophilum K.Koch and V. pyramidatum M. Bieb are discussed. Furthermore, distribution maps for the three taxa are provided.

  11. Green juice as a protector against reactive species in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pathise S; Saccon, Tatiana D; da Silva, Tatiane M; Costa, Marcelo Z; Dutra, Filipe S P; de Vasconcelos, Alana; Lencina, Claiton L; Stefanello, Francieli M; Barschak, Alethéa G

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El zumo verde es conocido popularmente como fuente de antioxidantes, mejorando la función intestinal y reduciendo la ganancia de peso. Objetivos: En este estudio determinamos el efecto antioxidante del zumo verde en comparación con el zumo de naranja. Métodos: Se dividió a las ratas en tres grupos experimentales y se las sometió a un suplemento durante 15 días: el grupo ZV recibió zumo verde, el grupo ZN recibió zumo de naranja y el grupo control recibió agua. Evaluamos la actividad antioxidante y el contenido total en fenoles de los zumos verde y de naranja, así como la ganancia de peso en las ratas. También investigamos algunos parámetros del estrés oxidativo, en concreto las sustancias reactivas del ácido tiobarbitúrico (SRATB), la superóxido dismutasa y la catalasa en la corteza cerebral de las ratas. Resultados y discusión: Los resultados mostraron que el ZV producía una ganancia de peso significativamente menor que en el grupo control. Con respecto al estudio de la actividad antioxidante, el porcentaje restante de DPPH en diluciones al 1:10, 1:100 y 1:1000 de zumo verde fue del 22,8%, 58% y 78%, y para el zumo de naranja, a las mismas diluciones, fue del 5,6%, 5,6% y 77,2%, respectivamente. La capacidad de los zumos para reducir el radical de ATB fue de 3,5 mmol trolox/l para el zumo verde y de 5,2 mmol trolox/l para el zumo de naranja. Adicionalmente, el zumo verde no mostró ninguna diferencia en el contenido total de ácido fenólico en comparación con el zumo de naranja. Las SRATB se redujeron con el ZV y el ZN. Además, el suplemento con ZV disminuyó la actividad catalasa. En conclusión, nuestros datos mostraron que el zumo verde redujo la ganancia de peso, la lipoperoxidación y la actividad catalasa, lo que sugiere que este suplemento podría tener un efecto protector frente a las especies reactivas.

  12. Stomach nematodes (Mastophorus Muris) in rats (Rattus rattus) are associated with coconut (Cocos nucifera) Habitat at palmyra atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, K.D.; Hathaway, S.A.; Wegmann, A.S.; Shipley, F.S.; Backlin, A.R.; Helm, J.; Fisher, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Black rats (Rattus rattus) and their stomach nematodes (Mastophorus muris) were historically introduced to islets at Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific Line Islands. To investigate patterns of parasitism, we trapped rats and quantified nematodes on 13 islets of various sizes and habitat types. Most rats were parasitized (59) with an average of 12 worms per infected rat. Islet size did not greatly influence parasite population biology. Nematodes also did not appear to affect rat condition (weight to skull length). The only strong and consistent factor associated with the mean abundance of nematodes in rats was habitat (dominant cover and locally dominant plant species). Thus, nematodes were much more abundant in rats from sites dominated by coconut trees (Cocos nucifera). Coconut trees may also be an introduced species at Palmyra Atoll. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2010.

  13. Stomach nematodes (Mastophorus muris) in rats (Rattus rattus) are associated with coconut (Cocos nucifera) habitat at Palmyra Atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Hathaway, Stacie A; Wegmann, Alex S; Shipley, Frank S; Backlin, Adam R; Helm, Joel; Fisher, Robert N

    2010-02-01

    Black rats ( Rattus rattus ) and their stomach nematodes (Mastophorus muris) were historically introduced to islets at Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific Line Islands. To investigate patterns of parasitism, we trapped rats and quantified nematodes on 13 islets of various sizes and habitat types. Most rats were parasitized (59%) with an average of 12 worms per infected rat. Islet size did not greatly influence parasite population biology. Nematodes also did not appear to affect rat condition (weight to skull length). The only strong and consistent factor associated with the mean abundance of nematodes in rats was habitat (dominant cover and locally dominant plant species). Thus, nematodes were much more abundant in rats from sites dominated by coconut trees (Cocos nucifera). Coconut trees may also be an introduced species at Palmyra Atoll.

  14. Vkorc1 sequencing suggests anticoagulant resistance in rats in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Phil E; Gleeson, Dianne M; Howitt, Robyn Lj; Ramón-Laca, Ana; Esther, Alexandra; Pelz, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulant toxins are used globally to control rats. Resistance of Rattus species to these toxins now occurs in at least 18 countries in Europe, America and Asia. Resistance is often associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Vkorc1 gene. This study gives a first overview of the distribution and frequency of Vkorc1 SNPs in rats in New Zealand. New Zealand is unusual in having no native rodents but three species of introduced Rattus - norvegicus Berk., rattus L. and exulans Peale. Sequence variants occurred in at least one species of rat at all 30 of the sites sampled. Three new SNPs were identified, one in kiore and two in ship rats. No SNPs previously associated with resistance were found in Norway rats or kiore, but seven ship rats were heterozygous and one homozygous for the A74T variant. Its resultant Tyr25Phe mutation has previously been associated with resistance to both first- and second-generation anticoagulants in ship rats in Spain. This is the first evidence of potential resistance to anticoagulant toxins in rats in New Zealand. Further testing using blood clotting response times in dosed rats is needed to confirm resistance potentially conferred by the Tyr25Phe mutation. Assessment is also needed of the potential of the other non-synonymous variants (Ala14Val, Ala26Val) recorded in this study to confer resistance to anticoagulant toxins. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Inhibition of rat, mouse, and human glutathione S-transferase by eugenol and its oxidation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Ploemen, J.H.T.M.; Jespersen, S.; Greef, J. van der; Verhagen, H.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1996-01-01

    The irreversible and reversible inhibition of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) by eugenol was studied in rat, mouse and man. Using liver cytosol of human, rat and mouse, species differences were found in the rate of irreversible inhibition of GSTs by eugenol in the presence of the enzyme tyrosinase

  16. Perinatal L-arginine and antioxidant supplements reduce adult blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racasan, S; Braam, B; van der Giezen, DM; Goldschmeding, R; Boer, P; Koomans, HA; Joles, JA

    2004-01-01

    Embryo cross-transplantation and cross-fostering between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive rats (WKY) suggest that perinatal environment modulates the genetically determined phenotype. In SHR the balance between NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) is disturbed. We hypothesized

  17. Laughing Rats? Playful Tickling Arouses High-Frequency Ultrasonic Chirping in Young Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panksepp, Jaak; Burgdorf, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In this reprint of a seminal article, once considered quite controversial, the authors discuss their radical claim that rats laugh. Even more provocative, the authors found that this rat-joy sound, especially evident during play, could be amplified dramatically by what they formally call heterospecific (cross-species) handplay (tickling). The…

  18. Vivendo no método canguru a tríade mãe-filho-família Viviendo en el método canguru la tríade madre-hijo-familia Living the mother-child-family triad in the kangaroo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laise Conceição Caetano

    2005-08-01

    con el hijo en el método canguro o con la familia.This study focuses on the experience of families in the Kangaroo Mother Method (KM and aims to understand the functioning of the family dynamics and to apprehend the family transformations as a result of their experience in the method. The study used Symbolic Interactionism as a theoretical and Grounded Theory as a methodological reference framework. Data revealed the following phenomena: having an unexpected evolution and outcome of pregnancy, which is a phase in which the parents go through a pregnancy and suffer due to its premature interruption; coping with the prematurity of the child, in which the parents get into the world of prematurity and face the need to act for the child's survival; and living with the decision and the experience together with the child, which reveals the possibility of staying in hospital in the KM or not. These phenomena led to the central category: weighing the risks and benefits between staying with the child in the kangaroo method or with the family.

  19. 袋鼠式护理配合母乳吸吮对新生儿足跟采血所致疼痛程度的影响%Influence of Kangaroo care with breast sucking on pain degree caused by neonatal heel prick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁林娟; 秦玲; 高倩; 梁文波; 黄海燕

    2016-01-01

    [目的]探究分析袋鼠式护理配合母乳吸吮对新生儿足跟采血所致疼痛程度的影响。[方法]随机选取我院在2014年8月-2015年7月接收的95例行足跟采血的新生儿为研究对象,随机分为观察组(48例)和对照组(47例)。对照组采用常规护理干预,观察组在新生儿足跟采血前后实施袋鼠式护理,对比分析两组新生儿的疼痛程度、血氧饱和度及心率变化情况。[结果]观察组新生儿的急性疼痛行为评分(6.32±1.05)分,明显低于对照组(7.83±1.27)分;观察组新生儿的疼痛程度也明显轻于对照组(P<0.05);观察组护理满意度(97.92%)显著高于对照组(87.23%),两组对比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。[结论]袋鼠式护理配合母乳吸吮能够显著缓解新生儿足跟采血前后的疼痛程度,有效改善了足跟采血所致疼痛对新生儿的刺激,同时也明显提高了护理满意度。%Objective:To probe into and analyze the influence of kangaroo care with breast sucking on pain degree caused by neonatal heel prick.Methods:A total of 9 5 cases of neonates receiving heel prick in hospital were ran-domly selected from August 2014 to July 2015 and randomly divided into observation group(48 cases)and con-trol group(47 cases).The neonates in control group received routine nursing intervention,the neonates in obser-vation group received the kangaroo care before and after the implementation of the neonatal heel prick,then to compare and analyze the degree of pain,blood oxygen saturation and heart rate changes between the two groups of newborns.Results:The acute pain behavior score in observation group of newborns was(6.32±1.05),signif-icantly lower than that in control group(7.83±1.27);the degree of pain in observation group of neonates was also significantly lighter than that in control group(P<0.05);the care satisfaction in observation group(97.92%) was significantly higher(87.23%),and the difference was statistically

  20. Reactive oxygen species inactivation improves pancreatic capillary blood flow in caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats A inativação de radicais livres melhora o fluxo capilar pancreático em pancreatite aguda induzida por ceruleína em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ferreira Meirelles Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Reactive oxygen species (ROS inactivation was studied to determine alterations in the pancreatic capillary blood flow (PCBF during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: A laser-Doppler flowmeter to measure PCBF and N-t-Butyl-Phenylnitrone (PBN compound to inactivate ROS were used. Forty rats were divided in groups: 1 control; 2 caerulein; 3 PBN; 4 caerulein+PBN. Serum biochemistry and histopathological analyses were performed. RESULTS: PCBF measured a mean of 109.08 ± 14.54%, 68.24 ± 10.47%, 102.18 ± 10.23% and 87.73 ± 18.72% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. PCBF in groups 2 and 4 decreased 31.75 ± 16.79% and 12.26 ± 15.24%, respectively. Serum amylase was 1323.70 ± 239.10 U/l, 2184.60 ± 700.46 U/l, 1379.80 ± 265.72 U/l and 1622.10 ± 314.60 U/l in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. There was a significant difference in the PCBF and serum amylase when compared groups 2 and 4. Cytoplasmatic vacuolation was present in groups 2 and 4. Otherwise, no qualitative changes were seen. CONCLUSION: ROS inactivation improves PCBF and minimizes the serum amylase increase during caerulein-induced pancreatitis. ROS effect may be one of the leading causative events in this model of acute pancreatitis.OBJETIVO: A inativação de radicais livres (RL foi estudada para determinar as alterações do fluxo capilar pancreático (FCP na pancreatite aguda induzida por ceruleína em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um laser-Doppler fluxímetro determinou o FCP e o composto N-t-Butyl-Phenylnitrone (PBN, para inativar os RL, foi utilizado. Quarenta ratos foram divididos em 4 grupos: 1 controle; 2ceruleína; 3 PBN; 4ceruleína+PBN. Dosagens bioquímicas e análise histopatológica foram realizadas. RESULTADOS: O FCP foi em média 109.08 ± 14.54%, 68.24 ± 10.47%, 102.18 ± 10.23% e 87.73 ± 18.72% nos grupos 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectivamente. O FCP nos grupos 2 e 4 diminuíram em média 31.75 ± 16.79% e 12.26 ± 15.24%, respectivamente. A média da

  1. In Vitro Metabolism of Tamoxifen in Human, Rat, and Fish Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from an in vivo study comparing biologically-active metabolites in the plasma of Wistar rats and cunner fish (Tautogolabrus adspersus) treated with tamoxifen indicate notable differences in circulating metabolite concentrations between these two species. After a single or...

  2. Sleep deprivation in pigeons and rats using motion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sarah M; Paletz, Elliott M; Obermeyer, William H; Benca, Ruth M

    2009-10-01

    Forced sleep deprivation results in substantial behavioral and physiologic effects in mammals. The disk-over-water (DOW) method produces a syndrome characterized by increased energy expenditure and a robust preferentially rapid-eye-movement sleep rebound upon recovery or eventual death after several weeks of sleep deprivation. The DOW has been used successfully only in rats. This paper presents a method to enforce long-term controlled sleep deprivation across species and to compare its effects in rats and pigeons. A conveyor was substituted for the DOW disk. Behavior rather than electroencephalography was used to trigger arousal stimuli, as in gentle-handling deprivation. Rats and pigeons were deprived using this apparatus, and the results were compared with each other and with published reports. The physiologic consequences and recovery sleep in rats were like those published for DOW rats. Magnitude of sleep loss and recovery patterns in pigeons were similar to those seen in rats, but expected symptoms of the sleep deprivation syndrome were absent in pigeons. The use of a motion trigger allowed us to measure and, thus, to assess the quality and impact of the procedure. Prolonged and controlled sleep deprivation can be enforced using automated motion detection and a conveyor-over-water system. Pigeons and rats, deprived of sleep to the same extent, showed similar patterns of recovery sleep, but pigeons did not exhibit the hyperphagia, weight loss, and debilitation seen in rats.

  3. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  4. Gender and Species-Mediated Differences in the In Vitro Metabolism of Triadimefon by Rodent Hepatic Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding how metabolism kinetics differ between genders and species is important in developing informative pharmacokinetic models and accurately assessing risk. Metabolism of the conazole fungicide Triadimefon (TDN) was studied in hepatic microsomes of SD rats and CD-1 mice...

  5. Support your local species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stärk, Johanna

    Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management. Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby...

  6. The Origin of Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darwin, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In The Origin of Species Darwin outlined his theory of evolution, which proposed that species had been evolving and differentiating over time under the influence of natural selection. On its publication it became hugely influential, bringing about a seismic shift in the scientific view of humanitys

  7. The Origin of Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darwin, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In The Origin of Species Darwin outlined his theory of evolution, which proposed that species had been evolving and differentiating over time under the influence of natural selection. On its publication it became hugely influential, bringing about a seismic shift in the scientific view of humanitys

  8. A multi-scale distribution model for non-equilibrium populations suggests resource limitation in an endangered rodent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Bean

    Full Text Available Species distributions are known to be limited by biotic and abiotic factors at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Species distribution models, however, frequently assume a population at equilibrium in both time and space. Studies of habitat selection have repeatedly shown the difficulty of estimating resource selection if the scale or extent of analysis is incorrect. Here, we present a multi-step approach to estimate the realized and potential distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat. First, we estimate the potential distribution by modeling suitability at a range-wide scale using static bioclimatic variables. We then examine annual changes in extent at a population-level. We define "available" habitat based on the total suitable potential distribution at the range-wide scale. Then, within the available habitat, model changes in population extent driven by multiple measures of resource availability. By modeling distributions for a population with robust estimates of population extent through time, and ecologically relevant predictor variables, we improved the predictive ability of SDMs, as well as revealed an unanticipated relationship between population extent and precipitation at multiple scales. At a range-wide scale, the best model indicated the giant kangaroo rat was limited to areas that received little to no precipitation in the summer months. In contrast, the best model for shorter time scales showed a positive relation with resource abundance, driven by precipitation, in the current and previous year. These results suggest that the distribution of the giant kangaroo rat was limited to the wettest parts of the drier areas within the study region. This multi-step approach reinforces the differing relationship species may have with environmental variables at different scales, provides a novel method for defining "available" habitat in habitat selection studies, and suggests a way to create distribution models at spatial and

  9. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extragastric Helicobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Hynes, S.; Wadstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Helicobacter has expanded at a rapid pace and no fewer than 31 species have been named since the proposal of the genus in 1989. Of these 31 species, 22 are principally associated with extragastric niches and there is increasing interest in the role of these taxa in diseases of humans...... and animals. Substantial evidence attests to certain species playing a role in the pathogenesis of enteric, hepatic and biliary disorders and some taxa demonstrate zoonotic potential. The importance of extragastric Helicobacters is likely to be an important topic for research in the near future. Here...

  11. SWEEP Project RAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Søren; Petersen, L. B.

    This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea.......This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea....

  12. Oral teratogenicity studies of methyl bromide in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, M; Hojo, H; Teramoto, S; Maita, K

    1998-05-01

    Teratogenicity studies of methyl bromide, a widely used fumigant, were conducted in rats and rabbits. Methyl bromide was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally to groups of 24 copulated female Crj:CD (SD) rats at dose levels of 0 (corn oil), 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg/day on days 6-15 of gestation and to groups of 18 artificially inseminated female Kbl:JW rabbits at 0, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg/day on days 6-18 of gestation. Maternal rats and rabbits were euthanized on respective days 20 and 27 of gestation. Foetuses were examined for survival, growth and teratological alterations. Maternal toxicity was evident in the high-dose groups for both species. In these groups, maternal body weight gains and food consumption were significantly decreased during the dosing and post-dosing periods. Necropsy of maternal rats also revealed erosive lesions in the stomach and the surrounding organs. However, no treatment-related adverse effects were found in foetuses of the treated groups for both rat and rabbit studies. These results led to the conclusion that methyl bromide was not foetotoxic or teratogenic to rat and rabbit foetuses up to dose levels of 30 and 10 mg/kg/day, respectively, at which maternal toxicity was evident for both species.

  13. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages.

  14. Dietary choline deprivation impairs rat brain mitochondrial function and behavioral phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Consiglia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Cocco, Tiziana; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Paradies, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Massaro, Antonio; Persichella, Michele; Borracci, Pietro; Portincasa, Piero; Carratù, Maria Rosaria

    2010-06-01

    Dietary choline deprivation (CD) is associated with behavioral changes, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not well characterized. For instance, no literature data are available concerning the CD effects on brain mitochondrial function related to impairment in cognition. Therefore, we investigated brain mitochondrial function and redox status in male Wistar rats fed a CD diet for 28 d. Moreover, the CD behavioral phenotype was characterized. Compared with rats fed a control diet (CTRL), CD rats showed lower NAD-dependent mitochondrial state III and state IV respiration, 40% lower complex I activity, and significantly higher reactive oxygen species production. Total glutathione was oxidatively consumed more in CD than in CTRL rats and the rate of protein oxidation was 40% higher in CD than in CTRL rats, reflecting an oxidative stress condition. The mitochondrial concentrations of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, was 20% lower in CD rats than in CTRL rats. Compared with CTRL rats, the behavioral phenotype of CD rats was characterized by impairment in motor coordination and motor learning assessed with the rotarod/accelerod test. Furthermore, compared with CTRL rats, CD rats were less capable of learning the active avoidance task and the number of attempts they made to avoid foot shock was fewer. The results suggest that CD-induced dysfunction in brain mitochondria may be responsible for impairment in cognition and underline that, similar to the liver, the brain also needs an adequate choline supply for its normal functioning.

  15. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  16. DENTURE WEARER: ALCALIGENES SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with Alcaligenes species infection in a patient using an upper single ... patient was HIV negative and VDRL screening for syphilis was also negative. ... status of denture and the underlying oral mucosal, to prevent opportunistic.

  17. Arctic species resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Jeppesen, Erik

    and precipitation. Concurrently, phenological change has been recorded in a wide range of plants and animals, with climate change seemingly being the primary driver of these changes. A major concern is whether species and biological systems embrace the plasticity in their phenological responses needed for tracking...... the predicted increase in climate variability. Whereas species may show relatively high phenological resilience to climate change per se, the resilience of systems may be more constrained by the inherent dependence through consumer-resource interactions across trophic levels. During the last 15 years...... Zackenberg Basic, a newly initiated project is focusing on how the changes and variability in the physical environment affects the species phenology and composition, population dynamics and how species specific responses at different trophic levels are carried on to the inter-trophic dynamics of consumers...

  18. Fire Management Species Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the Fire Management Species Profile project is to identify habitat management objectives that are specific, measurable, achievable, clearly...

  19. Sub specie aeternitatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioeni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Per delineare il rapporto tra etica ed estetica nell'architettura e rispondere alla domanda principale «che cosa è o dovrebbe essere un buon architetto?», il saggio discute la tesi di Wittgenstein secondo cui «l'opera d'arte è l'oggetto visto sub specie aeternitatis e la vita buona è il mondo visto sub specie aeternitatis. Questa è la connessione tra arte ed etica».

  20. Interação mãe-bebê pré-termo e mudança no estado de humor: comparação do Método Mãe-Canguru com visita na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal Interaction between mothers and pre-term infants and mood changes: a comparison between the Kangaroo Mother Method and those observed on a visit to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guimarães Cruvinel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar mudanças nos estados de humor de mães de bebês pré-termo em função do tipo de contato com o seu filho: Método Mãe-Canguru (MMC e visita ao filho na incubadora da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. MÉTODOS: foi aplicada a Escala Analógica de Humor em 60 mães divididas em 2 grupos: mães que participam do Método Mãe-Canguru (GC e mães que acompanharam o bebê na incubadora (GI. Os grupos foram pareados em função da idade das mães, número de gestações e tipo de parto. As mães foram avaliadas antes e depois de uma das visitas ao filho na incubadora ou sessão de MMC. RESULTADOS: as mães do GC melhoraram o humor, relatando: sentirem-se mais calmas, fortes, com idéias claras, ágeis, dinâmicas, satisfeitas, tranqüilas, perspicazes, relaxadas, atentas, competentes, alegres e amistosas. As mães do GI não apresentaram melhora no estado de humor em nenhum item, mas pioraram no item "sentindo-se desajeitada". CONCLUSÕES: o Método Mãe-Canguru mostrou-se eficaz na melhora nos estados de humor de mães de bebês pré-termo, contribuindo assim para a minimização dos efeitos negativos da internação neonatal.OBJECTIVE: to assess changes in the subjective state of mood of mothers of pre-term babies, comparing different kinds of mother-infant interaction: the Kangaroo Mother Method (KMM and those observed on a visit to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: the Visual Analogue Mood Scale was used with 60 mothers divided into two groups: mothers included in the Kangaroo Program (KG and mothers with a baby on an incubator (IG. The groups were matched for the mothers' age, number of pregnancies and kind of delivery. The mothers were evaluated before and after a visit to the baby on an incubator or a KMM session. RESULTS: it was found that KG mothers were in a better mood, reporting that they felt calmer, stronger, more clear-headed, more agile, dynamic, satisfied, at ease, perceptive, relaxed, considerate

  1. Programa mãe-canguru e a relação mãe-bebê: pesquisa qualitativa na rede pública de Betim El programa madre-canguro y la relación madre-bebé: pesquisa cualitativade en la red pública de Betim Kangaroo mother program and the relationship mother-baby: qualitative research in a public maternity of Betim city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Oliveira Moreira

    2009-09-01

    ás, que la madre, familiares, el equipo pueden crear un ambiente facilitador a partir del momento en que asumen una postura activa en la mediación de la relación del prematuro con el mundo.This text approaches the results of the qualitative research financed by FAPEMIG and PUC-MINAS and aims to investigate the effects of the kangaroo mother method in the relationship between the mother and the newborn baby. The field research had the data collected by semi structural interviews conducted with the mothers of newborn babies egressed from the Kangaroo program of Betim's Public Maternity named Maternidade Municipal Aidée Conroy Espejo. We utilized the content analyses with thematic categories on data assessment. The results showed the complexity of motherhood inside the prematurity, crossed by the trauma experience, by the fear of losing the baby and by the vision of the child's fragility. In this context, the Kangaroo-Mother Program facilitates the relationship between the mother and the premature baby, contributing to the dyadic's bound. We concluded that mother, family members, and staff can provide a facilitating environment as they take on an active attitude in the mediation between the premature relationship and the world.

  2. Core reserve expansion requirement/Long-term SKR HCP

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This letter is regarding the Stephens Kangaroo Rat Habitat Conservation Plan (SKR HCP) which requires that the Riverside County Habitat Conservation Agency establish...

  3. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  4. SWEEP Project RAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Søren; Petersen, L. B.

    This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea....

  5. Chemical-specific adjustment factors (inter-species toxicokinetics) to establish the ADI for steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ashley; Lynch, Barry; Rogerson, Rebecca; Renwick, Andrew; Kern, Hua; Coffee, Matthew; Cuellar-Kingston, Nicole; Eapen, Alex; Crincoli, Christine; Pugh, George; Bhusari, Sachin; Purkayastha, Sidd; Carakostas, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The acceptable daily intake (ADI) of commercially available steviol glycosides is currently 0-4 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day, based on application of a 100-fold uncertainty factor to a no-observed-adverse-effect-level value from a chronic rat study. Within the 100-fold uncertainty factor is a 10-fold uncertainty factor to account for inter-species differences in toxicokinetics (4-fold) and toxicodynamics (2.5-fold). Single dose pharmacokinetics of stevioside were studied in rats (40 and 1000 mg/kg bw) and in male human subjects (40 mg/kg bw) to generate a chemical-specific, inter-species toxicokinetic adjustment factor. Tmax values for steviol were at ∼8 and ∼20 h after administration in rats and humans, respectively. Peak concentrations of steviol were similar in rats and humans, while steviol glucuronide concentrations were significantly higher in humans. Glucuronidation in rats was not saturated over the dose range 40-1000 mg/kg bw. The AUC0-last for steviol was approximately 2.8-fold greater in humans compared to rats. Chemical-specific adjustment factors for extrapolating toxicokinetics from rat to human of 1 and 2.8 were established based on Cmax and AUC0-last data respectively. Because these factors are lower than the default value of 4.0, a higher ADI for steviol glycosides of between 6 and 16 mg/kg bw/d is justified.

  6. Rat-derived processed nerve allografts support more axon regeneration in rat than human-derived processed nerve xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Matthew D; Kemp, Stephen W P; Liu, Edward H; Szynkaruk, Mark; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2014-04-01

    Processed nerve allografts are increasingly used as "off the shelf" nerve replacements for surgically bridging nerve gaps. Benchmarking the regenerative capacity of a commercially available human-derived nerve or xenograft in a rat nerve injury model would provide a convenient platform for future studies seeking to modify the processed nerve graft. Human and rat processed nerve grafts were used to bridge a 14 mm defect in a Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerve. Reversed autografts served as a positive control group. Twelve weeks following surgery, the distal nerve stumps were retrograde labeled and harvested for histology and histomorphometry. The cross-sectional areas of the human- and rat-derived processed nerve grafts were similar. Neuron counts and myelinated axon counts following use of the human-derived processed xenografts were decreased compared with those obtained from both the rat-derived processed nerve allografts and the autografts; the rat-derived processed nerve allografts were statistically equivalent to autografts. Measures of nerve fiber diameter and myelination revealed inferior axon regeneration maturity in both processed nerve grafts compared with autografts. Processed xenografts showed significantly reduced regeneration compared with autografts or processed allografts indicating that cross-species immunological reactions are important considerations in this rat model. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Power of Classic Music to Reduce Anxiety in Rats Treated with Simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to investigate the effects of music in Wistar rats after sub-chronic treatment of simvastatin. The rats were orally administered with either simvastatin or saline (controls. After 4 weeks of drug treatment, the rats were selected for behavioral studies. The rats were exposed to music 24 hours before behavioral tests (Mozart’s piano sonata, KV361, Largo. Results: The experiments suggest that exposure to chronic treatment with simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day reduced anxiety levels in rats when associated with Mozart music in an elevated plus-maze. Discussion: These results indicate that music can serve as an effective adjuvant in rats treated with simvastatin, and that this species could potentially be used in other preclinical models utilizing musical interventions.

  8. Concepts of keystone species and species importance in ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper discussed the keystone species concept and introduced the typical characteristics of keystone species and their identification in communities or ecosystems. Based on the research of the keystone species, the concept of species importance (SI) was first advanced in this paper. The species importance can be simply understood as the important value of species in the ecosystem, which consists of three indexes: species structural important value (SIV), functional important value (FIV) and dynamical important value (DIV). With the indexes, the evaluation was also made on species importance of arbor trees in the Three-Hardwood forests (Fraxinus mandshurica, Juglans mandshurica, and Phellodendron amurense) ecosystem.

  9. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  10. Management of invasive species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper Sølver; Jensen, Frank

    In this paper, we conduct a number of cost-benefit analyses to clarify whether the establishment of invasive species should be prevented or the damage of such species should be mitigated after introduction. We use the potential establishment of ragweed in Denmark as an empirical case. The main...... impact of the establishment of this invasive species is a substantial increase in the number of allergy cases, which we use as a measure of the physical damage. As valuation methods, we use both the cost-of-illness method and the benefit transfer method to quantify the total gross benefits of the two...... policy actions. Based on the idea of an invasion function, we identify the total and average net benefit under both prevention and mitigation. For both policy actions, the total and average net benefits are significantly positive irrespective of the valuation method used; therefore, both prevention...

  11. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  12. Comportamento da produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio em miocárdio de ratos submetidos a treinamento de baixa intensidade em diferentes temperaturas Behavior of oxygen reactive species production in myocardium of rats submitted to low intensity training under different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Netto Jr.

    2007-12-01

    ício.INTRODUCTION: The practice of physical exercise causes increase in production of oxygen reactive species (ORS, derived from the aerobic metabolism, creating a significant amount of heat due to the energy production resulting in organic overload. The associations between ORS and exercise, as well as exercise and air temperature variations have been studied; however there is a lack of information on the scientific literature concerning the association between the myocardium free radicals production and physical activity under high temperature. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to compare the myocardium ORS production in rats submitted to low intensity training at different temperatures. METHODOLOGY: Twenty Wistar young male rats, with weight rage from 250 and 280 grams were used. They were divided in four groups: (G1 n = 5 exposed to training and heat (39 ± 1°C; (G2 n = 5 exposed to heat without training; (G3 n = 5 exposed to training and air temperature (22 ± 1°C; (G4 n = 5 exposed to air temperature without training. The training was performed on a treadmill in a controlled temperature room during 5 weeks, increasing 5 minutes every two sessions, reaching a total of 60 minutes under low intensity effort, 8 m/min. Room temperature was controlled between 39 ± 1° and 22 ± 1°, as well as between 40 to 60% of relative humidity. Lipoperoxidase was evaluated by Chemiluminescense (QL. Data analysis was accomplished using Two-Way ANOVA test. RESULTS: The QL analysis results revealed a light emission curve significantly lower for the animals exposed to room temperature exercise, compared to the sedentary ones kept under heat. TRAP analysis has showed a decrease in every experimental group in relation to G4. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that there were lower levels of ORS production in the groups submitted either to heat only or exercise only.

  13. Variation in nocturnality and circadian activity rhythms between photoresponsive F344 and nonphotoresponsive Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroka, Cheryl D; Johnson, Cynthia E; Heideman, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Background Variation in circadian rhythms and nocturnality may, hypothetically, be related to or independent of genetic variation in photoperiodic mediation of seasonal changes in physiology and behavior. We hypothesized that strain variation in photoperiodism between photoperiodic F344 rats and nonphotoperiodic Harlan Sprague Dawley (HSD) rats might be caused by underlying variation in clock function. We predicted that HSD rats would have more activity during the day or subjective day, longer free-running rhythms, poor entrainment to short day length, and shorter duration of activity, traits that have been associated with nonphotoperiodism in other laboratory rodent species, relative to F344 rats. An alternative hypothesis, that differences are due to variation in melatonin secretion or responses to melatonin, predicts either no such differences or inconsistent combinations of differences. Methods We tested these predictions by examining activity rhythms of young male F344 and HSD rats given access to running wheels in constant dark (DD), short day length (L8:D16; SD), and long day length (L16:D8; LD). We compared nocturnality (the proportion of activity during night or subjective night), duration of activity (alpha), activity onset and offset, phase angle of entrainment, and free running rhythms (tau) of F344 and HSD rats. Results HSD rats had significantly greater activity during the day, were sometimes arrhythmic in DD, and had significantly longer tau than F344 rats, consistent with predictions. However, HSD rats had significantly longer alpha than F344 rats and both strains entrained to SD, inconsistent with predictions. Conclusion The ability of HSD rats to entrain to SD, combined with longer alpha than F344 rats, suggests that the circadian system of HSD rats responds correctly to SD. These data offer best support for the alternative hypothesis, that differences in photoresponsiveness between F344 and HSD rats are caused by non-circadian differences in

  14. A new species of Curvularia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der H.A.

    1967-01-01

    Curvularia papendorfii, isolated from South African soil, is described as a new species. This species is characterized by greater overall dimensions than in any of the known species, and a hilum to the spore that is not protuberant at all.

  15. Prices and species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes

    of biodiversity and the appropriate incorporation in stochastic fron-tier models to achieve more realistic measures of production efficiency. We use the empirical example of tobacco production drawing from as well as affecting species diversity in the surrounding forests. We apply a shadow profit distance....... Based on a biologically defined species diver-sity index we incorporate biodiversity either as a desirable output or biodiversity loss as a detrimental input. Beside quantitative shadow price measures the main contribu-tion of the work is the evidence that parametric scores of environmental efficiency...

  16. Prices and species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes

    . Based on a biologically defined species diver-sity index we incorporate biodiversity either as a desirable output or biodiversity loss as a detrimental input. Beside quantitative shadow price measures the main contribu-tion of the work is the evidence that parametric scores of environmental efficiency...... of biodiversity and the appropriate incorporation in stochastic fron-tier models to achieve more realistic measures of production efficiency. We use the empirical example of tobacco production drawing from as well as affecting species diversity in the surrounding forests. We apply a shadow profit distance...

  17. Bioterrorism and invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, B B; Sun, B

    2010-08-01

    The risk of dispersing invasive species, especially human pathogens, through acts of bioterrorism, cannot be neglected. However, that risk appears quite low in comparison with the risk of dispersing animal pathogens that could dramatically burden the agricultural economy of food animal producing countries, such as Australia and countries in Europe and North and South America. Although it is not directly related to bioterrorism, the intentional release of non-native species, particularly undesired companion animals or wildlife, may also have a major economic impact on the environment and, possibly, on animal and human health, in the case of accidental release of zoonotic agents.

  18. Invasive rats alter woody seedling composition on seabird-dominated islands in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Hoffman, Madeline N; Mulder, Christa P; Bellingham, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Invasive rats (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus, R. exulans) have large impacts on island habitats through both direct and indirect effects on plants. Rats affect vegetation by extirpating burrowing seabirds through consumption of eggs, chicks, and adults. These seabirds serve as ecosystem engineers, affecting plant communities by burying and trampling seeds and seedlings, and by altering microclimate. Rats also directly affect plant communities by consuming seeds and seedlings. We studied the direct and indirect impacts of rats on the seedlings of woody plants on 21 islands in northern New Zealand. We compared seedling densities and richness on islands which differed in status with respect to rats: nine islands where rats never invaded, seven islands where rats were present at the time of our study, and five islands where rats were either eradicated or where populations were likely to be small as a result of repeated eradications and re-invasions. In addition, we compared plots from a subset of the 21 islands with different burrow densities to examine the effects of burrowing seabirds on plants while controlling for other factors that differ between islands. We categorized plant communities by species composition and seedling density in a cluster analysis. We found that burrow densities explained more variation in seedling communities than rat status. In areas with high seabird burrow density seedling densities were low, especially for the smallest seedlings. Species richness and diversity of seedlings, but not seedling density, were most influenced by changes in microclimate induced by seabirds. Islands where rats had been eradicated or that had low rat populations had the lowest diversity and richness of seedlings (and adults), but the highest seedling density. Seedling communities on these islands were dominated by Pseudopanax lessonii and Coprosma macrocarpa. This indicates lasting effects of rats that may prevent islands from returning to pre-invasion states.

  19. Derivation and transcriptional profiling analysis of pluripotent stem cell lines from rat blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunliang Li; Ying Yang; Junjie Gu; Yu Ma; Ying Jin

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst-stage embryos. Their unique properties of self-renewal and pluripotency make them an attractive tool for basic research and a potential cell resource for therapy. ES cells of mouse and human have been successfully generated and applied in a wide range of research. However, no genuine ES cell lines have been obtained from rat to date. In this study, we identified pluripotent cells in early rat embryos using specific antibodies against markers of pluripotent stem cells. Subsequently, by modifying the culture medium for rat blastocysts, we derived pluripotent rat ES-llke cell lines, which expressed pluripotency markers and formed embryoid bodies (EBs) in vitro. Importantly, these rat ES-like cells were able to produce teratomas. Both EBs and teratomas contained tissues from all three embryonic germ layers, in addition, from the rat ES-like cells, we derived a rat primitive endoderm (PrE) cell line. Furthermore, we conducted transcriptional profiling of the rat ES-like cells and identified the unique molecular signature of the rat pluripotent stem cells. Our analysis demonstrates that multiple signaling pathways, including the BMP, Activin and roTOR pathways, may be involved in keeping the rat ES-like cells in an undifferentiated state. The cell lines and information obtained in this study will accelerate our understanding of the molecular regulation underlying pluripotency and guide us in the appropriate manipulation of ES cells from a particular species.

  20. Coevolution of Symbiotic Species

    CERN Document Server

    Leok, B T M

    1996-01-01

    This paper will consider the coevolution of species which are symbiotic in their interaction. In particular, we shall analyse the interaction of squirrels and oak trees, and develop a mathematical framework for determining the coevolutionary equilibrium for consumption and production patterns.

  1. In vitro metabolic clearance of pyrethroid pesticides by rat and human hepatic microsomes and cytochrome P450 isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species differences in the intrinsic clearance (CLint) and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of pyrethroid pesticides were examined in rat and human hepatic microsomes. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, S-bioallethrin, bioresmethrin, β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, cis-per...

  2. Differences in hoarding behaviors among six sympatric rodent species on seeds of oil tea ( Camellia oleifera) in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gang; Zhang, Zhibin

    2011-05-01

    Seed hoarding is an important behavioral adaptation to food shortages for many rodent species. Sympatric rodents may affect the natural regeneration of large-seeded trees differently as seed dispersers or seed predators. Using seeds of oil tea ( Camellia oleifera), we investigated differences in hoarding behaviors among six sympatric rodent species in semi-natural enclosures in a subtropical forest in southwest of China. We found that all these six species ate seeds of C. oleifera, but only Edward's long-tailed rats ( Leopoldamys edwardsi) were predominantly scatter hoarders; chestnut rats ( Niviventer fulvescens) and white-bellied rats ( Niviventer confucianus) scatter hoarded and larder hoarded few seeds, but were seed predators; South China field mice ( Apodemus draco) exhibited little larder-hoarding behavior; and Chevrier's field mice ( A. chevrieri) as well as Himalayan rats ( Rattus nitidusa) did not hoard seeds at all. The rodents that engaged in scatter hoarding often formed single-seed caches and tended to cache seeds under grass or shrubs. Our findings indicate that sympatric rodents consuming seeds of the same species of plant can have different hoarding strategies, affecting seed dispersal and plant regeneration differently. We conclude by discussing the role of these species in hoarding seeds of C. oleifera and highlight the essential role of Edward's long-tailed rats as predominantly potential dispersers of this plant species.

  3. 室旁核中血管紧张素Ⅱ通过活性氧介导慢性间歇性低氧大鼠的升压作用%Angiotensin Ⅱ inparaventricular nucleus contributes to hypertension in chronic intermittent hypoxia rats by reactive oxygen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志强; 范一菲; 汪金丽; 程文慧; 沈兵; 钟明奎

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究室旁核( PVN)中血管紧张素Ⅱ( Ang Ⅱ)-活性氧(ROS)通路在慢性间歇性低氧(CIH)大鼠的升压作用。方法将雄性SD大鼠随机分为对照组和慢性间歇性低氧组(CIH 组)(8 h/d,连续15 d)。用立体定位仪进行PVN核团定位微量注射,采用颈动脉插管法在体测量大鼠平均动脉压(MAP),ELISA 法测量 PVN 中 Ang Ⅱ、ROS 含量, Western blot 法测定 PVN 中血管紧张素Ⅱ1型受体(AT1R)的蛋白表达,应用试剂盒(羟胺法)测定PVN中的总超氧化物歧化酶(T-SOD)活力。结果与对照组比较,CIH组大鼠PVN中ROS(P<0.05)和Ang Ⅱ含量显著升高(P<0.01),AT1R的表达显著增加(P<0.05),而T-SOD活力则明显下降( P <0.01)。双侧 PVN 内微量注射 Ang Ⅱ(0.3 nmol)可升高两组大鼠的MAP,而CIH大鼠MAP升高更显著(P<0.01);超氧阴离子清除剂Tempol可降低两组大鼠的MAP,而CIH大鼠MAP降低更显著(P<0.01);Tempol预处理可抑制Ang Ⅱ对两组大鼠的升压作用,且在CIH组中抑制作用更加明显( P<0.01)。结论室旁核中ROS介导了Ang Ⅱ在CIH大鼠中的升压作用。%Objective To investigate the effect of Ang II-ROS signal pathway in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus ( PVN) on chronic intermittent hypoxia( CIH) induced-hypertension in rats. Methods Male SD rats were randomly divided into control and CIH groups. The control rats were exposed to continuous normoxia, while the CIH rats were submitted to CIH (8 h per day for 15 days) . Rats were fixed on the stereotaxic instrument to conduct microinjection in the PVN according to Paxinos and Watson rat atlas. Mean arterial pressure ( MAP) was recorded in vivo on a PowerLab data acquisition system. We used ELISA kit to measure the content of AngⅡ, ROS, total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and Western blot to measure AngⅡtype 1 receptor (AT1R) protein expression in PVN. Results The contents of PVN ROS(P<0. 05)and AngⅡ(P<0. 01) were significantly higher than

  4. Attention and stimulus processing in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J L

    1996-06-01

    There is little doubt that rats are an essential species in laboratory testing. Given the substantial amount of anatomical and pharmacological information which is available for this species, rats are the animal of choice for many initial neurobiological investigations of the basic mechanisms of learning and memory as well as for pharmacological screening. Indeed, the study of brain-behaviour interactions is greatly facilitated in the rat given the ease with which brain transmitter systems and structures can be selectively manipulated, in contrast to the technical difficulties involved in undertaking such techniques in non-human primates. However, when considering the processing of information that occurs during cognitive processes such as learning and memory it is important to remember that fundamental to such processes are mechanisms of attention. When considering the concept of attentional functioning, it is important to keep in mind that attention is not a unitary construct but consists of several distinct mechanisms: vigilance, divided attention and selective attention, not all of which have been adequately modelled in the rat. Furthermore, attentional processes are also involved in learning operant discrimination tasks and appear to be quite different from those involved in maintaining high levels of trained performance. Consideration of discrimination learning is important given that firstly, during such learning the animal must select from the environment those stimuli which are relevant and secondly, that this type of learning is obviously inherent in many other tests used to assess cognitive function, such as delayed matching-to-sample procedures. Such issues will therefore form the basis of the following discussion.

  5. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  6. Short-Term Fire Effects on Small Mammal Populations and Vegetation of the Northern Chihuahuan Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony J. Monasmith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire is an important ecological factor in semidesert grass-shrub community dynamics, but there is a lack of designed field experiments documenting effects on vegetation and small mammals. We document effects of June prescribed fire on vegetation and small mammals on 20, 25-ha study areas in the Northern Chihuahuan Desert of Southern New Mexico, USA one month and one year posttreatment. Canopy cover of shrubs and grasses recovered to 68 and 27% of the preburn canopy cover, respectively, after one year. Prescribed burns during June enhanced short-term forb production by reducing competition from grasses and shrubs. Thirty thousand trap-nights yielded 1744 captures of 766 individuals of 15 small mammal species. Burns did not affect small mammal species richness and species diversity. Relative abundance of Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami was 91% greater on burned sites than on control sites one year postburn. Silky pocket mouse (Perognathus flavus relative abundance was 221% greater on burned sites one year postburn. Chihuahuan Desert pocket mice (Chaetodipus eremicus responded negatively to the fire, with relative abundance 170% greater on control sites (=.080. Burning produced short-term benefits for two heteromyids, Merriam's kangaroo rats and silky pocket mice.

  7. Smell facilitates auditory contagious yawning in stranger rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyaho, Alejandro; Rivas-Zamudio, Xaman; Ugarte, Araceli; Eguibar, José R; Valencia, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Most vertebrates yawn in situations ranging from relaxation to tension, but only humans and other primate species that show mental state attribution skills have been convincingly shown to display yawn contagion. Whether complex forms of empathy are necessary for yawn contagion to occur is still unclear. As empathy is a phylogenetically continuous trait, simple forms of empathy, such as emotional contagion, might be sufficient for non-primate species to show contagious yawning. In this study, we exposed pairs of male rats, which were selected for high yawning, with each other through a perforated wall and found that olfactory cues stimulated yawning, whereas visual cues inhibited it. Unexpectedly, cage-mate rats failed to show yawn contagion, although they did show correlated emotional reactivity. In contrast, stranger rats showed auditory contagious yawning and greater rates of smell-facilitated auditory contagious yawning, although they did not show correlated emotional reactivity. Strikingly, they did not show contagious yawning to rats from a low-yawning strain. These findings indicate that contagious yawning may be a widespread trait amongst vertebrates and that mechanisms other than empathy may be involved. We suggest that a communicatory function of yawning may be the mechanism responsible for yawn contagion in rats, as contagiousness was strain-specific and increased with olfactory cues, which are involved in mutual recognition.

  8. Invariant visual object recognition and shape processing in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolan, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Invariant visual object recognition is the ability to recognize visual objects despite the vastly different images that each object can project onto the retina during natural vision, depending on its position and size within the visual field, its orientation relative to the viewer, etc. Achieving invariant recognition represents such a formidable computational challenge that is often assumed to be a unique hallmark of primate vision. Historically, this has limited the invasive investigation of its neuronal underpinnings to monkey studies, in spite of the narrow range of experimental approaches that these animal models allow. Meanwhile, rodents have been largely neglected as models of object vision, because of the widespread belief that they are incapable of advanced visual processing. However, the powerful array of experimental tools that have been developed to dissect neuronal circuits in rodents has made these species very attractive to vision scientists too, promoting a new tide of studies that have started to systematically explore visual functions in rats and mice. Rats, in particular, have been the subjects of several behavioral studies, aimed at assessing how advanced object recognition and shape processing is in this species. Here, I review these recent investigations, as well as earlier studies of rat pattern vision, to provide an historical overview and a critical summary of the status of the knowledge about rat object vision. The picture emerging from this survey is very encouraging with regard to the possibility of using rats as complementary models to monkeys in the study of higher-level vision. PMID:25561421

  9. Invariant visual object recognition and shape processing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolan, Davide

    2015-05-15

    Invariant visual object recognition is the ability to recognize visual objects despite the vastly different images that each object can project onto the retina during natural vision, depending on its position and size within the visual field, its orientation relative to the viewer, etc. Achieving invariant recognition represents such a formidable computational challenge that is often assumed to be a unique hallmark of primate vision. Historically, this has limited the invasive investigation of its neuronal underpinnings to monkey studies, in spite of the narrow range of experimental approaches that these animal models allow. Meanwhile, rodents have been largely neglected as models of object vision, because of the widespread belief that they are incapable of advanced visual processing. However, the powerful array of experimental tools that have been developed to dissect neuronal circuits in rodents has made these species very attractive to vision scientists too, promoting a new tide of studies that have started to systematically explore visual functions in rats and mice. Rats, in particular, have been the subjects of several behavioral studies, aimed at assessing how advanced object recognition and shape processing is in this species. Here, I review these recent investigations, as well as earlier studies of rat pattern vision, to provide an historical overview and a critical summary of the status of the knowledge about rat object vision. The picture emerging from this survey is very encouraging with regard to the possibility of using rats as complementary models to monkeys in the study of higher-level vision.

  10. Effectiveness of rodenticides for managing invasive roof rats and native deer mice in orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Roger A; Quinn, Niamh; Davis, David H; Engeman, Richard M

    2014-05-01

    Roof rats (Rattus rattus) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are occasional pests of nut and tree fruit orchards throughout California and in many other parts of the USA and beyond. In general, the most practical and cost-effective control method for rodents in many agricultural environments is the use of rodenticides (toxic baits), but little or no information exists on the efficacy of current rodenticides in controlling roof rats and deer mice in orchards. Therefore, our goals were to develop an index of rodent activity to monitor efficacy of rodenticides and to subsequently test the efficacy of three California Department of Food and Agriculture rodenticide baits (0.005 % chlorophacinone treated oats, 0.005 % diphacinone treated oats, and 0.005 % diphacinone wax block) to determine their utility for controlling roof rats and deer mice in agricultural orchards. We determined that a general index using the number of roof rat photos taken at a minimum of a 5-min interval was strongly correlated to the minimum number known estimate of roof rats; this approach was used to monitor roof rat and deer mouse populations pre- and post-treatment. Of the baits tested, the 0.005 % diphacinone treated oats was most effective for both species; 0.005 % chlorophacinone grain was completely ineffective against roof rats. Our use of elevated bait stations proved effective at providing bait to target species and should substantially limit access to rodenticides by many non-target species.

  11. Availability of Acute and/or Subacute Toxicokinetic Data for Select Compounds for the Rat and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for Rats and Humans for Those Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-04

    represents a compilation of comparable data for 18 metals collected using a consistent protocol . The radiolabeled forms were arsenic trichloride...using a consistent protocol . A listing of the other tested metals may be found in Table A12. In urinary and fecal excretion studies, excreta were...mice, humans Species details Adult male and female Wistar, Sprague Dawley, and F344 rats; male Wistar Kyoto , Albino, Zucker, and unspecified rats

  12. Trading new neurons for status: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in eusocial Damaraland mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, M K; Amrein, I

    2016-06-02

    Diversity in social structures, from solitary to eusocial, is a prominent feature of subterranean African mole-rat species. Damaraland mole-rats are eusocial, they live in colonies that are characterized by a reproductive division of labor and a subdivision into castes based on physiology and behavior. Damaraland mole-rats are exceptionally long lived and reproductive animals show delayed aging compared to non-reproductive animals. In the present study, we described the hippocampal architecture and the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis of wild-derived, adult Damaraland mole-rats in relation to sex, relative age and social status or caste. Overall, Damaraland mole-rats were found to have a small hippocampus and low rates of neurogenesis. We found no correlation between neurogenesis and sex or relative age. Social status or caste was the most prominent modulator of neurogenesis. An inverse relationship between neurogenesis and social status was apparent, with queens displaying the lowest neurogenesis while the worker mole-rats had the most. As there is no natural progression from one caste to another, social status within a colony was relatively stable and is reflected in the level of neurogenesis. Our results correspond to those found in the naked mole-rat, and may reflect an evolutionary and environmentally conserved trait within social mole-rat species.

  13. Rats and humans differ in processing collinear visual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Meier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies in humans and rats demonstrate that visual detection of a target stimulus is sensitive to surrounding spatial patterns. In both species, the detection of an oriented visual target is affected when the surrounding region contains flanking stimuli that are collinear to the target. In many studies, collinear flankers have been shown to improve performance in humans, both absolutely (compared to performance with no flankers and relative to non-collinear flankers. More recently, collinear flankers have been shown to impair performance in rats both absolutely and relative to non-collinear flankers. However, these observations spanned different experimental paradigms. Past studies in humans have shown that the magnitude and even sign of flanker effects can depend critically on the details of stimulus and task design. Therefore either task differences or species could explain the opposite findings. Here we provide a direct comparison of behavioral data between species and show that these differences persist -- collinear flankers improve performance in humans, and impair performance in rats -- in spite of controls that match stimuli, experimental paradigm, and learning procedure. There is evidence that the contrasts of the target and the flankers could affect whether surround processing is suppressive or faciliatory. In a second experiment, we explored a range of contrast conditions in the rat, to determine if contrast could explain the lack of collinear facilitation. Using different pairs of target and flanker contrast, the rat’s collinear impairment was confirmed to be robust across a range of contrast conditions. We conclude that processing of collinear features is indeed different between rats and humans. We speculate that the observed difference between rat and human is caused by the combined impact of differences in the statistics in natural retinal images, the representational capacity of neurons in visual cortex, and

  14. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  15. Positive feedback in species communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes the eventual population densities in a species community depend on the initial densities or the arrival times of species. If arrival times determine species composition, a priority effect has occurred. Priority effects may occur if the species community exhibits alternative stable states (

  16. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, D.W.; Dalsgaard, B.; Svenning, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    between species traits and large-scale species distribution patterns in archipelagos, we use a network approach to classify birds as one of four biogeographical species roles: peripherals, connectors, module hubs, and network hubs. These roles are based upon the position of species within the modular...

  17. Characterization of rat lutropin charge microheterogeneity using chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, B A; Grotjan, H E

    1984-11-01

    Chromatofocusing was utilized to separate rat lutropin isohormones. The pH gradients generated were highly reproducible, allowing accurate comparisons of isohormones in different elution profiles. Extracts of anterior pituitaries from intact male rats yielded at least seven species of immunoreactive lutropin after chromatofocusing. Five species exhibited apparent pI's in the range 8.97 to 9.25. Two additional peaks of rat lutropin were also observed: one in the void volume (pI greater than 9.8) and one which bound to the column but could be eluted with 1.0 M NaCl (pI less than 7.0). All seven lutropin isohormones were active in an in vitro bioassay. The biological-to-immunological (B:I) assay ratios were directly related to the apparent pI. The presence of both the basic and the acidic species of biologically active rat lutropin has not been previously observed with isoelectric focusing. Chromatofocusing should prove to be a valuable analytical tool in the isolation and characterization of gonadotropin isohormones.

  18. Identification of Malassezia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindo, A J; Sophia, S K C; Kalyani, J; Anandan, S

    2004-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are lipophilic unipolar yeasts recognized as commensals of skin that may be pathogenic under certain conditions. The genus Malassezia now comprises of seven species. This study was aimed at using a simple practical approach to speciate Malassezia yeasts from clinical material. Seventy skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor infection, positive in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH), were cultured onto modified Dixon's agar (mDixon's agar) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and incubated at 32 degrees C. Speciation was done on the basis of Gram stain morphology, catalase test, and utilization of Tweens. Out of 70 scrapings 48 (68.75%) showed growth on mDixon's agar. The commonest isolate was M. sympodialis (28, 58%) followed by M. globosa (19, 40%) and one isolate was (2%) of M. restricta. M. sympodialis was the commonest species affecting our population and there was no isolation of M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis and M. furfur.

  19. Arctic species resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Jeppesen, Erik

    and precipitation. Concurrently, phenological change has been recorded in a wide range of plants and animals, with climate change seemingly being the primary driver of these changes. A major concern is whether species and biological systems embrace the plasticity in their phenological responses needed for tracking......The peak of biological activities in Arctic ecosystems is characterized by a relative short and intense period between the start of snowmelt until the onset of frost. Recent climate changes have induced larger seasonal variation in both timing of snowmelt as well as changes mean temperatures...... the predicted increase in climate variability. Whereas species may show relatively high phenological resilience to climate change per se, the resilience of systems may be more constrained by the inherent dependence through consumer-resource interactions across trophic levels. During the last 15 years...

  20. Antioxidant potential of bilirubin-accelerated wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumawat, Sanjay; Gopalakrishnan, Anu; Lingaraju, Madhu C; Gupta, Priyanka; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative injury is markedly responsible for wound complications in diabetes mellitus. The biological actions of bilirubin may be relevant to prevent oxidant-mediated cell death, as bilirubin application at a low concentration scavenges reactive oxygen species. Hence, we hypothesized that topical bilirubin application might improve wound healing in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in adult male Wistar rats, which were divided into two groups, i.e., diabetic control and diabetic treated. Non-diabetic healthy rats were also taken as healthy control group. Wound area was measured on days 3, 7, 14, and 19 post-wounding. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were estimated in the granulation tissue. There was a significant increase in percent wound closure in healthy control and diabetic treated rats on days 7, 14, and 19, as compared to diabetic control rats on days 7, 14, and 19. There was significant decrease in MDA levels on days 7, 14, and 19 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. Levels of GSH were significantly increased on days 3, 7, 14, and 19 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. GPx, SOD, and CAT activities were significantly higher on days 3, 7, and 14 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. The findings indicate that bilirubin is effective in reducing the oxidant status in wounds of diabetic rats which might have accelerated wound healing in these rats.

  1. Trichoderma species from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chu-long; XU Tong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Seventeen species of Trichoderma, isolated from soil or tree bark from China are identified based on morphological and physiological characters, and from their phylogenetic position inferred from parsimony analyses of nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA cluster (ITS1 and 2) and partial sequences of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) . There were T. citrinoviride, T. longibrachiatum, T. sinensis in section Longibrachiatum, T. atroviride, T.koningii, T. viride, T. asperellum, T. hamatum, T. erinaceum in section Trichoderma, T.harzianum (H.lixii) , T. inhamatum, T. velutinum , T. cerinum , T. strictipile , T. spirale ,T. virens, H. nigrovirens (Trichoderma sp.) in section Pachybasium. Among them four species:T. asperellum , T. velutinum , T. cerinum , T. spirale were reported firstly in China. In addition, two suspected new taxa (Trichoderma spp.) in Trichoderma section were proposed:Trichoderma sp. 1 (ZAUT261, 4, 4A, 15A, 2C), Trichoderma sp. 2 (2B, 5, 7A, 7B, 9A).Trichoderma sp. 1 was similar to T. hamatum , but the temperature optimum for mycelial growth was lower than that of T. hamatum and the species tended to form hemisphaerical pustule with Telatively larger conidia (average length 4.6 μm × 2.8 μm). Trichoderma sp. 2 was distinguished morphologically from related species T. strigosum, T. pubescens, T. erinaceum, T. hamatum and Trichoderma sp. 1 in pustules on CMD without fertile or sterile conidiophore elongation and distinctive phialide shape, the conidiophore branches similar to T. koningii, but the conidia similar to T. viride, subglobose, conspicuously tuberculate.

  2. Introduced Terrestrial Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all introduced mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons. The data are species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  3. Metabolic detoxification determines species differences in coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Jeffrey D; Hicks, Sarah M; Daston, George P; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D

    2004-08-01

    Hepatotoxicity of coumarin is attributed to metabolic activation to an epoxide intermediate, coumarin 3,4-epoxide (CE). However, whereas rats are most susceptible to coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity, formation of CE is greatest in mouse liver microsomes, a species showing little evidence of hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the present work was designed to test the hypothesis that detoxification of CE is a major determinant of coumarin hepatotoxicity. CE can either rearrange spontaneously to o-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (o-HPA) or be conjugated with gluatathione (GSH). o-HPA is hepatotoxic and is further detoxified by oxidation to o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (o-HPAA). In vitro experiments were conducted using mouse liver microsomes to generate a constant amount of CE, and cytosols from F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and human liver were used to characterize CE detoxification. All metabolites were quantified by HPLC methods with UV detection. In rats and mice, GSH conjugation occurred non-enzymatically and through glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), and the kinetics of GSH conjugation were similar in rats and mice. In rat liver cytosol, oxidation of o-HPA to o-HPAA was characterized with a high affinity K(m) of approximately 12 microM, and a V(max) of approximately 1.5 nmol/min/mg protein. In contrast, the K(m) and V(max) for o-HPA oxidation in mouse liver cytosol were approximately 1.7 microM and 5 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively, yielding a total intrinsic clearance through oxidation to o-HPAA that was 20 times higher in mouse than in rats. Human cytosols (two separate pools) detoxified CE through o-HPA oxidation with an apparent K(m) of 0.84 microM and a V(max) of 5.7 nmol/min/mg protein, for a net intrinsic clearance that was more than 50 times higher than the rat. All species also reduced o-HPA to o-hydroxyphenylethanol (o-HPE), but this was only a major reaction in rats. In the presence of a metabolic reaction replete with all necessary cofactors, GSH conjugation accounted

  4. Leptospira-rat-human relationship in Luzon, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Sharon Yvette Angelina M; Saito, Mitsumasa; Baterna, Rubelia A; Estrada, Crystal Amiel M; Rivera, Ana Kriselda B; Dato, Micaella C; Zamora, Pia Regina Fatima C; Segawa, Takaya; Cavinta, Lolita L; Fukui, Takashi; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection that is caused by the pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rats are the most important reservoirs of these organisms. Our study aimed to characterize Leptospira isolates from humans and rats and elucidate the Leptospira-rat-human relationship in Luzon, Philippines. Forty strains were isolated from humans and rats. The isolates were confirmed to be Leptospira and pathogenic through rrl- and flaB-PCR, respectively. Around 73% of the isolates were found to be lethal to hamsters. Serotyping showed that there were mainly three predominant leptospiral serogroups in the study areas namely Pyrogenes, Bataviae, and Grippotyphosa. Gyrase B gene sequence analysis showed that all the isolates belonged to Leptospira interrogans. Most had 100% similarity with serovar Manilae (15/40), serovar Losbanos (8/40), and serogroup Grippotyphosa (8/40). Strains from each group had highly identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and were further grouped as A (Pyrogenes, 14), B (Bataviae, 8), and C (Grippotyphosa, 10). Results further revealed that similar serotypes were isolated from both humans and rats in the same areas. It is suggested that these three predominant groups with highly similar intra-group PFGE patterns may have been primarily transmitted by rats and persistently caused leptospirosis in humans particularly in the Luzon islands.

  5. Identification of a pheromone that increases anxiety in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Tamogami, Shigeyuki; Watanabe, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2014-12-30

    Chemical communication plays an important role in the social lives of various mammalian species. Some of these chemicals are called pheromones. Rats release a specific odor into the air when stressed. This stress-related odor increases the anxiety levels of other rats; therefore, it is possible that the anxiety-causing molecules are present in the stress-related odorants. Here, we have tried to identify the responsible molecules by using the acoustic startle reflex as a bioassay system to detect anxiogenic activity. After successive fractionation of the stress-related odor, we detected 4-methylpentanal and hexanal in the final fraction that still possessed anxiogenic properties. Using synthetic molecules, we found that minute amounts of the binary mixture, but not either molecule separately, increased anxiety in rats. Furthermore, we determined that the mixture increased a specific type of anxiety and evoked anxiety-related behavioral responses in an experimental model that was different from the acoustic startle reflex. Analyses of neural mechanisms proposed that the neural circuit related to anxiety was only activated when the two molecules were simultaneously perceived by two olfactory systems. We concluded that the mixture is a pheromone that increases anxiety in rats. To our knowledge, this is the first study identifying a rat pheromone. Our results could aid further research on rat pheromones, which would enhance our understanding of chemical communication in mammals.

  6. Bounding species distribution models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN; Catherine S. JARNEVICH; Wayne E. ESAIAS; Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern.Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development,yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations.We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches:classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models,and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations,bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors,to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States.Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding,and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models,like those presented here,should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5):642-647,2011].

  7. Rat Lungworm: An Emerging Zoonosis in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Cecelia A; Todd, Cheridah D; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Lindo, John F

    2013-01-01

    Rat lungworm infection is caused by a metastrongylid nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The parasite was first recorded in the pulmonary arteries and heart of domesticated rats in China in 1935: its medical importance, however, was established 10 years later when Nomura and Lin recovered A. cantonensis larvae from the cerebro-spinal fluid of a human teenager with meningitis in Taiwan in 1945.1 Since then, the parasite has become recognised as a major cause of human meningoencephalitis worldwide.2,3 In the Caribbean, A. cantonensis has been documented in wild rats in Cuba,4 Dominican Republic,5 Grenada,6 Haiti,7 and Puerto Rico.8 Human infections have been reported in Cuba4 and Martinique.9 However, the parasite appears to be absent from Barbados.10 Land snails and slugs serve as intermediate hosts for the parasite, while a range of terrestrial and freshwater invertebrates may serve as paratenic hosts. Original investigations in Jamaica to assess the infection status of A. cantonensis followed an outbreak of eosinophilic meningitis on the island.11 They involved the collection of 437 wild rats (297 black rats, Rattus rattus, and 140 brown rats, R. norvegicus), and 777 terrestrial molluscs (representing 12 species of snails and slugs) from parishes making up the four Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) on the island. Adults of A. cantonensis, measuring ∼10 mm, were recovered from the cardiopulmonary system of 32.0% (n = 437) of the wild rats examined. The mean intensity of infection was 15.3 worms (n = 140). Multivariate analysis (binary logistic regression model) confirmed that A. cantonensis occurred significantly more frequently in R. rattus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.76); that R. rattus also harbored significantly more worms (mean = 16.8) than R. norvegicus (mean = 11.3 worms) (Student's t = −2.241; bootstrap [two-sided] P = .02); and that the majority of rodent infections occurred in the Northeast Regional Health Authority (OR = 11.66). The Northeast RHA

  8. Rat instigated human population collapse on easter island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basener, William; Brooks, Bernard; Radin, Michael; Wiandt, Tamas

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we develop an invasive species differential equations model for the population collapse on Easter Island. This model, motivated by recent archaeological results of T. Hunt, allows us to examine the role of rats in the collapse. In Hunt's theory, the decline of resources was accelerated by Polynesian rats and not merely the result of the overuse by the island's human population. Hunt uses archaeological data which suggests a different timeline for the settlement and the long term population dynamics of Easter Island. Our goal is to estimate the plausibility of Hunt's hypothesis.

  9. Late inflammatory swelling by carrageenan in rat's subcutaneous neck tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T S; Mathur, M; Bhide, N K

    1988-01-01

    When injected subcutaneously in the dorsum of neck in albino rats, carrageenan produced inflammatory swelling which reached peak after about 16 hr. The occurrence of the peak inflammatory swelling was delayed but not significantly reduced in severity by aspirin or indomethacin which were administered repeatedly. Phenylbutazone significantly reduced and dexamethasone almost completely inhibited it. In rat hind paw model, subplantar carrageenan injection produced peak inflammatory swelling after about 4 hr which was significantly reduced by all anti-inflammatory drugs mentioned above. It is interesting that an inflammagen when injected at different sites in the same species elicits responses which differ in the time course and drug responses.

  10. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species.

  11. High molecular weight hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole-rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years1–3. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole-rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years4,5. In addition to their longevity, naked mole-rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer2,6. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole-rat’s cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high molecular weight HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole rat tissues due to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signaling, as the naked mole rat cells have a higher affinity to HA than the mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signaling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high molecular weight HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, Hyal2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumors in mice. We speculate that naked mole-rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species. PMID:23783513

  12. The injustice of excluding laboratory rats, mice, and birds from the Animal Welfare Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlans, F Barbara

    2000-09-01

    A major shortcoming of the Animal Welfare Act is its exclusion of the species most-used in experimentation -- rats, mice, and birds. Considerations of justice dictate that extension of the law to these three species is the morally right thing to do. A brief history of how these species came to be excluded from the laws protecting laboratory animals is also provided, as well as discussion of the implications and significance of expanding the law.

  13. Comparative drug metabolism and disposition in minor species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C R; Barker, S A; Flory, W

    1988-01-01

    The disposition of fenbendazole (FBZ) was studied in vivo in cattle (steers), goats, chickens, ducks, turkeys and rabbits, and in vitro in hepatic enzyme preparations from cattle, sheep, goats, rabbits, rats, chickens, ducks, turkeys and catfish. The major excretory metabolite when FBZ was administered either iv or po (5 mg/kg) was p-hydroxyfenbendazole (FBZ-OH). The sulfoxide (FBZ-SO) and sulfone (FBZ-SO2) appeared in plasma but were recovered in only trace amounts in urine or feces, and the amine (FBZ-NH2) was a minor metabolite appearing only occasionally in plasma. The greatest species differences were seen among the avian species, and differences in metabolite excretion correlated well with the ability of the species to metabolize the drug (especially to FBZ-OH) in vitro. Other in vitro studies measured the rate of oxidative, hydrolytic, and conjugative (glucuronide, acetate, sulfate) pathways in liver preparations.

  14. Nonstructural Protein L* Species Specificity Supports a Mouse Origin for Vilyuisk Human Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drappier, Melissa; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michiels, Thomas

    2017-07-15

    Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV) is a picornavirus related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). VHEV was isolated from human material passaged in mice. Whether this VHEV is of human or mouse origin is therefore unclear. We took advantage of the species-specific activity of the nonstructural L* protein of theiloviruses to track the origin of TMEV isolates. TMEV L* inhibits RNase L, the effector enzyme of the interferon pathway. By using coimmunoprecipitation and functional RNase L assays, the species specificity of RNase L antagonism was tested for L* from mouse (DA) and rat (RTV-1) TMEV strains as well as for VHEV. Coimmunoprecipitation and functional assay data confirmed the species specificity of L* activity and showed that L* from rat strain RTV-1 inhibited rat but not mouse or human RNase L. Next, we showed that the VHEV L* protein was phylogenetically related to L* of mouse viruses and that it failed to inhibit human RNase L but readily antagonized mouse RNase L, unambiguously showing the mouse origin of VHEV.IMPORTANCE Defining the natural host of a virus can be a thorny issue, especially when the virus was isolated only once or when the isolation story is complex. The species Theilovirus includes Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), infecting mice and rats, and Saffold virus (SAFV), infecting humans. One TMEV strain, Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV), however, was isolated from mice that were inoculated with cerebrospinal fluid of a patient presenting with chronic encephalitis. It is therefore unclear whether VHEV was derived from the human sample or from the inoculated mouse. The L* protein encoded by TMEV inhibits RNase L, a cellular enzyme involved in innate immunity, in a species-specific manner. Using binding and functional assays, we show that this species specificity even allows discrimination between TMEV strains of mouse and of rat origins. The VHEV L* protein clearly inhibited mouse but not human RNase L

  15. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Mitchell R; Williams, C David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity.

  16. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses of insulin biosynthesis in isolated rat and mouse islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Hansen, Bruno A.; Welinder, B S

    1989-01-01

    Two RP-HPLC systems were developed for the separation of the products of the conversion of proinsulin into insulin in rat and mouse islets, including proinsulin I and II. Peaks were identified by microsequencing and radiosequencing. It was confirmed that mouse C-peptide I has a two amino acid...... deletion compared to rat C-peptide I. A marked species difference in the ratio between insulin I and II was observed, i.e., 2:1 in the rat and 1:2 in the mouse. Pulse-chase experiments in rat islets have demonstrated that the ratio between insulin I and II in newly synthesized insulin is higher than...

  17. Effects of L-malate on mitochondrial oxidoreductases in liver of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J-L; Wu, Q-P; Peng, Y-P; Zhang, J-M

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage has been implicated to be a major causative factor in the decline in physiological functions that occur during the aging process. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), considered as the pathogenic agent of many diseases and aging. L-malate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, plays an important role in transporting NADH from cytosol to mitochondria for energy production. Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. In the present study we focused on the effect of L-malate on the activities of electron transport chain in young and aged rats. We found that mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the activities of succinate dehydrogenase, NADH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase in liver of aged rats were significantly decreased when compared to young control rats. Supplementation of L-malate to aged rats for 30 days slightly increased MMP and improved the activities of NADH-dehydrogenase, NADH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase in liver of aged rats when compared with aged control rats. In young rats, L-malate administration increased only the activity of NADH-dehydrogenase. Our result suggested that L-malate could improve the activities of electron transport chain enzymes in aged rats.

  18. Prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti Shafiyyah, C O; Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Lau, Y L; Siti Aminah, F

    2012-12-01

    A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in urban area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 137 stool and blood samples were collected from wild rats from Sentul and Chow Kit areas. Five species of rats were captured and supplied by Kuala Lumpur City Hall. The most common was Rattus rattus diardii (Malayan Black rat), 67%, followed by Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat), 10%, Rattus argentiventer (rice-field rat), 10%, Rattus tiomanicus (Malaysian field rat), 9% and Rattus exulans (Polynesian rat), 4%. Rattus rattus diardii is commonly known to live in human environment and they are normally identified as pests to human community. More male rats were captured (61%) compared to female (39%). Out of 137 samples, 81.8% samples were positive with intestinal parasites, with 86.2% from Sentul area and 78.5% from Chow Kit area. Six different parasites were detected. The most common intestinal helminth parasite detected was Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (80.3%), followed by Hymenolepis nana (23.4%), Capillaria hepatica (13.9%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (2.9%). Intestinal protozoan detected was Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (8.8%). Trypanosoma lewisi (1.5%) was the only blood parasite detected.

  19. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose-response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period.

  20. Genomics of Bacillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Økstad, Ole Andreas; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    Members of the genus Bacillus are rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, the low G+C gram-positive bacteria. The Bacillus genus was first described and classified by Ferdinand Cohn in Cohn (1872), and Bacillus subtilis was defined as the type species (Soule, 1932). Several Bacilli may be linked to opportunistic infections. However, pathogenicity among Bacillus spp. is mainly a feature of bacteria belonging to the Bacillus cereus group, including B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis. Here we review the genomics of B. cereus group bacteria in relation to their roles as etiological agents of two food poisoning syndromes (emetic and diarrhoeal).

  1. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  2. Effects of some tobacco smoke constituents on foreign compound metabolism in the cat and the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.M.

    1977-03-01

    The effects of chronic nicotine administration on its own metabolism have been studied in the cat and the rat. Nicotine administration caused an increase in the in vitro metabolism in the liver of both species and in cat kidney. Cotinine production from nicotine was enhanced in both species by pretreatment with nicotine. The magnitude of the increase in enzyme activity was relatively small but of the same order as that produced, in the rat, by phenobarbital treatment. 3-methylcholanthrene pretreatment stimulated rat liver nicotine metabolism but was without effect on cotinine production. Chronic exposure of rats to relatively low levels of carbon monoxide inhibited the in vitro aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity but did not affect nicotine metabolism. The data are discussed in relation to the observed enzyme inductive effects of tobacco smoke.

  3. Naval Petroleum Reserves in California site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This summary for Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) is divided into NPR-1 and NPR-2. Monitoring efforts at NPR-1 include handling and disposal of oilfield wastes; environmental preactivity surveys for the protection of endangered species and archaeological resources; inspections of topsoil stockpiling; monitoring of revegetated sites; surveillance of production facilities for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions; monitoring of oil spill prevention and cleanup; and monitoring of wastewater injection. No major compliance issues existed for NPR-1 during 1989. Oil spills are recorded, reviewed for corrective action, and reported. Environmental preactivity surveys for proposed projects which may disturb or contaminate the land are conducted to prevent damage to the federally protected San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Tipton kangaroo rat and the giant kangaroo rat. Projects are adjusted or relocated as necessary to avoid impact to dens, burrows, or flat-bottomed drainages. A major revegetation program was accomplished in 1989 for erosion control enhancement of endangered species habitat. The main compliance issue on NPR-2 was oil and produced water discharges into drainages by lessees. An additional compliance issue on NPR-2 is surface refuse from past oilfield operations. 17 refs.

  4. 76 FR 49201 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Four Foreign Parrot Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... future. Factor C. Disease or Predation Predation by introduced mammals such as feral cats (Felis catus... act as refugia from predation by alien predators, such as the feral cat, for native species such as... terrestrial mammals. Introduced mammals such as rats, mongoose (Herpestes javanicus), cats and dogs prey...

  5. Possible role of cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase in species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Rieko; Nagata, Saori; Iida, Hiroko; Yamagishi, Norio; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2011-09-01

    To better understand species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we focused on renal cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase (C-S lyase), which may play a crucial role in the metabolism of platinum (Pt)-cysteine conjugates. Aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of C-S lyase, reduced renal injuries due to cisplatin in rats, suggesting involvement of C-S lyase. On day 5 following a bolus cisplatin injection, three species showed in vivo nephrotoxic potentials in the order of rats>mice=rabbits (the highest to lowest), based on body surface. The levels of renal Pt residue at the nephrotoxic dose were in order of rabbits>rats>mice. Meanwhile, the activity of endogenous (basal) mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (AST), one of the C-S lyases, in the renal cortex of naive animals was rats>mice=rabbits. In a qualitative Western blot analysis, expression of mitochondrial C-S lyase in the kidney was observed at approximately 37kDa in all five species used. In in vitro studies, the cytotoxicity of cisplatin was dependent on the expression level of C-S lyase mRNA in the respective renal cells. These results demonstrate that species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity are attributable to an interaction of renal Pt transition with C-S lyase activity.

  6. A new form of rodent placentation in the relict species, Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia Diatomyidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Enders, A C; Jones, C J P

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Laotian rock rat is a relict species in a sister group relationship to hystricognath rodents (Hystricognathi). We asked whether there were similarities in placentation that might reflect this relationship or differences that might cast light on the evolution of Hystricognathi. M...

  7. The characteristics of wild rat (Rattus spp.) populations from an inner-city neighborhood with a focus on factors critical to the understanding of rat-associated zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Jardine, Claire M; Parsons, Kirbee L; Feng, Alice Y T; Patrick, David M

    2014-01-01

    Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) are among the most ubiquitous urban wildlife species and are the source of a number of zoonotic diseases responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in cities around the world. Rodent ecology is a primary determinant of the dynamics of zoonotic pathogens in rodent populations and the risk of pathogen transmission to people, yet many studies of rat-associated zoonoses do not account for the ecological characteristics of urban rat populations. This hinders the development of an in-depth understanding of the ecology of rat-associated zoonoses, limits comparability among studies, and can lead to erroneous conclusions. We conducted a year-long trapping-removal study to describe the ecological characteristics of urban rat populations in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. The study focused on factors that might influence the ecology of zoonotic pathogens in these populations and/or our understanding of that ecology. We found that rat population density varied remarkably over short geographical distances, which could explain observed spatial distributions of rat-associated zoonoses and have implications for sampling and data analysis during research and surveillance. Season appeared to influence rat population composition even within the urban environment, which could cause temporal variation in pathogen prevalence. Body mass and bite wounds, which are often used in epidemiologic analyses as simple proxies for age and aggression, were shown to be more complex than previously thought. Finally, we found that factors associated with trapping can determine the size and composition of sampled rat population, and thus influence inferences made about the source population. These findings may help guide future studies of rats and rat-associated zoonoses.

  8. Resveratrol Pretreatment Ameliorates TNBS Colitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Gulserap; Yildiz, Yuksel; Ulutas, Pinar A; Yaylali, Asl; Ural, Muruvvet

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in humans constituting a major health concern today whose prevalence has been increasing over the world. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disturbed capacity of antioxidant defense in IBD subjects have been reported. Antioxidants may play a significant role in IBD treatment. This study aimed at evaluating ameliorative effects of intraperitoneal resveratrol pretreatment on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Thirty five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided equally into five groups. Inflammation was induced by the intrarectal administration of TNBS under anesthesia. Intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (RSV) at a concentration of 10mg/kg/day for 5 days before the induction of colitis significantly reduced microscopy score and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px) activity compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. Also an insignificant increase in catalase (CAT) activity was observed in the RSV treated group compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. In this paper, the most recent patent on the identification and treatment of IBD was indicated. In conclusion, antioxidant RSV proved to have a beneficial effect on TNBS colitis in rats. In light of these advantageous results, the RSV can be considered as adjuvant agent in IBD treatments.

  9. Identification of malassezia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindo A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia spp. are lipophilic unipolar yeasts recognized as commensals of skin that may be pathogenic under certain conditions. The genus Malassezia now comprises of seven species. This study was aimed at using a simple practical approach to speciate Malassezia yeasts from clinical material. Seventy skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor infection, positive in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH, were cultured onto modified Dixon′s agar (mDixon′s agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA and incubated at 32ºC. Speciation was done on the basis of Gram stain morphology, catalase test, and utilization of Tweens. Out of 70 scrapings 48 (68.75% showed growth on mDixon′s agar. The commonest isolate was M. sympodialis (28, 58% followed by M. globosa (19, 40% and one isolate was (2% of M. restricta. M. sympodialis was the commonest species affecting our population and there was no isolation of M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis and M. furfur.

  10. Save Our Species: Protecting Endangered Species from Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This full-size poster profiles 11 wildlife species that are endangered. Color illustrations of animals and plants are accompanied by narrative describing their habitats and reasons for endangerment. The reverse side of the poster contains information on the Endangered Species Act, why protecting endangered and threatened species is important, how…

  11. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  12. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  13. New species of Malaysian ferns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1962-01-01

    The present paper includes descriptions of several new species of ferns found among recent collections from various parts of Malaysia; also two new combinations of names of species which are of interest on account of their taxonomic history.

  14. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, D.W.; Dalsgaard, B.; Svenning, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship betw...

  15. As representações sociais do aleitamento materno para mães de prematuros em unidade de cuidado canguru Representaciones sociales de la lactancia materna para madres de prematuros en el cuidado canguro Social representations on breastfeeding according to preterm infants' mothers in kangaroo care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly Javorski

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos do estudo foram identificar as representações sociais sobre aleitamento materno de pré-termo, em unidade de Cuidado Canguru, sob a óptica das mães que estão amamentando, e descrever os conflitos e contradições que eles vivenciam nesse contexto institucional. A pesquisa utiliza-se de uma abordagem qualitativa em que foi empregado o primeiro estágio da análise de enunciação à luz da Teoria das Representações Sociais. As representações encontradas são: os bebês saudáveis são alimentados no peito, o leite materno confere a proteção e a preservação da vida de uma criança prematura, o aleitamento materno é o complemento da maternidade e amamentar um bebê prematuro é uma experiência difícil e desgastante. Os conflitos são decorrentes da assimilação de conteúdos e discurso técnico, sucção tardia e representações sobre leite materno.Los objetivos del estudio fueron identificar las representaciones sociales de la lactancia materna al bebe prematuro en la unidad de cuidado canguro bajo la óptica de las madres que están amamantando y describir los conflictos y contradicciones que vivencian en el contexto institucional. Fue adoptada una aproximación cualitativa, empleándose la primera fase del análisis de enunciación a la luz de la teoría de representaciones sociales. Las representaciones encontradas son: Los bebes saludables son alimentados a pecho, la leche materna da protección y preservación de la vida a un niño prematuro, la lactancia materna es el complemento de la maternidad y dar lactancia a un bebe prematuro es una experiencia difícil y desgastante. Los conflictos y contradicciones resultan de la asimilación de contenidos y discurso técnico, succión tardía y representaciones sobre la leche materna.This study aimed to identify the social representations on premature infants' breastfeeding at a Kangaroo Care Unit, from the perspective of mothers who are breastfeeding and describe the

  16. Sucção do recém-nascido prematuro: comparação do método Mãe-Canguru com os cuidados tradicionais Suckling of the premature newborn child: comparison between the Kangaroo Mother method with traditional care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Santos Nogueira de Andrade

    2005-03-01

    newborns were evaluated and submitted to phoniatric intervention in the process of hospital discharge. RESULTS: in Group 1 there was a significant improvement related to behavior, stress signs, coordination and suction rhythm. Hospital stay was considerably shorter. In group 2 there was a significant improvement related to the coordination between suction, deglutition and breathing. CONCLUSIONS: newborns of both groups were benefited by phoniatrics, nevertheless, the best results related to the Kangaroo-Mother Method. It has been noted that this method is a good alternative for developing countries for it contributes to the effectiveness of nursing, shortening hospital stay and reducing public health costs.

  17. Respostas fisiológicas de recém-nascidos pré-termo submetidos ao Metódo Mãe-Canguru e a posição prona Physical responses of pre-term newborn babies submitted to the Kangaroo-Mother Care Method in Prone position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Dantas Olmedo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O Ministério da Saúde recomenda e incentiva a Atenção Humanizada ao recém-nascido de baixo peso utilizando-se o Método Mãe-Canguru (MMC nas unidades integrantes do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar e comparar as respostas fisiológicas entre o MMC e a posição prona (PP, em recém-nascidos pré-termo (RNPT. Foi feito um estudo de intervenção, realizado entre setembro e outubro de 2009, composto por 20 RNPT, de ambos os sexos, com idade gestacional entre 24 a 36 semanas, estáveis hemodinamicamente, sendo classificados como grupo I (MMC e grupo II (PP. Foram consideradas as variáveis: frequência cardíaca (FC, frequência respiratória (FR, saturação periférica de oxigênio (SatO2 e temperatura corporal (T. As mensurações foram realizadas por três dias consecutivos, antes e 60 min após a aplicação das técnicas. No grupo PP, a FR aferida antes foi significativamente maior do que a aferida após a intervenção, nos 1º e 3º dias (pThe Ministry of Health recommends and looks forward to the Humanized Attention of low weight newborn babies using the Kangaroo-Mother Care Method (MCM in Unified Health System units. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the physiological responses between the MMC and the Prone Position (PP in pre-term newborn babies (PNB. Intervention study, realized between September and October of 2009, was performed. It was formed by 20 PNB, both sexes, with gestational ages between 24 to 36 weeks, hemodynamic stable, classified as group I (MCM and group II (PP. The following variables were considered: heart frequency (HF, breathing frequency (BF, periphery saturation of oxygen (SatO2, and body temperature (T. All measurements were realized for three consecutive days, before and 60 min after applying the procedures. On the PP group, the HF checked before was meaningfully higher than the one checked after the procedure, on the first and third days (p<0.0001; p<0

  18. Método mãe canguru nos hospitais / maternidades públicos de Salvador e atuação dos profissionais da saúde na segunda etapa do método Kangaroo mother method in hospitals / public maternity in Salvador and performance of health professionals in the second stage of the method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rodrigues da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar quantos hospitais/ maternidades públicos em Salvador utilizam o método mãe-canguru, quais os profissionais estão inseridos na equipe e caracterizar a atuação dos profissionais de saúde que estão inseridos na segunda etapa do método. MÉTODO: trata-se de um estudo quantitativo descritivo do qual participaram os responsáveis pelo setor de neonatologia e os profissionais de saúde inseridos na segunda etapa do método respondendo a questionários. Os dados obtidos foram analisados por meio de estatística descritiva calculando-se frequências simples. RESULTADOS:das sete instituições públicas de Salvador quatro utilizam o método. Nas três instituições pesquisadas realizam-se as três etapas preconizadas, em duas delas o quadro profissional tem pelo menos um atuante de cada especialidade recomendada pelo Ministério da Saúde, no entanto evidencia-se reduzido número de fonoaudiólogos nos serviços. Dentre as principais ações dos profissionais da saúde inseridos na segunda etapa estão o incentivo ao posicionamento canguru, ao aleitamento materno exclusivo e orientação às mães quanto aos cuidados com o bebê. CONCLUSÕES:evidencia-se que a recomendação do Ministério da Saúde de que o método seja implantado nas unidades médico-assistenciais integrante do Sistema Único de Saúde ainda não é uma realidade em todos os hospitais/ maternidades públicos de Salvador, no entanto evidenciou-se quadro profissional em conformidade com a recomendação em duas das instituições pesquisadas e a atuação dos profissionais entrevistados se incorpora no campo da transdisciplinaridade.PURPOSE:to investigate how many public hospitals and maternity hospitals in Salvador use the Kangaroo Mother Method, who are the professionals inserted in the team, and to characterize the acting of the health professionals who are inserted in the second stage of the method. METHOD: a descriptive quantitative study, in which the

  19. Species-specific pharmacology of antiestrogens: role of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, V.C.; Robinson, S.P.

    1987-04-01

    The nonsteroidal antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits a paradoxial space species pharmacology. The drug is a full estrogen in the mouse, a partial estrogen/antiestrogen in humans and the rat, and an antiestrogen in the chick oviduct. Inasmuch as tamoxifen has antiestrogenic effects in vitro, differential metabolism of tamoxifen to estrogens might occur in the species in which it has antiestrogen pharmacology. Tamoxifen or its metabolite 4-hydroxytamoxifen could lose the alkylaminoethane side chain to form the estrogenic compound metabolite E of bisphenol. Sensitive metabolic studies with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen in chicks, rats, and mice identified 4-hydroxytamoxifen as the major metabolite. Athymic mice with transplanted human breast tumors can be used to study the ability of tamoxifen to stimulate tissue or tumor growth. Estradiol caused the growth of transplanted breast cancer cells into solid tumors and a uterotrophic response. However, tamoxifen does not support tumor growth when administered alone, although it stimulates uterines growth. Since a similar profile of metabolites is sequestered in human mouse tissues, these studies strongly support the concept that the drug can selectively stimulate or inhibit events in the target tissues of different species without hometabolic intervention.

  20. Identification of endoparasites in rats of various habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Priyanto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Tikus merupakan hewan yang habitatnya berdekatan dengan lingkungan manusia. Keberadaannya merupakan faktor resiko penularan beberapa jenis penyakit zoonosis. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui jenis tikus di habitat pemukiman, kebun, sawah, dan pasar di Kabupaten Banjarnegara, serta mengidentifikasi zoonotik endoparasit yang terdapat pada organ hati, lambung, usus dan sekum tikus.Metode: Penangkapan tikus dilakukan di 3 kecamatan selama Juli - Oktober 2012. Observasi endoparasit dilakukan pada organ hati dan saluran pencernaan yang meliputi lambung, usus dan sekum. Analisis data secara deskriptif dengan menggambarkan spesies tikus dan endoparasit yang didapat.Hasil: Spesies tikus yang tertangkap dalam penelitian ini adalah Rattus tanezumi, Rattus exulans, Rattus tiomanicus, Rattus argentiventer, Rattus norvegicus dan Suncus murinus. Spesies endoparasit yang menginfeksi hati tikus adalah Capillaria hepatica dan Cystycercus Taenia taeniaeformis. Endoparasit yang menginfeksi organ lambung tikus adalah Masthoporus sp. dan Gongylonema neoplasticum. Nippostrongylus brassilliensis, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana, Monili formis sp. dan Echinostoma sp. ditemukan menginfeksi organ usus tikus, sedangkan Syphacia muris ditemukan menginfeksi organ sekum. Tidak ditemukan jenis endoparasit yang menginfeksi lebih dari satu jenis organ tikus.Kesimpulan: Endoparasit tikus yang bersifat zoonosis dalam penelitian ini adalah Capillaria hepatica, Gongylonema neoplasticum, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana dan Syphacia muris. Tiap jenis endoparasit menginfeksi organ yang spesifik pada tikus. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:49-53Kata kunci:tikus, endoparasit, zoonosis.AbstractBackground: Rat is an animal living around people. It is a risk factor for several types of zoonotic diseases. The aims of this study were to determine the rat species from various habitats including houses, gardens, rice fields, and traditional market

  1. Molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of rat melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audinot, Valérie; Bonnaud, Anne; Grandcolas, Line; Rodriguez, Marianne; Nagel, Nadine; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Balik, Ales; Messager, Sophie; Hazlerigg, David G; Barrett, Perry; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A

    2008-05-15

    In order to interpret the effects of melatonin ligands in rats, we need to determine their activity at the receptor subtype level in the corresponding species. Thus, the rat melatonin rMT(1) receptor was cloned using DNA fragments for exon 1 and 2 amplified from rat genomic DNA followed by screening of a rat genomic library for the full length exon sequences. The rat rMT(2) receptor subtype was cloned in a similar manner with the exception of exon 1 which was identified by screening a rat genomic library with exon 1 of the human hMT(2) receptor. The coding region of these receptors translates proteins of 353 and 364 amino acids, respectively, for rMT(1) and rMT(2). A 55% homology was observed between both rat isoforms. The entire contiguous rat MT(1) and MT(2) receptor coding sequences were cloned, stably expressed in CHO cells and characterized in binding assay using 2-[(125)I]-Iodomelatonin. The dissociation constants (K(d)) for rMT(1) and rMT(2) were 42 and 130 pM, respectively. Chemically diverse compounds previously characterized at human MT(1) and MT(2) receptors were evaluated at rMT(1) and rMT(2) receptors, for their binding affinity and functionality in [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding assay. Some, but not all, compounds shared a similar binding affinity and functionality at both rat and human corresponding subtypes. A different pharmacological profile of the MT(1) subtype has also been observed previously between human and ovine species. These in vitro results obtained with the rat melatonin receptors are thus of importance to understand the physiological roles of each subtype in animal models.

  2. Control of invasive rats on islands and priorities for future action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Quiterie; Shiels, Aaron B; Vidal, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Invasive rats are one of the world's most successful animal groups that cause native species extinctions and ecosystem change, particularly on islands. On large islands, rat eradication is often impossible and population control, defined as the local limitation of rat abundance, is now routinely performed on many of the world's islands as an alternative management tool. However, a synthesis of the motivations, techniques, costs, and outcomes of such rat-control projects is lacking. We reviewed the literature, searched relevant websites, and conducted a survey via a questionnaire to synthesize the available information on rat-control projects in island natural areas worldwide to improve rat management and native species conservation. Data were collected from 136 projects conducted over the last 40 years; most were located in Australasia (46%) and the tropical Pacific (25%) in forest ecosystems (65%) and coastal strands (22%). Most of the projects targeted Rattus rattus and most (82%) were aimed at protecting birds and endangered ecosystems. Poisoning (35%) and a combination of trapping and poisoning (42%) were the most common methods. Poisoning allows for treatment of larger areas, and poison projects generally last longer than trapping projects. Second-generation anticoagulants (mainly brodifacoum and bromadiolone) were used most often. The median annual cost for rat-control projects was US$17,262 or US$227/ha. Median project duration was 4 years. For 58% of the projects, rat population reduction was reported, and 51% of projects showed evidence of positive effects on biodiversity. Our data were from few countries, revealing the need to expand rat-control distribution especially in some biodiversity hotspots. Improvement in control methods is needed as is regular monitoring to assess short- and long-term effectiveness of rat-control. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Biodistribution of a novel antiestrogen (Analog II) in the mouse and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M T; Pento, J T; Magarian, R A; Mousissian, G K; Basmadjian, G P

    1990-01-01

    The biodistribution of a novel antiestrogen Analog II was determined in the mouse and rat. The tritiated product, [3H]-Analog II was prepared by New England Nuclear and was purified by preparative chromatography using silica gel and petroleum ether/methylene chloride (80:20). The fat tissue had the highest uptake due to the hydrophobic nature of Analog II. The second highest uptake was in the mouse uterine tissue which was greater than that observed in the rat. The differences in biodistribution between the mouse and rat may partially explain the differences in biological activity of Analog II previously observed in these two animal species.

  4. Hymenolepiosis in a group of albino rats (Rattus albus): a study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedevi, C; Ravi Kumar, P; Jyothisree, Ch

    2015-06-01

    A study was carried out on adult albino Wistar laboratory rats to know the incidence of hymenolepiosis, a zoonotic disease which were brought for experiment purpose. Faecal samples of 95 rats examined for parasitic infection by simple floatation technique in which 32 were positive (33.68 %) for hymenolepiosis. Identification of species of Hymenolepis was done based on morphology of egg. The highest prevalence of Hymenolepis diminuta (23.15 %) was recorded followed by Hymenolepis nana (10.52 %). Heavy infection with Hymenolepis in rats draws attention in view of public health importance in contact persons.

  5. Timeless standards for species delimitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Dalton S; Santos, Charles Morphy D; Krell, Frank-Thorsten; Dubois, Alain; Nihei, Silvio S; Oliveira, Otto M P; Pont, Adrian; Song, Hojun; Verdade, Vanessa K; Fachin, Diego A; Klassa, Bruna; Lamas, Carlos José E; Oliveira, Sarah S; Carvalho, Claudio J B De; Mello-Patiu, Cátia A; Hajdu, Eduardo; Couri, Márcia S; Silva, Vera C; Capellari, Renato S; Falaschi, Rafaela L; Feitosa, Rodrigo M; Prendini, Lorenzo; Pombal, José P Jr; Fernández, Fernando; Rocha, Rosana M; Lattke, John E; Caramaschi, Ulisses; Duarte, Marcelo; Marques, Antonio Carlos; Reis, Roberto E; Kurina, Olavi; Takiya, Daniela M; Tavares, Marcos; Fernandes, Daniel Silva; Franco, Francisco Luís; Cuezzo, Fabiana; Paulson, Dennis; Guénard, Benoit; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Steiner, Florian M; Fisher, Brian L; Johnson, Robert A; Delsinne, Thibaut Dominique; Donoso, David A; Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Carpenter, James M; Herman, Lee; Grimaldi, David

    2016-07-08

    Recently a new species of bombyliid fly, Marleyimyia xylocopae, was described by Marshall & Evenhuis (2015) based on two photographs taken during fieldwork in the Republic of South Africa. This species has no preserved holotype. The paper generated some buzz, especially among dipterists, because in most cases photographs taken in the field provide insufficient information for properly diagnosing and documenting species of Diptera.

  6. High Autophagy in the Naked Mole Rat may Play a Significant Role in Maintaining Good Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmin Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The maximum lifespan of the naked mole rat is over 28.3 years, which exceeds that of any other rodent species, suggesting that age-related changes in its body composition and functionality are either attenuated or delayed in this extraordinarily long-lived species. However, the mechanisms underlying the aging process in this species are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether long-lived naked mole rats display more autophagic activity than short-lived mice. Methods: Hepatic stellate cells isolated from naked mole rats were treated with 50 nM rapamycin or 20 mM 3-methyladenine (3-MA for 12 or 24 h. Expression of the autophagy marker proteins LC3-II and beclin 1 was measured with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The induction of apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Our results demonstrate that one-day-old naked mole rats have higher levels of autophagy than one-day-old short-lived C57BL/6 mice, and that both adult naked mole rats (eight months old and adult C57BL/6 mice (eight weeks old have high basal levels of autophagy, which may be an important mechanism inhibiting aging and reducing the risk of age-related diseases. Conclusion: Here, we report that autophagy facilitated the survival of hepatic stellate cells from the naked mole rat, and that treatment with 3-MA or rapamycin increased the ratio of apoptotic cells to normal hepatic stellate cells.

  7. Electrosmog and species conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: abalmorimartinez@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Despite the widespread use of wireless telephone networks around the world, authorities and researchers have paid little attention to the potential harmful effects of mobile phone radiation on wildlife. This paper briefly reviews the available scientific information on this topic and recommends further studies and specific lines of research to confirm or refute the experimental results to date. Controls must be introduced and technology rendered safe for the environment, particularly, threatened species. - Highlights: • Studies have shown effects in both animals and plants. • Two thirds of the studies reported ecological effects. • There is little research in this area and further research is needed. • The technology must be safe. • Controls should be introduced to mitigate the possible effects.

  8. Low prevalence of human enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouffaer, Lieze Oscar; Baert, Kristof; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Cox, Ivo; Vanantwerpen, Gerty; De Zutter, Lieven; Strubbe, Diederik; Vranckx, Katleen; Lens, Luc; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Delmée, Michel; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) have been identified as potential carriers of Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, the etiological agents of yersiniosis, the third most reported bacterial zoonosis in Europe. Enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. are most often isolated from rats during yersiniosis cases in animals and humans, and from rats inhabiting farms and slaughterhouses. Information is however lacking regarding the extent to which rats act as carriers of these Yersinia spp.. In 2013, 1088 brown rats across Flanders, Belgium, were tested for the presence of Yersinia species by isolation method. Identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS, PCR on chromosomal- and plasmid-borne virulence genes, biotyping and serotyping. Yersinia spp. were isolated from 38.4% of the rats. Of these, 53.4% were designated Y. enterocolitica, 0.7% Y. pseudotuberculosis and 49.0% other Yersinia species. Two Y. enterocolitica possessing the virF-, ail- and ystA-gene were isolated. Additionally, the ystB-gene was identified in 94.1% of the other Y. enterocolitica isolates, suggestive for biotype 1A. Three of these latter isolates simultaneously possessed the ail-virulence gene. Significantly more Y. enterocolitica were isolated during winter and spring compared to summer. Based on our findings we can conclude that brown rats are frequent carriers for various Yersinia spp., including Y. pseudotuberculosis and (human pathogenic) Y. enterocolitica which are more often isolated during winter and spring.

  9. Proteomic profiling of the rat hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedroso Amanda P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus plays a pivotal role in numerous mechanisms highly relevant to the maintenance of body homeostasis, such as the control of food intake and energy expenditure. Impairment of these mechanisms has been associated with the metabolic disturbances involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Since rodent species constitute important models for metabolism studies and the rat hypothalamus is poorly characterized by proteomic strategies, we performed experiments aimed at constructing a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE profile of rat hypothalamus proteins. Results As a first step, we established the best conditions for tissue collection and protein extraction, quantification and separation. The extraction buffer composition selected for proteome characterization of rat hypothalamus was urea 7 M, thiourea 2 M, CHAPS 4%, Triton X-100 0.5%, followed by a precipitation step with chloroform/methanol. Two-dimensional (2-D gels of hypothalamic extracts from four-month-old rats were analyzed; the protein spots were digested and identified by using tandem mass spectrometry and database query using the protein search engine MASCOT. Eighty-six hypothalamic proteins were identified, the majority of which were classified as participating in metabolic processes, consistent with the finding of a large number of proteins with catalytic activity. Genes encoding proteins identified in this study have been related to obesity development. Conclusion The present results indicate that the 2-DE technique will be useful for nutritional studies focusing on hypothalamic proteins. The data presented herein will serve as a reference database for studies testing the effects of dietary manipulations on hypothalamic proteome. We trust that these experiments will lead to important knowledge on protein targets of nutritional variables potentially able to affect the complex central nervous system control of energy homeostasis.

  10. Comparison of rat and rabbit embryo-fetal developmental toxicity data for 379 pharmaceuticals: on the nature and severity of developmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Peter T; Beken, Sonja; Beyer, Bruce K; Breslin, William J; Cappon, Gregg D; Chen, Connie L; Chmielewski, Gary; De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Enright, Brian; Foreman, Jennifer E; Harrouk, Wafa; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan M; Hui, Julia Y; Knudsen, Thomas B; Laffan, Susan B; Makris, Susan L; Martin, Matt; McNerney, Mary Ellen; Siezen, Christine L; Stanislaus, Dinesh J; Stewart, Jane; Thompson, Kary E; Tornesi, Belen; Van der Laan, Jan Willem; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Wood, Sandra; Piersma, Aldert H

    2016-11-01

    Regulatory non-clinical safety testing of human pharmaceuticals typically requires embryo-fetal developmental toxicity (EFDT) testing in two species (one rodent and one non-rodent). The question has been raised whether under some conditions EFDT testing could be limited to one species, or whether the testing in a second species could be decided on a case-by-case basis. As part of a consortium initiative, we built and queried a database of 379 compounds with EFDT studies (in both rat and rabbit animal models) conducted for marketed and non-marketed pharmaceuticals for their potential for adverse developmental and maternal outcomes, including EFDT incidence and the nature and severity of adverse findings. Manifestation of EFDT in either one or both species was demonstrated for 282 compounds (74%). EFDT was detected in only one species (rat or rabbit) in almost a third (31%, 118 compounds), with 58% (68 compounds) of rat studies and 42% (50 compounds) of rabbit studies identifying an EFDT signal. For 24 compounds (6%), fetal malformations were observed in one species (rat or rabbit) in the absence of any EFDT in the second species. In general, growth retardation, fetal variations, and malformations were more prominent in the rat, whereas embryo-fetal death was observed more often in the rabbit. Discordance across species may be attributed to factors such as maternal toxicity, study design differences, pharmacokinetic differences, and pharmacologic relevance of species. The current analysis suggests that in general both species are equally sensitive on the basis of an overall EFDT LOAEL comparison, but selective EFDT toxicity in one species is not uncommon. Also, there appear to be species differences in the prevalence of various EFDT manifestations (i.e. embryo-fetal death, growth retardation, and dysmorphogenesis) between rat and rabbit, suggesting that the use of both species has a higher probability of detecting developmental toxicants than either one alone.

  11. Convergent evolution of aquatic foraging in a new genus and species (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Kevin C; Achmadi, Anang S; Esselstyn, Jacob A

    2014-06-17

    The island of Sulawesi, in Indonesia, lies at the crossroads of the Indo-Australian Archipelago and has remained isolated from the Asian (Sunda) and Australian (Sahul) continental shelves for at least the last 10 million years. Of the 50 native species of rodents on Sulawesi, all are endemic and represent the evolution of a variety of ecological and morphological forms within the Muridae and Sciuridae. Carnivorous rodents have evolved, perhaps independently, in Muridae from the Philippines, Sulawesi, and Sahul, but semi-aquatic murids are only known from Sahul. Here we describe a new genus and species of insectivorous water rat from Sulawesi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that it is related to the shrew rats of Sulawesi and represents an origin of aquatic carnivory that is independent from the evolution of water rats on Sahul. Many areas of Sulawesi have not been surveyed systematically and current lists of mammal species are likely to dramatically underestimate actual diversity.

  12. CYP450-Dependent Biotransformation of the Insecticide Fipronil into Fipronil Sulfone Can Mediate Fipronil-Induced Thyroid Disruption in Rats (Full paper and erratum)

    OpenAIRE

    ROQUES, Beatrice; Lacroix, Marlène; Puel, Sylvie; Gayrard, Véronique; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Jouanin, Isabelle; Perdu, Elisabeth; Martin, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    In rats, the widely used insecticide fipronil increases the clearance of thyroxine (T-4). This effect is associated with a high plasma concentration of fipronil sulfone, the fipronil main metabolite in several species including rats and humans. In sheep, following fipronil treatment, fipronil sulfone plasma concentration and thyroid disruption are much lower than in rats. We postulated that fipronil biotransformation into fipronil sulfone by hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP) could act as a pote...

  13. Insular species swarm goes underground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Enghoff, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Cylindroiulus Verhoeff, 1894, C. julesvernei and C. oromii, are described from the subterranean ecosystem of Madeira Island, Portugal. Species are illustrated with photographs and diagrammatic drawings. The new species belong to the Cylindroiulus madeirae......-group, an insular species swarm distributed in the archipelagos of Madeira and the Canary Islands. We discuss the differences between the new species and their relatives and present information on the subterranean environment of Madeira. An updated overview of the subterranean biodiversity of millipedes...

  14. Hebeloma species associated with Cistus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Ursula; Beker, Henry J; Vila, Jordi; Vesterholt, Jan; Llimona, Xavier; Gadjieva, Rena

    2009-01-01

    The genus Hebeloma has a number of species highly specific to Cistus and others that occur with several host genera. This paper discusses the species of Hebeloma that appear to be ectomycorrhizal with Cistus, judging from their occurrence when Cistus is the only available host. The previously unknown species H. plesiocistum spec. nov. is described. We also provide a key to the known Hebeloma associates of Cistus. Molecular analyses based on ITS sequence data further illustrate the distinctness of the newly described species and difficulties in the species delimitation with view to H. erumpens. Specific associations with Cistus may have evolved more than once within the genus Hebeloma.

  15. Implantação do Método Mãe-Canguru na percepção de enfermeiras de um hospital universitário Implantación del Método Madre canguro en la percepción de enfermeras de un hospital universitario Implantation of the Kangaroo Mother Method in the perception of nurses in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cristina de Hollanda Parisi

    2008-01-01

    involucramiento de los colaboradores de la institución, en los procesos de cambio y la necesidad de adecuación de los recursos humanos y físicos para la implantación efectiva del método. De esta forma, dio subsidios para la reorganización de las actividades asistenciales y gerenciales en el referido servicio.OBJECTIVE: To understand the perception of nurses in a Neonatal Unit about the implantation of the Kangaroo Mother Method. METHODS: This is an exploratory-descriptive, qualitative study, performed at the Neonatal Unit at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, with the participation of five nurses. Data collection occurred through interviews, which were transformed into narratives and then categorized. RESULTS: Three categories were extracted from the narratives and interpreted according to the planned changes: the decision-making and awareness processes of the healthcare team, the intervenient factors and the beliefs and feelings associated to the implantation of the Kangaroo Mother Method. CONCLUSION: This study showed the importance of the involvement of the collaborators at the institution during the processes of change and the need to adequate the human and physical resources for the effective implantation of the method. Therefore, it yielded subsidies for the reorganization of the healthcare and managerial activities of the service.

  16. Comparative toxicokinetics of low-viscosity mineral oil in Fischer 344 rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and humans--implications for an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogaard, Peter J; Goyak, Katy O; Biles, Robert W; van Stee, Leo L P; Miller, Matthew S; Miller, Mary Jo

    2012-06-01

    Oral repeated-dose studies with low-viscosity mineral oils showed distinct species and strain differences, which are hypothesized to be due to differences in bioavailability, with Fischer 344 rats being more susceptible than Sprague-Dawley rats or dogs. Sensitive analytical methodology was developed for accurate measurement of low levels of mineral hydrocarbons and applied in single-dose toxicokinetics studies in rats and humans. Fischer 344 rats showed a 4-fold higher AUC(0-∞) and consistently higher blood and liver concentrations were found than Sprague-Dawley rats. Hepatic mineral hydrocarbon concentration tracked the blood concentration in both strains, indicating that blood concentrations can serve as functional surrogate measure for hepatic concentrations. In human volunteers receiving 1mg/kg body weight of low-viscosity white oil, all blood concentrations of mineral hydrocarbons were below the detection limit. Comparison with threshold blood concentrations associated with NOAELs in both rat strains, indicate that the margin-of-exposure is at least 37-fold. Using an internal dose metric rather than applied dose reduces the uncertainty around the temporary ADI considerably since it intrinsically accounts for intra- and inter-species differences. The current data support replacement of the temporary ADI of 0.01 mg/kg/day by a (permanent) ADI of at least 1.0mg/kg/day for low- and medium-viscosity mineral oils.

  17. Transmission of avian influenza A viruses among species in an artificial barnyard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna E Achenbach

    Full Text Available Waterfowl and shorebirds harbor and shed all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes of influenza A viruses and interact in nature with a broad range of other avian and mammalian species to which they might transmit such viruses. Estimating the efficiency and importance of such cross-species transmission using epidemiological approaches is difficult. We therefore addressed this question by studying transmission of low pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses from infected ducks to other common animals in a quasi-natural laboratory environment designed to mimic a common barnyard. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos recently infected with H5N2 or H7N3 viruses were introduced into a room housing other mallards plus chickens, blackbirds, rats and pigeons, and transmission was assessed by monitoring virus shedding (ducks or seroconversion (other species over the following 4 weeks. Additional animals of each species were directly inoculated with virus to characterize the effect of a known exposure. In both barnyard experiments, virus accumulated to high titers in the shared water pool. The H5N2 virus was transmitted from infected ducks to other ducks and chickens in the room either directly or through environmental contamination, but not to rats or blackbirds. Ducks infected with the H7N2 virus transmitted directly or indirectly to all other species present. Chickens and blackbirds directly inoculated with these viruses shed significant amounts of virus and seroconverted; rats and pigeons developed antiviral antibodies, but, except for one pigeon, failed to shed virus.

  18. Leptopsyllines from Madagascar (Insecta: Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae: description of five new species of Paractenopsyllus Wagner, 1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchemin J.B.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Five new species of the malagasy endemic genus Paractenopsyllus Wagner, 1938, are described. Paractenopsyllus rouxi, P. ratovonjatoi, P. duplantieri, P. juliamarinus and P. gemelli have been collected on endemic small mammals and the black rat. Biotopes are mid-elevation rain-forests of the central highlands or the northern mountains of Madagascar. Morphological affinities between these new species and those already known provide taxonomic links within the genus. Differences in the spatial and altitudinal distributions and host ranges allow discussion of the potential factors important in the species distribution of this genus.

  19. Dynamics of glucagon secretion in mice and rats revealed using a validated sandwich ELISA for small sample volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Windeløv, Johanne Agerlin

    2016-01-01

    secretion in response to intravenous glucose and arginine in anesthetized mice (isoflurane) and rats (Hypnorm/midazolam). Glucose caused a long-lasting suppression to very low values (1–2 pmol/l) within 2 min in both species. Arginine stimulated secretion 8- to 10-fold in both species, peaking at 1–2 min...

  20. Seroepidemiology of leptospirosis in dogs and rats in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suepaul, S M; Carrington, C V; Campbell, M; Borde, G; Adesiyun, A A

    2014-12-01

    Stray dogs (n=207), suspected canine cases of leptospirosis (n=50) and rats (n=200) from the Caribbean island of Trinidad were subjected to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) for leptospirosis. The seroprevalence in stray dogs was 15.5% (n=32), the predominant serogroup was Icterohaemorrhagiae (14.5%; n=30) with agglutinations to serovars Copenhageni at 5.8%, Icterohaemorrhagiae at 4.8%, Mankarso at 3.9%. The seroprevalence among suspected canine cases was 72% (n=36) with Icterohaemorrhagiae again being the predominant serogroup at 60% inclusive of serovars: Copenhageni, 44%; Mankarso, 14%; and Icterohaemorrhagiae 2%. A seroprevalence of 16.5% was determined in rats, all agglutinations were to the Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (inclusive of serovars Copenhageni, 9.5%; Icterohaemorrhagiae, 5.5%; and Mankarso, 1.5%). Overall serovar Copenhageni was the most common serovar as 11.6% of all the animal species tested by the MAT were positive and may be an important zoonotic serovar in Trinidad. The titres of infecting serovars of Leptospira in suspected canine cases of leptospirosis were considerably higher than that found in stray dogs and in rats where the lowest titres were found. Age and sex were not significant risk factors except in the case of rats where age was significant, indicating that juvenile rats were at a significantly higher risk. There was no definite pattern of the distribution of positive animals or the serovars when using the MAT. Data obtained in the current study indicate that dogs and rats in Trinidad have the potential to be sources of leptospiral infections for humans. This potential has public health implications making it imperative to control rat and stray dog populations in the island to reduce the risk of human leptospirosis.

  1. Species-conserved reconfigurations of brain network topology induced by ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Braun, U; Schwarz, A J; Gass, N; Schweiger, J I; Weber-Fahr, W; Schenker, E; Spedding, M; Clemm von Hohenberg, C; Risterucci, C; Zang, Z; Grimm, O; Tost, H; Sartorius, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    Species-conserved (intermediate) phenotypes that can be quantified and compared across species offer important advantages for translational research and drug discovery. Here, we investigate the utility of network science methods to assess the pharmacological alterations of the large-scale architecture of brain networks in rats and humans. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in humans and a placebo-controlled two-group study in rats, we demonstrate that the application of ketamine leads to a topological reconfiguration of large-scale brain networks towards less-integrated and more-segregated information processing in both the species. As these alterations are opposed to those commonly observed in patients suffering from depression, they might indicate systems-level correlates of the antidepressant effect of ketamine. PMID:27093068

  2. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  3. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T.; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome th...

  4. Bidens pilosa chemoprotective effect on induced breast cancer in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo, Jorge; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Departamento de Ciencias Dinámicas, Sección de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Bonilla, Pablo; Instituto de Ciencias Farmacéuticas y Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UNMSM. Lima, Perú.; Ráez, Ernesto; Instituto de Patología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Barreda, Alejandro; Departamento Académico de Ginecología y Obstetricia, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú.; Huamán, Oscar; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Bidens pilosa species belonging to the Asteraceae family, known in Peru as love dry bur, is credited with anti-inflammatory, diuretic, hepatoprotective effects. Objectives: To determine the protective effect of phenolic compounds and flavonoids extracted from Bidens pilosa L whole plant on breast cancer induced in rats by 7,12-dimethylbenz (A) anthracene (DMBA). Design: Experimental. Setting: Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marc...

  5. METABOLISM OF 3 PHARMACOLOGICALLY ACTIVE-DRUGS IN ISOLATED HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES - ANALYSIS OF INTERSPECIES VARIABILITY AND COMPARISON WITH METABOLISM IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDKER, GW; VOS, RME; DELBRESSINE, LPC; SLOOFF, MJH; MEIJER, DKF; GROOTHUIS, GMM

    1994-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the three drugs (Org GB 94, Org 3770 and Org OD 14) was studied in isolated human and rat hepatocytes. The metabolic profiles in rat and human hepatocytes were compared with the available in vivo data in both species. 2. All three drugs were metabolized extensively under the con

  6. The Use of Cytochrome b Gene as a Specific Marker of the Rat Meat (Rattus norvegicus on Meat and Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sumantri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Falsification of the origin of livestock meat and its processed with rat meat is a problem that must be overcome to ensure food safety. One way that is often used to detect forgeries by using cytochrome b gene as a marker. The purpose of this study was to create a specific primer derived from cytochrome b sequences in rat (Rattus norvegicus as the DNA marker to detect any contamination of rat meat on fresh livestock meat and its processed meat products. Meatballs were made from beef meat with the addition of rat 1%-25%, and the meatballs were obtained from traditional markets. DNA extraction was conducted from seven species (goat, chicken, cattle, sheep, pig, horse, and rat by using phenol-chloroform. The highest success rate in detecting the presence of rat meat in a mixture of beef meatballs at concentration of 15% was 100%. The specific fragment of cytochrome b gene in R. norvegicus has no similarity with the cytochrome b gene from six other species, so it can be used as molecular markers to detect the presence of rat meat contamination in the processed of meat products. Amplified fragment length for goats, chickens, cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, and rats 157, 227, 274, 331, 398, 439 and 603 bp respectively. The amplification of cytochrome b gene in seven species of animals with different fragment length indicated the specificity of cytochrome b gene sequences among species.

  7. Transcriptomic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD in liver: Comparison of rat and mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohjanvirta Raimo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse and rat models are mainstays in pharmacology, toxicology and drug development – but differences between strains and between species complicate data interpretation and application to human health. Dioxin-like polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons represent a major class of environmentally and economically relevant toxicants. In mammals dioxin exposure leads to a broad spectrum of adverse affects, including hepatotoxicity of varying severity. Several studies have shown that dioxins extensively alter hepatic mRNA levels. Surprisingly, though, analysis of a limited portion of the transcriptome revealed that rat and mouse responses diverge greatly (Boverhof et al. Toxicol Sci 94:398–416, 2006. Results We employed oligonucleotide arrays to compare the response of 8,125 rat and mouse orthologs. We confirmed that there is limited inter-species overlap in dioxin-responsive genes. Rat-specific and mouse-specific genes are enriched for specific functional groups which differ between species, conceivably accounting for species-specificities in liver histopathology. While no evidence for the involvement of copy-number variation was found, extensive inter-species variation in the transcriptional-regulatory network was identified; Nr2f1 and Fos emerged as candidates to explain species-specific and species-independent responses, respectively. Conclusion Our results suggest that a small core of genes is responsible for mediating the similar features of dioxin hepatotoxicity in rats and mice but non-overlapping pathways are simultaneously at play to result in distinctive histopathological outcomes. The extreme divergence between mouse and rat transcriptomic responses appears to reflect divergent transcriptional-regulatory networks. Taken together, these data suggest that both rat and mouse models should be used to screen the acute hepatotoxic effects of drugs and toxic compounds.

  8. Attachment behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigling, H.O.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes studies into the rat as an animal model for attachment, along the lines of Bowlby's attachment theory. First, the relation between attachment and human psychopathology is reviewed. The conclusion is that psychopathology is more frequent in insecure attached persons and that the

  9. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  10. Implementation of Kangaroo mother care by health workers in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-04

    Aug 4, 2016 ... mother (or substitute) and her low birth weight infant, both in hospital and ... come countries. In Nigeria, it was estimated that KMC would save over ..... parents and also benefit the hospital, with improved in- fant survival and ...

  11. Nitric oxide and superoxide transport in a cross section of the rat outer medulla. I. Effects of low medullary oxygen tension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Aurélie; Layton, Anita T

    2010-01-01

    ...) on the distribution of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O(2)(-)) and total peroxynitrite (ONOO), we developed a mathematical model that simulates the transport of those species in a cross section of the rat OM...

  12. Species of Wadicosa (Araneae, Lycosidae): a new species from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronestedt, Torbjörn

    2017-05-10

    Since establishing the wolf spider genus Wadicosa Zyuzin, 1985 (Zyuzin 1985), eleven species have been accepted in it, either by transfer from Lycosa Latreille, 1804 or Pardosa C.L. Koch, 1847 or by original designation (WSC 2017). However, according to Kronestedt (1987), additional species wait to be formally transferred to Wadicosa. The genus is restricted to the Old World, with one species, Wadicosa jocquei Kronestedt, 2015, recently described from Madagascar and surrounding islands.

  13. Native species that can replace exotic species in landscaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Regina Tempel Stumpf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beyond aesthetics, the contemporary landscaping intends to provide other benefits for humans and environment, especially related to the environmental quality of urban spaces and conservation of the species. A trend in this direction is the reduction in the use of exotic plants in their designs, since, over time, they can become agents of replacement of native flora, as it has occurred in Rio Grande do Sul with many species introduced by settlers. However, the use of exotic species is unjustifiable, because the flora diversity of the Bioma Pampa offers many native species with appropriate features to the ornamental use. The commercial cultivation and the implantation of native species in landscaped areas constitute innovations for plant nurseries and landscapers and can provide a positive reduction in extractivism, contributing to dissemination, exploitation and preservation of native flora, and also decrease the impact of chemical products on environment. So, this work intends to identify native species of Bioma Pampa with features and uses similar to the most used exotic species at Brazilian landscaping. The species were selected from consulting books about native plants of Bioma Pampa and plants used at Brazilian landscaping, considering the similarity on habit and architecture, as well as characteristics of leafs, flowers and/or fruits and environmental conditions of occurrence and cultivation. There were identified 34 native species able to properly replace exotic species commonly used. The results show that many native species of Bioma Pampa have interesting ornamental features to landscape gardening, allowing them to replace exotic species that are traditionally cultivated.

  14. Effects of salidroside on exhaustive exercise‑induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansheng; Li, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Intense exercise increases oxygen consumption and may produce an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, inducing oxidative stress as a result of increased ROS production. Exogenous antioxidants may prevent oxidative damages since they are able to detoxify certain peroxides by scavenging the ROS produced during exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of salidroside on exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. A total of 40 animals were randomly divided into four groups of ten rats each: control (C), low-dose salidroside‑treated (LT), middle-dose salidroside-treated (MT) and high-dose salidroside-treated (HT) groups. The rats in the treated groups received salidroside (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively) intragastrically (ig) and the rats in the control group received drinking water ig for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, the rats performed an exhaustive swimming exercise and exhaustive swimming times were recorded. The malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glycogen levels in the liver tissues of the rats were measured. The data revealed that salidroside was able to elevate the exercise tolerance and increase the liver glycogen levels of the rats following exhaustive exercise. Salidroside was also able to reduce MDA levels and enhance the activities of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD and GSH-Px) in the liver tissues of the rats. The results from this study indicate that salidroside is effective in the prevention of oxidative stress following exhaustive exercise.

  15. New mite species associated with certain plant species from Guam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi V.P. Reddy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Several new mite species have been reported from certain plants from Guam. Most remarkably, the spider mite, Tetranychus marianae (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae and the predatory mite Phytoseius horridus (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae (Solanum melongena have been found on eggplant. The noneconomically important species of Brevipalpus californicus(Banks Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae,Eupodes sp. (Acarina: Eupodidae and predator Cunaxa sp. (Prostigmata: Cunaxidae have been reported on guava (Psidium guajava L.. Also, the non-economically important species Brevipalpus californicus Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae, Lepidoglyphus destructor (Astigmata: Glycyphagidae and a predator Amblyseius obtusus, species group Amblyseius near lentiginosus (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae, have been recorded on cycad (Cycas micronesica.

  16. Ring species as demonstrations of the continuum of species formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Ricardo José Do Nascimento; Wake, David B.

    2015-01-01

    In the mid-20th century, Ernst Mayr (1942) and Theodosius Dobzhansky (1958) championed the significance of 'circular overlaps' or 'ring species' as the perfect demonstration of the gradual nature of species formation. As an ancestral species expands its range, wrapping around a geographic barrier...... resulted in restrictive gene flow relative to that observed around the ring, their results suggest that circular overlaps might be more common in nature than currently recognized in the literature. Most importantly, this work shows that the continuum of species formation that Mayr and Dobzhansky praised...

  17. Disposition of vildagliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, in rats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Handan; Tran, Phi; Yin, Hequn; Smith, Harold; Flood, Dennis; Kramp, Roger; Filipeck, Ron; Fischer, Volker; Howard, Dan

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of vildagliptin, a potent and orally active inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4, were evaluated in male rats and dogs. Vildagliptin was rapidly absorbed with peak plasma concentrations occurring between 0.5 and 1.5 h. Moderate to high bioavailability was observed in both species (45-100%). The distribution and elimination half-lives of vildagliptin were short: 0.57 h [82% of area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC)] and 8.8 h in the rat and 0.05 and 0.89 h (87% of AUC) in the dog, respectively. The volume of distribution was 1.6 and 8.6 l/kg in dogs and rats, respectively, indicating moderate to high tissue distribution. The plasma clearance of vildagliptin was relatively high for the rat (2.9 l/h/kg) and dog (1.3 l/h/kg) compared with their hepatic blood flow. The major circulating components in plasma after an intravenous or oral dose were the parent compound (rat and dog), a carboxylic acid metabolite from the hydrolysis of the amide bond M15.3 (dog), and a carboxylic acid metabolite from the hydrolysis of the cyano moiety M20.7 (rat and dog). After intravenous dosing, urinary excretion of radioactivity (47.6-72.4%) was the major route of elimination for rats and dogs as 18.9 to 21.3% of the dose was excreted into urine as unchanged parent drug. The recovery was good in both species (81-100% of the dose). Vildagliptin was mainly metabolized before excretion in both species. Similar to plasma, the most predominant metabolite in excreta was M20.7 in rats and dogs, and another major metabolite in dogs was M15.3.

  18. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  19. Species differences in blood-brain barrier transport of three positron emission tomography radioligands with emphasis on P-glycoprotein transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syvänen, Stina; Lindhe, Orjan; Palner, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    the increase in brain concentrations after P-gp inhibition was somewhat greater in rats than in the other species. Differences in plasma protein binding and metabolism did not explain the species-related differences. The findings are important for interpretation of brain drug delivery when extrapolating...

  20. Confronting species distribution model predictions with species functional traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marion E; Barnes, Matthew A; Jerde, Christopher L; Jones, Lisa A; Lodge, David M

    2016-02-01

    Species distribution models are valuable tools in studies of biogeography, ecology, and climate change and have been used to inform conservation and ecosystem management. However, species distribution models typically incorporate only climatic variables and species presence data. Model development or validation rarely considers functional components of species traits or other types of biological data. We implemented a species distribution model (Maxent) to predict global climate habitat suitability for Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). We then tested the relationship between the degree of climate habitat suitability predicted by Maxent and the individual growth rates of both wild (N = 17) and stocked (N = 51) Grass Carp populations using correlation analysis. The Grass Carp Maxent model accurately reflected the global occurrence data (AUC = 0.904). Observations of Grass Carp growth rate covered six continents and ranged from 0.19 to 20.1 g day(-1). Species distribution model predictions were correlated (r = 0.5, 95% CI (0.03, 0.79)) with observed growth rates for wild Grass Carp populations but were not correlated (r = -0.26, 95% CI (-0.5, 0.012)) with stocked populations. Further, a review of the literature indicates that the few studies for other species that have previously assessed the relationship between the degree of predicted climate habitat suitability and species functional traits have also discovered significant relationships. Thus, species distribution models may provide inferences beyond just where a species may occur, providing a useful tool to understand the linkage between species distributions and underlying biological mechanisms.

  1. Methanol poisoning. VI. Role of folic acid in the production of methanol poisoning in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makar, A.B. (Alexandria Univ., Egypt); Tephly, T.R.

    1977-05-01

    Methanol poisoning is well known to occur in humans but does not develop in common laboratory animals such as the rat. Rodents display neither metabolic acidosis nor ocular toxicity after methanol treatment, findings that commonly result in humans and that have recently been described in the monkey. Since methanol administration in the monkey leads to marked accumulation of formic acid and metabolic acidosis, experiments were devised to reduce formate metabolism in the rat and thereby study whether methanol administration would lead to the accumulation of formic acid and acidosis in that species. Several methods were employed to induce a state of folate deficiency in the rat, a prerequisite to producing a decrease in formate oxidation to CO/sub 2/ in that species. Rats placed on a folate-deficient diet for 10-12 wk showed a marked decrease in formate oxidation and a marked sensitivity to methanol poisoning, as evidenced by high blood formate levels and marked decreases in blood pH. Treatment of rats with methotrexate was relatively ineffective in inducing decreases in formate oxidation, but in rats fed a folate-deficient diet for 9 days and injected once daily for 9 days with 1 mg/kg methotrexate, a significant elevation of blood formate and decrease in blood pH was observed. In rats that were acidotic following methanol administration no accumulation of formaldehyde was observed. These results indicate that it is possible to sensitize the rat to methanol poisoning by reducing its capacity to oxidize formate. They also show that once the rat is susceptible to methanol poisoning, metabolic acidosis and formate accumulation occur without the accumulation of formaldehyde.

  2. Aggregation in quads but not pairs of rats exposed to cat odor or bright light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Michael T; Keats, Kirily; Kendig, Michael D; Cakic, Vince; Callaghan, Paul D; McGregor, Iain S

    2012-07-01

    In many prey species aggregation of individuals is a defensive strategy commonly employed in response to predators and predator-related cues. However, very little work has explored this adaptive response in laboratory rats. It is known that individual rats show characteristic defensive responses to predator odors, such as hiding, avoidance, inhibition of foraging, feeding and reproduction, and risk assessment directed toward the odor source. However, whether these species-typical responses in individuals are altered in the presence of other conspecifics is yet to be characterized. The present study therefore examined the defensive response of groups of two rats (dyads) or four rats (quads) to two unconditioned stressors: bright ambient light and cat odor (a 2g ball of cat fur). The dyads and quads were formed from familiar cage mates and test sessions (20 min) occurred in a large open arena (1200 mm(2)) to which the rats had been extensively habituated under dark conditions. The results showed that when quads of rats were exposed to either cat odor or bright light in this arena, they showed characteristic increases in close social proximity, termed "huddling". A tight grouping of 3 (triplet) or 4 (quad) rats was commonly seen in response to cat fur, while triplets were more commonly seen in response to bright light. Interestingly there was no evidence for increased social proximity in dyads exposed to either stressor, only in quads. However, cat odor caused other signs of fear (such as decreased locomotor activity and increased defecation) in both quads and dyads. It is concluded that huddling is a rodent defensive strategy in rats when anxiogenic stimuli are encountered by larger groups of rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective inflammatory pain insensitivity in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Park

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In all mammals, tissue inflammation leads to pain and behavioral sensitization to thermal and mechanical stimuli called hyperalgesia. We studied pain mechanisms in the African naked mole-rat, an unusual rodent species that lacks pain-related neuropeptides (e.g., substance P in cutaneous sensory fibers. Naked mole-rats show a unique and remarkable lack of pain-related behaviors to two potent algogens, acid and capsaicin. Furthermore, when exposed to inflammatory insults or known mediators, naked mole-rats do not display thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, naked mole-rats do display nocifensive behaviors in the formalin test and show mechanical hyperalgesia after inflammation. Using electrophysiology, we showed that primary afferent nociceptors in naked mole-rats are insensitive to acid stimuli, consistent with the animal's lack of acid-induced behavior. Acid transduction by sensory neurons is observed in birds, amphibians, and fish, which suggests that this tranduction mechanism has been selectively disabled in the naked mole-rat in the course of its evolution. In contrast, nociceptors do respond vigorously to capsaicin, and we also show that sensory neurons express a transient receptor potential vanilloid channel-1 ion channel that is capsaicin sensitive. Nevertheless, the activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons in naked mole-rats does not produce pain-related behavior. We show that capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in the naked mole-rat are functionally connected to superficial dorsal horn neurons as in mice. However, the same nociceptors are also functionally connected to deep dorsal horn neurons, a connectivity that is rare in mice. The pain biology of the naked mole-rat is unique among mammals, thus the study of pain mechanisms in this unusual species can provide major insights into what constitutes "normal" mammalian nociception.

  4. Uncommon Species and Other Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department's Natural Heritage Inventory (NHI) maintains a database of uncommon, rare, threatened and endangered species and natural...

  5. Incorporating Context Dependency of Species Interactions in Species Distribution Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Nina K; Zarnetske, Phoebe L; Gouhier, Tarik C; Menge, Bruce A

    2017-07-01

    Species distribution models typically use correlative approaches that characterize the species-environment relationship using occurrence or abundance data for a single species. However, species distributions are determined by both abiotic conditions and biotic interactions with other species in the community. Therefore, climate change is expected to impact species through direct effects on their physiology and indirect effects propagated through their resources, predators, competitors, or mutualists. Furthermore, the sign and strength of species interactions can change according to abiotic conditions, resulting in context-dependent species interactions that may change across space or with climate change. Here, we incorporated the context dependency of species interactions into a dynamic species distribution model. We developed a multi-species model that uses a time-series of observational survey data to evaluate how abiotic conditions and species interactions affect the dynamics of three rocky intertidal species. The model further distinguishes between the direct effects of abiotic conditions on abundance and the indirect effects propagated through interactions with other species. We apply the model to keystone predation by the sea star Pisaster ochraceus on the mussel Mytilus californianus and the barnacle Balanus glandula in the rocky intertidal zone of the Pacific coast, USA. Our method indicated that biotic interactions between P. ochraceus and B. glandula affected B. glandula dynamics across >1000 km of coastline. Consistent with patterns from keystone predation, the growth rate of B. glandula varied according to the abundance of P. ochraceus in the previous year. The data and the model did not indicate that the strength of keystone predation by P. ochraceus varied with a mean annual upwelling index. Balanus glandula cover increased following years with high phytoplankton abundance measured as mean annual chlorophyll-a. M. californianus exhibited the same

  6. Extended Longevity of Reproductives Appears to be Common in Fukomys Mole-Rats (Rodentia, Bathyergidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Philip; Šumbera, Radim; Maßmann, Christina; Scherag, André; Burda, Hynek

    2011-01-01

    African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) contain several social, cooperatively breeding species with low extrinsic mortality and unusually high longevity. All social bathyergids live in multigenerational families where reproduction is skewed towards a few breeding individuals. Most of their offspring remain as reproductively inactive “helpers” in their natal families, often for several years. This “reproductive subdivision” of mole-rat societies might be of interest for ageing research, as in at least one social bathyergid (Ansell's mole-rats Fukomys anselli), breeders have been shown to age significantly slower than non-breeders. These animals thus provide excellent conditions for studying the epigenetics of senescence by comparing divergent longevities within the same genotypes without the inescapable short-comings of inter-species comparisons. It has been claimed that many if not all social mole-rat species may have evolved similar ageing patterns, too. However, this remains unclear on account of the scarcity of reliable datasets on the subject. We therefore analyzed a 20-year breeding record of Giant mole-rats Fukomys mechowii, another social bathyergid species. We found that breeders indeed lived significantly longer than helpers (ca. 1.5–2.2fold depending on the sex), irrespective of social rank or other potentially confounding factors. Considering the phylogenetic positions of F. mechowii and F. anselli and unpublished data on a third Fukomys-species (F. damarensis) showing essentially the same pattern, it seems probable that the reversal of the classic trade-off between somatic maintenance and sexual reproduction is characteristic of the whole genus and hence of the vast majority of social mole-rats. PMID:21533255

  7. Extended longevity of reproductives appears to be common in Fukomys mole-rats (Rodentia, Bathyergidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Dammann

    Full Text Available African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia contain several social, cooperatively breeding species with low extrinsic mortality and unusually high longevity. All social bathyergids live in multigenerational families where reproduction is skewed towards a few breeding individuals. Most of their offspring remain as reproductively inactive "helpers" in their natal families, often for several years. This "reproductive subdivision" of mole-rat societies might be of interest for ageing research, as in at least one social bathyergid (Ansell's mole-rats Fukomys anselli, breeders have been shown to age significantly slower than non-breeders. These animals thus provide excellent conditions for studying the epigenetics of senescence by comparing divergent longevities within the same genotypes without the inescapable short-comings of inter-species comparisons. It has been claimed that many if not all social mole-rat species may have evolved similar ageing patterns, too. However, this remains unclear on account of the scarcity of reliable datasets on the subject. We therefore analyzed a 20-year breeding record of Giant mole-rats Fukomys mechowii, another social bathyergid species. We found that breeders indeed lived significantly longer than helpers (ca. 1.5-2.2fold depending on the sex, irrespective of social rank or other potentially confounding factors. Considering the phylogenetic positions of F. mechowii and F. anselli and unpublished data on a third Fukomys-species (F. damarensis showing essentially the same pattern, it seems probable that the reversal of the classic trade-off between somatic maintenance and sexual reproduction is characteristic of the whole genus and hence of the vast majority of social mole-rats.

  8. Helminth communities from two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zain Siti N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of parasitic infections among commensal animals such as black and brown rats in many tropical countries is high and in comparison with studies on rodents in temperate climates, little is known about the community structure of their parasites. Rodent borne parasites pose threats to human health since people living in close proximity to rodent populations can be exposed to infection. Methods The helminth community structures of two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were investigated. The rats were from two contrasting sites in the city caught over a period of 21 months in 2000-2002. Results Eleven species of helminth parasites comprising seven nematodes (Heterakis spumosum, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris, Pterygodermatites tani/whartoni, Gongylonema neoplasticum, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis, three cestodes (Hymenolepis (Rodentolepis nana, H. diminuta and Taenia taeniaeformis and one acanthocephalan (Moniliformis moniliformis were recovered from 346 Rattus rattus and 104 R. norvegicus from two urban sites, Bangsar and Chow Kit, during 2000-2002. Rattus rattus harboured over 60% of all helminths compared with R. norvegicus, although both host species played a dominant role in the different sites with, for example R. norvegicus at Bangsar and R. rattus at Chow Kit accounting for most of the nematodes. Overall 80% of rats carried at least one species of helminth, with the highest prevalences being shown by H. diminuta (35%, H. spumosum (29.8% and H. nana (28.4%. Nevertheless, there were marked differences in prevalence rates between sites and hosts. The influence of extrinsic (year, season and site and intrinsic (species, sex and age factors affecting infracommunity structure (abundance and prevalence of infection and measures of component community structure were analyzed. Conclusions Since at least two species of rat borne helminths in Kuala Lumpur have the potential

  9. Helminth communities from two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of parasitic infections among commensal animals such as black and brown rats in many tropical countries is high and in comparison with studies on rodents in temperate climates, little is known about the community structure of their parasites. Rodent borne parasites pose threats to human health since people living in close proximity to rodent populations can be exposed to infection. Methods The helminth community structures of two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were investigated. The rats were from two contrasting sites in the city caught over a period of 21 months in 2000-2002. Results Eleven species of helminth parasites comprising seven nematodes (Heterakis spumosum, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris, Pterygodermatites tani/whartoni, Gongylonema neoplasticum, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis), three cestodes (Hymenolepis (Rodentolepis) nana, H. diminuta and Taenia taeniaeformis) and one acanthocephalan (Moniliformis moniliformis) were recovered from 346 Rattus rattus and 104 R. norvegicus from two urban sites, Bangsar and Chow Kit, during 2000-2002. Rattus rattus harboured over 60% of all helminths compared with R. norvegicus, although both host species played a dominant role in the different sites with, for example R. norvegicus at Bangsar and R. rattus at Chow Kit accounting for most of the nematodes. Overall 80% of rats carried at least one species of helminth, with the highest prevalences being shown by H. diminuta (35%), H. spumosum (29.8%) and H. nana (28.4%). Nevertheless, there were marked differences in prevalence rates between sites and hosts. The influence of extrinsic (year, season and site) and intrinsic (species, sex and age) factors affecting infracommunity structure (abundance and prevalence of infection) and measures of component community structure were analyzed. Conclusions Since at least two species of rat borne helminths in Kuala Lumpur have the potential to infect humans

  10. Species comparison of inflammatory cell reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncavage-Hennessey, E.M.; Twerdok, L.E. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Finch, R.A.; Gardner, H.S. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In comparison to the use of rodent models, the use of fish as a potential model to predict immune dysfunction in response to environmental contaminants is a relatively new concept. The development of a fish model for immunotoxicity is possible due to the phylogenetic conservation of many immune functions. The authors have compared mononuclear cell reactivity following in vitro stimulation among five species; Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), DBA/2 mice, Sprague-Dawley rats and human ML-1 cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from the rodent bone marrow and from the teleost anterior kidney (the cell population which most closely resembles mammalian hematopoietic tissue). ML-1 cells are a myeloblastic cell line that were differentiated in vitro to monocytes/macrophages. Cell populations were characterized by myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase staining characteristic. Reactive oxidant production following in vitro stimulation by phorbol ester was measured using the following methods: reduction of cytochrome c (detection of extracellular superoxide), reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (detection of intracellular superoxide) and oxidation of phenol red in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (hydrogen peroxide production). In general, teleost cells demonstrated higher superoxide anion production and mammalian cells produced higher quantities of hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  12. The Year of the Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Do you know what your Chinese sign of the zodiac is? According to the Chinese lunar calendar,every year corre- sponds to one of twelve animals(rat,ox,tiger,rabbit,dragon, snake,horse,sheep,monkey,rooster,dog and pig)and these animals are used to identify years. After the Lunar New Year in 2008 we enter the rat year. All those born in 1996,1984,1972.1960,1948,1936 or 1924, also have a rat as their sign.

  13. Laughing rats are optimistic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Rygula

    Full Text Available Emotions can bias human decisions- for example depressed or anxious people tend to make pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Several studies have reported that affect contingent judgement biases can also be produced in animals. The animals, however, cannot self-report; therefore, the valence of their emotions, to date, could only be assumed. Here we present the results of an experiment where the affect-contingent judgement bias has been produced by objectively measured positive emotions. We trained rats in operant Skinner boxes to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a food reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment by electric foot shock. After attaining a stable level of discrimination performance, the animals were subjected to either handling or playful, experimenter-administered manual stimulation - tickling. This procedure has been confirmed to induce a positive affective state in rats, and the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (rat laughter emitted by animals in response to tickling have been postulated to index positive emotions akin to human joy. During the tickling and handling sessions, the numbers of emitted high-frequency 50-kHz calls were scored. Immediately after tickling or handling, the animals were tested for their responses to a tone of intermediate frequency, and the pattern of their responses to this ambiguous cue was taken as an indicator of the animals' optimism. Our findings indicate that tickling induced positive emotions which are directly indexed in rats by laughter, can make animals more optimistic. We demonstrate for the first time a link between the directly measured positive affective state and decision making under uncertainty in an animal model. We also introduce innovative tandem-approach for studying emotional-cognitive interplay in animals, which may be of great value for understanding the emotional