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  1. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  2. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  3. Hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT)

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    Shiotani, Seiji; Kohno, Mototsugu; Ohashi, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Kentaroh; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kaga, Kazunori; Ebashi, Toshio [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the finding of hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and investigate its causes. Our subjects were 50 PMCT of non-traumatic deaths and 50 CT of living persons (live CT). The ascending aorta at the level of the carina was visually assessed regarding the presence or absence of hyperattenuating aortic wall and hematocrit effect on PMCT and live CT. The diameter, thickness of the aortic wall, and CT number (HU) of the aortic wall and the lumen were also measured. Hyperattenuating aortic wall was detected in 100% of PMCT and 2% of live CT. The diameter of the aortic wall was 2.9{+-}0.5 cm on PMCT and 3.5{+-}0.5 cm on live CT, showing a significant difference. The thickness of the aortic wall was 2 mm on PMCT. Hematocrit effect was observed in 46% of PMCT and in none of live CT. With PMCT, there was a significant difference between the CT numbers of the upper and lower half portions of the lumen (19.6{+-}11.7/30.9{+-}12.9), whereas, with live CT, there was no such significant difference (37.4{+-}7.6/38.9{+-}6.7), with the overall value of 38.2{+-}6.7. The CT number of the aortic wall was 49.9{+-}10.9 on PMCT. The causes of hyperattenuating aortic wall on PMCT are considered to be increased attenuation due to contraction of the aortic wall, a lack of motion artifact, and decreased attenuation of the lumen due to dilution of blood after massive infusion at the time of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (author)

  4. The role of aortic wall CT attenuation measurements for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knollmann, Friedrich D.; Lacomis, Joan M.; Ocak, Iclal; Gleason, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if measurements of aortic wall attenuation can improve the CT diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes. Methods: CT reports from a ten year period were searched for acute aortic syndromes (AAS). Studies with both an unenhanced and a contrast enhanced (CTA) series that had resulted in the diagnosis of intramural hematoma (IMH) were reviewed. Diagnoses were confirmed by medical records. The attenuation of aortic wall abnormalities was measured. The observed attenuation threshold was validated using studies from 39 new subjects with a variety of aortic conditions. Results: The term “aortic dissection” was identified in 1206, and IMH in 124 patients’ reports. IMH was confirmed in 31 patients, 21 of whom had both unenhanced and contrast enhanced images. All 21 had pathologic CTA findings, and no CTA with IMH was normal. Attenuation of the aortic wall was greater than 45 HUs on the CTA images in all patients with IMH. When this threshold was applied to the new group, sensitivity for diagnosing AAS was 100% (19/19), and specificity 94% (16/17). Addition of unenhanced images did not improve accuracy. Conclusions: Measurements of aortic wall attenuation in CTA have a high negative predictive value for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

  5. The role of aortic wall CT attenuation measurements for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knollmann, Friedrich D., E-mail: friedrich.knollmann@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, 4860 Y Street, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Departments of Radiology and Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Lacomis, Joan M.; Ocak, Iclal; Gleason, Thomas [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, 4860 Y Street, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Departments of Radiology and Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To determine if measurements of aortic wall attenuation can improve the CT diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes. Methods: CT reports from a ten year period were searched for acute aortic syndromes (AAS). Studies with both an unenhanced and a contrast enhanced (CTA) series that had resulted in the diagnosis of intramural hematoma (IMH) were reviewed. Diagnoses were confirmed by medical records. The attenuation of aortic wall abnormalities was measured. The observed attenuation threshold was validated using studies from 39 new subjects with a variety of aortic conditions. Results: The term “aortic dissection” was identified in 1206, and IMH in 124 patients’ reports. IMH was confirmed in 31 patients, 21 of whom had both unenhanced and contrast enhanced images. All 21 had pathologic CTA findings, and no CTA with IMH was normal. Attenuation of the aortic wall was greater than 45 HUs on the CTA images in all patients with IMH. When this threshold was applied to the new group, sensitivity for diagnosing AAS was 100% (19/19), and specificity 94% (16/17). Addition of unenhanced images did not improve accuracy. Conclusions: Measurements of aortic wall attenuation in CTA have a high negative predictive value for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes.

  6. Ascending Aortic Wall Cohesion: Comparison of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Valves

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    Jaroslav Benedik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n=44 or a tricuspid (group 2, n=146 AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the “dissectometer” resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC. Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P<0.001, and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04±0.42 mm versus 2.24±0.41 mm, P=0.008. Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P=0.003, P=0.02, P=0.01. We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P=0.72, P=0.40, P=0.41. Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  7. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in aortic wall of patients with ruptured and nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Vorum, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms.......To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms....

  8. MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF INSTABILITY OF AORTIC ANEURYSM WALL

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    M. V. Vishnyakova Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic aneurysm is characterized by high incidence, polymorphic clinical features and sudden onset of severe complications.Aim: To develop a standard multidetector computed tomography (MDCT protocol for aortic aneurysm examination and image analysis for detection the signs of aortic wall instability.Materials and methods: The data of 279 patients with aortic aneurysm who underwent MDCT examination during 2009–2014 was analyzed to identify aortic wall instability signs.Results: Complicated course of aortic aneurysm was observed in 100 cases (36%. The most common sign of aortic wall instability was aortic dissection. According to our results, a new definition of aortic aneurysm complications was elaborated. It included signs of aortic wall instability with incomplete and/or complete disruption of aortic wall layers. A scheme of the most common patterns of aortic wall abnormalities was proposed, allowing a radiologist to reach high accuracy in characterizing this pathology.Conclusion: A dedicated MDCT protocol for aortic aneurysm detection and image analysis can increase quality of radiologic assessment of aneurysm wall allowing to approach to the level of histological accuracy.

  9. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

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    Yong Han Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods: Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV group (n=4. The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%, right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%, and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%. We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-2. Results: Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081. Conclusion: Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy.

  10. Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using 3D ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, A. M.; Nguyen, V.L.; Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Wall stress analysis is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, however, 3D ultrasound (US) has not been

  11. Acute aortic dissection mimics acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction in a Marfan syndrome patient

    OpenAIRE

    Phowthongkum, Prasit

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year old man with acute chest pain was diagnosed with acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction following electrocardiography. After a failed coronary angiography, an echocardiogram revealed an aortic intimal flap after which acute aortic dissection was diagnosed. The patient received a successful Bentall operation without immediate complication. Retrospective examination then confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. This case demonstrates acute aortic dissection may mimic acut...

  12. Acute aortic dissection mimics acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction in a Marfan syndrome patient.

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    Phowthongkum, Prasit

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year old man with acute chest pain was diagnosed with acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction following electrocardiography. After a failed coronary angiography, an echocardiogram revealed an aortic intimal flap after which acute aortic dissection was diagnosed. The patient received a successful Bentall operation without immediate complication. Retrospective examination then confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. This case demonstrates acute aortic dissection may mimic acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Age-related changes in aortic 3D blood flow velocities and wall shear stress: Implications for the identification of altered hemodynamics in patients with aortic valve disease

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    van Ooij, Pim; Garcia, Julio; Potters, Wouter V.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate age-related changes in peak systolic aortic 3D velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) in healthy controls and to investigate the importance of age-matching for 3D mapping of abnormal aortic hemodynamics in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV). 4D flow MRI (fields strengths = 1.5-3T;

  14. Ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity in soft biological tissue: Porcine aortic walls revisited

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    Lenz, T.; Hummel,R.; Katsouras,I.; Groen, W.A.; Nijemeisland, M.; Ruemmler,R.; Schäfer, M.K.E.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Recently reported piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements have proposed that porcine aortic walls are ferroelectric. This finding may have great implications for understanding biophysical properties of cardiovascular diseases such as arteriosclerosis. However, the complex anatomical

  15. Ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity in soft biological tissue : Porcine aortic walls revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, Thomas; Hummel, Regina; Katsouras, Ilias; Groen, W.A.; Nijemeisland, M.; Ruemmler, Robert; Schäfer, Michael K.E.; de Leeuw, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Recently reported piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements have proposed that porcine aortic walls are ferroelectric. This finding may have great implications for understanding biophysical properties of cardiovascular diseases such as arteriosclerosis. However, the complex anatomical

  16. Relationship of Aortic Wall Distensibility to Mitral and Aortic Valve Calcification: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

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    Cohoon, Kevin P; Criqui, Michael H; Budoff, Matthew J; Lima, Joao A; Blaha, Michael J; Decker, Paul A; Durazo, Ramon; Liu, Kiang; Kramer, Holly

    2018-05-01

    Data are limited on whether valvular calcification is associated with aortic wall stiffness. We tested whether aortic valve calcification (AVC) and/or mitral valve calcification (MVC) is inversely associated with aortic distensibility (AD). Cross-sectional study conducted in a subset of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) included 3676 MESA participants aged 44 to 84 years with AD measured with magnetic resonance imaging and with AVC and MVC measured with noncontrast cardiac computed tomography scans. Both AVC and MVC were divided into 3 categories: zero, AVC and MVC, while 6% (n = 211) and 4% (n = 156) had low, and 6% (n = 209) and 4% (n = 155) had high values of AVC and MVC, respectively. The AVC was independently associated with AD after adjusting for age, gender, and ethnicity ( P = .035). No association was noted between AVC groups and AD after adjustment for all covariates or MVC groups and AD in any model.

  17. Quantification of progression and regression of descending thoracic aortic wall thickness by enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Takasu, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Rie; Taguchi, Rie; Itani, Yasutaka; Ito, Yuichi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the usefulness of the quantification of aortic wall involvement by enhanced computed tomography (CT). One-hundred thirteen Japanese patients underwent two enhanced CT of the descending thoracic aorta at intervals. We sliced the descending thoracic aorta continuously from the level of the tracheal bifurcation with 1 cm intervals, and we defined aortic wall volume (AWV) (cm 3 ) as the sum of a 7-slice area of aortic wall involving calcification. The average of AWV increased from 7.95±2.92 cm 3 to 8.70±2.98 cm 3 . The developmental rate of AWV (ΔAWV) was 0.270±0.281 cm 3 /year. ΔAWV did not have a significant correlation with any risk factor at the baseline. ΔAWV had significant correlation with total cholesterol, (LDL-C) low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and LDL-C/(HDL-C) high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio at the follow-up, and by multivariate analysis with only the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. ΔAWV was not correlated with the intake status of hypoglycemic, antihypertensive or lipid-lowering drugs. The cut-off level of total cholesterol with the most significant odds ratio for progression of aortic wall was 190 mg/dl, and that of LDL-C was 130 mg/dl. This method proved to be useful for the non-invasive assessment of aortic wall thickness. (author)

  18. Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with increased wall and turbulence shear stress levels compared to trileaflet aortic valves.

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    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Mirabella, Lucia; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-06-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are associated with accelerated disease progression, such as leaflet calcification and ascending aorta dilatation. Although common underlying genetic factors have been implicated in accelerated disease in BAV patients, several studies have suggested that altered hemodynamics also play a role in this disease process. The present study compares turbulence and wall shear stress (WSS) measurements between various BAV and trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) models to provide information for mechanobiological models of BAV disease. BAV and TAV models were constructed from excised porcine aortic valves to simulate parametric variations in BAV stenosis, hemodynamics and geometry. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted at physiological pressure conditions to characterize velocity fields in the ascending aorta. The velocity fields were post-processed to calculate turbulence, viscous and wall shear stresses in the ascending aorta. Stenosed BAV models showed the presence of eccentric systolic jets, causing increased WSS. Lower cardiac output resulted in a narrower jet, lower turbulence and lower viscous shear stress (VSS). The specific severe stenosis BAV model studied here showed reduced WSS due to reduction in non-fused leaflet mobility. Dilation of the aorta did not affect any turbulence or VSS, but reduced the WSS. In comparison with BAVs, TAVs have similar VSS values, but much smaller WSS and turbulence levels. These increased turbulence  and WSS levels in BAVs may play a key role in amplifying the biological responses of the ascending aorta wall and valvular leaflets, and support the hemodynamic underpinnings of BAV disease processes.

  19. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

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    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  20. Importance of initial stress for abdominal aortic aneurysm wall motion: Dynamic MRI validated finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Veer, van 't M.; Speelman, L.; Breeuwer, M.; Buth, J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the transverse diameter is the primary decision criterion to assess rupture risk in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). To obtain a measure for more patient-specific risk assessment, aneurysm wall stress, calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), has been evaluated in

  1. Altered Aortic Upper Wall TDI Velocity Is Inversely Related with Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Operated Tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Saba, Luca; Marras, Andrea R; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients often develop progressive aortic root dilatation due to an impairment in aortic elastic properties. (1) to assess aortic elasticity at the level of the aortic upper wall by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI); (2) to evaluate the influence of aortic elasticity on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in TOF patients. Twenty-eight postoperative TOF patients (14 males, 14 females. Mean age: 25.7 ± 1.6 years) and 28 age- and sex-matched normal subjects were examined. Aortic distensibility and stiffness index were calculated. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities, LV systolic and diastolic parameters were assessed by TDI. Aortic distensibility was significantly lower (P = .024), and aortic stiffness index significantly higher (P = .036) in TOF patients compared to controls. E/E' was significantly higher in TOF than in control group (P < .001). Aortic upper wall early diastolic velocity (AWEDV) was significantly correlated with aortic stiffness index (r: -0.42; P < .03), aortic distensibility (r = 0.54; P < .004), left atrial volume (r = -0.62; P = .0004), and E/E' ratio (r = -0.87; P < .0001). The latter relationship remained significant even when excluding the influence of age at surgery (r = -0.60; P < .0007) and of previous palliative surgery (r = -0.53; P < .02). Aortic elastic properties can be directly assessed using TDI to measure AWEDV. Aortic elasticity is significantly lower in postoperative TOF patients, exerting a negative effect also on LV diastolic function, with a potential long-term influence on clinical status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spaceflight Affects Postnatal Development of the Aortic Wall in Rats

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    Shin-ichiro Katsuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effect of microgravity environment during spaceflight on postnatal development of the rheological properties of the aorta in rats. The neonate rats were randomly divided at 7 days of age into the spaceflight, asynchronous ground control, and vivarium control groups (8 pups for one dam. The spaceflight group rats at 9 days of age were exposed to microgravity environment for 16 days. A longitudinal wall strip of the proximal descending thoracic aorta was subjected to stress-strain and stress-relaxation tests. Wall tensile force was significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, whereas there were no significant differences in wall stress or incremental elastic modulus at each strain among the three groups. Wall thickness and number of smooth muscle fibers were significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, but there were no significant differences in amounts of either the elastin or collagen fibers among the three groups. The decreased thickness was mainly caused by the decreased number of smooth muscle cells. Plastic deformation was observed only in the spaceflight group in the stress-strain test. A microgravity environment during spaceflight could affect postnatal development of the morphological and rheological properties of the aorta.

  3. The Relationship Between Surface Curvature and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress.

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    de Galarreta, Sergio Ruiz; Cazón, Aitor; Antón, Raúl; Finol, Ender A

    2017-08-01

    The maximum diameter (MD) criterion is the most important factor when predicting risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). An elevated wall stress has also been linked to a high risk of aneurysm rupture, yet is an uncommon clinical practice to compute AAA wall stress. The purpose of this study is to assess whether other characteristics of the AAA geometry are statistically correlated with wall stress. Using in-house segmentation and meshing algorithms, 30 patient-specific AAA models were generated for finite element analysis (FEA). These models were subsequently used to estimate wall stress and maximum diameter and to evaluate the spatial distributions of wall thickness, cross-sectional diameter, mean curvature, and Gaussian curvature. Data analysis consisted of statistical correlations of the aforementioned geometry metrics with wall stress for the 30 AAA inner and outer wall surfaces. In addition, a linear regression analysis was performed with all the AAA wall surfaces to quantify the relationship of the geometric indices with wall stress. These analyses indicated that while all the geometry metrics have statistically significant correlations with wall stress, the local mean curvature (LMC) exhibits the highest average Pearson's correlation coefficient for both inner and outer wall surfaces. The linear regression analysis revealed coefficients of determination for the outer and inner wall surfaces of 0.712 and 0.516, respectively, with LMC having the largest effect on the linear regression equation with wall stress. This work underscores the importance of evaluating AAA mean wall curvature as a potential surrogate for wall stress.

  4. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78±0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48±0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility and

  5. Mass transport properties of the rabbit aortic wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Bailey

    Full Text Available Uptake of circulating macromolecules by the arterial wall may be a critical step in atherogenesis. Here we investigate the age-related changes in patterns of uptake that occur in the rabbit. In immature aortas, uptake was elevated in a triangle downstream of branch ostia, a region prone to disease in immature rabbits and children. By 16-22 months, uptake was high lateral to ostia, as is lesion prevalence in mature rabbits and young adults. In older rabbits there was a more upstream pattern, similar to the disease distribution in older people. These variations were predominantly caused by the branches themselves, rather than reflecting larger patterns within which the branches happened to be situated (as may occur with patterns of haemodynamic wall shear stress. The narrow streaks of high uptake reported in some previous studies were shown to be post mortem artefacts. Finally, heparin (which interferes with the NO pathway had no effect on the difference in uptake between regions upstream and downstream of branches in immature rabbits but reversed the difference in older rabbits, as does inhibiting NO synthesis directly. Nevertheless, examination of uptake all around the branch showed that changes occurred at both ages and that they were quite subtle, potentially explaining why inhibiting NO has only minor effects on lesion patterns in mature rabbits and contradicting the earlier conclusion that mechanotransduction pathways change with age. We suggest that recently-established changes in the patterns of haemodynamic forces themselves are more likely to account for the age-dependence of uptake patterns.

  6. Aortic wall damage in mice unable to synthesize ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, N; Hagihara, H; Nakata, Y; Hiller, S; Wilder, J; Reddick, R

    2000-01-18

    By inactivating the gene for L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase, a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, we have generated mice that, like humans, depend on dietary vitamin C. Regular chow, containing about 110 mg/kg of vitamin C, is unable to support the growth of the mutant mice, which require L-ascorbic acid supplemented in their drinking water (330 mg/liter). Upon withdrawal of supplementation, plasma and tissue ascorbic acid levels decreased to 10-15% of normal within 2 weeks, and after 5 weeks the mutants became anemic, began to lose weight, and die. Plasma total antioxidative capacities were approximately 37% normal in homozygotes after feeding the unsupplemented diet for 3-5 weeks. As plasma ascorbic acid decreased, small, but significant, increases in total cholesterol and decreases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed. The most striking effects of the marginal dietary vitamin C were alterations in the wall of aorta, evidenced by the disruption of elastic laminae, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and focal endothelial desquamation of the luminal surface. Thus, marginal vitamin C deficiency affects the vascular integrity of mice unable to synthesize ascorbic acid, with potentially profound effects on the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. Breeding the vitamin C-dependent mice with mice carrying defined genetic mutations will provide numerous opportunities for systematic studies of the role of antioxidants in health and disease.

  7. Chronic high-sodium diet increases aortic wall endothelin-1 expression in a blood pressure-independent fashion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Ohkita, Mamoru; Gariepy, Cheryl E

    2006-06-01

    Vascular endothelin (ET)-1 is upregulated in several forms of salt-induced hypertension. It is unclear to what extent these effects are primary or secondary to endothelial damage. We hypothesized that a high-sodium diet (HNa) increases vascular ET-1 production independent of arterial blood pressure changes. We investigated the effect of chronic HNa with and without ET(A) blockade on circulating and aortic ET-1 protein levels as well as aortic expression of ET-1 and ET(A) messenger RNA (mRNA) in inbred Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and congenic ET(B)-deficient rats. Comparing WKY rats fed a low-sodium diet (LNa) with those fed HNa for 3 weeks, aortic wall ET-1 protein is significantly increased in response to HNa (331 +/- 43 pg/g tissue for LNa vs. 557 +/- 34 pg/gm tissue for HNa). HNa also increased aortic wall ET-1 mRNA levels by 40%, as determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We then compared rats chronically treated with the ET(A)-selective antagonist, ABT-627, while receiving either LNa or HNa. There were no differences in arterial blood pressure (mean arterial pressure 89 +/- 1 mm Hg for WKY on LNa; 90 +/- 3 for WKY on HNa; 91 +/- 2 for ET(B)-deficient/ABT-627-treated on HNa) or heart rate. However, aortic wall ET-1 protein levels were 4-fold higher in the HNa group. Further, HNa increased aortic wall ET-1 mRNA (approximately 1.5- to 3-fold) and ET(A) mRNA (approximately 2- to 7-fold), independent of activation of ET(B). Therefore, the expression of ET-1 mRNA by the aortic wall is increased in response to chronic high dietary sodium in WKY rats in the absence of changes in arterial blood pressure.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging of the aortic vessel wall using an elastin-specific magnetic resonance contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Marcus R; Preissel, Anne; von Bary, Christian; Warley, Alice; Schachoff, Sylvia; Keithan, Alexandra; Cesati, Richard R; Onthank, David C; Schwaiger, Markus; Robinson, Simon P; Botnar, René M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution 3-dimensional aortic vessel wall imaging using a novel elastin-specific magnetic resonance contrast agent (ESMA) in a large animal model. The thoracic aortic vessel wall of 6 Landrace pigs was imaged using a novel ESMA and a nonspecific control agent. On day 1, imaging was performed before and after the administration of a nonspecific control agent, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA; Bayer Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). On day 3, identical scans were repeated before and after the administration of a novel ESMA (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, Massachusetts). Three-dimensional inversion recovery gradient echo delayed-enhancement imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the thoracic aortic vessel wall were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner (Achieva; Philips Medical Systems, the Netherlands). The signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast-to-noise ratio of arterial wall enhancement, including the time course of enhancement, were assessed for ESMA and Gd-DTPA. After the completion of imaging sessions, histology, electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy were performed to localize and quantify the gadolinium bound to the arterial vessel wall. Administration of ESMA resulted in a strong enhancement of the aortic vessel wall on delayed-enhancement imaging, whereas no significant enhancement could be measured with Gd-DTPA. Ninety to 100 minutes after the administration of ESMA, significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio could be measured compared with the administration of Gd-DTPA (45.7 ± 9.6 vs 13.2 ± 3.5, P wall imaging using a novel ESMA in a large animal model under conditions resembling a clinical setting. Such an approach could be useful for the fast 3-dimensional assessment of the arterial vessel wall in the context of atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, and hypertension.

  9. Abscisic acid ameliorates atherosclerosis by suppressing macrophage and CD4+ T cell recruitment into the aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Amir J; Misyak, Sarah A; Hontecillas, Raquel; Hasty, Alyssa; Liu, Dongmin; Si, Hongwei; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a natural phytohormone which improves insulin sensitivity and reduces adipose tissue inflammation when supplemented into diets of obese mice. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which ABA prevents or ameliorates atherosclerosis. apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed high-fat diets with or without ABA for 84 days. Systolic blood pressure was assessed on Days 0, 28, 56 and 72. Gene expression, immune cell infiltration and histological lesions were evaluated in the aortic root wall. Human aortic endothelial cells were used to examine the effect of ABA on 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro. We report that ABA-treated mice had significantly improved systolic blood pressure and decreased accumulation of F4/80(+)CD11b(+) macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in aortic root walls. At the molecular level, ABA significantly enhanced aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and tended to suppress aortic vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and plasma MCP-1 concentrations. ABA also caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular concentrations of cAMP and NO and up-regulated eNOS mRNA expression in human aortic endothelial cells. This is the first report showing that ABA prevents or ameliorates atherosclerosis-induced hypertension, immune cell recruitment into the aortic root wall and up-regulates aortic eNOS expression in ApoE(-/-) mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Wall Shear Stress Estimation in Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Erik T.; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Wentland, Andrew; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Wieben, Oliver; François, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate surface-based wall shear stress (WSS) and evaluate flow patterns in ascending aortic dilatation (AscAD) using a high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional (3D), three-directional velocity encoded, radially undersampled phase contrast magnetic resonance sequence (4D PC-MRI). Materials and Methods 4D PC-MRI was performed in 11 patients with AscAD (46.3±22.0 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (32.9±13.4 years) after written informed consent and IRB-approval. Following manual vessel wall segmentation of the ascending aorta (MATLAB, The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a 3D surface was created using spline interpolation. Spatial WSS variation based on surface division in 12 segments and temporal variation were evaluated in AscAD and normal aortas. Visual analysis of flow patterns was performed based on streamlines and particle traces using EnSight (v9.0, CEI, Apex, NC). Results AscAD was associated with significantly increased diastolic WSS, decreased systolic to diastolic WSS ratio, and delayed onset of peak WSS (all P wall of the ascending aorta. Vortical flow with highest velocities along the anterior wall and increased helical flow during diastole were observed in AscAD compared to controls. Conclusion Changes in WSS in the ascending aorta of AscAD correspond to observed alterations in flow patterns compared to controls. PMID:21563242

  11. Measurements of Intra‐Aortic Balloon Wall Movement During Inflation and Deflation: Effects of Angulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruti, Gianpaolo; Kolyva, Christina; Pepper, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intra‐aortic balloon pump (IABP) is a ventricular assist device that is used with a broad range of pre‐, intra‐, and postoperative patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although the clinical efficacy of the IABP is well documented, the question of reduced efficacy when patients are nursed in the semi‐recumbent position remains outstanding. The aim of the present work is therefore to investigate the underlying mechanics responsible for the loss of IABP performance when operated at an angle to the horizontal. Simultaneous recordings of balloon wall movement, providing an estimate of its diameter (D), and fluid pressure were taken at three sites along the intra‐aortic balloon (IAB) at 0 and 45°. Flow rate, used for the calculation of displaced volume, was also recorded distal to the tip of the balloon. An in vitro experimental setup was used, featuring physiological impedances on either side of the IAB ends. IAB inflation at an angle of 45° showed that D increases at the tip of the IAB first, presenting a resistance to the flow displaced away from the tip of the balloon. The duration of inflation decreased by 15.5%, the inflation pressure pulse decreased by 9.6%, and volume decreased by 2.5%. Similarly, changing the position of the balloon from 0 to 45°, the balloon deflation became slower by 35%, deflation pressure pulse decreased by 14.7%, and volume suctioned was decreased by 15.2%. IAB wall movement showed that operating at 45° results in slower deflation compared with 0°. Slow wall movement, and changes in inflation and deflation onsets, result in a decreased volume displacement and pressure pulse generation. Operating the balloon at an angle to the horizontal, which is the preferred nursing position in intensive care units, results in reduced IAB inflation and deflation performance, possibly compromising its clinical benefits. PMID:25959284

  12. Partial volume effect estimation and correction in the aortic vascular wall in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burg, S; Le Guludec, D; Dupas, A; Stute, S; Dieudonné, A; Huet, P; Buvat, I

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of partial volume effect (PVE) in the assessment of arterial diseases with 18 FDG PET. An anthropomorphic digital phantom enabling the modeling of aorta related diseases like atherosclerosis and arteritis was used. Based on this phantom, we performed GATE Monte Carlo simulations to produce realistic PET images with a known organ segmentation and ground truth activity values. Images corresponding to 15 different activity-concentration ratios between the aortic wall and the blood and to 7 different wall thicknesses were generated. Using the PET images, we compared the theoretical wall-to-blood activity-concentration ratios (WBRs) with the measured WBRs obtained with five measurement methods: (1) measurement made by a physician (Expert), (2) automated measurement supposed to mimic the physician measurements (Max), (3) simple correction based on a recovery coefficient (Max-RC), (4) measurement based on an ideal VOI segmentation (Mean-VOI) and (5) measurement corrected for PVE using an ideal geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. We found that Mean-VOI WBRs values were strongly affected by PVE. WBRs obtained by the physician measurement, by the Max method and by the Max-RC method were more accurate than WBRs obtained with the Mean-VOI approach. However Expert, Max and Max-RC WBRs strongly depended on the wall thickness. Only the GTM corrected WBRs did not depend on the wall thickness. Using the GTM method, we obtained more reproducible ratio values that could be compared across wall thickness. Yet, the feasibility of the implementation of a GTM-like method on real data remains to be studied. (paper)

  13. Automatic determination of the dynamic geometry of abdominal aortic aneurysm from MR with application to wall stress simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putter, de S.; Breeuwer, M.; Kose, U.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Gerritsen, F.A.; Lemke, H.U.

    2005-01-01

    The current surgical intervention criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm is based on the maximum transverse diameter of the aorta. Recent research advances indicate that a better rupture predictor may be derived from the wall stress, which can be computed with the finite element method. An

  14. Proteins associated with the size and expansion rate of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall as identified by proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Delbosc, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) holds the key to non-surgical intervention and improved selection for AAA repair. We aimed to associate the basic proteomic composition of AAA wall tissue with the expansion rate and size in patients with AAA....

  15. Feasibility of wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Annette M; Nguyen, V Lai; Speelman, Lambert; Brands, Peter J; Schurink, Geert-Willem H; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are local dilations that can lead to a fatal hemorrhage when ruptured. Wall stress analysis of AAAs is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification. Currently, wall stress analysis of AAAs is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging; however, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has great advantages over CT and magnetic resonance imaging in terms of costs, speed, and lack of radiation. In this study, the feasibility of 3D US as input for wall stress analysis is investigated. Second, 3D US-based wall stress analysis was compared with CT-based results. The 3D US and CT data were acquired in 12 patients (diameter, 35-90 mm). US data were segmented manually and compared with automatically acquired CT geometries by calculating the similarity index and Hausdorff distance. Wall stresses were simulated at P = 140 mm Hg and compared between both modalities. The similarity index of US vs CT was 0.75 to 0.91 (n = 12), with a median Hausdorff distance ranging from 4.8 to 13.9 mm, with the higher values found at the proximal and distal sides of the AAA. Wall stresses were in accordance with literature, and a good agreement was found between US- and CT-based median stresses and interquartile stresses, which was confirmed by Bland-Altman and regression analysis (n = 8). Wall stresses based on US were typically higher (+23%), caused by geometric irregularities due to the registration of several 3D volumes and manual segmentation. In future work, an automated US registration and segmentation approach is the essential point of improvement before pursuing large-scale patient studies. This study is a first step toward US-based wall stress analysis, which would be the modality of choice to monitor wall stress development over time because no ionizing radiation and contrast material are involved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryopreserved human aortic root allografts arterial wall: Structural changes occurring during thawing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Novotny

    Full Text Available The aim of our experimental work was to assess morphological changes of arterial wall that arise during different thawing protocols of a cryopreserved human aortic root allograft (CHARA arterial wall.The experiment was performed on CHARAs. Two thawing protocols were tested: 1, CHARAs were thawed at a room temperature at +23°C; 2, CHARAs were placed directly into a water bath at +37°C.After fixation, all samples were washed in distilled water for 5 min, and dehydrated in a graded ethanol series (70, 85, 95, and 100% for 5 min at each level. The tissue samples were then immersed in 100% hexamethyldisilazane for 10 minutes and air dried in an exhaust hood at room temperature. Processed samples were mounted on stainless steel stubs, coated with gold.Thawing protocol 1: All 6 (100% samples showed loss of the endothelium and damage to the subendothelial layers with randomly dispersed circular defects and micro-fractures without smooth muscle cells contractions in the tunica media. Thawing protocol 2: All 6 (100% samples showed loss of endothelium from the luminal surface, longitudinal corrugations in the direction of blood flow caused by smooth muscle cells contractions in the tunica media with frequent fractures in the subendothelial layer.All the samples thawed at the room temperature showed smaller structural damage to the CHARA arterial wall with no smooth muscle cell contraction in tunica media when compared to the samples thawed in a water bath.

  17. Histopathological analysis of cellular localization of cathepsins in abdominal aortic aneurysm wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Zimmermann, Alexander; Ockert, Stefan; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2012-08-01

    An important feature of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the destruction of vessel wall, especially elastin and collagen. Besides matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins are the most potent elastolytic enzymes. The expression of cathepsins with known elastolytic and collagenolytic activities in the individual cells within AAA has not yet been determined. The vessel wall of 32 AAA patients and 10 organ donors was analysed by immunohistochemistry for expression of cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and cystatin C in all cells localized within AAA. Luminal endothelial cells (ECs) of AAA were positive for cathepsin D and partially for cathepsins B, K and S. Endothelial cells of the neovessels and smooth muscle cells in the media were positive for all cathepsins tested, especially for cathepsin B. In the inflammatory infiltrate all cathepsins were expressed in the following pattern: B > D = S > K = L. Macrophages showed the highest staining intensity for all cathepsins. Furthermore, weak overall expression of cystatin C was observed in all the cells localized in the AAA with the exception of the ECs. There is markedly increased expression of the various cathepsins within the AAA wall compared to healthy aorta. Our data are broadly consistent with a role for cathepsins in AAA; and demonstrate expression of cathepsins D, B and S in phagocytic cells in the inflammatory infiltrate; and also may reveal a role for cathepsin B in lymphocytes. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2012 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  18. Effect of cannula shape on aortic wall and flow turbulence: hydrodynamic study during extracorporeal circulation in mock thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo; Yamazaki, Junichi; Fukui, Kozo; Yanaoka, Hideki; Inamura, Takao

    2007-12-01

    This study was designed to analyze flow pattern, velocity, and strain on the aortic wall of a glass aortic model during extracorporeal circulation, and to elucidate the characteristics of flow pattern in four aortic cannulas. Different patterns of large vortices and helical flow were made by each cannula. The high-velocity flow (0.6 m/s) was observed in end-hole cannula, causing high strain rate tensor (0.3~0.4 without unit) on the aortic arch. In dispersion cannula, a decreased strain rate tensor (less than 0.1) was found on the outer curvature of the aortic arch. In Soft-flow cannula (3M Cardiovascular, Ann Arbor, MI, USA), further decreased flow velocity (0.2 m/s) and strain (less than 0.2) were observed. In Select 3D cannula (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), a high strain (0.4~0.5) was observed along the inner curvature of the aortic arch. In conclusion, end-hole cannula should not be used in atherosclerotic aorta. Particular attention should be paid both for selection of cannulas and cannulation site based on this result.

  19. Measurements of Intra-Aortic Balloon Wall Movement During Inflation and Deflation: Effects of Angulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruti, Gianpaolo; Kolyva, Christina; Pepper, John R; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-08-01

    The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is a ventricular assist device that is used with a broad range of pre-, intra-, and postoperative patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although the clinical efficacy of the IABP is well documented, the question of reduced efficacy when patients are nursed in the semi-recumbent position remains outstanding. The aim of the present work is therefore to investigate the underlying mechanics responsible for the loss of IABP performance when operated at an angle to the horizontal. Simultaneous recordings of balloon wall movement, providing an estimate of its diameter (D), and fluid pressure were taken at three sites along the intra-aortic balloon (IAB) at 0 and 45°. Flow rate, used for the calculation of displaced volume, was also recorded distal to the tip of the balloon. An in vitro experimental setup was used, featuring physiological impedances on either side of the IAB ends. IAB inflation at an angle of 45° showed that D increases at the tip of the IAB first, presenting a resistance to the flow displaced away from the tip of the balloon. The duration of inflation decreased by 15.5%, the inflation pressure pulse decreased by 9.6%, and volume decreased by 2.5%. Similarly, changing the position of the balloon from 0 to 45°, the balloon deflation became slower by 35%, deflation pressure pulse decreased by 14.7%, and volume suctioned was decreased by 15.2%. IAB wall movement showed that operating at 45° results in slower deflation compared with 0°. Slow wall movement, and changes in inflation and deflation onsets, result in a decreased volume displacement and pressure pulse generation. Operating the balloon at an angle to the horizontal, which is the preferred nursing position in intensive care units, results in reduced IAB inflation and deflation performance, possibly compromising its clinical benefits. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Artificial Organs published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Center for

  20. Wall Shear Stress Estimation of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Febina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to evaluate the effects of wall shear stress (WSS on thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Aneurysm is an excessive localized swelling of the arterial wall due to many physiological factors and it may rupture causing shock or sudden death. The existing imaging modalities such as MRI and CT assist in the visualization of anomalies in internal organs. However, the expected dynamic behaviour of arterial bulge under stressed condition can only be effectively evaluated through mathematical modelling. In this work, a 3D aneurysm model is reconstructed from the CT scan slices and eventually the model is imported to Star CCM+ (Siemens, USA for intensive CFD analysis. The domain is discretized using polyhedral mesh with prism layers to capture the weakening boundary more accurately. When there is flow reversal in TAA as seen in the velocity vector plot, there is a chance of cell damage causing clots. This is because of the shear created in the system due to the flow pattern. It is observed from the proposed mathematical modelling that the deteriorating WSS is an indicator for possible rupture and its value oscillates over a cardiac cycle as well as over different stress conditions. In this model, the vortex formation pattern and flow reversals are also captured. The non-Newtonian model, including a pulsatile flow instead of a steady average flow, does not overpredict the WSS (15.29 Pa compared to 16 Pa for the Newtonian model. Although in a cycle the flow behaviour is laminar-turbulent-laminar (LTL, utilizing the non-Newtonian model along with LTL model also overpredicted the WSS with a value of 20.1 Pa. The numerical study presented here provides good insight of TAA using a systematic approach to numerical modelling and analysis.

  1. Heterogeneous distribution of a diffusional tracer in the aortic wall of normal and atherosclerotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.; Tomoike, H.; Nakamura, M.

    1990-01-01

    Tracer distribution as an index of nutritional support across the thoracic and abdominal aortas in rabbits in the presence or absence of atherosclerotic lesions was evaluated using [ 14 C]antipyrine, a metabolically inert, diffusible indicator. Intimal plaques were produced by endothelial balloon denudation of the thoracic aorta and a 1% cholesterol diet. After a steady intravenous infusion of 200 microCi of [ 14 C]antipyrine for 60 seconds, thoracic and abdominal aortas and the heart were excised, and autoradiograms of 20-microns-thick sections were quantified, using microcomputer-aided densitometry. Regional radioactivity and regional diffusional support, as an index of nutritional flow estimated from the timed collections of arterial blood, was 367 and 421 nCi.g-1 (82 and 106 ml.min-1.100 g-1) in thoracic aortic media of the normal and atherosclerotic rabbits, respectively. Radioactivity at the thickened intima was 179 nCi.g-1 (p less than 0.01 versus media). The gruel was noted at a deeper site within the thickened intima, and diffusional support here was 110 nCi.g-1 (p less than 0.01 versus an average radioactivity at the thickened intima). After ligating the intercostal arteries, regional tracer distribution in the media beneath the fibrofatty lesion, but not the plaque-free intima, was reduced to 46%. Thus, in the presence of advanced intimal thickening, the heterogeneous distribution of diffusional flow is prominent across the vessel wall, and abluminal routes are crucial to meet the increased demands of nutritional requirements

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics of the vascular wall components of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the ultrastructural characteristics of cell populations and extracellular matrix components in the wall of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. We analyzed 20 samples of ruptured AAA. For orientation to the light microscopy, we used routine histochemical techniques by standard procedures. For ultrastructural analysis, we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Our results have shown that ruptured AAA is characterized by the remains of an advanced atherosclerotic lesion in the intima followed by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and disruption of internal elastic lamina. On plaque margins as well as in the inner media we observed smooth muscle cells (SMCs that posses a euchromatic nucleus, a well-developed granulated endoplasmic reticulum around the nucleus and reduced myofilaments. The remains of the ruptured lipid core were acellular in all samples; however, on the lateral sides of ruptured plaque we observed a presence of two types of foam cells (FCs, spindle- and star-shaped. Fusiform FCs possess a well-differentiated basal lamina, caveolae and electron dense bodies, followed by a small number of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Star-shaped FCs contain a large number of lipid droplets and do not possess basal lamina. On the inner margins of the plaque, we observed a large number of cells undergoing apoptosis and necrosis, extracellular lipid droplets as well as a large number of lymphocytes. The media was thinned out with disorganized elastic lamellas, while the adventitia exhibited leukocyte infiltration. The presented results suggest that atherosclerotic plaque in ruptured AAA contains vascular SMC synthetic phenotype and two different types of FCs: some were derived from monocyte/macrophage lineage, while others were derived from SMCs of synthetic phenotype. The striking plaque hypocellularity was the result of apoptosis and necrosis

  3. Diuretics prevent Rho-kinase activation and expression of profibrotic/oxidative genes in the hypertensive aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araos, Patricio; Mondaca, David; Jalil, Jorge E; Yañez, Cristián; Novoa, Ulises; Mora, Italo; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2016-12-01

    Diuretics are current antihypertensive drugs since they reduce blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. Increased vascular tone is modulated in a relevant way by the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway, by acting on vascular smooth muscle cell contraction. This pathway has also proremodeling vascular effects. There are few data on the role of diuretics on both vascular ROCK activation and on proremodeling effects. We assessed the effects of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and spironolactone (spiro) alone and in combination with the ROCK inhibitor fasudil (FAS) on ROCK activation, gene expression of proremodeling markers and on hypertrophy in the aortic wall of hypertensive rats. Deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) were randomized to the specific ROCK inhibitor FAS, HCTZ, spiro or the combinations of FAS/HCTZ or FAS/spiro for 3 weeks. At the end of the study, ROCK activation (by western blot), gene expression of proremodeling markers (by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR) and vascular hypertrophy (by morphometry) were determined in the aortic wall. All treatments significantly reduced blood pressure. In the DOCA rats the p-myosin phosphatase target protein-1 (MYPT1)/t-MYPT1 ratio, index of ROCK activation was higher by 2.8 fold (p diuretics alone or in combination with FAS. In the aortic wall, both HCTZ and spiro in antihypertensive doses reduce ROCK activation, subsequent expression of genes that promote vascular remodeling and hypertrophy in this experimental model of hypertension. These effects could explain some of their clinical benefits in hypertensive patients. © The Author(s), 2016.

  4. The impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on left ventricular performance and wall thickness – single-centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Piotr; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Dariusz; Michałek, Piotr; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; El-Hassan, Kamal; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Adam; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a treatment alternative for the elderly population with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Aim To assess the impact of TAVI on echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) performance and wall thickness in patients subjected to the procedure in a single-centre between 2009 and 2013. Material and methods The initial group consisted of 170 consecutive patients with severe AS unsuitable for SAVR. Logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 21.73 ±12.42% and mean age was 79.9 ±7.5 years. Results The TAVI was performed in 167 (98.2%) patients. Mean aortic gradient decreased significantly more rapidly after the procedure (from 58.6 ±16.7 mm Hg to 11.9 ±4.9 mm Hg, p < 0.001). The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) significantly increased in both short-term and long-term follow-up (57 ±14% vs. 59 ±13%, p < 0.001 and 56 ±14% vs. 60 ±12%, p < 0.001, respectively). Significant regression of interventricular septum diameter at end-diastole (IVSDD) and end-diastolic posterior wall thickness (EDPWth) was noted in early (15.0 ±2.4 mm vs. 14.5 ±2.3 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.7 ±2.1 mm vs. 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.028, respectively) and late post-TAVI period (15.1 ±2.5 mm to 14.3 ±2.5 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.8 ±2.0 mm to 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.007, respectively). Significant paravalvular leak (PL) was noted in 21 (13.1%) patients immediately after TAVI and in 13 (9.6%) patients in follow-up (p < 0.001). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (msMR) was seen in 24 (14.9%) patients from the initial group and in 19 (11.8%) patients after TAVI (p < 0.001). Conclusions The TAVI had an immediate beneficial effect on LVEF, LV walls thickness, and the incidence of msMR. The results of the procedure are comparable with those described in other centres. PMID:25848369

  5. Enhanced caspase activity contributes to aortic wall remodeling and early aneurysm development in a murine model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Fabian C; Okamura, Homare; Dalal, Alex R; Penov, Kiril; Merk, Denis R; Raaz, Uwe; Hennigs, Jan K; Chin, Jocelyn T; Miller, Miquell O; Pedroza, Albert J; Craig, Juliana K; Koyano, Tiffany K; Blankenberg, Francis G; Connolly, Andrew J; Mohr, Friedrich W; Alvira, Cristina M; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Fischbein, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rupture and dissection of aortic root aneurysms remain the leading causes of death in patients with the Marfan syndrome, a hereditary connective tissue disorder that affects 1 in 5000 individuals worldwide. In the present study, we use a Marfan mouse model (Fbn1(C1039G/+)) to investigate the biological importance of apoptosis during aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. Using in vivo single-photon emission computed tomographic-imaging and ex vivo autoradiography for Tc99m-annexin, we discovered increased apoptosis in the Fbn1(C1039G/+) ascending aorta during early aneurysm development peaking at 4 weeks. Immunofluorescence colocalization studies identified smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as the apoptotic cell population. As biological proof of concept that early aortic wall apoptosis plays a role in aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome, Fbn1(C1039G/+) mice were treated daily from 2 to 6 weeks with either (1) a pan-caspase inhibitor, Q-VD-OPh (20 mg/kg), or (2) vehicle control intraperitoneally. Q-VD-OPh treatment led to a significant reduction in aneurysm size and decreased extracellular matrix degradation in the aortic wall compared with control mice. In vitro studies using Fbn1(C1039G/+) ascending SMCs showed that apoptotic SMCs have increased elastolytic potential compared with viable cells, mostly because of caspase activity. Moreover, in vitro (1) cell membrane isolation, (2) immunofluorescence staining, and (3) scanning electron microscopy studies illustrate that caspases are expressed on the exterior cell surface of apoptotic SMCs. Caspase inhibition attenuates aneurysm development in an Fbn1(C1039G/+) Marfan mouse model. Mechanistically, during apoptosis, caspases are expressed on the cell surface of SMCs and likely contribute to elastin degradation and aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Tamoxifen up-regulates catalase production, inhibits vessel wall neutrophil infiltration, and attenuates development of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryants, Vladimir; Hannawa, Kevin K; Pearce, Charles G; Sinha, Indranil; Roelofs, Karen J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Deatrick, Kristopher B; Woodrum, Derek T; Cho, Brenda S; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Eagleton, Matthew J; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-01-01

    controls on day 7 (P = .05). Administration of the direct catalase inhibitor AT to tamoxifen-treated rats partially reversed the aneurysm inhibitory effect of tamoxifen by nearly 30% (P = .02). In contrast, catalase administration inhibited AAA formation by 44% (P = .002). The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen inhibits the development of AAAs in male rats in association with an up-regulation of catalase and inhibition of aortic wall neutrophil infiltration.

  7. Association of aortic wall thickness on contrast-enhanced chest CT with major cerebro-cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Silvia; Di Leo, Giovanni; Zoffoli, Elena; Munari, Alice; Primolevo, Alessandra; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    There is a significant association between aortic atherosclerosis and previous major cardiovascular events. Particularly, thoracic aortic atherosclerosis is closely related to the degree of coronary and carotid artery disease. Thus, there is a rationale for screening the thoracic aorta in patients who undergo a chest computed tomography (CT) for any clinical question, in order to detect patients at increased risk of cerebro-cardiovascular (CCV) events. To estimate the association between either thoracic aortic wall thickness (AWT) or aortic total calcium score (ATCS) and CCV events. One hundred and forty-eight non-cardiac patients (78 men; 67 ± 12 years) underwent chest contrast-enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT). The AWT was measured at the level of the left atrium (AWTref) and at the maximum AWT (AWTmax). Correlation with clinical CCV patients' history was estimated. The value of AWTmax and of a semi-quantitative ATCS as a marker for CCV events was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis and multivariate regression analysis. Out of 148 patients, 59% reported sedentary lifestyle, 44% hypertension, 32% smoking, 23% hypercholesterolemia, 13% family history of cardiac disease, 12% diabetes, and 10% BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2); 9% reported myocardial infarction, 8% aortic aneurism, 8% myocardial revascularization, and 2% ischemic stroke. Twenty-six percent of patients had a medium-to-high ATCS. Both AWTmax and AWTref correlated with hypertension and age (P < 0.002). At the ROC analysis, a 4.8 mm threshold was associated to a 90% specificity and an odds ratio of 6.3 (AUC = 0.735). Assuming as threshold the AWTmax median value (4.3 mm) of patients who suffered from at least one CCV event in their history, a negative predictive value of 90%, a RR of 3.6 and an OR of 6.3 were found. At the multivariate regression analysis, AWTmax was the only independent variable associated to the frequency of CCV events. Patients with increased thoracic

  8. Relation of aortic calcification, wall thickness, and distensibility with severity of coronary artery disease: evaluation with coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seonah; Yong, Hwan Seok; Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Woo, Ok Hee; Choi, Eun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Korea Univ. Guro Hospital, Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: yhwanseok@naver.com

    2012-10-15

    Background Three known risk factors for aortic atherosclerosis predict the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD): aortic calcification (AC), aortic wall thickness (AWT), and aortic distensibility (AD). Purpose To determine the relationship of AC, AWT, and AD with the severity of CAD. Material and Methods A total of 104 patients who underwent both coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography were enrolled. The severity of CAD was assessed by three methods: the segment involvement score (SIS), the segment stenosis score (SSS), and the modified Gensini score (mG). We quantified AC using the Agatston method on low-dose ungated chest CT (LDCT). We measured AWT at the thickest portion of the descending thoracic aorta on CCTA. AD was calculated as the difference between the maximum and minimum areas of the ascending aorta and the pulse pressure. The relationships between the severity of CAD and the three aortic factors were assessed. Results The AC and AWT of the thoracic aorta were significantly higher in the occlusive CAD (OCAD) group (1984.21 {+-} 2986.10 vs. 733.00 {+-} 1648.71, P = 0.01; 4.13 {+-} 1.48 vs. 3.40 {+-} 1.01, P = 0.22). Patients with OCAD had more than one epicardial coronary artery with >50% luminal stenosis. The AC (r = 0.453 with SIS; r = 0.454 with SSS; r = 0.427 with mG) and the AWT (r = 0.279 with SIS; r = 0.324 with SSS; r = 0.304 with mG) were significantly correlated with all three methods, and the AD was negatively correlated with the SIS (r = - 0.221, P < 0.05, respectively) in the unadjusted model. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, only the correlations between AC and all three methods assessing CAD remained significant. Conclusion There are significant relationships between AC, AWT and AD and severity of CAD. In particular, AC measured on LDCT is the most consistent predictor of severity of CAD.

  9. Scan-rescan reproducibility of segmental aortic wall shear stress as assessed by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Palen, Roel L F; Roest, Arno A W; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; de Roos, Albert; Blom, Nico A; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2018-05-26

    The aim was to investigate scan-rescan reproducibility and observer variability of segmental aortic 3D systolic wall shear stress (WSS) by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy volunteers (age 26.5 ± 2.6 years) underwent aortic 4D flow MRI twice. Maximum 3D systolic WSS (WSSmax) and mean 3D systolic WSS (WSSmean) for five thoracic aortic segments over five systolic cardiac phases by phase-specific segmentations were calculated. Scan-rescan analysis and observer reproducibility analysis were performed. Scan-rescan data showed overall good reproducibility for WSSmean (coefficient of variation, COV 10-15%) with moderate-to-strong intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.63-0.89). The variability in WSSmax was high (COV 16-31%) with moderate-to-good ICC (0.55-0.79) for different aortic segments. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was good-to-excellent for regional aortic WSSmax (ICC ≥ 0.78; COV ≤ 17%) and strong-to-excellent for WSSmean (ICC ≥ 0.86; COV ≤ 11%). In general, ascending aortic segments showed more WSSmax/WSSmean variability compared to aortic arch or descending aortic segments for scan-rescan, intraobserver and interobserver comparison. Scan-rescan reproducibility was good for WSSmean and moderate for WSSmax for all thoracic aortic segments over multiple systolic phases in healthy volunteers. Intra/interobserver reproducibility for segmental WSS assessment was good-to-excellent. Variability of WSSmax is higher and should be taken into account in case of individual follow-up or in comparative rest-stress studies to avoid misinterpretation.

  10. Tissue factor levels and the fibrinolytic system in thin and thick intraluminal thrombus and underlying walls of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siennicka, Aldona; Zuchowski, Marta; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Clark, Jeremy Simon; Jastrzębska, Maria

    2018-03-20

    The hemostatic system cooperates with proteolytic degradation in processes allowing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. In previous studies, it has been suggested that aneurysm rupture depends on intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness, which varies across each individual aneurysm. We hypothesized that hemostatic components differentially accumulate in AAA tissue in relation to ILT thickness. Thick (A1) and thin (B1) segments of ILTs and aneurysm wall sections A (adjacent to A1) and B (adjacent to B1) from one aneurysm sac were taken from 35 patients undergoing elective repair. Factor levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of protein extract. Tissue factor (TF) activities were significantly higher in thinner segments of AAA (B1 vs A1, P = .003; B vs A, P thick thrombus-covered wall segments (A) than in B, A1, and B1 (P = .015, P thick ILT (P = .021) and thick ILT (A1; P thick ILT (A1). However, no correlations were found at B sites, except for a correlation between plasmin and TF activities (r = 0.55; P = .004). These results suggest that higher TF activities are present in thinner AAA regions. These parameters and local fibrinolysis may be part of the processes leading to destruction of the aneurysm wall. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  12. Observations on kangaroo baby care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, G K

    1992-01-01

    The author's visit to "kangaroo care" programs in Guatemala and Colombia has led Uganda's University of Kampala to consider the introduction of this innovation in its neonatal special care unit. Such programs, which place premature infants in direct contact with their mother's skin during breastfeeding, represents a simple, inexpensive strategy for infant survival in developing countries and eliminates the need for mechanical incubators. Research conducted at the Hospital Universitario de Valle in Cali, Colombia, found that falls in the infant's body temperature. In the Latin American programs, premature infants are entered into the breastfeeding program immediately after delivery.

  13. The adventitia layer modulates the arterial wall elastic response to intra-aortic counterpulsation: in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo I; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra; Armentano, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    There is a relationship between the intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) benefits and the dynamic behavior of muscular arteries, which is associated with induced changes on the vessel walls through an endothelial-dependent mechanism. The arterial wall elastic behavior is influenced by adventitial function; however, no studies were performed in order to elucidate if this layer plays a role in the changes determined by IABP. Our aim was to quantify acute IABP effects on the mechanical properties of muscular arteries in induced acute heart failure (AHF), before and after adventitia removal. Pressure and diameter were recorded in the iliac arteries (IA) of sheep (n = 7), before and during 1:2 IABP: (i) in control state (CS) with intact IA, (ii) in CS after IA adventitia removal, and (iii) in de-adventitialized IA after AHF. Conduit function, compliance and arterial distensibility were calculated in each state. During CS, IABP resulted in intact IA dilatation and in an increase in conduit function, compliance and distensibility; adventitial removal determined an increase of arterial stiffness with respect to the CS, which decreased when IABP was used; the increase in arterial stiffness observed after adventitia removal was also detected in AHF state; IABP improves conduit function and arterial stiffness in de-adventitialized arteries, both before and during AHF. However, the improvement in these properties was lower than in intact arteries. Before and after AHF induction, the improvements of conduit function and arterial distensibility determined by IABP in intact IA were significantly reduced after adventitia removal. Adventitial layer integrity would be necessary to maximize IABP-related beneficial effects on arterial system properties. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  14. Unlike Kangaroo care, mechanically simulated Kangaroo care does not change heart rate variability in preterm neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, Deedee; Joshi, Rohan; van Pul, Carola; Feijs, Loe; Oei, Guid; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Andriessen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Background: While numerous positive effects of Kangaroo care (KC) have been reported, the duration that parents can spend kangarooing is often limited. Aim: To investigate whether a mattress that aims to mimic breathing motion and the sounds of heartbeats (BabyBe GMBH, Stuttgart, Germany) can

  15. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew J.; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: (1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; (2) inner-volume imaging; and (3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p  =  0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3  ±  2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0  ±  0.4 mm (12.5  ±  3.4%) and 0.7  ±  0.3 mm (4.1  ±  1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35  ±  15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  16. Ventilatory accommodation of oxygen demand and respiratory water loss in kangaroos from mesic and arid environments, the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) and the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, T J; Munn, A J; Blaney, C E; Krockenberger, A; Maloney, S K

    2000-01-01

    We studied ventilation in kangaroos from mesic and arid environments, the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) and the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), respectively, within the range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) from -5 degrees to 45 degrees C. At thermoneutral temperatures (Ta=25 degrees C), there were no differences between the species in respiratory frequency, tidal volume, total ventilation, or oxygen extraction. The ventilatory patterns of the kangaroos were markedly different from those predicted from the allometric equation derived for placentals. The kangaroos had low respiratory frequencies and higher tidal volumes, even when adjustment was made for their lower basal metabolism. At Ta>25 degrees C, ventilation was increased in the kangaroos to facilitate respiratory water loss, with percent oxygen extraction being markedly lowered. Ventilation was via the nares; the mouth was closed. Differences in ventilation between the two species occurred at higher temperatures, and at 45 degrees C were associated with differences in respiratory evaporative heat loss, with that of M. giganteus being higher. Panting in kangaroos occurred as a graded increase in respiratory frequency, during which tidal volume was lowered. When panting, the desert red kangaroo had larger tidal volumes and lower respiratory frequencies at equivalent T(a) than the eastern grey kangaroo, which generally inhabits mesic forests. The inference made from this pattern is that the red kangaroo has the potential to increase respiratory evaporative heat loss to a greater level.

  17. Finite Element Implementation of a Structurally-Motivated Constitutive Relation for the Human Abdominal Aortic Wall with and without Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Lönn, L

    2011-01-01

    aneurysm (AAA) patients. Next the constitu-tive model is implemented in an anisotropic 3D FEM formula-tion for future simulation of intact aortic geometries. The 2D simulations of the biaxial test experiment show good agree-ment with experimental data with a standard deviation below 0.5% in all cases...

  18. On the effect of computed tomography resolution to distinguish between abdominal aortic aneurysm wall tissue and calcification: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; O Brien, J M; Moloney, M A; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal target CT spatial resolution for accurately imaging abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall characteristics, distinguishing between tissue and calcification components, for an accurate assessment of rupture risk. Ruptured and non-ruptured AAA-wall samples were acquired from eight patients undergoing open surgical aneurysm repair upon institutional review board approval and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Physical measurements of AAA-wall cross-section were made using scanning electron microscopy. Samples were scanned using high resolution micro-CT scanning. A resolution range of 15.5-155μm was used to quantify the influence of decreasing resolution on wall area measurements, in terms of tissue and calcification. A statistical comparison between the reference resolution (15.5μm) and multi-detector CT resolution (744μm) was also made. Electron microscopy examination of ruptured AAAs revealed extremely thin outer tissue structure leverage an improved assessment of AAA rupture risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  20. 18F-FDG uptake assessed by PET/CT in abdominal aortic aneurysms is associated with cellular and molecular alterations prefacing wall deterioration and rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Audrey; Nusgens, Betty V; Hustinx, Roland; Namur, Gauthier; Gomez, Pierre; Somja, Joan; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Delvenne, Philippe; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Colige, Alain C; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) leads to a significant morbidity and mortality in aging populations, and its prediction would be most beneficial to public health. Spots positive for uptake of (18)F-FDG detected by PET are found in 12% of AAA patients (PET+), who are most often symptomatic and at high rupture risk. Comparing the (18)F-FDG-positive site with a negative site from the same aneurysm and with samples collected from AAA patients with no (18)F-FDG uptake should allow the discrimination of biologic alterations that would help in identifying markers predictive of rupture. Biopsies of the AAA wall were obtained from patients with no (18)F-FDG uptake (PET0, n = 10) and from PET+ patients (n = 8), both at the site positive for uptake and at a distant negative site of the aneurysmal wall. Samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and zymography. The sites of the aneurysmal wall with a positive (18)F-FDG uptake were characterized by a strikingly increased number of adventitial inflammatory cells, highly proliferative, and by a drastic reduction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media as compared with their negative counterpart and with the PET0 wall. The expression of a series of genes involved in the maintenance and remodeling of the wall was significantly modified in the negative sites of PET+, compared with the PET0 wall, suggesting a systemic alteration of the aneurysmal wall. Furthermore, a striking increase of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), notably the MMP1 and MMP13 collagenases, was observed in the positive sites, mainly in the adventitia. Moreover, PET+ patients were characterized by a higher circulating C-reactive protein. Positive (18)F-FDG uptake in the aneurysmal wall is associated with an active inflammatory process characterized by a dense infiltrate of proliferating leukocytes in the adventitia and an increased circulating C-reactive protein. Moreover, a loss of SMC

  1. 4D Flow Analysis of BAV-Related Fluid-Dynamic Alterations: Evidences of Wall Shear Stress Alterations in Absence of Clinically-Relevant Aortic Anatomical Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Piatti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac disease and is a foremost risk factor for aortopathies. Despite the genetic basis of BAV and of the associated aortopathies, BAV-related alterations in aortic fluid-dynamics, and particularly in wall shear stresses (WSSs, likely play a role in the progression of aortopathy, and may contribute to its pathogenesis. To test whether WSS may trigger aortopathy, in this study we used 4D Flow sequences of phase-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR to quantitatively compare the in vivo fluid dynamics in the thoracic aorta of two groups of subjects: (i five prospectively enrolled young patients with normo-functional BAV and with no aortic dilation and (ii ten age-matched healthy volunteers. Through the semi-automated processing of 4D Flow data, the aortic bulk flow at peak systole was quantified, and WSSs acting on the endothelium of the ascending aorta were characterized throughout the systolic phase in terms of magnitude and time-dependency through a method recently developed by our group. Variables computed for each BAV patient were compared vs. the corresponding distribution of values obtained for healthy controls. In BAV patients, ascending aorta diameter was measured on cine-CMR images at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. As compared to controls, normo-functional BAV patients were characterized by minor bulk flow disturbances at peak systole. However, they were characterized by evident alterations of WSS distribution and peak values in the ascending aorta. In particular, in four BAV patients, who were characterized by right-left leaflet fusion, WSS peak values exceeded by 27–46% the 90th percentile of the distribution obtained for healthy volunteers. Only in the BAV patient with right-non-coronary leaflet fusion the same threshold was exceeded by 132%. Also, evident alterations in the time-dependency of WSS magnitude and direction were observed. Despite, these fluid

  2. High Central Aortic Rather than Brachial Blood Pressure is Associated with Carotid Wall Remodeling and Increased Arterial Stiffness in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Gonzalo; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marota, Marco; Castro, Juan; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2017-03-01

    In adults, central blood pressure (cBP) is reported to associate target organ damages (TODs) rather than peripheral blood pressure (pBP). However, data regarding the association of pre-clinical TODs with cBP and pBP in pediatric populations are scarce. To evaluate in children and adolescents the importance of cBP and pBP levels, in terms of their association with hemodynamic and vascular changes. 315 subjects [age (mean/range) 12/8-18 years] were included. pBP (oscillometry, Omron-HEM433INT and Mobil-O-Graph), cBP levels and waveforms (oscillometry, Mobil-O-Graph; applanation tonometry, SphygmoCor), aortic wave reflection-related parameters, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid (elastic modulus, stiffness-index) and aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV). Four groups were defined considering pBP and cBP percentiles (th): cBP ≥90th, cBP th, pBP ≥90th, pBP th. In each group, haemodynamic and vascular parameters were compared for subgroups defined considering the level of the remaining blood pressure (cBP or pBP). Subgroups were matched for anthropometric and cardiovascular risk factors (propensity matching-score). Subjects with high cBP showed a worse cardiovascular risk profile in addition to worse peripheral hemodynamic conditions. The CIMT, carotid and aortic stiffness levels were also higher in those subjects. CIMT and carotid stiffness remained statistically higher when subjects were matched for pBP and other cardiovascular risk factors. There were no differences in arterial properties when subjects were analyzed (compared) considering similar pBP levels, during normal and high cBP conditions. Compared with pBP, the cBP levels show a greater association with vascular alterations (high CIMT and arterial stiffness), in children and adolescents.

  3. Role of endothelial permeability hotspots and endothelial mitosis in determining age-related patterns of macromolecule uptake by the rabbit aortic wall near branch points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, K Yean; Comerford, Andrew; Cremers, Stephanie J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Transport of macromolecules between plasma and the arterial wall plays a key role in atherogenesis. Scattered hotspots of elevated endothelial permeability to macromolecules occur in the aorta; a fraction of them are associated with dividing cells. Hotspots occur particularly frequently downstream of branch points, where lesions develop in young rabbits and children. However, the pattern of lesions varies with age, and can be explained by similar variation in the pattern of macromolecule uptake. We investigated whether patterns of hotspots and mitosis also change with age. Evans' Blue dye-labeled albumin was injected intravenously into immature or mature rabbits and its subsequent distribution in the aortic wall around intercostal branch ostia examined by confocal microscopy and automated image analysis. Mitosis was detected by immunofluorescence after adding 5-bromo-2-deoxiuridine to drinking water. Hotspots were most frequent downstream of branches in immature rabbits, but a novel distribution was observed in mature rabbits. Neither pattern was explained by mitosis. Hotspot uptake correlated spatially with the much greater non-hotspot uptake (p hotspots were considered. The pattern of hotspots changes with age. The data are consistent with there being a continuum of local permeabilities rather than two distinct mechanisms. The distribution of the dye, which binds to elastin and collagen, was similar to that of non-binding tracers and to lesions apart from a paucity at the lateral margins of branches that can be explained by lower levels of fibrous proteins in those regions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Kangaroo Mother Care Management of a 750 Ggrammes Baby: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the successful management of 750 grammes low birth weight baby using kangaroo mother care in the hospital and at home. The baby had suffered a variety of morbidities associated with prematurity in the early neonatal period. Key words: Kangaroo mother care, low birth weight babies ...

  5. Parents\\' lived experience of providing kangaroo care to their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Premature and low birthweight infants pose particular challenges to health services in South Africa. While there is good evidence to demonstrate the benefits of kangaroo care in low birthweight infants, limited research has been conducted locally on the experiences of parents who provide kangaroo care to their preterm ...

  6. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease in which the aortic valve does not close ... aortic insufficiency Images Aortic insufficiency References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  7. Kangaroo mother care: a systematic review of barriers and enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace J; Labar, Amy S; Wall, Stephen; Atun, Rifat

    2016-02-01

    To investigate factors influencing the adoption of kangaroo mother care in different contexts. We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science and the World Health Organization's regional databases, for studies on "kangaroo mother care" or "kangaroo care" or "skin-to-skin care" from 1 January 1960 to 19 August 2015, without language restrictions. We included programmatic reports and hand-searched references of published reviews and articles. Two independent reviewers screened articles and extracted data on carers, health system characteristics and contextual factors. We developed a conceptual model to analyse the integration of kangaroo mother care in health systems. We screened 2875 studies and included 112 studies that contained qualitative data on implementation. Kangaroo mother care was applied in different ways in different contexts. The studies show that there are several barriers to implementing kangaroo mother care, including the need for time, social support, medical care and family acceptance. Barriers within health systems included organization, financing and service delivery. In the broad context, cultural norms influenced perceptions and the success of adoption. Kangaroo mother care is a complex intervention that is behaviour driven and includes multiple elements. Success of implementation requires high user engagement and stakeholder involvement. Future research includes designing and testing models of specific interventions to improve uptake.

  8. Development and use of a new perfusion technique to study glucose metabolism of the aortic wall in normal and alloxan-diabetic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated (1) possible alterations in glucose uptake and utilization in the perfused, normal, and diabetic vascular wall of rabbits and (2) the effects thereon of insulin and exogenous glucose concentration. Part I involved development and characterization of an in vitro perfusion technique that closely reproduced predetermined in vivo conditions of aortic blood flow, arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pulse pressure. The responsiveness of the preparation to vasoactive agents was assessed with concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) from 10 -9 to 10 -4 M. In Part II, the effects of NE-induced tension development on glucose metabolism were determined by perfusion with oxygenated physiological salt solution (PSS) containing 7 mM glucose and tracer amounts of uniformly labeled 14 C-glucose. Aortas from 8 week-diabetic rabbits were perfused under similar conditions employing a NE infusion in the presence or absence of insulin (150 uU/ml) and variable levels of glucose. Effects of NE-induced tension development include an apparent increase (39%) in glucose uptake and a twofold increase in 14 CO 2 and lactate production. Aortas from diabetic rabbits perfused with PSS containing 7 mM glucose demonstrated marked decreases in glucose uptake (74%), 14 CO 2 (68%), lactate (30%), total tissue glycogen (75%) and labeled tissue phospholipids (70%). Insulin or elevation of exogenous glucose to 25 mM (diabetic levels) normalized glucose uptake, but had differential effects on the pattern of substrate utilization. The marked alterations of glucose metabolism in the diabetic state may contribute to the functional changes observed in diabetic blood vessels

  9. Kangaroo rats: intraspecific variation in Dipodomys spectabilis Merriam and Dipodomys deserti Stephens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nader, Iyad A

    1978-01-01

    Twenty morpholoigcl characters in addition to color were studied throughout the geographic range of two species of kangaroo rats, the banner-tailed kangaroo rat Dipodomys spectabilis and the desert...

  10. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  11. The Impact of Kangaroo Care on Premature Infant Weight Gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evereklian, Melvina; Posmontier, Bobbie

    Preterm births occur among 11.4% of all live infant births. Without steady weight gain, premature infants may experience lengthy hospitalizations, neurodevelopmental deficits and hospital readmissions, which can increase the financial burden on the health care system and their families. The total U.S. health-related costs linked to preterm infant deliveries are estimated at $4.33 billion. Kangaroo care is a feasible practice that can improve preterm infant weight gain. However, this intervention is utilized less often throughout the U.S. due to numerous barriers including a lack of consistent protocols, inadequate knowledge, and decreased level of confidence in demonstrating the proper kangarooing technique. An integrative review was conducted to evaluate the impact of kangaroo care on premature infant weight gain in order to educate nurses about its efficacy among preterm infants. A literature search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, ClinicalKey and Google Scholar. Large volume searches were restricted using appropriate filters and limiters. Most of the evaluated studies determined that weight gain was greater among the kangarooing premature infants. Kangaroo care is a low-tech low-cost modality that can facilitate improved preterm infant weight gain even in low-resource settings. Despite its current efficacy, kangaroo care is not widely utilized due to several barriers including an absence of standardized protocols and a lack of knowledge about its benefits. Kangaroo care can become a widespread formalized practice after nurses and parents learn about the technique and its numerous benefits for premature infants, including its association with improved weight gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Kangaroo Care Education Effects on Nurses' Knowledge and Skills Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Wedad Matar; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    Less than 20% of the 996 NICUs in the United States routinely practice kangaroo care, due in part to the inadequate knowledge and skills confidence of nurses. Continuing education improves knowledge and skills acquisition, but the effects of a kangaroo care certification course on nurses' knowledge and skills confidence are unknown. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted. The Kangaroo Care Knowledge and Skills Confidence Tool was administered to 68 RNs at a 2.5-day course about kangaroo care evidence and skills. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, and paired t tests were conducted on 57 questionnaires. The nurses' characteristics were varied. The mean posttest Knowledge score (M = 88.54, SD = 6.13) was significantly higher than the pretest score (M = 78.7, SD = 8.30), t [54] = -9.1, p = .000), as was the posttest Skills Confidence score (pretest M = 32.06, SD = 3.49; posttest M = 26.80, SD = 5.22), t [53] = -8.459, p = .000). The nurses' knowledge and skills confidence of kangaroo care improved following continuing education, suggesting a need for continuing education in this area. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):518-524. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Mechanism design and optimization of a bionic kangaroo jumping robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Zheng, L.; Ge, W. J.; Zou, Z. H.

    2018-03-01

    Hopping robots have broad application prospects in the fields of military reconnaissance, field search or life rescue. However, current hopping robots still face the problems of weak jumping ability and load bearing. Inspired by the jumping of kangaroo, we design a Kangaroo hopping robot “Zbot”, which has two degrees of freedom and three joints. The geared five-bar mechanism is used to decouple the knee and ankle joints of the robot. In order to get a bionic performance, the coupling mechanism parameters are optimized. The simulation and experiments show that the robot has an excellent jumping ability and load capacity.

  14. Features of Heart Rate Variability Capture Regulatory Changes During Kangaroo Care in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Deedee R; Joshi, Rohan; van Pul, Carola; Atallah, Louis; Feijs, Loe; Oei, Guid; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Andriessen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether heart rate variability (HRV) can serve as a surrogate measure to track regulatory changes during kangaroo care, a period of parental coregulation distinct from regulation within the incubator. Nurses annotated the starting and ending times of kangaroo care for 3 months. The pre-kangaroo care, during-kangaroo care, and post-kangaroo care data were retrieved in infants with at least 10 accurately annotated kangaroo care sessions. Eight HRV features (5 in the time domain and 3 in the frequency domain) were used to visually and statistically compare the pre-kangaroo care and during-kangaroo care periods. Two of these features, capturing the percentage of heart rate decelerations and the extent of heart rate decelerations, were newly developed for preterm infants. A total of 191 kangaroo care sessions were investigated in 11 preterm infants. Despite clinically irrelevant changes in vital signs, 6 of the 8 HRV features (SD of normal-to-normal intervals, root mean square of the SD, percentage of consecutive normal-to-normal intervals that differ by >50 ms, SD of heart rate decelerations, high-frequency power, and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio) showed a visible and statistically significant difference (P heart rate decelerations. HRV-based features may be clinically useful for capturing the dynamic changes in autonomic regulation in response to kangaroo care and other changes in environment and state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Energetics and biomechanics of locomotion by red kangaroos (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, R; Dawson, T J

    1998-05-01

    As red kangaroos hop faster over level ground, their rate of oxygen consumption (indicating metabolic energy consumption) remains nearly the same. This phenomenon has been attributed to exceptional elastic energy storage and recovery via long compliant tendons in the legs. Alternatively, red kangaroos may have exceptionally efficient muscles. To estimate efficiency, we measured the metabolic cost of uphill hopping, where muscle fibers must perform mechanical work against gravity. We found that uphill hopping was much more expensive than level hopping. The maximal rate of oxygen consumption measured (3 ml O2 kg-1 s-1) exceeds all but a few vertebrate species. However, efficiency values were normal, approximately 30%. At faster level hopping speeds the effective mechanical advantage of the extensor muscles of the ankle joint remained the same. Thus, kangaroos generate the same muscular force at all speeds but do so more rapidly at faster hopping speeds. This contradicts a recent hypothesis for what sets the cost of locomotion. The cost of transport (J kg-1 m-1) decreases at faster hopping speeds, yet red kangaroos prefer to use relatively slow speeds that avoid high levels of tendon stress.

  16. Implementation of Kangaroo mother care by health workers in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-04

    Aug 4, 2016 ... thermia, hypoglycemia and nosocomial sepsis in neo- nates with birth weight ... for care for preterm babies with few neonatal care units, located often in .... Fig 2: Reasons for not practicing Kangaroo Mother Care in facilities of ...

  17. Kangaroo Care: Experiences and Needs of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care: A Systematic Review ‘Parents’ Experience of Kangaroo Care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriels, karlijn; Brouwer, AJ; maat, Jessica; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review is focusing on the experiences and needs of parents with infants within NICU regarding Kangaroo Care. Ten studies with qualitative designs were included. Kangaroo Care was overall experienced as positive; giving parents the opportunity to get to know their babies and (re-)

  18. Locomotion energetics and gait characteristics of a rat-kangaroo, Bettongia penicillata, have some kangaroo-like features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, K N; Dawson, T J

    2003-09-01

    The locomotory characteristics of kangaroos and wallabies are unusual, with both energetic costs and gait parameters differing from those of quadrupedal running mammals. The kangaroos and wallabies have an evolutionary history of only around 5 million years; their closest relatives, the rat-kangaroos, have a fossil record of more than 26 million years. We examined the locomotory characteristics of a rat-kangaroo, Bettongia penicillata. Locomotory energetics and gait parameters were obtained from animals exercising on a motorised treadmill at speeds from 0.6 m s(-1) to 6.2 m s(-1). Aerobic metabolic costs increased as hopping speed increased, but were significantly different from the costs for a running quadruped; at the fastest speed, the cost of hopping was 50% of the cost of running. Therefore B. penicillata can travel much faster than quadrupedal runners at similar levels of aerobic output. The maximum aerobic output of B. penicillata was 17 times its basal metabolism. Increases in speed during hopping were achieved through increases in stride length, with stride frequency remaining constant. We suggest that these unusual locomotory characteristics are a conservative feature among the hopping marsupials, with an evolutionary history of 20-30 million years.

  19. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwick, Tara D.; Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M.; Mikhaeel, N.G.; O'Doherty, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal ( max ) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV max was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls. (orig.)

  20. Delayed Presentation of a Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysm following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Göncü

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aortic aneurysm formation following aortic valve replacement is rare. A 28-year-old man who underwent aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve for aortic regurgitation secondary to congenital bicuspid aortic valve about 10 years ago was diagnosed with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm about 16 cm in diameter in follow-up. The aneurysm was resected leaving the functional old mechanical prosthesis in place and implanted a 34-mm Hemashield woven graft, associated with the left and right coronary artery button implantation. Histological findings of the aortic aneurysm wall showed cystic medial necrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative examination demonstrated good surgical results.

  1. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  2. Self-gated CINE MRI for combined contrast-enhanced imaging and wall-stiffness measurements of murine aortic atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Adel, Brigit; van der Graaf, Linda M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Poelmann, Robert E.; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI

  3. Kangaroo – A pattern-matching program for biological sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betel Doron

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists are often interested in performing a simple database search to identify proteins or genes that contain a well-defined sequence pattern. Many databases do not provide straightforward or readily available query tools to perform simple searches, such as identifying transcription binding sites, protein motifs, or repetitive DNA sequences. However, in many cases simple pattern-matching searches can reveal a wealth of information. We present in this paper a regular expression pattern-matching tool that was used to identify short repetitive DNA sequences in human coding regions for the purpose of identifying potential mutation sites in mismatch repair deficient cells. Results Kangaroo is a web-based regular expression pattern-matching program that can search for patterns in DNA, protein, or coding region sequences in ten different organisms. The program is implemented to facilitate a wide range of queries with no restriction on the length or complexity of the query expression. The program is accessible on the web at http://bioinfo.mshri.on.ca/kangaroo/ and the source code is freely distributed at http://sourceforge.net/projects/slritools/. Conclusion A low-level simple pattern-matching application can prove to be a useful tool in many research settings. For example, Kangaroo was used to identify potential genetic targets in a human colorectal cancer variant that is characterized by a high frequency of mutations in coding regions containing mononucleotide repeats.

  4. Features of heart rate variability capture regulatory changes during kangaroo care in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, D.R.; Joshi, R.; van Pul, C.; Atallah, N.L.; Feijs, L.M.G.; Oei, S.G.; Bambang Oetomo, S.; Andriessen, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether heart rate variability (HRV) can serve as a surrogate measure to track regulatory changes during kangaroo care, a period of parental coregulation distinct from regulation within the incubator. Study design: Nurses annotated the starting and ending times of kangaroo

  5. Good short-term outcome of kangaroo mother care in low birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Good short-term outcome of kangaroo mother care in low birth weight infants in a rural South African hospital. A N Rodriguez, M Nel, H Dippenaar, E A Prinsloo. Abstract. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the outcome of kangaroo mother care (KMC) in low birth weight infants at a community hospital. Methods ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  7. Impacts of visitor number on Kangaroos housed in free-range exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwen, Sally L; Hemsworth, Paul H; Butler, Kym L; Fanson, Kerry V; Magrath, Michael J L

    2015-01-01

    Free range exhibits are becoming increasingly popular in zoos as a means to enhance interaction between visitors and animals. However very little research exists on the impacts of visitors on animal behaviour and stress in free range exhibits. We investigated the effects of visitor number on the behaviour and stress physiology of Kangaroo Island (KI) Kangaroos, Macropus fuliginosus fuliginosus, and Red Kangaroos, Macropus rufus, housed in two free range exhibits in Australian zoos. Behavioural observations were conducted on individual kangaroos at each site using instantaneous scan sampling to record activity (e.g., vigilance, foraging, resting) and distance from the visitor pathway. Individually identifiable faecal samples were collected at the end of each study day and analysed for faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentration. When visitor number increased, both KI Kangaroos and Red Kangaroos increased the time spent engaged in visitor-directed vigilance and KI Kangaroos also increased the time spent engaged in locomotion and decreased the time spent resting. There was no effect of visitor number on the distance kangaroos positioned themselves from the visitor pathway or FGM concentration in either species. While there are limitations in interpreting these results in terms of fear of visitors, there was no evidence of adverse effects animal welfare in these study groups based on avoidance behaviour or stress physiology under the range of visitor numbers that we studied. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The bicuspid aortic valve and its relation to aortic dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common congenital heart disease, which affects 1-2% of the population. However, the relationship between BAVs and aortic dilation has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: A total of 241 BAV patients who were referred to this hospital for cardiac surgey over a 4.75-year period were included in this study. In addition to the clinical characteristics of the included patients, the morphological features of the aortic valve and aorta, the length of the left main coronary artery, and the laboratory findings (the coagulation and hematological parameters as well as the total cholesterol concentration were determined and compared with those of the tricuspid aortic valve (TAV patients. RESULTS: The BAV patients were younger than the TAV patients for a valve surgery in the last 3 months of the study period. The BAV patients were predominantly male. Most of the BAVs that were surgically treated were stenotic, regurgitant, or combined, and only 19 (7.88% were normally functioning valves. According to echocardiography or operative records, 148 (78.31% were type A, 31 (16.40% were type B, and 10 (5.29% were type C. The left main coronary artery was much shorter in the BAV patients than it was in the TAV patients. There was no significant difference between BAV and TAV patients in the total cholesterol concentrations; whereas differences were noted between patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy and those not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The dimensions of the aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta were beyond normal limits, while they were significantly smaller in the BAV patients than in the TAV patients. They were also much smaller in patients receiving statin therapy than those not receiving statin therapy in both groups. Moreover, the aortic dilation in the BAV group was found to be significantly associated with patient age. CONCLUSIONS: The BAV patients developed aortic wall and

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  10. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC CORRELATES OF FASCIOLIASIS IN TWO EASTERN GREY KANGAROOS (MACROPUS GIGANTEUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portas, Timothy J; Taylor, David

    2015-12-01

    Infection with the introduced trematode Fasciola hepatica was associated with anemia, mild to moderate azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated liver enzymes and creatine kinase values in two free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). Both kangaroos were euthanized because of the severity of clinical signs associated with infection. Histopathologic changes included severe cholangiohepatitis, biliary hyperplasia, and fibrosis. Hepatic, splenic, and intestinal amyloidosis was present in one kangaroo and hepatic abscessation in the other; neither histologic change has been reported in macropodids with fascioliasis previously.

  11. Plasma levels of plasmin-antiplasmin-complexes are predictive for small abdominal aortic aneurysms expanding to operation-recommendable sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Fasting, H

    2001-01-01

    Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  12. Inferring kangaroo phylogeny from incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Phillips

    Full Text Available The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus and M. (Osphranter, as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus. A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby within M. (Osphranter rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus. Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression.

  13. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  14. Effect of personalized external aortic root support on aortic root motion and distension in Marfan syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izgi, Cemil; Nyktari, Evangelia; Alpendurada, Francisco; Bruengger, Annina Studer; Pepper, John; Treasure, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2015-10-15

    Personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) is a novel surgical approach with the aim of stabilizing the aortic root size and decreasing risk of dissection in Marfan syndrome patients. A bespoke polymer mesh tailored to each patient's individual aorta shape is produced by modeling and then surgically implanted. The aim of this study is to assess the mechanical effects of PEARS on the aortic root systolic downward motion (an important determinant of aortic wall stress), aortic root distension and on the left ventricle (LV). A cohort of 27 Marfan patients had a prophylactic PEARS surgery between 2004 and 2012 with 24 having preoperative and follow-up cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging studies. Systolic downward aortic root motion, aortic root distension, LV volumes/mass and mitral annular systolic excursion before the operation and in the latest follow-up were measured randomly and blinded. After a median follow-up of 50.5 (IQR 25.5-72) months following implantation of PEARS, systolic downward motion of aortic root was significantly decreased (12.6±3.6mm pre-operation vs 7.9±2.9mm latest follow-up, p<0.00001). There was a tendency for a decrease in systolic aortic root distension but this was not significant (median 4.5% vs 2%, p=0.35). There was no significant change in LV volumes, ejection fraction, mass and mitral annular systolic excursion in follow-up. PEARS surgery decreases systolic downward aortic root motion which is an important determinant of longitudinal aortic wall stress. Aortic wall distension and Windkessel function are not significantly impaired in the follow-up after implantation of the mesh which is also supported by the lack of deterioration of LV volumes or mass. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxoplasmosis in the Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Macropus giganteus and the Cape Hyrax, Procavis capensis in Japan

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    Khaled Mohamed El-Dakhly1,4, Nagwan El-Habashi2, El-Shaymaa El-Nahass3,4, Hiroki Sakai4 and Tokuma Yanai4,*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis was investigated in an eastern grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus, and four cape hyraxes, Procavia capensis, in a Japanese zoo. Clinically, the kangaroo showed neurological signs, emaciation, diarrhea, elevated AST and CK, and subjected to coma before death. One young cape hyrax had severe anorexia, while the other three died without exhibiting clinical signs. Grossly, lungs of the kangaroo were dark red in color, while hyraxes, besides, showed hepatic multifocal white foci, and intestinal multifocal hemorrhages. Histologically, the kangaroo had frequent Toxoplasma gondii pseudocysts in brain, heart and skeletal muscles. All hyraxes had multifocal necrosis with cysts containing numerous bradyzoites in liver and spleen, along with necrotic gastroenteritis and intestinal hemorrhages. Immunohistochemically, cysts showed positive reaction to anti-T. gondii antibodies. These findings indicate possible outbreaks of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes, zoo habitants; therefore, they could be susceptible intermediate hosts for T. gondii in terms of zoonosis. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes in Japanese zoos.

  16. Effect of Kangaroo care combined with music on the mother–premature neonate attachment: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Vahdati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature birth may complicate the development and quality of the mother–infant attachment relationship. Music and kangaroo care are two common complementary cares performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. The present study investigated the effect of kangaroo care combined with music on the mother–premature neonate attachment. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 64 mothers with premature neonates were selected and assigned to the control and study groups through random allocation. In the control group, kangaroo care, and in the study group, kangaroo care combined with music was adopted. The level of mother–premature neonate attachment was measured and compared before and after the intervention in both the groups using Avant's Maternal Attachment Assessment Scale. Results: There was a significant increase in the mean overall score of attachment in the kangaroo care combined with music group (70.72 (11.46 after the intervention compared to the kangaroo care without music group (53.61 (9.76. Conclusions: The mean overall score of mother–neonate attachment in the kangaroo care combined with music group was higher than the kangaroo care group. This difference can be related to the effectiveness of music combined with kangaroo care.

  17. Chronic inflammation, immune response, and infection in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Shi, G-P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly of macrop......Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly...... matrix metalloproteases and cysteine proteases for aortic matrix remodeling. The lymphocyte activation may be mediated by microorganisms as well as autoantigens generated from vascular structural proteins, perhaps through molecular mimicry. As in autoimmune diseases, the risk of AAA is increased...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and narrower than usual. A thickened aorta is less flexible and resilient to the stress of constant blood flow and pumping of the heart. Over time, the wall of the aorta can become damaged. Aortic narrowing causes the heart to work harder to pump blood through the aorta, resulting ...

  19. Understanding kangaroo care and its benefits to preterm infants

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    Campbell-Yeo ML

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marsha L Campbell-Yeo,1–4 Timothy C Disher,1 Britney L Benoit,1 C Celeste Johnston,2,4,5 1School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, 2Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, 3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 4Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, 5Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: The holding of an infant with ventral skin-to-skin contact typically in an upright position with the swaddled infant on the chest of the parent, is commonly referred to as kangaroo care (KC, due to its simulation of marsupial care. It is recommended that KC, as a feasible, natural, and cost-effective intervention, should be standard of care in the delivery of quality health care for all infants, regardless of geographic location or economic status. Numerous benefits of its use have been reported related to mortality, physiological (thermoregulation, cardiorespiratory stability, behavioral (sleep, breastfeeding duration, and degree of exclusivity domains, as an effective therapy to relieve procedural pain, and improved neurodevelopment. Yet despite these recommendations and a lack of negative research findings, adoption of KC as a routine clinical practice remains variable and underutilized. Furthermore, uncertainty remains as to whether continuous KC should be recommended in all settings or if there is a critical period of initiation, dose, or duration that is optimal. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the benefits of KC for infants born preterm, highlighting differences and similarities across low and higher resource countries and in a non-pain and pain context. Additionally, implementation considerations and unanswered questions for future research are addressed. Keywords: kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, infant, preterm, review

  20. Spatial requirements of free-ranging Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei (Macropodidae, in upper montane forest.

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    Gabriel Porolak

    Full Text Available Tree kangaroos (Macropodidae, Dendrolagus are some of Australasia's least known mammals. However, there is sufficient evidence of population decline and local extinctions that all New Guinea tree kangaroos are considered threatened. Understanding spatial requirements is important in conservation and management. Expectations from studies of Australian tree kangaroos and other rainforest macropodids suggest that tree kangaroos should have small discrete home ranges with the potential for high population densities, but there are no published estimates of spatial requirements of any New Guinea tree kangaroo species. Home ranges of 15 Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei, were measured in upper montane forest on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The home range area was an average of 139.6±26.5 ha (100% MCP; n = 15 or 81.8±28.3 ha (90% harmonic mean; n = 15, and did not differ between males and females. Home ranges of D. matschiei were 40-100 times larger than those of Australian tree kangaroos or other rainforest macropods, possibly due to the impact of hunting reducing density, or low productivity of their high altitude habitat. Huon tree kangaroos had cores of activity within their range at 45% (20.9±4.1 ha and 70% (36.6±7.5 ha harmonic mean isopleths, with little overlap (4.8±2.9%; n = 15 pairs between neighbouring females at the 45% isopleth, but, unlike the Australian species, extensive overlap between females (20.8±5.5%; n = 15 pairs at the complete range (90% harmonic mean. Males overlapped each other and females to a greater extent than did pairs of females. From core areas and overlap, the density of female D. matschiei was one per 19.4 ha. Understanding the cause of this low density is crucial in gaining greater understanding of variations in density of tree kangaroos across the landscape. We consider the potential role of habitat fragmentation, productivity and hunting pressure in limiting tree kangaroo

  1. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  2. An unusual case of aortic rupture after deployment of a bare stent in the treatment of aortic dissection in a patient with giant-cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynio, Pawel; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz; Gutowski, Piotr; Cnotliwy, Miloslaw

    2017-06-01

    Giant-cell arteritis is associated with a higher risk of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection formation. We present a women with aortic dissection type B treated with a stent graft and bare-metal stent implantation. After the stent deployment we noticed aortic rupture, which was successfully treated with implantation of an additional stent graft. This report highlights the difficulty of endovascular therapy in patients with giant-cell arteritis. We have to bear in mind that chronic inflammation of the aorta leads to a more fragile aortic wall than normal. We recommend the use of a stent graft over a bare-metal stent and gentle use of a balloon catheter.

  3. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007408.htm Aortic valve surgery - open To use the sharing features on this page, ... separates the heart and aorta. The aortic valve opens so blood can flow out. It then closes ...

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  5. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

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    Andrew J Edelman

    Full Text Available Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m. Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  6. Superior Reproducibility of the Leading to Leading Edge and Inner to Inner Edge Methods in the Ultrasound Assessment of Maximum Abdominal Aortic Diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Bøgsted, Martin; Lindholt, Jes S

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy exists regarding optimal caliper placement in ultrasound assessment of maximum abdominal aortic diameter. This study aimed primarily to determine reproducibility of caliper placement in relation to the aortic wall with the three principal methods: leading to leading edge...

  7. Interpersonal relationships between professionals and mothers of premature from Kangaroo-Unit

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    Francisca Eliene de Oliveira Callou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the interpersonal relationships between professionals and mothers of premature newborns of the Kangaroo Unit. Methods: This was an exploratory study of qualitative approach. The interviews were conducted with 10 mothers and 7 professionals who joined in Kangaroo Program and then analyzed by the content analysis technique. The guiding questions used were related to feelings perceived in relation to the Kangaroo method, related to mother-child dyad and interpersonal relationships. Results: Mothers reported on their speeches: “safe to be with the baby in Kangaroo Method” and “sense of maternal feeling during breastfeeding”, while in the professionals’ discourses have emerged: “guidelines on caring for the babies”, “the embracement by the team” and “the importance of family support.” Conclusions: The interaction between professionals and mothers of Kangaroo Unit facilitates the permanence of the binomial in the method, therefore develops feelings of security, tranquility and confidence to take care of the baby. It is important that the team be aware of the difficulties, supporting them in the weakest moments and sharing their fears, doubts and concerns over the baby’s hospitalization.

  8. Kangaroo position: Immediate effects on the physiological variables of preterm and low birth weight newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Cesário Defilipo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC method is a significant neonatal alternative that ensures better quality humanized care for preterm and low birth weight newborns. Objective: To analyze the immediate physiological effects of the kangaroo position in critically ill newborns. Methods: Open clinical trial with parallel interventions, involving preterm (up to 28 days old low or very low birth weight newborns (minimum weight of 1,250 grams of both sexes, that were clinically stable and undergoing enteral nutrition. The degree of respiratory distress was assessed and quantified using the Silverman-Anderson scoring system. Heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation were collected using a pulse oximeter. Respiratory rate was determined by auscultation for one minute. The newborns were submitted to the kangaroo position once only, for 90 minutes. Results: Participants were 30 newborns, 56.7% of which were girls. Comparison of the variables before and after application of the kangaroo position using the Wilcoxon test showed a statistically significant reduction in respiratory rate (p = 0.02 and Silverman-Anderson score (p < 0.01. The remaining variables showed no significant differences: heart rate (p = 0.21, peripheral oxygen saturation (p = 0.26 and axillary temperature (p = 0.12. Conclusion: There was a decline in the respiratory rate and Silverman-Anderson score after application of the kangaroo position, while peripheral oxygen saturation, axillary temperature and heart rate remained stable.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of mesenteric volvulus in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafo, S Emmanuelle; Rosenblatt, Alana J; Morrisey, James K; Flanders, James A; Thompson, Margret S; Knapp-Hoch, Heather M

    2014-04-01

    An 8-year-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was evaluated with a 2-week history of vomiting and anorexia. Four days prior, the patient became refractory to medical management. The kangaroo was admitted for diagnostic testing and treatment including whole body CT, blood work, and emergency laparotomy. CT findings of a severely enlarged stomach, splenic displacement, and a whirl sign were indicative of mesenteric volvulus with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Contrast enhancement of abdominal viscera suggested intact arterial blood supply; however, compression of the caudal vena cava and portal vein indicated venous obstruction. Results of preoperative blood work suggested biliary stasis without evidence of inflammation. Additionally, a tooth root abscess was diagnosed on the basis of results of CT. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric volvulus and GDV. The volvuli were corrected by clockwise derotation, and a gastropexy was performed. Tissue samples were obtained from the spleen and liver for evaluation. The kangaroo recovered from surgery, and the abscessed tooth was extracted 6 days later. Eight days after initial evaluation, the kangaroo was discharged. In the present report, the CT whirl sign was used to diagnose volvulus of the abdominal viscera, which suggests that this diagnostic indicator has utility in veterinary patients. Mesenteric volvulus with GDV was successfully treated in a nondomestic species. The tooth root abscess, a common condition in macropods, may explain the historic episodes of anorexia reported by the owner and may have contributed to the development of mesenteric volvulus and GDV in this kangaroo.

  10. Decreasing methane yield with increasing food intake keeps daily methane emissions constant in two foregut fermenting marsupials, the western grey kangaroo and red kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendl, Catharina; Clauss, Marcus; Stewart, Mathew; Leggett, Keith; Hummel, Jürgen; Kreuzer, Michael; Munn, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Fundamental differences in methane (CH4) production between macropods (kangaroos) and ruminants have been suggested and linked to differences in the composition of the forestomach microbiome. Using six western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and four red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), we measured daily absolute CH4 production in vivo as well as CH4 yield (CH4 per unit of intake of dry matter, gross energy or digestible fibre) by open-circuit respirometry. Two food intake levels were tested using a chopped lucerne hay (alfalfa) diet. Body mass-specific absolute CH4 production resembled values previously reported in wallabies and non-ruminant herbivores such as horses, and did not differ with food intake level, although there was no concomitant proportionate decrease in fibre digestibility with higher food intake. In contrast, CH4 yield decreased with increasing intake, and was intermediate between values reported for ruminants and non-ruminant herbivores. These results correspond to those in ruminants and other non-ruminant species where increased intake (and hence a shorter digesta retention in the gut) leads to a lower CH4 yield. We hypothesize that rather than harbouring a fundamentally different microbiome in their foregut, the microbiome of macropods is in a particular metabolic state more tuned towards growth (i.e. biomass production) rather than CH4 production. This is due to the short digesta retention time in macropods and the known distinct 'digesta washing' in the gut of macropods, where fluids move faster than particles and hence most likely wash out microbes from the forestomach. Although our data suggest that kangaroos only produce about 27% of the body mass-specific volume of CH4 of ruminants, it remains to be modelled with species-specific growth rates and production conditions whether or not significantly lower CH4 amounts are emitted per kg of meat in kangaroo than in beef or mutton production. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Multi-proxy monitoring approaches at Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Bronwyn; Drysdale, Russell; Tyler, Jonathan; Goodwin, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Interpretations of geochemical signals preserved in young speleothems are greatly enhanced by comprehensive cave-site monitoring. In the light of this, a cave monitoring project is being conducted concurrently with the development of a new palaeoclimate record from Kelly Hill Cave (Kangaroo Island, South Australia). The site is strategically located because it is situated between longer-lived monitoring sites in southeastern and southwestern Australia, as well as being climatically 'upstream' from major population and agricultural centres. This study aims to understand possible controls on speleothem δ18O in Kelly Hill Cave through i. identification of local and regional δ18O drivers in precipitation; and ii. preservation and modification of climatic signals within the epikarst as indicated by dripwater δ18O. These aims are achieved through analysis of a five-year daily rainfall (amount and δ18O) dataset in conjunction with in-cave drip monitoring. Drivers of precipitation δ18O were identified through linear regression between δ18O values and local meteorological variables, air-parcel back trajectories, and synoptic-typing. Synoptically driven moisture sources were identified through the use of NCEP/NCAR climate reanalysis sea-level pressure, precipitable moisture, and outgoing longwave radiation data in order to trace moisture sources and travel mechanisms from surrounding ocean basins. Local controls on δ18O at Kelly Hill Cave are consistent with published interpretations of southern Australia sites, with oxygen isotopes primarily controlled by rainfall amount on both daily and monthly time scales. Back-trajectory analysis also supports previous observations that the Southern Ocean is the major source for moisture-bearing cold-front systems. However, synoptic typing of daily rainfall δ18O and amount extremes reveals a previously unreported tropical connection and moisture source. This tropical connection appears to be strongest in summer and autumn, but

  12. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Test of Kangaroo Care on Preterm Infant Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Kristin P.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; David, Richard; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of kangaroo care (KC) on breastfeeding outcomes in preterm infants compared to two control groups and to explore whether maternal-infant characteristics and the mother’s choice to use KC were related to breastfeeding measures. Design Secondary analysis of a multisite, stratified, and randomized 3-arm trial. The treatment groups used KC, auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention, or preterm infant care information. Setting Neonatal intensive care units from 4 hospitals in the United States from 2006–2011. Participants Racially diverse mothers (N=231) and their preterm infants born weighing breastfeeding, and breastfeeding exclusivity after hospital discharge did not differ statistically among the treatment groups. Regardless of group assignment, married, older, and more educated women were more likely to feed at the breast during hospitalization. Mothers who practiced KC, regardless of randomly allocated group, were more likely to provide their milk than those who did not practice KC. Breastfeeding duration was greatest among more educated women. Conclusion As implemented in this study, assignment to KC did not appear to influence the measured breastfeeding outcomes. PMID:26815798

  14. THE EFFECT OF KANGAROO METHOD APPLICATION TO BODY TEMPERATURE OF BABY WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT (LBW)

    OpenAIRE

    Kadek Ayu Erika, Kadek Ayu Erika

    2012-01-01

    - Background: Low Birth Weight (LBW) care in Indonesia is still prioritizing the use of incubators but its presence is still very limited. Kangaroo method is now starting to be used as an alternative to incubator that is economically efficient and effective. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of the application of the kangaroo method to body temperature of baby with LBW. Method: This research was conducted at the Hospital Prof. DR. W.Z. Johannes Kupang with a sample of 25 lo...

  15. Type A aortic dissection associated with Dietzia maris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Guillermo; Navarro, José-Luis; Gamallo, Carlos; delas Cuevas, María-Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Aortitis is a rare cause of aortic dissection. We report the unusual presentation of a 77-year-old male patient who underwent emergency surgery for an aortic dissection type A. A purulent pericardial fluid and inflammatory aorta were found after chest opening. Several samples were sent for analysis. The ascending aorta presented a mild dilatation with a large haematoma infiltrating the aortic root. The distal part of the ascending aorta seemed unaffected. The aortic rupture was found one centimetre above the non-coronary cusp. Aortic wall tissues were extremely fragile and with an inflammatory aspect. The patient died in the theatre room. In the histological study one out of three fragments of ascending aorta displayed longitudinal splitting of the outer media, with blood extravasation in the adventitial layer. In this level, the presence of a detritus material that reminded of bacterial colonies was noteworthy, together with abundant fibrinous exudates. In the laboratory a new specimen, Dietzia maris, was found in the pericardial liquid and in the aortic wall. We believe that this is the first reported finding of Dietzia maris in a patient with aortic disease.

  16. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-09-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.

  17. Ultrasonic delineation of aortic microstructure: The relative contribution of elastin and collagen to aortic elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jon N.; Takiuchi, Shin; Lin, Shiow Jiuan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2004-05-01

    Aortic elasticity is an important factor in hemodynamic health, and compromised aortic compliance affects not only arterial dynamics but also myocardial function. A variety of pathologic processes (e.g., diabetes, Marfan's syndrome, hypertension) can affect aortic elasticity by altering the microstructure and composition of the elastin and collagen fiber networks within the tunica media. Ultrasound tissue characterization techniques can be used to obtain direct measurements of the stiffness coefficients of aorta by measurement of the speed of sound in specific directions. In this study we sought to define the contributions of elastin and collagen to the mechanical properties of aortic media by measuring the magnitude and directional dependence of the speed of sound before and after selective isolation of either the collagen or elastin fiber matrix. Formalin-fixed porcine aortas were sectioned for insonification in the circumferential, longitudinal, or radial direction and examined using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound microscopy. Isolation of the collagen or elastin fiber matrices was accomplished through treatment with NaOH or formic acid, respectively. The results suggest that elastin is the primary contributor to aortic medial stiffness in the unloaded state, and that there is relatively little anisotropy in the speed of sound or stiffness in the aortic wall.

  18. [Assessing the impact of kangaroo care on preterm infant stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados-Gómez, Laura; Aragonés-Corral, Belén; Contreras-Olivares, Inmaculada; García-Feced, Elena; Vila-Piqueras, Maria Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of Kangaroo Care (KC) in decreasing stress in newborns of 29-34 weeks' post-menstrual age (PMA). Quasi-experimental pre-post without control group analytical study conducted in the Gregorio Marañón University Hospital Neonatal Unit. The inclusion criteria were: infants 29 to 34 weeks' PMA, in an incubator, did not have neurological pathology, were not post-surgical, and with a Spanish-speaking mother and/or father. The sample size was fifty-one premature infants. The study variables selected were: clinical variables (additional oxygen and pathology), socio-demographical variables (PMA, KC duration) and the outcome variable, premature infant stress, which consisted of two variables: the physiological stress signal and the behavioural stress response. The variables were collected at three different times: basal stress, during KC and after KC completion, making a comparison analysis between the basal stress and after KC. The response rate was 100%, without registering any loss. The stress variables that changed after the intervention (statistically significant) were: irregular breathing, trunk arching or hyperextension, very open fingers, contraction of the face muscles, apnea, irritability and exaggerated and sustained extension of arms and legs. O(2) saturation was 94.73%±3.05% before KC and 95.92%±2.97% after the intervention. The heart rate (HR) ranged from 158.14±17.48 bpm (beats per minute) before the KC to 151.47±4.47 bpm after it. KC is related to the decrease in the occurrence of neonatal variables of stress, helping to organize motor and physiological systems to achieve a state of tranquility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Water use and the thermoregulatory behaviour of kangaroos in arid regions: insights into the colonisation of arid rangelands in Australia by the Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; McTavish, Kirsten J; Munn, Adam J; Holloway, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    The Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) occurs mostly in the wetter regions of eastern Australia. However, in the past 30-40 years it has moved into more arid regions (rainfall Kangaroo (Macropus rufus). An increased access to water (supplied for domestic stock) may explain this range extension, but changes in the availability of preferred feed could also be involved. The water use, drinking patterns and thermoregulatory behaviour of these two species of kangaroo have been examined in a semi-free range study, during summer at an arid rangeland site. Foraging was largely nocturnal in both species and during the day they behaved to reduce heat loads. This was especially so for M. giganteus, which showed greater shade seeking. However, it still used more water (72 +/- 2.6 mL kg(-1) day(-1), mean +/- SE) than M. rufus (56 +/- 7.6 mL kg(-1) day(-1)) and drank twice as frequently. Although M. giganteus produced a less concentrated urine (1422 +/- 36 mosmol kg(-1)) than M. rufus (1843 +/- 28 mosmol kg(-1)), kidney physiology did not explain all of the differences in water metabolism between the species. Water from the feed and faecal water retention also appear to be involved. Broadly, a better access to reliable water and the utilisation of mesic microhabitats has enabled M. giganteus to make inroads into the changing rangelands of eastern Australia. However, changes in the vegetation, due to stock grazing, have also favoured M. giganteus, which is a grass eating specialist.

  20. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  1. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A Coghlan

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus. The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation.

  2. Influence of small-scale disturbances by kangaroo rats on Chihuahuan Desert ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. L. Schooley; B. T. Bestelmeyer; J. F. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that build large mounds that influence the spatial structuring of fungi, plants, and some ground-dwelling animals. Ants are diverse and functionally important components of arid ecosystems; some species are also ecosystem engineers. We investigated the effects of...

  3. To kill a kangaroo: understanding the decision to pursue high-risk/high-gain resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Holland; Bird, Rebecca Bliege; Bird, Douglas W

    2013-09-22

    In this paper, we attempt to understand hunter-gatherer foraging decisions about prey that vary in both the mean and variance of energy return using an expected utility framework. We show that for skewed distributions of energetic returns, the standard linear variance discounting (LVD) model for risk-sensitive foraging can produce quite misleading results. In addition to creating difficulties for the LVD model, the skewed distributions characteristic of hunting returns create challenges for estimating probability distribution functions required for expected utility. We present a solution using a two-component finite mixture model for foraging returns. We then use detailed foraging returns data based on focal follows of individual hunters in Western Australia hunting for high-risk/high-gain (hill kangaroo) and relatively low-risk/low-gain (sand monitor) prey. Using probability densities for the two resources estimated from the mixture models, combined with theoretically sensible utility curves characterized by diminishing marginal utility for the highest returns, we find that the expected utility of the sand monitors greatly exceeds that of kangaroos despite the fact that the mean energy return for kangaroos is nearly twice as large as that for sand monitors. We conclude that the decision to hunt hill kangaroos does not arise simply as part of an energetic utility-maximization strategy and that additional social, political or symbolic benefits must accrue to hunters of this highly variable prey.

  4. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Brett A; Goldizen, Anne W; Thomson, Vicki A; Seddon, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation.

  5. Aortic arch malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  6. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  7. Aortic arch malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellenberger, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Imaging in aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M D [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Radiology, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Inst.

    1996-12-31

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.).

  9. Multiple subfailures characterize blunt aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Brasel, Karen J

    2007-05-01

    Blunt aortic injuries result from rapid deceleration of the thorax as may occur during automotive impacts and falls from extreme heights. Pathological findings can range from failure of specific vessel layers to immediate vessel wall rupture. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of local structural events that may lead to aortic wall disruption. Fourteen porcine aorta specimens were opened to expose the intima and longitudinally distracted until rupture. Longitudinal mechanics were quantified and subfailures were identified. Histology was used to examine internal layer subfailure. Videography demonstrated that subfailures propagated into complete vessel wall rupture. Subfailures occurred before complete vessel rupture in 93% of specimens. Intimal and medial subfailures were present at 74% of the stress and 82% of the strain to rupture. Multiple subfailures were evident in 79% of specimens. Present results supported the clinical theory that nonimmediate death as a result of blunt aortic injury is commonly caused by propagation of lesser lesions, initiating on the intimal layer, into complete vessel rupture including the adventitial layer. This finding, along with histologic evidence of subfailure pathological findings, confirms the presence of an acute window during which recognition and initiation of permissive hypotension may be lifesaving.

  10. Hopping Down the Main Street: Eastern Grey Kangaroos at Home in an Urban Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Coulson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most urban mammals are small. However, one of the largest marsupials, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus, occurs in some urban areas. In 2007, we embarked on a longitudinal study of this species in the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have captured and tagged 360 individuals to date, fitting each adult with a collar displaying its name. We have monitored survival, reproduction and movements by resighting, recapture and radio-tracking, augmented by citizen science reports of collared individuals. Kangaroos occurred throughout the town, but the golf course formed the nucleus of this urban population. The course supported a high density of kangaroos (2–5/ha, and approximately half of them were tagged. Total counts of kangaroos on the golf course were highest in summer, at the peak of the mating season, and lowest in winter, when many males but not females left the course. Almost all tagged adult females were sedentary, using only part of the golf course and adjacent native vegetation and residential blocks. In contrast, during the non-mating season (autumn and winter, many tagged adult males ranged widely across the town in a mix of native vegetation remnants, recreation reserves, vacant blocks, commercial properties and residential gardens. Annual fecundity of tagged females was generally high (≥70%, but survival of tagged juveniles was low (54%. We could not determine the cause of death of most juveniles. Vehicles were the major (47% cause of mortality of tagged adults. Road-kills were concentrated (74% in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females. We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

  11. Kangaroo care by fathers and mothers: comparison of physiological and stress responses in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, B K; Shah, J; Kumar, P; Shah, P S

    2016-05-01

    To compare physiological and biochemical responses in stable preterm neonates and their parents following kangaroo mother care (KMC) and kangaroo father care (KFC). We conducted a prospective cross-over design study of stable preterm neonates of KFC for 1 h on consecutive days in a random order. Heart rate, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and salivary cortisol in infants before and after kangaroo care and heart rate, temperature and salivary cortisol in parents before and after kangaroo care were measured. Pairwise comparisons of changes in these measures were analyzed. Twenty-six sets of neonates and their parents were studied for physiological parameters, of which 19 had adequate samples for salivary cortisol assessment. The infants had a mean birth weight of 1096 g (s.d.=217) and a mean postmenstrual age at study of 32 weeks (s.d.=2). There were no significant differences in the changes in mean heart rate (P=0.51), temperature (P=0.37), oxygen saturation (P=0.50), systolic blood pressure (P=0.32), mean blood pressure (0.10) and salivary cortisol (P=0.50) before and after KMC or KFC in the neonates. The changes in mean heart rate (P=0.62), temperature (P=0.28) and salivary cortisol (P=0.59) before and after kangaroo care were similar between mothers and fathers. No significant differences in physiological and stress responses were identified following KMC or KFC in preterm neonates. KFC may be as safe and as effective as KMC.

  12. Complete genomic characterisation of two novel poxviruses (WKPV and EKPV) from western and eastern grey kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mark; Tu, Shin-Lin; Upton, Chris; McArtor, Cassie; Gillett, Amber; Laird, Tanya; O'Dea, Mark

    2017-10-15

    Poxviruses have previously been detected in macropods with cutaneous papillomatous lesions, however to date, no comprehensive analysis of a poxvirus from kangaroos has been performed. Here we report the genome sequences of a western grey kangaroo poxvirus (WKPV) and an eastern grey kangaroo poxvirus (EKPV), named for the host species from which they were isolated, western grey (Macropus fuliginosus) and eastern grey (Macropus giganteus) kangaroos. Poxvirus DNA from WKPV and EKPV was isolated and entire coding genome regions determined through Roche GS Junior and Illumina Miseq sequencing, respectively. Viral genomes were assembled using MIRA and SPAdes, and annotations performed using tools available from the Viral Bioinformatics Resource Centre. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy analysis was also performed on WKPV and its associated lesions. The WKPV and EKPV genomes show 96% identity (nucleotide) to each other and phylogenetic analysis places them on a distinct branch between the established Molluscipoxvirus and Avipoxvirus genera. WKPV and EKPV are 170 kbp and 167 kbp long, containing 165 and 162 putative genes, respectively. Together, their genomes encode up to 47 novel unique hypothetical proteins, and possess virulence proteins including a major histocompatibility complex class II inhibitor, a semaphorin-like protein, a serpin, a 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/δ 5→4 isomerase, and a CD200-like protein. These viruses also encode a large putative protein (WKPV-WA-039 and EKPV-SC-038) with a C-terminal domain that is structurally similar to the C-terminal domain of a cullin, suggestive of a role in the control of host ubiquitination. The relationship of these viruses to members of the Molluscipoxvirus and Avipoxvirus genera is discussed in terms of sequence similarity, gene content and nucleotide composition. A novel genus within subfamily Chordopoxvirinae is proposed to accommodate these two poxvirus species from kangaroos; we suggest

  13. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a child due to cystic medial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Watabe, Tsuneya; Ohtaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Shoya; Ogawa, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    The valuable role of computed tomography (CT) was stressed in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 12-year-old child. She initially presented mediastinal mass on plain chest film. A saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm was highly suspected from the CT findings, and it was confirmed on angiography. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed cystic medial necrosis. (author)

  14. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Idhrees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS. On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA. Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  16. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

    OpenAIRE

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to ...

  17. Molecular characterization and multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi from captive red kangaroos (Macropus Rufus in Jiangsu province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhong

    Full Text Available Enterocytozoon bieneusi is the most common pathogen of microsporidian species infecting humans worldwide. Although E. bieneusi has been found in a variety of animal hosts, information on the presence of E. bieneusi in captive kangaroos in China is limited. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of E. bieneusi in captive kangaroos. A total of 61 fecal specimens (38 from red kangaroos and 23 from grey kangaroos were collected from Nanjing Hongshan Forest Zoo and Hongshan Kangaroo Breeding Research Base, Jiangsu province, China. Using the nested PCR amplification ITS gene of rRNA of E. bieneusi, totally 23.0% (14/61 of tested samples were PCR-positive with three genotypes (i.e. one known genotype, CHK1, and two novel genotypes, CSK1 and CSK2. Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7 and one minisatellite (MS4 revealed one, five, two, and one types at these four loci, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, the two genotypes, CHK1 and CSK1, were clustered into a new group of unknown zoonotic potential, and the novel genotype CSK2 was clustered into a separate clade with PtEb and PtEbIX. To date, this is the first report on the presence of E. bieneusi in captive red kangaroos in Jiangsu province, China. Furthermore, a high degree of genetic diversity was observed in the E. bieneusi genotype and seven MLGs (MLG1-7 were found in red kangaroos. Our findings suggest that infected kangaroo may act as potential reservoirs of E. bieneusi and be source to transmit infections to other animal.

  18. Trial of Repeated Analgesia with Kangaroo Mother Care (TRAKC Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) between mother and infant, commonly referred to as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), is recommended as an intervention for procedural pain. Evidence demonstrates its consistent efficacy in reducing pain for a single painful procedure. The purpose of this study is to examine the sustained efficacy of KMC, provided during all routine painful procedures for the duration of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitalization, in diminishing behavioral pain response in preterm neonates. The efficacy of KMC alone will be compared to standard care of 24% oral sucrose, as well as the combination of KMC and 24% oral sucrose. Methods/design Infants admitted to the NICU who are less than 36 6/7 weeks gestational age (according to early ultrasound), that are stable enough to be held in KMC, will be considered eligible (N = 258). Using a single-blinded randomized parallel group design, participants will be assigned to one of three possible interventions: 1) KMC, 2) combined KMC and sucrose, and 3) sucrose alone, when they undergo any routine painful procedure (heel lance, venipuncture, intravenous, oro/nasogastric insertion). The primary outcome is infant’s pain intensity, which will be assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). The secondary outcome will be maturity of neurobehavioral functioning, as measured by the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI). Gestational age, cumulative exposure to KMC provided during non-pain contexts, and maternal cortisol levels will be considered in the analysis. Clinical feasibility will be accounted for from nurse and maternal questionnaires. Discussion This will be the first study to examine the repeated use of KMC for managing procedural pain in preterm neonates. It is also the first to compare KMC to sucrose, or the interventions in combination, across time. Based on the theoretical framework of the brain opioid theory of attachment, it is expected that KMC will be a

  19. Spiral CT aortography: an efficient technique for the diagnosis of traumatic aortic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Capasso, P.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Fischer, A.; Segesser, L. von

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of spiral CT (SCT) aortography for diagnosing acute aortic lesions in blunt thoracic trauma patients. Between October 1992 and June 1997, 487 SCT scans of the chest were performed on blunt thoracic trauma patients. To assess aortic injury, the following SCT criteria were considered: hemomediastinum, peri-aortic hematoma, irregular aspect of the aortic wall, aortic pseudodiverticulum, intimal flap and traumatic dissection. Aortic injury was diagnosed on 14 SCT examinations (2.9 %), five of the patients having had an additional digital aortography that confirmed the aortic trauma. Twelve subjects underwent surgical repair of the thoracic aorta, which in all but one case confirmed the aortic injury. Two patients died before surgery from severe brain lesions. The aortic blunt lesions were confirmed at autopsy. According to the follow-up of the other 473 patients, we are aware of no false-negative SCT examination. Our limited series shows a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 99.8 % of SCT aortography in the diagnosis of aortic injury. It is concluded that SCT aortagraphy is an accurate diagnostic method for the assessment of aortic injury in blunt thoracic trauma patients. (orig.)

  20. Aortic distensibility after aortic root replacement assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, Giovanni; Rajappan, Kim; Amrani, Mohamed; Khaghani, Asghar; Pennell, Dudley J; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2002-01-01

    The changes in geometry of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are thought to be essential for optimal valve function, both in terms of leaflet stress and dynamic behavior. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), the study aim was to determine aortic root distensibility of the homograft (group H) and the Medtronic Freestyle xenograft (group F) after aortic root replacement, from a prospective randomized trial. CMR was performed in 15 patients (six homografts, nine Freestyle) at six months and one year after surgery. Percentage change in aortic radius (PCR) and pressure strain elastic modulus (PSEM) were measured as indices of distensibility, and results related to left ventricular mass (LVM). At six months after surgery, mean PCR was 12+/-2.5 in group H and 12.9+/-6.1 in group F (p = NS), and PSEM was 428.5+/-69.8 and 493.5+/-72.7 g/cm2, respectively (p = NS). PCR was reduced to 10+/-1.7% in group H, and by 8.5+/-2.8% in group F (p = NS), while PSEM was increased to 520.5+/-87.3 and 825+/-420.4, respectively (p = NS) at the one-year follow up. Regression analysis showed a correlation between PCR and LVM (r = 0.52, p = 0.08) and LVM index (r = 0.46, p = 0.14), respectively. In addition, there was a relationship between PSEM, LVM and LVM index, suggesting that the stiffer the root wall, the higher the postoperative LVM. Up to one year after aortic root replacement, the wall of both the allogenic and xenogenic valves retained near-normal distensibility. For the first time, a correlation was demonstrated between the elastic properties of the aortic root and LVM. The longer-term behavior and clinical implications of these findings require further investigation.

  1. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  2. Association between osteopontin and human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, Jonathan; Muller, Juanita; Shephard, Neil; Clancy, Paula; Smallwood, Linda; Moran, Corey; Dear, Anthony E; Palmer, Lyle J; Norman, Paul E

    2007-03-01

    In vitro and animal studies have implicated osteopontin (OPN) in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm. The relationship between serum concentration of OPN and variants of the OPN gene with human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was investigated. OPN genotypes were examined in 4227 subjects in which aortic diameter and clinical risk factors were measured. Serum OPN was measured by ELISA in two cohorts of 665 subjects. The concentration of serum OPN was independently associated with the presence of AAA. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for upper compared with lower OPN tertiles in predicting presence of AAA were 2.23 (1.29 to 3.85, P=0.004) for the population cohort and 4.08 (1.67 to 10.00, P=0.002) for the referral cohort after adjusting for other risk factors. In 198 patients with complete follow-up of aortic diameter at 3 years, initial serum OPN predicted AAA growth after adjustment for other risk factors (standardized coefficient 0.24, P=0.001). The concentration of OPN in the aortic wall was greater in patients with small AAAs (30 to 50 mm) than those with aortic occlusive disease alone. There was no association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes of the OPN gene and aortic diameter or AAA expansion. Serum and tissue concentrations of OPN are associated with human AAA. We found no relationship between variation of the OPN gene and AAA. OPN may be a useful biomarker for AAA presence and growth.

  3. Thrombosed false channel in acute aortic dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alerci, M.; Dore, R.; Kluzer, A.; Digiulio, G.; D'Andrea, F.; De Agostini, A.

    1987-01-01

    Three cases are reported of acute dissection with complete thrombosis of the false channel, which is a very uncommonevent in DeBakey's I and II type aortic dissections. The 3 patients entered hospital because of severe thoracic pain without any ECG sign of myocardial infarction. Emergency CT showed evidence of pericardial effusion suggesting hemopericardium, enlargement of the ascending aorta and a peripheral semilunar filling defect which caused a slight deformation of the true channel. On precontrast scans, only one case showed inward displacement of peripheral calcifications and high-density aortic wall. No tipical signs of aortic dissection were reported, expect in the first patient - where a double contrast filled lumen, separated by an intimal flap was seen. CT findings are individually discussed. It is emphasized that in all patients more than one CT sign was present at a time. The correct evaluation of these signs together with the clinacal data could lead to the right diagnosis of aortic dissection in spite of the lack of a f???

  4. The influence of wall stress on AAA growth and biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Hellenthal, F.A.M.V.I.; Pulinx, B.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Breeuwer, M.; Sambeek, M.R.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Jacobs, M.J.H.M.; Wodzig, W.K.W.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall stress, AAA growth rate and biomarker concentrations. With increasing wall stress, more damage may be caused to the AAA wall, possibly leading to progression of the aneurysm and reflection in up- or

  5. Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  6. [Long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures in connective tissue disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, H; Matsuda, H; Minatoya, K; Sasaki, N

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures for patients having connective tissue disorder. Between 1993 and 2008, the aortic valve sparing surgery was performed in 94 patients having aortic root dilatation. Eighty patients of them (37.2 +/- 13.4 years, 50 male) had cystic medial necrosis in the aortic wall, which was confirmed the pathological examination. We reviewed these patients. Sixty percent (48/80) had Marfan syndrome, 5% (4/80) had Loeyz-Dietz syndrome, 2% (2/80) had bicuspid aortic valve, and 11% (9/80) had aortic dissection. Our reimplantation procedure has been refined as followed: with a tube graft in 41, a tube graft with creation of neo-sinuses in 11, and a Valsalva graft in 14. Fourteen patients underwent the remodeling procedure. The follow-up rate was 100% with the duration of 3.7+/- 3.4 years. There were no operative death but six late deaths. Seventeen (21.3%) patients required aortic valve replacement, for recurrent aortic insufficiency in 13 and infection in 4. Freedom from reoperation was 80%, 43%, and freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency was 80%, 54%, at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Pathological findings of the aortic valve obtained in the reoperations showed elongation and prolapse of the aortic valve due to myxomatous degeneration and fibrous thickening caused by aortic insufficiency. Even in connective tissue disorders, aortic valve sparing operation is associated with acceptable long-term durability, although cusp degeneration resulting in recurrent aortic insufficiency might be progressive.

  7. Jet length/velocity ratio: a new index for echocardiographic evaluation of chronic aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Karaçimen, Denizhan; Erer, Hatice Betül; İlhan, Erkan; Sayar, Nurten; Karakuş, Gültekin; Çekirdekçi, Elif; Eren, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Management of aortic regurgitation depends on the assessment for severity. Echocardiography remains as the most widely available tool for evaluation of aortic regurgitation. In this manuscript, we describe a novel parameter, jet length/velocity ratio, for the diagnosis of severe aortic regurgitation. A total of 30 patients with aortic regurgitation were included to this study. Severity of aortic regurgitation was assessed with an aortic regurgitation index incorporating five echocardiographic parameters. Jet length/velocity ratio is calculated as the ratio of maximum jet penetrance to mean velocity of regurgitant flow. Jet length/velocity ratio was significantly higher in patients with severe aortic regurgitation (2.03 ± 0.53) compared to patients with less than severe aortic regurgitation (1.24 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Correlation of jet length/velocity ratio with aortic regurgitation index was very good (r(2) = 0.86) and correlation coefficient was higher for jet length/velocity ratio compared to vena contracta, jet width/LVOT ratio and pressure half time. For a cutoff value of 1.61, jet length/velocity ratio had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 88%, with an AUC value of 0.955. Jet length/velocity ratio is a novel parameter that can be used to assess severity of chronic aortic regurgitation. Main limitation for usage of this novel parameter is jet impringement to left ventricular wall. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  9. Transparency and communication can improve wildlife welfare outcomes: A case of kangaroos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All countries manage human and wildlife coexistence. Where traditionally humans may have killed animals perceived to be a problem, this is often no longer legal or socially acceptable. Decision-makers tend to feel less strongly about coexistence issues than the people who attempt to influence them on behalf of human or wildlife interests. It has been argued that links between human interests and decisions affecting wildlife should be transparent, and that open decision making processes involving a range of local stakeholders will improve outcomes for humans and wildlife. This paper examines one case incident in an ongoing conflict between an international car racing track and kangaroos that have occasionally been found on the track during a race, causing danger to themselves and race participants. A secret local government report and plan to cull kangaroos was obtained using Freedom of Information legislation. When released to the media the subsequent public discussion showed a much greater concern for kangaroo stress, harm and right to live than the official report, and called for consideration of a range of alternatives to culling. This led to postponement of culling plans, and commitment to a more open community discussion of options. The case clearly supports claims that greater transparency and local stakeholder participation in management decision processes can improve welfare outcomes for non-human animals.

  10. A new self-expandable aortic valved stent deployed above native leaflets for aortic insufficiency: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Zhou, Y; Shao, J; Cai, J; Mei, Y; Wang, Y

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a new self-expandable aortic valved stent following the shape of the sinus of Valsalva, which can be deployed above native leaflets for aortic regurgitation, and study it's effect on coronary artery flow when orthotopic implantation in and above native leaflets. New self-expandable aortic valved stent consist of nitinol stent and bovine pericardium, and was designed following the shape of the sinus of Valsalva, the bovine pericardium was tailed as native leaflet. Thirty-six swine hearts were divided into three equal groups of twelve. In Group A (N.=12), the new self-expandable aortic valved stents deployed in native leaflets. In Group B (N.=12), the new self-expandable aortic valved stents deployed above native leaflets. In Group C (N.=12), the cylinder-like valved stents deployed only in native leaflets. The measurements of each coronary flow rate and endoscopic inspections were repeated post-implantation. In Group A and C, valve implantation in native leaflets resulted in a significant decrease in both left and right coronary flows. In Group B, no significant change in either right or left coronary flow was found after new self-expandable aortic valved stent placement. Endoscopic inspections showed that in group A and C the native leaflets sandwiched between valved stent and aortic wall, whereas, in group B the native leaflets were under the artificial leaflets. Two kinds of stents deployed in native leaflets affect left and right coronary flows significantly. No significant effect was found when the new self-expandable aortic valved stent deployed above native leaflets. This new self-expandable aortic valved stent can be deployed above the native leaflets, which avoids the obstruction of native leaflets on coronary flow.

  11. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o 2max ) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o 2max ). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform

  12. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis caused by alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroyoshi, Junko; Saito, Aya; Panthee, Nirmal; Imai, Yasushi; Kawashima, Dai; Motomura, Noboru; Ono, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of aortic stenosis associated with ochronosis in a 70-year-old man who underwent biologic aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative findings included ochronosis of a severely calcified pigmented aortic valve along with pigmentation of the intima of the aorta. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Derivation of soil screening thresholds to protect chisel-toothed kangaroo rat from uranium mine waste in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Otton, James K.; Finger, Susan E.; Little, Edward E.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical data from soil and weathered waste material samples collected from five uranium mines north of the Grand Canyon (three reclaimed, one mined but not reclaimed, and one never mined) were used in a screening-level risk analysis for the Arizona chisel-toothed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys microps leucotis); risks from radiation exposure were not evaluated. Dietary toxicity reference values were used to estimate soil-screening thresholds presenting risk to kangaroo rats. Sensitivity analyses indicated that body weight critically affected outcomes of exposed-dose calculations; juvenile kangaroo rats were more sensitive to the inorganic constituent toxicities than adult kangaroo rats. Species-specific soil-screening thresholds were derived for arsenic (137 mg/kg), cadmium (16 mg/kg), copper (1,461 mg/kg), lead (1,143 mg/kg), nickel (771 mg/kg), thallium (1.3 mg/kg), uranium (1,513 mg/kg), and zinc (731 mg/kg) using toxicity reference values that incorporate expected chronic field exposures. Inorganic contaminants in soils within and near the mine areas generally posed minimal risk to kangaroo rats. Most exceedances of soil thresholds were for arsenic and thallium and were associated with weathered mine wastes.

  14. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  15. Postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysm and dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Su Ok; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Mi Young; Moon, Hi Eun; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Hong Sup; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul

    1995-01-01

    To assess the postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysms or dissections treared by resection-and graft replacement or continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique. We reviewed postoperative follow-up CT findings of 14 patients, 19 cases. There were 8 patients (10 cases) of aortic aneurysm and 6 patients (9 cases) of aortic dissection which involved the thoracic aorta in 9 patients (13 cases) and abdominal aorta in 5 patients (6 cases). The interval of follow-up after operation was from 9 days to 2 year 9 months. On CT scans, we analyzed the appearance of graft materials, differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques, and normal or abnormal postoperative CT findings. Most of grafts appeared as hyperdense ring on precontrast scan, and all of them were not separated from aortic lumen on postcontrast scan. On CT findings of patients who were operated by continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique, perigraft thrombus was concentrically located with sharp demarcation by native aortic wall and its density was homogeneous, but in cases of those operated by resection-and graft replacement, perigraft hematoma was eccentrically located with indistinct margin and its density was heterogeneous and native aortic wall could not be delineated. In patients without complication, perigraft thrombus or hematoma (15 cases), perigraft calcification (11 cases), residual intimal flap (6 cases), graft deformity (4 cases), perigraft air (2 cases) and reconstructed vessels (1 cases) were noted. And in one patient with complication, perigraft flow was noted with more increased perigraft hematoma. Precise knowledge of the differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques and normal postoperative CT findings is crucial to evaluated the postoperative CT findings in aortic aneurysm and dissection

  16. Robotic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging 4-D flow-based analysis of aortic hemodynamics in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Raoul; Neu, Marie; Hirtler, Daniel; Gimpel, Charlotte; Markl, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular surveillance is important in Turner syndrome because of the increased risk of aortic dilation and dissection with consecutively increased mortality. To compare 4-D flow MRI for the characterization of aortic 3-D flow patterns, dimensions and vessel wall parameters in pediatric patients with Turner syndrome and age-matched controls. We performed 4-D flow MRI measuring in vivo 3-D blood flow with coverage of the thoracic aorta in 25 patients with Turner syndrome and in 16 female healthy controls (age mean ± standard deviation were 16 ± 5 years and 17 ± 4 years, respectively). Blood flow was visualized by time-resolved 3-D path lines. Visual grading of aortic flow in terms of helices and vortices was performed by two independent observers. Quantitative analysis included measurement of aortic diameters, quantification of peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index at eight defined sites. Patients with Turner syndrome had significantly larger aortic diameters normalized to BSA, increased vortices in the ascending aorta and elevated helix flow in the ascending and descending aorta compared to controls (all PTurner patients compared to controls (p=0.02, p=0.002 and p=0.01 respectively). Four-dimensional flow MRI provides new insights into the altered aortic hemodynamics and wall shear stress that could have an impact on the development of aortic dissections.

  18. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size ... differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p

  19. Arterial elastic fiber structure. Function and potential roles in acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, B; Curci, J

    2010-10-01

    The lethality of acute aortic dissection is well recognized. Successful treatment and prevention of aortic dissection is going to be dependent upon an improved understanding of the molecular and physiologic events which predispose to dissection development and propagation. In this review, we will focus on the elastic fiber, one of the critical elements of the aortic wall matrix. Mechanical or functional failure of the elastin in the wall of the aorta likely predisposes to dissection as well as the post-dissection aortic degeneration with aneurysm formation. Insight into the role of the elastin and the elastic fiber in aortic dissection has recently been accelerated by research into the molecular mechanisms associated with hereditary propensity for aortic dissection, such as Marfan syndrome. These studies have implicated both structural and metabolic contributions of alterations in the scaffolding proteins in matrix elastic fibers. In particular, increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity may play a prominent role in predisposing the aortic wall to dissection. The events which predispose to post-dissection aortic degeneration are somewhat less well defined. However, the loss of the structural integrity of the remaining elastic fibers leaves the wall weaker and prone to dilatation and rupture. It appears likely that the upregulation of several potent proteases, particularly those of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family such as MMP-9, are participating in the subsequent matrix damage. Novel medical treatments based on this pathologic data have been proposed and in some cases have made it to clinical trials. The ongoing study evaluating whether therapeutic inhibition of TGF-β may be useful in reducing the risk of aortic dissection in patients at high risk represents one promising new strategy in the treatment of this deadly disease.

  20. In vivo hypertensive arterial wall uptake of radiolabeled liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodis, H.N.; Amartey, J.K.; Crawford, D.W.; Wickham, E.; Blankenhorn, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Using five sham-operated and seven aortic coarctation-induced hypertensive New Zealand White rabbits intravenously injected with neutral small unilamellar vesicles loaded with [111In]nitrilotriacetic acid, we demonstrated in vivo that the normal aortic arterial wall participates in liposome uptake and that this uptake is increased in the hypertensive aortic wall by approximately threefold (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Among the three regions examined, aortic arch, thoracic aorta, and lower abdominal aorta, the difference in uptake between the normotensive and hypertensive arterial walls was significantly different, p less than or equal to 0.05, p less than or equal to 0.0001, and p less than 0.05, respectively. The uptake by the different regions of the hypertensive arterial wall is consistent with the pathological changes present in these areas. Furthermore, the extent of liposome uptake by the aortic wall is strongly correlated with the height of the blood pressure (r = 0.85, p = 0.001, n = 11). We conclude that neutral small unilamellar liposomes can be used to carry agents into the arterial wall in vivo in the study of hypertensive vascular disease and could be especially useful for the delivery of pharmacologically or biologically active agents that would otherwise be inactivated within the circulation or are impermeable to the arterial wall

  1. Double aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery can be done to fix double aortic arch. The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and separates it from the larger branch. Then the surgeon closes the ends of the aorta with stitches. This relieves pressure on the esophagus and windpipe.

  2. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aortic disease. In: Otto CM, Bonow RO, eds. Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease . 4th ed. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 13. Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’s Cecil ...

  3. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, doctors don't know why a heart valve fails to develop properly, so it isn't something you could have prevented. Calcium buildup on the valve. With age, heart valves may accumulate deposits of calcium (aortic valve ...

  4. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Fuss and Crying Time in Colicky Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Akbarian Rad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Infantile colic is a common complaint in the first few weeks of life. On the other hand, because of its unknown etiology, there is not a specific therapy for this complaint, but various therapeutic options for reducing pain and restlessness of these infants are recommended. Skin to skin contact by Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC increases in pain threshold and it seems to be a suitable method for the care of these infants. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of KMC on infantile colic.Methods: This case- control study was performed between March 2012 and March 2013. Subjects were 55 infants with exclusive breast fed infant, aged 15-60 days with excessive fuss and crying, referred to Infant and Child Clinic in Ayatollah Rohani Hospital in Babol, north of Iran. Babies whose weights were less than 2500 Grams and with inheritance and clinical diseases excluded from the study. Infants were subjected to KMC at least 2 hours a day. Standard questionnaire and Barr Scale were filled by interview. Data was analyzed by SPSS v.11.5 and T-test, a P- value less than 0.05 considered being significant.Results:The fuss and crying time before the KMC was 2.21±1.54 hours per day and decreased to 1.16±1.3 hours per day after the implementation of KMC. (p=0.001Conclusions:Kangaroo mother care at home can be used as a simple and safe method for decreasing of cry and fussiness in colicky infants. Keywords: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC, fussiness, Colicky Infants, colic

  5. A Reproductive Management Program for an Urban Population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tribe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, culling has been the expedient, most common, and in many cases, the only tool used to control free-ranging kangaroo populations. We applied a reproductive control program to a population of eastern grey kangaroos confined to a golf course in South East Queensland. The program aimed to reduce fecundity sufficiently for the population to decrease over time so that overgrazing of the fairways and the frequency of human–animal conflict situations were minimised. In 2003, 92% of the female kangaroos above 5 kg bodyweight were implanted with the GnRH agonist deslorelin after darting with a dissociative anaesthetic. In 2007, 86% of the females above 5 kg were implanted with deslorelin and also 87% of the males above 5 kg were sterilised by either orchidectomy or vasectomy. In 2005, 2008 and 2009, the population was censused to assess the effect of each treatment. The 2003 deslorelin program resulted in effective zero population growth for approximately 2.5 years. The combined deslorelin–surgery program in 2007 reduced the birth rate from 0.3 to 0.06%/year for 16 months, resulting in a 27% population reduction by November 2009. The results were consistent with implants conferring contraception to 100% of implanted females for at least 12 months. The iatrogenic mortality rates for each program were 10.5% and 4.9%, respectively, with 50% of all mortalities due to darting-related injuries, exertional myopathy/hyperthermia or recovery misadventure. The short term sexual and agonistic behaviour of the males was assessed for the 2007 program: no significant changes were seen in adult males given the vasectomy procedure, while sexual behaviours’ were decreased in adult males given the orchidectomy procedure. It is concluded that female reproduction was effectively controlled by implantation with deslorrelin and male reproductive behaviour was reduced by orchidectomy, which together achieved population control.

  6. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Fuss and Crying Time in Colicky Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Akbarian Rad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infantile colic is a common complaint in the first few weeks of life. On the other hand, because of its unknown etiology, there is not a specific therapy for this complaint, but various therapeutic options for reducing pain and restlessness of these infants are recommended. Skin to skin contact by Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC increases in pain threshold and it seems to be a suitable method for the care of these infants. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of KMC on infantile colic. Methods: This case- control study was performed between March 2012 and March 2013. Subjects were 55 infants with exclusive breast fed infant, aged 15-60 days with excessive fuss and crying, referred to Infant and Child Clinic in Ayatollah Rohani Hospital in Babol, north of Iran. Babies whose weights were less than 2500 Grams and with inheritance and clinical diseases excluded from the study. Infants were subjected to KMC at least 2 hours a day. Standard questionnaire and Barr Scale were filled by interview. Data was analyzed by SPSS v.11.5 and T-test, a P- value less than 0.05 considered being significant. Results: The fuss and crying time before the KMC was 2.21±1.54 hours per day and decreased to 1.16±1.3 hours per day after the implementation of KMC. (p=0.001 Conclusions: Kangaroo mother care at home can be used as a simple and safe method for decreasing of cry and fussiness in colicky infants. Keywords: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC, fussiness, Colicky Infants, colic

  7. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Growth and Morbidity Pattern in Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerti Swarnkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is dened as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby derived from practical similarities to marsupial care giving, proximately exclusive breastfeeding and early discharge from hospital. This concept was proposed as an alternative to conventional methods of care for low birth weight (LBW infants, and in replication to quandaries of earnest overcrowding in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. KMC essentially utilizes the mother as a natural incubator Aim and Objectives: The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and the effectiveness of KMC in LBW infants. It avoids agitation routinely experienced in busy ward. Material and Methods: A pilot open-labeled quasi-randomised clinical trial was conducted in Level III NICU of a teaching institution. 60 newborn infants <2500 g, meeting inclusion criteria were alternatively randomised into two groups: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC and Conventional Methods of Care (CMC. Kangaroo mother care was practiced with minimum total period of eight hours a day intermittently for the intervention group while the controls remained in incubators or cots. Weight, head circumference, length, morbidity episodes, hospital stay, feeding patterns were monitored for all infants till postmenstrual age of 42 weeks in preterm babies or till a weight of 2500 g is achieved in term SGA babies. Results: The pilot study conrmed that trial processes were efcient, the intervention was acceptable (to mothers and nurses and that the outcome measures were appropriate; KMC babies achieved signicantly better growth at the end of the study (For preterm babies, weight, length and head circumference gain were signicantly higher in the KMC group (weight 19.28±2.9g/day, length 0.99±0.56cm/week and head circumference 0.72±0.07 cm/week than in the CMC group (P <0.001. A signicantly higher number of babies in the CMC group suffered from hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and

  8. The physics of articulated toys—a jumping and rotating kangaroo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güémez, J; Fiolhais, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe the physics of an articulated toy with an internal source of energy provided by a spiral spring. The toy is a funny low cost kangaroo which jumps and rotates. The study consists of mechanical and thermodynamical analyses that make use of the Newton and centre of mass equations, the rotational equations and the first law of thermodynamics. This amazing toy provides a nice demonstrative example of how new physics insights can be brought about when links with thermodynamics are established in the study of mechanical systems. (papers)

  9. Using faecal DNA to determine consumption by kangaroos of plants considered palatable to sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K W; Krebs, G L; McCafferty, P; van Wyngaarden, S P; Addison, J

    2010-02-01

    Disagreement exists within the scientific community with regards to the level of competition for feed between sheep and kangaroos in the Australian rangelands. The greatest challenge to solving this debate is finding effective means of determining the composition of the diets of these potential grazing competitors. An option is to adopt a non-invasive approach that combines faecal collection and molecular techniques that focus on faecal DNA as the primary source of dietary information. As proof-of-concept, we show that a DNA reference data bank on plant species can be established. This DNA reference data bank was then used as a library to identify plant species in kangaroo faeces collected in the southern rangelands of Western Australia. To enhance the method development and to begin the investigation of competitive grazing between sheep and kangaroos, 16 plant species known to be palatable to sheep were initially targeted for collection. To ensure that only plant sequences were studied, PCR amplification was performed using a universal primer pair previously shown to be specific to the chloroplast transfer RNA leucine (trnL) UAA gene intron. Overall, genus-specific, single and differently sized amplicons were reliably and reproducibly generated; enabling the differentiation of reference plants by PCR product length heterogeneity. However, there were a few plants that could not be clearly differentiated on the basis of size alone. This prompted the adoption of a post-PCR step that enabled further differentiation according to base sequence variation. Restriction endonucleases make sequence-specific cleavages on DNA to produce discrete and reproducible fragments having unique sizes and base compositions. Their availability, affordability and simplicity-of-use put restriction enzyme sequence (RES) profiling as a logical post-PCR step for confirming plant species identity. We demonstrate that PCR-RES profiling of plant and faecal matter is useful for the identification

  10. Kangaroo care for adoptive parents and their critically ill preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Leslie; Anderson, Gene Cranston

    2002-01-01

    In this case study kangaroo care (KC) was facilitated for an adoptive mother and father who were planning to attend the birth of the infant they had arranged to adopt. Unexpectedly, the birth mother delivered at 27 weeks gestation. The infant was critically ill and required mechanical ventilation. However, in this neonatal intensive care unit where all adoptive parents and parents of mechanically ventilated infants are offered KC, these adoptive parents began KC on Day 3 while their infant daughter was still mechanically ventilated. She thrived thereafter and the entire experience was profoundly beneficial for this beginning family both at the hospital and after discharge home.

  11. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  12. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  14. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tribbles 3: A potential player in diabetic aortic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Yun; Xie, Guo-lu; Wang, Zhi-hao; Ding, Wen-yuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tribbles 3, whose expression is up-regulated by insulin resistance, was confirmed to be involved in diabetic cardiomyopathy in our previous study. However, it is not known whether Tribbles 3 has a role on conduit arteries such as the aorta in diabetes. Type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. We evaluated the characteristics of diabetic rats by serial ultrasonography and histopathologic analyses of aortic wall architecture. Diabetic rats displayed increased aortic medial thickness, excessive collagen deposition, diminished elastic fibres and reduced vascular compliance together with Tribbles 3 overexpression. To further investigate the role of Tribbles 3 in aortic remodelling, we used Tribbles 3 gene silencing in vivo 12 weeks after onset of diabetes. Silence of Tribbles 3 significantly reversed pathological aortic remodelling without blood pressure modification. In Tribbles 3-small interfering RNA group, medial thickness and perivascular fibrosis were markedly decreased; moreover, there were prominent reductions in collagen content and collagen/elastin ratio, resulting in an improved arterial compliance. Additionally, with Tribbles 3 silencing, the diminished phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt was restored, and increased activation of MKK4/JNK was decreased. Silence of Tribbles 3 is potent in mediating reversal of aortic remodelling, implicating that Tribbles 3 is proposed to be a potential therapeutic target for vascular complication in diabetes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Uremia modulates the phenotype of aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Pedersen, Annemarie Aarup; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    the phenotype of aortic SMCs in vivo. METHODS: Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) and wildtype C57Bl/6 mice. Plasma analysis, gene expression, histology, and myography were used to determine uremia-mediated changes in the arterial wall. RESULTS: Induction...... of moderate uremia in ApoE(-/-) mice increased atherosclerosis in the aortic arch en face 1.6 fold (p = 0.04) and induced systemic inflammation. Based on histological analyses of aortic root sections, uremia increased the medial area, while there was no difference in the content of elastic fibers or collagen...... in the aortic media. In the aortic arch, mRNA and miRNA expression patterns were consistent with a uremia-mediated phenotypic modulation of SMCs; e.g. downregulation of myocardin, α-smooth muscle actin, and transgelin; and upregulation of miR146a. Notably, these expression patterns were observed after acute (2...

  17. Characterization of the mechanical behavior and pathophysiological state of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on 4D ultrasound strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Andreas; Blase, Christopher; Derwich, Wojciech; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a degenerative disease of the human aortic wall that may lead to weakening and eventually rupture of the wall with high mortality rates. Since the currently established criterion for surgical or endovascular treatment of the disease is imprecise in the individual case and treatment is not free of complications, the need for additional patient-individual biomarkers for short-term AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making. Time resolved 3D ultrasound combined with speckle tracking algorithms is a novel non-invasive medical imaging technique that provides full-field displacement and strain measurements of aortic and aneurysmal wall motion. This is patient-individual information that has not been used so far to assess wall strength and rupture risk. The current study uses simple statistical indices of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of in-plane strain components as biomarkers for the pathological state of the aortic and aneurysmal wall. The pathophysiological rationale behind this approach are the known changes in microstructural composition of the aortic wall with progression of AAA development that results in increased stiffening and heterogeneity of the walls mechanical properties and in decreased wall strength. In a comparative analysis of the aortic wall motion of young volunteers without known cardiovascular diseases, aged arteriosclerotic patients without AAA, and AAA patients, mean values of all in-plane strain components were significantly reduced, and the heterogeneity of circumferential strain was significantly increased in the AAA group compared to both other groups. The capacity of the proposed method to differentiate between wall motion of aged, arteriosclerotic patients and AAA patients is a promising step towards a new method for in vivo assessment of AAA wall strength or stratification of AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making on surgical or endovascular

  18. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  19. Morphological and morphometric characteristics of gastric mucosa in western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Badran Shoeib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the morphology and histomorphometry of stomach and gastric mucosa in western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus. The stomach was composed of three indistinctive separate parts namely sacciform forestomach, tubiform forestomach, and hindstomach. The tubiform forestomach was the main tubular section of the organ. The stomach had a compound lining. The non-glandular mucosa occupied the medial blind sac (MBS of the sacciform forestomach; the layer covered about one-third of the tubiform forestomach (non-glandular region and the entire length of the gastric sulcus. The glandular part lined the parietal blind sac (PBS of sacciform forestomach and the cardiac gland region of tubiform forestomach as well as fundic and pyloric gland regions of the hindstomach. The cardiac mucosa had smooth and folded areas; these were filled with mixed glands. In the fundic glands, the parietal cells outnumbered the chief cells. The pyloric glands were of serous-like in characteristics. In conclusion, gross and histological structures of the stomach of western grey kangaroo are adaptive with its food habitat, which allows thorough mixing of highly fibrous grasses.

  20. Studies on the in vitro cultivation of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehority, Burk A; Wright, André-Denis G

    2014-08-01

    The methods used for culturing rumen protozoa were found to be unsatisfactory for growth of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach. Based on published measurements of physical parameters in the marsupial forestomach, several modifications were incorporated into the procedure, i.e., an increase in % hydrogen in the gas phase, adjustment of initial pH of the medium to 6.9-7.0 range, feed only forage as a substrate and incubate at a lower temperature (33-36 °C). Only incubation at the lower temperature increased survival time of the kangaroo protozoa. Two species of Bitricha were still viable after 28 d in culture. Cultures had to be terminated at that time. One of the species differed considerably in size and shape from previously described species and based on 18S rRNA data, may represent a new species of Bitricha. The second species, present in low numbers was identified as Bitricha oblata. In a separate trial, Macropodinium yalanbense survived for 11 d, at which time these cultures also had to be terminated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  2. Parents’ lived experience of providing kangaroo care to their preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Leonard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Premature and low birthweight infants pose particular challenges to health services in South Africa. While there is good evidence to demonstrate the benefits of kangaroo care in low birthweight infants, limited research has been conducted locally on the experiences of parents who provide kangaroo care to their preterm infants. This phenomenological study explores the lived experience of parents who provided their preterm infants with kangaroo care at a tertiary-level maternity centre in the Western Cape. In-depth interviews were conducted with six parents: four mothers and two fathers. Data was analysed using an adaptation of the approaches described by Colaizzi (1978:48-71 and Hycner (1985:280-294. To ensure trustworthiness, the trustworthiness criteria described by Guba and Lincoln (1989:242-243 were applied. Kangaroo care is a phased process, each phase bringing a unique set of experiences. The eight themes that emerged are described: unforeseen, unprepared and uncertain - the experience of birth; anxiety and barriers; an intimate connection; adjustments, roles and responsibilities; measuring success; a network of encouragement and support; living-in challenges; and living with the infant outside of hospital. Challenges facing health care providers are described and recommendations for information about kangaroo care and support for parents are made. Opsomming Vroeggebore babas en babas met ’n lae geboortegewig stel besondere uitdagings vir Suid-Afrikaanse gesondhiedsdienste. Daar bestaan goeie bewyse dat die kangaroesorgmetode voordelig is vir babas met ’n laegeboortegewig, dog is minimale plaaslike navorsing gedoen oor die ondervindinge van ouers wat hierdie metode gebruik om vir hul vroeggebore babas te sorg. Hierdie fenomenologiese studie verken die geleefde ervaringe van ouers wat vir hulle vroeggebore babas deur middel van die kangaroesorgmetode in ’n tersiêre kraamsentrum in die Weskaap gesorg het. Data is ingesamel deur in

  3. Original article The effects of kangaroo mother care in a sample of preterm, preschool aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Chrzan-Dętkoś

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The research has shown that kangaroo mother care has a protective impact both on health and future cognitive skills of prematurely born babies. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the early skin-to-skin contact and the cognitive and emotional-social functioning of preschool aged preterm babies. Participants and procedure The study group included 99 preterm babies. The children participated in a psychological examination conducted using the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale and the Terman-Merrill Test. The data concerning the skin-to-skin contact during the child’s hospitalisation were acquired during interviews with mothers. The emotional development was assessed on the basis of interviews with mothers, conducted using the Rescorla DSM-IV Orientation Scale (2005. Results The study showed no relation between kangaroo mother care and cognitive development. Nevertheless the early skin-to-skin contact turned out to be connected with the emotional functioning of the subjects. Preterm babies who used to experience kangaroo mother care experienced fewer anxiety and depressive disorders than those who did not. In addition it was revealed that the children who suffered from early damage to the brain in the forms of intraventricular and periventricular haemorrhages and experienced kangaroo mother care demonstrated less intense depressive symptoms than those who did not. Conclusions The obtained results, combined with the review of the foreign literature of the subject, indicate the usefulness of introducing kangaroo mother care to neonatal wards and encouraging parents to care about their prematurely born babies in such a way.

  4. Dynamic autophagic activity affected the development of thoracic aortic dissection by regulating functional properties of smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Yang, Fan; Yan, Yan; Liu, Su-Xuan; Li, Song-Hua; Wang, Guo-Kun; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aortic medial degeneration is the key histopathologic feature of Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). The aim of this study was to identify the change of autophagic activity in the aortic wall during TAD development, and to explore the roles of autophagy on regulating functional properties of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Firstly, compared with control group (n = 11), the increased expression of autophagic markers Beclin1 and LC3 was detected in the aortic wall from TAD group (n = 23) by immunochemistry and western blot. We found that more autophagic vacuoles were present in the aortic wall of TAD patients using Transmission electron microscopy. Next, autophagic activity was examined in AD mice model established by β-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN) and angiotensin II. Immunochemistry proved that autophagic activity was dynamically changed during AD development. Beclin1 and LC3 were detected up-regulated in the aortic wall in the second week after BAPN feeding, earlier than the fragmentation or loss of elastic fibers. When AD occurred in the 4th week, the expression of Beclin1 and LC3 began to decrease, but still higher than the control. Furthermore, autophagy was found to inhibit starvation-induced apoptosis of SMCs. Meanwhile, blockage of autophagy could suppress PDGF-induced phenotypic switch of SMCs. Taken together, autophagic activity was dynamically changed in the aortic wall during TAD development. The abnormal autophagy could regulate the functional properties of aortic SMCs, which might be the potential pathogenesis of TAD. - Highlights: • Autophagy is up-regulated in aorta wall from thoracic aorta dissection (TAD) patient. • Autophagic activity is dynamically changed during TAD development. • Dynamically change of autophagy is associated with pathological process of TAD. • Autophagy participate in the development of TAD by regulating function of SMCs.

  5. Energy requirements of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus): impacts of age, growth and body size in a large desert-dwelling herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, A J; Dawson, T J

    2003-09-01

    Generally, young growing mammals have resting metabolic rates (RMRs) that are proportionally greater than those of adult animals. This is seen in the red kangaroo ( Macropus rufus), a large (>20 kg) herbivorous marsupial common to arid and semi-arid inland Australia. Juvenile red kangaroos have RMRs 1.5-1.6 times those expected for adult marsupials of an equivalent body mass. When fed high-quality chopped lucerne hay, young-at-foot (YAF) kangaroos, which have permanently left the mother's pouch but are still sucking, and recently weaned red kangaroos had digestible energy intakes of 641+/-27 kJ kg(-0.75) day(-1) and 677+/-26 kJ kg(-0.75) day(-1), respectively, significantly higher than the 385+/-37 kJ kg(-0.75) day(-1) ingested by mature, non-lactating females. However, YAF and weaned red kangaroos had maintenance energy requirements (MERs) that were not significantly higher than those of mature, non-lactating females, the values ranging between 384 kJ kg(-0.75) day(-1) and 390 kJ kg(-0.75) day(-1) digestible energy. Importantly, the MER of mature female red kangaroos was 84% of that previously reported for similarly sized, but still growing, male red kangaroos. Growth was the main factor affecting the proportionally higher energy requirements of the juvenile red kangaroos relative to non-reproductive mature females. On a good quality diet, juvenile red kangaroos from permanent pouch exit until shortly after weaning (ca. 220-400 days) had average growth rates of 55 g body mass day(-1). At this level of growth, juveniles had total daily digestible energy requirements (i.e. MER plus growth energy requirements) that were 1.7-1.8 times the MER of mature, non-reproductive females. Our data suggest that the proportionally higher RMR of juvenile red kangaroos is largely explained by the additional energy needed for growth. Energy contents of the tissue gained by the YAF and weaned red kangaroos during growth were estimated to be 5.3 kJ g(-1), within the range found for

  6. Aortic non communicating dissections. A study with helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midiri, M.; Strada, A.; Stabile Ianora, A.A.; Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; D'Agostino, D.; De Luca Tupputi Schinosa, L.

    2000-01-01

    The evaluate the signs of aortic intramural hematoma with helical CT and the diagnostic role of this technique in patients with this condition. It was reviewed the CT findings of 396 patients submitted to emergency examinations for suspected aortic dissection from 1995 to 1999. Only 18 patients (6 women and 12 men) had CT signs of aortic intramural hematoma. Helical CT studies were carried out with the following parameters: slice thickness 10 mm, reconstruction index 10, feed 1.5 mm, conventional algorithm with minimum values of 130 kV and 125mA. All patients were examined with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, before and after a power injection of 130 mL ionic contrast material. It was studied: hematoma localization and longitudinal extension; thickness and density of aortic wall; presence and location of intimal calcifications; integrity of intimal wall; hemo mediastinum and/or hemo thorax. Aortic wall thickening appeared as a high density crescent-shaped area at baseline CT and had low density on enhanced images in all patients. Thickening was eccentric in 14/18 patients and concentric in 4/18 only; it always exceeded 4 mm. It was found some intimal calcifications in 8 patients and hemo thorax and/or hemo mediastinum in 9 patients. A patient with type A hematoma died of cardiac tamponade a few hours after CT diagnosis. Six patients (5 type B and 1 type A) underwent anti-hypertensive treatment and radiological follow-up. Eleven patients (6 type A and 5 type B) underwent prosthesis replacement and 5 of them (3 type A and 2 type B) died of postoperative complications. In the 5 type B patients surgery was performed because of treatment-resistant pain and of the onset of ischemic complications to abdominal organs caused by involvement of the main collateral branches of the aorta. One patient with type A hematoma was submitted to drug treatment because it was judged unresectable. Intramural hematoma of the aorta is a distinct pathological entity, which should not be

  7. Energy, water and space use by free-living red kangaroos Macropus rufus and domestic sheep Ovis aries in an Australian rangeland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, A J; Dawson, T J; McLeod, S R; Dennis, T; Maloney, S K

    2013-08-01

    We used doubly labelled water to measure field metabolic rates (FMR) and water turnover rates (WTR) in one of Australia's largest native herbivores, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and one of Australia's dominant livestock species, the wool-breed Merino sheep, under free-living conditions in a typical Australian rangeland. Also, we used GPS technology to examine animal space use, along with the comparisons of urine concentration, diet, diet digestibility, and subsequent grazing pressures. We found smaller space-use patterns than previously reported for kangaroos, which were between 14 and 25 % those of sheep. The FMR of a 25-kg kangaroo was 30 % that of a 45-kg sheep, while WTR was 15 % and both were associated with smaller travel distances, lower salt intakes, and higher urine concentration in kangaroos than sheep. After accounting for differences in dry matter digestibility of food eaten by kangaroos (51 %) and sheep (58 %), the relative grazing pressure of a standard (mature, non-reproductive) 25-kg kangaroo was 35 % that of a 45-kg sheep. Even for animals of the same body mass (35 kg), the relative grazing pressure of the kangaroo was estimated to be only 44 % that of the sheep. After accounting for the energetic costs of wool growth by sheep, the FMRs of our sheep and kangaroos were 2-3 times their expected BMRs, which is typical for mammalian FMR:BMRs generally. Notably, data collected from our free-living animals were practically identical to those from animals confined to a semi-natural enclosure (collected in an earlier study under comparable environmental conditions), supporting the idea that FMRs are relatively constrained within species.

  8. Aortic obstruction: anatomy and echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keirns Candace

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography is a valuable non-invasive technique for identifying the site and type of aortic obstruction. Knowledge of the morphological details of each type of obstruction is the basis for correct interpretation of the diagnostic images and clinical decisions. This study was undertaken to correlate the echocardiographic images with anatomic specimens of equivalent valvular and supravalvular aortic obstruction. Specimens were part of the collection of the Department of Embryology. Fifty six patients were studied, and forty specimens with aortic obstruction were analyzed. Echocardiographic characteristics: Thirty one (55.3% patients were women and twenty five (44.7% men. Valvular aortic obstruction was found in Thirty six patients (64.3 % and supravalvular aortic obstruction in twenty (35.7%. Anatomic characteristics: Of the forty specimens examined, twenty one (52.5% had valvular aortic obstruction and nineteen (47.5% supravalvular aortic obstruction. The anatomoechocardiographic correlation clearly showed that the anatomic findings of the specimen hearts and aortas corresponded to echocardiographic images of valvular and supravalvular aortic obstruction and provided solid corroboration of echocardiographic diagnoses.

  9. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  10. Patient-specific AAA wall stress analysis: 99-percentile versus peak stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Hellenthal, F.A.M.V.I.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Jacobs, M.J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Biomechanically, rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the stress acting on the wall due to the blood pressure, exceeds the strength of the wall. Peak wall stress estimations, based on CT reconstruction, may be prone to observer variation. This study focuses on the

  11. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  12. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitation and chronic descending aortic dissection immediately after Cesarean section. Regular follow-up will be needed to monitor the descending aortic dissection.

  13. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging 4-D flow-based analysis of aortic hemodynamics in Turner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Raoul; Neu, Marie; Hirtler, Daniel; Gimpel, Charlotte; Markl, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular surveillance is important in Turner syndrome because of the increased risk of aortic dilation and dissection with consecutively increased mortality. To compare 4-D flow MRI for the characterization of aortic 3-D flow patterns, dimensions and vessel wall parameters in pediatric patients with Turner syndrome and age-matched controls. We performed 4-D flow MRI measuring in vivo 3-D blood flow with coverage of the thoracic aorta in 25 patients with Turner syndrome and in 16 female healthy controls (age mean ± standard deviation were 16 ± 5 years and 17 ± 4 years, respectively). Blood flow was visualized by time-resolved 3-D path lines. Visual grading of aortic flow in terms of helices and vortices was performed by two independent observers. Quantitative analysis included measurement of aortic diameters, quantification of peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index at eight defined sites. Patients with Turner syndrome had significantly larger aortic diameters normalized to BSA, increased vortices in the ascending aorta and elevated helix flow in the ascending and descending aorta compared to controls (all P<0.03). Patients with abnormal helical or vortical flow in the ascending aorta had significantly larger diameters of the ascending aorta (P<0.03). Peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index were significantly lower in Turner patients compared to controls (p=0.02, p=0.002 and p=0.01 respectively). Four-dimensional flow MRI provides new insights into the altered aortic hemodynamics and wall shear stress that could have an impact on the development of aortic dissections. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging 4-D flow-based analysis of aortic hemodynamics in Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Raoul [University Medical Center Heidelberg, Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Neu, Marie [University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Hemostaseology, Mainz (Germany); Hirtler, Daniel [University of Freiburg, Department of Congenital Heart Defects and Pediatric Cardiology, Heart Center, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Gimpel, Charlotte [Center for Pediatrics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of General Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine and Neonatology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States); Geiger, Julia [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Cardiovascular surveillance is important in Turner syndrome because of the increased risk of aortic dilation and dissection with consecutively increased mortality. To compare 4-D flow MRI for the characterization of aortic 3-D flow patterns, dimensions and vessel wall parameters in pediatric patients with Turner syndrome and age-matched controls. We performed 4-D flow MRI measuring in vivo 3-D blood flow with coverage of the thoracic aorta in 25 patients with Turner syndrome and in 16 female healthy controls (age mean ± standard deviation were 16 ± 5 years and 17 ± 4 years, respectively). Blood flow was visualized by time-resolved 3-D path lines. Visual grading of aortic flow in terms of helices and vortices was performed by two independent observers. Quantitative analysis included measurement of aortic diameters, quantification of peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index at eight defined sites. Patients with Turner syndrome had significantly larger aortic diameters normalized to BSA, increased vortices in the ascending aorta and elevated helix flow in the ascending and descending aorta compared to controls (all P<0.03). Patients with abnormal helical or vortical flow in the ascending aorta had significantly larger diameters of the ascending aorta (P<0.03). Peak systolic wall shear stress, pulsatility index and oscillatory shear index were significantly lower in Turner patients compared to controls (p=0.02, p=0.002 and p=0.01 respectively). Four-dimensional flow MRI provides new insights into the altered aortic hemodynamics and wall shear stress that could have an impact on the development of aortic dissections. (orig.)

  16. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-01-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitat...

  17. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  18. Renal Infarction from Type B Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Tweet

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old-female with a medical history of hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of sudden onset of lower back and abdominal pain. Eight hours prior to presentation she reported turning to grab something on another counter and felt a sudden onset sharp pain in her lower back. She began to notice ill-defined abdominal pain, although she denied any shortness of breath, chest pain, numbness, weakness, or urologic symptoms. Her vital signs on presentation to the ED were temperature 36.5˚C, blood pressure 143/88, heart rate 84, respiratory rate 14, and oxygen saturation 93% on room air. On arrival, the patient was in significant discomfort and was rolling on the bed due to pain. Although she appeared to be in moderate distress she had minimal, if any, tenderness on abdominal exam, and only mild left lower back tenderness to palpation. This disconnect between the patient’s apparent discomfort and the lack of physical exam findings prompted the ordering of a computed tomography angiography (CTA of the abdomen/pelvis with greatest suspicion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Significant findings: Initial abdominal images demonstrated a dissection flap; therefore, a CTA of the chest was also obtained. These images revealed a Stanford type B aortic dissection beginning just distal to the left subclavian artery and extending to the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery. The right renal artery arose from the true lumen of the dissection while the left renal artery arose from the false lumen. This case is interesting as imaging shows the lack of perfusion to the left kidney, residing in the retroperitoneum, which correlates with her non-descript abdominal and left flank pain. Discussion: Aortic dissection is defined as a tear within the wall of the aorta that allows blood to track between intima and media layers. A dissection is classified as Stanford Type A if it involves any portion of the

  19. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Disha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH (Stanford A, DeBakey I. This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively.

  20. Plasma cholinesterase activity of rats, western grey kangaroos, alpacas, sheep, cattle, and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Chris; Mawson, Peter; Maloney, Shane K

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity levels of various species may be of interest to toxicologists or pathologists working with chemicals that interfere with the activity of plasma cholinesterase. We used a pH titration method to measure the plasma cholinesterase activity of six mammalian species. Plasma cholinesterase activity varied up to 50-fold between species: sheep (88 ± 45 nM acetylcholine degraded per ml of test plasma per minute), cattle (94 ± 35), western grey kangaroos (126 ± 92), alpaca (364 ± 70), rats (390 ± 118) and horses (4539 ± 721). We present a simple, effective technique for the assay of plasma cholinesterase activity levels from a range of species. Although labour-intensive, it requires only basic laboratory equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  2. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  3. Strain measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysm with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, P; Shelke, A; Nwe, T H; Mularczyk, M; Nelson, K; Schmandra, T; Knez, P; Schmitz-Rixen, T

    2013-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is caused by mechanical vascular tissue failure. Although mechanical properties within the aneurysm vary, currently available ultrasound methods assess only one cross-sectional segment of the aorta. This study aims to establish real-time 3-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking ultrasound to explore local displacement and strain parameters of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm. Validation was performed on a silicone aneurysm model, perfused in a pulsatile artificial circulatory system. Wall motion of the silicone model was measured simultaneously with a commercial real-time 3D speckle tracking ultrasound system and either with laser-scan micrometry or with video photogrammetry. After validation, 3D ultrasound data were collected from abdominal aortic aneurysms of five patients and displacement and strain parameters were analysed. Displacement parameters measured in vitro by 3D ultrasound and laser scan micrometer or video analysis were significantly correlated at pulse pressures between 40 and 80 mmHg. Strong local differences in displacement and strain were identified within the aortic aneurysms of patients. Local wall strain of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm can be analysed in vivo with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking imaging, offering the prospect of individual non-invasive rupture risk analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Current indications for stentless aortic bioprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Yasser Y; Rayan, Amr; Bauer, Stefan; Keshk, Noha; Bauer, Kerstin; Ennker, Ina; Ennker, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The best aortic prostheses have been debated for decades. The introduction of stentless aortic bioprostheses was aimed at improving hemodynamics and potentially the durability of aortic bioprostheses. Despite the good short- and long-term outcomes after implantation of stentless aortic bioprostheses, their use remains limited owing to the technically demanding implantation techniques. Nevertheless, stentless aortic bioprostheses might be of special benefit in certain indications, where they could be a valuable addition to the surgical armamentarium.

  6. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael H; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2010-05-05

    Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2) = 83.8; P<0.001). Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local response

  7. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Parsons

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo, along with a control (water. If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous, western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area.We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones. Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5. Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2 = 83.8; P<0.001.Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local

  8. Massive aggrecan and versican accumulation in thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikach, Frank S; Koch, Christopher D; Mead, Timothy J; Galatioto, Josephine; Willard, Belinda B; Emerton, Kelly B; Eagleton, Matthew J; Blackstone, Eugene H; Ramirez, Francesco; Roselli, Eric E; Apte, Suneel S

    2018-03-08

    Proteoglycan accumulation is a hallmark of medial degeneration in thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD). Here, we defined the aortic proteoglycanome using mass spectrometry, and based on the findings, investigated the large aggregating proteoglycans aggrecan and versican in human ascending TAAD and a mouse model of severe Marfan syndrome. The aortic proteoglycanome comprises 20 proteoglycans including aggrecan and versican. Antibodies against these proteoglycans intensely stained medial degeneration lesions in TAAD, contrasting with modest intralamellar staining in controls. Aggrecan, but not versican, was increased in longitudinal analysis of Fbn1mgR/mgR aortas. TAAD and Fbn1mgR/mgR aortas had increased aggrecan and versican mRNAs, and reduced expression of a key proteoglycanase gene, ADAMTS5, was seen in TAAD. Fbn1mgR/mgR mice with ascending aortic dissection and/or rupture had dramatically increased aggrecan staining compared with mice without these complications. Thus, aggrecan and versican accumulation in ascending TAAD occurs via increased synthesis and/or reduced proteolytic turnover, and correlates with aortic dissection/rupture in Fbn1mgR/mgR mice. Tissue swelling imposed by aggrecan and versican is proposed to be profoundly deleterious to aortic wall mechanics and smooth muscle cell homeostasis, predisposing to type-A dissections. These proteoglycans provide potential biomarkers for refined risk stratification and timing of elective aortic aneurysm repair.

  9. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grønbæk, Morten

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  10. Reproductive implications of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus ocydromus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Chris; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Jeff; Mawson, Peter R; Bencini, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Australian marsupials are thought to be particularly vulnerable to pathologic impacts of Toxoplasma gondii, and they may be similarly affected by Neospora caninum. Pathology due to either organism could be expressed as reduced female reproductive performance. We studied adult female western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus ocydromus) from suburban Perth, Western Australia, between May 2006 and October 2008. We used indirect fluorescent antibody tests to look for evidence of exposure to T. gondii and N. caninum in M. fuliginosus ocydromus and tested the association between their reproductive performance and a positive test result. Although 20% of plasma samples collected from 102 female kangaroos were positive for T. gondii and 18% were positive for N. caninum, we found no association between positive results and reproductive performance. Further study will be required to clarify if, and under what circumstances, T. gondii and N. caninum are pathogenic to macropod marsupials.

  11. CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS VAR. GRUBII-ASSOCIATED RENAL AMYLOIDOSIS CAUSING PROTEIN-LOSING NEPHROPATHY IN A RED KANGAROO (MACROPUS RUFUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Mary Irene; Gjeltema, Jenessa; Sheley, Matthew; Wack, Ray F

    2017-09-01

    A 10-year-old male castrated red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented with mandibular swelling. Examination findings included pitting edema with no dental disease evident on examination or radiographs. The results of blood work were moderate azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, and severely elevated urine protein:creatinine ratio (9.9). Radiographs showed an interstitial pattern of the caudal right lung, and an abdominal ultrasound demonstrated scant effusion. Symptomatic and empirical therapy with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor did not resolve clinical signs. Due to poor prognosis and declining quality of life, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed chronic granulomatous pneumonia of the caudal right lung lobe with intralesional Cryptococcus, identified as C. neoformans var. grubii by DNA sequencing. Severe bilateral glomerular and tubulointerstitial amyloidosis induced protein-losing nephropathy, leading to tri-cavitary effusion, subcutaneous edema, and cachexia. The authors speculate that renal amyloidosis was associated with chronic cryptococcal pneumonia in this red kangaroo.

  12. Turbulence downstream of subcoronary stentless and stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Jonas Amstrup; Frost, Markus Winther; Wierup, Per; Klaaborg, Kaj-Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2011-08-11

    Regions of turbulence downstream of bioprosthetic heart valves may cause damage to blood components, vessel wall as well as to aortic valve leaflets. Stentless aortic heart valves are known to posses several hemodynamic benefits such as larger effective orifice areas, lower aortic transvalvular pressure difference and faster left ventricular mass regression compared with their stented counterpart. Whether this is reflected by diminished turbulence formation, remains to be shown. We implanted either stented pericardial valve prostheses (Mitroflow), stentless valve prostheses (Solo or Toronto SPV) in pigs or they preserved their native valves. Following surgery, blood velocity was measured in the cross sectional area downstream of the valves using 10MHz ultrasonic probes connected to a dedicated pulsed Doppler equipment. As a measure of turbulence, Reynolds normal stress (RNS) was calculated at two different blood pressures (baseline and 50% increase). We found no difference in maximum RNS measurements between any of the investigated valve groups. The native valve had significantly lower mean RNS values than the Mitroflow (p=0.004), Toronto SPV (p=0.008) and Solo valve (p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences between the artificial valve groups (p=0.3). The mean RNS was significantly larger when increasing blood pressure (p=0.0006). We, thus, found no advantages for the stentless aortic valves compared with stented prosthesis in terms of lower maximum or mean RNS values. Native valves have a significantly lower mean RNS value than all investigated bioprostheses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, B.; Amenta, A.; Kane, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was determined in 42 patients with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation during upright exercise by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction and volume with radionuclide ventriculography. Classification of the patients according to exercise tolerance showed that patients with normal exercise tolerance (greater than or equal to 7.0 minutes) had a significantly higher ejection fraction at rest (probability [p] . 0.02) and during exercise (p . 0.0002), higher cardiac index at exercise (p . 0.0008) and lower exercise end-systolic volume (p . 0.01) than did patients with limited exercise tolerance. Similar significant differences were noted in younger patients compared with older patients in ejection fraction at rest and exercise (both p . 0.001) and cardiac index at rest (p . 0.03) and exercise (p . 0.0005). The end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise in 60% of the patients. The patients with a decrease in volume were significantly younger and had better exercise tolerance and a larger end-diastolic volume at rest than did patients who showed an increase in volume. The mean corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio was significantly greater in patients with abnormal than in those with normal exercise reserve (mean +/- standard deviation 476 +/- 146 versus 377 +/- 92 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Thus, in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: 1) left ventricular systolic function during exercise was related to age, exercise tolerance and corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio, and 2) the end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise, especially in younger patients and patients with normal exercise tolerance or a large volume at rest

  14. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE USE OF KANGAROO POSITION ON PRETERM BABIES AND MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTION UPON DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Cynthia Ribeiro do Nascimento; Campos, Lu?s Gustavo; Lucena, Aline Moreira; Pereira, Janser Moura; da Costa, Patr?cia Rodrigues; de Lima, Fl?via Aparecida Felipe; Azevedo, Vivian Mara Gon?alves de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the influence of the Kangaroo Position duration in the initial interactions between mothers and preterm infants. Methods: This is an exploratory prospective observational study that analyzed the mother-infant interaction during breastfeeding, before hospital discharge. All eligible newborns, with a gestational age of 28-32 weeks and a birth weight of 1,000-1,800 g from June 11 to September 31, 2014 were included. The films of the interaction were evaluated by th...

  15. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, E.N.; Johnson, R.T.; Downes, C.S.; Eveno, E.; Mezzina, M.; Sarasin, A.; Menck, C.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2) that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, po...

  16. Estudo comparativo da eficácia do etanol e do ácido L-glutâmico na prevenção da calcificação das cúspides e parede aórtica porcina: estudo experimental em ratos Comparative study on the efficacy of ethanol and of l-glutamic acid for preventing calcification of pig cusps and aortic wall: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Ronald Soncini da ROSA

    2002-06-01

    álcio/ mg tecido, E80% 30 dias (9,47 ± 2,59mg cálcio/mg tecido e E80% 60 dias (23,56±7,75 mg cálcio/mg tecido no grupo de AG 0,8% 15 dias (4,31±0,85 mg cálcio/mg tecido, AG 0,8% 30 dias (7,69±1,48 mg cálcio/mg tecido e AG 0,8% 60 dias (20,50± 1,22 mg cálcio/mg tecido com o grupo controle GDA 15 dias (7,34±1,32 mg cálcio/mg tecido, GDA 30 dias (9,28±0,76 mg cálcio/mg tecido e GDA 60 dias (27,60±1,08 mg cálcio/mg tecido. Na avaliação microscópica da cúspide aórtica houve uma progressiva calcificação naquelas submetidas à fixação com GDA. Este processo foi parcialmente encontrado com o AG 0,8% e totalmente ausente com o E80%. Quanto à avaliação referente aos segmentos da parede aórtica, também evidenciou-se progressiva calcificação, não sendo inibida pelos tratamentos com AG 0,8% e E80%. CONCLUSÕES: O pré-tratamento com etanol a 80% inibiu a calcificação nas cúspides aórticas porcinas, entretanto, não teve a mesma eficácia na parede aórtica. Contudo, o ácido L-glutâmico a 0,8% demonstrou minimizar a calcificação na parede aórtica. Estudos devem ser feitos para evidenciar se a ação anticalcificante do etanol a 80% mantém-se nas biopróteses aórticas porcinas se estas forem implantadas no sistema circulatório.INTRODUCTION: The glutataldehyde (GDA treated pigs cusps are one of most employed tissues in bioprosthesis, but is late post-implant calcification is main cause of its failure. BACKGROUND: This study aims at comparing and analyzing two methods (ethanol 80% and l-glutamic acid 0.8% to prevent calcification in pig cusps and aortic wall implanted subcutaneously in rats, the cusps and aortic wall segments of the control were in glutaraldehyde (GDA, during a 15, 30 and 60 days period after the implant. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used 45 young rats, distributed in 3 groups of 15 rats each, which in turn were subdivided in 3 subgroups of 5 rats each, in which we implanted one cusp and one aortic wall segment in 2 subcutaneous

  17. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  18. Abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective...... surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening...... patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could...

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...... patients, 51 (9%) of whom died within the first 48 hours. Of the 502 patients who survived for more than 48 hours, 109 required ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, whereas 393 patients were in the ICU for less than 48 hours. The incidence of preoperative risk factors was similar for the two groups...... combined failed to permit identification of patients in whom the perioperative survival rate was 0%. Even 20% of patients with multiorgan failure survived for 6 months. Of those patients who needed ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, 41 (38%) were alive at the end of 1988. In response to a questionnaire...

  20. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care Immediately after Delivery on Mother-infant Attachment 3 Months after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zahra Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background  The aim of this study was determine the effect of kangaroo mother care (KMC immediately after delivery on mother-infant attachment 3-month after delivery. Materials and Methods: In this RCT study, 72 mother-infant pairs were randomly divided in to kangaroo mother care and routine care groups.The intervention group received kangaroo mother care (KMC in the first two hours post birth. The control group just received routine hospital care. Mothers in the intervention group were encouraged to keep the baby in KMC as much as possible during the day and night throughout the neonatal period. Participants were followed up for three months after birth. The Main outcome measure was mother-infant attachment at 3 months postpartum and maternal anxiety about the baby at the same time. The data was collected by questionnaire (demographic information of parents and neonates and maternal attachment scale. Analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 14. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding their baseline data. Mean maternal attachment score in the KMC group and in the routine care group at three months after delivery was 52.40±3.30 and 49.86±4.18 respectively, which was significantly higher in the KMC group (P

  1. The effects of thyroxine on metabolism and water balance in a desert-dwelling rodent, Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Marilyn R; Holcombe, Dale W

    2002-01-01

    Desert-dwelling mammals such as Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriani) need to conserve both energy and water to survive desert conditions characterized by aridity and low productivity. The thyroid hormone thyroxine increases both basal metabolic rate and urinary water loss in mammals. Increases in basal metabolism and urinary water loss are likely to be detrimental to D. merriami, therefore the regulation of this hormone may be important. To examine the effects of thyroxine in this species, we implanted adult kangaroo rats with pellets designed to release specific doses of thyroxine at a constant rate for 90 days or a placebo pellet. We measured plasma thyroxine concentration, basal metabolic rate, food consumption, urine concentration and water loss in all implanted animals. Thyroxine implants significantly increased both plasma thyroxine and basal metabolic rate in a relatively dose-dependent manner. In response to thyroxine. kangaroo rats increased food consumption only slightly, but this small increase was sufficient to compensate for their elevated metabolic rates. Neither urine concentration nor water loss varied among treatment groups. Thyroxine increased energy expenditure but not water loss in this species.

  2. Bringing compassion to the ethical dilemma in killing kangaroos for conservation: comment on "Conservation through sustainable use" by Rob Irvine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramp, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Ethical debate on the killing of kangaroos has polarised conservation and animal welfare science, yet at the heart of these scientific disciplines is the unifying aim of reducing harm to non-human animals. This aim provides the foundation for common ground, culminating in the development of compassionate conservation principles that seek to provide mechanisms for achieving both conservation and welfare goals. However, environmental decision-making is not devoid of human interests, and conservation strategies are commonly employed that suit entrenched positions and commercial gain, rather than valuing the needs of the non-human animals in need of protection. The case study on the wild kangaroo harvest presents just such a dilemma, whereby a conservation strategy is put forward that can only be rationalised by ignoring difficulties in the potential for realising conservation benefits and the considerable welfare cost to kangaroos. Rather than an open debate on the ethics of killing game over livestock, in this response I argue that efforts to bring transparency and objectivity to the public debate have to date been obfuscated by those seeking to maintain entrenched interests. Only by putting aside these interests will debate about the exploitation of wildlife result in humane, compassionate, and substantive conservation benefits.

  3. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units: a policy survey in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Pierrat, Veronique; Warren, Inga; Haumont, Dominique; Westrup, Björn; Smit, Bert J; Sizun, Jacques; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-09-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out. Prospective multicenter survey. Neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Patients were not involved in this study. None. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 362 units (response rate 78%); only units with ≥50 very-low-birth-weight annual admissions were considered for this study. Facilities for parents such as reclining chairs near the babies' cots, beds, and a dedicated room were common, but less so in Italy and Spain. All units in Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Belgium reported encouraging parental participation in the care of the babies, whereas policies were more restrictive in Italy (80% of units), France (73%), and Spain (41%). Holding babies in the kangaroo care position was widespread. However, in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Spain, many units applied restrictions regarding its frequency (sometimes or on parents request only, rather than routinely), method (conventional rather than skin-to-skin), and clinical conditions (especially mechanical ventilation and presence of umbilical lines) that would prevent its practice. In these countries, fathers were routinely offered kangaroo care less frequently than mothers (p involvement as well as the role played by mothers and fathers varied within and between countries.

  4. Evaluation of the aortic anulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, K.M.; Margosian, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the efficacy of echocardiography and MR imaging for measuring the aortic anulus in patients who are candidates for aortic valve replacement. The MR imaging study was performed on a 1.5-T system, and the results were compared with echocardiography results obtained with use of a Toshiba system with a 2.5-mHz transducer. The aortic valve anulus was evaluated in the coronal, long-axis, and short-axis views with the MR imaging technique and in the right parasternal suprasternal, and apical projections with the echocardiographic technique. Twenty-four patients studied with MR imaging and echocardiography went on to have aortic valve replacement. When compared with surgical results, MR imaging had an r value of .95 while echocardiography had an r value of .70

  5. Conservative treatment of type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiwei; Wang Jiaxiang; Li Zhen; Guan Sheng; Wang Leiyong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of conservative treatment for type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification, and to discuss the medium-term follow-up results. Methods: During the period from March 2009 to March 2012, a total of 21 patients with type B aortic intramural hematoma without calcification on the aortic wall were admitted to authors' hospital. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT angiography in all patients. Drug therapy was carried out in all the 21 patients, and all the patients were followed up for one year. At 3, 6 and 12 months after the treatment, CT angiography of the aorta was performed to check the results. Results: Of the 21 patients, one received TEVAR therapy one week after the start of drug therapy and the remaining 20 accomplished the whole medication course. At the time of discharge, all the patients were asymptomatic. All the patients were alive up to the end of the following-up period and no recurrence was observed. Three months after the treatment, complete disappearance of the left pleural effusion was obtained in 11 patients, and complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was seen in 3 patients. Six months after the treatment, complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was found in 13 cases. One year after the treatment, complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was confirmed in 19 patients, and in the remaining two patients both the thickness and extent of the intramural hematoma were markedly improved. Conclusion: It is easy to determine whether there is calcification or not in aortic wall of the diseased segment in patients with Stanford type B aortic intramural hematoma. Strict conservative treatment has satisfactory medium-term therapeutic results for type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification on the aortic wall. (authors)

  6. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  7. Alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Zoe S Y; Goldstein, Jacob; Smith, Julian A

    2013-07-01

    Alkaptonuria is an autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, which results in accumulation of unmetabolized homogentisic acid and its oxidized product in various tissues, including the heart. Cardiovascular involvement is a rare but serious complication of the disease. We present two patients who have undergone successful aortic valve replacement for alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis along with a review of the literature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. CT imaging of aortic intramural hematoma: Report of two cases, and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Marzec, Małgorzata; Lasek, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is a relatively rare, but potentially fatal pathology, which is most commonly diagnosed under emergency conditions with computed tomography angiography (CTA). We present two cases of IMH examined with different CTA protocols, which resulted in diverse diagnoses.In the first patient, contrast-enhanced CTA revealed dilatation of thoracic aorta and polymorphic wall thickening. It was misdiagnosed as being a mural thrombus and was complicated by acute dissection. In the second patient, non-enhanced CT revealed hyperdense aortic wall thickening. The patient was diagnosed as having type B IMH but he died due to aortic rupture.In our opinion, CT examination of the aorta in emergency cases should always include non-enhanced scanning. Any delay in proper diagnosis and treatment of IMH may result in serious complications.

  9. CT imaging of aortic intramural hematoma: Report of two cases, and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.

    2011-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is a relatively rare, but potentially fatal pathology, which is most commonly diagnosed under emergency conditions with computed tomography angiography (CTA). We present two cases of IMH examined with different CTA protocols, which resulted in diverse diagnoses. In the first patient, contrast-enhanced CTA revealed dilatation of thoracic aorta and polymorphic wall thickening. It was misdiagnosed as being a mural thrombus and was complicated by acute dissection. In the second patient, non-enhanced CT revealed hyperdense aortic wall thickening. The patient was diagnosed as having type B IMH but he died due to aortic rupture. In our opinion, CT examination of the aorta in emergency cases should always include non enhanced scanning. Any delay in proper diagnosis and treatment of IMH may result in serious complications. (authors)

  10. The great imitator: IgG4 periaortitis masquerading as an acute aortic syndrome on computed tomographic angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Drew W.; Hansen, Neil J.; DiMaio, Dominick J.; Harrison, William L.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with chest and neck pain. Initial cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging shows an abnormal flow void in the left vertebral artery, which prompted a computed tomographic angiogram. This demonstrated a hyperdense thickened ascending aortic wall, which extended into the great vessel origins. Clinically and radiographically interpreted as an acute aortic syndrome and/or intramural hematoma, the patient underwe...

  11. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Smooth Muscle Cells Maintains Genome Integrity, Resists Aortic Medial Degeneration, and Is Suppressed in Human Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alanna; Nong, Zengxuan; Yin, Hao; O'Neil, Caroline; Fox, Stephanie; Balint, Brittany; Guo, Linrui; Leo, Oberdan; Chu, Michael W A; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2017-06-09

    The thoracic aortic wall can degenerate over time with catastrophic consequences. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can resist and repair artery damage, but their capacities decline with age and stress. Recently, cellular production of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) has emerged as a mediator of cell vitality. However, a role for Nampt in aortic SMCs in vivo is unknown. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system exists within the aortic media and is required for aortic health. Ascending aortas from patients with dilated aortopathy were immunostained for NAMPT, revealing an inverse relationship between SMC NAMPT content and aortic diameter. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system in SMCs impacts aortic integrity, mice with Nampt -deficient SMCs were generated. SMC- Nampt knockout mice were viable but with mildly dilated aortas that had a 43% reduction in NAD + in the media. Infusion of angiotensin II led to aortic medial hemorrhage and dissection. SMCs were not apoptotic but displayed senescence associated-ß-galactosidase activity and upregulated p16, indicating premature senescence. Furthermore, there was evidence for oxidized DNA lesions, double-strand DNA strand breaks, and pronounced susceptibility to single-strand breakage. This was linked to suppressed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and was reversible on resupplying NAD + with nicotinamide riboside. Remarkably, we discovered unrepaired DNA strand breaks in SMCs within the human ascending aorta, which were specifically enriched in SMCs with low NAMPT. NAMPT promoter analysis revealed CpG hypermethylation within the dilated human thoracic aorta and in SMCs cultured from these tissues, which inversely correlated with NAMPT expression. The aortic media depends on an intrinsic NAD + fueling system to protect against DNA damage and premature SMC senescence, with relevance to human thoracic aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart

  12. Contemporary Management of Type B Aortic Dissection in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Tadros, Rami O; McKinsey, James; Chander, Rajiv; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common catastrophic pathologies affecting the aorta. Anatomic classification is based on the origin of entry tear and its extension. Type A dissections originate in the ascending aorta, whereas the entry tear in Type B dissections starts distal to the left subclavian artery. The patients with aortic dissection who manifest complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal degeneration, and intractable pain are classified as complicated AD. Risk factors for developing aortic dissection include age, male gender, and aortic wall structural abnormalities. The most common presenting symptom of acute aortic dissection is pain. Malperfusion occurs as a result of end-organ ischemia due to involvement of aortic branches from the dissecting process. This can happen in various locations causing mesenteric ischemia (mesenteric vessels), stroke (aortic arch vessels), renal failure (renal arteries), spinal ischemia, and limb ischemia (iliac or subclavian arteries). Aneurysmal degeneration is the most common complication of patients with chronic Type B dissection who are managed with medical therapy. Management of Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) remains controversial. Many groups recommend conservative therapy for newly diagnosed TBAD and reserve surgical management for patients who develop complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal dilatation, and refractory pain. The mainstay of medical therapy includes antihypertensive medication to reduced ΔP/ ΔT by lowering blood pressure and heart rate. With the continued success of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), this procedure has been extended to treat TBAD in selected patients. The outcomes of TEVAR are promising, with early mortality rates from 10% to 20%. With promising results from these series, some groups recommend early TEVAR in uncomplicated TBAD to prevent future adverse events. The goals of endovascular treatment of TBAD are to cover the entry tear

  13. Results of aortic root reimplantation in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The research was designed to evaluate the results of valve-sparing operations: aortic root reimplantation versus aortic valve reimplantation when repairing an ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods. Within a blind prospective randomized study conducted over a period from 2011 to 2015, 64 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery. The inclusion criteria were the presence of an aortic aneurysm of the ascending aorta exceeding 4.5 cm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. All patients were divided into two groups: FS-group, aortic root reimplantation (modified Florida Sleeve technique (n = 32 and D-group, aortic valve reimplantation (David procedure (n = 32. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23–73 years in the FS-group and 55±11 (15–72 years in the D-group (p = 0.54. Both groups had 78% of males (p>0.99. A Marfan syndrome was identified in 6% and 9% in the FS-group and D-group respectively (p>0.99. Mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 51±7 mm and 56±10 mm (p = 0.09, aortic insufficiency 2.6±0.7 and 2.8±0.8 (p = 0.15 in the FS-group and D-group respectively. In the FS-group and D-group LVEDD amounted to 5.5±0.7 mm and 5.9±1.0 mm (p = 0.09 respectively. All patients took echocardiography in the preoperative, postoperative and follow-up periods.Results. In the long-term period, the degree of aortic regurgitation was 1.2±0.1 in the FS-group and 1.3±0.6 in the D-group (p = 0.72. LVEDD was 123±23 mm in the FS-group and 139.6±80 mm in the D-group at follow-up (p = 0.77. There were no statistically significant differences in the analysis of complications. Overall 30-day in-hospital mortality was 7.8%. There were 2 (6.3% deaths in the FS-group and 3 (9.4% in the D-group (p = 0.5.Late mortality was 6.3% in the FS-group and 3.1% in the D-group (p>0.99. Cumulative survival at 4 years was 84.3% and 84.8% in the FS-group and the D-group respectively (p = 0.94. Cumulative freedom from

  14. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  15. The mechanical role of thrombus on the growth rate of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Jacobs, M.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: In the decision for surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), the maximum diameter is the main factor. Several studies have concluded that the diameter may not be reliable as rupture risk criterion for the individual patient and wall stress was found to have a higher

  16. Aortic calcification and renal cysts demonstrated by CT in a teenager with Alagille syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pombo, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Isla, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Gayol, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Bargiela, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1995-06-01

    Alagille syndrome, or arteriohepatic dysplasia, is a disorder characterized by paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, peculiar facies and skeletal anomalies. We report a typical case of this syndrome in an 18-year-old girl, in whom abdominal CT showed bilateral renal cysts and aortic wall calcification, findings unreported in the radiological literature. (orig.)

  17. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be of value for patient specific rupture risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Galanakis, Nikolaos; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to pose a significant cause of unexpected mortality in the developed countries with its incidence constantly rising. The indication of elective surgical repair is currently based on the maximum diameter and growth rate criteria which represent an oversimplification of the Law of Laplace stating that the stress exerted in a cylinder or sphere is proportional to its radius. These criteria fail to capture the complex pathophysiology of the aneurismal disease thus often leading to therapeutic inaccuracies (treating large AAAs with a very low actual rupture risk while observing smaller ones with a much greater risk). Aneurysmal disease is mainly a degenerative process leading to loss of structural integrity of the diseased aortic wall which cannot withhold the stresses due to systemic pressurization. Moreover aortic wall degeneration has been shown to be a localized phenomenon and rupture depends on the pointwise comparison of strength and stress rather than a global aortic wall weakening. Ex-vivo mechanical studies have related vessel wall hypoxia to loss of structural endurance and reduced wall strength. Therefore a module to capture in vivo variation of aortic wall blood supply and oxygenation would be of value for the evaluation of AAA rupture risk. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging represents a novel technique which has been already used to estimate tissue vascularity in several clinical conditions but not aneurismal disease. We hypothesize that PCT could be used as an adjunct tool during AAA diagnostics in order to evaluate aortic wall oxygenation in vivo, therefore providing a possible means to identify weak spots making the lesion amenable to rupture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  19. The Effects of Kangaroo Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit on the Physiological Functions of Preterm Infants, Maternal-Infant Attachment, and Maternal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun-Sook; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon; Cho, Haeryun; Kim, Eun Hye; Jun, Eun Mi; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effects of kangaroo care on the physiological functions of preterm infants, maternal-infant attachment, and maternal stress. For this study, a quasi-experiment design was used with a nonequivalent control group, and a pre- and post-test. Data were collected from preterm infants with corrected gestational ages of ≥33weeks who were hospitalized between May and October 2011. Twenty infants were assigned to the experimental group and 20 to the control group. As an intervention, kangaroo care was provided in 30-min sessions conducted thrice a week for a total of 10 times. The collected data were analyzed by using the t test, repeated-measures ANOVA, and the ANCOVA test. After kangaroo care, the respiration rate significantly differed between the two groups (F=5.701, p=.020). The experimental group had higher maternal-infant attachment scores (F=25.881, pinfant physiological functions such as respiration rate, increasing maternal-infant attachment, and reducing maternal stress. This study suggests that kangaroo care can be used to promote emotional bonding and support between mothers and their babies, and to stabilize the physiological functions of premature babies. Kangaroo care may be one of the most effective nursing interventions in the neonatal intensive care unit for the care of preterm infants and their mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  1. Bovine aortic arch: A novel association with thoracic aortic dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, C.D.; Urbania, T.H.; Crook, S.E.S.; Hope, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there is a link between bovine arch and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the thorax of 191 patients with dilated thoracic aortas and 391 consecutive, unselected patients as controls were retrospectively reviewed. Bovine arch was considered present if either a shared origin of the left common carotid and innominate arteries or an origin of the left common carotid from the innominate artery was identified. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between subgroups. Results: A trend towards increased prevalence of bovine arch was seen in patients with dilated aortas (26.2%) compared to controls (20.5%, p = 0.12). The association was statistically significant in patients over 70 years old (31.9%, p = 0.019) and when dilation involved the aortic arch (47.6%, p = 0.003). Conclusions: An association between bovine arch and aortic dilation is seen in older patients, and when dilation involves the aortic arch. Bovine arch should be considered a potential risk factor for thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  2. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany); Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  3. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael; Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  4. Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation with Concomitant Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenges, Katharina; Panholzer, Bernd; Cremer, Jochen; Haneya, Assad

    2018-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is nowadays a routine therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. We present the case of a 74-year-old male patient who was admitted to our center with terminal heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy and ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation. The LVAD implantation with simultaneous aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement was successfully performed.

  5. Dynamics of the aortic annulus in 4D CT angiography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa A.; Vink, Leon W.; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Baan, Jan; Vanbavel, Ed T.; Planken, R. Nils; Marquering, Henk A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. This procedure requires pre-operative planning by assessment of aortic dimensions on CT Angiography (CTA). It is well-known that the aortic root dimensions vary over the

  6. Aortic wall damage in mice unable to synthesize ascorbic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Nobuyo; Hagihara, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Yukiko; Hiller, Sylvia; Wilder, Jennifer; Reddick, Robert

    2000-01-01

    By inactivating the gene for l-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase, a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, we have generated mice that, like humans, depend on dietary vitamin C. Regular chow, containing about 110 mg/kg of vitamin C, is unable to support the growth of the mutant mice, which require l-ascorbic acid supplemented in their drinking water (330 mg/liter). Upon withdrawal of supplementation, plasma and tissue ascorbic acid levels decreased to 10–15% of normal within 2 weeks, and after 5 weeks...

  7. EFFECT OF KANGAROO MOTHER CARE ON OUTCOME IN PRETERM AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Kondapalli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study the effect of kangaroo mother care(KMC on preterm and LBW neonates’ vital parameters like temperature, respiratory rate, heart rate and oxygen saturation, establishment of breastfeeding and weight gain, morbidity and mortality, outcome in intramural and extramural neonates. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hospital-based prospective study, Katuri Medical College and Hospital, 300 newborns shifted to KMC ward. In our study group, female newborns were more than male newborns. Inborn were more than outborn, late preterm more than early preterm and term neonates. A significant increase in axillary temperature, increase in respiratory rate, decrease in heart rate and increase in oxygen saturation was seen in neonates. Higher proportion of neonates achieved transition from predominant expressed breast milk consumption to predominant direct breastfeeding during hospital stay. RESULTS The study showed significantly mean weight gain per day during in hospital KMC of 20 g/kg/day. Mean age when neonates started to gain weight was 8.5 days. Neonates were discharged early as they met our discharge criteria with mean age being 11.6 days. Morbidity of neonates requiring NICU admissions apart from LBW in our study were hyperbilirubinaemia (49.9%, sepsis (19.4%, respiratory illness (7.8% and hypothermia (6.4%. During KMC stay, sepsis and NEC seen in 2 each, apnoea, PDA, jaundice in one each and maternal acceptance of KMC was good. During follow up, it was observed that all neonates were exclusively breastfed and the rate of weight gain (148 g/week was satisfactory with an exception that only 8 requiring hospitalisation and only 1 death due to severe infection. The response of the family and/or the father was supportive. CONCLUSION KMC sustains improvement in LBW neonates’ physiological parameters and accelerates growth pattern. Practice of KMC promote breastfeeding, shorten hospital stay without compromising survival, growth

  8. Does altered aortic flow in marfan syndrome relate to aortic root dilatation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Hsuan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac; Peng, Hsu-Hsia

    2016-08-01

    To examine possible hemodynamic alterations in adolescent to adult Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients with aortic root dilatation. Four-dimensional flow MRI was performed in 20 MFS patients and 12 age-matched normal subjects with a 3T system. The cross-sectional areas of 10 planes along the aorta were segmented for calculating the axial and circumferential wall shear stress (WSSaxial , WSScirc ), oscillatory shear index (OSIaxial , OSIcirc ), and the nonroundness (NR), presenting the asymmetry of segmental WSS. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to present the correlations between the quantified indices and the body surface area (BSA), aortic root diameter (ARD), and Z score of the ARD. P < 0.05 indicated statistical significance. Patients exhibited lower WSSaxial in the aortic root and the WSScirc in the arch (P < 0.05-0.001). MFS patients exhibited higher OSIaxial and OSIcirc in the sinotubular junction and arch, but lower OSIcirc in the descending aorta (all P < 0.05). The NR values were lower in patients (P < 0.05). The WSSaxial or WSScirc exhibited moderate to strong correlations with BSA, ARD, or Z score (R(2)  = 0.50-0.72) in MFS patients. The significant differences in the quantified indices, which were associated with BSA, ARD, or Z score, in MFS were opposite to previous reports for younger MFS patients, indicating that altered flows in MFS patients may depend on the disease progress. The possible time dependency of hemodynamic alterations in MFS patients strongly suggests that longitudinal follow-up of 4D Flow is needed to comprehend disease progress. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:500-508. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population. This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

  10. Aortic compliance in patients with aortic regurgitation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Sachiko; Hamada, Seiki; Ueguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess by means of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aortic compliance before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR with SJM (St. Jude Medical, St paul, MN) valve) in patients with aortic regurgitation (AR). Two groups (healthy controls and patients with severe isolated AR) of 10 subjects each were included in this study. Cine MRI was performed at three locations of the aorta, and aortic compliance was calculated by dividing the maximum change in the aortic area by pulse pressure. Cine MRI is useful to assess abnormalities of aortic compliance in patients with AR. Compared with the control group, aortic compliance in the AR group was significantly less in the ascending aorta (p<0.05), decreasing in order of aortic location. After AVR, aortic compliance improved for all locations. Cine MRI enables assessment of aortic biophysical properties such as a compliance for evaluating the progression of AR and the efficacy of treatment. (author)

  11. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Aortic atresia with normal sized left ventricle

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Jagia; Arun Sharma; Saurabh K Gupta; Munish Guleria

    2016-01-01

    Aortic atresia with an associated ventricular septal defect and adequate sized left ventricle is extremely rare. We present two cases in which an alternate diagnosis was suggested on echocardiography because the hypoplastic aortic trunk was missed due to its small caliber. The final diagnosis was, however, clinched on dual source computed tomography, which not only showed the thin aortic trunk but also clearly depicted the coronary artery origins from the hypoplastic aortic root. To the best ...

  13. A History of Thoracic Aortic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Paul Michael; Wiggins, Luke M; Boys, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    Ancient historical texts describe the presence of aortic pathology conditions, although the surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease remained insurmountable until the 19th century. Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease then progressed along with advances in surgical technique, conduit production, cardiopulmonary bypass, and endovascular technology. Despite radical advances in aortic surgery, principles established by surgical pioneers of the 19th century hold firm to this day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reference Values for Cardiac and Aortic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy, Young Caucasian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikendal, Anouk L M; Bots, Michiel L; Haaring, Cees; Saam, Tobias; van der Geest, Rob J; Westenberg, Jos J M; den Ruijter, Hester M; Hoefer, Imo E; Leiner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Reference values for morphological and functional parameters of the cardiovascular system in early life are relevant since they may help to identify young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. This study provides age and sex specific reference values for aortic wall characteristics, cardiac function parameters and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a population-based sample of healthy, young adults using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In 131 randomly selected healthy, young adults aged between 25 and 35 years (mean age 31.8 years, 63 men) of the general-population based Atherosclerosis-Monitoring-and-Biomarker-measurements-In-The-YOuNg (AMBITYON) study, descending thoracic aortic dimensions and wall thickness, thoracic aortic PWV and cardiac function parameters were measured using a 3.0T MR-system. Age and sex specific reference values were generated using dedicated software. Differences in reference values between two age groups (25-30 and 30-35 years) and both sexes were tested. Aortic diameters and areas were higher in the older age group (all page or sex effect. This study provides age and sex specific reference values for cardiovascular MR parameters in healthy, young Caucasian adults. These may aid in MR guided pre-clinical identification of young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing.

  15. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  16. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) in Proximal (Type A) Aortic Dissection: Ready for a Broader Application?

    OpenAIRE

    Nienaber, Christoph A.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Clough, Rachel E.; Aboukoura, Mohamed; Mancuso, Enrico; Yeh, James S.M.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Cheshire, Nick; Rosendahl, Ulrich Peter; Quarto, Cesare; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has demonstrated encouraging results and is gaining increasing acceptance as a treatment option for aortic aneurysms and dissections. Yet, its role in managing proximal aortic pathologies is unknown - this is important because in proximal (Stanford type A) aortic dissections, 10-30% are not accepted for surgery, and 30-50% are technically amenable for TEVAR. We describe our case series of type A aortic dissections treated using TEVAR.Method...

  17. Evaluation of chemokine receptors (CCRs expression on peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kishore Tiwari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Mortality and morbidity from the complication of aortic aneurysm remain very high. Aortic size index, which classify thoracic aortic aneurysm patients in three risk groups for aortic rupture prediction. Recent data support that aortic wall remodeling is a dynamic process with active involvement of the chronic inflammation and immunological system. Aim of our study is to evaluate expression level of chemokine receptors known to be involved in the T-cells migration and to correlate them with aortic size index. Materials & Methods: Total 20 patients undergoing surgery for ascending aortic aneurysm and/or aortic valve surgery were enrolled. Aortic size index was calculated. Preoperatively blood samples collected. By flowcytometry and dual parameter dot plot technology percentage of positivity of CCR5 on these T-cell subsets were quantified. Results: Mean age of the patients was 67±5.93 years. Majority of patients had hypertension. Mean ascending aortic diameter was 42.1±8.14 mm. Mean Aortic size Index was 22.21±3.38 mm/m2. A statistical significance has observed between aortic size index and the expression of CCR5 on total CD4 positive T-cells (p-0.0949, and between aortic size index and CCR5 expression on the total CD3 positive T-cells (p-0.0293. Significant correlation observed between ASI and CCR5 expression on the CD8+/CD3+ T-cell subset (p-0.0183. Similarly, strong positive relationship between ASI and the expression of CCR5 on the cytotoxic CD28-/CD4+ T-cell subset (p-0.0055. Activated state of cytotoxic CD28-/CD4+ cell also correlated with aortic size index (p-0.0668.Conclusion: We conclude that T-cell mediated cytotoxic mechanism driven by CCR5 play an important role in the pathophysiology of the thoracic aortic aneurysm.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:23-27.

  18. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  19. Relation of murine thoracic aortic structural and cellular changes with aging to passive and active mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jason B; Mukherjee, Rupak; Stroud, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2015-02-25

    Maintenance of the structure and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta contributes to aortic function and is dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix and the cellular content within the aortic wall. Age-related alterations in the aorta include changes in cellular content and composition of the extracellular matrix; however, the precise roles of these age-related changes in altering aortic mechanical function are not well understood. Thoracic aortic rings from the descending segment were harvested from C57BL/6 mice aged 6 and 21 months. Thoracic aortic diameter and wall thickness were higher in the old mice. Cellular density was reduced in the medial layer of aortas from the old mice; concomitantly, collagen content was higher in old mice, but elastin content was similar between young and old mice. Stress relaxation, an index of compliance, was reduced in aortas from old mice and correlated with collagen fraction. Contractility of the aortic rings following potassium stimulation was reduced in old versus young mice. Furthermore, collagen gel contraction by aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced with age. These results demonstrate that numerous age-related structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and were related to alterations in mechanical properties. Aortic contractility decreased with age, likely because of a reduction in medial cell number in addition to a smooth muscle contractile deficit. Together, these unique findings provide evidence that the age-related changes in structure and mechanical function coalesce to provide an aortic substrate that may be predisposed to aortopathies. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Maternal singing during kangaroo care led to autonomic stability in preterm infants and reduced maternal anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shmuel; Diamant, Chagit; Bauer, Sofia; Regev, Rivka; Sirota, Gisela; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2014-10-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) and maternal singing benefit preterm infants, and we investigated whether combining these benefitted infants and mothers. A prospective randomised, within-subject, crossover, repeated-measures study design was used, with participants acting as their own controls. We evaluated the heart rate variability (HRV) of stable preterm infants receiving KC, with and without maternal singing. This included low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and the LF/HF ratio during baseline (10 min), singing or quiet phases (20 min) and recovery (10 min). Physiological parameters, maternal anxiety and the infants' behavioural state were measured. We included 86 stable preterm infants, with a postmenstrual age of 32-36 weeks. A significant change in LF and HF, and lower LF/HF ratio, was observed during KC with maternal singing during the intervention and recovery phases, compared with just KC and baseline (all p-values singing than just KC (p = 0.04). No differences in the infants' behavioural states or physiological parameters were found, with or without singing. Maternal singing during KC reduces maternal anxiety and leads to autonomic stability in stable preterm infants. This effect is not detected in behavioural state or physiological parameters commonly used to monitor preterm infants. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Kangaroo Mother Care in Colombia: A Subaltern Health Innovation against For-profit Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadía-Barrero, César Ernesto

    2018-01-24

    This ethnographic study presents the origins, growth, and collapse of the first Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) program, a well-established practice for neonatal care created in 1978 in Colombia. The WHO and UNICEF praised this zero-cost revolutionary technique for its promotion of skin-to-skin contact between premature and low-birth-weight newborns and family members. KMC facilitates early hospital discharge, brings many clinical and psychological benefits, and constitutes an excellent alternative to placing babies in incubators. However, these benefits and political potential against biomedical interventions were undermined after being relabeled as a "reverse innovation," a business concept that encourages corporate investments in low-income countries to develop technologies that can both solve global health problems and boost multinational corporations profits. In response, I propose "subaltern health innovations" as a label for KMC that accounts for the power dynamics in global health between health care initiatives that originate in the Global South and neoliberal configurations of for-profit biomedicine. © 2018 by the American Anthropological Association.

  2. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Neonatal Outcomes in Iranian Hospitals: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sarparast

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is a supportive technique that beings at the neonatal period and is one of the skin-to-skin contact methods of holding neonate by mother. This method has an important role in exclusive breastfeeding and thermal care of neonates. This study aimed to investigate the application of KMC and evaluate the effect of this technique in different neonatal outcomes, particularly in Iranian neonates. Moreover, this review can be a tool for formative evaluation for this newly introduced treatment intervention in Iran. Evidence Acquisition: This review was conducted in national and international databases concerning experience with KMC on term and preterm neonates admitted in Iranian hospitals from 2006 to 2014. The measured outcomes included physiologic, psychologic, and clinical effects of this practice on newborn infants. Results: In this study, 42 Persian and English language papers were reviewed and finally 26 articles were selected. Various effects of KMC on different factors such as analgesia; physiological effects, breastfeeding, icterus, length of hospitalization, infection, psychologic effects, and weight gain were found. Conclusions: The results showed that as a simple and suitable strategy for increasing the health status of the mothers and newborns, KMC had an important role in improvement of neonatal outcomes in neonatal wards of Iranian hospitals in recent ten years. Therefore, promoting this technique in all neonatal wards of the country can promote health status of this population.

  3. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  4. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  5. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  6. Evaluation of Biaxial Mechanical Properties of Aortic Media Based on the Lamellar Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Taghizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the mechanical properties of arterial wall components is necessary for establishing a precise mechanical model applicable in various physiological and pathological conditions, such as remodeling. In this contribution, a new approach for the evaluation of the mechanical properties of aortic media accounting for the lamellar structure is proposed. We assumed aortic media to be composed of two sets of concentric layers, namely sheets of elastin (Layer I and interstitial layers composed of mostly collagen bundles, fine elastic fibers and smooth muscle cells (Layer II. Biaxial mechanical tests were carried out on human thoracic aortic samples, and histological staining was performed to distinguish wall lamellae for determining the dimensions of the layers. A neo-Hookean strain energy function (SEF for Layer I and a four-parameter exponential SEF for Layer II were allocated. Nonlinear regression was used to find the material parameters of the proposed microstructural model based on experimental data. The non-linear behavior of media layers confirmed the higher contribution of elastic tissue in lower strains and the gradual engagement of collagen fibers. The resulting model determines the nonlinear anisotropic behavior of aortic media through the lamellar microstructure and can be assistive in the study of wall remodeling due to alterations in lamellar structure during pathological conditions and aging.

  7. Aortic atresia with normal sized left ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Jagia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic atresia with an associated ventricular septal defect and adequate sized left ventricle is extremely rare. We present two cases in which an alternate diagnosis was suggested on echocardiography because the hypoplastic aortic trunk was missed due to its small caliber. The final diagnosis was, however, clinched on dual source computed tomography, which not only showed the thin aortic trunk but also clearly depicted the coronary artery origins from the hypoplastic aortic root. To the best of our knowledge, use of multi-detector computed tomography in aortic atresia with well developed left ventricle has not been reported in literature till date.

  8. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  9. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  10. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  11. OBSERVATION ON INCREASE IN WEIGHT OF LOW BIRTH WEIGHT (LBW) BABIES BY IMPLEMENTING KANGAROO MOTHER CARE (KMC) TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Purnendu Kumar Singh; Kumar Amritanshu; Bijoy Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is a practical technique for nursing of low birth weight babies by direct skin to contact with the mother. This study was undertaken to observe and record the effect of KMC with focus on increase in weight of at term low birth weight (LBW) babies weighing less than 2000 grams. The study was conducted over thirty six month’s period from July 2011 to June 2014. The method of care consisted of skin to skin contact between the mother and the infant along ...

  12. Aortic valve function after bicuspidization of the unicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, Diana; Bewarder, Moritz; Kindermann, Michael; Abdul-Khalique, Hashim; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-05-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) anatomy leads to dysfunction of the valve in young individuals. We introduced a reconstructive technique of bicuspidizing the UAV. Initially we copied the typical asymmetry of a normal bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (I), later we created a symmetric BAV (II). This study compared the hemodynamic function of the two designs of a bicuspidized UAV. Aortic valve function was studied at rest and during exercise in 28 patients after repair of UAV (group I, n = 8; group II, n = 20). There were no differences among the groups I and II with respect to gender, age, body size, or weight. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I. Six healthy adults served as control individuals. All patients were studied with transthoracic echocardiography between 4 and 65 months postoperatively. Systolic gradients were assessed by continuous wave Doppler while patients were at rest and exercising on a bicycle ergometer. Aortic regurgitation was grade I or less in all patients. Resting gradients were significantly elevated in group I compared with group II and control individuals (group I, peak 33.8 ± 7.8 mm Hg; mean 19.1 ± 5.4 mm Hg; group II, peak 15.8 ± 5.4, mean 8.2 ± 2.8 mm Hg; control individuals, peak 6.0 ± 1.6, mean 3.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg; p competence. A symmetric repair design leads to improved systolic aortic valve function at rest and during exercise. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  14. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  15. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  16. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  17. Kangaroo mother care in resource-limited settings: implementation, health benefits, and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku–Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: Kangaroo mother care (KMC represents an intervention in low birth weight infants for resource-limited settings which aims to reduce mortality rates by thermoregulation, supporting breastfeeding, and promoting early hospital discharge. In terms of cost and impact on neonatal survival, it has comparative advantages over the conventional method of care (CMC. This paper aimed to review the evidence concerning the progress of KMC implementation, its health benefits, and its cost-effectiveness, especially in developing countries. From the synthesized evidence, KMC was shown to be a useful adjunct to CMC particularly with respect to improving neonatal survival, supporting breastfeeding, and promoting early discharge from the hospital. Substantial progress has been made in its implementation in many developing countries where facility-based KMC has been institutionalized. Despite the cost-effectiveness of KMC in neonatal care, its global implementation is bedeviled with country-specific, multifaceted challenges. In developed countries, there is an implementation gap due to easy accessibility to technology-based CMC. Nevertheless, many developing countries have initiated national policies to scale up KMC services in their domain. Given the major constraints to program implementation peculiar to these resource-limited countries, it has become imperative to boost caregiver confidence and experience using dedicated spaces in the hospital, as well as dedicated staff meant for adequate ambulatory follow-up and continuous health education. Capacity training for health professionals and provision of space infrastructure thus constitute the basic needs which could be funded by International Aid Agencies in order to scale up the program in these settings. Keywords: neonatal care, low birth weight infants, thermoregulation, breastfeeding

  18. Maternal mood and concordant maternal and infant salivary cortisol during heel lance while in kangaroo care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castral, T C; Warnock, F; Dos Santos, C B; Daré, M F; Moreira, A C; Antonini, S R R; Scochi, C G S

    2015-03-01

    Maternal kangaroo care (MKC) is a naturalistic intervention that alleviates neonatal pain, and mothers are assumed to play a stress regulatory role in MKC. Yet, no MKC infant pain study has examined relationship between maternal and infant stress reactivity concurrently, or whether post-partum depression and/or anxiety (PPDA) alters maternal and neonatal stress response and the regulatory effects of MKC. To examine the concordance of salivary cortisol reactivity between 42 mothers and their stable preterm infants during routine infant heel lance (HL) while in MKC and to compare salivary cortisol between groups of mothers with and without PPDA and their infants. Maternal and infant salivary cortisol samples were collected pre-HL and 20 min post-HL with two additional maternal samples at night and in the morning. Mothers and infants were allocated to with PPDA versus without PPDA study groups on the basis of maternal post-natal mental health assessment scores. Higher mothers' cortisol pre-HL was weakly associated with higher infants' salivary cortisol in response to the HL procedure. Maternal depression and/or anxiety were not associated with infants' cortisol. During HL, both groups of mothers and infants showed no change in salivary cortisol. Concordance between mother and infant salivary cortisol supports the maternal stress regulatory role in MKC. MKC may have stress regulatory benefits for mothers and their preterm infants during HL independent of PPDA. Future MKC studies that target mothers with altered mood will help to build on these findings. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  19. Increasing Confidence and Ability in Implementing Kangaroo Mother Care Method Among Young Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenanga Purbasary, Eleni; Rustina, Yeni; Budiarti, Tri

    Mothers giving birth to low birth weight babies (LBWBs) have low confidence in caring for their babies because they are often still young and may lack the knowledge, experience, and ability to care for the baby. This research aims to determine the effect of education about kangaroo mother care (KMC) on the confidence and ability of young mothers to implement KMC. The research methodology used was a controlled-random experimental approach with pre- and post-test equivalent groups of 13 mothers and their LBWBs in the intervention group and 13 mothers and their LBWBs in the control group. Data were collected via an instrument measuring young mothers' confidence, the validity and reliability of which have been tested with a resulting r value of .941, and an observation sheet on KMC implementation. After conducting the education, the confidence score of young mothers and their ability to perform KMC increased meaningfully. The score of confidence of young mothers before education was 37 (p = .1555: and the ability score for KMC Implementation before education was 9 (p = .1555). The median score of confidence of young mothers after education in the intervention group was 87 and in the control group was 50 (p = .001, 95% CI 60.36-75.56), and ability median score for KMC implementation after education in the intervention group was 16 and in the control group was 12 (p = .001, 95% CI 1.50-1.88). KMC education should be conducted gradually, and it is necessary to involve the family, in order for KMC implementation to continue at home. A family visit can be done for LBWBs to evaluate the ability of the young mothers to implement KMC.

  20. Kangaroo mother care: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, Linda; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Kerber, Kate J; Valsangkar, Bina; Mazia, Goldy; Moxon, Sarah G; Blencowe, Hannah; Darmstadt, Gary L; de Graft Johnson, Joseph; Dickson, Kim E; Ruiz Peláez, Juan; von Xylander, Severin; Lawn, Joy E

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is now the leading cause of under-five child deaths worldwide with one million direct deaths plus approximately another million where preterm is a risk factor for neonatal deaths due to other causes. There is strong evidence that kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces mortality among babies with birth weight Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks", factors that hinder the scale-up, of maternal-newborn intervention packages. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, combined with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for KMC. Marked differences were found in the perceived severity of health system bottlenecks between Asian and African countries, with the former reporting more significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC with respect to all the health system building blocks. Community ownership and health financing bottlenecks were significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC in both low and high mortality contexts, particularly in South Asia. Significant bottlenecks were also reported for leadership and governance and health workforce building blocks. There are at least a dozen countries worldwide with national KMC programmes, and we identify three pathways to scale: (1) champion-led; (2) project-initiated; and (3) health systems designed. The combination of all three pathways may lead to more rapid scale-up. KMC has the potential to save lives, and change the face of facility-based newborn care, whilst empowering women to care for their preterm newborns.

  1. Comparison of skin-to-skin (kangaroo) and traditional care: parenting outcomes and preterm infant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I; Sirota, Lea; Weller, Aron

    2002-07-01

    To examine whether the kangaroo care (KC) intervention in premature infants affects parent-child interactions and infant development. Seventy-three preterm infants who received KC in the neonatal intensive care unit were matched with 73 control infants who received standard incubator care for birth weight, gestational age (GA), medical severity, and demographics. At 37 weeks' GA, mother-infant interaction, maternal depression, and mother perceptions were examined. At 3 months' corrected age, infant temperament, maternal and paternal sensitivity, and the home environment (with the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment [HOME]) were observed. At 6 months' corrected age, cognitive development was measured with the Bayley-II and mother-infant interaction was filmed. Seven clusters of outcomes were examined at 3 time periods: at 37 weeks' GA, mother-infant interaction and maternal perceptions; at 3-month, HOME mothers, HOME fathers, and infant temperament; at 6 months, cognitive development and mother-infant interaction. After KC, interactions were more positive at 37 weeks' GA: mothers showed more positive affect, touch, and adaptation to infant cues, and infants showed more alertness and less gaze aversion. Mothers reported less depression and perceived infants as less abnormal. At 3 months, mothers and fathers of KC infants were more sensitive and provided a better home environment. At 6 months, KC mothers were more sensitive and infants scored higher on the Bayley Mental Developmental Index (KC: mean: 96.39; controls: mean: 91.81) and the Psychomotor Developmental Index (KC: mean: 85.47; controls: mean: 80.53). KC had a significant positive impact on the infant's perceptual-cognitive and motor development and on the parenting process. We speculate that KC has both a direct impact on infant development by contributing to neurophysiological organization and an indirect effect by improving parental mood, perceptions, and interactive behavior.

  2. The mood variation in mothers of preterm infants in Kangaroo mother care and conventional incubator care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, Elizeu Coutinho; Cruvinel, Fernando; Lukasova, Katerina; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá

    2007-10-01

    Preterm babies are more prone to develop disorders and so require immediate intensive care. In the conventional neonatal intensive care, the baby is kept in the incubator, separated from the mother. Some actions have been taken in order to make this mother-child separation less traumatic. One of these actions is the Kangaroo mother care (KMC) characterized by skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn. The objective of this study was to compare the mood variation of mothers enrolled in the KMC program to those in the conventional incubator care. In one general hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 90 mothers were evaluated before and after contact with the baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The participants were divided into three groups: 30 mothers of term newborns (TG), 30 mothers of preterm infants included in KMC program (PGK) and 30 preterms with incubator placement (PGI). The Brazilian version of the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) was used for the assessment before and after the infant's visit. Results showed that TG mothers reported fewer occurrences of depressive states than PGK and PGI mothers. A significant mood variation was observed for PGK and PGI after the infant's visit. PGK mothers reported feeling calmer, stronger, well-coordinated, energetic, contented, tranquil, quick-witted, relaxed, proficient, happy, friendly and clear-headed. The only variation showed by PGI mothers was an increase in feeling clumsy. This study shows a positive effect of the KMC on the mood variation of preterm mothers and points to the need of a more humane experience during the incubator care.

  3. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Ogata, Jun; Ito, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    1985-01-01

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  4. Aortic intramural hematoma : assessment of clinical and radiological features in comparison to acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lee, Jin Seong; Kang, Duk Hyun; Song, Jae Kwan; Song, Koun Sik; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1996-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological features of aortic intramural hematoma(IMH) to those of acute aortic dissection(AD). We analyzed the clinical and radiological features of 12 patients with aortic IMH and 43 patients with acute AD. In aortic IMH, the diagnoses were made by means of both CT and transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) and included two surgically proven cases. In acute AD, the diagnoses were made by means of CT and TEE and included 21 surgically proven cases. We compared patients ages, etiologies, the extent of the disease, the presence or absence of aortic branch involvement, complications, and outcomes. Aortic IMH tended to develop in older patients (67.8±7.9 vs. 50.4±13.4, P .05). In aortic IMH, there was no involvement of aortic branches, whereas in acute AD, 14(33%) patients showed involvement of one or more aortic branches. Complications of aortic IMH included pericardial effusion (n=2) and pleural effusion (n=4);in acute AD, pericardial effusion (n=7), pleural effusion (n=4), aortic insufficiency (n=8), cerebral infarction (n=3), renal infarction (n=4) and spinal infarction (n=1) were seen. There was one (8%) death due to aortic IMH and ten (23%) deaths due to acute AD (p<.01). Aortic IMH is characterized by its occurrence in older patients with hypertension, a less frequent incidence of complications, and a more favorable outcome than acute AD

  5. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Ertan; Waltenberger, Johannes

    2009-06-12

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common cause of aortic valve replacement in developed countries, and this condition increases in prevalence with advancing age. The fibrotic thickening and calcification are common eventual endpoint in both non-rheumatic calcific and rheumatic aortic stenoses. New observations in human aortic valves support the hypothesis that degenerative valvular aortic stenosis is the result of active bone formation in the aortic valve, which may be mediated through a process of osteoblast-like differentiation in these tissues. Additionally histopathologic evidence suggests that early lesions in aortic valves are not just a disease process secondary to aging, but an active cellular process that follows the classical "response to injury hypothesis" similar to the situation in atherosclerosis. Although there are similarities with the risk factor and as well as with the process of atherogenesis, not all the patients with coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis have calcific aortic stenosis. This review mainly focuses on the potential vascular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. Namely extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, inflammation, and eventually osteoblast-like differentiation resulting in bone formation have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. Several mediators related to underlying mechanisms, including growth factors especially transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factors, angiogenesis, cathepsin enzymes, adhesion molecules, bone regulatory proteins and matrix metalloproteinases have been demonstrated, however the target to be attacked is not defined yet.

  6. Aerobic characteristics of red kangaroo skeletal muscles: is a high aerobic capacity matched by muscle mitochondrial and capillary morphology as in placental mammals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; Mifsud, Brock; Raad, Matthew C; Webster, Koa N

    2004-07-01

    Marsupials and placentals together comprise the Theria, the advanced mammals, but they have had long independent evolutionary histories, with the last common ancestor occurring more than 125 million years ago. Although in the past the marsupials were considered to be metabolically 'primitive', the red kangaroo Macropus rufus has been reported to have an aerobic capacity (VO2max) comparable to that of the most 'athletic' of placentals such as dogs. However, kangaroos travel at moderate speeds with lower relative cost than quadrupedal placentals. Given the long independent evolution of the two therian groups, and their unusual locomotor energetics, do kangaroos achieve their high aerobic capacity using the same structural and functional mechanisms used by (athletic) placentals? Red kangaroo skeletal muscle morphometry matched closely the general aerobic characteristics of placental mammals. The relationship between total mitochondrial volume in skeletal muscle and VO2max during exercise was identical to that in quadrupedal placentals, and differed from that in bipedal humans. As for placentals generally, red kangaroo mitochondrial oxygen consumption at VO2max was 4.7 ml O2 min(-1) ml(-1) of mitochondria. Also, the inner mitochondrial membrane densities were 35.8 +/- 0.7 m2 ml(-1) of mitochondria, which is the same as for placental mammals, and the same pattern of similarity was seen for capillary densities and volumes. The overall data for kangaroos was equivalent to that seen in athletic placentals such as dogs and pronghorns. Total skeletal muscle mass was high, being around 50% of body mass, and was concentrated around the pelvis and lower back. The majority of the muscles sampled had relatively high mitochondrial volume densities, in the range 8.8-10.6% in the major locomotor muscles. Again, capillary densities and capillary blood volumes followed the pattern seen for mitochondria. Our results indicate that the red kangaroo, despite its locomotion and extreme

  7. Aorto-aortic intrathoracic bypass in surgical treatment of aortic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Perez, F.; Duran Reyes, A.; Bigalli, D.; Filgueira Berobide, J.

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of coarctation of the aorta is 6.5 percent of all congenital heart defects, according to national and international data. There is a restenosis rate of patients after surgery. Factors that influence this evolution depends on the age at which patients underwent surgery for the first time the anatomy of the aortic arch and type of surgical technique. Several procedures can be used to correct the coarctation, which include surgery and balloon catheter dilation. We present here a case of a patient of 22 years old, with a recurrent coarctation of the aorta studied by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent surgery a third time. We used an anterior approach (median sternotomy) and performed an aortic bypass graft, intrathoracic, under cardiopulmonary bypass. Evolved favorably and was discharged on the sixth day of post operative day (Author) [es

  8. A micro case study of the legal and administrative arrangements for river health in the Kangaroo River (NSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, C; Farrier, D

    2002-01-01

    Kangaroo Valley is a drinking water supply catchment for Kangaroo Valley village, parts of the Southern Highlands and Sydney. It is also a popular recreation area both for swimming and canoeing. Land use has traditionally been dominated by dairy farming but there has been significant and continuing development of land for hobby farms and rural residential subdivision. Dairy industry restructuring has affected the viability of some farms in the Valley and created additional pressure for subdivision. River health is a function of flows, water quality, riparian vegetation, geomorphology and aquatic habitat and riverine biota. River flows in the Kangaroo River are affected by water extraction and storage for urban water supply and extraction by commercial irrigators and riparian land holders which have a significant impact at low flows. Current water quality often does not meet ANZECC Guidelines for primary contact and recreation and the river is a poor source of raw drinking water. Key sources of contaminants are wastewater runoff from agriculture, and poorly performing on-site sewage management systems. Riparian vegetation, which is critical to the maintenance of in-stream ecosystems suffers from uncontrolled stock access and weed infestation. The management of land use and resulting diffuse pollution sources is critical to the long term health of the river. The Healthy Rivers Commission of New South Wales Independent Inquiry into the Shoalhaven River System Final Report July, 1999 found that the longer term protection of the health of the Kangaroo River is contingent upon achievement of patterns of land use that have regard to land capability and also to the capability of the river to withstand the impacts of inappropriate or poorly managed land uses. This micro case study of Kangaroo Valley examines the complex legal and administrative arrangements with particular reference to the management of diffuse pollution for river health. In the past, diffuse pollution has

  9. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    -specified requirements for the aortic root geometry for current available prostheses, CoreValve and Edwards-Sapien. The ratio of sinus of Valsalva height to sinus width was 1:2. In multivariate linear regression analysis, larger sinus of Valsalva height was associated with older age, larger sinus of Valsalva diameter......, lower ejection fraction and smaller supracoronary diameter (multiple R(2) = 0.19, PSapien prosthesis in 66.9%. Overall, annular dimension feasible for TAVI using any available prosthesis was found...

  10. Kangaroo supported diagonal flexion positioning: New insights into skin-to-skin contact for communication between mothers and very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buil, A; Carchon, I; Apter, G; Laborne, F X; Granier, M; Devouche, E

    2016-09-01

    Skin-to-skin contact shows benefits in the relationship developed between a mother and her premature infant. In the skin-to-skin session, face-to-face exchanges are impossible in vertical infant positioning. We therefore undertook an observational, prospective, single-center study using kangaroo "supported diagonal flexion" (SDF) positioning. The first aim was to evaluate the safety of kangaroo SDF positioning compared to the usual vertical positioning. The second aim was to evaluate SDF positioning on early communication between the mother and her infant and to improve their well-being. Fifteen mothers and their very premature infants (birth 26communication with their infant were assessed through questionnaires. In terms of the infant's physiology, no negative effects were associated with SDF positioning in comparison with the usual vertical positioning. SDF positioning led to fewer disorganized gestures, negative vocalizations, and drowsiness, in favor of more deep sleep. SDF led to more mother-infant eye-to-eye contact as well as maternal vocalizations, smiles, and caressing, although these differences did not reach significance. The score for the risk of postnatal depression decreased significantly between the first and the last session in the SDF group, whereas it did not change in the vertical positioning group. These results support the idea that the kangaroo SDF positioning technique is physiologically safe, has obvious immediate benefits on mothers' infant-directed communicative behaviors, and respects the baby's naturally flexed and asymmetrical tonic neck posture. It is an innovative, inexpensive, easy-to-use technique in daily practice, by all healthcare professionals working in a neonatal intensive care unit. These data suggest that the current kangaroo positioning technique could be improved. More studies are needed to confirm the benefits and safety of the kangaroo SDF positioning in larger groups of preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson

  11. The cardiovascular effects of aortic clamping and unclamping

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aortic clamping is that afterload and blood pressure increase, and ... individually, albeit they interact with each other. The degree of ... position of the aortic clamp, the greater the increase ... the increase in preload in response to aortic clamping.

  12. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  13. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  14. Tissue Doppler Imaging in the evaluation of abdominal aortic pulsatility: a useful tool for the neonatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Enrico; Grison, Alessandra; Capretta, Anna; Golin, Rosanna; Ferrarese, Paola; Bellettato, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Sonographic cardiac evaluation of newborns with suspected aortic coarctation (AoC) should tend to demonstrate a good phasic and pulsatile flow and the absence of pressure gradient along a normally conformed aortic arch from the modified left parasternal and suprasternal echocardiographic views; these findings, however, may not necessarily rule out a more distal coarctation in the descending aorta. For this reason, the sonographic exam of newborns with suspected AoC should always include a Doppler evaluation of abdominal aortic blood flow from the subcostal view. Occasionally, however, a clearly pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta may be difficult to obtain due to the bad insonation angle existing between the probe and the vessel. In such suboptimal ultrasonic alignment situation, the use of Tissue Doppler Imaging instead of classic Doppler flow imaging may reveal a preserved aortic pulsatility by sampling the aortic wall motion induced by normal flow. We propose to take advantage of the TDI pattern as a surrogate of a normal pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta when the latter is difficult to obtain due to malalignment with the insonated vessel.

  15. Modification of Aortic Cannula With an Inlet Chamber to Induce Spiral Flow and Improve Outlet Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlis, Nofrizalidris; Osman, Kahar; Padzillah, Muhamad Hasbullah; Dillon, Jeswant; Md Khudzari, Ahmad Zahran

    2018-05-01

    Physiologically, blood ejected from the left ventricle in systole exhibited spiral flow characteristics. This spiral flow has been proven to have several advantages such as lateral reduction of directed forces and thrombus formation, while it also appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing neurological complications. In order to deliver spiral flow characteristics during cardiopulmonary bypass operation, several modifications have been made on an aortic cannula either at the internal or at the outflow tip; these modifications have proven to yield better hemodynamic performances compared to standard cannula. However, there is no modification done at the inlet part of the aortic cannula for inducing spiral flow so far. This study was carried out by attaching a spiral inducer at the inlet of an aortic cannula. Then, the hemodynamic performances of the new cannula were compared with the standard straight tip end-hole cannula. This is achieved by modeling the cannula and attaching the cannula at a patient-specific aorta model. Numerical approach was utilized to evaluate the hemodynamic performance, and a water jet impact experiment was used to demonstrate the jet force generated by the cannula. The new spiral flow aortic cannula has shown some improvements by reducing approximately 21% of impinging velocity near to the aortic wall, and more than 58% reduction on total force generated as compared to standard cannula. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Aging impairs smooth muscle-mediated regulation of aortic stiffness: a defect in shock absorption function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan Z.; Saphirstein, Robert J.; Yamin, Rina; Suki, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is an early and independent biomarker of cardiovascular disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute significantly to aortic stiffness and investigated the mechanisms involved. The relative contributions of VSMCs, focal adhesions (FAs), and matrix to stiffness in mouse aorta preparations at optimal length and with confirmed VSMC viability were separated by the use of small-molecule inhibitors and activators. Using biomechanical methods designed for minimal perturbation of cellular function, we directly quantified changes with aging in aortic material stiffness. An alpha adrenoceptor agonist, in the presence of NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to remove interference of endothelial nitric oxide, increases stiffness by 90–200% from baseline in both young and old mice. Interestingly, increases are robustly suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 in young but not old mice. Phosphotyrosine screening revealed, with aging, a biochemical signature of markedly impaired agonist-induced FA remodeling previously associated with Src signaling. Protein expression measurement confirmed a decrease in Src expression with aging. Thus we report here an additive model for the in vitro biomechanical components of the mouse aortic wall in which 1) VSMCs are a surprisingly large component of aortic stiffness at physiological lengths and 2) regulation of the VSMC component through FA signaling and hence plasticity is impaired with aging, diminishing the aorta's normal shock absorption function in response to stressors. PMID:25128168

  17. Aortic valvuloplasty of calcific aortic stenosis with monofoil and trefoil balloon catheters: practical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); L.C.P. van Veen; C. di Mario (Carlo); C.E. Essed; K.J. Beatt (Kevin); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn order to evaluate the relation between balloon design (monofoil, trefoil) and valvular configuration, experimental aortic valvuloplasty was performed in four post-mortem hearts with calcific aortic stenosis of various morphology. The degree of obstruction of the aortic orifice was

  18. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA gradient (gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  1. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi; Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  2. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  3. Surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection without resection of supra-aortic entry sites leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Woon; Song, Suk-Won; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Baek, Min-Young; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2018-01-29

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of remnant re-entries in arch branches on postoperative change in the aortic arch and descending aortic diameters and the rate of major adverse aortic events. Between January 2010 and December 2016, 249 patients underwent surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection. Patients who underwent total arch replacement, had Marfan syndrome or had intramural haematoma were excluded. Seventy-two patients with predischarge and follow-up computed tomography scans were enrolled. Patients with and without re-entries in the arch branches after surgery were assigned to the supra-aortic entry (SAE, n = 21) and no supra-aortic entry (n = 51) groups, respectively. Diameters were measured at 7 levels: the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery, pulmonary artery bifurcation, coeliac axis and maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta. Growth rates at the levels of the pulmonary artery bifurcation and 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery were significantly higher in the SAE group than in the no supra-aortic entry group. The rate of freedom from major adverse aortic events (annual growth >5 mm or maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta >50 mm) at 5 years was significantly higher in the no supra-aortic entry group than in the SAE group. Remnant SAE leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling after acute Type I aortic dissection repair. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Starting the conversation: community perspectives on preterm birth and kangaroo mother care in southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon, Megan; Longwe, Monica; Likomwa, Dyson; Lwesha, Victoria; Chimtembo, Lydia; Donohue, Pamela; Guenther, Tanya; Valsangar, Bina

    2018-06-01

    Despite introduction of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in Malawi over a decade ago, preterm birth remains the leading cause of neonatal mortality. Although KMC is initiated in the health care facility, robust community follow-up is critical for survival and optimal development of preterm and low birth weight infants post-discharge. The objective of this qualitative study was to gain insight into community and health worker understanding, attitudes, beliefs and practices around preterm and low birth weight babies and KMC in Malawi. A total of 152 participants were interviewed in two districts in southern Malawi, Machinga and Thyolo, in April 2015. Focus group discussions (groups = 11, n = 132) were conducted with pregnant women, community members and women who have practiced KMC. In-depth interviews (n = 20) were conducted with fathers who have practiced KMC, community and religious leaders, and health workers. Purposive and snowball sampling were employed to identify participants. Thematic content analysis was conducted. KMC mothers and fathers only learned about KMC and care for preterm newborns after delivery of a child in need of this care. Men typically were not included in KMC counseling due to societal gender roles. Health facilities were the main source of information on KMC, however informal networks among women provided some degree of knowledge exchange. Community leaders were regarded as major facilitators of health information, conveners, key influencers, and policy-makers. Religious leaders were regarded as advocates and emotional support for families with preterm infants. Finally, while many participants initially had negative feelings towards preterm births and KMC, the large majority saw a shift in their perceptions through health counseling, peer modeling, and personal success with KMC. The findings offer several opportunities to improve KMC implementation including 1) earlier introduction of KMC to pregnant women and their families that are

  5. Translating research findings into practice – the implementation of kangaroo mother care in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Anne-Marie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC is a safe and effective method of caring for low birth weight infants and is promoted for its potential to improve newborn survival. Many countries find it difficult to take KMC to scale in healthcare facilities providing newborn care. KMC Ghana was an initiative to scale up KMC in four regions in Ghana. Research findings from two outreach trials in South Africa informed the design of the initiative. Two key points of departure were to equip healthcare facilities that conduct deliveries with the necessary skills for KMC practice and to single out KMC for special attention instead of embedding it in other newborn care initiatives. This paper describes the contextualisation and practical application of previous research findings and the results of monitoring the progress of the implementation of KMC in Ghana. Methods A three-phase outreach intervention was adapted from previous research findings to suit the local setting. A more structured system of KMC regional steering committees was introduced to drive the process and take the initiative forward. During Phase I, health workers in regions and districts were oriented in KMC and received basic support for the management of the outreach. Phase II entailed the strengthening of the regional steering committees. Phase III comprised a more formal assessment, utilising a previously validated KMC progress-monitoring instrument. Results Twenty-six out of 38 hospitals (68 % scored over 10 out of 30 and had reached the level of ‘evidence of practice’ by the end of Phase III. Seven hospitals exceeded expected performance by scoring at the level of ‘evidence of routine and institutionalised practice.’ The collective mean score for all participating hospitals was 12.07. Hospitals that had attained baby-friendly status or had been re-accredited in the five years before the intervention scored significantly better than the rest, with a mean score of 14

  6. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  7. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  8. Aortic elongation in aortic aneurysm and dissection: the Tübingen Aortic Pathoanatomy (TAIPAN) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tobias; Sandoval Boburg, Rodrigo; Lescan, Mario; Oikonomou, Alexandre; Schneider, Wilke; Vöhringer, Luise; Lausberg, Henning; Bamberg, Fabian; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Schlensak, Christian

    2018-01-24

    To study the lengths and diameters of aortic segments in healthy and diseased aortas and to assess the role of aortic elongation in Type A aortic dissection (TAD) prediction. Ectasia and aneurysm were defined by ascending aorta diameters of 45-54 mm and ≥55 mm, respectively. Computed tomography angiography studies of 256 healthy, 102 ectasia, 38 aneurysm, 17 pre-TAD and 166 TAD aortas were analysed using curved multiplanar reformats. The study groups were structurally equal. The diameter of the ascending aorta was 35 mm in the control group and was larger (P TAD (43 mm) and TAD (56 mm) groups. The length of the ascending aorta from the aortic annulus to the brachiocephalic trunk was 92 mm in the control group, 113 mm in the ectasia group, 120 mm in the aneurysm group and 111 mm and 118 mm in the pre-TAD and TAD groups (all P TAD group and 48% of the TAD group. The correlation between the diameter and the length of the ascending aorta was r = 0.752; therefore, both parameters must be examined separately. A score considering both parameters identified 23.5% of pre-TAD patients, significantly more than the diameter alone, and 31.4% of ectasia aortas were elongated. Patients with ectatic (45-54 mm diameter) and elongated (≥120 mm) ascending aortas represent a high-risk subpopulation for TAD. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm. In search of an optimal differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Nobukazu; Sohmiya, Koichi; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Umeda, Tatsuya; Tsuji, Motomu; Katsumata, Takahiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm each account for a minor fraction of the total incidence of aortic aneurysm and are associated with periaortic inflammation. Despite the similarity, infected aortic aneurysm generally shows a more rapid change in clinical condition, leading to a fatal outcome; in addition, delayed diagnosis and misuse of corticosteroid or immunosuppressing drugs may lead to uncontrolled growth of microorganisms. Therefore, it is mandatory that detection of aortic aneurysm is followed by accurate differential diagnosis. In general, infected aortic aneurysm appears usually as a saccular form aneurysm with nodularity, irregular configuration; however, the differential diagnosis may not be easy sometimes for the following reasons: symptoms, such as abdominal and/or back pain and fever, and blood test abnormalities, such as elevated C-reactive protein and enhanced erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are common in infected aortic aneurysm, but they are not found infrequently in inflammatory aortic aneurysm; some inflammatory aortic aneurysms are immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related, but not all of them; the prevalence of IgG4 positivity in infected aortic aneurysm has not been well investigated; enhanced uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography may not distinguish between inflammation mediated by autoimmunity and that mediated by microorganism infection. Here we discuss the characteristics of these two forms of aortic aneurysm and the points of which we have to be aware before reaching a final diagnosis. (author)

  10. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  11. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open

  12. Severe aortic stenosis: diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.A. van Geldorp (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDegenerative aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in developed countries. The prevalence of severe aortic stenosis increases with age from 1% in people below 65 years of age to nearly 6% in people over the age of 85. Since the population life expectancy continues to

  13. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  14. OBSERVATION ON INCREASE IN WEIGHT OF LOW BIRTH WEIGHT (LBW BABIES BY IMPLEMENTING KANGAROO MOTHER CARE (KMC TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnendu Kumar Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is a practical technique for nursing of low birth weight babies by direct skin to contact with the mother. This study was undertaken to observe and record the effect of KMC with focus on increase in weight of at term low birth weight (LBW babies weighing less than 2000 grams. The study was conducted over thirty six month’s period from July 2011 to June 2014. The method of care consisted of skin to skin contact between the mother and the infant along with exclusive breast milk. Upon implementation of KMC babies under observation showed satisfactory gain in weight of average 25grams per day and an average hospital stay of 10 days. KMC aims towards achieving good weight gain in LBW babies. It is a simple hassle free technique which can be implemented at all levels of health care.

  15. [Effects of Kangaroo Care on anxiety, maternal role confidence, and maternal infant attachment of mothers who delivered preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bok; Shin, Hye Sook

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Kangaroo Care(KC) on anxiety, maternal role confidence, and maternal infant attachment of mothers who delivered preterm infants. The research design was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest. Data was collected from September 1. 2006 to June 20. 2007. The participants were 22 mothers in the experimental group and 21 in the control group. KC was applied three times per day, for a total of ten times in 4 days to the experimental group. The degree of anxiety was statistically significantly different between the two groups but maternal role confidence and maternal infant attachment was statistically insignificant. This data suggests that KC was effective for mothers anxiety relief but it was not effective for maternal role confidence and maternal infant attachment of mothers. The implications for nursing practice and directions for future research need to be discussed.

  16. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyaji E.N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2 that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, possibly indicating a defect in preferential repair of actively transcribed genes, and a slower cell proliferation rate, including a longer S-phase. This phenotype reinforces the present notion that control of key mechanisms in cell metabolism, such as cell cycle control, repair, transcription and cell death, can be linked.

  17. MRI evaluation of the aortic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapuscinski, O.; Polkowski, J.; Zaleska, T.; Walecki, J.; Biesiadko, M.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our study was to establish the value of MRI in diagnosing aortic disease. During 3 years period 46 patients were examined (12 women aged from 6 to 62 years and 34 men aged from 8 to 72 years). In 28 cases the thoracic aorta was examined, in 6 cases the abdominal aorta and in 12 - both the thoracic and the abdominal aorta. MR images were performed on MRT 50 A Toshiba unit 0.5 T. MR images demonstrated aortic aneurysm (caused by atherosclerosis or trauma), aortic dissections, aortic anomalies (i.e. in Turner syndrome) and non-specific aortitis and vasculitis. We regard MRI as preferable noninvasive imaging technique in diagnosing aortic disease. (author)

  18. Treatment strategy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, L

    2014-07-01

    Rupture is the most serious and lethal complication of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Despite all improvements during the past 50 years, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are still associated with very high mortality. Namely, including patients who die before reaching the hospital, the mortality rate due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is 90%. On the other hand, during the last twenty years, the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms significantly increased. One of the reasons is the fact that in majority of countries the general population is older nowadays. Due to this, the number of degenerative AAA is increasing. This is also the case for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Age must not be the reason of a treatment refusal. Optimal therapeutic option ought to be found. The following article is based on literature analysis including current guidelines but also on my Clinics significant experience. Furthermore, this article show cases options for vascular medicine in undeveloped countries that can not apply endovascular procedures at a sufficient level and to a sufficient extent. At this moment the following is evident. Thirty-day-mortality after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is significantly lower in high-volume hospitals. Due to different reasons all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are not suitable for EVAR. Open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm should be performed by experienced open vascular surgeons. This could also be said for the treatment of endovascular complications that require open surgical conversion. There is no ideal procedure for the treatment of AAA. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, its own limits and complications, as well as indications and contraindications. Future reductions in mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms will depend on implementation of population-based screening; on strategies to prevent postoperative organ injury and also on new medical technology

  19. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  20. MR imaging of aortic coarctation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beslic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the contribution of MRI as diagnostic procedure in the preoperative diagnosis of aortic coarctation (CoA), in patients with clinical and echocardiographic suspicion for this disease. Patients and methods. During the period of three years, eight patients were examined, 5 (62.5%) male and 3 (37.5%) female patients with clinical echocardiographic suspicion of CoA. The ratio between male and female patients was 1.7 : 1. The youngest patient was 3 and the oldest 46 years (median age was 15 years). Without administration of contrast media and using body coil the examinations were performed with MR machine Magnetom 1.0 Tesla ( S iemens ) , with the slice thickness of 6 mm, Fast spin-echo (FSE) T1W sequences, Cine gradient echo (GRE) sequence with slab 7 mm and time of flight (TOF) sequence with MIP reconstructions were applied. During the examinations the patients underwent also ECG gating. Examinations were done in axial, coronal and oblique sagittal projections with measuring of the dimensions of cardiovascular structures. Results. CoA was found in 8 (100%) patients. In 7 (87.5%) cases, coarctation developed at isthmus and in one case, coarctation was detected at the horizontal part of aortic arch, between the truncus arteriosus of the left carotid communis artery. Aortal insufficiency was found in 7 (87.5%) patients; in four of them (50%), bicuspidia was confirmed (bicuspid aortic valve), 7 (87.5%) patients had slightly expressed hypertrophy of the left ventricle. Two (25%) patients had dilatation of the ascendant aorta, six (75%) wider outgoing vessels of the aortic arch, four (50%) had well developed arterial collaterals and 2 (25%) patients rib notching. In 2 (25%) patients as side finding thymus persistent was found. Average diameter of coarctation was 10 mm. In one patient, CoA was accompanied with stenosis of pulmonary artery, in one with ventricular septal defect, and one with tricuspid insufficiency. The results

  1. Imaging techniques in aortic valve and root surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeer, M.V.

    2017-01-01

    Aortic valve sparing surgery for aortic regurgitation and/or aortopathy serves as an alternative to aortic valve and root replacement. One of the advantages of aortic valve sparing surgery over conventional replacement is that there is no need for life-long anticoagulation, which is particularly

  2. Evaluation of Marfan patients status post valve-sparing aortic root replacement with 4D flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Thomas A; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Hope, Michael D; Miller, D Craig; Markl, Michael; Herfkens, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    Over the past two decades elective valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) has become more common in the treatment of patients with aortic root and ascending aortic aneurysms. Currently there are little data available to predict complications in the post-operative population. The study goal was to determine if altered flow patterns in the thoracic aorta, as measured by MRI, are associated with complications after V-SARR. Time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D flow) was used to image 12 patients with Marfan syndrome after V-SARR. The patients were followed up for an average of 5.8 years after imaging and 8.2 years after surgery. Additionally 5 volunteers were imaged for comparison. Flow profiles were visualized during peak systole using streamlines. Wall shear stress estimates and normalized flow displacement were evaluated at multiple planes in the thoracic aorta. During the follow-up period, a single patient developed a Stanford Type B aortic dissection. At initial imaging, prior to the development of the dissection, the patient had altered flow patterns, wall shear stress estimates, and increased normalized flow displacement in the thoracic aorta in comparison to the remaining V-SARR patients and volunteers. This is the first follow-up study of patients after 4D flow imaging. An aortic dissection developed in one patient with altered flow patterns and hemodynamic stresses in the thoracic aorta. These results suggest that flow and altered hemodynamics may play a role in the development of post-operative intramural hematomas and dissections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic aorta 3D hemodynamics in pediatric and young adult patients with bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley D; van Ooij, Pim; Barker, Alex J; Carr, Maria; Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly B; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Robinson, Joshua D

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the 3D hemodynamics in the thoracic aorta of pediatric and young adult bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients. 4D flow MRI was performed in 30 pediatric and young adult BAV patients (age: 13.9 ± 4.4 (range: [3.4, 20.7]) years old, M:F = 17:13) as part of this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Nomogram-based aortic root Z-scores were calculated to assess aortic dilatation and degree of aortic stenosis (AS) severity was assessed on MRI. Data analysis included calculation of time-averaged systolic 3D wall shear stress (WSSsys ) along the entire aorta wall, and regional quantification of maximum and mean WSSsys and peak systolic velocity (velsys ) in the ascending aorta (AAo), arch, and descending aorta (DAo). The 4D flow MRI AAo velsys was also compared with echocardiography peak velocity measurements. There was a positive correlation with both mean and max AAo WSSsys and peak AAo velsys (mean: r = 0.84, P max: r = 0.94, P max: rS  = 0.70, P < 0.001). AAo peak velocity was significantly higher when measured with echo compared with 4D flow MRI (2.1 ± 0.98 m/s versus 1.27 ± 0.49 m/s, P < 0.001). In pediatric and young adult patients with BAV, AS and peak ascending aorta velocity are associated with increased AAo WSS, while aortic dilation, age, and body surface area do not significantly impact AAo hemodynamics. Prospective studies are required to establish the role of WSS as a risk-stratification tool in these patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fabrication of a compliant phantom of the human aortic arch for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütter Larissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compliant phantoms of the human aortic arch can mimic patient specific cardiovascular dysfunctions in vitro. Hence, phantoms may enable elucidation of haemodynamic disturbances caused by aortic dysfunction. This paper describes the fabrication of a thin-walled silicone phantom of the human ascending aorta and brachiocephalic artery. The model geometry was determined via a meta-analysis and modelled in SolidWorks before 3D printing. The solid model surface was smoothed and scanned with a 3D scanner. An offset outer mould was milled from Ebalta S-Model board. The final phantom indicated that ABS was a suitable material for the internal model, the Ebalta S-Model board yielded a rough external surface. Co-location of the moulds during silicone pour was insufficient to enable consistent wall thickness. The resulting phantom was free of air bubbles but did not have the desired wall thickness consistency.

  5. A Structural Finite Element Model for Lamellar Unit of Aortic Media Indicates Heterogeneous Stress Field After Collagen Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunes, James R.; Pal, Siladitya; Fortunato, Ronald N.; Phillippi, Julie A.; Gleason, Thomas G.; Vorp, David A.; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of collagen structural information into the study of biomechanical behavior of ascending thoracic aortic (ATA) wall tissue should provide better insight into the pathophysiology of ATA. Structurally motivated constitutive models that include fiber dispersion and recruitment can successfully capture overall mechanical response of the arterial wall tissue. However, these models cannot examine local microarchitectural features of the collagen network, such as the effect of fiber disruptions and interaction between fibrous and non-fibrous components, which may influence emergent biomechanical properties of the tissue. Motivated by this need, we developed a finite element based three-dimensional structural model of the lamellar units of the ATA media that directly incorporates the collagen fiber microarchitecture. The fiber architecture was computer generated utilizing network features, namely fiber orientation distribution, intersection density and areal concentration, obtained from image analysis of multiphoton microscopy images taken from human aneurysmal ascending thoracic aortic media specimens with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) phenotype. Our model reproduces the typical J-shaped constitutive response of the aortic wall tissue. We found that the stress state in the non-fibrous matrix was homogeneous until the collagen fibers were recruited, but became highly heterogeneous after that event. The degree of heterogeneity was dependent upon local network architecture with high stresses observed near disrupted fibers. The magnitude of non-fibrous matrix stress at higher stretch levels was negatively correlated with local fiber density. The localized stress concentrations, elucidated by this model, may be a factor in the degenerative changes in aneurysmal ATA tissue. PMID:27113538

  6. Correction of aortic insufficiency with an external adjustable prosthetic aortic ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogbashian, Andrew; Ghanta, Ravi K; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Rangaraj, Aravind T; Laurence, Rita G; Fox, John A; Cohn, Lawrence H; Chen, Frederick Y

    2007-09-01

    Less invasive, valve-sparing options are needed for patients with aortic insufficiency (AI). We sought to evaluate the feasibility of reducing AI with an external adjustable aortic ring in an ovine model. To create AI, five sheep underwent patch plasty enlargement of the aortic annulus and root by placement of a 10 x 15 mm pericardial patch between the right and noncoronary cusps. An adjustable external ring composed of a nylon band was fabricated and placed around the aortic root. Aortic flow, aortic pressure, and left ventricular pressures were measured with the ring loose (off) and tightened (on). Mean regurgitant orifice area decreased by 86%, from 0.07 +/- 0.03 cm2 (ring loose, off) to 0.01 +/- 0.00 cm2 (ring tightened, on) [p < 0.01]. The regurgitant fraction decreased from 18 +/- 4% to 2 +/- 1% [p < 0.01]. The ring did not significantly affect stroke volume and aortic pressure. An ovine model of aortic root dilatation resulting in acute AI has been developed. In this model, application of an external, adjustable constricting aortic ring eliminated AI. An aortic ring may be a useful adjunct in reducing AI secondary to annular dilatation.

  7. Histological aspects of arterial abnormalities produced by X-irradiation of the aortic and branchial arches in the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.-L.

    1976-01-01

    Low dose X irradiations centred on one or two aortic and branchial arches of 3-day chick embryos result in teratogenic effects on the arteries (21-92%) and in low mortality (4-12%). Histological studies of abnormal arteries show different structural malformations of the arterial wall: inorganized arterial fibres, abnormal intima, newly formed arterial tissue in arterial lumen, coalescence of two arteries. It is suggested that a disturbance at the aortic differentiation level results under experimental conditions in the observed arterial abnormalities

  8. The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement vs surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hanna A Jensen, Lillian L Tsai, Vinod H Thourani Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Joseph B Whitehead Department of Surgery, Structural Heart and Valve Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and is increasing in prevalence as the global population increases. Since AS primarily affects the elderly, many of these patients have comorbidities that make them poor candidates for the gold standard treatment for AS, surgical aortic valve replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as a novel technology for the management of AS in higher risk patients over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the medical community has rallied to identify the patients who are most suitable for this transformative treatment. This review focuses on outlining the key procedural differences, describing the unique challenges of both operations, and finally assessing and comparing outcomes both on a general level and in challenging patient subgroups. Keywords: aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, surgical aortic valve replacement 

  9. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Comparison of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation versus composite grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Hagl, Christian; Rhein, Christine; Leyh, Rainer; Haverich, Axel

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic root replacement with mechanical valve conduits in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing operation for aortic root aneurysms. Patients and methods Between March 1979 and April 2002, 119 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome underwent composite graft replacement with mechanical valve conduits (n = 74) or aortic valve-sparing reimplantation according to David (n = 45). The underlying causes were aortic dissection type A (43 patients) and aneurysms (76 patients). Patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation were younger compared with patients undergoing composite grafting (28 vs 35 years, P =.002) and had longer intraoperative aortic crossclamp times (125 vs 78 minutes, P valve reimplantation (P =.15). Mean follow-up was 30 months for patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation and 114 months for patients undergoing composite grafting. Freedom from reoperation and death after 5 years postoperatively was 92% and 89% in patients undergoing composite grafting and 84% and 96% in patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation (P =.31; P =.54), respectively. Thromboembolic complications or late postoperative bleeding occurred in 17 patients undergoing composite grafting, and an early postoperative event occurred in 1 patient undergoing aortic valve reimplantation. The results of aortic valve reimplantation and composite grafting of the aortic valve and ascending aorta with mechanical valve conduits are similar with regard to early and mid-term postoperative mortality and to the incidence of late reoperations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The low risk of thromboembolic or bleeding complications favors aortic valve reimplantation in these patients.

  10. Influence of the tilt angle of Percutaneous Aortic Prosthesis on Velocity and Shear Stress Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alvares de Azevedo Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Due to the nature of the percutaneous prosthesis deployment process, a variation in its final position is expected. Prosthetic valve placement will define the spatial location of its effective orifice in relation to the aortic annulus. The blood flow pattern in the ascending aorta is related to the aortic remodeling process, and depends on the spatial location of the effective orifice. The hemodynamic effect of small variations in the angle of inclination of the effective orifice has not been studied in detail. Objective: To implement an in vitro simulation to characterize the hydrodynamic blood flow pattern associated with small variations in the effective orifice inclination. Methods: A three-dimensional aortic phantom was constructed, reproducing the anatomy of one patient submitted to percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Flow analysis was performed by use of the Particle Image Velocimetry technique. The flow pattern in the ascending aorta was characterized for six flow rate levels. In addition, six angles of inclination of the effective orifice were assessed. Results: The effective orifice at the -4° and -2° angles directed the main flow towards the anterior wall of the aortic model, inducing asymmetric and high shear stress in that region. However, the effective orifice at the +3° and +5° angles mimics the physiological pattern, centralizing the main flow and promoting a symmetric distribution of shear stress. Conclusion: The measurements performed suggest that small changes in the angle of inclination of the percutaneous prosthesis aid in the generation of a physiological hemodynamic pattern, and can contribute to reduce aortic remodeling.

  11. Myocardial hypertrophy and intracardial hemodynamics in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Kamenshchyk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve is one of the most common congenital heart diseases with low manifestation in childhood and severe consequences in adults that determines the importance in early diagnostics of myocardial changes in this anomaly. According to the literature the polymorphisms in the genes of NFATC family could result both in impaired embriogenetic valves formation and development of postnatal myocardial hypertrophy. The aim of the study was to detect the early changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve in children with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and establish their interrelations to the signs of myocardial hypertrophy in these children. Materials and methods: Dopplerograhphic study of basic intracardiac hemodynamics parameters in 38 children with BAV and in 28 children of control group was conducted. The results were processed statistically by Student’s t-test, correlation analysis and multiple regression. Results: In the result of study the moderate concentric left ventricle myocardial hypertrophy development was detected in 62 % of children with BAV which is accompanying to significant increasing of blood flow velocity and pressure gradient at aortic valve. There were not established significant correlations between the parameters of hemodynamics at valve and left ventricle’s posterior wall depth and septum depth whereas the highest inputs of these values were obtained in the left ventricle systolic dimension and volume and less in the hypertrophic signs. Conclusions: In children with BAV the moderate concentric myocardial hypertrophy with significant changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve takes place with the highest inputs in left ventricle volumetric values The obtained data serves as a substantiation for the treatment and prevention of it further development. bicuspid aortic valve; children; heart hypertrophy; dopplerechocardiography; hemodynamics; regression analysis

  12. Chromosome evolution in kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodidae): cross species chromosome painting between the tammar wallaby and rock wallaby spp. with the 2n = 22 ancestral macropodid karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, R J; Eldridge, M D; Toder, R; Ferguson-Smith, M A; O'Brien, P C; Graves, J A

    1999-06-01

    Marsupial mammals show extraordinary karyotype stability, with 2n = 14 considered ancestral. However, macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies) exhibit a considerable variety of karyotypes, with a hypothesised ancestral karyotype of 2n = 22. Speciation and karyotypic diversity in rock wallabies (Petrogale) is exceptional. We used cross species chromosome painting to examine the chromosome evolution between the tammar wallaby (2n = 16) and three 2n = 22 rock wallaby species groups with the putative ancestral karyotype. Hybridization of chromosome paints prepared from flow sorted chromosomes of the tammar wallaby to Petrogale spp., showed that this ancestral karyotype is largely conserved among 2n = 22 rock wallaby species, and confirmed the identity of ancestral chromosomes which fused to produce the bi-armed chromosomes of the 2n = 16 tammar wallaby. These results illustrate the fission-fusion process of karyotype evolution characteristic of the kangaroo group.

  13. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang; Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  14. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  15. Aortography following subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmler, J.

    1982-01-01

    A juxtaposition of the subdiaphragmal and infrarenal translumbar aortic biopsy sites showed decisive advantages in favour of the higher site: a more stable position because of better anatomic fixation and rarer incidence of vascular alterations, a wider vascular lumen. Disadvantages lie in the fact that the large visceral arteries (especially Tr. coeliacus) branch off nearly and in the close anatomic relationship to large abdominal organs and the thoracal region. Evaluation of the radiographical image of the vascular tree after subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy showed an average 82% of the vessels to the area of the Knees to be assessable (renal arteries approximately 93%, popliteal arteries approximately 70%). Beyong, the method proved unsatisfactory: 52% of the vessels could not, or not safety, be evaluated. A relatively broad spectrum of indications by comparison with transfemoral catheter aortography had no influence on the rate of complications with reference to either method. A comparison of the topographic conditions shows the need for even more scrupulons observation of the technique in subdiaphragmal biopsy than in the infrarenal one. To sum up the results obtained, subdiaphregmal translumbar aortography is to be preferred to the infrarenal one where transfemoral catheter aortography is contra-indicated, within the limits mentioned. (orig.) [de

  16. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, F.H.; Young, N.; Soo, Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Effect of kangaroo method on the risk of hypothermia and duration of birth weight regain in low birth weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    I G. A. P. Eka Pratiwi; Soetjiningsih Soetjiningsih; I Made Kardana

    2009-01-01

    Background In Indonesia, the infant mortality rate in 2001 was 50 per 1000 live births, with 34.7% due to perinatal death. This perinatal death was associated with low birth weight (LBW) newborn, which was caused by prematurity, infection, birth asphyxia, hypothermia, and inadequate breast feeding. In developing countries, lack of facilities of LBW infant care leads to the utilization of kangaroo method as care to prevent hypothermia in LBW newborn. Objective To evaluate the differences of...

  18. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo He

    Full Text Available Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  19. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  20. Altered Metabolism of LDL in the Arterial Wall Precedes Atherosclerosis Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D.; Christoffersen, Christina; Lindholm, Marie W.

    2015-01-01

    and degradation of LDL particles in atherosclerotic aortas of mice by measuring the accumulation of iodinated LDL particles in the arterial wall. Methods and Results: Cholesterol-fed, LDL receptor–deficient mice were treated with either an anti-Apob antisense oligonucleotide or a mismatch control antisense...... oligonucleotide once a week for 1 or 4 weeks before injection with preparations of iodinated LDL particles. The anti-Apob antisense oligonucleotide reduced plasma cholesterol by ≈90%. The aortic LDL permeability and degradation rates of newly entered LDL particles were reduced by ≈50% and ≈85% already after 1...... week of treatment despite an unchanged pool size of aortic iodinated LDL particles. In contrast, the size, foam cell content, and aortic pool size of iodinated LDL particles of aortic atherosclerotic plaques were not reduced until after 4 weeks of treatment with the anti-Apob antisense oligonucleotide...

  1. Preoperative evaluation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm using spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisuwa, Hisanao; Nishimaki, Keiji; Arai, Masayuki; Honda, Haruyasu; Urata, Koichi; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Mikio; Okamoto, Kohei.

    1995-01-01

    Six patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were studied with three-dimensionally reconstructed CT angiography (3D-CTA) in order to evaluate its usefulness as a diagnostic tool for vascular surgery patients. Images of the intravenously contrasted abdominal aorta were obtained with spiral scan during a single breath hold. The images of the abdominal aorta and its major branches were three-dimensionally reconstructed with a shaded surface display mode. The three-dimensional image reconstruction was successful in all the six cases and performed without difficulties. Shaded surface display presented a deficit to depict the aortic wall with mural thrombus. However, multidirectional display of the abdominal aorta and its branches facilitated interpretation of the anatomical details of the lesions and planning of surgical repair. 3D-CTA is an alternative to conventional aortography for preoperative diagnosis of AAA. Moreover it was shown to be noninvasive, easy to proceed. It presented good angiographical resolution that can be used as a precise diagnostic tool in vascular surgery. (author)

  2. The Effect of Aortic Compliance on Left Ventricular Power Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2009-11-01

    Aortic compliance depends on both geometry and mechanical properties of the aorta. Reduction in arterial compliance has been associated with aging, smoking, and multiple cardiovascular diseases. Increased stiffness of the aorta affects the wave dynamics in the aorta by increasing both pulse pressure amplitude and wave speed. We hypothesized that decreased aortic compliance leads to an increased left ventricular power requirement for a fixed cardiac output due to altered pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity. We used a computational approach using the finite element method for solid and fluid domains coupled to each other by using the direct coupling method. A nonlinear material model was used for the solid wall. The fluid flow model was considered to be Newtonian, incompressible, and laminar. The simulation was performed for a heart rate of 75 beats per minute for six different compliances while keeping the cardiac output and the peripheral resistance constant. The results show a trend towards increased left ventricular energy expenditure per cycle with decreased compliance. The relevance of these findings to clinical observations will be discussed.

  3. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  4. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  5. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Aortic stenosis and vascular calcifications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J; Chen, Marcus Y; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A; Gahl, William A; Sachdev, Vandana

    2012-02-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports. We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Aortic reconstruction with bovine pericardial grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Lindemberg Mota

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Glutaraldehyde-treated crimped bovine pericardial grafts are currently used in aortic graft surgery. These conduits have become good options for these operations, available in different sizes and shapes and at a low cost. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the results obtained with bovine pericardial grafts for aortic reconstruction, specially concerning late complications. METHOD: Between January 1995 and January 2002, 57 patients underwent different types of aortic reconstruction operations using bovine pericardial grafts. A total of 29 (50.8% were operated on an urgent basis (mostly acute Stanford A dissection and 28 electively. Thoracotomy was performed in three patients for descending aortic replacement (two patients and aortoplasty with a patch in one. All remaining 54 underwent sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic resection. Deep hypothermia and total circulatory arrest was used in acute dissections and arch operations. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was 17.5%. Follow-up was 24.09 months (18.5 to 29.8 months confidence interval and complication-free actuarial survival curve was 92.3% (standard deviation ± 10.6. Two patients lately developed thoracoabdominal aneurysms following previous DeBakey II dissection and one died from endocarditis. One "patch" aortoplasty patient developed local descending aortic pseudoaneurysm 42 months after surgery. All other patients are asymptomatic and currently clinically evaluated with echocardiography and CT scans, showing no complications. CONCLUSION: Use of bovine pericardial grafts in aortic reconstruction surgery is adequate and safe, with few complications related to the conduits.

  8. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Perrotta, Sossio [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bech-Hanssen, Odd [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olaison, Lars [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Gothenburg (Sweden); Svensson, Gunnar [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  9. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl; Perrotta, Sossio; Bech-Hanssen, Odd; Olaison, Lars; Svensson, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  10. Aortic stenosis: From diagnosis to optimal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavčiovski Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is considered today as the process similar to atherosclerosis. Progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. It is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Proper physical examination remains an essential diagnostic tool in aortic stenosis. Recognition of characteristic systolic murmur draws attention and guides further diagnosis in the right direction. Doppler echocardiography is an ideal tool to confirm diagnosis. It is well known that exercise tests help in stratification risk of asymptomatic aortic stenosis. Serial measurements of brain natriuretic peptide during a follow-up period may help to identify the optimal time for surgery. Heart catheterization is mostly restricted to preoperative evaluation of coronary arteries rather than to evaluation of the valve lesion itself. Currently, there is no ideal medical treatment for slowing down the disease progression. The first results about the effect of ACE inhibitors and statins in aortic sclerosis and stenosis are encouraging, but there is still not enough evidence. Onset symptoms based on current ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations are I class indication for aortic valve replacement. Aortic valve can be replaced with a biological or prosthetic valve. There is a possibility of percutaneous aortic valve implantation and transapical operation for patients that are contraindicated for standard cardiac surgery.

  11. Altered aortic shape in bicuspid aortic valve relatives influences blood flow patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Susanne; Smith, Danielle A; Barker, Alex J; Entezari, Pegah; Honarmand, Amir R; Carr, Maria L; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick M; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to exhibit familial inheritance and is associated with aortopathy and altered aortic haemodynamics. However, it remains unclear whether BAV-related aortopathy can be inherited independently of valve morphology. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging for the in vivo assessment of thoracic aortic 3D blood flow was performed in 24 BAV relatives with trileaflet aortic valves (age = 40 ± 14 years) and 15 healthy controls (age = 37 ± 10 years). Data analysis included aortic dimensions, shape (round/gothic/cubic), and 3D blood flow characteristics (semi-quantitative vortex/helix grading and peak velocities). Cubic and gothic aortic shapes were markedly more prevalent in BAV relatives compared with controls (38 vs. 7%). Ascending aorta (AAo) vortex flow in BAV relatives was significantly increased compared with controls (grading = 1.5 ± 1.0 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, P = 0.015). Aortic haemodynamics were influenced by aortic shape: peak velocities were reduced for gothic aortas vs. round aortas (P = 0.003); vortex flow was increased for cubic aortas in the AAo (P gothic aortas in the AAo and descending aorta (P = 0.003, P = 0.029). Logistic regression demonstrated significant associations of shape with severity of vortex flow in AAo (P < 0.001) and aortic arch (P = 0.016) in BAV relatives. BAV relatives expressed altered aortic shape and increased vortex flow despite the absence of valvular disease or aortic dilatation. These data suggest a heritable component of BAV-related aortopathy affecting aortic shape and aberrant blood flow, independent of valve morphology. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  13. The future of aortic surgery in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Bachet, Jean; Bavaria, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    the interested reader with an overview of how aortic surgery and (perhaps more accurately) aortic medicine has evolved in Europe, and its present standing; also to provide a glimpse into the future, trying to disseminate the thoughts of a group of people actively involved in the development of aortic medicine......At least every ten years, each specialty should reflect upon its past, its present and its future, in order to be able to reconfirm the direction in which it is headed, to adopt suggestions from inside and outside and, consequently, to improve. As such, the aim of this manuscript is to provide...

  14. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  15. Bio-chemo-mechanics of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2018-03-01

    Most thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) occur in the ascending aorta. This review focuses on the unique bio-chemo-mechanical environment that makes the ascending aorta susceptible to TAA. The environment includes solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, cell phenotype, and extracellular matrix composition. Advances in solid mechanics include quantification of biaxial deformation and complex failure behavior of the TAA wall. Advances in fluid mechanics include imaging and modeling of hemodynamics that may lead to TAA formation. For cell phenotype, studies demonstrate changes in cell contractility that may serve to sense mechanical changes and transduce chemical signals. Studies on matrix defects highlight the multi-factorial nature of the disease. We conclude that future work should integrate the effects of bio-chemo-mechanical factors for improved TAA treatment.

  16. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  17. Reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure allowing thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a chronic ascending aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Canaud, MD, PhD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman was admitted with a large chronic dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm starting 5 mm distal to the ostia of the left coronary artery and ending immediately proximal to the innominate artery. A reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure was performed. During the same operative time, through a transapical approach, a thoracic stent graft was deployed with the proximal landing zone just distal to the coronary ostia and the distal landing zone excluding the origin of the left common carotid artery. The postoperative course was uneventful. Computed tomography at 12 months documented patent extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching and no evidence of endoleak. Keywords: Ascending aorta, Thoracic aorta, Aortic dissection, Stent graft

  18. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  19. Stroke Volume estimation using aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, S; Pretty, C G; Chiew, Y S; Pironet, A; Davidson, S; Desaive, T; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2015-08-01

    Accurate Stroke Volume (SV) monitoring is essential for patient with cardiovascular dysfunction patients. However, direct SV measurements are not clinically feasible due to the highly invasive nature of measurement devices. Current devices for indirect monitoring of SV are shown to be inaccurate during sudden hemodynamic changes. This paper presents a novel SV estimation using readily available aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area, using data from a porcine experiment where medical interventions such as fluid replacement, dobutamine infusions, and recruitment maneuvers induced SV changes in a pig with circulatory shock. Measurement of left ventricular volume, proximal aortic pressure, and descending aortic pressure waveforms were made simultaneously during the experiment. From measured data, proximal aortic pressure was separated into reservoir and excess pressures. Beat-to-beat aortic characteristic impedance values were calculated using both aortic pressure measurements and an estimate of the aortic cross sectional area. SV was estimated using the calculated aortic characteristic impedance and excess component of the proximal aorta. The median difference between directly measured SV and estimated SV was -1.4ml with 95% limit of agreement +/- 6.6ml. This method demonstrates that SV can be accurately captured beat-to-beat during sudden changes in hemodynamic state. This novel SV estimation could enable improved cardiac and circulatory treatment in the critical care environment by titrating treatment to the effect on SV.

  20. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  1. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-06

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Zamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition.

  3. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  4. Traumatic aortic dissection presenting with respiratory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Meyer

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Blunt aortic injury is a major cause of death in blunt chest trauma. Signs and symptoms of this injury are nonspecific and other injuries often take precedence, which makes a relatively difficult diagnosis even more challenging.

  5. Aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bekkers (Jos); L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne); G. Bol-Raap (Goris); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To report the results of aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation. Methods: All consecutive patients in our prospective Ross research database were selected for analysis, and additional information for patients requiring reoperation was obtained from the

  6. [Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Sasaki, H; Hanafusa, Y; Hirata, M; Numata, S; Ando, M; Yagihara, T; Kitamura, S

    2002-07-01

    The outcome of aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome was reviewed. Thirteen patients with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction for annuloaortic ectasia or aortic root dissection between 1994 and 1999. The grade of preoperative aortic regurgitation was I in 4, II in 2, III in 5, IV in 2 patients. The procedures of aortic valve-sparing were reimplantation in 7 and remodeling in 5 patients. There was no hospital and late death. Recurrence of aortic regurgitation greater than moderate grade developed in 1 patient immediately after the surgery and in the other 4 patients in the late stage. One patient of them required aortic valve replacement for it. Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction is applicable in Marfan patients, although the indication should be cautious. Close observation is needed for recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  7. Initial stress and nonlinear material behavior in patient-specific AAA wall stress analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Jacobs, M.J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture risk estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently based on the maximum diameter of the AAA. A more critical approach is based on AAA wall stress analysis. For that, in most cases, the AAA geometry is obtained from CT-data and treated as a stress free geometry. However, during

  8. Decreasing Compensatory Ability of Concentric Ventricular Hypertrophy in Aortic-Banded Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lewalle

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac system compensates for variations in physiological and pathophysiological conditions through a dynamic remodeling at the organ, tissue, and intracellular levels in order to maintain function. However, on longer time scales following the onset of ventricular pressure overload, such remodeling may begin to inhibit physiological function and ultimately lead to heart failure. This progression from compensatory to decompensatory behavior is poorly understood, in particular owing to the absence of a unified perspective of the concomitantly remodeling subsystems. To address this issue, the present study investigates the evolution of compensatory mechanisms, in response to overload, by integrating diffusion-tensor MRI, echocardiography, and intracellular and hemodynamic measurements within consistent computational simulations of aortic-banded rat hearts. This approach allows a comparison of the relative leverage of different cardiac properties (geometry, passive mechanical stiffness, fiber configuration, diastolic and peak calcium concentrations, calcium-binding affinity, and aortic impedance to affect cardiac contraction. Measurements indicate that, following aortic banding, an ejection fraction (EF of 75% was maintained, relative to control rats, despite significant remodeling of the left-ventricular wall thickness (increasing by ~90% over 4 weeks. Applying our framework, we identified the left-ventricular wall thickness (concentric hypertrophy and the intracellular calcium dynamics as playing the dominant roles in preserving EF acutely, whereas the significance of hypertrophy decreased subsequently. This trend suggests an increasing reliance on intracellular mechanisms (average increase ~50%, rather than on anatomical features (average decrease ~60%, to achieve compensation of pump function in the early phase of heart failure.

  9. Descending aortic injury by a thoracic pedicle screw during posterior reconstructive surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kei; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Hirano, Toru; Izumi, Tomohiro; Sano, Atsuki; Morita, Osamu; Kikuchi, Ren; Ito, Takui

    2010-09-15

    Case report. To describe an iatrogenic aortic injury by pedicle screw instrumentation during posterior reconstructive surgery of spinal deformity. Iatrogenic major vascular injuries during anterior instrumentation procedures have been reported by several authors, but there have been few reports regarding iatrogenic major vascular injuries during posterior instrumentation procedures. A 57-year-old woman with thoracolumbar kyphosis due to osteoporotic T12 vertebral fracture underwent posterior correction and fusion (T10-L2), using segmental pedicle screw construct concomitant with T12 pedicle subtraction osteotomy. Postoperative routine plain radiographs and computed tomography myelography demonstrated a misplaced left T10 pedicle screw, which was in contact with the posteromedial aspect of the thoracic aorta, and suspected penetration of the aortic wall. The patient underwent removal of the pedicle screw, and repair of the penetrated aortic wall through a simultaneous anterior-posterior approach. The patient tolerated the procedure well without neurologic sequelae, and was discharged several days after removal of a left tube thoracostomy. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid fusion at the osteotomy site and no loosening of hardware. Preoperative neurologic symptoms improved completely at 18-months follow-up. Use of pedicle screw instrumentation has the potential to cause major vascular injury during posterior spinal surgery, and measures to prevent this complication must be taken. Timely diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent both early and delayed complications and death.

  10. CT diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen (47.5%) of 35 patients with acute aortic dissection showed a non-opacified crescent in the aorta on an initial contrast CT. Seven of these 16 patients underwent cineangiography soon after the initial CT, and in all 7 patients, neither an intimal tear nor an intimal flap was obtained. All but one of above 16 patients were followed by CT. Mean duration of follow-up was 9.6 months. In 10 of 15 patients with non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen remained non-opacified until the last examination. Moreover, in 6 of these 10 patients, the false lumen shrunk, and in the other 3, it disappeared completely on follow-up CT. On the other hand, in remaining 5 of these 15 patients who were initially diagnosed to have non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen became opacified and enlarged in size on follow-up CT performed in the first 14 weeks. Moreover, in 4 of these 5 patients, the false lumen became opacified in the only first 6 weeks. No matter how intensive care should be paid at least for the first 6 weeks, it seems that patients with aortic dissection which have non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis in comparison to patients with ordinary aortic dissections which have opacified false lumen. We believe aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen may consist of two type of aortic dissection, one has no intimal tear, the other has some intimal tears and a thrombosed false lumen. In conclusion, CT is the most useful modality in diagnosing acute aortic dissection. The reasons are the incidence of acute aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen was high, patients with non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis, and it was difficult to diagnose aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen by conventional cineangiography and/or DSA. (author)

  11. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open surgical reconstructions as first line of treatment for aorto-iliac diseases. Nowadays, open reconstructions are primarily reserved for patients unsuitable for endovascular reconstructions or for redo ...

  12. Aortic dissection. Basic aspects and endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, Nicolas I; Alviar, Carlos I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long-term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes have facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular Stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention, as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular Stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the theoretically high risk of complications should render the surgeon extremely cautious especially with young patients. Conceptually, the endo luminal treatment in the acute phase seems to be the solution and will probably become a preferred therapy while technical refinement is under way. Worldwide experience is growing and with this a better understanding of the indications and limitations of this innovative therapy will be

  13. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  14. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schachner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April. We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200 cm versus 175 (157–191 cm, and heavier (90 (68–125 kg versus 80 (45–110 kg, than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (. Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (. The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853 m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good.

  16. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  17. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  18. Scaling up kangaroo mother care in South Africa: 'on-site' versus 'off-site' educational facilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rooyen Elise

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up the implementation of new health care interventions can be challenging and demand intensive training or retraining of health workers. This paper reports on the results of testing the effectiveness of two different kinds of face-to-face facilitation used in conjunction with a well-designed educational package in the scaling up of kangaroo mother care. Methods Thirty-six hospitals in the Provinces of Gauteng and Mpumalanga in South Africa were targeted to implement kangaroo mother care and participated in the trial. The hospitals were paired with respect to their geographical location and annual number of births. One hospital in each pair was randomly allocated to receive either 'on-site' facilitation (Group A or 'off-site' facilitation (Group B. Hospitals in Group A received two on-site visits, whereas delegates from hospitals in Group B attended one off-site, 'hands-on' workshop at a training hospital. All hospitals were evaluated during a site visit six to eight months after attending an introductory workshop and were scored by means of an existing progress-monitoring tool with a scoring scale of 0–30. Successful implementation was regarded as demonstrating evidence of practice (score >10 during the site visit. Results There was no significant difference between the scores of Groups A and B (p = 0.633. Fifteen hospitals in Group A and 16 in Group B demonstrated evidence of practice. The median score for Group A was 16.52 (range 00.00–23.79 and that for Group B 14.76 (range 07.50–23.29. Conclusion A previous trial illustrated that the implementation of a new health care intervention could be scaled up by using a carefully designed educational package, combined with face-to-face facilitation by respected resource persons. This study demonstrated that the site of facilitation, either on site or at a centre of excellence, did not influence the ability of a hospital to implement KMC. The choice of outreach

  19. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  20. Aortopathy in Congenital Heart Disease in Adults: Aortic Dilatation with Decreased Aortic Elasticity that Impacts Negatively on Left Ventricular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve and/or coarctation of the aorta are consistently associated with ascending aortic and para-coarctation medial abnormalities. Medial abnormalities in the ascending aorta are prevalent in other types of patients with a variety of forms congenital heart disease (CHD), such as single ventricle, persistent truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tetralogy of Fallot. These abnormalities encompass a wide age range, and may predispose to dilatation, aneurysm, and rupture that necessitates aortic valve and root surgery. This dilatation can develop in CHD patients without stenotic region. These CHDs exhibit ongoing dilatation of the aortic root and reduced aortic elasticity and increased aortic stiffness that may relate to intrinsic properties of the aortic root. The concept of aortic dilatation is shifting a paradigm of aortic dilatation, as so called post stenotic dilatation, to primary intrinsic aortopahy. These aortic dilatation and increased stiffness can induce aortic aneurysm, rupture of the aorta and aortic regurgitation, but also provoke left ventricular hypertrophy, reduced coronary artery flow and left ventricular failure. We can recognize this association of aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic dilation and aorto-left ventricular interaction as a new clinical entity: "aortopathy".

  1. Aortic events in a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian A; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Hove, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Marfan syndrome is associated with morbidity and mortality due to aortic dilatation and dissection. Preventive aortic root replacement has been the standard treatment in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic dilatation. In this study, we present aortic event data from a nationwide Marfan...... syndrome cohort. METHOD: The nationwide cohort of Danish Marfan syndrome patients was established from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Register, where we retrieved information about aortic surgery and dissections. We associated aortic events with age, sex, and Marfan syndrome...

  2. [Aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhao-xia; You, Xiang-dong; Weng, Wen-chao; Wang, Jian-an; Shi, Jian

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms (IAs). One hundred and seven IAs patients (57 with hypertension) and 108 healthy subjects were recruited. The internal aortic diameters in systole and diastole were measured by the M-mode echocardiography, the aortic elasticity indexes were calculated and compared. The aortic distensibility (DIS) was lower and the aortic stiffness index (SI) was higher in IAs patients than those in controls (both P IAs patients with hypertension (IAs-HP) than those in IAs with no hypertension (P IAs patients and hypertension is closely related to the severity of aortic elasticity.

  3. Non- invasive in vivo analysis of a murine aortic graft using high resolution ultrasound microimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowinska, Zuzanna; Zander, Simone; Zernecke, Alma; Jacobs, Michael; Langer, Stephan; Weber, Christian; Merx, Marc W.; Koeppel, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As yet, murine aortic grafts have merely been monitored histopathologically. The aim of our study was to examine how these grafts can be monitored in vivo and non-invasively by using high-resolution ultrasound microimaging to evaluate function and morphology. A further aim was to prove if this in vivo monitoring can be correlated to immunohistological data that indicates graft integrity. Methods: Murine infrarenal aortic isografts were orthotopically transplanted into 14 female mice (C57BL/6-Background) whereas a group of sham-operated animals (n = 10) served as controls. To assess the graft morphology and hemodynamics, we examined the mice over a post-operative period of 8 weeks with a sophisticated ultrasound system (Vevo 770, Visual Sonics). Results: The non-invasive graft monitoring was feasible in all transplanted mice. We could demonstrate a regular post-transplant graft function and morphology, such as anterior/posterior wall displacement and wall thickness. Mild alterations of anterior wall motion dynamics could only be observed at the site of distal graft anastomosis (8 weeks after grafting (transplant vs. sham mice: 0.02 mm ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 mm ± 0.01, p < 0.05). However, the integrity of the entire graft wall could be confirmed by histopathological evaluation of the grafts. Conclusions: With regard to graft patency, function and morphology, high resolution ultrasound microimaging has proven to be a valuable tool for longitudinal, non-invasive, in vivo graft monitoring in this murine aortic transplantation model. Consequently, this experimental animal model provides an excellent basis for molecular and pharmacological studies using genetically engineered mice.

  4. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  5. Endoluminal Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Small Intestinal Submucosa Sandwich Endografts: A Pilot Study in Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Katsuyuki; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Corless, Christopher L.; Yin, Qiang; Yamakado, Koichiro; Wha Park, Joong; Roesch, Josef; Keller, Frederick S.; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) Sandwich endografts for the treatment of acute rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and to explore the short-term reaction of the aorta to this material.Methods: In eight adult sheep, an infrarenal AAA was created transluminally by dilation of a short Palmaz stent. In six sheep, the aneurysm was then ruptured by overdilation of the stent with a large angioplasty balloon. Two sheep with AAAs that were not ruptured served as controls. A SIS Sandwich endograft, consisting of a Z stent frame with 5 bodies and covered inside and out with SIS, was used to exclude the ruptured and non-ruptured AAAs. Follow-up aortography was done immediately after the procedure and before sacrifice at 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Autopsy and histologic studies followed.Results: Endograft placement was successful in all eight sheep. Both ruptured and non-ruptured AAAs were successfully excluded. Three animals with AAA rupture developed hind leg paralysis due to compromise of the arterial supply to the lower spinal cord and were sacrificed 1 day after the procedure. In five animals, three with rupture and two controls, follow-up aortograms revealed no aortic stenoses and no perigraft leaks. Gross and histologic studies revealed incorporation of the endografts into the aortic wall with replacement of SIS by dense neointima that was completely endothelialized in areas where the endograft was in direct contact with the aortic wall. In central portions of the endograft, in contact with the thrombosed aneurysm, endothelialization was incomplete even at 12 weeks.Conclusion: The SIS Sandwich endografts effectively excluded simple AAAs and ruptured AAAs. They were rapidly incorporated into the aortic wall. A detailed long-term study is warranted

  6. Aortic annulus and ascending aorta: Comparison of preoperative and periooperative measurement in patients with aortic stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, Michal; Ferda, Jiri; Baxa, Jan; Cech, Jakub; Hajek, Tomas; Kreuzberg, Boris; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Precise determination of the aortic annulus size constitutes an integral part of the preoperative evaluation prior to aortic valve replacement. It enables the estimation of the size of prosthesis to be implanted. Knowledge of the size of the ascending aorta is required in the preoperative analysis and monitoring of its dilation enables the precise timing of the operation. Our goal was to compare the precision of measurement of the aortic annulus and ascending aorta using magnetic resonance (MR), multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis. Methods and results: A total of 15 patients scheduled to have aortic valve replacement were enrolled into this prospective study. TTE was performed in all patients and was supplemented with TEE, CT and MR in the majority of patients. The values obtained were compared with perioperative measurements. For the measurement of aortic annulus, MR was found to be the most precise technique, followed by MDCT, TTE, and TEE. For the measurement of ascending aorta, MR again was found to be the most precise technique, followed by MDCT, TEE, and TTE. Conclusion: In our study, magnetic resonance was found to be the most precise technique for the measurement of aortic annulus and ascending aorta in patients with severe degenerative aortic stenosis.

  7. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  8. Aortic stiffness and diameter predict progressive aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, Gijs J.; Groenink, Maarten; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Aim Patients with Marfan syndrome may develop dissection due to progressive dilatation in the entire aorta, which is not always predictable by mere anatomic assessment of the aortic diameter, especially of the descending aorta. The aim of this study was to identify the predictive value of aortic

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: emerging role in poor left ventricular function severe aortic stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. John Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has become an established treatment option for high risk elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Its role in less high risk patients is being evaluated in clinical trials. Patients with severely impaired left ventricular function may be another group who may benefit from this emerging percutaneous treatment option.

  10. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition to con...

  11. The effect of endoleak on intra-aneurysmal pressure after EVE for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sheng; Jing Zaiping; Mei Zhijun; Lu Qingsheng; Zhao Jun; Zhang Suzhen; Zhao Xin; Cai Lili; Tang Jingdong; Xiong Jiang; Liao Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the intra-aneurysmal pressure curve in the presence of endoleak after endovascular exclusion (EVE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Infrarenal aortic aneurysms were created with bovine jugular vein segments or patches. Then they were underwent incomplete endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and formation of endoleaks. The pressures of blood flow outside the graft into the sac were measured. Results: The intrasac pressure was higher than systemic pressure in the presence of endoleak. After sealing the endoleak, pressure decreased significantly, and the pressure cure showed approximately linear. Conclusion: The change of intra-aneurysmal pressure curve reflected the load on aneurysmal wall after EVE, and can also help to determine the endoleak existence

  12. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Interventions: After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. Outcomes: The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. Lessons: TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size. PMID:29703033

  13. Metabolic syndrome and its effect on aortic stiffness in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkova, A; Bulas, J; Balogova, S; Reptova, A; Kisa, B; Luha, J; Kinova, S

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of proatherogenic risk factors (RF) (abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes mellitus, higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy) that move patients into a higher risk for development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. The preclinical (subclinical) target organ diseases (SOD) are early signs of atherosclerosis. An increased aortic stiffness characterised by an increased pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao) is one of SOD.The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of metabolic syndrome (MS) on aortic wall stiffness and the risk profile in premenopausal women. The aortic stiffness was measured using Arteriograph-Tensiomed, based on oscillometric measurement and analysis of the shape of brachial pulse wave, giving the PWV Ao. The results of measurements characterise a global aortic stiffness. We examined 81 premenopausal women (without history of CVD). The MS (according to the 2009 "harmonizing" definition) was present in 31 women (mean age 41.5 y), in the control group, there were 50 women (39 y). The most frequent components of MS were abdominal obesity (93 % vs 42%), arterial hypertension (68 % vs 10 %) and dyslipidemia (29 % vs 8 %). The PWV Ao was significantly higher in women with MS (9.26 m/s) compared to the control group (7.44 m/s). The aortic stiffness in women with MS compared to controls was significantly higher despite a presumed general protective hormonal effect on cardiovascular system in women with child-bearing potential (Tab. 4, Ref. 25).

  14. [Aortic valve insufficiency due to rupture of the cusp in a patient with multiple trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, J; Brilej, D; Voga, G; Kovacic, N; Smrkolj, V

    2003-06-01

    Lesions of the heart valve caused by blunt chest trauma is rare, but when it does occur it can significantly injure the patient. On the basis of autopsy studies, research shows that heart valves are injured in less than 5% of patients who have died due to impact thoracic trauma. Among the heart valves, the aortic valve is the most often lacerated, which has been proved by relevant autopsy and clinical studies. Aortic valve lesions can be the only injury, but it is possible that additional heart or large vessel injuries are also present (myocardial contusion, rupture of the atrial septum, aortic rupture, rupture of the left common carotid artery). The force that causes such an injury is often great and often causes injuries to other organs and organ systems. In a multiple trauma patient, it is very important to specifically look for heart-related injuries because it is possible that they may be overlooked or missed by the surgeon, because of other obvious injuries. We describe the case of a 41-year-old man with multiple trauma who was diagnosed with aortic valve insufficiency due to rupture of the left coronary cusp 6 weeks after a road accident. Valvuloplasty was performed. Seven years later the patient is free of symptoms and is in good physical condition. Echocardiography showed normal dimensions of the heart chambers, a normal thickness of the heart walls, and normal systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Heart valves are morphologically normal, and only an unimportant aortic insufficiency was noticed by echocardiography.

  15. Ameliorative role of gemfibrozil against partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrit Pal; Singh, Randhir; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-04-01

    Fibrates are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α agonists and are clinically used for treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Fenofibrate is reported as a cardioprotective agent in various models of cardiac dysfunction; however, limited literature is available regarding the role of gemfibrozil as a possible cardioprotective agent, especially in a non-obese model of cardiac remodelling. The present study investigated the role of gemfibrozil against partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by partial abdominal aortic constriction in rats and they survived for 4 weeks. The cardiac hypertrophy was assessed by measuring left ventricular weight to body weight ratio, left ventricular wall thickness, and protein and collagen content. The oxidative stress in the cardiac tissues was assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The haematoxylin-eosin and picrosirius red staining was used to observe cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen deposition, respectively. Moreover, serum levels of cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, and glucose were also measured. Gemfibrozil (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered since the first day of partial abdominal aortic constriction and continued for 4 weeks. The partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac oxidative stress and hypertrophy are indicated by significant change in various parameters used in the present study that were ameliorated with gemfibrozil treatment in rats. No significant change in serum parameters was observed between various groups used in the present study. It is concluded that gemfibrozil ameliorates partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac oxidative stress and hypertrophy and in rats.

  16. Kangaroo care and behavioral and physiologic pain responses in very-low-birth-weight twins: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Cusson, Regina M; Hussain, Naveed; Zhang, Di; Kelly, Sharon P

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe pain responses in three study conditions: longer (30 minutes) kangaroo care (KC) before and throughout heel stick (KC30), shorter (15 minutes) KC before and throughout heel stick (KC15), and incubator care throughout heel stick (IC) in 28-week gestational age twins. Pain responses were measured by crying time, Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), and heart rate variability indexes, including low-frequency power (LF, representing sympathetic activity), high-frequency power (HF, parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF ratio (sympathetic-parasympathetic balance). Both twins cried more and had higher PIPP pain scores and tachycardia during heel stick in the IC condition. Infant B had an incident of apnea and tachycardia by the end of the heel stick and a bradycardia episode during recovery in the IC condition. The twins had lower LF/HF ratios (better autonomic nervous system balance) during recovery in both longer and shorter KC conditions compared with the IC condition. Infant B had difficulty returning to LF/HF ratio baseline level after the painful procedure in the IC condition. These data suggest that both longer and shorter KC before and throughout painful procedures can be helpful in reducing behavioral and physiologic pain responses in preterm infants. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lysine and glutamate transport in the erythrocytes of common brushtail possum, Tammar Wallaby and eastern grey, kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, E; Kuchel, P W; Agar, N S

    1998-04-01

    It was recently coincidentally discovered, using 1H NMR spectroscopy, that the erythrocytes of two species of Australian marsupials, Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and Bettong (Bettongia penicillata), contain relatively high concentrations of the essential amino acid lysine (Agar NS, Rae CD, Chapman BE, Kuchel PW. Comp Biochem Physiol 1991;99B:575-97). Hence, in the present work the rates of transport of lysine into the erythrocytes from the Common Brushtail Possum (Dactylopsilia trivirgata) and Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) (which both have low lysine concentrations), and Tammar Wallaby were studied, to explore the mechanistic basis of this finding. The concentration-dependence of the uptake was studied with lysine alone and in the presence of arginine, which may be a competitor of the transport in some species. In relation to GSH metabolism, glutamate uptake was determined in the presence and absence of Na+. The data was analysed to yield estimates of the maximal velocity (Vmax) and the Km in each of the species. Erythrocytes from Tammar Wallaby lacked saturable lysine transport in contrast to the other two species. The glutamate uptake was normal in all three animals for adequate GSH biosynthesis.

  18. Infection with Toxoplasma gondii in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus and a Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Díaz-Ayala

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxoplasmosis is an infectious, zoonotic and parasitic disease, caused by Toxoplasma gondii. In this manucript, two cases of infection with T. gondii in captive animals from a zoological park in the central region of Chile are described. One case was a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus, which is highly susceptible to the infection, and the other was a Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum, a rodent in which there is no previous report of the infection. Both animals had myocarditis, with the presence of intralesional tachizoites and cysts suggestive of infection with T. gondii. This infection was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in both animals. The origin of the infection is unknown, but it is likely that free ranging domestic felines were associated with the dissemination of the parasites. This highlights the importance of controlling the domestic animal populations in zoological parks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that T. gondii infection is described in a Patagonian mara, adding a new host for this infectious agent.

  19. Evalvacija šolskega matematičnega tekmovanja Kenguru = Evaluation of the Kangaroo School Mathematical Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Komel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year Slovene students of secondary vocational schools, among them also the Construction and Service School in Kranj (Economics and Service Educational Centre Kranj, compete in knowledge in the Kangaroo International Mathematical Competition . We decided to evaluate two points of view of the competition, namely processional in the sense of extra-curricular activities, i.e. preparation for the competition, and interpersonal in the sense of deepening the relations between teachers and students. One of the main aims of our evaluation, besides deepening the relations, was to motivate and prepare as many students as possible for the competition. While carrying out the project, there was a growing conviction that the process of evaluation is more important than its results, because it has united and brought closer all the participants, students as well as teacher-mentors. An extremely positive consequence of evaluation is the fact that the understanding of the competition itself has improved and it has also boosted its own efficiency. School climate has become friendlier, while the project group of mathematicians gained new guidelines for further work.

  20. A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H Black

    Full Text Available Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal "kangaroo", and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade--Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.

  1. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, K.R.; Fisher, J.A.; Muths, E.; Trott, J.; Janssens, P.A.; Reich, C.; Shaw, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of ??-lactalbumin, ??-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Health care professionals' perspectives on the requirements facilitating the roll-out of kangaroo mother care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma ten Ham

    2016-10-01

    Purpose of the research: To explore and describe the perspectives of health professionals on the requirements for the rolling-out process of KMC as a best practice in South Africa. Methodology: Twelve semi-structured individual interviews were conducted in 2012 with health professionals from various South African healthcare levels, involved in the implementation and the rolling-out process of kangaroo mother care. Content analysis were guided in terms of the four requirements for roll-out of best practices, identified in Edwards and Grinspun's Evidence Informed Model of Care. Results: The requirements for the successful rollout of best practices mentioned by the participants in this study concur with the requirements of Edwards and Grinspun: personal alignment and protocol/policy alignment with the best practice; a roll-out plan; leadership; and supporting and reinforcing structures such as: resources, communicating, education and development regarding the best practice, and the organisational structure. The requirements were identified at four different levels: individual level (e.g. the nurse and medical specialists, management level (of the hospital, provincial level and national level.

  3. [Marfan syndrome: clinical and pathomorphological restructurings after surgical treatment of aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuraev, R K; Zerbino, D D

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined the state of patients suffering from Marfan syndrome (MS) who endured operation for ascending aorta aneurysm with replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve (Bentall operation), studying alterations of the skeleton, face, heart and eyes, as well as pathomorphological restructurings in the aortic wall. The study was carried out 7.0 ± 4.2 years after the operation. We examined a total of 39 patients with MS - 27 (69.2%) men and 12 (30.8%) women aged from 22 to 70 years old (average age - 42.1 ± 13.4 years). All patients were operated on for dissecting aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by a considerable degree of aortic valve insufficiency or aortic ostium stenosis. The mean diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva amounted to 7.0 ± 1.3 cm (minimal - 5.0 cm, maximal - 12.0 cm), the Z-score prior to operation was 12.7 ± 6.5. The time form making the diagnosis of MS to surgical intervention for aortic aneurysm amounted to 9.6 ± 5.9 years. The condition after operative treatment in all patients was satisfactory, with the haemodynamic indices stable: systolic AP - 133.5 ± 19.1 mm Hg, diastolic AP 85.1 ± 12.9 mm Hg, heart rate 74.8 ± 7.2 bpm. The average systemic score for the symptoms and tests of MS patients amounted to 8.2 ± 3.3 points. Pathohistological alterations of the aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome consisted in pronounced restructuring of the wall with deep irreversible alternative changes. The pathological process extended in the middle aortic layer all alone the length, but not only in the portions of rupture and dissection. The main pathomorphological signs in MS were as follows: focal accumulations of mucoid substances, dystrophic alterations of smooth-muscle cells, ribbon-like anuclear zones, formation of cystlike cavities, alterations of elastic fibres - fragmentation, hyperelastosis, multiplication, thinning and straightening, zones of elastolysis.

  4. Automated Normalized Cut Segmentation of Aortic Root in CT Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa; Wiegerinck, Esther; Planken, Nils; VanBavel, Ed; van Assen, Hans; Baan, Jan Jr; Marquering, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is a new minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. This procedure is associated with adverse effects like paravalvular leakage, stroke, and coronary obstruction. Accurate automated sizing for

  5. Juxtarenal Modular Aortic Stent Graft Infection Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Novotný

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We are presenting a case report of an infected modular abdominal stent graft. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old male patient three years after Cook’s modular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA graft implantation for juxtarenal AAA with an implantation of a stent extension into the right common iliac artery for type Ib endoleak. The patient was admitted into our center in severe condition with suspected retroperitoneal bleeding. Computed tomography angiography (CTAG confirmed retroperitoneal bleeding in the right common iliac artery. An urgent surgical revision was indicated; destructed arterial wall around the stent extension in the right common iliac artery was discovered. Due to the severe state of health of the patient, a resection of the infected stent and affected arterial wall was performed, followed by an iliac-femoral crossover bypass. The patient was transported to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal failure, with maximal catecholamine support. Combined antibiotic treatment was started. The patient died five hours after the procedure. The cause of death was multiorgan failure caused by sepsis. Hemocultures and perioperative microbiological cultures showed the infection agent to be Staphylococcus aureus methicillin sensitive. Conclusion. Stent graft infection is a rare complication. Treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity.

  6. Clinical Examination for Acute Aortic Dissection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohle, Robert; Kareemi, Hashim Khaliq; Wells, George; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2018-04-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition due to a tear in the aortic wall. It is difficult to diagnose and if missed carries a significant mortality. We conducted a librarian-assisted systematic review of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane database from 1968 to July 2016. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and data were extracted by two independent reviewers (agreement measured by kappa). Studies were combined if low clinical and statistical heterogeneity (I 2  < 30%). Study quality was assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Bivariate random effects meta analyses using Revman 5 and SAS 9.3 were performed. We identified 792 records: 60 were selected for full text review, nine studies with 2,400 participants were included (QUADAS-2 low risk of bias, κ = 0.89 [for full-text review]). Prevalence of aortic dissection ranged from 21.9% to 76.1% (mean ± SD = 39.1% ± 17.1%). The clinical findings increasing probability of aortic dissection were 1) neurologic deficit (n = 3, specificity = 95%, positive likelihood ratio [LR+] = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.3-5.7, I 2  = 0%) and 2) hypotension (n = 4, specificity = 95%, LR+ = 2.9 95% CI = 1.8-4.6, I 2  = 42%), and decreasing probability were the absence of a widened mediastinum (n = 4, sensitivity = 76%-95%, negative likelihood ratio [LR-] = 0.14-0.60, I 2  = 93%) and an American Heart Association aortic dissection detection (AHA ADD) risk score < 1 (n = 1, sensitivity = 91%, LR- = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.15-0.33). Suspicion for acute aortic dissection should be raised with hypotension, pulse, or neurologic deficit. Conversely, a low AHA ADD score decreases suspicion. Clinical gestalt informed by high- and low-risk features together with an absence of an alternative diagnosis should drive investigation for acute aortic dissection. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Quantification of aortic regurgitation by magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Lindvig, K; Hildebrandt, P

    1993-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in the quantification of aortic valvular blood flow was examined in 10 patients with angiographically verified aortic regurgitation. MR velocity mapping succeeded in identifying and quantifying the regurgitation in all patients, and the regurgit......The use of magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in the quantification of aortic valvular blood flow was examined in 10 patients with angiographically verified aortic regurgitation. MR velocity mapping succeeded in identifying and quantifying the regurgitation in all patients...

  8. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  9. Vessel asymmetry as an additional diagnostic tool in the assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Barry J

    2009-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of the wall tissue. On the basis of this hypothesis, the knowledge of the stress acting on the wall of an unruptured aneurysm could be useful in determining the risk of rupture. The role of asymmetry has previously been identified in idealized AAA models and is now studied using realistic AAAs in the current work. METHODS: Fifteen patient-specific AAAs were studied to estimate the relationship between wall stress and geometrical parameters. Three-dimensional AAA models were reconstructed from computed tomography scan data. The stress distribution on the AAA wall was evaluated by the finite element method, and peak wall stress was compared with both diameter and centerline asymmetry. A simple method of determining asymmetry was adapted and developed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine potential significance of results. RESULTS: Mean von Mises peak wall stress +\\/- standard deviation was 0.4505 +\\/- 0.14 MPa (range, 0.3157-0.9048 MPa). Posterior wall stress increases with anterior centerline asymmetry. Peak stress increased by 48% and posterior wall stress by 38% when asymmetry was introduced into a realistic AAA model. CONCLUSION: The relationship between posterior wall stress and AAA asymmetry showed that excessive bulging of one surface results in elevated wall stress on the opposite surface. Assessing the degree of bulging and asymmetry that is experienced in an individual AAA may be of benefit to surgeons in the decision-making process and may provide a useful adjunct to diameter as a surgical intervention guide.

  10. Impact of bicuspid aortic valve on complications and death in infective endocarditis of native aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Gokhan; Bayrak, Fatih; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the impact of bicuspid aortic valve on the prognosis of patients who had definite infective endocarditis of the native aortic valve.Of 51 patients, a bicuspid aortic valve was present in 22 (43%); the other 29 had tricuspid aortic valves. On average, the patients who had bicuspid valves were younger than those who had tricuspid valves. Patients with a tricuspid valve had larger left atrial diameters and were more likely to have severe mitral regurgitation.Periannular complications, which we detected in 19 patients (37%), were much more common in the patients who had a bicuspid valve (64% vs 17%, P = 0.001). The presence of a bicuspid valve was the only significant independent predictor of periannular complications. The in-hospital mortality rate in the bicuspid group was lower than that in the tricuspid group; however, this figure did not reach statistical significance (9% vs 24%, P = 0.15). In multivariate analysis, left atrial diameter was the only independent predictor associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5; P = 0.031).In our study, patients with infective endocarditis in a bicuspid aortic valve were younger and had a higher incidence of periannular complications. Although a worse prognosis has been reported previously, we found that infective endocarditis in a native bicuspid aortic valve is not likely to increase the risk of death in comparison with infective endocarditis in native tricuspid aortic valves.

  11. The high aerobic capacity of a small, marsupial rat-kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata) is matched by the mitochondrial and capillary morphology of its skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Koa N; Dawson, Terence J

    2012-09-15

    We examined the structure-function relationships that underlie the aerobic capacities of marsupial mammals that hop. Marsupials have relatively low basal metabolic rates (BMR) and historically were seen as 'low energy' mammals. However, the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus (family Macropodidae), has aerobic capacities equivalent to athletic placentals. It has an extreme aerobic scope (fAS) and its large locomotor muscles feature high mitochondrial and capillary volumes. M. rufus belongs to a modern group of kangaroos and its high fAS is not general for marsupials. However, other hopping marsupials may have elevated aerobic capacities. Bettongia penicillata, a rat-kangaroo (family Potoroidae), is a small (1 kg), active hopper whose fAS is somewhat elevated. We examined the oxygen delivery system in its muscles to ascertain links with hopping. An elevated fAS of 23 provided a relatively high maximal aerobic oxygen consumption ( ) in B. penicillata; associated with this is a skeletal muscle mass of 44% of body mass. Ten muscles were sampled to estimate the total mitochondrial and capillary volume of the locomotor muscles. Values in B. penicillata were similar to those in M. rufus and in athletic placentals. This small hopper had high muscle mitochondrial volume densities (7.1-11.9%) and both a large total capillary volume (6 ml kg(-1) body mass) and total capillary erythrocyte volume (3.2 ml kg(-1)). Apparently, a considerable aerobic capacity is required to achieve the benefits of the extended stride in fast hopping. Of note, the ratio of to total muscle mitochondrial volume in B. penicillata was 4.9 ml O(2) min(-1) ml(-1). Similar values occur in M. rufus and also placental mammals generally, not only athletic species. If such relationships occur in other marsupials, a fundamental structure-function relationship for oxygen delivery to muscles likely originated with or before the earliest mammals.

  12. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  14. Intermittent, Non Cyclic Severe Mechanical Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Seunghwan; Lee, Myung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction can result from thrombosis or pannus formation. We describe an unusual case of intermittent, non cyclic mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction due to pannus formation with thrombus in the absence of systolic restriction of disk excursion, that presented with intermittent severe aortic regurgitation. PMID:24459568

  15. Aortic microcalcification is associated with elastin fragmentation in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanga, Shaynah; Hibender, Stijntje; Ridwan, Yanto; van Roomen, Cindy; Vos, Mariska; van der Made, Ingeborg; van Vliet, Nicole; Franken, Romy; van Riel, Luigi Amjg; Groenink, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Mulder, Barbara Jm; de Vries, Carlie Jm; Essers, Jeroen; de Waard, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder in which aortic rupture is the major cause of death. MFS patients with an aortic diameter below the advised limit for prophylactic surgery ( <5 cm) may unexpectedly experience an aortic dissection or rupture, despite yearly monitoring. Hence,

  16. Challenging Friesian horse diseases : aortic rupture and megaesophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic rupture is quite rare in Warmblood horses and is best known as an acute and fatal rupture of the aortic root in older breeding stallions. It has now become clear that aortic rupture, which is diagnosed around an age of 4 years, is more frequent in the Friesian breed than in others. The high

  17. Dissection of Retroesophageal Aortic Diverticulum and Descending Aorta in a Patient with Right Aortic Arch: Magnetic Resonance Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, S.-F.; Ng, S.-H.; Fu, Morgan; Lo, P.-H.; Cheng, Y.-F.; Lee, T.-Y.

    1996-01-01

    An acute aortic dissection involved the retroesophageal aortic diverticulum (RAD) and descending thoracic aorta in a patient with right aortic arch. The RAD, which was separated into false and true lumens by an intimal flap-the classic diagnostic sign of aortic dissection-was overlooked on transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography but was clearly depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It was found that MRI can delineate the anatomy of a congenital arch anomaly complicated by great vessels disease

  18. Microarray analysis to identify the similarities and differences of pathogenesis between aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofu; Bi, Lechang; Wang, Gaofeng; Huang, Feilai; Lu, Mingjing; Zhu, Kai

    2018-06-01

    Objectives Expression profile of GSE57691 was analyzed to identify the similarities and differences between aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods The expression profile of GSE57691 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 20 small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, 29 large abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, 9 aortic occlusive disease samples, and 10 control samples. Using the limma package in R, the differentially expressed genes were screened. Followed by enrichment analysis was performed for the differentially expressed genes using database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery online tool. Based on string online tool and Cytoscape software, protein-protein interaction network and module analyses were carried out. Moreover, integrated TF platform database and Cytoscape software were used for constructing transcriptional regulatory networks. Results As a result, 1757, 354, and 396 differentially expressed genes separately were identified in aortic occlusive disease, large abdominal aortic aneurysm, and small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples. UBB was significantly enriched in proteolysis related pathways with a high degree in three groups. SPARCL1 was another gene shared by these groups and regulated by NFIA, which had a high degree in transcriptional regulatory network. ACTB, a significant upregulated gene in abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, could be regulated by CLIC4, which was significantly enriched in cell motions. ACLY and NFIB were separately identified in aortic occlusive disease and small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, and separately enriched in lipid metabolism and negative regulation of cell proliferation. Conclusions The downregulated UBB, NFIA, and SPARCL1 might play key roles in both aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, while the upregulated ACTB might only involve in abdominal aortic aneurysm. ACLY and NFIB were specifically involved in aortic occlusive

  19. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  1. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  2. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  3. Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Salazar; Hanna, Franklin; Capasso, Aminta

    2009-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  4. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process.

  5. Proposed new mechanism of traumatic aortic rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crass, J.R.; Cohen, A.M.; Motta, A.O.; Tomashefski, J.F.; Wiesen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The currently accepted mechanism to explain traumatic aortic rupture from rapid deceleration invokes a combination of traction, torsion, and hydrostatic forces. None of these forces individually is of adequate magnitude to result in aortic disruption. This paper proposes a theory, that aortic lacerations result from a pinch of the aorta between the spine and the anterior bony thorax during the chest compression caused by abrupt deceleration. Three sets of experiments were performed. Geometric analysis of CT images and compression of an articulated skeleton were performed to assess where the anterior and posterior osseous structures would contact if maximally compressed. Fresh dog aortas were pinched in a manner that would mimic the manubrium impacting the spine. Finally, attempts were made to tear an aorta via traction and torsion (whiplash)

  6. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier......BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... and mortality. In a stepwise cox model with forward selection GLS was the sole independent predictor HR=1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.25), p=0.04. Comparing the overall log likelihood χ(2) of the predictive power of the multivariable model containing GLS was statistically superior to models based on Euro...

  7. Flow measurement at the aortic root

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    during CMR and aortic stenosis were excluded from the analyses. Stroke volumes were measured volumetrically (SVref) from steady-state free precision short axis images covering the entire left ventricle, excluding the papillary muscles and including the left ventricular outflow tract. Flow sequences......BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard of cardiac volumetric measurements. Flow in the aortic root is often measured at the sinotubular junction, even though placing the slice just above valve level may be more precise. It is unknown how much flow...... theoretically be equal to flow measurements, SVV and SVST were compared to SVref. RESULTS: Initially, 152 patients were included. 22 were excluded because of arrhythmias during scans and 9 were excluded for aortic stenosis. Accordingly, data from 121 patients were analysed and of these 63 had visually evident...

  8. A geometric reappraisal of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair according to aortic arch types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrocco-Trischitta, Massimiliano M.; de Beaufort, Hector W.; Secchi, Francesco; van Bakel, Theodorus M.; Ranucci, Marco; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Moll, Frans L.; Trimarchi, Santi

    Objective: This study assessed whether the additional use of the aortic arch classification in type I, II, and III may complement Ishimaru's aortic arch map and provide valuable information on the geometry and suitability of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods:

  9. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author)

  10. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheick-Yousif, Basheer; Sheinfield, Ami; Tager, Salis; Ghosh, Probal; Priesman, Sergey; Smolinsky, Aram K; Raanani, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    As the shortcomings of the Bentall operation and its variants in the Marfan syndrome have become apparent, the recent cusp-sparing techniques (remodeling or reimplantation) bear promise of better mid-term and long-term outcomes. To examine the results of aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome. During the period March 1994 to September 2007, 220 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery; 20 were Marfan patients (group 1) who were compared with another 20 Marfan patients undergoing composite aortic root replacement (group 2). Fourteen patients had aortic dissection and 26 had thoracic aortic aneurysm. There were 31 males and 9 females with a mean age of 37.9 +/- 13.8 years. In group 1, reimplantation was used in 13 patients, remodeling in 4, and aortic valve repair with sinotubular junction replacement in 3. In group 2, a mechanical valve conduit was used. Mean logistic Euroscore was 12.27 +/- 14.6% for the whole group, five of whom were emergent cases Group 2 had more previous cardiac procedures compared to group 1 (9 vs. 2, P = 0.03) and shorter cross-clamp time (122 +/- 27.1 vs. 153.9 +/- 23.7 minutes, P = 0.0004). Overall mortality was 10%. Early mortality was 10% in group 2 and 5% in group 1 (NS). Mean follow-up time was 25 months for group 2 and 53 months for group 1. Three patients were reoperated; all had undergone the remodeling. Five year freedom from reoperation and death was 86% and 90% in group 2 and 70% and 95% in group 1 (P = 0.6, P = 0.6), respectively. Late survival of patients with Marfan syndrome was similar in both groups. Root reconstruction tends towards a higher incidence of late reoperations if the remodeling technique is used. We now prefer to use the reimplantation technique.

  11. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  12. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  13. The Relationship Between Pulsatile Flow Impingement and Intraluminal Thrombus Deposition in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozowy, Richard J; Kuhn, David C S; Ducas, Annie A; Boyd, April J

    2017-03-01

    Direct numerical simulations were performed on four patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometries and the resulting pulsatile blood flow dynamics were compared to aneurysm shape and correlated with intraluminal thrombus (ILT) deposition. For three of the cases, turbulent vortex structures impinged/sheared along the anterior wall and along the posterior wall a zone of recirculating blood formed. Within the impingement region the AAA wall was devoid of ILT and remote to this region there was an accumulation of ILT. The high wall shear stress (WSS) caused by the impact of vortexes is thought to prevent the attachment of ILT. WSS from impingement is comparable to peak-systolic WSS in a normal-sized aorta and therefore may not damage the wall. Expansion occurred to a greater extent in the direction of jet impingement and the wall-normal force from the continuous impact of vortexes may contribute to expansion. It was shown that the impingement region has low oscillatory shear index (OSI) and recirculation zones can have either low or high OSI. No correlation could be identified between OSI and ILT deposition since different flow dynamics can have similar OSI values.

  14. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  15. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  16. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as a Stridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stridor is an abnormal, high-pitched, whining breathing sound caused by a blockage in the throat or larynx that is usually heard in children. We describe an unusual case of an 81-year-old man brought to our emergency department with sudden onset of dyspnea and shortness of breath. Stridor could be heard without a stethoscope. We found a huge mass over the left upper chest on chest radiography, suggesting an aortic aneurysm. We believed that these symptoms were caused by a huge thoracic aortic aneurysm with trachea/bronchi compression. Chest computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis.

  18. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  19. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Arnáiz-García

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  20. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  1. Testicular shield for para-aortic radiotherapy and estimation of gonad doses

    OpenAIRE

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Kannadhasan, S.; Shariff, M. H.; Ghamrawy, Kamal El

    2008-01-01

    For radiotherapy of para-aortic and abdominal regions in male patients, gonads are to be protected to receive less than 2% of the prescribed dose. A testicular shield was fabricated for abdominal radiotherapy with 15 MV X-rays ((Clinac 2300 CD, Varian AG) with low melting point alloy (Cerroband). The dimensions of the testicular shield were 6.5 cm diameter and 3.5 cm depth with 1.5 cm wall thickness. During treatment, this shield was held in position by a rectangular sponge and Styrofo...

  2. Hemoglobin induces monocyte recruitment and CD163-macrophage polarization in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Lindholt, Jes S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased hemoglobin (Hb) accumulation was reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). CD163 is a macrophage receptor involved in tissue Hb clearance, however its role in AAA has not been reported. We investigated the role of Hb on monocyte recruitment and differentiation towards CD......163 expressing macrophages ex vivo, in vitro and in human AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: CD163 mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in human AAA (n=7) vs. healthy wall (n=6). CD163 was predominantly found in adventitia of AAA, coinciding with areas rich in hemosiderin and adjacent...

  3. Aortic valve-sparing operation after correction of heart displacement due to pectus excavatum using Nuss procedure in a Marfan syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Naoto; Yuzaki, Mitsuru; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Nasu, Michihiro; Takahashi, Yutaka; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular surgery in the setting of chest wall deformities is a clinical challenge. Pectus excavatum, for example, can cause heart displacement to the left thoracic cavity, following the poor operative field. This report highlights a case in which a successful aortic valve-sparing operation via conventional median sternotomy after correction of the heart displacement due to pectus excavatum using Nuss procedure in Marfan syndrome. This technique can be one surgical option in Marfan syndrome patients with pectus excavatum and thoracic aortic aneurysm under close follow up.

  4. In vivo transfer of cholesteryl ester from high and low density plasma lipoproteins into human aortic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, S.; Hjelms, E.

    1988-01-01

    For the study of cholesteryl ester transfer from different plasma lipoproteins into human aortic tissue, patients scheduled for reconstructive aortic surgery were intravenously injected with autologous in vitro labeled lipoproteins 20 to 24 hours before aortic intima-media samples were obtained during the operation. The injectate contained high density lipoproteins (d greater than 1.063) labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ester and lipoproteins of lower density (d less than 1.063) labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester or lipoproteins with the opposite labeling. In 16 aortic tissue samples (some with visible atherosclerosis) from 11 normocholesterolemic patients, the aortic influx of total cholesteryl ester was 1 to 50 nmol x cm-2 x day-1. Some 39% +/- 3% (mean +/- SEM) of the influx was derived from high density lipoproteins, which in plasma accounted for only 22% +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM) of the esterified cholesterol. The findings suggest that: 1) esterified cholesterol from the two lipoprotein fractions in plasma enter the aortic intima by the same mechanism, and 2) influx of cholesteryl ester from the smaller, high density lipoproteins is greater than influx from the larger, lower density lipoproteins considering their concentrations in plasma. In some patients, the cholesterol content in the intima-media tissue with no visible atherosclerosis corresponded to only a few months of continuous cholesteryl ester influx. This time is short considering the age of the patients and, therefore, indicates that removal of esterified cholesterol from the intima-media is of major importance in preventing cholesterol deposition in the arterial wall

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Hemodynamic Changes in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm After Stent-Graft Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, Thomas; Lotfey, Mourad; Boehm, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the hemodynamic changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after stent-graft placement based on multidetector CT angiography (MDCT-A) datasets using the possibilities of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Eleven patients with AAA and one patient with left-side common iliac aneurysm undergoing MDCT-A before and after stent-graft implantation were included. Based on the CT datasets, three-dimensional grid-based models of AAA were built. The minimal size of tetrahedrons was determined for grid-independence simulation. The CFD program was validated by comparing the calculated flow with an experimentally generated flow in an identical, anatomically correct silicon model of an AAA. Based on the results, pulsatile flow was simulated. A laminar, incompressible flow-based inlet condition, zero traction-force outlet boundary, and a no-slip wall boundary condition was applied. The measured flow volume and visualized flow pattern, wall pressure, and wall shear stress before and after stent-graft implantation were compared. The experimentally and numerically generated streamlines are highly congruent. After stenting, the simulation shows a reduction of wall pressure and wall shear stress and a more equal flow through both external iliac arteries after stenting. The postimplantation flow pattern is characterized by a reduction of turbulences. New areas of high pressure and shear stress appear at the stent bifurcation and docking area. CFD is a versatile and noninvasive tool to demonstrate changes of flow rate and flow pattern caused by stent-graft implantation. The desired effect and possible complications of a stent-graft implantation can be visualized. CFD is a highly promising technique and improves our understanding of the local structural and fluid dynamic conditions for abdominal aortic stent placement

  6. Newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh: Implications for the adaptation of kangaroo mother care for community-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Erin C; Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A; Al Mahmud, Abdullah; Shah, Rashed; Farzin, Azadeh; Cristofalo, Elizabeth A; Akhter, Sadika; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2014-12-01

    Bangladesh has one of the world's highest rates of low birth weight along with prevalent traditional care practices that leave newborns highly vulnerable to hypothermia, infection, and early death. We conducted formative research to explore existing newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh with an emphasis on thermal protection, and to identify potential facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for the community level delivery of kangaroo mother care (CKMC). Forty in-depth interviews and 14 focus group discussions were conducted between September and December 2012. Participants included pregnant women and mothers, husbands, maternal and paternal grandmothers, traditional birth attendants, village doctors, traditional healers, pharmacy men, religious leaders, community leaders, and formal healthcare providers. Audio recordings were transcribed and translated into English, and the textual data were analyzed using the Framework Approach. We find that harmful newborn care practices, such as delayed wrapping and early initiation of bathing, are changing as more biomedical advice from formal healthcare providers is reaching the community through word-of-mouth and television campaigns. While the goal of CKMC was relatively easily understood and accepted by many of the participants, logistical and to a lesser extent ideological barriers exist that may keep the practice from being adopted easily. Women feel a sense of inevitable responsibility for household duties despite the desire to provide the best care for their new babies. Our findings showed that participants appreciated CKMC as an appropriate treatment method for ill babies, but were less accepting of it as a protective method of caring for seemingly healthy newborns during the first few days of life. Participants highlighted the necessity of receiving help from family members and witnessing other women performing CKMC with positive outcomes if they are to adopt the behavior themselves. Focusing intervention

  7. Hybrid aortic repair with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castro-Madrazo, José Antonio; Rivas-Domínguez, Margarita; Fernández-Prendes, Carlota; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Amer; Llaneza-Coto, José Manuel; Alonso-Pérez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening condition. Hybrid repair has been described for the treatment of complex aortic pathology such as thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) and type A and B dissections, although open and total endovascular repair are also possible. Open surgery is still associated with substantial perioperative morbi-mortality rates, thus less invasive techniques such as endovascular repair and hybrid procedures can achieve good results in centers with experience. We present the case of a patient with a chronic type B dissection and TAAA degeneration that was treated in a single stage hybrid procedure with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from the ascending aorta and TEVAR. At three-year follow up, the patient is free of intervention-related complications.

  8. Strategy to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch: aortic root enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Sanki, Prokash; Bhattacharya, Subhankar; Siddique, Javed Veqar

    2014-02-01

    The choice of a valve with an effective orifice area matching the body surface area and providing efficient hemodynamics is an important factor affecting mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Our preventative strategy was to implant a larger prosthetic valve by aortic root enlargement using the Nunez procedure in 17 patients between February 2010 and January 2011. The decision to enlarge the aortic root was taken when the 19-mm sizer could not be negotiated easily through the aortic root, or on the basis of body surface area of the patient or type of prosthesis available. Postoperative reductions in peak and mean pressure gradients across aortic valve of 12.8-16.5 and 10.2-12.6 mm Hg, respectively, were observed. Postoperative effective orifice areas of the aortic valves were 1.1-1.5 cm(2). By upsizing the aortic valve, we were able to eliminate patient-prosthesis mismatch in 5 patients, and reduce severe patient-prosthesis mismatch to moderate in 11. Aortic root enlargement is a safe procedure. Therefore, cardiac surgeons should not be reluctant to enlarge the aortic root with an autologous pericardial patch to permit implantation of an adequate size of aortic valve prosthesis, with minimal additional aortic crossclamp time and no added cost.

  9. Is there a prospect for hybrid aortic arch surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mohamad; Harky, Amer; Bilal, Haris

    2018-05-16

    The surge of endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm in current modern aortic surgery practice has been the key for surgical management of elective cases of thoracic aortic aneurysms. This has paved way for the combined hybrid approach to be amongst the armamentarium for the management of aortic arch disease. The pivotal understanding of the aortic arch natural history coupled with device technology advancement allowed surgeons insight into delivery of hybrid surgery with acceptable morbidity and mortality results. This review article provides current insights into hybrid technique of aortic arch aneurysm repair and the evidences behind its applicability to arch surgery. It is aimed to highlight the challenges encountered for this innovative approach and correlate its challenges to those that are met by the conventional open aortic arch repair.

  10. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-07-28

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed.

  11. New predictor of aortic enlargement in uncomplicated type B aortic dissection based on elliptic Fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshiro; Kuroda, Yosuke; Uchiyama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Naomi; Nakazawa, Junji; Harada, Ryo; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to re-examine the conventional predictive factors for dissected aortic enlargement, such as the aortic and false lumen diameter and to consider whether the morphological elements of the dissected aorta could be predictors by quantifying the 'shape' of the true lumen based on elliptic Fourier analysis. A total of 80 patients with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection were included. The patients were divided into 'Enlargement group' and 'No Change group.' Between the 2 groups, the mean systolic blood pressure during follow-up, aortic and false lumen maximum diameters, and analysed morphological data were compared using each statistical method. The maximum aortic and false lumen diameters were significantly larger in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (39.3 vs 35.9 mm; P = 0.0058) (23.5 vs 18.2 mm; P = 0.000095). The principal component 1, which is the data calculated by elliptic Fourier analysis, was significantly lower in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (0.020 vs - 0.072; P = 0.000049). The mean systolic blood pressure ≥130 mmHg, aortic diameter, false lumen diameter and principal component 1 were included in the Cox proportional hazard model as covariates to determine the significant predictive variable. Principal component 1 demonstrated the only significance with aortic enlargement on multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.32; P = 0.048). The analysed and calculated morphological data of the shape of the true lumen can be more effective predictive factors of aortic enlargement of type B dissection than the conventional factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  14. Retroperitoneal aortic hemorrhage caused by penetration of an endovascular stent-graft anchoring barb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Christopher P; Winterbottom, Andrew; Shaida, Nadeem; Boyle, Jonathan R

    2013-08-01

    To report a rare case of acute intraoperative retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to aortic penetration by the suprarenal anchoring barb on a stent-graft. A 75-year-old patient on dual antiplatelet therapy for coronary stents and low-molecular-weight heparin for atrial thrombus underwent elective endovascular repair of a 6.7-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A device with suprarenal fixation and metal anchoring barbs was implanted, and a molding balloon was used that at no time covered the proximal bare metal stents or barbs. In recovery, the patient became tachycardic and hypotensive. After resuscitation, imaging identified an anterior barb penetrating the aortic wall, causing the acute retroperitoneal hemorrhage. A decision to treat conservatively rather than resort to open surgery was difficult but ultimately influenced by the patients' high risk for open surgery. The patient was treated by aggressive reversal of heparin and platelet transfusion, and the bleed settled spontaneously. Major surgery and subsequent morbidity may be avoided by medical management of what would appear to be a surgical problem.

  15. Type A Aortic Dissection Presenting with Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bao-Tzung; Li, Chun-Yi; Chen, Ying-Tsung

    2014-05-01

    Type A aortic dissection with concurrent ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is relatively rare. However, it can be potentially fatal and easily misdiagnosed as STEMI alone. Misdiagnosis will lead to inappropriate administration of anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapy and delayed surgical repair of the aorta. In patients with STEMI, short reperfusion time is associated with improved survival, and minimizing the door-to-balloon time is the goal of therapy worldwide. However, signs critical for differential diagnosis may be overlooked in the rush to primary percutaneous coronary intervention. When a patient is encountered who presents with chest pain and ST elevation on electrocardiogram, STEMI should not be the only diagnosis considered. By using bedside available information, detailed history taking and focused physical examination, it is possible to avoid a mistaken diagnosis. Here we report a case of Stanford type A aortic dissection with STEMI that was initially misdiagnosed as sole acute inferior wall myocardial infarction. Patient mortality may have resulted from delayed diagnosis and surgical treatment. Acute myocardial infarction; Aortic dissection.

  16. Four-dimensional flow MRI of stented versus stentless aortic valve bioprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesteren, Floortje van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wollersheim, Laurens W.; Kaya, Abdullah; Mol, Bas A. de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baan, Jan; Boekholdt, S.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederveen, A.J.; Ooij, Pim van; Planken, R.N. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate aortic velocity, wall shear stress (WSS) and viscous energy loss (EL) of stented and stentless bioprostheses using 4D flow MRI 1 year after surgical aortic valve replacement. For this cross-sectional study 28 patients with stented (n = 14) or stentless (n = 14) bioprosthesis underwent non-contrast-enhanced 4D-flow MRI at 1.5 T. Analyses included a comparison of velocity, WSS and EL in the ascending aorta during peak systole for both spatially averaged values and a comparison of local differences using per-voxel analysis. No significant differences were found in peak and mean velocity (stented vs. stentless: 2.45 m/s vs. 2.11 m/s; p = 0.09 and 0.60 m/s vs. 0.62 m/s; p = 0.89), WSS (0.60 Pa vs. 0.59 Pa; p = 0.55) and EL (10.17 mW vs. 7.82 mW; p = 0.10). Per-voxel analysis revealed significantly higher central lumen velocity, and lower outer lumen velocity, WSS and EL for stentless versus stented prostheses. One year after aortic valve implantation with stented and stentless bioprostheses, velocity, WSS and EL were comparable when assessed for averaged values in the ascending aorta. However, the flow profile described with local analysis for stentless prosthesis is potentially favourable with a significantly higher central velocity profile and lower values for outer lumen velocity, WSS and EL. (orig.)

  17. Open Treatment of Blunt Injuries of Supra-Aortic Branches: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladojevic, Milos; Markovic, Miroslav; Ilic, Nikola; Pejkic, Sinisa; Banzic, Igor; Djoric, Predrag; Koncar, Igor; Tomic, Ivan; Davidovic, Lazar

    2016-02-01

    Blunt injuries of the supra-aortic branches are rare entity, and majority of patients die before arrival at the hospital. Those who arrive alive require complex and fast procedure that requires sternotomy. We report 3 successfully managed cases. We report 3 patients with injury of supra-aortic branches. One was treated urgently due to longitudinal rupture on the posterior wall of innominate artery after car accident, and another 2 had chronic false aneurysm located at the very orifice of the right subclavian and left common carotid artery. In first and second patient bypass grafting with a hand-made, Y-shaped, 8-mm Dacron graft from the ascending aorta to the right common carotid and proximal right subclavian artery were performed, whereas in last 1 bypass grafting from the ascending aorta to the cervical part of the left common carotid artery was performed. In our facility, there were no possibilities for any endovascular treatment. When endovascular technology is not available, open surgical repair of blunt injuries of supra-aortic vessels can be performed without complications. No matter to that, endovascular and hybrid procedures should be considered whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of thoracic aortic elasticity: a preliminary study using electrocardiographically gated dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Guo, Lijun; Sun, Haitao; Gao, Fei; Liu, Cheng; Beck, Thomas; Chen, Jiuhong; Biermann, Christina

    2011-01-01

    To gain a new insight into the elastic properties of the thoracic aorta in patients without aortic diseases using electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated dual-source (DS) CT. 56 subjects with no cardiovascular disease, selected from 2,700 people undergoing ECG-gated DSCT examination, were divided into three groups according to their age. CT data were reconstructed in 5% step throughout the RR interval. Diameter and area were measured at the curve of the ascending aorta (AA) and at the same level of the descending aorta (DA). The pulsation and elasticity of the aorta were evaluated. Aortic diameter changes were noted throughout the cardiac cycle. The maximum average diameter was seen at an RR interval of 24.02 ± 4.99% for the AA and 25.63 ± 4.77% for the DA. The minimum was at 93.5 ± 4.04% for the AA and 96.6 ± 4.58% for the DA. There was an age-dependent decrease in elasticity, while different correlation coefficients were found between various age groups and different elastic parameters. The properties of aortic pulsation and wall elasticity could be well shown by ECG-gated DSCT. The new findings regarding segment difference and age relevance were significant and should be taken into account in clinical trials and treatments for the elasticity related cardiovascular diseases. (orig.)

  19. Acute aortic rupture in a dog with spirocercosis following the administration of medetomidine : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Spirocercosis is an emerging disease in veterinary medicine. A strong suspicion of spirocercosis is usually evident after a thorough clinical examination and radiography of the chest has been performed. Lesions seen on radiography include an oesophageal mass, spondylitis and oesophageal air. Unfortunately, radiography is not diagnostic and additional diagnostic procedures are required to confirm the diagnosis. Endoscopy is commonly performed to diagnose the condition. The dog presented in this study had radiographic and clinical signs consistent with spirocercosis and definitive diagnosis was required. Shortly after sedation with medetomidine, the dog went into cardiac arrest and failed to respond to resuscitative measures. On post mortem, the diagnosis of spirocercosis was confirmed and the cause of death was identified as acute aortic rupture. Aortic aneurysms are not an uncommon finding and cause of acute death in dogs with spirocercosis. The acute rupture of the aorta in this case is most probably the result of cardiovascular changes associated with the administration of medetomidine. Medetomidine causes an acute rise in systemic vascular resistance with hypertension. The increase in shear stress across the weakened aortic wall resulted in rupture. Caution with the use of medetomidine in patients with spirocercosis is advised.

  20. Aorto-right atrial fistula after ascending aortic replacement or aortic value replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi Aihua; Dai Ruping; Jiang Shiliang; Lu Bin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT features of aorto-right atrial fistula after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or ascending aortic replacement. Methods: Eighty-seven patients with aortic-right atrial fistula underwent CT after operation. The CT features were retrospectively analyzed. Fistula was measured according to maximum width of the shunt. Results: Aorto-right atrial fistula was detected in 87 patients after aortic valve replacement or ascending aortic replacement by CT scan. Among them, 25 patients were diagnosed as mild aorto-right atrial fistula, 47 patients as moderate, and 15 patients as severe. Thirty-seven patients underwent follow-up CT.Among them, 10 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula were considered to have complete regression, 8 patients with mild aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have incomplete regression, 14 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have stable condition, and 5 patients with moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have progression at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusion: CT is a useful tool for defining aorto-right atrial fistula after AVR or ascending aortic replacement and for evaluating it in follow-up. (authors)

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm development in men following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H; Druce, P S; Ashton, H A

    2008-11-01

    To determine predictors related to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan. Over a 23-year period, 22 961 men participated in an AAA screening programme. Maximum aortic diameter of less than 30 mm was deemed "normal". 4308 of these "normal" individuals were later re-scanned at intervals for research purposes. AAA prevalence was 4.4% at initial scanning. In those with a normal scan, 46 patients subsequently presented with AAAs incidentally detected and 120 (2.8%) had AAAs identified as part of the ongoing surveillance. The median initial aortic size of these 166 men was 25 mm (range 15-29 mm). Over the follow-up period, there have been 24 (14%) AAA-related deaths, 24 patients underwent successful AAA surgery and 36 died of unrelated causes. In those with an initial aortic diameter of <25 mm who later developed an AAA, the odds ratio for AAA-related mortality was 2 (95% CI 1-4.1, p=0.03, x(2)). AAAs can develop following an initial "normal" scan and men with an aortic diameters of 25-29 mm appear to be at greater risk. Surveillance for this sub-group may further reduce the incidence of undiagnosed AAA and AAA-related mortality.

  2. Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Dias, Altamiro Ribeiro; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations). Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88%) were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001), (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03) and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dl, Cabrol operation and renal dialysis were predictors of mortality, respectively, with occurrence chance of 6 (95% CI = 1.8 - 19.5, P = 0.003), 12 (95% CI = 3 - 49.7, P = 0.0004) and 16 (95% CI = 3.6 - 71.3, P = 0.0002). The aortic root reconstruction has a low early and late mortality, high survival free of complications and low need for reoperation. During the late follow-up, valve sparing aortic root reconstructions presented fewer incidences of bleeding, thromboembolic events and endocarditis.

  3. Extended aortic repair using frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naomichi; Katayama, Akira; Kuraoka, Masatsugu; Katayama, Keijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Takasaki, Taiichi; Sueda, Taijiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze midterm results of frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection. Between February 1999 and August 2011 we performed arch replacement uisng frozen elephant trunk technique for acute aortic dissection in 8 patients with Marfan syndrome containing two complicated type B dissections and six type A dissections.Five patients compromised annulo-aortic ectasia who performed Bentall operation. No patients died in the initial operation. Fate of false lumen on the stent graft border was expressed by CT scan follow-up that were patent in 0, thrombosis in 5 and absorption in 3 patients. One patient who had new aortic dissection 8 years after initial surgery required the Crawford V operation. Ten-years-survival rate was 100% and ten years-event free rate was 67%. Frozen elephant trunk technique was feasible for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection and might become alternative prophylactic treatment to the downstream aorta for acute aortic dissection.

  4. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L. Donahoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi in Western Australia.

  5. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  6. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  7. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half...

  8. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, F.; Wiegerinck, E. M. A.; Rizzo, S.; Baan, J.; Planken, R. N.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Niessen, H. W. M.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; Pucci, A.; Thiene, G.; Basso, C.; Sheppard, M. N.; Wassilew, K.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of

  9. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  10. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  11. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  12. The relevance of aortic endograft prosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cernohorsky, Paul; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M. M.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Vascular prosthetic graft infection is a severe complication after open aortic aneurysm repair. Reports of infected endografts are scarce. General treatment consensus with infected graft material is that it should be removed completely. The objective of this study was to describe the

  13. Dynamic renal scintigraphy in aortic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terae, Satoshi; Itoh, Kazuo; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Nakada, Kunihiro; Fujimori, Kenji; Hashimoto, Masato; Tanabe, Tatsuzo; Furudate, Masayori; Irie, Goro

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic renal scintigraphy has been reviewed for evaluation of renal arterial involvement in aortic disorders such as arteriosclerosis obliterans, abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissecting aneurysm. As a diagnostic finding and parameters, we used blood perfusion images of both kidneys and relative split renal function index obtained with analysis of the time-activity curves which were generated using a renal region of interest. In the diagnosis of unilateral renal arterial involvement, sensitivity and specificity of blood perfusion images were 100 % (9/9) and 77 % (10/13) and those of relative split renal function index were 78 % (7/9) and 92 % (12/13), respectively. Dynamic renal scintigraphy was useful for evaluating unilateral renal arterial involvement in aortic diseases. However, scintigraphic diagnosis of bilateral renal arterial involvement were difficult. And in a severe case, we could not differentiate renal parenchymal damage due to renovascular involvement from senile renal dysfunction or hypertensive renal disease which is often a cause of aortic disorders. (author)

  14. Aortic root reconstruction by aortic valve-sparing operation (David type I reimplantation) in Marfan syndrome accompanied by annuloaortic ectasia and acute type-A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Shunichi; Furuya, Hidekazu; Yagi, Kentarou; Ikeya, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Masaomi; Fujimura, Takabumi; Kanabuchi, Kazuo

    2006-09-20

    To reconstruct the aortic root for aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by aortic regurgitation, annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and acute type-A dissection with root destruction, the Bentall operation using a prosthetic valve still is the standard procedure today. Valve-sparing procedures have actively been used for aortic root lesions, and have also been attempted in aortic root reconstruction for Marfan syndrome which may have abnormalities in the valve leaflets. We conducted a valve-sparing procedure in a female patient with Marfan syndrome who had AAE accompanied by type-A acute aortic dissection. The patient was a 37-year-old woman complaining of severe pain from the chest to the back. The limbs were long, and funnel breast was observed. Diastolic murmurs were heard. On chest computed tomography, a dissection cavity was present from the ascending aorta to the left common iliac artery, and the root dilated to 55 mm. Grade II aortic regurgitation was observed on ultrasound cardiography. Regarding her family history, her father had died suddenly at 54 years of age. She was diagnosed with type-A acute dissection concurrent with Marfan syndrome and AAE. The structure of the aortic valve was normal, and root reconstruction by a valve-sparing operation and total replacement of the aortic arch was conducted. On postoperative ultrasound cardiography, the aortic regurgitation was within the allowable range, and the shortterm postoperative results were good.

  15. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  16. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  17. Role of diastolic function indices in the risk stratification of patients with mixed aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, Alexander C; Khan, Arooj R; Boler, Amber; Said, Sameh M; Geske, Jeffrey B; Miranda, William R; Akintoye, Emmanuel; Connolly, Heidi M; Warnes, Carole A; Oh, Jae K

    2018-06-01

    Determine the role of diastolic function indices in pre-operative and post-operative risk stratification in patients with moderate mixed aortic valve disease (MAVD). A retrospective study was conducted of asymptomatic patients with moderate MAVD (a combination of moderate aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation) and an ejection fraction of 50% or more who were followed up at Mayo Clinic from 1 January 2004, to 31 December 2013. A pre-requisite for inclusion in the study was assessment of diastolic function involving at least three of the following indices: tissue Doppler early diastolic velocity (e'), mitral inflow early velocity (E), tricuspid regurgitation velocity, and left atrial volume index. Primary endpoints were aortic valve replacement (AVR) or cardiac death while secondary endpoints were cardiovascular adverse events (CAEs) after AVR. We defined CAEs as stroke, heart failure hospitalization, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and cardiac death. There were 214 patients (age 61 ± 8 years, men 146 [68%]) followed for 6.1 ± 2.3 years during which 162 (76%) AVRs and 11 (5%) cardiac deaths occurred. The multivariable risk factors for cardiac death or AVR were relative wall thickness (RWT) > 0.42 [hazard ratio (HR), 1.88 [95% CI, 1.28-2.59]; P = 0.001] and average E/e' >14 (HR, 1.94 [95% CI, 1.29-3.01]; P = 0.02). Freedom from CAE after AVR was significantly lower in the patients with baseline RWT >0.42 or mean E/e' >14 than the other patients: 79% (95% CI 74-83%) vs. 94% (95% CI 89-98%) at 3 years (P = 0.03). The presence of RWT >0.42 or E/e' >14 identifies a high-risk patient subset whose risk for cardiovascular morbidities persists even after AVR.

  18. Rapid 3D printing of anatomically accurate and mechanically heterogeneous aortic valve hydrogel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockaday, L A; Kang, K H; Colangelo, N W; Cheung, P Y C; Duan, B; Wu, J; Bonassar, L J; Butcher, J T; Malone, E; Lipson, H; Girardi, L N; Chu, C C

    2012-01-01

    The aortic valve exhibits complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and heterogeneity essential for the long-term efficient biomechanical function. These are, however, challenging to mimic in de novo engineered living tissue valve strategies. We present a novel simultaneous 3D printing/photocrosslinking technique for rapidly engineering complex, heterogeneous aortic valve scaffolds. Native anatomic and axisymmetric aortic valve geometries (root wall and tri-leaflets) with 12–22 mm inner diameters (ID) were 3D printed with poly-ethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels (700 or 8000 MW) supplemented with alginate. 3D printing geometric accuracy was quantified and compared using Micro-CT. Porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVIC) seeded scaffolds were cultured for up to 21 days. Results showed that blended PEG-DA scaffolds could achieve over tenfold range in elastic modulus (5.3±0.9 to 74.6±1.5 kPa). 3D printing times for valve conduits with mechanically contrasting hydrogels were optimized to 14 to 45 min, increasing linearly with conduit diameter. Larger printed valves had greater shape fidelity (93.3±2.6, 85.1±2.0 and 73.3±5.2% for 22, 17 and 12 mm ID porcine valves; 89.1±4.0, 84.1±5.6 and 66.6±5.2% for simplified valves). PAVIC seeded scaffolds maintained near 100% viability over 21 days. These results demonstrate that 3D hydrogel printing with controlled photocrosslinking can rapidly fabricate anatomical heterogeneous valve conduits that support cell engraftment. (paper)

  19. Impact of aortic prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassal, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Bedir M; Elsadeck, Nabil

    2014-06-01

    Prostheses used for aortic valve replacement may be small in relation to body size, causing prosthesis-patient mismatch and delaying left ventricular mass regression. This study examined the effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch on regression of left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement. We prospectively studied 96 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement between 2007 and 2012. Mean and peak gradients and indexed effective orifice area were measured by transthoracic echocardiography at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Patient-prosthesis mismatch was defined as indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)·m(-2). Moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch was present in 25% of patients. There were no significant differences in demographic and operative data between patients with and without prosthesis-patient mismatch. Left ventricular dimensions, posterior wall thickness, transvalvular gradients, and left ventricular mass decreased significantly after aortic valve replacement in both groups. The interventricular septal diameter and left ventricular mass index regression, and left ventricular ejection fraction were better in patients without prosthesis-patient mismatch. There was a significant positive correlation between the postoperative indexed effective orifice area of each valve prosthesis and the rate of left ventricular mass regression. Prosthesis-patient mismatch leads to higher transprosthetic gradients and impaired left ventricular mass regression. A small-sized valve prosthesis does not necessarily result in prosthesis-patient mismatch, and may be perfectly adequate in patient with small body size. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  1. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  2. Adipocytes and abdominal aortic aneurysm: Putative potential role of adipocytes in the process of AAA development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugo, Hirona; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2018-01-15

    Background Adipose tissue plays a role in the storage of excess energy as triglycerides (TGs). Excess fat accumulation causes various metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. It has been reported that ectopic fat deposition and excess TG accumulation in non-adipose tissue might be important predictors of cardiometabolic and vascular risk. For example, ectopic fat in perivascular tissue promotes atherosclerotic plaque formation in the arterial wall. Objective Recently, it has been reported that ectopic fat (adipocyte) in the vascular wall of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is present in both human and experimental animal models. The pathological significance of adipocytes in the AAA wall has not been fully understood. In this review, we summarized the functions of adipocytes and discussed potential new drugs that target vascular adipocytes for AAA treatment. Result Previous studies suggest that adipocytes in vascular wall play an important role in the development of AAA. Conclusion Adipocytes in the vascular wall could be novel targets for the development of AAA therapeutic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  4. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  5. An Animal Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Created with Peritoneal Patch: Technique and Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynar, Manuel; Qian Zhong; Hernandez, Javier; Sun Fei; Miguel, Carmen de; Crisostomo, Veronica; Uson, Jesus; Pineda, Luis-Fernando; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wilfrido R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm model that more closely resembles themorphology of human aneurysms with potential for further growth of the sac. An infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model was created with a double-layered peritoneal patch in 27 domestic swine. The patch,measuring in average from 6 to 12 cm in length and from 2 to 3 cm in width, was sutured to the edge of an aortotomy. Pre- and postsurgical digital subtraction aortograms (DSA) were obtained to document the appearance and dimensions of the aneurysm. All animals were followed with DSA for up to 5 months. Laparoscopic examination enhanced by the use of laparoscopic ultrasound was also carried out in 2 animals to assess the aneurysm at 30 and 60 days following surgery. Histological examination was performed on 4 animals. All the animals that underwent the surgical creation of the AAA survived the surgical procedure.Postsurgical DSA demonstrated the presence of the AAA in all animals,defined as more than 50% increase in diameter. The aneurysmal mean diameter increased from the baseline of 10.27 ± 1.24 to 16.69± 2.29 mm immediately after surgery, to 27.6 ± 6.59 mm at 14 days, 32.45 ± 8.76 mm at 30 days (p <0.01), and subsequently decreased to 25.98 ± 3.75 mm at 60 days. A total of 15 animals died of aneurysmal rupture that occurred more frequently in the long aneurysms (≥6 cm in length) than the short aneurysms (<6 cm in length) during the first 2 weeks after surgery(p < 0.05). No rupture occurred beyond 16 days after surgery. Four animals survived and underwent 60-day angiographic follow-up. Laparoscopic follow-up showed strong pulses, a reddish external appearance and undetectable suture lines on the aneurysmal wall. On pathology, the patches were well incorporated into the aortic wall, the luminal wall appeared almost completely endothelialized, and cellular and matrix proliferation were noted in the aneurysmal wall. A reproducible technique for the

  6. Aortic events in a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Kristian A; Stochholm, Kirstine; Hove, Hanne; Kyhl, Kasper; Gregersen, Pernille A; Vejlstrup, Niels; Østergaard, John R; Gravholt, Claus H; Andersen, Niels H

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome is associated with morbidity and mortality due to aortic dilatation and dissection. Preventive aortic root replacement has been the standard treatment in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic dilatation. In this study, we present aortic event data from a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort. The nationwide cohort of Danish Marfan syndrome patients was established from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Register, where we retrieved information about aortic surgery and dissections. We associated aortic events with age, sex, and Marfan syndrome diagnosis prior or after the first aortic event. From the total cohort of 412 patients, 150 (36.4 %) had an aortic event. Fifty percent were event free at age 49.6. Eighty patients (53.3 %) had prophylactic surgery and seventy patients (46.7 %) a dissection. The yearly event rate was 0.02 events/year/patient in the period 1994-2014. Male patients had a significant higher risk of an aortic event at a younger age with a hazard ratio of 1.75 (CI 1.26-2.42, p = 0.001) compared with women. Fifty-three patients (12.9 %) were diagnosed with MFS after their first aortic event which primarily was aortic dissection [n = 44 (83.0 %)]. More than a third of MFS patients experienced an aortic event and male patients had significantly more aortic events than females. More than half of the total number of dissections was in patients undiagnosed with MFS at the time of their event. This emphasizes that diagnosing MFS is lifesaving and improves mortality risk by reducing the risk of aorta dissection.

  7. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the strain field of abdominal aortic aneurysm measured by magnetic resonance imaging and stereovision: a feasibility study for prediction of the risk of rupture of aortic abdominal aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufei; Joannic, David; Delassus, Patrick; Lalande, Alain; Juillion, Patrick; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2015-04-13

    The prediction of the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex problem. Currently the criteria to predict rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms are aneurysm diameter and growth rates. It is generally believed that study of the wall strain distribution could be helpful to find a better decision criterion for surgery of aortic aneurysms before their rupture. The wall strain distribution depends on many biological and biomechanical factors such as elastic properties of the aorta, turbulent blood flow, anatomy of the aorta, presence of thrombus or not and so on. Recently, numerical simulations to estimate rupture-potential have received many attentions. However, none of the medical imaging tools for screening and monitoring of AAAs were studied in terms of mechanical behavior and experimentally to demonstrate their capability to measure relevant variables. The aim of this study was to develop a metrological approach for deployment testing of the ability of techniques for measuring local in-vitro deformations based on comparison of stereovision and MRI. In this paper, we present the implementation approach and results of the study based on cylindrical phantoms with or without AAA representing, respectively, healthy and unhealthy artery. Through this study, an experimental device was developed for the behavior study of AAA during a cardiac cycle. The results show that the stereovision techniques used in laboratory is well suited and is qualitatively and