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Sample records for kanchanaburi province thailand

  1. Molecular and serological survey on taeniasis and cysticercosis in Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Okamoto, Munehiro; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Saguankiat, Surapol; Kusolsuk, Teera; Sato, Megumi; Sato, Marcello O; Sako, Yasuhito; Waikagul, Jitra; Ito, Akira

    2010-09-01

    A community-based field survey on taeniasis and cysticercosis was performed in two villages in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province, central Thailand, where 3 Taenia species, T. solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica, are sympatrically occurring. Four (0.6%) out of 667 stool samples were egg-positive for Taenia sp. by Kato-Katz technique. Three out of those four persons and other three persons who were Taenia egg-negative but having a recent (1 year) history of expelling proglottids in the stool.

  2. Ten-Year Monitored Natural Recovery of Lead-Contaminated Mine Tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Otwong, Ashijya; Chantharit, Aphichart; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Klity Creek has become Thailand’s first official remediation ordered by the court in 2013, 15 years after the spill of lead (Pb)-contaminated mine tailing into the creek. The Pollution Control Department (PCD) decided to restore the creek through monitored natural recovery (MNR) since 2006 but has not been successful. Interestingly, the most recent remediation plan in 2015 will still apply MNR to five out of the seven portions of the creek, despite no scientific feasibility evaluation of using MNR to restore the creek. Objective: This study qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the feasibility of using MNR to clean up the creek in order to protect the Klity children from excess Pb exposure. Methods: We analyzed the physical and chemical transformation of Pb contaminated sediment in the creek and developed a remedial action goal and cleanup level using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK). We empirically determined the natural recovery (NR) potentials and rates using 10 years of data monitoring the water and sediment samples from eight monitoring stations (KC1 to KC8). Results: Klity Creek has NR potential for water except at KC2, which is closest to the spill and the other improperly managed Pb sources. However, the creek has no NR potential for sediment except at the KC8 location (NR rate = 11.1 ± 3.0 × 10–3 month–1) farthest from the spill. Conclusion: The MNR method is not suitable to use as the sole remedial approach for Klity Creek (KC2 to KC7). Although MNR is applicable at KC8, it may require up to 377 ± 76 years to restore the sediment to the background Pb concentration. Citation: Phenrat T, Otwong A, Chantharit A, Lowry GV. 2016. Ten-year monitored natural recovery of lead-contaminated mine tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand. Environ Health Perspect 124:1511–1520; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP215 PMID:27157823

  3. Oral Contraceptives and User Satisfaction in Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwarat Tor.Jarern; Kusol Soonthorndhada

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to identify the factors that affect women who use public and private oral contraceptive services. It also aims to assess user satisfaction among pill users, particularly those who are covered by the 30-Baht card of the Universal Coverage Scheme. 1,234 women of reproductive age from the Kanchanaburi DSS (Round 5, 2004) were studied by using logistic regression to determine factors affecting the selection of family planning providers. More than half of the pill users used privat...

  4. Ectoparasitic fauna of birds, and volant and non-volant small mammals captured at Srinakarin Dam, Kanchanaburi, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changbunjong, Tanasak; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Buddhirongawatr, Ruangrat; Chewajon, Kacha; Charoenyongyoo, Pavinee; Suwanapakdee, Sarin; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Chaichoun, Kridsada; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2010-05-01

    The investigation of ectoparasitic fauna on birds, and volant and nonvolant small mammals at Srinakarin Dam, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand was carried out under a national biodiversity and disease surveillance program for four consecutive months: January, February, May and June 2009. A total of 122 animals, comprised of 15 species of birds, 9 species of volant small mammals and 8 species of non-volant small mammals were examined for ectoparasite infestation. Of these animals, 1 genus of hard ticks (Ixodidae), 2 species of mesostigmatid mites (Laelapidae), 4 genera in three families of astigmatid mites (Proctophyllodidae, Pteronyssidae and Trouessartiidae), 4 species in three families of lice (Philopteridae, Polyplacidae and Trichodectidae) and 2 families of batflies (Nycteribiidae and Streblidae) were collected. This is the first survey conducted to determine ectoparasites infesting birds and small mammals living in the reserved forest of Srinakarin Dam, Thailand. A lower infestation rate of ectoparasites was observed in mammals, ranging from 3.5% to 10.3% than birds, with infestation rates between 7.3% and 34.2%. No major potential health risks to people who lived in this area were found.

  5. ESR dating of laterite from Ban Tha Ta Suea, Kanchanaburi, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwan, S; Vichaidid, T; Limsuwan, P

    2011-02-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating was carried out on laterite samples collected from Ban Tha Ta Suea, the original deposit of the laterite used in the construction of Muang Sing Historical Park. Ban Tha Ta Suea is about 6 km east of Muang Sing Historical Park in Kanchanaburi province (181 km far from Bangkok). The dose response of the g=2.0028 ESR signal was found to be suitable for age determination. An exponential saturation function was fitted to the ESR signal growth on additional γ-irradiation. Extrapolation of this function resulted in the accumulated dose 144±5 Gy. Gamma spectroscopy and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were used to determine concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in the samples from which the annual dose rate 16±2 mGy was calculated. In addition, the dose rate of cosmic rays was taken into account. The ESR age of laterite samples was found to be 9.0±0.9 ka. This age falls within the Holocene epoch of the Quaternary on the geological time scale. Samples from Muang Sing Historical Park were assigned to the same epoch. Both results agree with the geological map.

  6. ESR dating of laterite from Ban Tha Ta Suea, Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limsuwan, S., E-mail: opticslaser@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Vichaidid, T. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani Campus, Pattani 94000 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2011-02-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating was carried out on laterite samples collected from Ban Tha Ta Suea, the original deposit of the laterite used in the construction of Muang Sing Historical Park. Ban Tha Ta Suea is about 6 km east of Muang Sing Historical Park in Kanchanaburi province (181 km far from Bangkok). The dose response of the g=2.0028 ESR signal was found to be suitable for age determination. An exponential saturation function was fitted to the ESR signal growth on additional {gamma}-irradiation. Extrapolation of this function resulted in the accumulated dose 144{+-}5 Gy. Gamma spectroscopy and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were used to determine concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in the samples from which the annual dose rate 16{+-}2 mGy was calculated. In addition, the dose rate of cosmic rays was taken into account. The ESR age of laterite samples was found to be 9.0{+-}0.9 ka. This age falls within the Holocene epoch of the Quaternary on the geological time scale. Samples from Muang Sing Historical Park were assigned to the same epoch. Both results agree with the geological map.

  7. Two new species of Callerya Endl. (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae) from Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirichamon, Yotsawate; Balslev, Henrik; Mathapa, Sawai

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Callerya (Endl.); C. chlorantha and C. tennaserimensis are illustrated and described. They are commonly found in dry deciduous or bamboo forest in Kanchanaburi and Ratchaburi province, South-western Thailand. It was also found that C. chlorantha might be associated wi...

  8. Rodent consumption in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S

    2014-09-01

    Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne infections worldwide, including Southeast Asia and Northeast Thailand (Isaan), where rodent consumption may be a source of rodent-borne diseases. The behavior of consuming rodents is related to a population's traditions, knowledge, cultural, and household contexts, among other factors. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand during November-December 2011. It aimed to elicit information about rodent consumption among residents of this province, and to identify factors associated with rodent consumption there. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that male gender, large family size, and use of rainwater as the main source of drinking water were positively associated with reported rodent consumption in this province, while having proper knowledge/attitudes towards animal-borne disease was negatively associated. These results provide evidence-base information for further studies, such as participatory ac- tion research, to further explore how people interact with rodents in different contexts. Further research is also needed to characterize risk of zoonotic diseases in relation to rodent consumption.

  9. Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Northern Provinces of Thailand

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    Supot Teachavorasinskun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There are quite a few active faults recently found in the western and northern parts of Thailand, which could possibly induce earthquakes of magnitude (ML of 5.5-6.5. Although seismic design code has been enforced in the area since 1980, the fundamental knowledge on dynamic soil behavior has not been extensively attained. Approach: Collection of existing borehole information in the targeted areas to form a typical subsoil profile. This borehole information, together with analytical result obtained from logistic regression based on worldwide liquefaction database was used to conduct an effective stress analysis. Result: Literature reviews of the existing boreholes from the two largest provinces in the north, Chiang-Mai and Chiang-Rai, revealed that the areas were underlain by layers of loose to medium dense sand found at shallow depths. The corrected SPT N-value of those sand layers varies in the range of 5-20. A simple tool correlating the liquefaction probability, which correlated excess pore water pressure and peak ground acceleration, was proposed for the studied areas. Conclusion: The proposed correlation provided preliminary tool to evaluate risk of the shallow foundation from partial liquefaction in the two northern provinces of Thailand.

  10. Prevalence of OV infection in Yasothon Province, Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengsawang, Phubet; Promthet, Supannee; Bradshaw, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrrini (OV), is the major cause of the high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand. The prevalence of OV infection remains high in various parts of the country, especially in Northeast Thailand and particularly in wetland rural areas where a large proportion of the community work in agriculture and continue the traditional practice of eating raw or undercooked cyprinoid fish products. The national control program seems to have had little impact in many of these areas, and it has been difficult to make precise assessments of the overall effectiveness of the program. This paper is the first report of prospective research project designed to monitor the impact of the national control program in rural communities located in a northeastern province and at high risk of OV infection. The participants in this initial survey were 1,569 villagers, aged 20-65 years, living in two subdistricts of Yasothon Province. Stool examinations showed that 38.68% were infected with OV. Males were slightly more likely to be infected than females, but the difference was not statistically significant. Infection was found to be positively associated with age in both males and females. The preliminary data indicate that the population selected for study is suitable for the purpose of the monitoring project.

  11. Overexploitation of Abalone at Libong Island, Trang Province, Southern Thailand

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    Chanyut Sudtongkong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abalone is generally known as a fishery resource of high economic value. The wild abalone from Libong Island iswidely known for its potential as a cocktail-size and high-quality broodstock for hatcheries. The high market price andexternal demand have encouraged local fisherman to catch the wild abalone without proper management, resulting in a nearextinction crisis in the abalone population in this area. The present evaluation of abalone management at Libong Island,Trang Province, Thailand, was conducted using local user perceptions. Sixteen performance indicators included effectiveness indicators, equity indicators, and sustainable indicators. These were measured to determine whether the abalonemanagement activities had achieved the set objectives in terms of better conditions for abalone cultivation and sustainability.The results revealed that the abalone population has undergone degrading and decline due to lack of proper managementmeasures in this area. The findings suggest that practical management is needed for the abalone population at Libong Island.

  12. Bryophytes of beach forests in Chon Buri Province, Thailand

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    Phiangphak Sukkharak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of bryophyte diversity of three beach forests including Had Tung Prong, Had Tein Talay, and the beach forest in Thai Island and Sea Natural History Museum in Chon Buri Province, Thailand, was carried out. From 137 enumerated specimens, 16 species (6 mosses, 10 liverworts in 12 genera (5 mosses, 7 liverworts and eight families (5 mosses, 3 liverworts were found. Among those the most common families of mosses are Fissidentaceae (2 species and the most common families of liverwort are Lejeuneaceae (8 species. A comparison of species richness among the three areas revealed that the highest species richness of bryophytes was found in Had Tung Prong. Moreover, of all bryophyte species found, Weissia edentula Mitt. was the most common one.

  13. Seismic hazards in Thailand: a compilation and updated probabilistic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailoplee, Santi; Charusiri, Punya

    2016-06-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Thailand was performed and compared to those of previous works. This PSHA was based upon (1) the most up-to-date paleoseismological data (slip rates), (2) the seismic source zones, (3) the seismicity parameters ( a and b values), and (4) the strong ground-motion attenuation models suggested as being suitable models for Thailand. For the PSHA mapping, both the ground shaking and probability of exceedance (POE) were analyzed and mapped using various methods of presentation. In addition, site-specific PSHAs were demonstrated for ten major provinces within Thailand. For instance, a 2 and 10 % POE in the next 50 years of a 0.1-0.4 g and 0.1-0.2 g ground shaking, respectively, was found for western Thailand, defining this area as the most earthquake-prone region evaluated in Thailand. In a comparison between the ten selected specific provinces within Thailand, the Kanchanaburi and Tak provinces had comparatively high seismic hazards, and therefore, effective mitigation plans for these areas should be made. Although Bangkok was defined as being within a low seismic hazard in this PSHA, a further study of seismic wave amplification due to the soft soil beneath Bangkok is required.

  14. Management of flood victims: Chainat Province, central Thailand.

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    Wisitwong, Anchaleeporn; McMillan, Margaret

    2010-03-01

    This article focuses on the processes of flood management and the experiences of flood victims in Chainat Province, central Thailand, so as to develop knowledge about the future handling of such disasters. A phenomenological qualitative approach was used to describe the processes of providing assistance to flood victims. In-depth interviews and observation were used to collect the data. Criterion sampling was used to select 23 participants. Content analysis of the data revealed that some flood victims could predict flooding based on prior experiences, so they prepared themselves. The data revealed six themes that demonstrated that those who could not predict how floods would impact on them were unprepared and suffered losses and disruption to their daily life. Damaged routes meant people could not go to work, resulting in the loss of income. There was a lack of sanitary appliances and clean drinking water, people were sick, and experienced stress. At the community level, people helped one another, making sandbags and building walls as a defense against water. They formed support groups to enable the processing of stressful experiences. However, later, the water became stagnant and contaminated, creating an offensive smell. The government provided assistance to cut off electricity services, food and water, toilets and health services, and water drainage. In the recovery phase, the victims needed money for investment, employment opportunities, books for children, extra time to pay off loans, reconnection of electricity, surveys of damage, and pensions to deal with damage and recovery.

  15. Toxoplasmosis and neosporosis among beef cattle slaughtered for food in Western Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiengcharoen, Jitbanjong; Nakthong, Chowalit; Mitchaothai, Jumlong; Udonsom, Ruenruthai; Sukthana, Yaowalark

    2012-09-01

    Beef is a main type of meat consumed by Thais. The prevalences of anti-Toxoplasma gondii and anti-Neospora caninum antibodies were investigated among beef cattle slaughtered for food in western Thailand. A total of 389 blood samples obtained from beef cattle from 24 herds were collected at 3 slaughterhouses in 3 western provinces of Thailand: Kanchanaburi, Ratchaburi and Nakhon Pathom. An indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) was performed using cut-off values of 1:128 for T. gondii and 1:200 for N. caninum. The antibodies to T. gondii were found in 100 samples (25.7%) and antibodies to N. caninum were found in 23 samples (5.9%) a significant difference (p Thailand finding both T. gondii and N. caninum antibodies among beef cattle.

  16. Current status of taeniasis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantaphruti, Malinee Thairungroj

    2013-02-01

    Taeniasis is prevalent in all regions of Thailand, except the South. Infections were more frequently found in males than females of any age from 7-83 years. Taenia saginata is the most common species throughout the country. Taenia asiatica was reported only in the province of Kanchanaburi in the Central region. Co-infections, with Taenia solium and T. asiatica or T. solium and T. saginata, were found. Hybridization between T. asiatica and T. saginata is evidence that co-infection is never found between these 2 species. Finding more than 1 worm in a single patient was not entirely rare. Genetic variation was found without correlation to its geographic distribution in T. saginata, whereas no variation was found in T. asiatica.

  17. Challenging School Leadership in Thailand's Southern Border Provinces

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    Maxcy, Brendan D.; Sungtong, Ekkarin; Nguyen, Thu Su'o'ng Thi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the challenges facing public school leadership in southern Thailand, a region destabilized by renewal of a longstanding insurgency. Seeking to implement national educational reforms on shifting social, political and cultural terrain, educators in this region face extraordinary challenges as they reconsider and renegotiate…

  18. Effects of an injury and illness prevention program on occupational safety behaviors among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Santaweesuk S; Chapman RS; Siriwong W

    2014-01-01

    Sapsatree Santaweesuk,1,2 Robert S Chapman,1 Wattasit Siriwong1,3 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Srinakarinwirot University Ongkharak Campus, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand; 3Thai Fogarty ITREOH Center, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an Injury and Illness Prevention (IIP) program intervention on occupational safety behavior among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok province,...

  19. A preliminary study of bryophytes in the Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand

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    Phiangphak Sukkharak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of bryophyte diversity of Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand was carried out in April 2013. In total, 387 specimens were enumerated, consisting of 103 species (45 liverworts, 1 hornwort, 57 mosses, 67 genera (25 liverworts, 1 hornwort, 41 mosses, and 38 families (14 liverworts, 1 hornwort, 23 mosses, excluding those as yet unidentified to species. Among these, four species of mosses, including Clastobryum glabrescens (Z.Iwats. B.C.Tan, Z.Iwats. & D.H.Norris, Macromitrium lorifolium Paris & Broth., Pterobryopsis gedehensis M.Fleisch., and Radulina borbonica (Bél. W.R.Buck, are newly reported to Thailand in this paper.

  20. Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Among People in the Border Areas of Three Provinces, Northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Wakkuwattapong, Rujirakul; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Pengsaa, Prasit; Jomkoa, Darawan; Joosiri, Apinya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is still a serious problem in Northeastern and Northern Thailand. Active surveillance is required to determine updated data for further prevention and control planning. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and risk factors for O. viverrini in three provinces, Northeastern Thailand. A cross- sectional survey was conducted during October 2015 to March 2016 at Kaeng Sanam Nang district of Nakhon Ratchasima province, Waeng Noi district of Khon Kaen province, and Khon Sawan district of Chaiyaphum province, Thailand. Stool samples were examined by using a modified Kato-Katz Thick smear technique. From a total of 978 participants screened, O. viverrini infection was found in 1.74%, the majority opf positive cases being male (6.62%), age group 51-60 years old (4.21%), educated at primary school (8.43%), occupied with agriculture (9.62%),having an income <4,000 baht per month (4.82%), and living in Khon Sawan district (8.43%). Participants had a high knowledge level (42.43%), good attitude level (34.76%), and fair level (38.04%). The present study indicates the O. viverrini infection rate is low, but elderly males with primary school education involved in agriculture are still frequently effected particularly in Khon Sawan district. Therefore, this risk group requires behavior modification and continued monitoring.

  1. Occurrence of blow fly species (Diptera: calliphoridae) in Phitsanulok Province, Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunchu, Nophawan; Sukontason, Kom; Sanit, Sangob; Chidburee, Polprecha; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Sukontason, Kabkaew L

    2012-12-01

    Based on the current forensic importance of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae), their biological aspects have been studied increasingly worldwide. The blow fly fauna in Phitsanulok Province, Northern Thailand was studied from May 2009 to April 2010 in the residential, agricultural, mountainous and forested areas of Muang, Wat Bot, Nakhon Thai and Wang Thong districts, respectively, in order to know the occurrence of blow flies in this province. Collections were carried out monthly using commercial funnel fly traps and sweeping methods, with 1-day tainted pork viscera as bait. Identification of adult blow flies exhibited 14 634 specimens, comprising of 5 subfamilies, 14 genera and 36 species. Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) and Achoetandrus rufifacies (Macquart, 1843) were the most and second most abundant species trapped, respectively. These two species of carrion flies prevailed in all the types of land investigated. We calculated and compared the diversity indices, species evenness and richness, and similarity coefficients of the blow fly species in various areas. The data from this study may be used to identify the potential of forensicallyimportant fly species within Phitsanulok Province and fulfill the information on blow fly fauna in Thailand.

  2. Estimating methane emissions from mangrove area in Ranong Province, Thailand

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    Suwanchai Nitisoravut

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate methane emissions from the mangrove area of Ranong Province andto explore the factors affecting the emissions, as part of an attempt to evaluate methane contribution to the global methane budget. Methane was measured by using a closed chamber technique and analyzed by a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID. The results showed that the annual estimated methane emission was released at approximately 157.32 mg/m2. The amount of methane emission from this mangrove area was lower than in other previously studied areas. Emission rates varied seasonally with the highest rate in the rainy season followed by summer and cold seasons, during which the values were 0.52, 0.27, and 0.19 mg/m2/day, respectively. Seasonal variations of methane emission was related to several factors depending upon field conditions such as water conductivity, soil temperature, and water level.

  3. A new species of Bauhinia L. (Caesalpinioideae, Leguminosae from Nakhon Phanom Province, Thailand

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    Wannachai Chatan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new liana species of the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae, namely Bauhinia nakhonphanomensis, collected from the Phulangkha National Park, Nakhon Pranom Province, Thailand, is described and illustrated. It is easily recognized by the following combination of characters: tendrilled liana, entire leaves, acuminate or caudate leaf apices, oblong or elliptic floral bud, floral bud 25–35 mm long, raceme or panicle inflorescence, 10–13 mm long hypanthium, anther opening by longitudinal slits. Important comparative morphological characters with some closely related species are discussed.

  4. Social Network Analysis of Cattle Movement in Sukhothai Province, Thailand: A Study to Improve Control Measurements

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    Supot Noopataya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyse the pattern of cattle movement in Sukhothai province, Thailand. A validated questionnaire was applied to 308 respondents related to cattle farming using one-step snowball sampling. The results showed that most of the nodes are farmers who move their animals in the province. The average normalized degree centrality and normalized closeness centrality were low (<0.01 and 0.04, resp.. We found that traders are the nodes with a high value of centrality. This corresponds with the cutpoint analysis results that traders are outstanding. In conclusion, the relevant authorities should focus on the nodes such as traders for controlling disease. However, a measure to detect disease in the early stages needs to be implemented.

  5. Spatial Diffusion of Influenza Outbreak-Related Climate Factors in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

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    Marc Souris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is one of the most important leading causes of respiratory illness in the countries located in the tropical areas of South East Asia and Thailand. In this study the climate factors associated with influenza incidence in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand, were investigated. Identification of factors responsible for influenza outbreaks and the mapping of potential risk areas in Chiang Mai are long overdue. This work examines the association between yearly climate patterns between 2001 and 2008 and influenza outbreaks in the Chiang Mai Province. The climatic factors included the amount of rainfall, percent of rainy days, relative humidity, maximum, minimum temperatures and temperature difference. The study develops a statistical analysis to quantitatively assess the relationship between climate and influenza outbreaks and then evaluate its suitability for predicting influenza outbreaks. A multiple linear regression technique was used to fit the statistical model. The Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW interpolation and Geographic Information System (GIS techniques were used in mapping the spatial diffusion of influenza risk zones. The results show that there is a significance correlation between influenza outbreaks and climate factors for the majority of the studied area. A statistical analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the model comparing model outputs and actual outbreaks.

  6. Spatial diffusion of influenza outbreak-related climate factors in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakapan, Supachai; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Tipdecho, Taravudh; Souris, Marc

    2012-10-24

    Influenza is one of the most important leading causes of respiratory illness in the countries located in the tropical areas of South East Asia and Thailand. In this study the climate factors associated with influenza incidence in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand, were investigated. Identification of factors responsible for influenza outbreaks and the mapping of potential risk areas in Chiang Mai are long overdue. This work examines the association between yearly climate patterns between 2001 and 2008 and influenza outbreaks in the Chiang Mai Province. The climatic factors included the amount of rainfall, percent of rainy days, relative humidity, maximum, minimum temperatures and temperature difference. The study develops a statistical analysis to quantitatively assess the relationship between climate and influenza outbreaks and then evaluate its suitability for predicting influenza outbreaks. A multiple linear regression technique was used to fit the statistical model. The Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques were used in mapping the spatial diffusion of influenza risk zones. The results show that there is a significance correlation between influenza outbreaks and climate factors for the majority of the studied area. A statistical analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the model comparing model outputs and actual outbreaks.

  7. Population pressure, mechanization, and landlessness in Central Thailand.

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    Ramsay, A

    1985-04-01

    This paper evaluates 2 explanations of the growing landlessness noted in contemporary Thailand. The 1st conceptualizes landlessness as a natural consequence of population pressures on limited agricultural land, while the 2nd blames technologic changes that give larger farmers substantial advantages over smaller ones. The validity of the 2 explanations is tested by examining differing levels of landlessness among provinces in Thailand's Central Plain. Overall, 14% of farm households in the Central Plain area were landless in 1974-75; however, the range extended from 4% in Kanchanaburi to 38% in Ayuthaya province. Multiple regression analysis suggests a strong association betweeen the percentage of landless agricultural worker families among farm households in the Central Plain and new technology. It is hypothesized that it is not that technology causes landlessness, but that it creates a demand for agricultural labor. As more and more arable land in Thailand becomes occupied, it becomes increasingly difficult for farmers to open new land. Thus, many choose to become an agricultural laborer or to leave agriculture altogether. The commercialization of rice agriculture made it possible to find wage labor in the villages of the Central Plain in the 1930s and played a role in the creation of a landless labor class. Demand factors appear to be of importance in determining which provinces have the highest concentrations of farm workers, but the closing frontier hypothesis seems to explain the origins of landless agricultural workers in Central Plain provinces. A closing frontier is significantly associated with outmigration. Provinces with the least idle land are closest to having a closed frontier.

  8. Province-based self-remediation efficiency of the Tha Chin river basin, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaipichitburapa, P; Meksumpun, C; Meksumpun, S

    2010-01-01

    The Tha Chin River Basin located in the great central basin of Thailand is used for water supply, aquaculture, transportation, and recreation as well as a sink for wastewater discharges. Because of gradual deterioration of water quality and fishery resources, this study aimed to explain recent status of the river self-remediation efficiency that was influenced by nutrient inputs and outputs from the river system. Field surveys were carried out during May 2007 (early rainy season) and October 2007 (late rainy season) within the Tha Chin River located in 4 provinces; Chainat, Suphan Buri, Nakhon Pathom, and Samut Sakhon. The nutrient budgets in each province section were analyzed. Results indicated that the river was in eutrophic condition all year round. High nitrogen and phosphorus loads from surrounding agricultural land use, agro-industry, and community continuously flew into the river system. Those nutrient concentrations were higher in the early rainy season than the late rainy season. The lowest river zone (in Samut Sakhon province) indicated highest dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate phosphorus (P) discharges of 145.54 and 36.14 tons/day, respectively. The highest remediation efficiency of the river (ca 60% of the total input) was found in the uppermost area of Suphan Buri province. The lowest remediation efficiency (ca 12%) was found in Samut Sakhon province. From the overall view, long term monitoring of river and estuarine DIN and P should be conducted. To make better condition of aquatic environment and fishery resource in each province-based section, the controls of DIN and P remediation efficiencies (e.g. by effective management of flow speed) at 20 and 50%, respectively, were recommended.

  9. Mapping Sargassum beds off, ChonBuri Province, Thailand, using ALOS AVNI2 image

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    Noiraksar, Thidarat; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Sawayama, Shuhei; Phauk, Sophany; Hayashizaki, Ken-ichi

    2012-10-01

    Sargassum species grow on rocks and dead corals and form dense seaweed beds. Sargassum beds play ecological roles such as CO2 uptake and O2 production through photosynthesis, spawning and nursery grounds of fish, feeding ground for sea urchins and abalones, and substrates for attached animals and plants on leaves and holdfasts. However, increasing human impacts and climate change decrease or degrade Sargassum beds in ASEAN countries. It is necessary to grasp present spatial distributions of this habitat. Thailand, especially its coastal zone along the Gulf of Thailand, is facing degradation of Sargassum beds due to increase in industries and population. JAXA launched non-commercial satellite, ALOS, providing multiband images with ultra-high spatial resolution optical sensors (10 m), AVNIR2. Unfortunately, ALOS has terminated its mission in April 2011. However, JAXA has archived ALOS AVNIR2 images over the world. They are still useful for mapping coastal ecosystems. We examined capability of remote sensing with ALOS AVNIR2 to map Sargassum beds in waters off Sattahip protected area as a natural park in Chon Buri Province, Thailand, threatened by degradation of water quality due to above-mentioned impacts. Ground truth data were obtained in February 2012 by using continual pictures taken by manta tow. Supervised classification could detect Sargassum beds off Sattahip at about 70% user accuracy. It is estimated that error is caused by mixel effect of bottom substrates in a pixel with 10 x 10 m. Our results indicate that ALOS AVNIR2 images are useful for mapping Sargassum beds in Southeast Asia.

  10. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum infection in dairy cows in Northern provinces, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inpankaew, Tawin; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Mitchell, Thomas J; Sununta, Chainirun; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2014-06-01

    Neospora caninum, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of neosporosis, recognized as a major cause of bovine abortion around the world. Thailand is a developing agricultural country located in Southeast Asia. Livestock developments particularly in dairy cows of this country have been hampered by low productivity including milk and slow growth rate due to the impact of many pathogens including N. caninum. Currently, there is no effective method for control of neosporosis since there is less information regarding current status of infections. The objective of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of neosporosis in dairy cows of the northern part of Thailand. During 2006-2007, the sera of 642 cows from 42 small farm holders with the top three highest consensus of dairy farms in the northern provinces, such as Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai and Lumpang were collected and performed tests. Antibodies to N. caninum were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with recombinant N. caninum surface antigen 1 (NcSAG1) and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). The overall prevalence of N. caninum infection in this study was 46.9% (301/642) by ELISA and 34.3% (220/642) by IFAT.

  11. Smoking behaviour and associated factors of illicit cigarette consumption in a border province of southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchoo, Chittawet; Sangthong, Rassamee; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Geater, Alan; McNeil, Edward

    2013-07-01

    Illicit cigarette consumption has increased worldwide. It is important to understand this problem thoroughly. To investigate behaviours and factors associated with illicit cigarette consumption in southern Thailand. A survey and qualitative study were conducted in a border province in southern Thailand next to Malaysia. A modified snowballing technique was used to recruit 300 illicit and 150 non-illicit cigarette smokers. A questionnaire was used to interview subjects. Illicit cigarette packs were obtained in order to identify their characteristics. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used for data analysis. Smoking of illicit cigarettes has become accepted in the communities. They were available in supermarkets and vendor shops. Friends and other illicit smokers known by illicit cigarette smokers were an important source of information for access to illicit cigarette products. The main factors associated with smoking illicit cigarettes, compared with smoking non-illicit cigarettes, were younger age, higher education and higher average monthly expenditure on cigarettes (most illicit smokers smoked illicit cigarettes (average price per packet = 33 THB (US$1.1), while most non-illicit smokers smoked hand-rolled cigarettes (average price per packet = 7 THB (US$0.2)) and knowledge of other illicit cigarette smokers. The low price of illicit cigarettes was the main reason for their use. Selling strategies included sale of singles, sale in shops and direct sale through social networking. Illicit cigarette consumption has become more acceptable especially among young adult smokers. Age and extent of social networks are important factors associated with smoking illicit cigarettes.

  12. The mangosteen flowering date model in Nakhon Si Thammarat province, southern Thailand

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    Poontarasa OUNLERT

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. is one of the economically important fruits of Thailand. Recent studies show that the climatic variability affects the flowering period of tropical fruit trees. The objectives of this study are: 1 to investigate the correlation between climatic factors (in particular with, rainfall, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, relative humidity, and dry period before flowering and mangosteen flowering date and 2 to develop the poisson regression model to predict the flowering date of mangosteen in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, Thailand. This model is useful in guiding farmers to manage mangosteen orchards. The results showed that the rainfall, the maximum and minimum temperatures, the relative humidity, and the dry period before flowering dates affect mangosteen flowering dates. The model which will be used as a guideline for mangosteen flowering date prediction was log(μ=10.85+0.0001x1-0.0564x2-0.0634x3-0.0232x4+0.0003x5 where μ where is the mean of mangosteen flowering date, x1 is rainfall, x2 is maximum temperature, x3 is minimum temperature, x4 is relative humidity, and x5 is dry period before flowering date.

  13. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among schoolchi ldren in Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand

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    Pisit Suntaravitun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among primary schoolchildren in rural areas from Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and March 2017 among 203 schoolchildren in four rural schools using purposive sampling. All stool samples were examined using simple direct smear method and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique. Results: The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was 14.8% (30/203. Seven intestinal parasite species (two helminths and five protozoa were identified in the stool samples. The most common intestinal protozoa in schoolchildren was Giardia intestinalis (n = 11, 5.4% followed by Blastocystis hominis (n = 9, 4.4%, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (n = 5, 2.5%, Entamoeba coli (n = 2, 1.0% and Endolimax nana (n = 1, 0.5%. Hookworm (n = 1, 0.5% and Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1, 0.5% were the most frequent helminths. No significant statistical differences in the prevalence rates of infections were observed by gender, age and school location (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Intestinal parasitic infection is a significant public health problem among schoolchildren in rural areas of Thailand. Therefore, health education and environmental sanitation improvement are recommended as preventive control measures.

  14. Pattern of the haemoglobinopathy in the endemic and nearby provinces in Thailand, a note from then GIS pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-11-01

    In Thailand, high prevalence of haemoglobin disorders has been reported. Millions of Thai people suffer from these diseases. This problem affects not only public health but also the economy of the country. Carrier detection, genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis should be encouraged. Most of the programmes have been launched to the endemic provinces in the southern part of northeastern region of Thailand. However, due to the recent industrialisation in Thailand, the migration of the Thai population affects the pattern of haemoglobin disorder in this area. Here, the author performs a spatial analysis by Geographical Information System (GIS) using ArcExplorer Program on the database of the recorded prevalence of haemoglobin disorder in the endemic area and nearby provinces. The drift of the high prevalence from the central endemic area to the nearby provinces can be seen and support the migration effect of the population. Of interest, this observation can support the recent report on the rising prevalence of haemoglobin disorders in the non-endemic area of Thailand.

  15. Alcoholic beverages drinking among female students in a tourist province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Sataporn, Hatairat; Sirichotiratana, Nithat; Charupoonphol, Phitaya

    2011-12-29

    This study aimed to investigate alcoholic beverages drinking and predictive factors among female students. The participants were 377 subjects from 3 high schools in a tourist province, of Thailand. Data collection was done through self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.84 - 0.88. The data were analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed as follows. About half (51%) of them have ever drunk and 10.5% of drinkers have drunk once a week. In addition, 15.6% of drinkers began their first drink when they were under 10 years old. Risk factors for alcohol consumption of female student were age, GPA, drinker in family, peer pressure, advertisement and accessibility to alcoholic beverages while protective factors were perception of drinking impacts on family and moral values. Students who have a drinking family member were 4.6 times more likely to drink than those who do not have.

  16. Climate-related Changes in Tropical-fruit Flowering Phases in Songkhla Province, Southern Thailand

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    Supakracha Apiratikorn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the timing of plant phenological phases in response to anomalous climate variability and the ongoing anthropogenic climate change have recently been studied in southern Thailand. In this study, we showed the evidence of climate-related changes in flowering phases of 2 tropical-fruit species: mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana and longkong (Lansium domesticum Corr. during 2003-2012. The flowering dates of these tropical fruits recorded at Hat Yai district, Songkhla province and daily climate data were used to assess phenophase response to variations in rainfall and evaporation. With the observed changes in local climate conditions which are defining factors for phenological development of tropical fruits particularly in southern Thailand, the flowering dates of both tropical fruits during 2003-2012 have significantly delayed comparing with the regular pattern in the past. Paradoxically, below-than-normal rainfall was also found in the El Niño years, while La Niña years were found in opposite. In summary, rainfall variations in Hat Yai district, Songkhla province are associated with ENSO. It was evident that the flowering period of tropical fruits tended to shift to the second-half of the year instead of the first-half of the year as usual. The results revealed that, during 33 years (1980-2012, annual rainfall totals, the annual number of rainy days, relative humidity, maximum and minimum temperatures from the Thai Meteorological Department significantly increased by 29.5 mm/year, 0.83 day/year, 0.116 %/year, 0.033 and 0.035C/year, respectively. These findings suggest that anthropogenically warm climate and its associated inter-annual variations in local weather patterns may to the great extent influence on tropical-fruit phenology and their responses to recent climate change seem to be complex and nonlinear. Therefore, further study is needed to shed more light on such causal-effect linkages and plausible underlying mechanisms.

  17. Nutritional Status among Rural Community Elderly in the Risk Area of Liver Fluke, Surin Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Namwichaisirikul, Niwatchai; Loyd, Ryan A; Churproong, Seekaow; Ueng-Arporn, Naporn; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Rujirakul, Ratana; Nimkhuntod, Porntip; Wakhuwathapong, Parichart; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is becoming an aging society, this presenting as a serious problem situation especially regarding health. Chronic diseases found frequently in the elderly may be related to dietary intake and life style. Surin province has been reported as a risk area for liver fluke with a high incidence of cholangiocarcinma especially in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the nutritional status and associated factors among elderly in Surin province, northeast of Thailand. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 people aged 60 years and above, between September 2012 and July 2014. The participants were selected through a randomized systematic sampling method and completed a pre-designed questionnaire with general information, food recorded, weight, height, waist circumference, and behavior regarding to food consume related to liver fluke infection. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The majority of participants was female (63.5%), age between 60-70 years old (75.6%), with elementary school education (96.6%), living with their (78.9%), and having underlying diseases (38.3%). Carbohydrate (95.3%) was need to improve the consumption. The participants demonstrated under-nutrition (24.4%), over-nutrition (16.4%), and obesity (15.4%). Elderly had a waist circumference as the higher than normal level (34.0%). Gender, female, age 71-80 years old, elementary school and underlying diseases were significantly associated with poor nutritional status. The majority of them had a high knowledge (43.0%), moderate attitude (44.4%), and moderate practice (46.2%) regarding food consumption related to liver fluke infection. In conclusion, these findings data indicated that elderly age group often have an under- or over-nutritional status. Carbohydrate consumption needs to be improved. Some elderly show behavior regarding food consumption that is related to liver fluke infection hat needs

  18. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans isolated from pigeon excreta in Chon Buri Province, Eastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwattanachuleeporn, Marut; Somparn, Poorichaya; Poolpol, Kulwara; Gross, Uwe; Weig, Michael; Bader, Oliver

    2013-01-01

     The prevalence of cerebral meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans in HIV-infected patients in Eastern Thailand is high. However, little is known about the occurrence of this pathogenic yeast in the environment of this region.  The aim of our study was to characterize the prevalence of C. neoformans, its serotypes and antifungal drug susceptibilities in environmental isolates from Chon Buri, Eastern Thailand.  C. neoformans was isolated from 10% of fifty pigeon excreta examined from this province. All C. neoformans isolates were of serotype A and although the isolates displayed slightly decreased susceptibility towards fluconazole, all tested sensitive to amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole. This study is the first report of the occurrence of C. neoformans in pigeon excreta in eastern Thailand.

  19. White spot disease risk factors associated with shrimp farming practices and geographical location in Chanthaburi province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piamsomboon, Patharapol; Inchaisri, Chaidate; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2015-12-09

    Over the past 2 decades, shrimp aquaculture in Thailand has been impacted by white spot disease (WSD) caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Described here are results of a survey of 157 intensive shrimp farms in Chanthaburi province, Thailand, to identify potential farm management and location risk factors associated with the occurrence of WSD outbreaks. Logistic regression analysis of the survey responses identified WSD risks to be associated with farms sharing inlet water and culturing shrimp year round and with a single owner operating more than 1 farm. The analysis also showed WSD risks to be reduced at farms that used probiotics and applied lime to pond bottoms when fallow to neutralize acidity and kill microorganisms. Regression modeling identified no association of geographical location with WSD. The data should assist shrimp farms in mitigating the effects of WSD in Thailand.

  20. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible. PMID:28285506

  1. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible.

  2. Epidemiology of cercarial stage of trematodes in freshwater snails from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thapana Chontananarth; Chalobol Wongsawad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the epidemiological situation of cercarial trematodes infection in freshwater snails from different water resources in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Methods:The snail specimens were collected from 13 districts of Chiang Mai province during April 2008 to February 2012. The prevalence of cercarial infection in snails was investigated using the crushing method. The drawing was done with the help of a camera lucida for the morphological study. Results:A total of 2 479 snail individuals were collected and classified into 7 families, 11 genera, and 14 species, Among them, 8 snails species were found to be infected with an overall prevalence of 17.27% (428/2 479), which infected with nine groups of cercariae;gymnocephalous cercaria, strigea cercaria, megalurous cercaria, monostome cercaria, parapleurolophocercous cercaria (Haplorchis cercaria), pleurolophocercous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria (Transversotrema cercaria), xiphidiocercaria, and virgulate cercaria. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found to be the dominant type among the cercarial infection in the snails (64.25%). Conclusions:The various species of snails found in the research location act as the intermediate hosts for the high prevalence of parasitic infection of many species of mammals. This work will provide new information on both the distribution and first intermediate host of trematodes.

  3. Survey of the Synanthropic Flies Associated with Human Habitations in Ubon Ratchathani Province of Northeast Thailand

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    Tarinee Chaiwong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synanthropic fly surveys were performed to determine the species composition and abundance in Ubon Ratchathani province in Northeast Thailand. Adult fly collections were conducted in various human habitations from two districts—Muang Ubon Ratchathani and Warinchamrap, at fresh-food markets, garbage piles, restaurants, school cafeterias, and rice paddy fields. Customized reconstructable funnel fly traps baited with 250 g of 1-day tainted beef were used for fly collections from September 2010–February 2011. A total of 3,262 flies were captured, primarily consisting of three families including: Calliphoridae (6 species, Muscidae (3 species, and Sarcophagidae (11 species. The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala, and the house fly, Musca domestica, were the dominant species collected from both districts at all collection sites. C. megacephala was predominant in paddy fields, restaurants and garbage piles, while M. domestica was numerically dominant in fresh-food markets and school cafeterias. The current survey identified various species of synanthropic flies with close associations to humans and with the ability to transmit human pathogens in Ubon Ratchathani province; providing crucial information that may be used for developing control and sanitation management plans in this particular area.

  4. SPECIES DIVERSITY AND SEASONALITY OF PHLEBOTOMINE SAND FLIES (DIPTERA: PSYCHODIDAE) IN SATUN PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthawong, Amonrat; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2015-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is prevalent mainly in the southern provinces of Thailand where sand flies are considered to be an important vector. Sand flies were collected using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps in Satun Province from June 2013 to July 2014. A total of 1,982 sand flies (1,228 females and 754 males) were collected. Only female sand flies were identified to the species level and were tested for Leishmania infection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Morphological identification revealed 2 genera and 9 species: Phlebotomus stantoni, P. argentipes, Sergentomyia gemmea, S. indica, S. barraudi, S. iyengari, S. bailyi, S. perturbans, and S. silvatica. S. gemmea (57.2%) was the most abundant species. The diversity of sand flies was highest in Thung Wa District. The sand flies were most abundant late in the hot season and early in the rainy season (April to June). The highest number of sand flies was collected in June. Significant correlations between the number of female sand flies and rainfall and between S. gemmea and rainfall were found. Of the female sand flies tested, none were positive for Leishmania spp.

  5. Characteristics associated with contact with rodents in, around, and outside homes in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Rodents are an important reservoir for zoonotic diseases. To enhance the evidence on the human-rodent interface, this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 to investigate characteristics associated with rodent contact in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. A standardized, interviewer-administered questionnaire elicited information from 201 adults (101 males and 100 females). Overall, 86.6% of participants reported encountering or seeing evidence of rodents in or near the home, whereas 57.2% encountered rodents while working with crops. Encountering rodents in or near the home was positively associated with the number of agricultural activities, whereas encountering rodents during crop work was positively associated with perceiving that disease can be acquired from rodents, the number of food crops grown, the number of agricultural activities, and living in a house with wooden walls. Surprisingly, neither outcome was associated appreciably with gender, age, or setting (urban, forest, or agricultural). These results provide information on the potential risk of rodent-borne zoonoses; this evidence has implications for risk communication strategies in this province and likely elsewhere.

  6. Molecular confirmation of trematodes in the snail intermediate hosts from Ratchaburi Province, Thailand

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    Sothorn Anucherngchai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the prevalence of trematode infections in the snails intermediate host Tarebia granifera and Melanoides tuberculata collected from Ratchaburi Province by a molecular approach in order to construct a dendrogram to identify species at the cercarial stage. Methods: Specimens were collected from nine districts located in Ratchaburi Province using the stratified sampling method. The samples were examined for cercarial infection using the crushing method. All specimens were amplified by region of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 based on the PCR technique, and the sequence data were aligned in order to construct the dendrogram by maximum likelihood with 10 000 bootstrap replicates. Results: Five cercarial types were observed comprising parapleurolophocercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria. The overall prevalence of cercarial infection was found to be 7.92% (63 / 795. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found in the highest level of prevalence followed by xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria, respectively. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria samples were identified and separated into Haplorchis taichui and Haplorchis pumilio, while xiphidiocercaria were identified as Lecithodendriidae and megarulous cercaria were identified as Philophthalmus. The dendrogram separated the cercariae into five groups, which were comprised of parapleurolophocercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria using the sequence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis as an out-group. Conclusions: This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cercarial infection in Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. The high prevalence of cercariae was revealed by the infection in Tarebia granifera and Melanoides tuberculata. Thus, the sequence data of ITS2 can be used to investigate the

  7. Avian influenza protection knowledge, awareness, and behaviors in a high-risk population in Suphan Buri Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Tavorn; Butraporn, Piyarat; Kaewkangwal, Jaranit; Fungladda, Wijitr

    2007-05-01

    Avian influenza (Al) had outbreaks in Thailand from January 2004 to December 2005, which resulted in 22 human cases, and 14 deaths. Three confirmed cases were reported in Suphan Buri Province in 2004, one of whom died. A cross-sectional study aimed to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices about AI in Song Phi Nong District of Suphan Buri Province. Most of the respondents had moderate levels of knowledge. Most of their attitudes towards and practices of the prevention and control of AI were also appropriate. However, the peoples' knowledge about major signs and symptoms of AI was limited. The study suggested that those who had received information from media had better attitudes towards and practices of AI prevention and control, compared with those who had not received information from media. Therefore, the media played an important role in improving knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors; but for the better protection from AI, continuing health education will be necessary in Thailand.

  8. Cigarette, alcohol use and physical activity among Myanmar youth workers, Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand.

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    Howteerakul, N; Suwannapong, N; Than, M

    2005-05-01

    Over 1.2 million migrants from Myanmar are currently residing in Thailand. Little information is known about Myanmar youth risk behaviors. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence and the factors associated with cigarette and alcohol use, and physical inactivity, among Myanmar youth working in a harbor town in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand. One hundred and seventy-seven young workers aged 15-24 years, living in the study area, were interviewed by structured questionnaire. About 21.5% were current smokers, 25.4% were alcohol drinkers, and 36.7% were physically inactive. Univariate analysis indicated one variable was significantly associated with cigarette smoking: education level higher than primary school (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.02-5.0), Three variables were significantly associated with alcohol drinking: married status (OR=2.2, 95%CI 1.02-4.5); non-seafood-processing workers, i e, street vendors, construction laborers, etc. (OR=3.4, 95% CI 1.7-7.1), and high job stress due to supervisor/boss (OR=2.1 95% CI 1.1-4.2). Two variables were significantly associated with physical inactivity: female youth (OR=3.9 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and education level higher than primary school (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). The prevalence of smoking, alcohol drinking and physical inactivity among Myanmar migrant youths was quite high. Government and non-government organizations should co-operate to provide interventions to reduce youths' risk behaviors.

  9. New province record of Rhinagrion for Thailand and description of the larva of R. mima (Odonata: Zygoptera: Philosinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelo-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Sites, Robert W; Vitheepradit, Akekawat

    2014-08-19

    The Oriental damselfly genus Rhinagrion includes 10 known species, but the larva of only R. philippinum has been described in any detail, while the larva of R. viridatum has been well-illustrated and features summarized. The larvae of the other eight species were unknown. Here, the larva of Rhinagrion mima is described and illustrated by supposition, based upon an F0 larva collected in Phetchabun Province in Thailand. It is compared with the larvae of R. philippinum and R. viridatum. This represents the first record of the genus for Phetchabun Province

  10. A Firefly Learning Module for Environmental Sustainable Development in Samutsongkhram Province, THAILAND

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    Jongdee To-im

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A firefly learning module for the sustainable development was developed for Thai secondary school students in the study province. A deeper connection between environment, social and economic dimensions, which lies at the core of sustainability, became the key issue for this learning module. Also an important dimension of the module was the empowerment of the students themselves. Through brainstorming and ensuring activities, students were expected to act at the local level and to develop a deeper sense of responsibility. This study aimed at to develop learning module based on both the principle of inquiry approaches and the collaboration of a community of learners. Mixed methods paradigm was employed for data collection and analysis. Four data collection techniques: classroom observations, interviews, written documents, and questionnaire were employed. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was applied for quantitative data analysis. The qualitative data were analyzed using open and axial coding techniques. The analyzed data were categorized to describe context of developed learning module, the students’ conceptual understanding, and awareness toward ecosystems and firefly conservation. The study involved one-9th grade class of twenty students from one school in Samutsongkhram Province, Thailand. The results indicated that the developed learning module improved students’ conceptual understanding, perceptions, and self-reported behavior toward ecosystems and firefly conservation. The results of the effectiveness of this learning module clearly showed that the students gained significantly higher score in conceptual understanding and perceptions after participating in this learning module. The results from interviews showed that the students changed from a poor to a very good level of understanding after involvement in this learning module. The results also indicated that none of the students remained at the poor level after

  11. Application of traditional knowledge to create indigo-dyed fabric products in Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand

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    Chanitsara Duangbubpa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Indigo fabric is created by dying silk or cotton with color from the true indigo plant (Indigofera tinctoria and is a valuable commodity in Northeastern Thai communities. This is a qualitative investigation with two principal research aims: 1 To study the history and background of indigo-dyed fabric in Sakon Nakhon Province; 2 To study the current conditions and application of traditional knowledge in creating indigo-dyed fabric in Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand. Data for this investigation were collected from document analysis and field research between July 2013 and July 2014. Results show that weaving groups are sponsored by the government and the local community to produce indigo-dyed fabric that can be transformed into a variety of different products that meet consumer needs. These products include blankets, scarves, shawls, formal wear and bags. Weaving communities prefer to use materials from the surrounding environment. Community members cultivate their own true indigo plants using the traditional processes inherited from generation to generation. The dye creation process requires plant matter to be soaked in water for 24 hours before it can be used in the dye mixture. The traditional dye mixture is 4 liters of indigo plant, 2 liters of natural lye water and 1 tablespoon of white lime. During the dyeing process, the cotton fabric is stirred and wring in the dye mixture until the color holds. The fabric is then rested and the process is repeated to achieve the desired hue. The quality of the dye is then tested by washing the fabric in clean water. By applying the resourcefulness of traditional knowledge used in the dye creation process to the marketing and sale of indigo fabric, the entire production will benefit.

  12. Molecular Phylogenetics of Centrocestus formosanus (Digenea: Heterophyidae) Originated from Freshwater Fish from Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

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    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Wongsawad, Pheravut; Sukontason, Kom; Maneepitaksanti, Worawit; Nantarat, Nattawadee

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the morphology and reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of Centrocestus formosanus originating from 5 species of freshwater fish, i.e., Esomus metallicus, Puntius brevis, Anabas testudineus, Parambassis siamensis, and Carassius auratus, in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and phylogeny based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) were performed. The results showed similar morphologies of adult C. formosanus from day 5 after infection in chicks. C. formosanus originated from 4 species of freshwater fish had the same number of circumoral spines on the oral sucker, except for those from C. auratus which revealed 34 circumoral spines. The phylogenetic tree obtained from SRAP profile and the combination of ITS2 and CO1 sequence showed similar results that were correlated with the number of circumoral spines in adult worms. Genetic variability of C. formosanus also occurred in different species of freshwater fish hosts. However, more details of adult worm morphologies and more sensitive genetic markers are needed to confirm the species validity of C. formosanus with 34 circumoral spines originating from C. auratus in the future. PMID:28285504

  13. Molecular Phylogenetics of Centrocestus formosanus (Digenea: Heterophyidae) Originated from Freshwater Fish from Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Wongsawad, Pheravut; Sukontason, Kom; Maneepitaksanti, Worawit; Nantarat, Nattawadee

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the morphology and reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of Centrocestus formosanus originating from 5 species of freshwater fish, i.e., Esomus metallicus, Puntius brevis, Anabas testudineus, Parambassis siamensis, and Carassius auratus, in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and phylogeny based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) were performed. The results showed similar morphologies of adult C. formosanus from day 5 after infection in chicks. C. formosanus originated from 4 species of freshwater fish had the same number of circumoral spines on the oral sucker, except for those from C. auratus which revealed 34 circumoral spines. The phylogenetic tree obtained from SRAP profile and the combination of ITS2 and CO1 sequence showed similar results that were correlated with the number of circumoral spines in adult worms. Genetic variability of C. formosanus also occurred in different species of freshwater fish hosts. However, more details of adult worm morphologies and more sensitive genetic markers are needed to confirm the species validity of C. formosanus with 34 circumoral spines originating from C. auratus in the future.

  14. Trihalomethane formation potential of shrimp farm effluents in Chachoengsao Province, Thailand

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    Aweewan Mangmeechai

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp farm effluents along Bangpakong River in Chachoengsao Province, Thailand, were evaluated for their trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP, which were shown to be in the range of 810-3,100 µg/L. Samples from river locations, both upstream and downstream from these selected farms, were also tested for their existing THMFP. These river samples were illustrated to have notably lower level of THMFP than the shrimp farm effluents. The downstream concentration was, however, found to be significantly higher than the upstream (as much as 5 times. This indicated that the contamination of shrimp farm effluents could have increased the formation potential of THMs in the natural water source. The experimental results showed a positive correlation between salinity and THMFP. The formation of various THM species depended significantly on the level of salinity in the water sample. Low salinity (0-5 ppt often led to a high formation of chloroform and bromodichloromethane while high salinity (5-15 ppt resulted in a great quantity of dibromochloromethane and bromoform. FTIR spectra of the samples before and after chlorination suggested that the functional groups involved in the reaction were hydroxyl group, amines group, aromatic ring, aliphatic chloro compounds and aliphatic bromo compounds, whereas C-O was the product from the reaction.

  15. Seroprevalence of antibody against diphtheria among the population in Khon Kaen province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansiddhi, Hataichanok; Vuthitanachot, Viboonsuk; Vuthitanachot, Chanpim; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-03-01

    To assess diphtheria immunity in the northeastern region of Thailand, a seroepidemiological survey was undertaken in 2011 from 516 healthy individuals (age range 2-87 years) in Khon Kaen province. Diphtheria antitoxin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and titers of ≥0.1 IU/mL were considered to be protective antitoxin levels. Among the studied population, 94.8% have fully protective levels. The younger population (age range 2-19 years) has higher diphtheria immunity with seroprotection rates of 96.8% to 97.9%, compared with the adult population. The proportion of protective diphtheria antitoxin levels declines to 88.3% to 91.9% in the middle-aged group (20-50 years), and appeared to be higher again in the older age-group (50-70 years). To avoid epidemic spreading, promoting immunization booster programs will be helpful, especially among the adult population (20-50 years). Finally, this study may serve as a valuable guide in deciding exactly which age-groups should be targeted by such an effort. © 2012 APJPH.

  16. A causal model of depression among older adults in Chon Buri Province, Thailand.

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    Piboon, Kanchana; Subgranon, Rarcharneeporn; Hengudomsub, Pornpat; Wongnam, Pairatana; Louise Callen, Bonnie

    2012-02-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and empirically test a theoretical model that examines the relationships between a set of predictors and depression among older adults. A biopsychosocial model was tested with 317 community dwelling older adults residing in Chon Buri Province, Thailand. A face-to-face interview was used in a cross-sectional community-based survey. A hypothesized model of depression was tested by using path analysis. It was found that the modified model fitted the data and the predictors accounted for 60% of the variance in depression. Female gender, activities of daily living, loneliness, stressful life events, and emotional-focused coping had a positive direct effect on depression. Social support and problem-focused coping had a negative direct effect on depression. Additionally, perceived stress, stressful life events, loneliness, and income had a negative indirect effect on depression through social support. Female gender, activities of daily living, and perceived stress also had a positive indirect effect on depression through emotional-focused coping. Stressful life events, perceived stress, and income had a negative indirect effect on depression through problem-focused coping. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the variables that predict depression in older adults. Thus, health care providers should consider the effects of these contributing factors on depression in the older adult person and can devise a program to prevent and promote health in older adults alleviating depression.

  17. Factors affecting utilization of health centers in a rural area of Chon Buri Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, D R; Ittiravivongs, A

    1994-06-01

    A descriptive study was carried out in two subdistricts of Nong Heng and Nong Kakha, Phan Thong District, Chon Buri Province eastern Thailand with the aim to determine factors affecting health center utilization. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 206 randomly selected households in which household head or senior person in each household was interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The study household was classified as either high or low health center utilization group on the basis of using health services more than 50% of total health services needed in each household. The results revealed that age group, sex, education, family size, and distance from household to health center were not associated with the utilization of health center, whereas occupation, economic status, knowledge and attitude towards health center and quality as well as convenience of health services were found to be associated with health center utilization. It was seemed that underutilization of health centers was multifactorial, in which some factors were related with the personality of individual whereas others were concerned with the health center itself.

  18. Factors influencing life happiness among elderly female in Rayong Province, Thailand.

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    Nanthamongkolchai, Sutham; Tuntichaivanit, Chutigai; Munsawaengsub, Chokchai; Charupoonphol, Phitaya

    2009-12-01

    To study the factors influencing life happiness of elderly female in Rayong province, Thailand. A cross-sectional survey research was conducted among 233 elderly female aged between 60-80 years using multi-stage random sampling. The data were collected from June 6th to July 31st 2008 by interviewing questionnaires. Data were analyzed by frequency, percentage, Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient and Stepwise multiple regression analysis. About half (50.2%) of the elderly female had moderate level of life happiness, followed by low level (27.1%) and high level (22.7%). The factors which significantly influenced the life happiness of the elderly female were self-esteem, social support, and family relationships (p happiness of the elderly female by 91.4%. Self-esteem had the highest predictive power of life happiness among elderly female. The important factors influencing life happiness of elderly female were self-esteem, social support, and family relationships. To promote life happiness of elderly female, responsible organizations should establish activities that enhance the elderly female's self-esteem, provide sufficient social support, and promote good family relationships.

  19. Seasonal distribution of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Tham Phra Phothisat temple, Saraburi province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polseela, R; Apiwathnasorn, C; Samung, Y

    2011-08-01

    Phlebotomine sand flies have long been incriminated as vectors of leishmaniasis in various parts of both the Old and New World. Prompted by recent indigenous cases of leishmaniasis in Thailand, a bionomic study of sand flies was undertaken in Tham Phra Phothisat temple, Saraburi province. In this study, sand flies were collected using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps, to clarify the activity patterns and species composition of the sand flies. Traps were laid from August 2005 to July 2006. The insects were collected monthly between 1800-0600 hours. A total of 8,131 sand flies were collected with a female:male ratio of 1.9:1. Sixteen species were identified, of which 5 belonged to the genus Phlebotomus, 9 to Sergentomyia and 1 to Chinius. Species comprised the abundant species (Sergentomyia silvatica 35.6%, Sergentomyia barraudi 18.1%, Sergentomyia anodontis, 17.1%, Sergentomyia iyengari 11.9%, and Sergentomyia gemmea 11.2%); the less common species (sand fly prevalence, with the highest peak in July. Soil samples collected were characterized by alkaline (pH 7.6).

  20. Breast feeding behavior and supplementary food pattern of villagers in Udon Thani Province, northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saowakontha, S; Chantraphosri, V; Kampor, P; Ketkowit, K; Panomratanarak, B; Thaworndunstid, P; Nathapindhu, K

    1995-03-01

    Breast feeding and supplementary food patterns were studied in 3 villages, of Udon Thani Province in Northeast Thailand. All children of 58 mothers were breast fed. Moreover, 42 mothers (72.4%), advised by health workers, fed their children with colostrum. Those who did not give colostrum believed that colostrum may cause diarrhea. Fifty-one (87.9%) children were fed Kaw Yam, northeast native food made out of baked chewed banana and sticky rice, within 1-7 days after birth. The mothers believed that the food will fill the child's stomach, and consequently, her baby will stop to cry. Powder milk was also given to the child as supplementary food. A powder milk had a high social value for the mother and also health worker advised them to feed the children with it. Rice porridge was additionally supplemented at the age of 6-8 months until weaning or, at the time when the child had two front teeth. Child's weaning was forced by applying the nipples with local bitter tasting herb. This study indicates that any health education within a community should be aware of traditional belief and customs of the population. The promotion of proper breast feeding, and the introduction of supplementary food to children should be consider traditional beliefs and combine it with health educational means, which will result in a better adoptability of the villagers to the promotion of adequate infant feeding.

  1. Complex genetic structure of the rabies virus in Bangkok and its surrounding provinces, Thailand: implications for canine rabies control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Ruankaew, Nipada; Hoonsuwan, Wirongrong; Puanghat, Apirom; Sakarasaeranee, Plyyonk; Briggs, Deborrah; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2006-03-01

    Dog vaccination and population management have been suggested as priorities in attempts at disease control in canine rabies-endemic countries. Budget limitations and the complexity of social, cultural and religious variables have complicated progress in the developing world. In Bangkok, Thailand, an intensive canine vaccination and sterilization programme has been in place since November 2002. Our objective was to determine if the rabies virus could be mapped according to its genetic variations and geographical location on the small localized scale of Bangkok and its surrounding provinces. Phylogenetic characterization of 69 samples from Bangkok and five neighbouring and two remote provinces, by limited sequence analysis of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene, distinguished six different clades. Rabies viruses of four clades were intermixed in Bangkok and in the surrounding highly populated regions whereas the other two clades were confined to rural and less populated provinces. Such a complex pattern of gene flow, particularly in Bangkok, may affect the outcome of canine control programmes.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium falciparum in Thailand, a low transmission country

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    Sitthi-amorn Chitr

    2009-07-01

    populations during this study. Comparison of the genetic structure of P. falciparum populations in Thailand with those in the French Guyana, Congo and Cameroon revealed a significant genetic differentiation between all of them, except the two African countries, whilst the genetic variability of P. falciparum amongst countries showed overlapping distributions. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum shows genetically structured populations across local areas of Thailand. Although Thailand is considered to be a low transmission area, a relatively high level of genetic diversity and no linkage disequilibrium was found in five of the studied areas, the exception being the Yala province (Southern peninsular Thailand, where a clonal population structure was revealed and in Kanchanaburi province (Western Thailand. This finding is particularly relevant in the context of malaria control, because it could help in understanding the special dynamics of parasite populations in areas with different histories of, and exposure to, drug regimens.

  3. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

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    Piratae, Supawadee; Pimpjong, Kiattisak; Vaisusuk, Kotchaphon; Chatan, Wasupon

    2015-01-01

    Canine tick borne diseases showing distribution worldwide have caused morbidity and mortality in dogs. This study observed the mainly tick borne pathogens described for dogs in Thailand, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli. From May to July 2014, blood samples were collected from 79 stray dogs from 7 districts of Mahasarakham province to molecular surveyed for 16s rRNA gene of E. canis and 18s rRNA gene of H. canis and B. canis vogeli. Twenty eight (35.44%) of stray dogs showed the infection with tick borne pathogens. The prevalence of E. canis infection was the highest with 21.5% (17/79). DNA of H. canis and B. canis vogeli were detected at the prevalence of 10.1% (8/79) and 6.3% (5/79), respectively. Co-infection between E. canis and B. canis vogeli were identified in 2 (2.5%) dogs. The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens are circulation in the canine population in Mahasarakham province. This study is the first report on prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham, a province in northern part of Thailand. This data providing is important to understand the prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli infection in stray dogs in this region, which will assist in the management of these blood parasite.

  4. Analysis of chain saw lubricating oils commonly used in Thailand's southern border provinces for forensic science purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choodum, Aree; Tripuwanard, Kijja; Daeid, Niamh Nic

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, Thailand's southern border provinces (Malay-Muslim-majority border provinces) have become the scene of violence and insurgency. One of the attack patterns is the blocking of roads with perennial plants followed by planned attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or weapons on first responders. Containers of viscous dark lubricating oil and traces of lubricants on the felled trees were usually found at the scene. These were suspected to be chain oil lubricant from the chainsaws used to cut down the trees used for the roadblock. This work aimed to differentiate the chromatographic patterns of used lubricating oils available in automobile repair shops from various locations across Thailand's southern border provinces. Lubricating oils were analyzed using gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) every two weeks to study their variation in chemical compositions over time. The results obtained from GC/FID were normalized for differentiation. This included four two-stroke, six four-stroke, and three recycled oils. Two lubricating oils found at an incident scene were also analyzed and the results compared with the chain oil from five seized chainsaws.

  5. Characterization of halloysite from Thung Yai District, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, in Southern Thailand

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    Sunaree Bordeepong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite obtained from Thung Yai District, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, Southern Thailand was characterized byX-Ray fluorescence (XRF, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, a zeta potential analyzer, thermalanalysis (TGA and DTA, scanning (SEM, and transmission (TEM electron microscopy. SEM and TEM analysis showedthat it consisted mainly of hollow microtubules and plates with typical dimension of 0.08-0.20 m diameter and lengths of0.50-4.50 m. XRF analysis showed that it consisted mainly of Al2O3 and SiO2. The SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio of 1.37 indicatedthat a 1:1 clay mineral was the dominant component. It had a high Fe2O3 (2.27% and TiO2 (2.72% content. XRD analysisshowed that the halloysite was mainly in its dehydrated (7Å basal spacing form with some kaolinite, quartz and anatase.Semi quantification in clay by XRD after formamide treatment showed that it was approx. 70% halloysite. FTIR was used todistinguish between the different types of clay minerals and provided information concerning their structure. TGA and DTAwere used to examine the dehydroxylation and other thermally induced caused changes of the halloysite. The charge (zetapotential behavior of the halloysite was negative over the relevant pH range (>2 and indicated that the material has apotential for binding of cationic drugs or could be used as a coating polymer from solution.

  6. Biodiversity of Mushrooms in Conservative Forest in Dansai District of Loei Province, Thailand

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    Benchawattananon, Rachadaporn

    2016-01-01

    Dansai District is located in Loei Province, Northeast Thailand, rich in natural resources and composes of many kinds of forests, such as evergreen forests and mixed-deciduous forests. The objectives of the study are to determine the diversity of mushrooms and investigate the values of the forest influencing the community way of life and exploration of problems and guidelines for developing the forest along with sufficiency economy theory. The study includes compilation of data from past studies, semi-structured interview with the local communities and discussion with focus group. The survey was done once a month during the rainy season from May to August in 2012 and 2013. The results of the survey revealed 56 species belonging to 26 families, 38 genera. A total of 52 mushroom species belong to Basidiomycota, while 4 species belong to Ascomycota. The community forest remains fertile due to the conservation effort by the community leaders and a group of villagers. A community forestry board were set up to conserve the forest and proposed to the government at Dansai Vocational Community College to officially declare the forest as a formal community forest. The conservation management relied upon the kinship relations, seniority, and religious belief along with the enforcing authorities. If an encroacher is found, he would be fined according to the regulations and defamed publicly. However, encroachment still exists. In general, community forest is valuable and directly affected the villagers’ ways of life in which they could generate income from the forest, particularly reducing the daily expenses and promoting their socio-cultural perspective. PMID:27965747

  7. Investigation of coastline changes in three provinces of Thailand using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochamnanvita, T.; Muttitanon, W.

    2014-11-01

    The measuring of coastal in the certain short period of time is almost impossible, but applying the remote sensing with the satellite imagery bring mankind to track down and analyze the approximately length of the coastal changes at the Nano technology speed. An attempt has been made to study the length of shoreline changes along three provinces in the upper gulf of Thailand. The significant purpose is to investigate coastline length changes and to evaluate those different coastal changes at different times. Two specialties of chosen areas are the outstanding location at mouth of river in curve pattern and ecological important mangrove forest, as nominated and designated area listed in Ramsar convention, international wetlands treaty. In employing the remote sensing will help to investigate the shoreline erosion, stable or construction shoreline. Rapid and drastic shoreline changes have been compared and measured base on satellite image Landsat 5 TM on 1994, 2002 and 2007 at path129 row 051. There were geometrically co-registered and, in the process were resampled to 25 m. By composing RGB band, fusion, supervised classification. By apply different theories will give different results but the similarly pattern. Training sites were selected by signature editor, area of interest, evaluate by seperabilitly and contingency. Principle component analysis (PCA) was employed as a method of change detection. This is to conclude that these shoreline areas were in erosion from natural processes and manmade activities, for example, aquaculture and agriculture expansion, such as shrimp farm. These coastal line lost were not just losing the land; it's losing the soul of the cycle of marine life, economically, and environmentally. Moreover, this project, in the future, could benefit to set the recovery buffer zone for mangrove restoration also.

  8. Juvenile and small fishes in a mangrove estuary in Trang province, Thailand: seasonal and habitat differences

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    Ikejima, K.; Tongnunui, P.; Medej, T.; Taniuchi, T.

    2003-03-01

    Juvenile and small resident fish assemblages at three sites (beach with mangroves, beach without mangroves and middle reach of mangrove creek), comprising the major habitat types of a mangrove estuary in Trang Province, Thailand, were studied for 3 years. A total of 6616 individuals, comprising 89 species (30 families), were collected using a small seine net. In terms of number of species per family, Gobiidae (18 species) was the most diverse, followed by Engraulidae (nine species) and Leiognathidae (seven species). In terms of individuals, Engraulidae, Leiognathidae, Gerreidae, Atherinidae and Gobiidae were the dominant families. Species richness was significantly greater in the mangrove creek than at the two beach sites, and greater in the wet season than the dry season. Fish abundance (individuals per tow) was also greater in the wet season, with no significant differences among sites. On the other hand, biomass (weight per tow) was greater in the mangrove creek than the mangrove beach, but with no significant difference between seasons. Cluster and ordination analysis based on the number of individuals of each species demonstrated that the fish assemblage structures were markedly different between the beach and creek sites, the assemblages at the two beach sites being similar in the wet season. Most species were specific to a particular habitat type (or types), some occurring exclusively in the creek or beach sites, and some in both the mangrove sites. Such distributional differences were found even between species within a single family. The results indicated that creek and beach habitats function as nursery sites for different fish species, the former being utilized by a grater diversity of species than the latter.

  9. Seasonal variations in seagrass percentage cover and biomass at Koh Tha Rai, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, Gulf of Thailand

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    Anchana Prathep

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variations in seagrass percentage cover and biomass at Koh Tha Rai, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, Gulf ofThailand, were investigated between July 2006 - July 2008 using SeagrassNet protocol. The SeagrassNet protocol is astandard method for monitoring seagrass worldwide, and Koh Tha Rai is among the first few places using such protocol inThailand. The standard protocol such as SeagrassNet allows comparisons of findings among various sites worldwide. Fivespecies of seagrass found at Koh Tha Rai : Enhalus acoroides (L.f. Royle, Cymodocea rotundata Asch. & Schweinf.,Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb.Asch., Halophila ovalis (R.Br. Hook.f. and Halodule uninervis (Forssk. Asch. E. acoroidescovered the largest area, while C. rotundata covered only a small area. Most seagrass showed seasonal variations both inpercentage cover and biomass. There were also variations in above and below ground biomass as well as in the sediment.There was a decline of seagrass with increasing of sedimentation in a sheltered site. This study provides a systematic monitoringof seagrass in Thailand, which is still limited.

  10. High prevalence of bancroftian filariasis in Myanmar-migrant workers: a study in Mae Sot district, Tak province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triteeraprapab, S; Songtrus, J

    1999-07-01

    Although the prevalence of lymphatic filariasis in the Thai population is low, migration of Myanmar labor into Thailand may increase the incidence of bancroftian filariasis. Epidemiology of filariasis in Myanmars has not been precisely determined. By using microscopic examination, we found that the microfilarial rate in 654 Myanmar migrants working in Mae Sot, Tak province, was 4.4 per cent. The highest microfilarial rate was found in males aged 21-30 years (6.8%). History of mosquito bites was significantly correlated with microfilaremia. The majority of Myanmar migrants (55.5%) have been staying in Thailand 1-6 years; most (82.0%) have never been back to Myanmar. Seventy-nine per cent of infected Myanmars were from Moulmein (Maulamyine) city. Since these migrants carry the parasite with high infected rate and the mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus is also prevalent in Thailand, Thai people are at high risk of acquiring this disease if good control and prevention strategies are not implemented.

  11. An Alternative Policy Proposal for the Provinces Populated by the Malay Ethnonationality in the South of Thailand

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    Otto F. von Feigenblatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a public policy analysis of governance in the provinces populated by the Malay ethnonationality in the South of Thailand. Important stakeholders are identified as well as important sociopolitical environmental factors. The final sections of the paper present a proposal for a new governance structure for the Muslim South of Thailand taking into consideration the social, cultural, and economic context as well as the wellbeing and right to self-determination of the local population. This study concludes that considerable economic, political, and social opportunities for development are being lost in the South of Thailand due to misguided governance policies. --- Dieser Artikel stellt eine politische Analyse von Governance in den von der nationalen Minderheit der Malaien bewohnten Provinzen in Südthailand vor. Zunächst werden zentrale InteressensvertreterInnen und soziopolitische Faktoren identifiziert. Anschließend diskutiert der Autor einen Vorschlag für eine neue Governancestruktur, die soziale, kulturelle und wirtschaftliche Kontexte ebenso beachtet wie die Bedürfnisse und das Recht zur Selbstbestimmung der lokalen Bevölkerung. Der Beitrag konkludiert, dass beträchtliche Möglichkeiten zur wirtschaftlichen, politischen und sozialen Entwicklung aufgrund von fehlgeleiteten Politiken ausgelassen wurden.

  12. Re-Examination of Opisthorchis viverrini in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand, Indicates Continued Needs for Health Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Loyd, Ryan A; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kompor, Porntip; Norkaew, Jun; Chavengkun, Wasugree; Kujapan, Jirawoot; Polphimai, Sukanya; Phatisena, Tanida; Eaksunti, Thawatchai; Polsripradist, Poowadol; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with cholangiocarcinoma particularly in the cases of chronic or re-infection. This presents a serious health problem in northeastern and northern Thailand. A community base approach is required for surveillance. Therefore, in a pilot project, re-examination of O. viverrini infection was conducted in the 3 districts of Nakhon Ratchasima province, Thailand, during June and October 2015. A total of 355 participants from a 194,152 population, was selected through multi-stage sampling. O. viverrini infection was determined using modified Kato Katz thick smear technique. Participants were 229 males and 126 females, and aged ≥30 years old. Prevalence of O. viverrini infection was 2.25% (8/355 participants). O. viverrini infection was slightly higher in females (3.17%), and age group between 41-50 years (4.49%). Mueang Yang district had a highest of O. viverrini infection rate (2.82%), and followed by Bua Yai (2.48%), and Chum Phuang (1.84%), respectively. O. viverrini infection rate was increased from year 2012 to 2015 particularly in Bua Yai and Mueang Yang. These re-examinion results indicate that opisthorchiasis is still problem in community of Nakhon Ratchasima province, therefore, the provincial-wide scale is need required. Furthermore health education is need intervened in the infected group, and screening of cholangiocarcinoma is urgently concerned.

  13. Measuring and factors influencing mathematics teachers' technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) in three southernmost provinces, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adulyasas, Lilla

    2017-08-01

    Technology becomes an important role in teaching and learning mathematics nowadays. Integrating technology in the classroom helps students have better understanding in many of mathematics concepts. One of the major framework for assessing the knowledge of integrating technology with the pedagogy and content in the classroom is Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework. This study aimed to measure mathematics teachers' TPACK in three southernmost provinces, Thailand and to study on factors influencing their TPACK. A quantitative study was carried out with 210 secondary level mathematics teachers in the three southernmost provinces, Thailand which were random by two stage sampling technique. Data were collected by using a questionnaire to identify the level of mathematics teachers' TPACK and the factors influencing their TPACK. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlation and multiple regression analysis were used for analysing data. Findings reveal that the mean score of mathematics teachers' TPACK is 3.33 which is in the medium level and the three factors which have positive correlation at .05 level of significant with the level of TPACK are teaching experience factor, individual specialization factor and personal & organization factor. However, there are only two factors influencing mathematics teachers' TPACK. The two factors are individual specialization factor and personal & organization factors. These give better understanding on mathematics teachers' knowledge in integrating technology with the pedagogy and content which will be the important information for improving mathematics teachers' TPACK.

  14. Effects of an injury and illness prevention program on occupational safety behaviors among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santaweesuk S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sapsatree Santaweesuk,1,2 Robert S Chapman,1 Wattasit Siriwong1,3 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Srinakarinwirot University Ongkharak Campus, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand; 3Thai Fogarty ITREOH Center, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an Injury and Illness Prevention (IIP program intervention on occupational safety behavior among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. This was a quasi-experimental study in an intervention group and a control group. It was carried out in two rice farming communities, in which most people are rice farmers with similar socio-demographic characteristics. Multistage sampling was employed, selecting one person per rice farming household. The intervention group was 62 randomly selected rice farmers living in a rural area; another 55 rice farmers served as the control group. A structured face-to-face interview questionnaire was administered to participants to evaluate their safety behaviors in four areas: equipment use, pesticide use, ergonomics, and working conditions. The 2-week intervention program consisted of four elements: 1 health education, 2 safety inspection, 3 safety communication, and 4 health surveillance. Data were collected at baseline and 4 months after the intervention (follow-up. We used a general linear model repeated-measures analysis of variance to assess the mean difference between baseline and follow-up occupational safety behavior points between the intervention and control groups. Pesticide safety behaviors significantly increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. Ergonomics and working conditions points also increased in the intervention group, but not significantly so. The equipment use score decreased in the intervention group. It is necessary to identify and develop further measures to improve occupational safety behaviors. Some

  15. High prevalence and molecular characteristics of multidrug-resistant Salmonella in pigs, pork and humans in Thailand and Laos provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinwat, Nuananong; Angkittitrakul, Sunpetch; Coulson, Kari F; Pilapil, Flor Marie Immanuelle R; Meunsene, Dethaloun; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine occurrence and antimicrobial resistance characteristics of Salmonella from pigs, pork and humans in Thailand and Laos provinces. The samples were collected from pigs, carcasses and workers in slaughterhouses, retail pork and butchers in fresh markets and patients in hospitals in Thailand (n=729) and Laos (n=458). A total of 295 of 729 samples (34.6 %) collected in Thailand and 253 of 458 (47.4 %) samples collected in Laos were positive for Salmonella. A total of 548 Salmonella isolates from Thailand (n=295) and Laos (n=253) were further analysed. Serovar Typhimurium was the most common serotype in Thai (34 %) and Laos (20.6 %) samples. Approximately 2.4 % of Thai isolates produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). All the ESBL producers possessed blaCTX-M-14, some of which were horizontally transferred. Class 1 integrons were common in Thai (31.9 %) and Laos (39.1 %) isolates, but none were associated with SGI1. The resistance cassette dfrA12-aadA2 was the most common, while the least common was aadA2-linG (n=1). The dfrA12-aadA2 gene cassette in five isolates and aadA2-linG were located on conjugative plasmid. Three pork isolates were fluoroquinolone resistant and carried an amino acid substitute, Ser-83-Tyr, in GyrA. The qnrS gene was found in 7.1 and 5.5 % of the Thai and Laos isolates, respectively, while qnrB was carried in another Laos isolate (1.9 %). All ESBL producers carried qnrS. In conclusion, multidrug-resistant Salmonella was common in pigs, pork and human samples in this region. The bacteria carried mobile genetic elements and resistance genes on conjugative plasmids that could be readily transferred to other bacterial species.

  16. Alcohol consumption behaviour of young people in Thailand: perspectives of stakeholders in Petchaburi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Glomjai, Thanee

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines the issue of young people and alcohol consumption in order to understand their behaviour and experiences in Thailand. Alcohol consumption is socially accepted as a pleasurable activity in many countries world-wide. Alcohol consumption among young people in Thailand has been affected by the spread of western culture, which has encouraged an acceptance of drinking alcohol as being fashionable and as a means of promoting social relationships. This study aimed ...

  17. People Participation Towards Opisthorchis viverrini Prevention and Control in Chaiyaphum Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsiripapat, Rutjirapat; Chimplee, Kanokporn; Rujirakul, Ratana; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Keawpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive and qualitative study was aimed to study the people participation and their approaches toward the human carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, prevention and control in Ban Chaun sub-district administrative organization (BCSAO) and Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality (BNSM), Bamnet Narong district, Chaiyaphum Province, Thailand between June 2013 and February 2014. Participants were purposive selected, included chiefs of sub-district administrative organizations, sub-district municipalities, sub-district health promotion hospitals (SHPHs), heads of village, and a further sample was selected with a multi- stage random sampling for public health volunteers, and villagers. The pre-designed questionnaire contained items for individualized status and the participatory steps of sharing ideas, decision-making, and planning, procession, evaluation, and mutual benefit, for the project O. viverrini prevention and control (POPC). In-depth interviews were used for collection of need approaches to POPC. With 375 participants who completed the questionnaire, it was found that people had a high level regarding to participate in the POPC, particularly in the process stage (X_ =3.78, S.D. = 0.56), but the lowest level was found in sharing ideas, decision making, and planning step (X_ =3.65, S.D. = 0.63). By comparison, participant status and organization did not significantly differ with people participation. In each step, Ban Chaun sub-district had a high level of participation in the step of sharing ideas, decision making, and planning toward POPC, more than Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality (t=2.20, p=0.028). Approaches for POPC in Ban Chaun sub-district and Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality included requirements for budget support, annual campaigns for liver fluke prevention and control, campaign promotion, risk group observation, home visiting, community rules regarding reducing raw fish consumption in their

  18. A survey of herbal weeds for treating skin disorders from Southern Thailand: Songkhla and Krabi Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamsuvan, Oratai; Bunmee, Pattaraporn

    2016-12-04

    Skin diseases are common health problems which affecting to all ages. In Thailand, the number of patients diagnosed with skin diseases is increasing every year. Nowadays, The Ministry of Public Health is supporting and promoting herbs for treating various disorders, including disorders of the skin to reduce the problem of antibiotic resistance and adverse drug reactions. This study aimed to: (1) enumerate the herbal weeds for treating skin disorders; (2) study local knowledge of weed utilization for treating skin disorders according to the folk healers in Songkhla and Krabi province; and (3) study quantitative data by Informant consensus factor (ICF), Use value (UV) and Fidelity level (FL) value. Field surveys and Semi-structured interviews about the local names, parts of plants used, preparation and use method, as well as local properties were done. The data were further analyzed by descriptive statistics, interpretation and quantitative indexes (ICF, UV as well as FL). The results discovered 44 herbal species of weeds belonging to 41 genera in 25 families. The most used plant families were Amaranthaceae (6 species). Most plants were used to treat abscess (18 species; 40.91%). The highest UV was recorded for Commelina benghalensis (0.65). The highest ICF values were found in vitiligo, ringworm, tinea versicolor and burns (1.00 each). The highest FL values were recorded for Cleome gynandra, Cleome viscosa, Sphenoclea zeylanica, Acmella oleracea, Leersia hexandra, Cyperus involucratus, Phyllanthus urinaria and Iresine herbstii (100.00 each). A review of the literatures revealed that 34 plant species had already been tested for their pharmacological activities. The biological activities associated with treatment of skin diseases can be divided into four categories: antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, wound healing and antioxidant activity. The information indicates that herbal weedy utilization is still importance to the treatment of traditional healers through

  19. Rural-to-Urban Migration and Changes in Health Among Young Adults in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, Elizabeth; VanLandingham, Mark; Anglewicz, Philip; Patthavanit, Umaporn; Punpuing, Sureeporn

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the impacts of rural-to-urban migration on the health of young adult migrants. A key methodological challenge involves the potentially confounding effects of selection on the relationship between migration and health. Our study addresses this challenge in two ways. To control for potential effects of prior health status on post-migration health outcomes, we employ a longitudinal approach. To control for static unobserved characteristics that can affect migration propensity as well as health outcomes, we use fixed-effects analyses. Data were collected in 2005 and 2007 for a cohort of young adults in rural Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand. The migrant sample includes individuals who subsequently moved to urban destinations where they were reinterviewed in 2007. Return migrants were interviewed in rural Kanchanaburi in both years but moved to an urban area and returned in the meantime. A rural comparison group comprises respondents who remained in the origin villages. An urban comparison sample includes longer-term residents of the urban destination communities. Physical and mental health measures are based on the SF-36 health survey. Findings support the "healthy migrant hypothesis." Migrants are physically healthier than their nonmigrant counterparts both before and after moving to the city. We did not find an effect of migration on physical health. Rural-to-urban migrants who stayed at destination experienced a significant improvement in mental health status. Fixed-effects analyses indicate that rural-to-urban migration positively affects mental health. Return migrants do not fare as well as migrants who stayed at destination on both physical and mental health status--evidence of selective return migration.

  20. Thailand; Thailande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This economical study summarizes the energy situation of Thailand: energy institutions and policy, energy companies (oil, gas, electricity), energy supplies (gas reserves, oil, power production, coal, lignite, renewable energies), prices, consumption, economical stakes and perspectives (energy consumption, power production, projects, contracts, agreements, investments). Economical data for the 1971-1999 period are summarized in graphs and tables. (J.S.)

  1. Thailand; Thailande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This economical study summarizes the energy situation of Thailand: energy institutions and policy, energy companies (oil, gas, electricity), energy supplies (gas reserves, oil, power production, coal, lignite, renewable energies), prices, consumption, economical stakes and perspectives (energy consumption, power production, projects, contracts, agreements, investments). Economical data for the 1971-1999 period are summarized in graphs and tables. (J.S.)

  2. Access to free or low-cost tuberculosis treatment for migrants and refugees along the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Naomi; Nosten, Francois; Foster, Angel M

    2016-07-07

    In Tak province, Thailand migrants and refugees from Myanmar navigate a pluralistic healthcare system to seek Tuberculosis (TB) care from a variety of government and non-governmental providers. This multi-methods qualitative study examined access to TB, TB/HIV and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment with an emphasis on barriers to care and enabling factors. In the summer and fall of 2014, we conducted 12 key informant interviews with public health officials and TB treatment providers. We also conducted 11 focus group discussions with migrants and refugees who were receiving TB, TB/HIV and MDR-TB treatment in Tak province as well as non-TB patients. We analyzed these data through thematic analysis using both predetermined and emergent codes. As a second step in the qualitative analysis, we explored the barriers and enabling factors separately for migrants and refugees. We found that refugees face fewer barriers to accessing TB treatment than migrants. For both migrants and refugees, legal status plays an important intermediary role in influencing the population's ability to access care and eligibility for treatment. Our results suggest that there is a large geographical catchment area for migrants who seek TB treatment in Tak province that extends beyond provincial boundaries. Migrant participants described their ability to seek care as linked to the financial and non-financial resources required to travel and undergo treatment. Patients identified language of health services, availability of free or low cost services, and psychosocial support as important health system characteristics that affect accessibility. Access to TB treatment for migrants and refugees occurs at the interface of health system accessibility, population ability and legal status. In Tak province, migrant patients draw upon their social networks and financial resources to navigate a pathway to treatment. We revised a conceptual framework for access to healthcare to incorporate

  3. The Dynamics of Avian Influenza: Individual-Based Model with Intervention Strategies in Traditional Trade Networks in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilasang, Chaiwat; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Chadsuthi, Sudarat

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 is endemic to Southeast Asia. In Thailand, avian influenza viruses continue to cause large poultry stock losses. The spread of the disease has a serious impact on poultry production especially among rural households with backyard chickens. The movements and activities of chicken traders result in the spread of the disease through traditional trade networks. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of avian influenza in the traditional trade network in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand. We also propose an individual-based model with intervention strategies to control the spread of the disease. We found that the dynamics of the disease mainly depend on the transmission probability and the virus inactivation period. This study also illustrates the appropriate virus disinfection period and the target for intervention strategies on traditional trade network. The results suggest that good hygiene and cleanliness among household traders and trader of trader areas and ensuring that any equipment used is clean can lead to a decrease in transmission and final epidemic size. These results may be useful to epidemiologists, researchers, and relevant authorities in understanding the spread of avian influenza through traditional trade networks. PMID:27110273

  4. The Dynamics of Avian Influenza: Individual-Based Model with Intervention Strategies in Traditional Trade Networks in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiwat Wilasang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 is endemic to Southeast Asia. In Thailand, avian influenza viruses continue to cause large poultry stock losses. The spread of the disease has a serious impact on poultry production especially among rural households with backyard chickens. The movements and activities of chicken traders result in the spread of the disease through traditional trade networks. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of avian influenza in the traditional trade network in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand. We also propose an individual-based model with intervention strategies to control the spread of the disease. We found that the dynamics of the disease mainly depend on the transmission probability and the virus inactivation period. This study also illustrates the appropriate virus disinfection period and the target for intervention strategies on traditional trade network. The results suggest that good hygiene and cleanliness among household traders and trader of trader areas and ensuring that any equipment used is clean can lead to a decrease in transmission and final epidemic size. These results may be useful to epidemiologists, researchers, and relevant authorities in understanding the spread of avian influenza through traditional trade networks.

  5. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis ofEchinostoma revolutumand Echinostoma malayanum (Trematoda:Echinostomatidae) isolated from Khon Kaen Province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weerachai Saijuntha; Sumonta Tapdara; Chairat Tantrawatpan

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore the genetic variation and differentiation of 2 echinostomes from genus Echinostoma, i.e.Echinostoma revolutum (E. revolutum)andEchinostoma malayanum (E. malayanum) from Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.Methods: These parasites were compared at22enzymes encoding a presumptive30 loci by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) technique.Results: Twenty-two loci can be used as diagnostic markers to differentiate these2species.E. revolutum andE. malayanum had fixed genetic differences at70% of loci, whereas both species had fixed genetic differences from the liver fluke,Opisthorchis viverrini at91% of loci. Intraspecific variation within a population ofE. revolutum was observed at5 polymorphic loci.Conclusions:MEE is a powerful technique to investigate genetic variation and differentiation ofE. revolutum andE. malayanum.

  6. Distribution of Selected Heavy Metals in Sediment of the River Basin of Coastal Area of Chanthaburi Province, Gulf of Thailand

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    Jakkapan Potipat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The sediment samples from 24 stations in coastal area of Chanthaburi Province were collected during March 2012 to March 2013 and analyzed for heavy metal contents (Pb, Cd, Cr, Fe, Cu and Zn, pH, organic matters and grain sizes. The correlation analyses showed that heavy metal concentrations were affected by the content of organic matter and the size of clay particles. The evaluation of the quality of sediment was carried out using the geoaccumulation index (Igeo and the enrichment factor (EF as well as the comparison with those in the Thailand's sediment quality guideline (SQG values. The results of the geoaccumulation index and the enrichment factor values of the heavy metals content in the sediments revealed that the study area was unpolluted and not enriched, respectively. The relationship between the heavy metals concentration and the organic matter, and the clay particle was proposed by using the multiple regression equations.

  7. GIS-based spatial statistical analysis of risk areas for liver flukes in Surin Province of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujirakul, Ratana; Ueng-arporn, Naporn; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Loyd, Ryan J; Kaewthani, Sarochinee; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    It is urgently necessary to be aware of the distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, for proper allocation of prevention and control measures. This study aimed to investigate the human behavior, and environmental factors influencing the distribution in Surin Province of Thailand, and to build a model using stepwise multiple regression analysis with a geographic information system (GIS) on environment and climate data. The relationship between the human behavior, attitudes (land use as wetland (X64), were correlated with the liver fluke disease distribution at 0.000, 0.034, and 0.006 levels, respectively. Multiple regression analysis, by equations OV=-0.599+0.005(population density (148-169 pop/km2); X73)+0.040 (human attitude (land used (wetland; X64), was used to predict the distribution of liver fluke. OV is the patients of liver fluke infection, R Square=0.878, and, Adjust R Square=0.849. By GIS analysis, we found Si Narong, Sangkha, Phanom Dong Rak, Mueang Surin, Non Narai, Samrong Thap, Chumphon Buri, and Rattanaburi to have the highest distributions in Surin province. In conclusion, the combination of GIS and statistical analysis can help simulate the spatial distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, and thus may be an important tool for future planning of prevention and control measures.

  8. Preliminary investigation on the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection in Mae Sot District, Tak Province of Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siwalee; Rattanapunya; Wanna; Chaijaroenkul; Jiraporn; Kuesap; Ronnatrai; Ruengweerayut; Kesara; Na-Bangchang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To preliminarily investigate the prevalence of HIV co-infection in patients with malaria in Mae Sot District, Tak Province of Thailand.Methods: The study was a retrospective study on blood samples collected from a total of 256 patients with malaria(all species and severity) who attended Mae Tao clinic for migrant workers, Tak Province during 2005-2007(148 samples) and 2010-2012(108 samples). Malaria diagnosis was performed based on microscopic examination of patients’ blood smears. Chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and gel particle passive agglutination were employed for the detection of HIV antigen in patients’ plasma. Results: Plasmodium falciparum(P. falciparum) and Plasmodium vivax(P. vivax) are the two predominant malaria species with the ratio of about 1: 1 to 1.5:1. Most of the P. falciparum cases were presented with acute uncomplicated signs and symptoms with highest parasitemia of 1 045 000 asexual parasites/μL bloods. The prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection during 2005-2007 was 1.35%(2/148 cases, 1 each for P. falciparum and P. vivax co-infection), but was increased to 2.78%(3/108 cases, 2 and 1 for P. falciparum and P. vivax co-infection, respectively) during 2010-2012.Conclusions: The increasing trend of prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection in Mae Sot, Tak province was of a great concern on either pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetics aspect. The study in a larger numbers of malaria patients in different endemic areas throughout the country with different time periods is underway.

  9. A Late Pleistocene transgression in Thailand: A marine molluscan fauna from Ban Praksa (Samut Prakan Province)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Mauro Pietro

    2012-01-01

    A Late Pleistocene molluscan fauna sampled at Ban Praksa, near the Chao Phraya River mouth (Lower Central Plain of Bangkok, Thailand) is herein analyzed and paleoecologically characterized, revealing a shallow infralittoral, coarse/hard-bottomed environment. The comparison of the Ban Praksa association with several coeval ones recovered from Phra Pradaeng Formation seems to be evidence of a 10,000 year hiatus between two separate groups of marine faunas, possibly belonging to different interstadial transgressive peaks that occurred during the long-term sea-level regression following the Last Interglacial.

  10. Turning Red Rural Landscapes Yellow? Sufficiency Economy and Royal Projects in the Hills of Nan Province, Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Rossi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the efforts of the royal family to moralise the environmental behaviour of their subjects in the name of the Sufficiency Economy philosophy solicited by King Bhumibol since the 1990s in Thailand. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Nan province, Northern Thailand, in 2008 and 2009, I focus particularly on Royal Projects recently promoted to correct the rural practices of the ethnic minority groups living in the hills of Nan. In the past, many of these ethnic groups took part in the Maoist insurgency while at present, they represent a key basin of support- ers for the reformist Red Shirts movement which is currently threatening the role of the monarchy in Thai politics. The research suggests that the recently increased trend of staging new projects for sustainable agro-forestry management in a ‘red’ area as Nan does not only aim at improving the conditions of mountain peoples and of the environment, but simultaneously increases the political influence of the conservative forces over this ‘ungovernable’ territory in times of political crisis. ----- Dieser Artikel diskutiert die Bemühungen der königlichen Familie in Thailand seit den 1990-er Jahren, das Umweltverhalten ihrer Subjekte im Namen der Sufficiency Economy Philosophie von König Bhumibol zu moralisieren. Mit Bezug auf ethnografische Forschung in der Provinz Nan in Nordthailand in den Jahren 2008 und 2009 fokussiere ich insbesondere auf Royal Projects, die in letzter Zeit gefördert werden, um ländliche Praktiken ethnischer Minderheiten in den Bergen von Nan zu korrigieren. In der Vergangenheit waren viele dieser ethnischen Gruppen am maoistischen Aufstand beteiligt, während sie heute ein zentrales Auffangbecken für UnterstützerInnen der reformistischen Rothemden, die derzeit die Rolle der Monarchie in der thailändischen Politik in Frage stellen, darstellen. Die Forschung deutet an, dass der Trend zur Einführung von neuen Projekten f

  11. Survey of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and giant African land snails in Phitsanulok province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Apichat Vitta; Raxsina polseela; Seangchai Nateeworanart; Muncharee Tattiyapong

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To survey theAngiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) or the rat lungworm in a rat, definitive host, and in a giant African land snail (Achatina fulica), the intermediate host, in Phitsanulok, Thailand.Methods:Rats and giant African land snails were captured from Tha Pho sub-district, Phitsanulok, Thailand. Rats were killed and examined for adultA. cantonensis. The artificial digestion method following Baermann technique were used for isolation third stage larvae ofA. cantonensis.Results: Sixty-two rats were captured and they were identified as Rattus argentiventer,Rattus rattus (R. rattus), Bandicota savilei, andBandicota indicabut only one animal (R. rattus) of62rats (1.61%)was positive with adult worm ofA. cantonensis. The third stage larvae ofA. cantonensis were examined on307Angiostrongylus fulica snails. It was found that the overall infection rate was12.38%(38 infected out of307Achatina snails).Conclusions:This study demonstrates thatA. cantonensis is available in the natural hosts of Phitsanulok. This suggests that the transmissions of this parasite to human may occur in this region.

  12. Fishing Status and Management Proposal in Bandon Bay, Suratthani Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amonsak SAWUSDEE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bandon bay is one of the importance and high-pressure fishing grounds of southern Thailand in the Gulf of Thailand. The present fishing grounds are under threat due to three main issues. Firstly, the fishing area has been minimized because some parts of the fishing grounds are now used for clam-culture. Secondly, fishery resources per se are in a vulnerable state because the catch is largely composed of unsalable and immature fish, resulting in a noticeable decrease in the fisherman’s income. Lastly, the growth in the price of gasoline (i.e. marginal cost index was higher than the growth of catch price index. Thus, the short- and a long- term plans for the fishery management of Bandon bay are urgently required. This article presents the current threats in detail and develops management plans for the purpose of a sustainable fishing industry in Bandon bay, in terms of socio-economics, environmental and fishery resources as well as policies aspects.

  13. Benjarong Sanitary Ware: Design and development for commerce in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchai Sama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation has three primary aims: 1 to study the traditional knowledge of Benjarong in Samut Sakhon Province; 2 to study designs and the production process of Benjarong sanitary ware in Samut Sakhon Province; 3 to develop Benjarong sanitary ware for commerce in Samut Sakhon Province. The research area for this investigation was purposively selected as Samut Sakhon Province. Data was gathered by document study, survey, participant and non-participant observation, structured and non-structured interview, focus group discussion and workshop. Results show that Benjarong sanitary products have been inherited from generation to generation in Samut Sakhon Province and continue to provide local jobs. Benjarong sanitary ware production uses a high budget because of the high price of colour inks, gold and electricity, so there are problems securing adequate funding. There are also problems with the management process and a lack of expert craftsmen to write and design modern patterns in harmony with contemporary art and Thai social identity. Moreover, many Thai people do not realize the value of cultural heritage and Benjarong inheritance is at risk. Benjarong sanitary ware can reflect local knowledge and traditional handicrafts. The researchers propose patterns for three types of Benjarong sanitary ware: washbasins, wall tiles and soap ledges. Development of these products will increase functionality and aesthetics, whilst maintaining Thai heritage.

  14. CONFLICT RESOLUTION: A CASE STUDY OF THE SEPARATIST MOVEMENT IN THE SOUTHERN BORDER PROVINCES OF THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfee Abdulmani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This Undergraduate thesis tried to discuss about conflict resolution in the case of southern Thailand which are Pattani, Yala, and Narathiwat, known as an escalating and brutal conflict and long history of insurgency, the crisis has been conducted primarily on the basis of Malay ethnic nationalism with religion and politics as an additional factors. The violence has already had important political consequences in the failure of Prime Minister Thaksin’s government. The government tries to solve the problem and lunched a strategy based on increased public participation, economic development, apologizing for the past misdeeds of the security services, ending the blacklisting of Muslim and opens a dialogue with insurgents, but the violence remains. In this research, the writer use an extensive of relevant published materials such as books, journals, reports, newsletters, official website and other sources o a wide variety of topics related with the subject of the topic. Keywords: Pattani, Yala, and Narathiwat. Conflict resolution. Malay ethnic

  15. Preliminary Study on Thalassemia Screening and Genetic Counseling in Selective Hmong People in Saraburi Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pa Vang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available it can lead to the destruction of red blood cells. Studies have shown that there is a high prevalence of thalassemia in Southeast Asia. The Institute of Health Research, Chulalongkorn University developed a successful “Module” to screen for thalassemia in the Thai population, however, it has not been implemented in the minority population in Thailand. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of the newly developed educational and thalassemia screening program with the Hmong population. The primary aim of this study was to test this program. The secondary aim was to determine the prevalence of thalassemia in the Hmong and provide education. A third aim was to determine the reliability of two different screening methods in the Hmong population. A pre-test and post-test design was used; participants (N=12 were individuals residing in Thailand with the ability to read English and between the ages 18-50. The participants met twice with the researchers to complete the program. The first contact consisted of assessing participants’ knowledge about thalassemia, providing thalassemia information and education about genetic counseling, and drawing blood samples. The second contact consisted of assessing knowledge, providing a written report of individual blood sample results and counseling. The initial interview revealed that the majority of the participants (82% did not know anything about thalassemia prior to participation. The program was easy to understand by most participants (90%. Of the eleven Hmong participants, two tested positive for being a possible carrier for thalassemia. In order to reduce the prevalence of thalassemia, it is necessary to engage in risk reduction health services. The modified screening method proved to be as effective as the standard method. Therefore, the program can expand and be used in other regional populations with low cost.

  16. Effectiveness of the multidimensional ergonomic intervention model to reduce musculoskeletal discomfort among street sweepers in Chiang Rai Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintakham K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kanjanar Pintakham,1,2 Wattasit Siriwong1 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 2School of Health Science, Chiang Rai Rajabhat University, Chiang Rai, Thailand Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of multidimensional ergonomic intervention (MEI model to reduce musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD among street sweepers. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Chiang Rai Province. The MEI model was designed on the basis of four core components: cognitive behavior therapy, ergonomic education training, stretching exercise, and the foam sleeve broom handle grip. Seventy-five street sweepers volunteered for the screening process on MSD of having level score ≥4 by physiotherapist. Face to face interviews were used mainly in order to diagnose MSD. Physical examination was performed by physiotherapist and physical performance by sports scientist. The findings showed that the MEI model among the intervention group significantly reduced MSD compared with that among control group at exit model and follow-up (P<0.01. This research suggests that the MEI model was appropriate to reduce MSD associated with repetitive movement and awkward postures on task. Keywords: repetitive movement, cognitive behavior therapy, stretching exercise, street sweepers

  17. Prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infections among acute febrile patients in Nong Khai Province, Thailand.

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    Lertanekawattana, Sujet; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Duan-ngern, Pawinee; Potjalongsin, Sathit; Wiittayabamrung, Wisanu; Daroon, Pamol; Techolarn, Meta

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study at three hospitals of Nong Khai Province, Thailand to determine the prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infection among patients who sought care. The study population was acute febrile patients who visited these hospitals during 1 August -31 October, 2010 who were aged 2-60 years and had clinical symptoms compatible with the case definition. Dengue and chikungunya cases were confirmed by an ELISA IgM titer or RT-PCR. We also reviewed surveillance data of dengue and chikungunya infections from 2003-2009. Of the 200 participants recruited into the study, 103 patients (51.5%) were confirmed to have acute dengue infection; dengue serotype 2 was the most prevalence serotype. The ages of confirmed dengue cases ranged from 2-37 years old. The distribution of cases showed that dengue morbidity tended to be clustered in adjacent areas, particularly in Mueang District. Only a small proportion of the patients uses mosquito repellant and had screens on their windows. One patient (0.5%) had laboratory confirmed chikungunya infection. She was from Rattanawapi District, an area where no chikungunya had been reported before. Since the disease varies by age and geographic location, increased awareness of health care workers and public health officers about the diseases in the area is needed for early detection of cases and to promote early prevention and control measures.

  18. Small-Scale Fishing: Perceptions and Threats to Conserving a Livelihood in the Province of Phang-nga, Thailand

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    Estelle Victoria Jones

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited understanding of small-scale fishing communities has hindered appropriate management initiatives in coastal communities which are threatening livelihoods. Informants, stakeholder interviews and questionnaires from local fishermen were used to gain knowledge of fishing factors, perceptions and threat to the small-scale fishing community in a coastal region in the province of Phang-nga, Thailand. Results revealed communities utilizing multi-geared, multi-species fisheries with a preference for marketable species that sell on a local scale. Whilst subsistence and local markets share equally the use of catches, there is a noticeable decline in small-scale fishers being recruited into the industry. This was considered by some to be due to urbanisation and by others to opportunities in tourism but was viewed as a socio-economic shift by government informants towards medium sized operations formed by resilient groups. Current management can be classified as open access, with virtually no management or regulations in place. This has led to fishers listing failing stocks and commercial fleets as the biggest threats to their livelihoods. Management initiatives are needed to focus on protecting and improving coastal stocks by clamping down on illegal activity large-scale from fishers and reviewing fishers access for resource protection.

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Infection by Opisthorchis viverrini in an Urban Area of Mahasarakham Province, Northeast Thailand.

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    Chaiputcha, Kusumaporn; Promthet, Supannee; Bradshaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional analytic study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection in an urban area of Northeastern Thailand. The participants were 254 household representatives aged 15 years or older living in the most urbanised part of Chiang Yuen municipality in Mahasarakham Province. All participants provided stool samples which were examined using the modified Kato-Katz procedure, and a structured interview questionnaire was used to collection demographic information, knowledge about OV infection, and the consumption of unsafely prepared freshwater fish. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The overall prevalence of OV infection was 15.0%, and in the multivariate analysis male gender was found to be significantly and positively associated with OV infection (ORadj=9.75, 95%CI: 34.03-23.58) while education to secondary school level or above was a significant protective factor (ORadj=0.30, 95%CI: 0.12-0.74). The eating of unsafely prepared fish and knowledge about OV were not significantly related to infection status. The findings were discussed in terms of issues for future research, especially the need to consider the possibility of higher rates of OV infection in urban areas than might be expected and to investigate the sources of infected fish products which may well be different from those in rural villages.

  20. Susceptibility to temephos, permethrin and deltamethrin ofAedes aegypti (Diptera:Culicidae) from Muang district, Phitsanulok Province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damrongpan Thongwat; Nophawan Bunchu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the susceptibility to temephos, permethrin and deltamethrin ofAedes aegypti(Ae. aegypti), collected from areas with high incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever cases inPhitsanulokProvince,Thailand.Methods:TheF1 progenies ofAe. aegypti colony, originated from five sub-districts includingAranyik,HuaRo,NaiMuang,BanKrang andThaPho, were used in the bioassays following the procedures ofWorldHealthOrganization.For larval bioassay, the late third or early fourth-instar larvae were tested with different concentrations of temephos. For adult bioassay, the females were exposed to0.75% permethrin or0.05% deltamethrin.LC50 value and mortality rate were analyzed to compare the insecticide susceptibility of the larvae and the adults in each area, respectively. Results:TheLC50 value of temephos for the larvae from Aranyik,HuaRo,NaiMuang,BanKrang andThaPho sub-districts was0.017,0.017,0.026,0.061, and0.113 ppm, respectively.For permethrin, the highest mortality rate(86.84%) was found in the mosquitoes fromAranyik but the others were more resistant with the lower mortality rates(16.00-42.67%).The adult mortality rates after exposing to deltamethrin were higher(82.34-98.67%) in all areas.Conclusions:Ae. aegypti larvae were still susceptible to temephos.Conversely, most tested adults tended to resist the permethrin and deltamethrin.

  1. Comparative phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Salmonella spp. in pig farms and slaughterhouses in two provinces in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadee, Pakpoom; Boonkhot, Phacharaporn; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Patchanee, Prapas

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are an important group of bacterial zoonotic pathogens which can cause acute food-borne diseases in humans. Pork products are the main source of salmonellosis, but the origins and transmission routes of the disease have not been clearly determined. The purpose of this study was to characterize Salmonella spp. isolated in pig production lines both from pig farms and from slaughterhouses in Chiang Mai and Lamphun provinces in northern Thailand. The study focuses on the association among serotypes, antimicrobial resistance patterns and Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns to investigate possible sources of infection and to provide information which could help strengthen salmonellosis control programs in the region. A total of 86 strains of Salmonella comprising five majority serotypes were identified. Antibiotic resistance to tetracycline was found to be the most prevalent (82.56%) followed by ampicillin (81.40%) and streptomycin (63.95%). Seven clusters and 28 fingerprint-patterns generated by PFGE were identified among strains recovered from various locations and at different times, providing information on associations among the strains as well as evidence of the existence of persistent strains in some areas. Study results suggest that Salmonella control programs should be implemented at slaughterhouse production lines, including surveillance to insure good hygiene practices, in addition to regular monitoring of large populations of farm animals.

  2. Atrazine Contamination and Potential Health Effects on Freshwater Mussel Uniandra contradens Living in Agricultural Catchment at Nan Province, Thailand

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    Tongchai Thitiphuree

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal cultivation in northern part of Thailand leads to widely uses of agrochemicals especially atrazine herbicide. To examine whether an intensive use of atrazine could lead to contamination in aquatic environment, sediment and water were collected from an agricultural catchment in Nan Province during 2010-2011 and subjected to analysis for atrazine by GC-MS. The results showed that detectable levels of atrazine were found in water (0.16 µg/ml and sediment (0.23 µg/g of the catchment. To monitor potential effects of atrazine on aquatic animals, a freshwater mussel Uniandra contradens was used as a sentinel species for bioaccumulation and potential health effects. Mussels collected from the catchment during 2010-2011 were subjected to analysis for atrazine residue in tissue and condition factor based on body weight and shell length. The results showed that detectable levels of atrazine were found in mussel tissue with the highest level (8.40  2.06 ng/g in late wet season when runoff from heavy rain was evidenced. Condition factor, an indicative of overall health, showed a significant negative correlation with atrazine residue in the tissue. This information could be used as part of the monitoring program for herbicide contamination and potential health effects in agricultural environment.

  3. Coastal debris analysis in beaches of Chonburi Province, eastern of Thailand as implications for coastal conservation.

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    Thushari, Gajahin Gamage Nadeeka; Chavanich, Suchana; Yakupitiyage, Amararatne

    2017-03-15

    This study quantified coastal debris along 3 beaches (Angsila, Bangsaen, Samaesarn) in eastern coast of Thailand. Debris samples were collected from lower and upper strata of these beaches during wet and dry seasons. The results showed that Bangsaen had the highest average debris density (15.5m(-2)) followed by Samaesarn (8.10m(-2)), and Angsila (5.54m(-2)). Among the 12 debris categories, the most abundant debris type was plastics (>45% of the total debris) in all beach locations. Coastal debris distribution was related to economic activities in the vicinity. Fishery and shell-fish aquaculture activities were primary sources of debris in Angsila while tourism activities were main sources in Bangsaen and Samaesarn. Site-specific pollution control mechanisms (environmental awareness, reuse and recycling) are recommended to reduce public littering. Management actions in Angsila should focus on fishery and shell-fish culture practices, while Bangsaen and Samaesarn should be directed toward leisure activities promoting waste management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation and characterization of Orientia tsutsugamushi from rodents captured following a scrub typhus outbreak at a military training base, Bothong district, Chonburi province, central Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Ruang-Areerate, Toon; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Richards, Allen L; Jeamwattanalert, Pimmada; Bodhidatta, Dharadhida; Sangjun, Noppadon; Prasartvit, Anchana; Jatisatienr, Araya; Jatisatienr, Chaiwat

    2011-04-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, an obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of scrub typhus, a vector-borne disease transmitted by infected chiggers (trombiculid mite larvae). In 2002, an outbreak of scrub typhus occurred among Royal Thai Army troops during the annual field training at a military base in Bothong district, Chonburi province, central Thailand. This report describes the outbreak investigation including its transmission cycle. Results showed that 33.9% of 174 trained troops had scrub typhus-like signs and symptoms and 9.8% of those were positive for O. tsutsugamushi-specific antibodies by indirect fluorescence antibody assay. One hundred thirty-five rodents were captured from this training area, 43% of them had antibodies against O. tsutsugamushi. Six new O. tsutsugamushi isolates were obtained from captured rodent tissues and successfully established in cell culture. Phylogenetic studies showed that these six isolates were either unique or related to a native genotype of previously described isolates from Thailand.

  5. Plasmid Profiles and Prevalence of Intermediately Virulent Rhodococcus equi from Pigs in Nakhonpathom Province, Thailand: Identification of a New Variant of the 70-kb Virulence Plasmid, Type 18

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    Chaithep Poolkhet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of intermediately virulent Rhodococcus equi isolates from pig submaxillary lymph nodes from four slaughterhouses in Nakhonpathom province, Thailand, was investigated. The isolates were tested for the presence of virulence plasmids and the 20-kDa virulence-associated protein antigen (VapB gene by PCR. Of the 734 submaxillary lymph nodes tested, 19 (2.6% produced positive cultures of R. equi. All 19 isolates were positive for the VapB gene and contained virulence plasmids that were identified as type 1 (six isolates, type 6 (two isolates, type 7 (one isolate, type 16 (two isolates, and a new variant (eight isolates. Based on the restriction digestion patterns of the plasmid DNAs, we tentatively designated the variant as type 18. Investigation of the prevalence and plasmid profiles of VapB-positive R. equi in pigs should be extended throughout Thailand to evaluate potential sources of zoonotic infections.

  6. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among hill-tribe school children in Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanola, Jintana; Kongpan, Chatpat; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2014-07-01

    The prevalaence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were examined among 265 hill-tribe school children, 8-14 years of age, from Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Anemia was observed in 20 school children, of whom 3 had iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency and β-thalassemia trait [codon 17 (A>T), IVSI-nt1 (G>T) and codons 71/72 (+A) mutations] was 4% and 8%, respectively. There was one Hb E trait, and no α-thalassemia-1 SEA or Thai type deletion. Furthermore, anemia was found to be associated with β-thalassemia trait in 11 children. These data can be useful for providing appropriate prevention and control of anemia in this region of Thailand.

  7. Costume Development Model for Tourism Promotion in Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand

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    Sarobol A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study Pha Bong community’s dressing style and to develop a new ethnic costume that shows their identity to promote tourism in the province. Pha Bong Community is a community in Maehongson Province where two ethnic groups, people of Tai Yai (Shan and Sakor Karen, co-exist. The data collection methods include focus group and in-depth interview with target population, small group discussion and review of literature on costume development. The obtained data were then submitted to content analysis. First, it was found that they both have their own identity, resources, network marketing and inherited wisdom from their ancestors. Each group runs their business separately. Secondly, the research resulted in the creation of a new costume for the Pha Bong community created by members of two ethnic groups. This costume combines Karen symbol with Tai Yai (Shan clothing style. The motif and pattern of the fabric identify community members’ lifestyle, belief and value. It is recommended that development should be planned upon available resource and the need of the community. In addition, the community leader should encourage members to take parts in management and to cooperate for a sustainable development.

  8. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY AMONG ORPHANS INFECTED WITH INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATHUM THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

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    Mahittikorn, Aongart; Prasertbun, Rapeepan; Mori, Hirotake; Popruk, Supaluk

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections can negatively impact growth and nutrition in children. The infections can induce oxidative stress, resulting in a variety of illnesses. We measured antioxidant enzyme levels in orphan children infected with intestinal parasites to investigate the influence of nutritional status on antioxidant enzymes. This cross sectional study was conducted at an orphanage in Thailand. Stool samples were obtained from each subject and examined for intestinal parasites. Anthropometric measurements, complete blood count and biochemical parameters, including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, were obtained from studied subjects. One hundred twenty-eight children were included in the study. Intestinal parasites were found on microscopic examination of the stools in 36.7% (47/128); 18% (23/128) had a mixed parasite infection. Intestinal protozoa were found in 34.4% of subjects and intestinal helminthes were found in 2.3%. The median GPx level in children infected with intestinal parasites (2.3 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in non-infected children (7.7 ng/ml) (p parasites, 2) non-pathogenic parasites and 3) no intestinal parasite infection, GPx levels differed significantly among three groups (2.2 ng/ml, 2.4 ng/ml and 7.7 ng/ml, respectively) (p parasites (107.2 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in underweight children infected with non-pathogenic parasites (68.6 ng/ml) and without intestinal parasite infections (72.2 ng/ml). The present study identified two key findings: low GPx levels in children with intestinal parasitic infections, and the potential impact of malnutrition on some antioxidants.

  9. Effects of an injury and illness prevention program on occupational safety behaviors among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaweesuk, Sapsatree; Chapman, Robert S; Siriwong, Wattasit

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an Injury and Illness Prevention (IIP) program intervention on occupational safety behavior among rice farmers in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand. This was a quasi-experimental study in an intervention group and a control group. It was carried out in two rice farming communities, in which most people are rice farmers with similar socio-demographic characteristics. Multistage sampling was employed, selecting one person per rice farming household. The intervention group was 62 randomly selected rice farmers living in a rural area; another 55 rice farmers served as the control group. A structured face-to-face interview questionnaire was administered to participants to evaluate their safety behaviors in four areas: equipment use, pesticide use, ergonomics, and working conditions. The 2-week intervention program consisted of four elements: 1) health education, 2) safety inspection, 3) safety communication, and 4) health surveillance. Data were collected at baseline and 4 months after the intervention (follow-up). We used a general linear model repeated-measures analysis of variance to assess the mean difference between baseline and follow-up occupational safety behavior points between the intervention and control groups. Pesticide safety behaviors significantly increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. Ergonomics and working conditions points also increased in the intervention group, but not significantly so. The equipment use score decreased in the intervention group. It is necessary to identify and develop further measures to improve occupational safety behaviors. Some methods, such as effective risk communication, could be added to increase risk perception.

  10. Health Status of Immigrant Children and Environmental Survey of Child Daycare Centers in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnuankiat, Surapol; Wanichsuwan, Molee; Bhunnachet, Ekaporn; Jungarat, Nahathai; Panraksa, Kanitha; Komalamisra, Chalit; Maipanich, Wanna; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Pubampen, Somchit; Adisakwattana, Poom; Watthanakulpanich, Dorn

    2016-02-01

    Samut Sakhon is a Thai province popular among immigrants attracted to work in factories and the Thai food industry, especially people from Myanmar. Poor personal-hygiene behaviors, crowded accommodation and limited sanitation, result in health problems among immigrant workers. Various infectious diseases among this group are seen and managed by Samut Sakhon General Hospital. The impact of intestinal parasitic infections on public health is well known; they can spread from infected immigrant areas to uninfected areas via close contact and fecal-oral transmission from contaminated food and water. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among 372 immigrant children at 8 child-daycare centers during their parents' work time, by physical examination, fecal examination, and examination of the environment around the centers. Physical examinations were generally unremarkable, except that head-lice and fingernail examinations were positive in two cases (0.8 %). The results showed intestinal parasitic infections to be highly prevalent, at 71.0 %. These infections comprised both helminths and protozoa: Trichuris trichiura (50.8 %), Enterobius vermicularis (25.2 %), Ascaris lumbricoides (15.3 %), hookworm (11.6 %), Giardia lamblia (10.2 %), Endolimax nana (3.5 %), Entamoeba coli (2.7 %), and Blastocystis hominis (0.5 %). The environmental survey found a small number of houseflies near the accommodation to be positive for helminthic eggs (0.2 %), including A. lumbricoides, E. vermicularis, hookworms, Taenia spp., and minute intestinal flukes. Regarding the high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among children, it has been conjectured whether they were infected, along with their parents, during their daily lives before or after settling in Thailand. Intestinal parasites among immigrant children may involve a significant epidemiological impact, since immigrant children can serve as carriers and transmitters of disease.

  11. Species Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Macroinvertebrates on the Intertidal Zone of Rajamangala Beach, Trang Province, Thailand

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    Khwanta Tantikamton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study on species diversity and spatial distribution of macro-invertebrates on the intertidal zone of Rajamangala beach, Trang province, Thailand aims to investigate species, numbers and spatial distribution changes of polychaetes, mollusks and crabs along the 2 km beach. Four sampling stations from an adjacent of the estuary to the end at the beach, located near a hill, were examined. Each station was divided into four lines: highest tide, 100 m, 200 m and 300 m in distance from the high tide line. Quadrate sampling method was applied for sample collection in monsoon and dry seasons with three replicates in a season. The results showed that 23 polychaete, 23 mollusk and 19 crab species were found. The highest polychaete diversity was recorded at the lowest tide line. At 200 m and 300 m from the highest tide line, there was the highest diversity of mollusk species, whereas at 100 m from the highest tide line, the diversity of crab species was highest. Lumbrineris punctata McIntosh, 1885 and Scoloplos spp. were dominated polychaete species of the 200 m and 300 m whereas Glycera spp. were frequently found at the 100 m from the highest tide line. For mollusk species, high densities of Nassarius spp., Pilucina sp. and Donax incarnatus Gmelin, 1791 were found. Crab species found on the beach were in Infraorder Brachyura (15 species and Anomura (four species. The most abundant species was Dotilla myctiroides (Milne-Edwards, 1852 followed by Scopimera proxima Kemp, 1919. The species diversity of all sampling stations had similar distribution, but from the highest tide line to the lowest tide line, a different pattern of macroinvertebrate species distribution was found.

  12. Spatial Correlation Analysis between Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Hazard and Respiratory Diseases in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, N. Ha; Tripathi, N. K.

    2014-11-01

    Every year, during dry season, Chiang Mai and other northern provinces of Thailand face the problem of haze which is mainly generated by the burning of agricultural waste and forest fire, contained high percentage of particulate matter. Particulate matter 10 (PM10), being very small in size, can be inhaled easily to the deepest parts of the human lung and throat respiratory functions. Due to this, it increases the risk of respiratory diseases mainly in the case of continuous exposure to this seasonal smog. MODIS aerosol images (MOD04) have been used for four weeks in March 2007 for generating the hazard map by linking to in-situ values of PM10. Simple linear regression model between PM10 and AOD got fair correlation with R2 = 0.7 and was applied to transform PM10 pattern. The hazard maps showed the dominance of PM10 in northern part of Chiang Mai, especially in second week of March when PM10 level was three to four times higher than standard. The respiratory disease records and public health station of each village were collected from Provincial Public Health Department in Chiang Mai province. There are about 300 public health stations out of 2070 villages; hence thiessen polygon was created to determine the representative area of each public health station. Within each thiessen polygon, respiratory disease incident rate (RDIR) was calculated based on the number of patients and population. Global Moran's I was computed for RDIR to explore spatial pattern of diseases through four weeks of March. Moran's I index depicted a cluster pattern of respiratory diseases in 2nd week than other weeks. That made sense for a relationship between PM10 and respiratory diseases infections. In order to examine how PM10 affect the human respiratory system, geographically weighted regression model was used to observe local correlation coefficient between RDIR and PM10 across study area. The result captured a high correlation between respiratory diseases and high level of PM10 in

  13. Flood Hazard Prediction from Soil Properties by Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System: A Case Study of Mae Rim Watershed,Chiang Mai Province,Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANJIANJIUN; E.BERGSMA; 等

    1998-01-01

    Physiography and soil in Mae Rim watershed,Chiang Mai Province,Thailand were investigated by using aerial photographs and satellite image in conjunction with field work,and soil infiltration rate and soil shear resistance were measured in field. Many factors affecting runoff were analyzed usig the Integrated Land and Water Informaiton System(ILWIS).As a result,a model determining flood hazar was set up.Three mps including runoff curve number map,runoff coefficent map,and flood inumdation map were created,In addition,the time of concentration was predicted.

  14. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts, Surat Thani province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titipornpun, K.; Titipornpun, A.; Sola, P.; Bhongsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    Chaiya and Tha Chana districts of Surat Thani province are located in the areas with high levels of equivalent uranium at the ground surface, which have been identified as sources of radon. A survey measurement of indoor radon concentrations was carried out in 248 houses, using CR-39 detectors in closed cups. The geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts were 26 ± 2 Bq·m-3 and 30 ± 2 Bq·m-3, respectively. Although the minimum radon concentration was 4 Bq·m-3 in both locations, the maximum radon concentration was found to be 159 Bq·m-3 in Tha Chana district, while it was 88 Bq·m-3 in Chaiya district. The level of radon concentrations above the action level (148 Bq·m-3) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency was only found in two houses, which accounted for 1% of the total buildings surveyed in this present study. The majority of houses, which accounted for 94% of the total buildings surveyed, showed the radon concentration below the action level. As these houses had access to air flow during the daytime through open doors and windows, it is likely that such ventilation was sufficient to keep radon at a low concentration.

  15. Isolation, toxicity and detection of cry gene in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates in Krabi province, Thailand

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    Prakai Thaphan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available One hundred twenty one isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis were isolated from 91 soil samples collected in the national park and wildlife sanctuary in Krabi province. All isolates of B.thuringiensis were tested for their insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura, S. exigua and Plutella xylostella larvae. Seven isolates of B. thuringiensis named JCPT7, JCPT16, JCPT18, JCPT64, JCPT68, JCPT74 and JCPT89 exhibited toxic activities against the insects, more than 90% mortality. The detection of cry gene of these isolates was done by a method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The PCR result indicated that cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1C, cry1D, cry1I, cry9A, cry9B and cry2A were on chromosomal DNA and cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1C, cry1D, cry1I and cry2A were on plasmid DNA. This study has introduced the promising B. thuringiensis isolates collected from soil samples which could be developed as an effective biocontrol agent for Lepidopterous pest.

  16. Monitoring Land Use Dynamics in Chanthaburi Province of Thailand Using Digital Remotely Sensed Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN RUNPING; I. KHEORUENROMNE

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive method of image classification was developed for monitoring land use dynamics in Chanthaburi Province of Tailand. RS (Remote Sensing), GIS (Geographical Information System), GPS (Global Positioning System) and ancillary data were combined by the method which adopts the main idea of classifying images by steps from decision tree method and the hybridized supervised and unsupervised classification. An integration of automatic image interpretation, ancillary materials and expert knowledge was realized. Two subscenes of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) images of bands 3, 4 and 5 obtained on December 15, 1992, and January 17, 1999, were used for image processing and spatial data analysis in the study. The overall accuracy of the results of classification reached 90%, which was verified by field check.Results showed that shrimp farm land, urban and traffic land, barren land, bush and agricultural developing area increased in area, mangrove, paddy field, swamp and marsh land, orchard and plantation, and tropical grass land decreased, and the forest land kept almost stable. Ecological analysis on the land use changes showed that more attentions should be paid on the effect of land development on ecological environment in the future land planning and management.

  17. Snails and trematode infection after Indian Ocean tsunami in Phang-Nga Province, southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Chusongsang, Yupa; Pornpimol, Surinthwong; Butraporn, Piyarat; Lohachit, Chantima

    2010-01-01

    The tsunami and non-tsunami affected areas of Takua Pa District, Phang-Nga Province were investigated for fresh- and brackish-water snails that transmit human parasitic diseases during 2006 and 2007. Among 46 snail species found, 17 species of 8 families were freshwater snails, 28 species of another 7 families were brackish-water snails, and 1 species was a land snail. Of these species, 11 freshwater snails, 4 brackish-water snails and 1 land snail were of medical importance. The fresh-water snails were Pomacea canaliculata, Pila angelica, P. gracilis, P. polita, Filopaludina (S.) martensi, F. (F.) s. polygramma, Melanoides tuberculata, Indoplanorbis exuxtus, Radix rubiginosa, Helicorbis umbilicalis, Gyraulus convexiusculus. Four brackish-water snails were Cerithidea cingulata, C. djadjarensis, C. alata, Sermyla riqueti and Achatina fulica was the land snail. I. exutus, M. tuberculata and F. (F.) s. polygramma harbored Xiphidio, Microcercus, Furocercus, Echinostome cercariae, and cercaria without eyespots or tail with hair. Three species of brackish-water snails, Cerithidia cingulata, C. djadjariensis, and C. alata presented with 6 types of trematode cercariae and rediae. Knowledge of medically important snails and their parasitic diseases, and prevention were given to Takua Pa people by poster, pamphlets and broadcasting through community radio.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for intestinal parasite infection in goats raised in Nakhon Pathom Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanapob, Niorn; Arunvipas, Pipat; Kasemsuwan, Suwicha; Phimpraphai, Waraphon; Panneum, Supachart

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for intestinal parasite infection in goats raised in Nakhon Pathom Province. Fecal samples from 190 goats in 12 herds were collected per rectum. Questionnaires focusing on the general information about the farm and farmers, and management practices on farms were completed. Modified McMaster counting technique was performed to detect eggs of intestinal parasites. Each egg found was classified into three groups of parasites based on its characteristics. Individual and herd prevalence were calculated. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to analyze risk factors of infection. Herd prevalence of intestinal parasite infection was 100%, while individual prevalence was 79.47%. Strongyle group was the most common intestinal parasite found in this study. Moniezia spp. (8/190) and Trichuris spp. (1/190) were also found. The average number of eggs found was 1,176 eggs per gram of feces. Risk factors for intestinal parasite infection were housing system, deworming interval, and type of goat in herd. Goats housed in groups had higher infection rates compared with goats housed individually (odds ratio (OR) = 6.34; P value = 0.009). Goats in herds in which anthelmintic drugs were administered in intervals of greater than 3 months were more likely to become infected with intestinal parasites (OR = 33.07; P value Goats in herds that kept only dairy goats were less likely to become infected than herd that kept only meat goats or kept both dairy and meat goats (OR = 46.20 and 8.75; P value <0.001 and 0.011, respectively).

  19. Diversity and uses of Zingiberaceae in Nam Nao National Park, Chaiyaphum and Phetchabun provinces, Thailand, with a new record for Thailand

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    Surapon Saensouk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three tribes, 12 genera and 38 species of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae along five routes in Nam Nao National Park were surveyed between January 2012 and December 2013 to determine their diversity, ecological data, phenology, uses and conservation status. The highest diversity was found in the tribe Zingibereae (6 genera and 21 species, of which the genera Curcuma and Zingiber comprised the highest number species (eight species each. A species key was constructed based on morphology. The ginger family was found in four forest-types—deciduous dipterocarp forest, mixed deciduous forest, dry evergreen forest and pine forest. The most flowering bloom of the ginger family in Nam Nao National Park was during March to August and the most fruiting bloom was during June to September. The popular uses of Zingiberaceae were as a food, spice, in medicine, as ornamentation and in rituals. Eight species have been evaluated as of least concern and are presented in the IUCN Red List, while two rare species were reported in Thailand Red Data: Plants, while six rare Zingiberaceae species were identified based on the evaluation criteria of Saensouk (2011. Four species were endemic to Thailand. Moreover, Etlingera yunnanensis (T. L. Wu & S. J. Chen R. M. Smith was a new record for Thailand.

  20. Molecular genetic characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein gene sequences from rabid dogs in Bangkok and neighboring provinces in Thailand, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjathummarak, Surachet; Fa-Ngoen, Chanon; Pipattanaboon, Chonlatip; Boonha, Khwanchit; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip

    2016-05-01

    Because of its association with dogs, rabies virus (RABV) is still endemic in Thailand, where it is a serious public health problem. The genetic characterization of RABV in Thailand is limited. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of RABV in the endemic area. Viral RNA from 48 brain specimens from rabid dogs, collected in Bangkok and seven neighboring provinces in 2013-2014, was extracted and sequenced. The complete rabies glycoprotein (G) gene sequences (1575 nt) were aligned, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed using the maximum-likelihood method. All of the Thai rabies virus isolates belonged to lyssavirus genotype 1 and clustered in the same lineage as isolates from South East Asia (SEA) and China. The Thai rabies virus isolates formed two distinct clades, THA-1 and THA-2. Clade THA-1 was the predominant clade and could be divided into two subclades, THA-1A and THA-1B. Clade THA-2 was closely associated with human Thai isolates collected in a previous study. The overall mean rate of evolution based on the G gene was approximately 1.56 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year. The genetic identities among the isolates from Thailand and other SEA countries were >88.4 % at the nucleotide sequence level and 95 % at the amino acid sequence level. The deduced amino acid sequences of the G proteins of the RABV isolates were compared. A single amino acid change (N194T) in subclade THA-1A distinguished the Thai RABV isolates from other RABV isolates. Our results suggest that these Thai dog RABV isolates share a common ancestor with the RABV isolates circulating in the endemic regions of SEA countries and China. Furthermore, there were strong genetic relationship to RABV from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. These data extend our understanding of the relatedness and genetic variation of RABV in Thailand.

  1. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from broiler chickens, pigs and meat products in Thailand-Cambodia border provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trongjit, Suthathip; Angkititrakul, Sunpetch; Tuttle, R Emerson; Poungseree, Jiratchaya; Padungtod, Pawin; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of Salmonella isolates from broiler chickens, pigs and their associated meat products in the Thailand-Cambodia border provinces. A total of 941 samples were collected from pigs and broiler chickens at slaughter houses and from carcasses at local fresh markets in Sa Kaeo, Thailand (n = 554) and Banteay Meanchey, Cambodia (n = 387) in 2014 and 2015. From these samples, 345 Salmonella isolates were collected from Sa Keao (n = 145; 23%) and Banteay Meanchey (n = 200; 47%) and assayed for antimicrobial susceptibility, class 1 integrons and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes. Serovars Typhimurium (29%) and Rissen (29%) were the most common serotypes found in Thai and Cambodian isolates, respectively. Multidrug resistance was detected in 34% and 52% of isolates from Sa Keao and Banteay Meanchey, respectively. The majority of the Thai isolates were resistant to ampicillin (72.4%), whereas most Cambodian isolates were resistant to sulfamethoxazole (71%). Eleven isolates from Sa Keao and 44 from Banteay Meanchey carried class 1 integrons comprising resistance gene cassettes. The most common gene cassette array was dfrA12-aadA2 (61.1%). Six isolates were ESBL producers. The β-lactamase genes found included blaTEM-1 , blaCTX-M-55 and blaCMY-2 . Some of these class 1 integrons and ESBL genes were located on conjugative plasmid. In conclusion, multidrug-resistant Salmonella are common in pigs, chickens and their products in the Thailand-Cambodia border provinces. Our findings indicate that class 1 integrons play a role in spread of AMR in the strains in this study. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Alley Farming in Thailand

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    Teerapol Silakul

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Poverty alleviation and environmental preservation are very important issues to many governments. Alley farming is beneficial to the environment because it conserves soil and sustains yields over time. Specifically, alley farming reduces soil erosion, which is a major problem in Thailand. Alley farming was conducted on a farmer’s field at Khaokwan Thong, a village in Uthaithani Province, Northern Thailand. We did a two-by-two factorial with and without alley farming, and with and without fertilizer. From this study, we observed that the two species used, Leucaena leucocephala and Acacia auriculiformis, grow well in Thailand, and that alley farming is suitable for Thailand. Few Thai farmers have heard about alley farming. However, it is nevertheless useful to know that there is potential for alley farming in Thailand using the two species. These plants, based upon the diameter and height measurements provided, grew well.

  3. Specific activities and radiological hazard assessment in beach sand samples in Songkhla province, Thailand after Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessaratikoon, P.; Boonkrongcheep, R.; Choosiri, N.; Daoh, M.; Udomsomporn, S.

    2017-06-01

    According to the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Japan on March 11, 2011, specific activities of natural (40K, 226Ra and 232Th) and anthropogenic (137Cs) radionuclides in 210 beach sand samples which were collected from Maharat, Sai Kaew, Samila, Chalatat, Na Thab, Sakom and Soi Sawan beaches in Songkhla Province along the eastern coast of Thailand, have been studied and evaluated. The specific activity levels of 40K, 226Ra, 232Th and 137Cs in the area were found in the range 110.13 - 4574.12, 6.99 - 451.87, 3.75 - 665.76 and 0.58- 9.91 Bq/Kg, respectively. Furthermore, the median values of specific activities of 40K, 226Ra, 232Th and 137Cs were calculated and compared with other research data in Thailand as well as global measurements and evaluations. Moreover, four radiological hazard indices for the studied area were also assessed by using the median values of specific activities of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th.

  4. A field-scale study of cadmium phytoremediation in a contaminated agricultural soil at Mae Sot District, Tak Province, Thailand: (1) Determination of Cd-hyperaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaokaew, Saengdao; Landrot, Gautier

    2015-11-01

    The cadmium (Cd) phytoremediation capabilities of Gynura pseudochina, Chromolaena odorata, Conyza sumatrensis, Crassocephalum crepidioides and Nicotiana tabacum were determined by conducting in-situ experiments in a highly Cd-contaminated agricultural field at Mae Sot District, Tak Province, Thailand. Most of these five plant species, which are commonly found in Thailand, previously demonstrated Cd-hyperaccumulating capacities under greenhouse conditions. This study represented an important initial step in determining if any of these plants could, under field-conditions, effectively remove Cd from the Mae Sot contaminated fields, which represent a health threat to thousands of local villagers. All plant species had at least a 95% survival rate on the final harvest day. Additionally, all plant species, except C. odorata, could hyperaccumulate the extractable Cd amounts present in the soil, based on their associated Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF), Translocation Factor (TF), and background Vegetation Factor (VF). Therefore, the four Cd-hyperaccumulating plant species identified in this study may successfully treat a majority of contaminated fields at Mae Sot, as it was previously reported that Cd amounts present in a number of these soils were mostly available.

  5. Knowledge, attitudes and practices (kap) regarding influenza A (H1N1) among a population living along Thai-Myanmar border, Ratchaburi Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukmanee, Natefa; Yimsamran, Surapon; Rukmanee, Prasert; Thanyavanich, Nipon; Maneeboonyang, Wanchai; Puangsa-art, Supalarp; Wuthisen, Pitak; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Prommongkol, Sutthiporn; Chaimoongkun, Wuthichai; Pan-ngum, Wirichada

    2014-07-01

    The 2009 influenza A (H1N1) outbreaks in Thailand was successfully controlled, partly through the use of electronic media to educate the public. People living along the Thai-Myanmar border may have less access to this electronic media or might have health beliefs that differ from the general Thai population with potential to impact an influenza outbreak. We conducted a survey to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza among people living along the Thai-Myanmar boder in Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. Of 110 house- holds surveyed, 96% were Karen ethnicity. Greater than 50% were uneducated and most had a low family income. Knowledge about influenza was low. Attitudes regarding infection were mostly negative among the elderly in this area. Practices regarding influenza were moderately good. Education level was associated with knowledge and practice. Income level and wealth indicators were associated with knowledge and having a radio or TV was associated with good practices. Preventive behavior was associated with good knowledge but not with attitudes about influenza. Health education campaigns are needed in these communities to help people adopt desired changes in behavior to improve personal hygiene.

  6. Additional Burden of Diseases Associated with Cadmium Exposure: A Case Study of Cadmium Contaminated Rice Fields in Mae Sot District, Tak Province, Thailand

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    Nisarat Songprasert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cadmium (Cd contaminated rice fields in Mae Sot District, Tak Province, Thailand has been one of the major environmental problems in Thailand for the last 10 years. We used disability adjusted life years (DALYs to estimate the burden of disease attributable to Cd in terms of additional DALYs of Mae Sot residents. Cd exposure data included Cd and β2–microglobulin (β2-MG in urine (as an internal exposure dose and estimated cadmium daily intake (as an external exposure dose. Compared to the general Thai population, Mae Sot residents gained 10%–86% DALYs from nephrosis/nephritis, heart diseases, osteoporosis and cancer depending on their Cd exposure type and exposure level. The results for urinary Cd and dietary Cd intake varied according to the studies used for risk estimation. The ceiling effect was observed in results using dietary Cd intake because of the high Cd content in rice grown in the Mae Sot area. The results from β2-MG were more robust with additional DALYs ranging from 36%–86% for heart failure, cerebral infraction, and nephrosis/nephritis. Additional DALYs is a useful approach for assessing the magnitude of environmental Cd exposure. The Mae Sot population lost more healthy life compared to populations living in a non- or less Cd polluted area. This method should be applicable to various types of environmental contamination problems if exposure assessment information is available.

  7. The impact of a national program to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in selected Myanmar immigrant communities in Bangkok and Ranong Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satimai, Wichai; Jiraamonnimit, C; Thammapalo, S; Choochote, W; Luenee, P; Boitano, J J; Wongkamchai, S

    2011-09-01

    Some immigrants from Myanmar to Thailand have brought Wuchereria bancrofti infections with them, causing a community health problem for Thai citizens. The seroprevalence of bancroftian filariasis was detected in 438 and 512 Myanmar immigrants residing in Bangkok and Ranong Provinces, respectively, along with 81 Thai citizens living in Bangkok. The immunochromatograpy card test was positive in 5 Myanmar immigrants living in Bangkok and 1 living in Ranong for a prevalence of 0.63%. Antifilarial IgG4 antibodies were found in 21 Myanmar immigrants living in Bangkok and 14 living in Ranong for a prevalence of 3.68%. None of the samples from Thai citizens were positive with either test. These prevalence rates are lower than those observed between 2001 and 2005. The Thai mass drug administration program to eliminate lymphatic filariasis among Myanmar immigrants appears to be a successful public health strategy.

  8. Biochemical studies of insecticide resistance in Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethuan, S; Jirakanjanakit, N; Saengtharatip, S; Chareonviriyaphap, T; Kaewpa, D; Rongnoparut, P

    2007-06-01

    Biochemical analysis was performed on field caught Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes to determine activities of enzymes including mixed function oxidases (MFO), nonspecific esterases (alpha- and beta-), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), and insensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Biochemical tests were performed on F1 generation of Ae. aegypti field caught mosquitoes, while in Ae. albopictus F2 progenies were used. Twenty-six samples of Ae. aegypti mosquito were collected from areas across different parts of Thailand including Bangkok (central), and the provinces of Chiang Rai (north), Nakhon Sawan (north-central), Nakhon Ratchasrima (northeast), Chonburi (east), Chanthaburi (east), and Songkhla (south). Eight wild caught samples of Ae. albopictus were from Songkhla, Nakhon Sawan, Nakhon Ratchasrima and Kanchanaburi (west) provinces. The susceptibility to pyrethroids (deltamethrin, permethrin), organophosphate (fenitrothion) and carbamate (propoxur) insecticides were revealed in these samples. The biochemical test results were compared with those of the susceptible Bora (French Polynesia) strain. There was significant enhancement of MFO in pyrethroid resistant Ae. aegypti samples, except those from Songkhla and Hauykwang district in Bangkok. Biochemical assay results suggested that nonspecific esterases conferred fenitrothion resistance in Ae. aegypti in Nakhon Sawan, while insensitive AChE and/or nonspecific esterases could play role in fenitrothion resistance in Nakhon Ratchasrima. There was no consistent association of GST with pyrethroid resistance in Ae. aegypti. Low enzyme activities found in Ae. aegypti in Songkhla and in Ae. albopictus corresponded to their insecticide susceptibility status. The increased enzyme activity in field samples reflecting local history of insecticide employment was discussed.

  9. Initial Assessment of the Acceptability of a Push-Pull Aedes aegypti Control Strategy in Iquitos, Peru and Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    to the logistical complexities local vector control authorities have in implementing these strategies (i.e., financial and labor con- straints...Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática (INEI) , 2008 . Censos Nacionales 2007: XI de Población y VI de Vivienda, Sistema de Consulta de

  10. GIS Database and Google Map of the Population at Risk of Cholangiocarcinoma in Mueang Yang District, Nakhon Ratchasima Province of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Joosiri, Apinya; Jantakate, Sirinun; Sangkudloa, Amnat; Kaewthani, Sarochinee; Chimplee, Kanokporn; Khemplila, Kritsakorn; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a serious problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern and northern regions. Database of population at risk are need required for monitoring, surveillance, home health care, and home visit. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a geographic information system (GIS) database and Google map of the population at risk of CCA in Mueang Yang district, Nakhon Ratchasima province, northeastern Thailand during June to October 2015. Populations at risk were screened using the Korat CCA verbal screening test (KCVST). Software included Microsoft Excel, ArcGIS, and Google Maps. The secondary data included the point of villages, sub-district boundaries, district boundaries, point of hospital in Mueang Yang district, used for created the spatial databese. The populations at risk for CCA and opisthorchiasis were used to create an arttribute database. Data were tranfered to WGS84 UTM ZONE 48. After the conversion, all of the data were imported into Google Earth using online web pages www.earthpoint.us. Some 222 from a 4,800 population at risk for CCA constituted a high risk group. Geo-visual display available at following www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/ edit?mid=zPxtcHv_iDLo.kvPpxl5mAs90 and hl=th. Geo-visual display 5 layers including: layer 1, village location and number of the population at risk for CCA; layer 2, sub-district health promotion hospital in Mueang Yang district and number of opisthorchiasis; layer 3, sub-district district and the number of population at risk for CCA; layer 4, district hospital and the number of population at risk for CCA and number of opisthorchiasis; and layer 5, district and the number of population at risk for CCA and number of opisthorchiasis. This GIS database and Google map production process is suitable for further monitoring, surveillance, and home health care for CCA sufferers.

  11. Environmental factors and public health policy associated with human and rodent infection by leptospirosis: a land cover-based study in Nan province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rossa, P; Tantrakarnapa, K; Sutdan, D; Kasetsinsombat, K; Cosson, J-F; Supputamongkol, Y; Chaisiri, K; Tran, A; Supputamongkol, S; Binot, A; Lajaunie, C; Morand, S

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis incidence has increased markedly since 1995 in Thailand, with the eastern and northern parts being the most affected regions, particularly during flooding events. Here, we attempt to overview the evolution of human prevalence during the past decade and identify the environmental factors that correlate with the incidence of leptospirosis and the clinical incidence in humans. We used an extensive survey of Leptospira infection in rodents conducted in 2008 and 2009 and the human incidence of the disease from 2003 to 2012 in 168 villages of two districts of Nan province in Northern Thailand. Using an ad-hoc developed land-use cover implemented in a geographical information system we showed that humans and rodents were not infected in the same environment/habitat in the land-use cover. High village prevalence was observed in open habitat near rivers for the whole decade, or in 2008-2009 mostly in rice fields prone to flooding, whereas infected rodents (2008-2009) were observed in patchy habitat with high forest cover, mostly situated on sloping ground areas. We also investigated the potential effects of public health campaigns conducted after the dramatic flood event of 2006. We showed that, before 2006, human incidence in villages was explained by the population size of the village according to the environmental source of infection of this disease, while as a result of the campaigns, human incidence in villages after 2006 appeared independent of their population size. This study confirms the role of the environment and particularly land use, in the transmission of bacteria, emphasized by the effects of the provincial public health campaigns on the epidemiological pattern of incidence, and questions the role of rodents as reservoirs.

  12. The Developmental Model of Cultural Tourism-Homestay of the Lao Vieng and Lao Song Ethnic Groups in the Central Region of Thailand

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    Supon Chaiyatorn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Lao Wieng and Lao Songe Ethnic Groups were herded from Lanchang Region to Siam Region. In recent time, they settled down in Central Thailand. The objectives of this research were to study: (1 historical background of Lao Wieng and Lao Songe Ethnic Groups, (2 their lifestyle facilitating tourism and (3 development of cultural tourism model as Home Stay of the Ethnics. Approach: the research area included Pechaburi, Nakonpatom, Saraburi, Supanburi and Kanchanaburi Provinces. The key informants were selected by Purposive Sampling including: 30 experts, 40 practitioners and 50 general villagers. The research design was Qualitative Research. Data were collected by techniques of interview, observation and focus group discussion. They were analyzed by using Triangulation technique. The findings were presented by descriptive analysis. Results: (1 Lao Wieng and Lao Songe Ethnic Groups, were herded from Vientiene City, Lao Country abut 200 years ago. They settled down in Middle Thailand by doing rice farm. For their living, they maintained their traditional culture of community since then, (2 lifestyle facilitating tourism consisted of identity including household, relatives relationship, dressing, language, religious, custom and beliefs, (3 the model of inherited local cultural tourism as Home Stay, each ethnic group should be organized as the following model: For Lao Wieng Ethnic, the conservation and inheritance of local culture should be focused using major lifestyle factor based on household, food and dressing. For Thai Songedam Ethnic Group, major lifestyle factor should be based on lifestyle and cultural factor with identity including living place, food, dressing, tradition, ritual, local item selling and play. Conclusion/Recommendations: The ethnic group identity was necessary for cultural tourism. But, the scenery, culture, custom and tradition with identity should be emphasized so that it would be prominent by focusing on

  13. Goat farm management and Brucella serological test among goat keepers and livestock officers, 2011-2012, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te-Chaniyom, Thanidtha; Geater, Alan F; Kongkaew, Wandee; Chethanond, Usa; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonotic disease particularly affecting goats, emerged in Thailand in 2003, resulting in both an occupational hazard for goat keepers and livestock officers, and production losses. Farm management practices have been identified as risk factors associated with Brucella sero-positivity in many studies. Our finding in this study should be considered in order to strengthen the system of biosecurity control in farm animals as one health approach. The objectives of the study were to describe the distribution of potential risk factors by types of goat farms and to document the prevalence of human Brucella sero-positivity among goat keepers and livestock officers in Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to December 2012. The study population included three types of goat farms: standard, community enterprise and private goat farms that were located in Nakhon Si Thammmarat Province in southern Thailand. Information on whether the farm had any Brucella sero-positivity goats since 2011 was retrieved from the local livestock office records. Information on farming management was also traced back to 2011. Field researchers collected information from goat keepers of the selected farms using a structured questionnaire. Goat keepers on all farms pre-identified (January to June 2012) as having had at least one positive goat were considered to have been exposed. Goat keepers on a random sample of farms having all goats with negative results were considered to be unexposed. Venous blood samples were collected from goat keepers exposed and unexposed and from livestock officers and the samples were tested by IgG ELISA. Statistical analysis was done under the complex survey design in R software. Fourteen standard farms, 66 community enterprise farms and 68 private farms participated in the study; 82.4% (122/148) used public pasture and 53.4% (79/148) shared breeder goats with other farms. Farm management practices corresponding

  14. A New Basal Hadrosauroid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

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    Masateru Shibata

    Full Text Available A new basal hadrosauroid dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation of Thailand, Sirindhorna khoratensis gen. et sp. nov is described. The new taxon is based on composite skull and mandible including premaxilla, maxilla, jugal, quadrate, braincases, predentary, dentaries, surangular, and maxillary and dentary teeth. It is diagnostic by such characters as, sagittal crest extending along entire dorsal surface of the parietal and reaching the frontoparietal suture (autapomorphy, transversely straight frontoparietal suture, caudodorsally faced supraoccipital, no participation of the supraoccipital in the foramen magnum, mesiodistally wide leaf-shaped dentary tooth with primary and secondary ridges on the lingual surface of the crown, perpendicularly-erected and large coronoid process of dentary, and nonvisible antorbital fossa of the maxilla in lateral view. Phylogenetic analysis revealed S. khoratensis as among the most basal hadrosauroids. Sirindhorna khoratensis is the best-preserved iguanodontian ornithopod in Southeast Asia and sheds new light to resolve the evolution of basal hadrosauriforms.

  15. A New Basal Hadrosauroid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masateru; Jintasakul, Pratueng; Azuma, Yoichi; You, Hai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    A new basal hadrosauroid dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation of Thailand, Sirindhorna khoratensis gen. et sp. nov is described. The new taxon is based on composite skull and mandible including premaxilla, maxilla, jugal, quadrate, braincases, predentary, dentaries, surangular, and maxillary and dentary teeth. It is diagnostic by such characters as, sagittal crest extending along entire dorsal surface of the parietal and reaching the frontoparietal suture (autapomorphy), transversely straight frontoparietal suture, caudodorsally faced supraoccipital, no participation of the supraoccipital in the foramen magnum, mesiodistally wide leaf-shaped dentary tooth with primary and secondary ridges on the lingual surface of the crown, perpendicularly-erected and large coronoid process of dentary, and nonvisible antorbital fossa of the maxilla in lateral view. Phylogenetic analysis revealed S. khoratensis as among the most basal hadrosauroids. Sirindhorna khoratensis is the best-preserved iguanodontian ornithopod in Southeast Asia and sheds new light to resolve the evolution of basal hadrosauriforms.

  16. Coral recruitment and recovery after the 2004 Tsunami around the Phi Phi Islands (Krabi Province) and Phuket, Andaman Sea, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawall, Y.; Phongsuwan, N.; Richter, C.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 tsunami left a discontinuous pattern of destruction in the reefs along Andaman Sea coast of Thailand. Here, a comparative assessment of coral recruitment was carried out to assess differences in recovery between damaged and undamaged sites in near-shore fringing reefs 1 and 3 years after the tsunami. Settlement plates showed high frequencies of coral spat after 4 months (coral rubble is a key determinant of recruitment success. Low regeneration success of some species e.g. branching acroporids and rebounding tourism industry at sites like Patong and partly around the Phi Phi Islands (dense carpets of filamentous algae) led to the assumption of selectivity and eventually to an alternation of the coral community even though live coral cover might be recovered soon.

  17. Phlebotomine sand flies of edible-nest swiftlet cave of Lang Ga Jiew Island, Chumphon province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittsamart, B; Samruayphol, Suchada; Sungvorayothin, Sangsit; Pothiwat, Ratcharin; Samung, Yudthana; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn

    2015-09-01

    The present study reported for the first time phlebotomine sandfly species inhabiting edible-nest swiftlet cave of the isolated island, based on field collections made during June 2010-May 2011. The insect diversity was relatively lower to that of mainland caves. All species, Phlebotomus stantoni, Sergentomyia anodontis, Sergentomyia bailyi, Sergentomyia gemmea, Sergentomyia hodgsoni and Sergentomyia punjabensis were either endemic island species or native elsewhere in Thailand. Sergentomyia hodgsoni was the most prevalent species accounted for 94.7% and classified as a troglophile species. Seasonal pattern of the phlebotomine abundance and some aspects of their population characteristics were described and discussed. Two ectoparasites, Ornithodorus and Paracimex sp. were also incidentally collected from the swiftlet cave.

  18. Preliminary investigation on the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection in Mae Sot District, Tak Province of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwalee Rattanapunya

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: The increasing trend of prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection in Mae Sot, Tak province was of a great concern on either pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetics aspect. The study in a larger numbers of malaria patients in different endemic areas throughout the country with different time periods is underway.

  19. Rice Crop Monitoring and Yield Assessment with MODIS 250m Gridded Vegetation Products: A Case Study of Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesingha, J. S. J.; Deshapriya, N. L.; Samarakoon, L.

    2015-04-01

    Billions of people in the world depend on rice as a staple food and as an income-generating crop. Asia is the leader in rice cultivation and it is necessary to maintain an up-to-date rice-related database to ensure food security as well as economic development. This study investigates general applicability of high temporal resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250m gridded vegetation product for monitoring rice crop growth, mapping rice crop acreage and analyzing crop yield, at the province-level. The MODIS 250m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) time series data, field data and crop calendar information were utilized in this research in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand. The following methodology was used: (1) data pre-processing and rice plant growth analysis using Vegetation Indices (VI) (2) extraction of rice acreage and start-of-season dates from VI time series data (3) accuracy assessment, and (4) yield analysis with MODIS VI. The results show a direct relationship between rice plant height and MODIS VI. The crop calendar information and the smoothed NDVI time series with Whittaker Smoother gave high rice acreage estimation (with 86% area accuracy and 75% classification accuracy). Point level yield analysis showed that the MODIS EVI is highly correlated with rice yield and yield prediction using maximum EVI in the rice cycle predicted yield with an average prediction error 4.2%. This study shows the immense potential of MODIS gridded vegetation product for keeping an up-to-date Geographic Information System of rice cultivation.

  20. Effects of Application of Social Marketing Theory and the Health Belief Model in Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening among Targeted Women in Sisaket Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichachai, Suparp; Songserm, Nopparat; Akakul, Theerawut; Kuasiri, Chanapong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Thailand, being ranked second only to breast cancer. Thai women have been reported to have a low rate of cervical cancer screening (27.7% of the 80% goal of WHO). We therefore aimed to apply the social marketing theory and health belief model in promoting cervical cancer screening in Kanthararom District, Sisaket Province. A total of 92 from 974 targeted women aged 3060 years were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group underwent application of social marketing theory and a health belief model program promoting cervical cancer screening while the control group received normal services. Two research tools were used: (1) application of social marketing theory and health belief model program and (2) questionnaire used to evaluate perceptions of cervical cancer. Descriptive and inferential statistics including paired sample ttest and independent ttest were used to analyze the data. After the program had been used, the mean score of perception of cervical cancer of experimental group was at a higher level (x=4.09; S.D. =0.30), than in the control group (x=3.82; S.D. =0.20) with statistical significance (psocial marketing and the health belief model be used to promote cervical cancer screening in targeted women and it can be promoted as a guideline for other health services, especially in health promotion and disease prevention.

  1. Field evaluation of G10, a celery (Apium graveolens)-based topical repellent, against mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuetun, B; Choochote, W; Pongpaibul, Y; Junkum, A; Kanjanapothi, D; Chaithong, U; Jitpakdi, A; Riyong, D; Wannasan, A; Pitasawat, B

    2009-02-01

    The potential of G10, a celery (Apium graveolens)-based topical product, as a repellent against natural mosquito populations was evaluated in comparison to commercial (Insect Block 28) and standard (25% DEET) repellents in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand. These repellent products afforded encouragingly excellent personal protection against a broad range of mosquito species belonging to various genera, including Aedes, Anopheles, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia. No mosquito bite was observed on the volunteers treated with G10 and Insect Block 28 throughout the field study, whereas two species, i.e., six A. barbirostris and two A. subalbatus, came to bite or land on 25% DEET-treated volunteers. Thus, it can be concluded that while G10 and Insect Block 28 exhibited similarly powerful repellent activities with complete (100%) protection, 25% DEET was effective in minimizing bites with 99.68% protection. G10 formula was also studied for physical properties and biological stability after being kept under two conditions; a heating and cooling cycle, and varying temperature and time storage. Most samples of stored G10 not only demonstrated a similarity in appearance and physical properties, but also provided comparable repellency to that of the fresh preparation. These findings encourage commercial development of G10 formula as an alternative to conventional synthetic repellents.

  2. Quantification of contamination levels and particular risk of Salmonella spp. in pigs in slaughterhouses in Chiang Mai and Lamphun provinces, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadee, Pakpoom; Boonkhot, Phacharaporn; Patchanee, Prapas

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella spp. is one of the important foodborne pathogens, and the slaughtering process is recognized as a potential point of contamination and the spread of the pathogens. The three objectives of this study are first, to quantify the contamination levels of Salmonella spp. in pig skins and carcasses, second, to evaluate the outcomes from different pig supply sources and different practices at three critical steps (scalding, splitting, and washing) for Salmonella spp. contamination, and third, to assess risk of Salmonella spp. contamination in pork products after slaughtering level. The study was performed in three representative slaughterhouses in Chiang Mai and Lamphun provinces, Thailand. Investigation conducted from May 2013 through October 2013 found the overall prevalence and contamination levels mean to be 11.85% and 0.34 MPN/cm2, respectively. There was no statistically significant in Salmonella spp. prevalence and contamination levels detected with different patterns at the slaughterhouses which were supplied pigs from either co-operative or integrated farms. Factors found to reduce Salmonella spp. loads on carcasses included good practices, e.g., regular changing of water in the scalding tank after each batch and the use of chlorine in the washing step. Risk of Salmonella spp. contamination of pork products at the final stage of slaughtering was nearly 10%. Good practices and proper hygiene measures should be applied to minimize the risk of Salmonella spp. exposure in the slaughtering line, which can reduce the contamination pressure downstream at retail shops as well as for end consumers.

  3. Techno-Economic and dynamic analysis of low velocity wind turbines for rural electrification in agricultural area of Ratchaburi Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipirodjanapong, Sumate; Namboonruang, Weerapol

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis of potential wind speed of electrical power generating using for agriculture in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The total area is 1,900 square kilometers. First of all, the agriculture electrical load (AEL) data was investigated from all farming districts in Ratchaburi. Subsequently, the load data was analyzed and classified by the load power and energy consumption at individual district. The wind turbine generator (WTG) at capacity rate of 200w, 500w, 1,000w, and 2,000w were adopted to implement for the AEL in each area at wind speed range of 3 to 6 m/s. This paper shows the approach based on the wind speed at individual district to determine the capacity of WTG using the capacitor factor (CF) and the cost of energy (COE) in baht per unit under different WTG value rates. Ten locations for wind station installations are practical investigated. Results show that for instance, the Damnoen Sa-duak (DN-04) one of WTG candidate site is identically significant for economic investment of installing rated WTG. The results of COE are important to determine whether a wind site is good or not.

  4. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Preeyaporn Butboonchoo; Chalobol Wongsawad

    2015-01-01

    The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results reve...

  5. Policies, Socioeconomic, Institutional and Biophysical Factors Influencing the Change from Rice to Sugarcane in Nong Bua Lamphu Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakapunrat, Narinpat; Thapa, Gopal B.

    2017-06-01

    For the past decade, Thailand pursued a strategy of promoting biofuel crop production, including sugarcane, to meet the ever increasing energy demand and to increase the income of farmers. This study analyzed the influence of policy instruments implemented to promote the sugarcane cultivation, farm household socioeconomic levels, biophysical, and institutional factors driving the conversion of rice fields into sugarcane farms. Primary information was collected from 230 farm households through a structured questionnaire. Relevant policy documents published by the responsible government agencies were the main sources of secondary information collected for policy analysis. The analyses revealed that farmers in the study area converted 25-75% of their rice fields into sugarcane farms as a result of implementation of policy instruments that made sugarcane financially far more attractive than rice. The results of the regression analysis showed that eight variables were found significant and positively influenced the conversion of rice fields into sugarcane farms. These were access to extension services, information, sugarcane loading stations, and ground water for irrigation, and duration of experience in sugarcane farming as well as household head's age and education. Irrespective of landholding size, the majority of farmers were not concerned about food security. In view of the finding, if feasible, in the form of additional price supports and commercial cane sugar index-based pricing strategies to promote sugarcane production should benefit all concerned farmers. Likewise, attention should be paid to deliver essential extension and marketing services in an effective way, particularly to those farmers who are not receiving such services.

  6. A survey into process and worker's characteristics in the wood furniture industry in Songkhla Province, southern region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiseranee, P; Chongsuvivatwong, V

    1998-12-01

    A cross-sectional survey of the wood furniture industry was conducted in southern Thailand in February 1993. The aim was to examine the manufacturing process, occupational hazards at the workplace, workers' demographic characteristics, period of employment, incidence rate of work related injury and some reproductive history of workers. Altogether 69 managers and 1,000 workers participated in the study. There are 2 main types of wood industry, rubberwood and hardwood. The rubberwood industry is semi-automated with advanced technology, has a female-dominated workforce of 200-300 workers per factory and overseas-market orientation. The hardwood industry is based in small-scale workplaces ranging from 20 to 60 workers, domestic-market orientation and has a male-dominated workforce. Most of the workers were young, single, of low education and were high turnover rate laborforce, with arduous work and long working hours per week. Solvent was the most frequent chemical exposure. The person-year incidence of chemical exposure in female workers was higher than in male workers for every group of chemicals. The incidence of accidents was twice as high as the official rate. The standardized fertility ratio of female wood workers was only 51.6% of that of the Thai female population. There was a high abortion rate among women who became pregnant inside the wood industry compared to that among pregnancies outside the wood factory. Wood industry workers were exposed to occupational hazards and accident-prone work conditions.

  7. Late Cenozoic basalt and gabbro in the subsurface in the Phetchabun Basin, Thailand: Implications for the Southeast Asian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, S. M.; Cooper, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    Fragments of basaltic and gabbroic rocks were obtained in cuttings from 15 exploration wells in the Na Sanun area of the Wichian Buri Sub-basin of the Phetchabun Basin in central Thailand. The samples represent flows and sills in lacustrine and fluvial sedimentary rocks of the Lower to mid-Miocene Wichian Buri Group. Mafic igneous units were identified in the sections based on their typically high-amplitude seismic reflections, confirmed by the examination of several hundred well cuttings and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Cross-sections of the sub-basin were constructed on the basis of previously published subsurface interpretations, seismic and well data, and petrological observations. Basaltic flows A, B, E, and F have ages of ca. 2 Ma, 16 Ma, 24 Ma and 18 Ma, based on inferred stratigraphic position. Gabbroic sill C and dioritic sill G are inferred to be correlative at ca. 11.6 Ma, and differ petrologically from ca. 12.8 Ma gabbroic sill D. Major minerals in both basaltic and gabbroic samples are plagioclase (ca. An50), anorthoclase, and augite, with pervasive alteration to Na- and Ca- zeolite minerals and analcime. Leucodioritic sill G also contains amphibole and high Ti-phlogopite. Overall, the rocks show within-plate tholeiitic to alkalic characteristics, and show similarities to basaltic surface outcrops of similar ages in the Wichian Buri-Lop Buri area. No evidence was seen in the subsurface for the andesitic to rhyolitic rocks of similar ages that occur at surface, but their presence cannot be precluded based on our limited data.

  8. Effectiveness of the multidimensional ergonomic intervention model to reduce musculoskeletal discomfort among street sweepers in Chiang Rai Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintakham, Kanjanar; Siriwong, Wattasit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of multidimensional ergonomic intervention (MEI) model to reduce musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) among street sweepers. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Chiang Rai Province. The MEI model was designed on the basis of four core components: cognitive behavior therapy, ergonomic education training, stretching exercise, and the foam sleeve broom handle grip. Seventy-five street sweepers volunteered for the screening process on MSD of having level score ≥4 by physiotherapist. Face to face interviews were used mainly in order to diagnose MSD. Physical examination was performed by physiotherapist and physical performance by sports scientist. The findings showed that the MEI model among the intervention group significantly reduced MSD compared with that among control group at exit model and follow-up (P<0.01). This research suggests that the MEI model was appropriate to reduce MSD associated with repetitive movement and awkward postures on task.

  9. Heavy metal contamination and human health risk assessment in drinking water from shallow groundwater wells in an agricultural area in Ubon Ratchathani province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsasuluk, Pokkate; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Siriwong, Wattasit; Robson, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Most local people in the agricultural areas of Hua-ruea sub-district, Ubon Ratchathani province (Thailand), generally consume shallow groundwater from farm wells. This study aimed to assess the health risk related to heavy metal contamination in that groundwater. Samples were randomly collected from 12 wells twice in each of the rainy and the dry seasons and were analyzed by inductive coupled plasma spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentration of detected metals in each well and the overall mean were below the acceptable groundwater standard limits for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni and Zn, but Pb levels were higher in four wells with an overall average Pb concentration of 16.66 ± 18.52 μg/l. Exposure questionnaires, completed by face-to-face interviews with 100 local people who drink groundwater from farm wells, were used to evaluate the hazard quotients (HQs) and hazard indices (HIs). The HQs for non-carcinogenic risk for As, Cu, Zn and Pb, with a range of 0.004-2.901, 0.053-54.818, 0.003-6.399 and 0.007-26.80, respectively, and the HI values (range from 0.10 to 88.21) exceeded acceptable limits in 58 % of the wells. The HI results were higher than one for groundwater wells located in intensively cultivated chili fields. The highest cancer risk found was 2.6 × 10(-6) for As in well no. 11. This study suggested that people living in warmer climates are more susceptible to and at greater risk of groundwater contamination because of their increased daily drinking water intake. This may lead to an increased number of cases of non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health defects among local people exposed to heavy metals by drinking the groundwater.

  10. Changes in Sexual Behavior and Attitudes Across Generations and Gender Among a Population-Based Probability Sample From an Urbanizing Province in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Darawuttimaprakorn, Niphon; Punpuing, Sureeporn; Musumari, Patou Masika; Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; El-Saaidi, Christina; Suguimoto, S Pilar; Feldman, Mitchell D; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Thailand has undergone rapid modernization with implications for changes in sexual norms. We investigated sexual behavior and attitudes across generations and gender among a probability sample of the general population of Nonthaburi province located near Bangkok in 2012. A tablet-based survey was performed among 2,138 men and women aged 15-59 years identified through a three-stage, stratified, probability proportional to size, clustered sampling. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out accounting for the effects of multistage sampling. Relationship of age and gender to sexual behavior and attitudes was analyzed by bivariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to adjust for possible confounding. Patterns of sexual behavior and attitudes varied substantially across generations and gender. We found strong evidence for a decline in the age of sexual initiation, a shift in the type of the first sexual partner, and a greater rate of acceptance of adolescent premarital sex among younger generations. The study highlighted profound changes among young women as evidenced by a higher number of lifetime sexual partners as compared to older women. In contrast to the significant gender gap in older generations, sexual profiles of Thai young women have evolved to resemble those of young men with attitudes gradually converging to similar sexual standards. Our data suggest that higher education, being never-married, and an urban lifestyle may have been associated with these changes. Our study found that Thai sexual norms are changing dramatically. It is vital to continue monitoring such changes, considering the potential impact on the HIV/STIs epidemic and unintended pregnancies.

  11. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2017-01-01

    The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results revealed that the total prevalence of infection was 99.2%. Cestode and nematode infections showed the highest prevalence in rainy season, while trematode infections were low and only found in hot season. The species and their prevalence were: Ascaridia galli (50.8%), Heterakis gallinarum (86.7%), Prosthogonimus macrorchis (1.7%), Echinostoma revolutum (0.8%), Raillietina echinobothrida (48.3%), Raillietina tetragona (57.5%), Raillietina cesticillus (12.5%), Raillietina sp. (35.8%), Cotugnia chiangmaii (14.2%) and Cotugnia sp. (32.5%). The prevalence of helminth infections did not differ significantly between male and female chickens. HAT-RAPD analysis, the specific fragment of 400 and 250 bp indicated that Raillietina sp. and Cotugnia sp. found, respectively, differ from other closely related species. This study has confirmed that HAT-RAPD technique can be used to differentiate among related species combined with morphological observations.

  12. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus in Phayao province, northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeyaporn Butboonchoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results revealed that the total prevalence of infection was 99.2%. Cestode and nematode infections showed the highest prevalence in rainy season, while trematode infections were low and only found in hot season. The species and their prevalence were: Ascaridia galli (50.8%, Heterakis gallinarum (86.7%, Prosthogonimus macrorchis (1.7%, Echinostoma revolutum (0.8%, Raillietina echinobothrida (48.3%, Raillietina tetragona (57.5%, Raillietina cesticillus (12.5%, Raillietina sp. (35.8%, Cotugnia chiangmaii (14.2% and Cotugnia sp. (32.5%. The prevalence of helminth infections did not differ significantly between male and female chickens. HAT-RAPD analysis, the specific fragment of 400 and 250 bp indicated that Raillietina sp. and Cotugnia sp. found, respectively, differ from other closely related species. This study has confirmed that HAT-RAPD technique can be used to differentiate among related species combined with morphological observations.

  13. DISTRIBUTION OF PHLEBOTOMINE SAND FLIES (DIPTERA:PSYCHODIDAE) IN LIMESTONE CAVES, KHAO PATHAWI, UTHAI THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polseela, R; Vitta, A; Apiwathnasorn, C

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the species composition and density of the sand flies found inside four limestone caves at Khao Pathawi, Thap Than District, Uthai Thani Province. Sand flies were collected using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps from October 2012 to September 2013. The sand flies were captured between 06:00 PM - 06:00 AM. A total of 11,817 sand flies were collected with a male:female ratio of 1.0:1.2 (5,325:6,492). The specimens were identified as eight species belonging to three genera Phlebotomus, Sergentomyia, Chinius, and comprised of S. anodontis, P. argentipes, P. stantoni, S. barraudi, S. silvatica, S. gemmea, S. indica, and C. barbazani. Sergentomyia anodontis (55.0%) was the predominant species followed by P. argentipes (33.6%) and others. Five species of sand fly were found throughout the year in this area: P. argentipes, P. stantoni, S. anodontis, S. barraudi and S. gemmea. The highest average density of sand flies was found in Ratree cave (35.0 sand flies per trap per night) and lowest in Bandai cave (29.0 sand flies per trap per night). The population of sand fly fluctuated from the highest peak in December (28.5%) to the lowest peak in May (2.3%). The distribution of sand fly species in attraction areas is important for the control program of infection risk of leishmaniasis.

  14. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasert Saichua; Choosak Nithikathkul; Natthawut Kaewpitoon

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand.

  15. Experiences with Direct Steam Generation at the Kanchanaburi Solar Thermal Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Dirk; Krüger, Joachim; Pandian, Yuvaraj; O'Connell, Bryan; Feldhoff, Jan Fabian; Karthikeyan, Ramkumar; Hempel, Sören; Muniasamy, Karthik; Hirsch, Tobias; Eickhoff, Martin; Hennecke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 the parabolic trough power plant TSE1 has started operation in Thailand. As a novelty it uses the direct steam generation (DSG) process, evaporating and super heating water and steam directly in the solar field. During the commissioning phase and first months of operation the start-up procedure has been optimised for the solar field and turbine system resulting in a reduced start-up time. The DSG process can be controlled well in the evaporator and super heater section securing a safe...

  16. A survey of herbal weeds that are used to treat gastrointestinal disorders from southern Thailand: Krabi and Songkhla provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamsuvan, Oratai; Ruangrit, Thamakorn

    2017-01-20

    Weeds are plants grow naturally and are commonly seen. They are mostly used for feedstuff. However, their use as herbs for treating diseases, including gastrointestinal disorders, is rare. Therefore, the present study aimed to: (1) quantify the number of herbal weeds used for treating gastrointestinal disorders; (2) study local knowledge of weed utilization for treating gastrointestinal disorders in Songkhla and Krabi provinces; and (3) analyse quantitative data with the Informant Consensus Factor (ICF), Use Value (UV) and Fidelity Level (FL). The study was conducted from November 2014 to January 2016 through semi-structured interviews with 35 folk healers. The main questions were designed to obtain plant information, including the local name, method of use, preparation method and medicinal properties. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics, quantitative indexes (UV, ICF as well as FL) and interpretation. A total of 49 species in 46 genera and 28 families were found. The most common use of weeds was as herbs (80%). The preferred part used was the whole plant (76.27%). The preferred methods of drug preparation and use were decoction and drink, respectively. The highest UV was found for Acmella oleracea (0.83). The highest FLs (100%) were found for 12 species, including Amaranthus spinosus, Amaranthus viridis, Alternanthera sessilis, Sauropus androgynus, Plantago major, and others. The highest ICFs (1.00) were found for treating toothache, dysentery, haemorrhoids, intestinal pain and abdominal pain. Overall, there are reports on the pharmacological activity of 31 species of weeds and reports on toxicity for 20 species of weeds. Therefore, awareness of the use of herbs is necessary to ensure that they are used safely and that benefits arise from the therapy. This study showed that medicinal weeds are still popularly used by folk healers. The pharmacological properties were consistent with the local uses, which supported a preliminary indication that the weed

  17. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes in primary health care unit of Udon Thani province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narenpitak, Surapong; Narenpitak, Aphaphan

    2008-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Type 2 diabetes and risk factors of decreased kidney function in Type 2 diabetes at primary health care unit of Udon Thani province. A descriptive cross-sectional study, cluster random sampling method was conducted from April to August 2007. Seven hundred and sixteen patients were enrolled. Medical histories, physical examinations, and blood tests for glucose, creatinine, total cholesterol, and triglyceride after 9-12 hours fasting were collected. The definition and classification of CKD are classified according to K/DOQI guideline 2002. The mean age of the diabetic patients was 58.70 +/- 9.83 years ranged from 30 to 92 years old. The mean duration of diabetes was 5.53 +/- 4.62 years, the majority (82.41%) had diabetes less than 10 years. More than half (51.82%) were obese (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2). Most of them (89.39%) had universal coverage health assurance. According to the ADA guideline 2006, the target systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride level could be achieved 55.45, 52.93, 36.31, 33.66, and 45.65% respectively. The prevalence of CKD stage 3 to 5 were 27.09 and 25.28% by using C-G and MDRD formulae respectively. The duration of diabetes, diabetes with history of hypertension, triglyceride level, and diabetic retinopathy were significant independent risk factors of the presence of decreased kidney function processed by logistic regression analysis. The present study demonstrated the clinical characteristic and the prevalence of decreased kidney function in type 2 diabetes in a primary health care setting. Intensive and optimal treatment of diabetes to slow the progression of long-term complications should be effectively managed by a disciplinary team.

  18. The ant nest of Crematogaster rogenhoferi (Mayr, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae at Tarutao National Park, Satun Province, Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparoek Watanasit

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Nests of the ant Crematogaster rogenhoferi (Mayr, 1879 were investigated at Tarutao National Park, Satun Province. Fifteen ant nests were selected at random along Phante Malacca Bay between the 2-7 March 2004. They built their nests from leaf and stick debris on branches of trees, at between 248-469 cm above the ground level. The vegetation on which nests were built was composed of 5 species: Vitex pinnata L., Oleasalicifolia Wall, Syzygium gratum (Wight, Ardisia elliptica Thum and one unknown species. The physical features of each nest were recorded. The average dimensions of the nest width and length were 10.65±2.57 cm and 22.10±1.22 cm, respectively.Each nest was cut into small pieces for counting the numbers of each caste and developing stages. The results showed that the average number of queens, winged females, males and workers in each nest were 1.53±0.38, 1,753.33±506.55, 4,970.67±2,227.00, 15,577.93±2,637.84 respectively, while the developing stages of pupae, larvae, eggs were 1,589.93±480.37, 4,113.20±1,469.49 and 1,942.80±741.67 respectively. Thus the total number of ants in the population in each nest was 29,949.40±5,358.31.The relationships between the number of castes, developing stages and physical features of the nests were explored. The Spearman Rank Correlation indicated that the width of nest positively correlated with the number of queens (rs = 0.862, p = . 000, winged females (rs = 0.691, p = 0.004 and workers (rs = 0.667, p = 0.007. A comparison of the effects of vegetation types on the number of castes and development stages, showed that vegetation type did have an influence but only on the number of the worker caste (F = 7.712, P = 0.011, one-way ANOVA. Most workers were associated with nests from Vitex pinnata. No nests were found on the dominant tree species of the area probably due to its ability to produce an insect repellant oil.

  19. Microbiological quality of cooked foods and drinks sold in higher educational institutions around Yala, Pattani, and Narathiwat Provinces, Southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalee, Abdullah D.; Sali, Khosiya; Hayeeyusoh, Nurainee; Hayeewangoh, Zubaidah; Thadah, Amporn

    2017-08-01

    Quality of cooked foods and drinks water sold within the vicinity of higher institutions located in Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat provinces were randomly sampled and microbiologically evaluated. As to Thai National Food Safety Standard, various food menu and drinks were subjected to conventionally determining the bacterial index; Most Probable Number (MPN) of coliform and fecal coliform as well as the detection of indicator organisms; Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella sp. As for bacterial index, results showed that curry-type likes PSU-stir-fried liver (7.5x106 CFU/g), and and the lowest was PSU-Koleh chicken Roast (1.72x103 CFU/g). The highest and lowest counts of soup-type items were observed in YPH-KaengSom soup (1.9x107 CFU/g), and PSU-Palo soup (0.4x103 CFU/g), respectively. Higher bacterial counts were also found in YPH-spicy stir-fried chicken (7.5 x 106 CFU/g), and YPH-squid salad (2.2x107 CFU/g). For drinks, bacterial count ranged 2.0 x 103 to 8.3 x 103 CFU/g, and NRU-iced grape juice having the highest bacterial count (2.0x106 CFU/g). Overall, foods not complying to the Thai National Food Safety Standard of 1 x 103 CFU/g from higher to lower were those of soup, stir-fried, salad, fried, and curry categories with as much as 4:17 (23.53%), 4:21 (19.05%), 2:11 (18.18%), 2:16 (12.5%) and 1:12 (8.33%), respectively. As for Coliform and fecal coliform, the highest (>1100 MPN/g) and the lowest (0.34 MPN/g),were not much found in all food categories with percentages of 23.53, 24.00, 13.79, 9.10, and 47.37 for curry (4:17), soup (6:15), stir-fried (4:29), fried (2:22), and salad (9:19), respectively. However, indicator organisms were not detected in almost all food samples except PSU-chicken yellowish curry, NRU-chicken TongYam soup, NRU-Long-tail tuna soup, NRU-KaengSom soup, YPE-watery soup, NRU-stir-fried liver, NRU-omelets, NRU-fried chicken, YPE-crispy fish salad, and NRU-salted eggs salad, which showed the presence of E. coli, but not

  20. Household food security and buffering mechanisms in Thai and non-Thai households in Nong Loo Sub-district, Sangkhla Buri, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, May Myat; Knowles, Jacqueline; Atwood, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    This was a cross sectional study to measure any difference between Thai and Non-Thai households in the prevalence of food security and the effect of state and local buffering mechanisms on household food security status in Nong Loo Sub-district in Kanchanaburi Province. Seventy-five point eight percent of 211 households (120 Thai and 91 non-Thai households) were food insecure. Non-Thai households were found to be significantly more food insecure than Thai households (95.6% compared with 60.8%; OR=21.4). Non-Thais tended to have less knowledge of and access to buffering mechanisms; however, this was not statistically significant. Of interest, however, was that no statistically significant association was found between household food insecurity and lack of access to buffering mechanisms. Qualitative interview results suggested that landownership, possession of a Thai card (Government registration card), increased food prices, and a dependence on imported food from other districts were important factors associated with household food insecurity in the sub-district. This survey underlines the importance of the food insecurity as a problem among Thai and, more severely, among non-Thai households and provides stake holders with information that can be used to intensify programs to address this problem. Thailand has a long border area with a high proportion of non-Thai households, and it is likely that similar food insecurity problems exist in other areas also. Further research on nutrition security (as distinct from food security) of this population is recommended in order to better assess the impact of the observed food insecurity.

  1. Trichinosis: Epidemiology in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natthawut Kaewpitoon; Soraya Jatesadapattaya Kaewpitoon; Chutikan Philasri; Ratana Leksomboon; Chanvit Maneenin; Samaporn Sirilaph; Prasit Pengsaa

    2006-01-01

    Trichinosis is one of the most common food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand and many outbreaks are reported each year. This paper reviews the history, species,and epidemiology of the disease and food habits of the people with an emphasis on the north, northeast, central and south regions of Thailand. The earliest record of trichinosis in Thailand was in 1962 in the Mae Sariang District, Mae Hong Son Province. Since then, about 130 outbreaks have been reported involving 7392 patients and 97 deaths (1962-2005). The highest number of cases, 557, was recorded in 1983. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports of the Bureau of Epidemiology,Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health,Thailand, show that trichinosis cases increased from 61 in 1997 to 351 in 1998.In contrast to these figures, the number of reported cases decreased to 16 in 1999 and 128 cases in 2000. There was no record of trichinosis in 2001, but then the figures for 2002, 2003 and 2004 were 289, 126 and 212 respectively. The infected patients were mostly in the 35-44 years age group and the disease occurred more frequently in men than women at a ratio of 1.7-2.0:1. There were 84 reported cases of trichinosis in Chiang Rai, Nan, Chiang Mai, Si Sa ket,Nakhon Phanom, Kalasin, Nakhon Ratchasima, Nakhon Nayok, Nakhon Pathom and Surat Thani, provinces located in different parts of Thailand in 2005. The outbreaks were more common in the northern areas, especially in rural areas where people ate raw or under-cooked pork and/or wild animals. This indicates the need for health education programs to prevent and control trichinosis as soon as possible in the high-risk areas.

  2. Arsenic contamination in surface drainage and groundwater in part of the southeast Asian tin belt, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M.; Fordyce, F.; Paijitprapapon, A.; Charoenchaisri, P.

    1996-02-01

    The occurrence of human health problems resulting from arsenic contamination of domestic water supplies in Ron Phibun District, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand was first recognized in 1987. The area has an extensive history of bedrock and alluvial mining, the waste from which is typically rich in arsenopyrite and related alteration products. In 1994 a collaborative study was instigated involving Thai and British government authorities to establish the distribution and geochemical form of As in surface drainage and aquifer systems in the affected area, the probable sources of As contamination, and the potential for problem alleviation. Hydrochemical analyses of surface- and groundwaters have confirmed the presence of dissolved As at concentrations exceeding WHO potable water guidelines by up to a factor of 500. Contamination of the shallow alluvial aquifer system is systematically more severe than the underlying carbonate-hosted aquifer. Deep boreholes may therefore provide the best available potable water source for the local population. The presence of up to 39% of total As as arsenite (H3AsO3) within the carbonate aquifer may, however, constitute a ‘hidden’ toxicological risk, not evident in the shallow groundwater (in which arsenate species account for > 95% of total As). Mineralogical investigations of As-rich tailings and flotation wastes were undertaken to evaluate their likely impact on water quality. The results indicate that although some flotation wastes contain up to 30% As, the rate of leaching is extremely low. Consequently the As loading of drainage emanating from such waste is below the subregional average. Analyses of the silty alluvium that covers much of the central sector of the study area have highlighted As concentrations of up to 5000 mg kg-1, probably carried by disseminated arsenopyrite. Following sulfide dissolution, the mobility of As in this material may be high (with resultant contamination of shallow groundwater) due

  3. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. II: responses to mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy among falciparum malaria patients in provinces bordering Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satimai Wichai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The area along the Thai-Cambodian border is considered an epicenter of anti-malarial drug resistance. Recently, parasite resistance to artemisinin-based therapies has been reported in the area. The artemisinin resistance containment project was initiated in November 2008, with the aim to limit resistant parasites and eliminate malaria in this region. This study describes the response to artemisinin-based therapy among falciparum malaria patients in the area, using data from the malaria surveillance programmed under the containment project. Methods The study was conducted in seven provinces of Thailand along the Thai-Cambodian border. Data of Plasmodium falciparum-positive patients during January 2009 to December 2011 were obtained from the electronic malaria information system (eMIS Web-based reporting system. All P. falciparum cases were followed for 42 days, as the routine case follow-up protocol. The demographic characteristics of the patients were described. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the cure rate of the current standard anti-malarial drug regimen--mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy (MAS. The proportion of patients who remained parasite-positive at each follow-up day was calculated. In addition, factors related to the delayed parasite clearance on day-3 post-treatment, were explored. Results A total of 1,709 P. falciparum-positive cases were reported during the study period. Almost 70% of falciparum cases received MAS therapy (n = 1,174. The majority of cases were males, aged between 31 and 50 years. The overall MAS cure rate was >90% over the three-year period. Almost all patients were able to clear the parasite within 7 to 14 days post-treatment. Approximately 14% of patients undergoing MAS remained parasite-positive on day-3. Delayed parasite clearance was not significantly associated with patient gender, age, or citizenship. However, delayed parasite clearance varied across the

  4. Radiation Dose and Risk Assessments from Polonium-210 in Green Mussels (Perna viridis) and Seafood Consumers Living nearby the Industrial Area in Chonburi Province, Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumnoi, Y.; Phaopeng, N. [Office of Atoms for Peace - OAP (Thailand)

    2014-07-01

    Marine environmental samples including seawater (filtered and unfiltered), suspended particles, and green mussels (Perna viridis) were collected from Sriracha and Angsira areas located in Chonburi province in order to determine Po-210 radioactivity. The former was chosen because it is generally believed that this area has been contaminated by one of the largest industrial estates in Thailand and others human-activities (non-nuclear activities) nearby such as oil refineries and Coal Power Plants. Discharges, ashes, and wastes released from these activities may result in an increase of Po-210 concentration in marine environment when compared to other areas. The later was designated to serve as a control site in this study since this area is unlikely to be impacted by industrial activities. Our results revealed that, in the filtered seawater, averaged values of Po-210 level were 0.26 + 0.14 mBq/L (Sriracha) and 0.56 + 0.42 mBq/L (Angsira) and, in the unfiltered seawater, means of Po-210 radioactivity were 2.37 + 0.32 mBq/L (Sriracha) and 4.20 + 2.78 mBq/L (Angsira). Furthermore, the suspended particles contained Po-210 concentrations with averaged values of 14.11 + 8.87 Bq/kg dw (Sriracha) and 102.21 + 51.49 Bq/kg dw (Angsira) while averaged Po-210 levels of 35.74 + 17.53 Bq/kg dw (Sriracha) and 71.12 + 62.88 Bq/kg dw (Angsira) were found in the green mussels examined. The present finding indicates that there is no radiological impact caused by those human activities to the marine environment at Sriracha. Radiation dose assessment was also performed in both the green mussels and human who consume green mussels. The results show that the green mussels farmed at Sriracha and Angsira received averaged radiation dose rates from Po-210 at 0.0007 and 0.0015 mGy/d, respectively. In addition, our results reveal that populations living in Chonburi province and ingesting the green mussels from these 2 locations received radiation dose rates from Po-210 at the means of 44.25 and

  5. Meteorological, environmental remote sensing and neural network analysis of the epidemiology of malaria transmission in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kiang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In many malarious regions malaria transmission roughly coincides with rainy seasons, which provide for more abundant larval habitats. In addition to precipitation, other meteorological and environmental factors may also influence malaria transmission. These factors can be remotely sensed using earth observing environmental satellites and estimated with seasonal climate forecasts. The use of remote sensing usage as an early warning tool for malaria epidemics have been broadly studied in recent years, especially for Africa, where the majority of the world’s malaria occurs. Although the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS, which includes Thailand and the surrounding countries, is an epicenter of multidrug resistant falciparum malaria, the meteorological and environmental factors affecting malaria transmissions in the GMS have not been examined in detail. In this study, the parasitological data used consisted of the monthly malaria epidemiology data at the provincial level compiled by the Thai Ministry of Public Health. Precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and vegetation index obtained from both climate time series and satellite measurements were used as independent variables to model malaria. We used neural network methods, an artificial-intelligence technique, to model the dependency of malaria transmission on these variables. The average training accuracy of the neural network analysis for three provinces (Kanchanaburi, Mae Hong Son, and Tak which are among the provinces most endemic for malaria, is 72.8% and the average testing accuracy is 62.9% based on the 1994-1999 data. A more complex neural network architecture resulted in higher training accuracy but also lower testing accuracy. Taking into account of the uncertainty regarding reported malaria cases, we divided the malaria cases into bands (classes to compute training accuracy. Using the same neural network architecture on the 19 most endemic provinces for years 1994 to 2000, the

  6. External evaluation of the Ban Nam Paeng & Ban Nam Ki ComMod case study in Nan Province, Northern Thailand : Final Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paassen, van A.; Patamadit, I.

    2007-01-01

    Verslag van de evaluatie rondom het gebruik van Companion Modelling (ComMod) bij projecten in Ban Nam Paeng & Ban Nam Ki, in de provincie Nan, in het noorden van Thailand. Een van de doelen is om de lokale bevolking (meer) inspraak te geven bij besluitvorming rond bijvoorbeeld het oprichten van

  7. Hypovitaminosis D in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontrapa, Sukree; Soontrapa, Suppasin; Chailurkit, La-Or

    2009-09-01

    The hypovitaminosis D in the premenopausal women and the postmenopausal elderly women in Thailand was investigated. One hundred and six cases of the elderly women living in the urban area of Khon Kaen province, one hundred and thirty-two cases of the elderly women living in the rural area of Khon Kaen province, ninety-eight cases of the postmenopausal women who attended Menopausal Clinic, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen province, and 357 premenopausal women from the multicenters in Thailand were the subjects. The serum level of 25(OH)D hypovitaminosis D. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in these selected groups of women was 65.4, 15.4, 60.2, and 77.8 percent respectively. The premenopausal female group had the highest prevalence of hypovitaminosis D and the lowest level of 25 (OH) D whereas the group of the postmenopausal elderly women in the rural area had the lowest prevalence of hypovitaminosis D and the highest 25 (OH) D level.

  8. Bioconcentration Factor (BCF and Depuration of Heavy Metals of Oysters (Saccostrea cucullata and Mussels (Perna viridis in the River Basins of Coastal Area of Chanthaburi Province, Gulf of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakkapan Potipat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the distribution of Pb, Cd, Cr, Fe, Cu and Zn in the whole tissues of oysters (Saccostrea cucullata and mussels (Perna viridis collected from the three river basins of the coastal area in Chanthaburi Province, Thailand. The heavy metal concentrations in oysters followed the order: Zn>Fe>Cu>Cd>Cr>Pb, whereas in the mussels it was: Fe>Zn>Cu>Cr>Cd>Pb. The concentrations of Cu and Zn in the oysters were higher than the permission standard, and the bioconcentration factor (BCF study revealed the ability of the oysters to accumulate the heavy metals. The results of depuration found that Cu and Zn levels in both oysters and mussels were below the permission standard after the end of the process. The time of depuration was related to the levels of Cu and Zn with the higher r values and the relationship of the depuration study obtained from the results of multiple regression analysis.

  9. Epidemiological Situation of Dengue in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sucharit, Supat

    1994-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever is one of the major infectious diseases in Thailand with trend to increase morbidity in its subperiodic fluctuations. All provinces were infected and more prone in Bangkok and other dense populated provinces in the North East. Recently Nakhon Sri Thammarat province in the South was the second rank in morbidity due to the internal migration of labour from the North East to the South working in coffee and oil palm plantation thus causing the South to be the highest epi...

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Orientia tsutsugamushi from Rodents Captured following a Scrub Typhus Outbreak at a Military Training Base, Bothong District, Chonburi Province, Central Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Recently, new 0. tsutsugamushi isolates have been described in Thailand,21 .22 Taiwan,t’ and Malaysia ,24 which implies diverse and antigenic distinct...analysis. The PCR products of expected amplicon size were purified using the High Pure PCRTemplate Preparation kit ( Roche , Indianapolis, IN). The...kDa immunodominant protein genes of Orientia tsutsugamushi strains in Malaysia . Microbio/lmmuno/49: 67-71. 25. Ohashi N, Koyama Y, Urakami H

  11. Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) Field Evaluation in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    Thailand. Nongyakaeo is in the Sra Kaeo Province of Thailand located approximately 260 km east of Bangkok , 40 km north of Aranyaprathet, and 35 km...but rather for its proximity to actual minefields. The western half of the test area appeared to be clay or clay loam1 with a short layer of weed

  12. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. (I): Implementation of electronic-based malaria information system for early case detection and individual case management in provinces along the Thai-Cambodian border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamsiriwatchara, Amnat; Sudathip, Prayuth; Sawang, Surasak; Vijakadge, Saowanit; Potithavoranan, Thanapon; Sangvichean, Aumnuyphan; Satimai, Wichai; Delacollette, Charles; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2012-07-29

    The Bureau of Vector-borne Diseases, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has implemented an electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS) as part of a strategy to contain artemisinin resistance. The attempt corresponds to the WHO initiative, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to contain anti-malarial drug resistance in Southeast Asia. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the eMIS' functionality and outputs after implementation for use in the Thailand artemisinin-resistance containment project. The eMIS had been functioning since 2009 in seven Thai-Cambodian border provinces. The eMIS has covered 61 malaria posts/clinics, 27 Vector-borne Disease Units covering 12,508 hamlets at risk of malaria infections. The eMIS was designed as an evidence-based and near real-time system to capture data for early case detection, intensive case investigation, monitoring drug compliance and on/off-site tracking of malarial patients, as well as collecting data indicating potential drug resistance among patients. Data captured by the eMIS in 2008-2011 were extracted and presented. The core functionalities of the eMIS have been utilized by malaria staff at all levels, from local operational units to ministerial management. The eMIS case detection module suggested decreasing trends during 2009-2011; the number of malaria cases detected in the project areas over the years studied were 3818, 2695, and 2566, with sero-positive rates of 1.24, 0.98, and 1.16%, respectively. The eMIS case investigation module revealed different trends in weekly Plasmodium falciparum case numbers, when classified by responsible operational unit, local and migrant status, and case-detection type. It was shown that most Thai patients were infected within their own residential district, while migrants were infected either at their working village or from across the border. The data mapped in the system suggested that P. falciparum-infected cases and potential drug-resistant cases were

  13. A study on health problems, etiology, morbidity rate and mortality rate of goats under village environments in 3 provinces of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choldumrongkul, S.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The causes and influence of factors on, health problems, morbidity and mortality rate of Thai native and Anglo-Nubian crossbred goats raised by farmers in southern Thailand, were studied. Out of 620 goatsduring the period of study (January 2003 - January 2004, There were 464 sick cases and 65 goats died (10.48%. Major causes were helminthiasis, pneumonitis, mellioidosis, infections, weak-starvation complex,predator and accident. The morbidity rate of postweaning goats (3 months-1 year by helminthiasis especially in the light rainy season was higher than that for other causes and season. The mortality rate forpostweaning goats from pneumonitis in the heavy rainy season was greater than that from other causes. Genotype and birth weight of preweaning kids significantly (P0.05

  14. Co-infection with Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis taichui detected by human fecal examination in Chomtong district, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Phalee, Anawat; Noikong, Waraporn; Chuboon, Suksan; Nithikathkul, Choosak

    2012-03-01

    Diseases caused by the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini and the minute intestinal fluke, Haplorchis taichui, are clinically important, especially in the Northeast and North regions of Thailand. It is often difficult to distinguish between these trematode species using morphological methods due to the similarity of their eggs and larval stages both in mixed and co-infections. A sensitive, accurate, and specific detection method of these flukes is required for an effective epidemiological control program. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of O. viverrini and H. taichui infections in human feces by using formalin-ether sedimentation and high annealing temperature random amplified polymorphic DNA (HAT-RAPD) PCR methods. Fecal specimens of people living along the Mae Ping River, Chomtong district were examined seasonally for trematode eggs using a compound microscope. Positive cases were analyzed in HAT-RAPD, DNA profiles were compared with adult stages to determine the actual species infected, and specific DNA markers of each fluke were also screened. Our results showed that out of 316 specimens, 62 were positive for fluke eggs which were pre-identified as O. viverrini and H. taichui. In addition, co-infection among these two fluke species was observed from only two specimens. The prevalence of H. taichui infections peaked in the hot-dry (19.62%), gradually decreased in the rainy (18.18%), and cool-dry seasons (14.54%), respectively. O. viverrini was found only in the hot-dry season (6.54%). For molecular studies, 5 arbitrary primers (Operon Technologies, USA) were individually performed in HAT-RAPD-PCR for the generation of polymorphic DNA profiles. The DNA profiles in all 62 positives cases were the same as those of the adult stage which confirmed our identifications. This study demonstrates the mixed infection of O. viverrini and H. taichui and confirms the extended distribution of O. viverrini in Northern Thailand.

  15. Migrant workers’ occupation and healthcare-seeking preferences for TB-suspicious symptoms and other health problems: a survey among immigrant workers in Songkhla province, southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naing Tinzar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the unskilled and semi-skilled workforce in Thailand comprises migrant workers from neighbouring countries. While, in principle, healthcare facilities in the host country are open to those migrants registered with the Ministry of Labour, their actual healthcare-seeking preferences and practices, as well as those of unregistered migrants, are not well documented. This study aimed to describe the patterns of healthcare-seeking behaviours of immigrant workers in Thailand, emphasizing healthcare practices for TB-suspicious symptoms, and to identify the role of occupation and other factors influencing these behaviours. Methods A survey was conducted among 614 immigrant factory workers (FW, rubber tappers (RT and construction workers (CW, in which information was sought on socio-demography, history of illness and related healthcare-seeking behaviour. Mixed effects logistic regression modeling was employed in data analysis. Results Among all three occupations, self-medication was the most common way of dealing with illnesses, including the development of TB-suspicious symptoms, for which inappropriate drugs were used. Only for GI symptoms and obstetric problems did migrant workers commonly seek healthcare at modern healthcare facilities. For GI illness, FW preferred to attend the in-factory clinic and RT a private facility over government facilities owing to the quicker service and greater convenience. For RT, who were generally wealthier, the higher cost of private treatment was not a deterrent. CW preferentially chose a government healthcare facility for their GI problems. For obstetric problems, including delivery, government facilities were utilized by RT and CW, but most FW returned to their home country. After adjusting for confounding, having legal status in the country was associated with overall greater use of government facilities and being female and being married with use of both types of modern healthcare

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of low back pain among Thai and Myanmar migrant seafood processing factory workers in Samut Sakorn Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Shigeru; Arphorn, Sara; Muto, Takashi; Koetkhlai, Kanatid; Naing, Saw Sandy; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) and investigated risk factors for LBP among seafood processing factory workers in Thailand including migrant workers. The subjects were Thai and Myanmar workers in the typical seafood processing factory. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a self-administered questionnaire. Prevalence of LBP, general characteristics, life style, and working condition were investigated. The associations between LBP and risk factors were estimated by multiple logistic regression models. Of 254 workers, 165 completed the questionnaire. Half of these workers were Thai, the others were from Myanmar. The point prevalence of LBP was 28.5%. Risk factors for LBP were age over 40 yr, poor health status, history of back injury, twisting posture at work, and slipping on wet floors. The results suggest that health promotion should focus on working conditions rather than individual life style in order to prevent LBP. Furthermore, greater attention to other risk factors such as history of back injury and perception of health status after regular health check up, especially in older age groups may be needed.

  17. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Gastritis Increases Risk of Colorectal Polyps: a Hospital Based-Cross-Sectional Study in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are common in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. The present study aimed to determine any correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and colorectal polyps in the Thai population. A total of 303 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy with colonoscopy for investigation of chronic abdominal pain participated in this study from November 2014 to October 2015. A diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis was made if the bacteria were seen on histopathological examination and a rapid urease test was positive. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. Patient demographic data were analyzed for correlations. The prevalence of colorectal polyps was 77 (25.4%), lesions being found more frequently in Helicobacter pylori infected patients than non-infected subjects [38.4% vs. 12.5%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 2.26 (1.32 - 3.86), p gastritis were at high risk of having adenomas featuring dysplasia [OR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.16 - 7.99); P = 0.02]. There was no varaition in location of polyps, age group, sex and gastric lesions with respect to Helicobacter pylori status. This study showed that Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps, especially adenomas with dysplasia in the Thai population. Patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis may benefit from concurrent colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal polyps as a preventive and early treatment for colorectal cancer.

  18. Altered Immune Response of the Rice Frog Fejervarya limnocharis Living in Agricultural Area with Intensive Herbicide Utilization at Nan Province, Thailand

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    Khattapan Jantawongsri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides (atrazine, glyphosate and paraquat have been intensively used in Nan Province for a long time. Prior observations indicated that herbicide contamination and adverse health effects were found on the rice frog Fejervarya limnocharis living in paddy fields at Nan Province. Contamination of herbicides may influence disease emergence by acting directly or indirectly upon the immune system of amphibian or by causing disruptions in homeostasis, it is thus interesting to investigate potential effects of herbicide contamination in Nan Province on immune responses of the rice frog living in agricultural areas. Frogs were caught from a paddy field with no history of herbicide utilization (reference site and a paddy field with intensive herbicide utilization (contaminated site during 2010-2011. After dissection, frog livers were fixed in 10% neutral buffer formalin, processed by paraffin method and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Number of melanomacrophage and melanomacrophage center (MMC were counted under a light microscope and used as markers of non-specific immune response. It was found that there was no significant sex-related difference in these numbers. However, there were significant seasonal differences in these numbers in both reference and contaminated site frogs, suggesting that seasonal difference in herbicide usage tend to affect frog's immune system in agricultural areas. Furthermore, numbers of melanomacrophage and MMC in early wet, late wet and early dry periods were markedly higher in the contaminated site frogs compared to those of the reference site frogs. The observation on amphibian's immune response to environmental contaminants could indicate the impacts of herbicide utilization on other vertebrates, as well as its role in amphibian declines.

  19. Species Diversity and Abundance of Marine Crabs (Portunidae: Decapoda) from a Collapsible Crab Trap Fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunsook, Chutapa; Dumrongrojwatthana, Pongchai

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and abundance of marine crabs from a collapsible crab trap fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Gulf of Thailand, were observed from August 2012 to June 2013 using 10 sampling stations. The results showed that there were seven families, 11 genera and 17 species (two anomuran and 15 brachyuran crabs). The two anomuran species were Clibanarius virescens (1,710 individuals) and Clibanarius infraspinatus (558 individuals). For brachyuran crabs, Portunidae was the most common family, including 10 species. The dominant species of brachyuran crabs included Thalamita crenata (897 individuals), Portunus pelagicus (806 individuals), Charybdis affinis (344 individuals), Scylla sp. (201 individuals), and Charybdis anisodon (100 individuals). The abundance of crabs was affected by the habitat type. Anomuran crabs had the highest abundance in Halodule pinifolia seagrass beds, whilst brachyurans had the highest abundance in Enhalus acoroides seagrass beds. The dominant brachyuran species were found in pelagic areas near the bay mouth, such as P. pelagicus, P. sanguinolentus, C. feriatus, C. helleri, C. natator, C. affinis, and M. hardwickii. Lastly, reforested mangroves were important habitats for Scylla tranquebarica and C. anisodon. Seasonal and physical factors influenced the abundance of some crabs, for example, the abundance of C. virescens was correlated with temperature, and the abundance of T. crenata was correlated with transparency depth. Our results revealed that Kung Krabaen Bay serves as the home to many marine crab species; however, our results also revealed that 49% of the harvested crabs (2,308 out of 4,694 individuals) were simply discarded and subsequently died. Moreover, our research noted that eight non-target species will become target species in the near future. Therefore, research on the reproductive biology of some marine crabs and an improved understanding of the importance of marine crabs by local fishermen are necessary to prevent biodiversity

  20. Estimation of number and density, and random distribution testing of important plant species in Ban Pong Forest, Sansai District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand using T-Square sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phahol Sakkatat

    Full Text Available A study by T-square sampling method was conducted to investigate importantplant species in Ban Pong Forest, Sansai district, Chiang Mai province by estimation of theirnumber and density, and testing of their random distribution. The result showed that, therewere 14 kinds of important plant species, viz. Dipterocarpus tuberculatus Roxb., Shoreaobtuse Wall. exBlume, Bridelia retusa (L. A. Juss, Derris scandens Benth., Thysostachyssiamensis, Parinari anamense Hance, Vitex pinnata L.f., Canarium subulatum Guill.,Litsea glutinosa C.B.Roxb., Alphonsea glabrifolia Craib., Pueraria mirifica, Vaticastapfiana van Slooten, Walsura robusta Rox. and Dipterocarpus alatus Roxb. By far,Dipterocarpus tuberculatus Roxb was greatest in number and density, and all of the specieshad random distribution, except Walsura robusta Roxb and Dipterocarpus alatus Roxb

  1. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. (I: Implementation of electronic-based malaria information system for early case detection and individual case management in provinces along the Thai-Cambodian border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamsiriwatchara Amnat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bureau of Vector-borne Diseases, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has implemented an electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS as part of a strategy to contain artemisinin resistance. The attempt corresponds to the WHO initiative, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to contain anti-malarial drug resistance in Southeast Asia. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the eMIS’ functionality and outputs after implementation for use in the Thailand artemisinin-resistance containment project. Methods The eMIS had been functioning since 2009 in seven Thai-Cambodian border provinces. The eMIS has covered 61 malaria posts/clinics, 27 Vector-borne Disease Units covering 12,508 hamlets at risk of malaria infections. The eMIS was designed as an evidence-based and near real-time system to capture data for early case detection, intensive case investigation, monitoring drug compliance and on/off-site tracking of malarial patients, as well as collecting data indicating potential drug resistance among patients. Data captured by the eMIS in 2008–2011 were extracted and presented. Results The core functionalities of the eMIS have been utilized by malaria staff at all levels, from local operational units to ministerial management. The eMIS case detection module suggested decreasing trends during 2009–2011; the number of malaria cases detected in the project areas over the years studied were 3818, 2695, and 2566, with sero-positive rates of 1.24, 0.98, and 1.16%, respectively. The eMIS case investigation module revealed different trends in weekly Plasmodium falciparum case numbers, when classified by responsible operational unit, local and migrant status, and case-detection type. It was shown that most Thai patients were infected within their own residential district, while migrants were infected either at their working village or from across the border. The data mapped in the system suggested that P

  2. Prevalence of infection and molecular confirmation by using ITS-2 region of Fasciola gigantica found in domestic cattle from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anawat Phalee; Chalobol Wongsawad

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the infection ofFasciola gigantica(F. gigantica) in domestic cattle from ChiangMai province and molecular confirmation usingITS-2 region.Methods:The liver and gall bladder ofBubalus bubalis(B. bubalis) andBos taurus(B. taurus) from slaughterhouses were examined adult worms and prevalence investigation.The species confirmation with phylogenetic analysis usingITS-2 sequences was performed by maximum likelihood andUPGMA methods. Results:The total prevalences of infection inB. bubalis andBubalus taurus(B. taurus) were 67.27% and52.94% respectively.The respective prevalence in bothB. bubalis andB. taurus were acquired fromDoi-Saket,Muang, andSanpatong districts, with81.25%,62.50% and60.00% for B. bubalis and62.50%,50.00% and47.06% forBos taurus respectively.The species confirmation ofF. gigantica and some related species by basing on maximum likelihood andUPGMA methods used,4 groups of trematodes weregenerated, firstF. gigantica group including specimen ofChiang Mai, second2 samples of F. hepatica, third group of3 rumen flukes;Orthocoelium streptocoelium, F. elongatus andParamphistomum epliclitum and fourth group of3 minute intestinal flukes;Haplorchis taichui, Stellantchasmu falcatus,Haplorchoides sp. and liver fluke;Opisthorchis viverrini respectively.Conclusions:These results can be confirmed theGiant liver fluke which mainly caused fascioliasis inChiangMai was identified asF. gigantica and specimens were the same as those ofF. gigantica recorded in other different countries.Nucleotide sequence of ITS-2 region has been proven as effective diagnostic tool for the identification ofF. gigantica.

  3. Influence of environmental factors on abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary, Samut Sakhon province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritnim, Nittaya; Meksumpun, Charumas

    2011-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources was studied in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary located in Samut Sakhon province. The objectives were to analyze the status of abundance and temporal variation of the benthic fauna and to clarify the impacts from environmental factors (water and sediment quality). Field surveys were conducted monthly from August 2007 to March 2008 at 11 sampling stations in the estuary. Based on freshwater runoff volumes, the high-, medium-, and low-loading periods were categorized to be from August to October 2007, November to December 2007, and January to March 2008, respectively. The benthic fauna resources were composed of 57 species in eight phyla. Annelids were the dominant species (with the maximum density being 19,885 individuals/m2), followed by the mollusks. Both densities decreased during the low-loading period in 2008. Water quality deteriorated during the high-loading period. Land-based wastewater discharges decreased the levels of salinity and dissolved oxygen but dramatically increased various nutrients. Consequently, the sediment quality deteriorated during the medium-loading period. Bottom deposits during this time depicted high accumulation of acid volatile sulfides (more than 0.76 mg/g dry weight). Analyzing the environmental relationships, deposit feeders (for example, Nereis sp. and Prionospio sp.) and a clam (Arcuatula sp.) showed potential as bio-indicators for environmental monitoring. The overall results revealed the importance of changes in the water and sediment qualities that had an influence on related benthic resources. The increase in the level of NH4(+)-N had a negative impact on the economic clam species, while the sedimentary TOM showed positive correlation (P land-based runoff should be controlled for the protection of resources. Further effective sustainable management will be enhanced by giving serious consideration to an eco-based zoning

  4. Regional Rapid Growth in Cities and Urbanization in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Thanadorn Phuttharak

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the driving forces affecting regional rapid growth in Thailand, along with its impact, to understand the dynamics of urbanization and how it affects cities. The study selected UdonThani Province, Thailand, as a case study. This study collected data from academic and semi-academic documents, semi-structured interviews, participatory and non-participatory observations, and group discussion. The informants were residents within municipalities, government, and pri...

  5. CYPERACEAE OF THAILAND (EXCL. CAREX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JH Keen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an enumeration of 174 examined spacies and of 11 not examined ones, in 16 genera, collected in or recorded from Thailand. The treatment is largely in the same way as in the 'Florae Siamensis Enume-ratio'. Synonyms and references are given. All examined specimens are listed for each of the 7 provinces of Thailand indicated on a map, and their field notes are recorded. Distribution outside Thailand is given in some detail, and occasionally nomenclatural or other notes are added. In Lepironia 1 species is recognized, in Mupaniu 5, in Hypolyf/ntm 1, in Fuirena 2, in Lipocarpha 2, in H&miearpha 1, in Scirpus 10, in Elco-charis 8, in Fimbristylis 51, in Bulbostylis 3, in Cyperus 53, in Rltyncho-spora 7, in Triocostularia 1, in Schoemis 'I, in Gahnia 1, in Scleria 23. Novelties are Fimbristylis grudlenta var. psilopodu, Scleria biflora ssp. fervuginea, (Ohwi, and Scleria retieuiata (Holtt.. An index to collectors' numbers is given at the end.

  6. Genetic analysis of Thailand hantavirus in Bandicota indica trapped in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugot Jean-Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sixty one tissue samples from several rodent species trapped in five provinces of Thailand were examined for the presence of hantaviral markers by enzyme-immunoassay and immunoblotting. Four samples, all from the great bandicoot rat Bandicota indica, were confirmed positive for the hantaviral N-antigen. Two of them were trapped in Nakhon Pathom province, the other two in Nakhon Ratchasima province, approximately 250 km from the other trapping site. When analysed by RT-nested PCR, all four rodents were found positive for the hantaviral S- and M-segment nucleotide sequences. Genetic analysis revealed that the four newly described wild-type strains belong to Thailand hantavirus. On the phylogenetic trees they formed a well-supported cluster within the group of Murinae-associated hantaviruses and shared a recent common ancestor with Seoul virus.

  7. A new species oc Cladocroce Topsent, 1892 (Porifera, Haplosclerida) from the Gulf of Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putchakarn, Sumaitt; Weerdt, de Wallie H.; Soncheang, Pichai; Soest, van Rob W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new sponge species, Cladocroce burapha n. sp. (Chalinidae, Haplosclerida, Porifera), is described from Chonburi province, eastern coast of the Gulf of Thailand, Thailand. The new species can be separated from other Cladocroce species by a combination of characters, including growth form, form and

  8. Modelling spatial connectivity in epidemiological systems, dengue fever in Thailand on networks from radiation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollenwerk, Nico; Götz, Thomas; Mateus, Luis; Wijaya, Putra; Willems, David; Skwara, Urszula; Marguta, Ramona; Ghaffari, Peyman; Aguiar, Maíra

    2016-06-01

    We model the connectivity between Thai provinces in terms of human mobility via a radiation model in order to describe dengue fever spreading in Thailand, for which long term epidemiological data are available.

  9. Molecular variation in the Paragonimus heterotremus complex in Thailand and Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Nawa, Yukifumi; Blair, David; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is an important food-borne parasitic zoonosis caused by infection with lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. Of the 7 members of the genus known in Thailand until recently, only P. heterotremus has been confirmed as causing human disease. An 8th species, P. pseudoheterotremus, has recently been proposed from Thailand, and has been found in humans. Molecular data place this species as a sister species to P. heterotremus, and it is likely that P. pseudoheterotremus is not specifically distinct from P. heterotremus. In this study, we collected metacercariae of both nominal species (identification based on metacercarial morphology) from freshwater crabs from Phetchabun Province in northern Thailand, Saraburi Province in central Thailand, and Surat Thani Province in southern Thailand. In addition, we purchased freshwater crabs imported from Myanmar at Myawaddy Province, western Thailand, close to the Myanmar-Thailand border. The DNAs extracted from excysted metacercariae were PCR-amplified and sequenced for ITS2 and cox1 genes. The ITS2 sequences were nearly identical among all samples (99-100%). Phylogenies inferred from all available partial cox1 sequences contained several clusters. Sequences from Indian P. heterotremus formed a sister group to sequences from P. pseudoheterotremus-type metacercariae. Sequences of P. heterotremus from Thailand, Vietnam, and China formed a separate distinct clade. One metacercaria from Phitsanulok Province was distinct from all others. There is clearly considerable genetic variation in the P. heterotremus complex in Thailand and the form referred to as P. pseudoheterotremus is widely distributed in Thailand and the Thai-Myanmar border region.

  10. 'Reproductive revolution' succeeds in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismartono, Y

    1984-01-01

    Between 1964-81, fertility in Thailand declined about 40% and the country is well on its way to a target growth rate of 1.5% by 1986. Thais, like many agrlcultural peoples, have traditionally preferred large families, but lower infant mortality and longer life spans resulting form medical advances produced a rapidly growing population that threatened the country's economic and social well-being. Rising prosperity led the growth rate to increase form 1.9% in 1937-47 to 3.2%/year by the mid-1960s. The government in 1970 promulgated its national population policy which led to incorporation of the family planning program into the next 5-year plan. Contraceptive use among currently married women aged 15-44 quadrupled from 1970-81, with the number of users increasing from 225,000 to 1,126,000. The pill is utilized by about 60% of users, followed by female sterilization, injectables, and the IUD. Despite the rapid fertility decline, Thailand still faces serious demographic pressures, sch as rapidly growing labor force and a population doubling time of 35 years. Factors in the success of Thailand's family planning program have included the adherence of 95% of the population to Theravada Buddhism, which has no problem with the concept of limiting births to ensure an individual's well-being; the progressive position of women, who may act independently of their husbands in family planning; and the supportive government strategy, which has welcomed private efforts in family planning. Among private agencies which have contributed to the success of the family planning program is the Population and Community Development Association. The government's call for wide public participation activated a rare spirit of innovation. Thai surgeons developed the minilaparotomy operation and thailand was among the 1st countries to implement community based distribution of contraceptives. Thailand will need to recruit about 4.6 million new users and retain 4.1 million continuing users if the

  11. Population pressure and fertility in pre-transition Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandingham, M; Hirschman, C

    2001-11-01

    Before the demographic transition in Thailand, fertility was high, but not uniformly so. As in other pre-transition settings, Thai fertility responded to pressures and opportunities created by socioeconomic structure and land availability. Drawing upon provincial data from the 1947 and 1960 censuses of Thailand, we find a strong 'frontier effect' on Thai fertility in the 1950s. Fertility was higher in sparsely settled frontier provinces and lower in provinces with higher population density relative to cultivatable land. This finding is robust and holds up with controls for agricultural employment, land quality, and the sex ratio (an indicator of sex-selective migration). The effect of population pressure lowers the likelihood of marriage and of marital fertility. The findings from Thailand are consistent with the research of Easterlin on the nineteenth century United States and with other pre-transition societies. We suggest how demographic transition theory might be broadened to include fertility dynamics in pre-transition societies.

  12. Probability seismic hazard maps of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinda Sutiwanich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Seismic hazard maps of southern Thailand were obtained from the integration of crustal fault, areal and subductionsource models using probability seismic hazard analysis and the application of a logic tree approach. The hazard maps showthe mean peak ground and spectral accelerations at 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0 second periods with a 10%, 5%, 2% and 0.5% probabilityof exceedance in 50-year hazard levels. The highest hazard areas were revealed to be in the Muang, Phanom, and Viphavadidistricts of Surat Thani province, the Thap Put district of Phang Nga province, and the Plai Phraya district of Krabi province.The lowest hazard areas are in the southernmost part of Thailand e.g. Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat provinces. The maximumvalues of the mean peak ground acceleration for the 475–9,975 yr return period are 0.28-0.52 g and the maximum spectralaccelerations at 0.2 seconds for the same return period are 0.52-0.80 g. Similar hazard is also obtained for different returnperiods. Presented seismic hazard maps are useful as a guideline for the future design of buildings, bridges or dams, for rocksites to resist earthquake forces.

  13. Status of Agricultural Production and Crop Variety Improvement in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Chun-hai; GUO Ying; YAO Ming-hua; WAN Zheng-huang

    2012-01-01

    We introduced basic conditions of agricultural production in Thailand, and variety improvement of major crops, including rice, cassava, rubber, and vegetable, in the hope of providing reference for agricultural production and crop variety improvement in Hubei Province and even in the whole country.

  14. Potato production in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato production has increased dramatically in recent years in Thailand. Consumer demand for fresh and processed potatoes has driven this trend. Most potatoes are produced in northern Thailand in either double cropping highland zones or as a single winter crop following rice in lowland regions. Maj...

  15. EFFECTS OF THE DECEMBER 2004 TSUNAMI AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT IN SOUTHERN THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Chanchai Thanawood; Chao Yongchalermchai; Omthip Densrisereekul

    2006-01-01

    A quake-triggered tsunami lashed the Andaman coast of southern Thailand on December 26, 2004 at around 9.30 am local time. It was the first to strike the shorelines of southern Thailand in living memory. Coastal provinces along the Andaman coast suffered a total of 5,395 deaths – more than half of whom were foreign tourists, with another 2,822 reported missing. Of the 6 affected coastal provinces, Phang Nga was the worst-hit province with some 4,224 lives lost and 7,003 ha of land area devast...

  16. Cancer incidence in Thailand, 1995-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriplung, Hutcha; Sontipong, Sineenat; Martin, Nimit; Wiangnon, Surapon; Vootiprux, Visoot; Cheirsilpa, Arkom; Kanchanabat, Chol; Khuhaprema, Theeravud

    2005-01-01

    There are five population-based cancer registries in Thailand in different regions of the country. Four of them (Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Bangkok, and Songkhla) have been operating since 1988 and the other (Lampang) since the early 1990s. These registries have published regular 3-year cancer incidence reports since the first in 1993 for the period 1989-1991. The objective of this article is to summarize the figures of cancer incidence in Thailand during 1995-1997. The population of Thailand in 1996, at the middle of the period, was 27 million males and 27.5 million females. Information of cancer cases residing in the five provinces was collected and abstracted from different sources. Age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of cancer in males and females was calculated for each registry and that for the whole country was estimated using the five registries as representatives for the four geographical regions of Thailand. The estimated number of new cancer cases in 1996 for the whole country was 35,539 men and 38,476 women and the ASRs were 149.2 and 125.0 per 10(5) population in men and women respectively. Cancer incidences greatly differed from region to region. Lung cancer was the commonest in Chiang Mai and Lampang in the Northern region in both sexes. The incidence of liver cancer in Khon Kaen in the Northeastern region outnumbered all the others in both sexes; cholangiocarcinoma was the major type of liver cancer. In Bangkok, lung cancer was the most important cancer in males and breast cancer was in females. Though it was lung and cervix uteri cancer that ranked the first in men and women in Songkhla, the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer was exceptionally higher than in other registries. The geographical variability in cancer patterns in Thailand reflects exposure of the population to different risk factors unique to the different regions. In the study as a whole, there are some methodological weak points in estimating the ASRs and number of cancer cases for the

  17. A new species of Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906 (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae) from the Mae Chaem District, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K

    2014-04-02

    A new species of the fire-colored beetle genus Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906, is described from the Mae Chaem District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The new species, Pseudopyrochroa inthanonensis sp. nov., is superficially similar to Pseudopyrochroa basalis (Pic), Pseudopyrochroa cardoni (Fairmaire) and Pseudopyrochroa fainanensis (Pic) by virtue of body color, antennal form and prothoracic shape. It is the second species of the genus known from Thailand, the other being Pseudopyrochroa diversicornis (Blair).

  18. Taeniasis, cysticercosis and echinococcosis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, Jitra; Dekumyoy, Paron; Anantaphruti, Malinee T

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis is one of the major food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand. During the years 1957-1997, the prevalence was low in most parts of the country. Recent (2000-2005) country prevalence was lower than 1%. A high prevalence (5.9%) was found among 1450 villagers from 30 villages in the North, and among 1233 stool samples from 19 provinces in the Northeast (2.8%). Taenia saginata was the dominant species. Cysticercosis in Thailand is somewhat under-reported/recorded. During the period 1965-2005, diagnosis was based on techniques other than serodiagnosis, giving a total of cysticercosis cases of less than 500. However, an immunoblot technique using delipidized cyst antigen showed 314 positive cases out of 754 samples tested in 2000-2005. Reports of neurocysticercosis appeared more often than cutaneous cysticercosis. A total of 24 cases of echinococcosis, mostly hydatid cysts (only 2 cases of alveolar cysts), were recorded during 1936-2005. These records included 3 cases of foreigners seeking surgery in hospitals in Bangkok. Most Thai patients were migrant workers from the Middle East, and only a few cases were indigenous. The prevalence of cysticercosis and echinococcosis is increasing resulting from sensitive modern diagnostic tests. Taeniasis will persist in Thailand as the consumption of raw/half-cooked meat dishes is still a normal practice for Thai people.

  19. Ilyocryptus thailandensis sp. nov. (Cladocera: Anomopoda: Ilyocryptidae) from North Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexey A.; Sanoamuang, La-Orsri

    2004-05-01

    Previously only a single species of Ilyocryptus Sars, 1862 (Cladocera: Anomopoda: Ilyocryptidae) was reported from Thailand, I. spinifer Herrick, 1882. However, our examination of numerous samples from this country resulted in the discovery of four other species of Ilyocryptus. Ilyocryptus thailandensis sp. nov. is described from two adjacent water bodies in Uttaradit Province, North Thailand. It has at least two characters which distinguish it from any other species of the Ilyocryptus: (1) a row of lateral setae reaching medial anus, and continuing along preanal margin up to base of the postabdomen; (2) a large projection bearing the sensory setae, situated on the coxal region of antenna II. It appears to be a rare species, may be, endemic of the North Thailand.

  20. Tracking origins and spread of sulfadoxine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum dhps alleles in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Tauqeer; Vinayak, Sumiti; Congpuong, Kanungnit; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Satimai, Wichai; Slutsker, Laurence; Escalante, Ananias A; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum have been a major impediment for the control of malaria worldwide. Earlier studies have shown that similar to chloroquine (CQ) resistance, high levels of pyrimethamine resistance in P. falciparum originated independently 4 to 5 times globally, including one origin at the Thailand-Cambodia border. In this study we describe the origins and spread of sulfadoxine-resistance-conferring dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) alleles in Thailand. The dhps mutations and flanking microsatellite loci were genotyped for P. falciparum isolates collected from 11 Thai provinces along the Burma, Cambodia, and Malaysia borders. Results indicated that resistant dhps alleles were fixed in Thailand, predominantly being the SGEGA, AGEAA, and SGNGA triple mutants and the AGKAA double mutant (mutated codons are underlined). These alleles had different geographical distributions. The SGEGA alleles were found mostly at the Burma border, while the SGNGA alleles occurred mainly at the Cambodia border and nearby provinces. Microsatellite data suggested that there were two major genetic lineages of the triple mutants in Thailand, one common for SGEGA/SGNGA alleles and another one independent for AGEAA. Importantly, the newly reported SGNGA alleles possibly originated at the Thailand-Cambodia border. All parasites in the Yala province (Malaysia border) had AGKAA alleles with almost identical flanking microsatellites haplotypes. They were also identical at putatively neutral loci on chromosomes 2 and 3, suggesting a clonal nature of the parasite population in Yala. In summary, this study suggests multiple and independent origins of resistant dhps alleles in Thailand.

  1. Distribution of pathogenic Naegleria spp in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiewcharoen, S; Junnu, V

    2001-01-01

    Research concerning the distribution, isolation, viability, ultrastructure, morphology and immunogenicity of Naegleria fowleri has been increasing in Thailand during 1988-2000. The distribution of the organism was carried out from 1985 to 1987 in Si Sa Ket and Ubon Rachathani Provinces, after the first fatal case was reported in Si Sa Ket. Since then in a 1998 survey of N. fowleri in stagnant water around industrial areas was carried out in Pathum Thani, Samut Prakan and Lopburi provinces. The results showed that 10% of pathogenic Naegleria belonged to species fowleri as characterized by morphology and the occurrence of pathogenesis in mice after nasal inoculation. In the same year, Nacapunchai et al (1999) determined the prevalence of amebae in aquatic habitat of human environments in five parts of Thailand during the summer. Fourteen percent of free living Naegleria spp were found in both soil and water resources. Recent studies of the ultrastructure, factors affecting the viability and SDS-PAGE electrophoretic patterns of 3 Thai strains of pathogenic Naegleria spp indicated their similarities in morphological characteristics of pathogenic reference control, Naegleria fowleri CDC VO 3081. Additional study using a genetic approach to species criteria using allozyme electrophoresis had been conducted.

  2. To be, or not to be, referred: A qualitative study of women from Burma's access to legal abortion care in Thailand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grady Arnott; Eh Tho; Niru Guroong; Angel M Foster

    2017-01-01

    .... In 2014, a multi-national team launched a collaborative three-year initiative to expand a program that refers eligible women for safe and legal abortion care to government Thai hospitals in Tak province, Thailand...

  3. The relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kontogeorgopoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Short-term international voluntary service is frequently linked to development discourse in the literature on volunteer tourism and the marketing materials of organizations that offer short-term volunteer opportunities. This paper explores the relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand, and assesses the role played by development in the motivations and experiences of volunteers. Based on interviews with 55 volunteer tourists in the northern Thai province of Chiang Mai,...

  4. A new species of Camchaya (Asteraceae, Vernonieae from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhonthip Bunwong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Camchaya thailandica Bunwong, Chantar. & S.C.Keeley, sp. nov. from Phu Phrabat Historical Park, Udon Thani, Thailand is described as a new species. Plant of this new species are similar to C. gracilis (Gagnep. Bunwong & H.Rob. but differ inovate phyllaries without margin spines, 10-ribbed achenes, and broadly ovate leaves. This species is a rare endemic known only from the type collection and probably confined to open areas of sandstone hills in Udon Thani province.

  5. A new species of Camchaya (Asteraceae, Vernonieae) from Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhonthip Bunwong; Pranom Chantaranothai; Stirling Keeley

    2012-01-01

    Camchaya thailandica Bunwong, Chantar. & S.C.Keeley, sp. nov. from Phu Phrabat Historical Park, Udon Thani, Thailand is described as a new species. Plant of this new species are similar to C. gracilis (Gagnep.) Bunwong & H.Rob. but differ inovate phyllaries without margin spines, 10-ribbed achenes, and broadly ovate leaves. This species is a rare endemic known only from the type collection and probably confined to open areas of sandstone hills in Udon Thani province.

  6. English in...Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    This account of English in the formal education system in Thailand traces briefly its historical background and then looks at the teaching of English today. The country itself has quite a complex sociolinguistic context and in order to understand the teaching and learning of English, one must understand the basic tenets of the culture. From this…

  7. Sex tourism in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Many foreigners visit Thailand in search of sex. While long-distance tourism was long enjoyed by members of more privileged social classes, even the lower economical classes of Japan, Malaysia, Europe, America, and Australia can now afford to travel over long distances. This relatively new breed of tourist is more likely to be of lower socioeconomic and educational status and less likely to use condoms when having sex. An estimated 30,000 sex workers are active in Bangkok, of whom 7000/10,000 are females who work specifically in the tourism sector. 1/2-1/3 of the 600 commercial sex establishments in the city are visited by foreigners. Phuket, Pattaya, Koh Samui, and Chiangmai are also well-frequented by sex tourists. Overall, a large, diverse, inexpensive, and accessible commercial sex market exists in Thailand. One may meet sex workers quasi-ubiquitously and be assured to find someone capable of meeting one's sexual needs. With these attributes, Thailand strongly attracts tourists in search of sex. A certain degree of recklessness also prevails among those on vacation. Away from the peers and social mores of their native lands, tourists may engage in sexually activities without criticism. Likewise, Thai sex workers who cater to foreigners, especially females, enjoy more freedom and control in sexual relations than their peers who work among nationals. Neither single nor married women in Thailand are allowed much sexual freedom and are traditionally expected to be obliging docile, and submissive. The greater than normal personal latitude enjoyed by both sex worker and foreigner lead to more negotiation on condom use and overall lower use. As such, Thailand's commercial sex market with foreigners' involvement therein threatens to spread HIV to many other countries throughout the world.

  8. Benzodiazepines misuse: The study community level Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puangkot Sukdepat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Benzodiazepines (BZD misuse, abuse, and dependence are becoming a new problem in medicine, in Thailand, and the pharmacoepidemiology knowledge is insufficient. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population of the Ubon Rachathani province, in Thailand. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional household survey research was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009, with a target population age of 15 years and above. This took place in Ubon Ratchathani Province, in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A total sample size of 2280 were selected from three-stage stratified random sampling. BZD were identified with an accuracy of generic name, trade name, and drug characteristics. The DSM-IV questionnaire was used to define misuse, abuse, and dependence. The accuracy of dependence was interpreted with the help of the judgment of a psychiatric nurse. Statistical analysis: For the statistical analyses, prevalence was estimated with weight adjustment, variances estimated by the Teylor Series Linearization method, and interpreted with 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: There were 46,805 current users [3.9% (95% CI: 2.2-6.4], 26,404 misusers [2.2% (95% CI: 1.6-6.2], 7,203 abusers [0.6% (95% CI: 0.1 - 4.1], and 2,402 with dependence [0.2% (0.1-9.2]. When considering the group of current users in this study, 57.2% misusers, 16.6% abusers, and 5.9% with dependence were found, respectively. Conclusions: All prevalence of use was higher than previously reported, in Thailand, while more than half of the current users had a behavior of misuse. Surveillance of misuse should be undertaken in the current use. The medical professional should counsel the patient on the harm of misuse and limit the amount of medicine, with necessary dispensing.

  9. Taxonomic identity of two enigmatic aquatic snake populations (Squamata: Homalopsidae: Cerberus and Homalopsis) from southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Olivier S G; Sumontha, Montri

    2016-05-02

    In their revision of the homalopsid genus Homalopsis Kuhl & Van Hasselt, Murphy et al. (2012) resurrected H. semizonata Blyth, 1855 and noted that ''Frith (1977) reported on two Homalopsis from Phuket, Thailand with 40 and 42 dorsal scale rows, and 159 and 162 ventrals-scale counts within the range of H. semizonata which is found along the same coast, about 900 km to the north''. Murphy et al. (2012), however, did not list H. semizonata from Thailand, and on their species' distribution map they indicated an interrogation mark along the southern coast of Myanmar and the southwestern coast of peninsular Thailand. It should be noted that Murphy et al. (2012) misread Frith: while one of the two specimens reported by Frith was indeed from Phuket (''from the rocky edge of a stream torrent in good forest east of Thalang, central Phuket Island''), the other was from ''Klong Nakha, 80 kilometeres [sic] south of Ranong in lowland rain forest with some clearings and dwellings'', thus in Ranong Province, closer to the border with Myanmar. Nabhitabhata et al. (2004) recognized a single Homalopsis species in Thailand, H. buccata, which they listed for numerous provinces, including Phuket, based on Frith's (1977) record. Among the two Homalopsis species recognized to occur in Thailand by Nabhitabhata and Chan-ard (2005), H. buccata and H. nigroventralis, none was recorded by them from Phuket Province, but H. buccata was listed from, among others, the neighbouring provinces of Phang-Nga and Ranong. Chuaynkern & Chuaynkern (2012) recognized the same two species, and listed H. buccata from, among others, the provinces of Phang-Nga, Phuket and Ranong. Cox et al. (2012) listed three Homalopsis for Thailand (H. buccata, H. mereljcoxi and H. nigroventralis), and indicated that H. mereljcoxi is the species occurring, a.o., in Phang-Nga, Phuket and Ranong provinces. Wallach et al. (2014) noted that H. semizonata lives in southern Myanmar near sea level, but also that it ''possibly occurs

  10. Food safety in Thailand 1: it is safe to eat watermelon and durian in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Kanchanamayoon, Onnicha; Boonpangrak, Somchai; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2015-05-01

    The wide use of pesticides raises serious concerns regarding food safety and environmental impacts. There is increasing public concern about the potential health risks linked with exposure to pesticides. Regulation of maximum residue limits (MRL) of pesticide residues in food commodities has been established in many developed countries. For developing countries, like Thailand, this regulation often exists in law, but is not completely enforced in practice. Thus, pesticide residue levels in vegetables and fruits have not been thoroughly monitored. The present study aimed to examine potential health risks associated with pesticide exposure by determining the pesticide residues in two commonly consumed fruits, watermelon and durian. The fruit samples were purchased from markets in central provinces of Thailand and assayed for the content of 28 pesticides. Analysis of pesticides was performed by multiresidue extraction and followed by GC-MS/MS detection. Of 28 pesticides investigated, 5 were detected in 90.7% of the watermelon samples (n = 75) and 3 in 90% of durian samples (n = 30). Carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dimethoate and metalaxyl were found in watermelons, whereas dichlorvos, dimethoate and metalaxyl were detected in durians. However, their levels were much lower than the recommended MRL values. These pesticide levels detected in the fruits are unlikely to harm the consumers; therefore it is safe to eat watermelon and durian in Thailand. While our results found negligible risk associated with pesticide exposure from consuming these common tropical fruits, special precautions should be considered to decrease total exposure to these harmful pesticides from various foods.

  11. Child prostitution in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Child prostitution is an old, global and complex phenomenon, which deprives children of their childhood, human rights and dignity. Child prostitution can be seen as the commercial sexual exploitation of children involving an element of forced labour, and thus can be considered as a contemporary form of slavery. Globally, child prostitution is reported to be a common problem in Central and South America and Asia. Of all the south-east Asian nations, the problem is most prolific in Thailand. In Thailand, there appears to be a long history of child prostitution, and this article explores the factors that underpin the Thai child sex industry and the lessons and implications that can be drawn for health care and nursing around the world.

  12. Oligarchy in Thailand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern conception of oligarchy, which can be housed under an authoritarian regime as easily as it can under a liberal democratic one, can affect our understanding of the potential national political repercussions of extreme inequalities of wealth. This article has two goals: (1 to conceptually analyse the meaning of oligarchy; and (2 to make a descriptive case for its use in the Thai context. The test case of contemporary Thailand shows what exactly an oligarch or oligarchy means under a military regime and the potential effects for national politics of an oligarchy based on material wealth. Utilizing Jeffrey A. Winters’ Aristotelian-grounded conception of oligarchy for the contemporary world, this article argues that some political outcomes in Thailand are inexplicable without recourse to a modern variant of oligarchic theory and analysis.

  13. Astronomy education in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutawarakorn, Busaba; Soonthornthum, B.; Kirdkao, T.

    Thailand is one of the developing countries which pursues the goal to advance economy, technology as well as science. Education in Astronomy is considered as a supporting factor, since it is one of the basic sciences which can teach the young generation to understand and conserve their mother nature and at the same time helps to develop analytical thinking. The poster reports the present developments in astronomical education in Thailand which includes (1) current astronomy education in school and university; (2) educational activities outside school; (3) development of programs for teaching astronomy in school (including teacher training); (4) the access of educational resources via internet. Proposals for future development and collaborations will be presented and discussed.

  14. Some Boletes of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-chato, S.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to collect and identify some Boletes of Thailand. Through periodical excursions in woodland area in the north, northeast and south of Thailand, and regular visits to markets inthe areas during 1995-2005, 20 species of Boletes were collected and identified. These were Boletellus ananas (M.A.Curtis Murrill, Boletellus emodensis (Berk. Singer, Boletellus sp. 1, Boletellus sp. 2, Boletellus sp. 3,Boletinus sp., Boletus griseipurpureus Corner, Boletus bicolor Peck, Boletus nanus (Massee. Singer, Boletus sp. 1, Boletus sp. 2, Boletus sp. 3, Heimiella retispora (Pat. & C.F. Baker Boedijn, Phlebopus colossus (R.Heim Singer, Phylloporus pelletieri (Lev. Quel., Pulveroboletus ravenelii (Berk. & M.A.Curtis Murrill, Pulveroboletus sp., Strobilomyces confusus Singer, Strobilomyces floccopus (Vahl P. Karst., and Tylopilusalbo - ater (Schwein Murrill.

  15. Thailand's reproductive revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodel, J

    1987-01-01

    Thailand has achieved a remarkable population revolution in the past 15 years, resulting in a fertility decline of 44%, the 3rd greatest decline of the major developing countries. Thailand is quite distinct from either China or South Korea, the leaders in fertility decline. It has neither China's authoritarian power system to enforce population control nor the highly developed, Westernized outlook of South Korea. Instead it achieved its astounding fertility drop through a noncoercive family planning program operating within a context of rapid social change and a cultural setting. Thailand's drop in population growth has touched almost all segments of Thai society. The preferred number of children among couples married less than 5 years has dropped in both rural and urban families at almost exactly the same rate, from about 3.2 in 1969 to 2.3 in 1984. Religious groups represent the only substantial difference in family size preference; Moslem women married less than 5 years stated a desired average of 3.1 children versus 2.3 for Buddhist women. The direct case of the fertility drop is a national increase in contraceptive use. In 1984, 65% of Thai women reported using contraception. The Thai population, however, was ripe for using contraception when it became available due to 1) mass media creating a desire for consumer goods, 2) the increased costs of education to parents, 3) the willingness of parents to trade off "parent repayment" from many children for a few quality children, 4) couples' autonomy in fertility decision making, 5) the high status of women in Thailand, and 6) the fact that Buddhism poses no barriers to contraception. Current trends show no immediate sign of change.

  16. Village power in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the electric power system in Thailand. 99% of the country is electrified, but much of this is with diesel generators which leaves high costs but a high level of service. The paper discusses renewable energy projects which have been sited in the country, and examples of hybrid systems which have been retrofit into existing diesel generator systems. Photovoltaic and hydroelectric power projects are described. Dedicated systems have been installed for water pumping and battery charging applications.

  17. [AIDS research and prevention strategies in Thailand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisch, H

    1997-04-01

    The first case of AIDS was registered in Thailand in 1984; this syndrome was deemed to be mainly a disease affecting homosexuals and foreigners. However, soon thereafter its incidence among prostitutes and intravenous drug users increased. According to 1995 data, the number of AIDS patients was about 20,000 and there were approximately 800,000 HIV-positive people. A 1991 map of the AIDS incidence showed that, after the Bangkok metropolitan area, the province of Chiang Mai in the north exhibited a particularly high rate of infection. According to a medium-range forecast, by the year 2010 there will be close to 2.3 million cumulative HIV infection cases and 1.2 million AIDS cases in Thailand. This corresponds to an infection rate of about 3.2% vs. the present 2%. It is estimated that about 20% of all mortality in the age range of 20-48 years in the year 2000 will be caused by AIDS. In 1995, the prime minister predicted that AIDS would cause a 20% drop of the GDP by 2000. The boom of the economy in the 1980s and the early 1990s led to migration to the cities, where prostitution and drug use are rampant, as well as to the emergence of sex tourism, mainly from Germany (40,000-60,000 Germans traveled to Thailand in 1990). The age-old tradition among married men of seeking out the services of prostitutes, lack of condom use (only 20% of men intend to use it, according to recent studies), and disregard for the AIDS problem among the populace are other factors contributing to the rapid spread of AIDS. UNAIDS has undertaken sex education and other information campaigns to counter the epidemic.

  18. The introduction of oil palm in Northeast Thailand: a new cash crop for smallholders?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somnuek, Siriluk; Slingerland, M.A.; Grünbühel, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Thai Government’s objective to increase energy security through biodiesel, oil palm was introduced to Northeast Thailand in 2005. Nong Khai Province was selected as a pilot project because of its suitable environmental conditions. This study assesses the acceptance of policy intervent

  19. A new species and three taxonomic changes in Piper (Piperaceae) from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwanphakdee, C.; Chantaranothai, P.

    2011-01-01

    A new species, Piper chiangdaoense from Doi Chiangdao Wildlife Sanctuary, Chiang Mai province, Thailand, is described and illustrated. Piper trichostigma is raised to specific status and an epitype is selected. Piper maculaphyllum and P. rubroglandulosum are reduced to the synonymy of P. argyrites a

  20. English-Teaching Problems in Thailand and Thai Teachers' Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noom-ura, Sripathum

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys problems with English language teaching and learning and the professional development (PD) needs of high-school teachers in three provinces of three Secondary Educational Service Areas in Thailand. Both closed-and open-ended questionnaires were employed. The data was analyzed by frequency distribution and percentage; the…

  1. A new species and three taxonomic changes in Piper (Piperaceae) from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwanphakdee, C.; Chantaranothai, P.

    2011-01-01

    A new species, Piper chiangdaoense from Doi Chiangdao Wildlife Sanctuary, Chiang Mai province, Thailand, is described and illustrated. Piper trichostigma is raised to specific status and an epitype is selected. Piper maculaphyllum and P. rubroglandulosum are reduced to the synonymy of P. argyrites

  2. Gymnodoris pattani, a new dorid nudibranch from Pattani Bay, Gulf of Thailand (Gastropoda, Nudibranchia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, C.

    1996-01-01

    Several specimens of a new dorid nudibranch have been found in Yaring River, Pattani Province in southern Thailand. The species clearly belongs to the genus Gymnodoris, and is described and named G. pattani. It can be distinguished from all other species described in the genus by its translucently g

  3. Two new species of the genus Sorolopha Lower (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) from northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patibhakyothin, Nathaphan; Pinkaew, Nantasak; Sukprakob, Nutchaya

    2015-04-23

    Two new species of Sorolopha Lower (i.e., S. suthepensis, n. sp., and S. undula, n. sp.) are described and illustrated from male specimens collected in agricultural areas and natural forest in Doi Suthep-Pui National Park, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

  4. Development of community based model of Tawanchai Center: sufficiency economy principles for community Development an applicability at Bankhambong Community, Sa-ard Sub-district, Nampong District, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrmaneetaweetong, Unchana; Choopen, Hhakuan; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2012-11-01

    The objectives of the present study are 1) to study the application of sufficiency economy philosophy in community development as a model for future application of community health care program of Tawanchai Center, 2) study the administrative model for self sufficiency economy community in Bankhambong Community, Sa-ard Sub-district, Nampong District, Khon Kaen Province. The integrated study model included qualitative research by collecting data from documents, textbook, article, report, theory concept, researches and interviewing of relevant persons and the quantitative research by collecting data from questionnaires. The findings of study included objectives for development model of sufficiency economy for understanding of people, and use the philosophy of sufficiency economy model which compose of decrease expenditure, increase income activities, saving activities, learning activities and preservation of environment and sustainable natural resources activities. Decrease in expenditure activities included household gardening, and no allurements leading to ruin. Increase in income activities included supplement occupation and appropriate use of technology. Saving activities included creating saving group in household and community level. Learning activities included community use of local wisdom, and household learnt philosophy of sufficiency economy in daily living. Preservation of environment and sustainable natural resources activities included the use of sustainable raw materials in occupation. The generosity of one another activities included helping each other and solving problems for the poor and disable persons. The community development at in Bankhambong Community, Sa-ard Sub-district, Nampong District, Khon Kaen Province followed all of the above scope and guidelines and is the model for application of sufficiency community philosophy. We recommended method for successful implementation, including the starting from group process with capability of

  5. Food-borne parasitic zoonosis: Distribution of trichinosis in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natthawut Kaewpitoon; Soraya Jatesadapattaya Kaewpitoon; Prasit Pengsaa

    2008-01-01

    Trichinosis is among the most common food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand and many outbreaks are reported each year. This paper investigates the distribution of the disease in regions of north, northeast, central and south Thailand. Between the earliest recorded of outbreak of trichinosis in Mae Hong Son Province in 1962 and 2006, there have been 135 outbreaks involving 7340 patients and 97 deaths in Thailand. The highest number of cases, 557, was recorded in 1983. Most infected patients were in the 35-44 year age group, and the disease occurred more frequently in men than women during 1962-2003, with no significant sex difference during 2004-2006. Outbreaks were most common in the northern areas, especially in rural areas where raw and under-cooked pork and/or wild animals are eaten. Human infections occur annually in northern Thailand during communal feasts celebrating the Thai New Year. Trichinosis causes have been reported every year, supporting the need for planning education programs.

  6. Food-borne parasitic zoonosis: Distribution of trichinosis in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya Jatesadapattaya; Pengsaa, Prasit

    2008-01-01

    Trichinosis is among the most common food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand and many outbreaks are reported each year. This paper investigates the distribution of the disease in regions of north, north-east, central and south Thailand. Between the earliest recorded of outbreak of trichinosis in Mae Hong Son Province in 1962 and 2006, there have been 135 outbreaks involving 7340 patients and 97 deaths in Thailand. The highest number of cases, 557, was recorded in 1983. Most infected patients were in the 35-44 year age group, and the disease occurred more frequently in men than women during 1962-2003, with no significant sex difference during 2004-2006. Outbreaks were most common in the northern areas, especially in rural areas where raw and under-cooked pork and/or wild animals are eaten. Human infections occur annually in northern Thailand during communal feasts celebrating the Thai New Year. Trichinosis causes have been reported every year, supporting the need for planning education programs. PMID:18567073

  7. Toward integrated opisthorchiasis control in northeast Thailand: the Lawa project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mallory, Frank F; Smith, John F; Wilcox, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode is a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. Despite a long history of control programmes in Thailand and a nationwide reduction, O. viverrini infection prevalence remains high in the northeastern provinces. Therefore, a new strategy for controlling the liver fluke infection using the EcoHealth/One Health approach was introduced into the Lawa Lake area in Khon Kaen province where the liver fluke is endemic. A programme has been carried using anthelminthic treatment, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. As a result, the infection rate in the more than 10 villages surrounding the lake has declined to approximate one third of the average of 50% as estimated by a baseline survey. Strikingly, the Cyprinoid fish species in the lake, which are the intermediate host, now showed less than 1% prevalence compared to a maximum of 70% at baseline. This liver fluke control programme, named "Lawa model," is now recognised nationally and internationally, and being expanding to other parts of Thailand and neighbouring Mekong countries. Challenges to O. viverrini disease control, and lessons learned in developing an integrative control programme using a community-based, ecosystem approach, and scaling-up regionally based on Lawa as a model are described.

  8. Thailand : Investment Climate Assessment Update

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report provides an up-to-date assessment of the investment climate of Thailand. As the socio-economic framework in which enterprises operate including infrastructure, policies and regulations improving the investment climate is helpful for productivity and economic growth. The report is based mainly on the results of the second round of the Thailand Productivity and Investment Climate...

  9. Violence against women migrant workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyanukij, Charnchao

    2004-10-01

    A paper on "Violence against Women Migrant Workers in Thailand" will show the situation of women migrant workers in Thailand, why they have to come to Thailand, what kind of job they do, how they are abused and exploited by employer in many types of violence and how the Thai government manages to solve the problems and assist them. The term or definition of "violence against women-VAW" and "discrimination against women" is provided and based on the definition stated in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Readers will see that violence against women is a form of discrimination committed on a basis of sex. In other words, VAW is a clear violation of women's inherent human rights including the rights to life, liberty, and security of person, equality, equal protection under the law and freedom from all forms of discrimination. More than one hundred thousands of women illegal migrant workers work in Thailand. They come from countries in the Mekong Sub-region namely Myanmar Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam and China (Yunnan province). As they come illegally and have low level of education and working skills, they are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse or face violence. In general, they work in small factories, domestic work and restaurant. They are forced begging, forced prostitution or work in a slavery-like condition. Root causes of illegal migration and VAW are interrelated and occur in both sending and receiving countries of migrant workers. Poverty, demand and supply sides of labor, level of education, no knowledge of their own rights, impact of capitalism and gender issues, are mentioned as original factors of migration and VAW. The Thai government has national policy, plan, instrument and measures to cope with in- migration of illegal workers. Not only government agencies are active to solve the problems and assist the women migrant workers, but also non

  10. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi w

  11. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi

  12. The dinosaurs of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffetaut, Eric; Suteethorn, Varavudh

    After more than ten years of Thai-French research, the Thai dinosaur record, from the continental rocks of the Khorat Plateau, is, to date, the best in Southeast Asia. The oldest evidence consists of footprints of small dinosaurs from the Middle to Late Jurassic Phra Wihan Formation. The most varied dinosaur assemblage hitherto found in Thailand comes from the Late Jurassic Sao Khua Formation; it is dominated by sauropods, but also includes various theropods. Large theropod footprints are known from the Early Cretaceous Phu Phan Formation. Theropods and the primitive ceratopsian Psittacosaurus occur in the Aptian-Albian Khok Kruat Formation.

  13. Biogas Application Options within Milk Dairy Cooperatives in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybæk, Rikke; Sommart, Kritapon

    2016-01-01

    By means of a case study conducted within a milk dairy cooperative in Tambon Ban Kor, a district in Khon Kaen Province, this paper analyze opportunities for implementing a biogas development ‘hub’ in Thailand for achieving bio-economic and environmental benefits within a local rural community....... Options for collecting manure and other types of relevant biomass residues within the area are identified. Manure and biomass residues are thus suggested treated in a multi-purpose & centralized biogas plant - the first in Thailand - established in connection to the dairy company, owned by the dairy...... cooperative, etc. The biogas plant substitutes the use of fossil fuels, and surplus electricity can be exported to the power grid and provide extra income. Local crop farmers and ago-industries could benefit economically from sale of biomass residues to the energy plant. The environment will benefit from e...

  14. Fires in Thailand and Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Many fires (red pixels) were seen burning across Thailand and Southern Cambodia on January 8, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Almost the entire countries of Thailand (center) and Cambodia (lower right) were remarkably cloud-free in this true-color scene. Thailand is bordered by the countries of Myanmar to the west, Laos to the north and east, and Cambodia to the southeast. Thailand's capital city of Bangkok sits on its southern shore, where the Chao Phraya River flows into the large bay in the northern Gulf of Thailand. Moving eastward from Bangkok, one can see the Tonle Sap-Cambodia's largest inland body of water. Waters from the Tonle Sap flow southeastward and converge with the mighty Mekong River, just east of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital. The Mekong River defines much of the border between Thailand and Laos. The captal of Laos-Viangchan-is situated just across the Mekong from Thailand's northern border. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. The first rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saichin Isipradit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The majority of vision loss is preventable or treatable. Population surveys are crucial for planning, implementation, and monitoring policies and interventions to eliminate avoidable blindness and visual impairments. This is the first rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB study in Thailand. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of a population in Thailand age 50 years old or over aimed to assess the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairments. Using the Thailand National Census 2010 as the sampling frame, a stratified four-stage cluster sampling based on a probability proportional to size was conducted in 176 enumeration areas from 11 provinces. Participants received comprehensive eye examination by ophthalmologists. RESULTS: The age and sex adjusted prevalence of blindness (presenting visual acuity (VA <20/400, severe visual impairment (VA <20/200 but ≥20/400, and moderate visual impairment (VA <20/70 but ≥20/200 were 0.6% (95% CI: 0.5-0.8, 1.3% (95% CI: 1.0-1.6, 12.6% (95% CI: 10.8-14.5. There was no significant difference among the four regions of Thailand. Cataract was the main cause of vision loss accounted for 69.7% of blindness. Cataract surgical coverage in persons was 95.1% for cut off VA of 20/400. Refractive errors, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and corneal opacities were responsible for 6.0%, 5.1%, 4.0%, and 2.0% of blindness respectively. CONCLUSION: Thailand is on track to achieve the goal of VISION 2020. However, there is still much room for improvement. Policy refinements and innovative interventions are recommended to alleviate blindness and visual impairments especially regarding the backlog of blinding cataract, management of non-communicative, chronic, age-related eye diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, prevention of childhood blindness, and establishment of a robust eye health information system.

  16. Genetic diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus based on two hypervariable effector genes in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamrongjet Puttamuk

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB, also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' (Las being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1, 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2, and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions.

  17. Tourists' attitudes towards ban on smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyachaiyo, V; Lim, A

    2009-06-01

    Thailand is internationally renowned for its stringent tobacco control measures. In Thailand, a regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies was issued in late 2006, causing substantial apprehension within the hospitality industry. A survey of tourists' attitudes toward the ban was conducted. A cross-sectional survey of 5550 travellers staying in various hotels in Bangkok, Surat Thani, Phuket, Krabi and Songkhla provinces, October 2005 to December 2006. Travellers aged 15 years or older with a check-in duration of at least one day and willing to complete the questionnaire were requested by hotel staff to fill in the 5-minute questionnaire at check-in or later at their convenience. Secondhand cigarette smoke was recognised as harmful to health by 89.7% of respondents. 47.8% of travellers were aware of the Thai regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned restaurants. 80.9% of the respondents agreed with the ban, particularly female non-smokers. 38.6% of survey respondents indicated that they would be more likely to visit Thailand again because of the regulation, 53.4% that the regulation would not affect their decision and 7.9% that they would be less likely to visit Thailand again. Banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand is widely supported by tourists. Enforcement of the regulation is more likely to attract tourists than dissuade them from holidaying in Thailand.

  18. Tourists’ attitudes towards ban on smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyachaiyo, V; Lim, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thailand is internationally renowned for its stringent tobacco control measures. In Thailand, a regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies was issued in late 2006, causing substantial apprehension within the hospitality industry. A survey of tourists’ attitudes toward the ban was conducted. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 5550 travellers staying in various hotels in Bangkok, Surat Thani, Phuket, Krabi and Songkhla provinces, October 2005 to December 2006. Travellers aged 15 years or older with a check-in duration of at least one day and willing to complete the questionnaire were requested by hotel staff to fill in the 5-minute questionnaire at check-in or later at their convenience. Results: Secondhand cigarette smoke was recognised as harmful to health by 89.7% of respondents. 47.8% of travellers were aware of the Thai regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned restaurants. 80.9% of the respondents agreed with the ban, particularly female non-smokers. 38.6% of survey respondents indicated that they would be more likely to visit Thailand again because of the regulation, 53.4% that the regulation would not affect their decision and 7.9% that they would be less likely to visit Thailand again. Conclusion: Banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand is widely supported by tourists. Enforcement of the regulation is more likely to attract tourists than dissuade them from holidaying in Thailand. PMID:19364754

  19. Four colorful new species of dragon millipedes, genus Desmoxytes Chamberlin, 1923, from northern Thailand (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Paradoxosomatidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srisonchai, Ruttapon; Enghoff, Henrik; Likhitrakarn, Natdanai;

    2016-01-01

    Four new dragon millipede species of the genus Desmoxytes from northern Thailand are described and illustrated: D. des sp. n. from Chiang Mai Province, D. breviverpa sp. n. from Phrae Province, D. takensis sp. n. from Tak Province and D. pinnasquali sp. n. from Phitsanulok Province. The new speci...... on the metaterga, and the shape of the paraterga. The coloration of all new species is clearly aposematic: ranging from purple-pink to red. The new species are discussed in relation to their congeners, and a distribution map is provided....

  20. Balancing the Direct and Indirect Approaches: Implications for Ending the Violence in Southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    place daily. More than 2,500–3,000 years into its history, Thailand and the Indo-China region were influenced by Brahmanism ( Hinduism ) and Buddhism... Hinduism and Buddhism from India, beginning in the 7th century; then Islam was brought to the area and to other countries in Southeast Asia in the 13th...the 7th century, the three southern provinces of Thailand were called the “Lankasuka Empire” and influenced by Hinduism . People lived their lives by

  1. Rural Thailand: Change and Continuity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Rigg

    2017-01-01

    Part of the reason for the persistence of agriculture can be understood in terms of a shift from farming as a way of life to farming as a business and the emergence of Thailand as a significant player...

  2. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases...

  3. Reprieve for Thailand's AIDS campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, A

    1992-07-25

    A promilitary coalition began to govern Thailand in March 1992. It reduced the budget for the original proposed national AIDS awareness campaign from 30 million British pounds to almost 15 million British pounds. The Ministry of Health professed that the campaign had exaggerated the problem of AIDS in Thailand and had damaged tourism. Yet prodemocracy demonstrations in Bangkok in which troops killed many protesters restored the politicians who started the AIDS campaign to power in May 1992. There were to remain in power until new elections in September 1992. In July, the Minister of Health, Mechai Viravaidya, said he would step down if the government did not completely restore the 30 million British pounds for the AIDS campaign. It then increased the budget to almost that amount. Mr. Viravaidya initiated Thailand's open policy on the AIDS crisis and was known as Mr. Condom. He claimed that at the present HIV prevalence rate, Thailand may have between 2-4 million HIV infected people by 2000. If the country would take on anti-AIDS efforts now, however, they could cut the spread of HIV by 75%. As of mid-1992, about 400,000 people living in Thailand were HIV positive. The AIDS campaign planned to sue the mass media to inform people about AIDS especially those in universities and schools and high risk occupational groups. The increasing number of construction workers in Bangkok and existing sex workers were a high risk occupational group. At the 2nd national seminar of AIDS, the Minister of Health reproached tourists who come to Thailand for its sex industry. He said that Thailand does not need the 1 billion British pounds they bring to Thailand annually, and Thais do not want their homeland to be referred to as the sex capital.

  4. Diversity, knowledge and use of leafy vegetables in northern Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turreira Garcia, Nerea; Vilkamaa, Anna M.; Byg, Anja

    2017-01-01

    , Thailand. The leafy vegetables collected from fresh food markets included 55 species, six of them with a total of 13 cultivars, belonging to 32 families. Structured interviews were made with 49 vegetable sellers. Semi-structured interviews were made with three Thai medicine practitioners and 100 residents...... of Chiang Mai city. The residents participated in a knowledge test using photographs of six species widely used in dishes and six species specific to traditional homemade dishes. The diversity of leafy vegetables in urban areas of Chiang Mai Province has remained the same in the past decade. Leafy vegetable...

  5. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Grasses in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Jinaporn Wongwatanapaiboon; Kunn Kangvansaichol; Vorakan Burapatana; Ratanavalee Inochanon; Pakorn Winayanuwattikun; Tikamporn Yongvanich; Warawut Chulalaksananukul

    2012-01-01

    The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85–38.51, 31.13–42.61, and 3.10–5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification....

  6. AIDS in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M P

    1991-02-18

    The reasons for the rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand, and the impact of the unique non-governmental agency Population and Community Development Association (PDA) directed by the charismatic Dr. Mechai are described. The rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand is due to presence of all possible factors facilitating HIV transmission, a large population of injecting drug addicts, an extensive mobile domestic and tourist sex industry, and an active gay community. The number of HIV-positive persons rose from 179 in 1988 to 16,359 in 1989, and is now estimated at 100,000. 1% of the Thai population works in prostitution, and from 16% of the high-income to 72% of the low-income prostitutes are infected, with their infection rates rising 10% per month. 75% of Thai men use cheap prostitutes. While the government was ignoring the AIDS threat in the early '80s, Dr. Mechai, whose name translated as "condom," was organizing the grass-roots community-based condom distribution system PDA, said to be responsible for the fall in annual population growth from 3.4% in 1968 to 1.5% in 1990. His organization now distributes contraceptives to 16,000 villages by 12,000 volunteers. He uses booklets, cards, cassettes, slide shows, videos and appearances with condom-inflating contests and costumes to de-mystify condoms with humor. Now AIDS messages are heard in taxis, on military TV and radio, and in remote villages. Converting knowledge into practice is more difficult, requiring tactful convincing of brothel operators and finding some way to reach their clients, who exert economic control over young female prostitutes.

  7. SCCmec Type IX Element in Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcusaureusspa Type t337 (CC9) Isolated from Pigs and Pork in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Cavaco, Lina M; Sirichote, Pantip

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcusaureus (MRSA) have emerged among livestock in several countries. In this study, we describe the results of a screening performed in pigs and raw pork samples in Thailand. Ten pork samples and 15 nasal swabs from pigs were collected from 2 markets and 1 pig farm...... in the Samuth Songkhram province in Thailand. MRSA were isolated using selective isolation procedures and confirmed by mecA PCR. The MRSA were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, SCCmec typing, and MLST. Resistance and virulence markers...... and food products in Thailand have been observed but this is the first observation of MRSA CC9 associated with SCCmec IX in pork. This study indicates a likely widespread distribution of MRSA in pig and pork in Thailand and further investigation on the prevalence and importance of livestock associated MRSA...

  8. Prevalence of zoonotic Bartonella species among rodents and shrews in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangjai, Decha; Maruyama, Soichi; Boonmar, Sumalee; Kabeya, Hidenori; Sato, Shingo; Nimsuphan, Burin; Petkanchanapong, Wimol; Wootta, Wattanapong; Wangroongsarb, Piyada; Boonyareth, Maskiet; Preedakoon, Poom; Saisongkorh, Watcharee; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Bartonella species in 10 rodent and one shrew species in Thailand. From February 2008 to May 2010, a total of 375 small animals were captured in 9 provinces in Thailand. Bartonella strains were isolated from 57 rodents (54 from Rattus species and 3 from Bandicota indica) and one shrew (Suncus murinus) in 7 of the 9 provinces, and identified to the species level. Sequence analysis of the citrate synthase and RNA polymerase β subunit genes identified the 58 isolates from each Bartonella-positive animal as B. tribocorum in 27 (46.6%) animals, B. rattimassiliensis in 17 (29.3%) animals, B. elizabethae in 10 (17.2%) animals and B. queenslandensis in 4 (6.9%) animals. R. norvegicus, R. rattus, and Suncus murinus carried B. elizabethae, which causes endocarditis in humans. The prevalence of Bartonella bacteremic animals by province was 42.9% of the animals collected in Phang Nga, 26.8% in Chiang Rai, 20.4% in Sa Kaeo, 16.7% in Nakhon Si Thammarat, 12.0% in Surat Thani, 9.1% in Mae Hong Son and Loei Provinces. These results indicate that Bartonella organisms are widely distributed in small mammals in Thailand and some animal species may serve as important reservoirs of zoonotic Bartonella species in the country.

  9. An Assessment of Epidemiology Capacity in a One Health Team at the Provincial Level in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soawapak Hinjoy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi-sectoral core epidemiology capacity assessment was conducted in provinces that implemented One Health services in order to assess the efficacy of a One Health approach in Thailand. In order to conduct the assessment, four provinces were randomly selected as a study group from a total of 19 Thai provinces that are currently using a One Health approach. As a control group, four additional provinces that never implemented a One Health approach were also sampled. The provincial officers were interviewed on the epidemiologic capacity of their respective provinces. The average score of epidemiologic capacity in the provinces implementing the One Health approach was 66.45%, while the provinces that did not implement this approach earned a score of 54.61%. The epidemiologic capacity of surveillance systems in provinces that utilized the One Health approach earned higher scores in comparison to provinces that did not implement the approach (75.00% vs. 53.13%, p-value 0.13. Although none of the capacity evaluations showed significant differences between the two groups, we found evidence that provinces implementing the One Health approach gained higher scores in both surveillance and outbreak investigation capacities. This may be explained by more efficient capacity when using a One Health approach, specifically in preventing, protecting, and responding to threats in local communities.

  10. A Master Plan for Sustainable Tourism Development — Koh Lanta Yai, Krabi Province

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    On December 26, 2004, a massive undersea Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, measuring 9.3 on the Richter scale, jarred the waters of the Andaman Sea. Approximately 580 kilometers off the coast of Thailand, it caused a devastating tsunami wave 10 meters in height to strike the coast of 6 provinces of western Thailand, completely destroying 47 villages and severely impacting 360 other villages. In February 2005, in response to the severe economic and environmental damage caused by the tsunami...

  11. Species diversity of vascular plants in Si Phang-nga National Park, Phangnga Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeratiwong, C.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the vascular plants in Si Phang-nga National Park, Phangnga Province, was conducted from September 2002 to August 2003. Five hundred and forty three species of 287 genera and 111 families were collected. The most diverse family was Rubiaceae, 53 species. Four species of these collected plants are endemic to Thailand, Argostemma lobulatum, Aristolochia helix, Crinum thaianum and Mallotus hymenophyllus and three species, Hedyotis hedyotidea, Lipocarpha microcephala and Pterolobium intergum are newly recorded for southern Thailand.

  12. Risk factors for malaria infection among rubber tappers living in a malaria control program area in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanasin, Sarika; Satitvipawee, Pratana; Wongklang, Warunnee; Viwatwongkasem, Chukiat; Bhumiratana, Adisak; Soontornpipit, Pichitpong; Jareinpituk, Sutthi

    2012-11-01

    Rubber tappers work begins at midnight during the feeding time of Anopheles maculatus and An. minimus, two common malaria vectors in southern Thailand. We studied the association between rubber tapper behavior and malaria infections as reported to the Notified Disease Surveillance System during 2010 in Prachuab Khiri Khan Province, Thailand. In that province insecticide treated bednets are distributed free to the population and insecticide residual spraying is performed annually. A random sample of 394 rubber tapper households was interviewed from October 2010 to May 2011. Twenty-six households (6.6%) had at least one family member who contracted malaria during 2010. Poisson regression was used to identify potential characteristics associated with malaria. Multilevel Poisson regression was used to test for simultaneous effects of tapper behavior and household risk for malaria infection. The estimated incidence rate ratio (IRR) for contracting malaria among those owning a farming hut was 2.9 (95% CI 1.1-7.3, p Thailand may increase.

  13. Human leptospirosis trends: northeast Thailand, 2001-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thipmontree, Wilawan; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Tantibhedhyangkul, Wiwit; Suttinont, Chuanpit; Wongswat, Ekkarat; Silpasakorn, Saowaluk

    2014-08-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changing trend of leptospirosis over time in Thailand using two prospective hospital-based studies conducted amongst adult patients with acute undifferentiated fever (AUFI) admitted to Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand between July 2001 to December 2002 and between July 2011 to December 2012. During the first period, leptospirosis (98 patients, 40%) and scrub typhus (59 patients, 24.1%) were the two major causes of AUFI. In the second period, scrub typhus (137 patients, 28.3%) was found to be more common than leptospirosis (61 patients, 12.7%). Amongst patients with leptospirosis, the proportion of male patients and the median age were similar. Leptospira interrogans serogroup Autumnalis was the major infecting serogroup in both study periods. The case fatality rate of leptospirosis was significantly higher in 2011-2012 as compared with the case fatality rate in 2001-2002 (19.7% vs. 6.3%, p Thailand. However, the case fatality rate of severe leptospirosis has increased. Severe lung hemorrhage associated with leptospirosis remained the major cause of death.

  14. Human Leptospirosis Trends: Northeast Thailand, 2001–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilawan Thipmontree

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the changing trend of leptospirosis over time in Thailand using two prospective hospital-based studies conducted amongst adult patients with acute undifferentiated fever (AUFI admitted to Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand between July 2001 to December 2002 and between July 2011 to December 2012. During the first period, leptospirosis (98 patients, 40% and scrub typhus (59 patients, 24.1% were the two major causes of AUFI. In the second period, scrub typhus (137 patients, 28.3% was found to be more common than leptospirosis (61 patients, 12.7%. Amongst patients with leptospirosis, the proportion of male patients and the median age were similar. Leptospira interrogans serogroup Autumnalis was the major infecting serogroup in both study periods. The case fatality rate of leptospirosis was significantly higher in 2011–2012 as compared with the case fatality rate in 2001–2002 (19.7% vs. 6.3%, p < 0.001. In summary, we found that number of leptospirosis cases had decreased over time. This trend is similar to reportable data for leptospirosis complied from passive surveillance by the Ministry of Public Health, Thailand. However, the case fatality rate of severe leptospirosis has increased. Severe lung hemorrhage associated with leptospirosis remained the major cause of death.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF ENTOMOPATHOGENIC NEMATODES IN LOWER NORTHERN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitta, Apichat; Yimthin, Thatcha; Fukruksa, Chamaiporn; Wongpeera, Wichuda; Yotpanya, Waranan; Polseela, Raxsina; Thanwisai, Aunchalee

    2015-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are used successfully for biological control of subterranean larval pests leading to reduced environmental contamination if chemical control measures are employed. Their diversity and distribution in Thailand are unclear, so the present study sought to obtain a better understanding these EPN populations in the lower northern region of Thailand. We collected 930 soil samples from 186 sites of Kamphaeng Phet, Nakhon Sawan, Phetchabun, Phichit, Phitsanulok, Sukhothai, Tak, Uthai Thani, and Uttaradit Provinces, Thailand from December 2011 to November 2012. Galleria mellonella was used as host for isolating and propagating EPNs. Seventy soil samples (7.5%) yielded EPNs of two genera, Steinernema (3.0%) and Heterorhabditis (4.5%). The majority of the isolated EPNs were found in loam at 26°C-33°C and pH values of 5.0-7.0. Molecular identification from partial 28S rDNA sequences revealed S. websteri, isolated from soil samples from Nakhon Sawan and Uthai Thani. Phylogenetic analysis of these EPNs showed they are closely related to S. websteri JC1032. The identification that S. websteri was the predominant EPN should enable its application for biological control in the local prevailing soil conditions.

  16. Genetic diversity and multiple introductions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanawonguwech Roongroje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is prevalent in Thailand, causing a huge impact on the country's swine industry. Yet the diversity and origin of these Thai PRRSVs remained vague. In this context, we collected all the Thai PRRSV sequences described earlier and incorporated them into the global diversity. The results indicated that PRRSVs in Thailand were originated from multiple introductions involving both Type 1 and Type 2 PRRSVs. Many of the introductions were followed by extensive geographic expansion, causing regional co-circulation of diverse PRRSV variants in three major pig-producing provinces. Based on these results, we suggest (1 to avoid blind vaccination and to apply vaccines tailor-made for target diversity, (2 to monitor pig importation and transportation, and (3 to implement a better biosecurity to reduce horizontal transmissions as three potentially effective strategies of controlling PRRS in Thailand.

  17. Thailand discovers the wind power; Thailand entdeckt die Windkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombrowski, Katja

    2013-04-15

    In Thailand, the monsoon supplies a constant wind for months. This monsoon can be used for the power generation. The currently two wind farms in Thailand deliver contiguously an output of 207 megawatts. The utilization of wind energy is to be expanded to 1,200 megawatts up to the year 2021. Thailand's area (761 square kilometers) supplies good to excellent wind conditions for large wind power plants. Small wind power plants are suitable for the local power consumption and particularly useful in remote areas or on islands. In Southeast Asia, Vietnam has the greatest potential for the utilization of wind energy. The 3,444 km long coast of Vietnam, its mountains and the monsoon provide particularly good wind conditions. In Asia, the wind energy market is a great growth market. At this, the People's Republic of China is the world's number 1.

  18. Angiostrongylus infections in rats and snails in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipitgool, V; Sithithaworn, P; Pongmuttasaya, P; Hinz, E

    1997-01-01

    A survey of Angiostrongylus infections in rats and snails was carried out in the provinces of Ubon Ratchathani, Udon Thani. Kalasin, Chaiyaphum and Khon Kaen in northeast Thailand. Only two Rattus norvegicus (3.8%) and one Bandicota indica (1.4%) out of 151 R. rattus, 52 R. norvegicus and 69 B. indica examined were infected with adult lung worms. All worms recovered were A. cantonensis. Prevalence of infection in 423 Pila polita was 0.9% while all of 77 P. ampullacea were negative for larvae. In contrast to this 36.4% of 500 Achatina fulica harbored L3 of Angiostrongylus (with variations of between 29% and 46% in the five provinces). The average infection intensity in A. fulica was 13.6 L3 (1 to 441). Experimental infection of Wistar rats with L3 (isolated from A. fulica resulted in a recovery rate of 48.3% of adult worms of which 91.7% and 8.3% were identified as A. cantonensis and A. malaysiensis, respectively. This is the first proven finding of A. malaysiensis in northeast Thailand.

  19. Hepatitis viruses and risk of cholangiocarcinoma in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Honjo, Satoshi; Kittiwatanachot, Pacharin; Jedpiyawongse, Adisorn; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Miwa, Masanao

    2010-01-01

    Liver cancer is the most common cancer in males in Thailand and the third in females. A high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is estimated in the northeast of Thailand. Chronic infection with Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) is the major risk factor for development of CCA. It has been demonstrated that HCV infection is a risk factor for CCA in non - endemic area of OV infection. We examined the association of HBV and HCV and risk of CCA in the northeast Thailand. All cases of CCA were recruited between 1999 and 2001 from Nakhon Phanom provincial hospital and all community hospitals in the province. One control per case was selected, matched by sex, age (∓5 years) and residence. 106 case-control pairs were obtained. Anti-OV, HBsAg, and Anti HCV were determined by ELISA. Among 103 age-sex-place of residence matched case-control pairs, there were 7, 0, 0, 96 pairs for anti-HCV (+) case vs. (-) control, (+) case vs. (+) control, (-) case vs. (+) control and (-) case vs. (-) control combinations (OR=7/0). Among 106 matched pairs, there were 9, 2, 4, 91 pairs for the similar four combinations of HBsAg (OR=2.25 (95%CI: 0.63-10.0). If the subject had anti-HCV and/or HBsAg, the OR for CCA was 4.00 (95%CI: 1.29-16.4). Even after adjustment for anti-OV, risk for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV positive was still marginally increased with an OR of 4.69 although not reaching statistical significance (95%CI: 0.98-22.5). Hepatitis B and C virus infection may also play role in the development of CCA in northeast Thailand.

  20. Modeling the Geographic Consequence and Pattern of Dengue Fever Transmission in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekoe, Collins; Pansombut, Tatdow; Riyapan, Pakwan; Kakchapati, Sampurna; Phon-On, Aniruth

    2017-05-04

    Dengue fever is one of the infectious diseases that is still a public health problem in Thailand. This study considers in detail, the geographic consequence, seasonal and pattern of dengue fever transmission among the 76 provinces of Thailand from 2003 to 2015. A cross-sectional study. The data for the study was from the Department of Disease Control under the Bureau of Epidemiology, Thailand. The quarterly effects and location on the transmission of dengue was modeled using an alternative additive log-linear model. The model fitted well as illustrated by the residual plots and the  Again, the model showed that dengue fever is high in the second quarter of every year from May to August. There was an evidence of an increase in the trend of dengue annually from 2003 to 2015. There was a difference in the distribution of dengue fever within and between provinces. The areas of high risks were the central and southern regions of Thailand. The log-linear model provided a simple medium of modeling dengue fever transmission. The results are very important in the geographic distribution of dengue fever patterns.

  1. PHYLOGENY OF ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS IN THAILAND BASED ON CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE SUBUNIT I GENE SEQUENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apichat, Vitta; Narongrit, Srisongcram; Jittranuch, Thiproaj; Anucha, Wongma; Wilaiwan, Polsut; Chamaiporn, Fukruksa; Thatcha, Yimthin; Bandid, Mangkit; Aunchalee, Thanwisai; Paron, Dekumyoy

    2016-05-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an emerging infectious agent causing eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis in humans with clinical manifestation of severe headache. Molecular genetic studies on classification and phylogeny of A. cantonensis in Thailand are limited. This study surveyed A. cantonensis larvae prevalence in natural intermediate hosts across Thailand and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. A total of 14,032 freshwater and land snails were collected from 19 provinces of Thailand. None of Filopaludina sp, Pomacea sp, and Cyclophorus sp were infected with Angiostrongylus larvae, whereas Achatina fulica, Cryptozona siamensis, and Megaustenia siamensis collected from Kalasin, Kamphaeng Phet, Phetchabun, Phitsanulok, and Tak Provinces were infected, with C. siamensis being the common intermediate host. Based on morphology, larvae isolated from 11 samples of these naturally infected snails preliminarily were identified as A. cantonensis. Comparison of partial nucleotide sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene revealed that four sequences are identical to A. cantonensis haplotype ac4 from Bangkok and the other seven to that of A. cantonensis isolate AC Thai, indicating two independent lineages of A. cantonensis in Thailand.

  2. Knowledge in Goats in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winai PRALOMKARN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The goat population in Thailand is relatively small. However the past 10 years, has seen a marked increase due to an increased demand for goat meat and milk. In the past, the numbers of research publications concerning goats in Thailand were small, especially dairy goats compared with those in other economical livestock such as swine, cattle and poultry. However, the numbers have gradually increased owning to the promotion of goat production by the government. Major research areas have been focused on breeding and genetic improvement, feed and feeding, management, health, diseases and socio-economics. This paper presents background and facilities on goat research in Thailand such as knowledge in terms of breeds and genetic improvement (genetic resources, breed evaluation and breeding and molecular genetics, nutrition, management, diseases and parasites, goat’s milk and meat processing. Conclusions and recommendations are also provided.

  3. Managing School Safety in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachernwaat Srichai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Child injuries are replacing infectious disease as the leading cause of mortality in developing countries. As school is one of the environments where children spend significant time during their formative years, school safety should be effectively managed, promoted, and prioritized. In Thailand however, school safety is considered to be of low priority compared with other educational issues, lacking effective policy, and with schools struggling to justify safety costs. This article proposes a novel application of lean thinking to control the cost, bureaucracy, and waste associated with managing and administering a safe school. Through a case study in northern Thailand, one primary school’s current safety scenario is reviewed with regard to people, finance, and operations, before applying a lean framework to improve the handling of safety suggestions. Results show significant capacity to improve the management of school safety, along with management implications and potential to expand the framework beyond Thailand.

  4. Isu Perkawinan Minoritas di Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Triyono

    2016-06-01

    Masyarakat dalam sebuah negara biasanya terbagi dalam dua kelompok besar, kelompok mayoritas dan kelompok minoritas. Kelompok mayoritas biasanya memegang kendali dalam setiap kebijakan yang akan dilaksanakan dalam lingkungan masyarakat tersebut, sementara kelompok minoritas terkadang dapat ikut berperan di dalamnya dan terkadang juga tidak mendapatkan peran apapun dalam melaksanakan sebuah kebijakan di lingkungan tersebut. Negara Thailand merupakan memiliki keunikan tersendiri, karena selain tetap memegang kebijakan dalam melaksanakan perkawinan adat ketimuran yang kental dengan nilai-nilai budaya Thailand, negara gajah putih ini juga memberikan ruang kepada perkawinan kelompok minoritas yang ada di negara itu. Perkawinan minoritas yang terjadi di negara ini antara lain adalah isu perkawinan sejenis yang dilakukan oleh kelompok minoritas LGBT dan isu perkawinan beda agama yang umumnya terjadi antara mereka yang beragama Islam dan Buddha di wilayah Thailand Selatan.

  5. Morphology and Molecular Phylogeny of Raillietina spp. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Davaineidae) from Domestic Chickens in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Rojanapaibul, Amnat; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Raillietina species are prevalent in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand. Their infection may cause disease and death, which affects the public health and economic situation in chicken farms. The identification of Raillietina has been based on morphology and molecular analysis. In this study, morphological observations using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) coupled with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (I...

  6. Notocotylus loeiensis n. sp. (Trematoda: Notocotylidae from Rattus losea (Rodentia: Muridae in Thailand

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    Chaisiri K.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notocotylus loeiensis n. sp. (Trematoda: Notocotylidae is described from the cecum of the lesser rice field rat (Rattus losea, from Loei Province in Thailand with a prevalence of 9.1% (eight of 88 rats infected. The new species differs from previously described Notocotylus species mainly by the extreme prebifurcal position of the genital pore and the number of ventral papillae. This is the first description at the species level of Notocotylus from mammals in Southeast Asia.

  7. Characteristics of operations at fish-landing sites managed by private owners in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Mika; Okamoto, Junichiro; Yasuma, Hiroki; Kimura, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the results of a survey on the operation characteristics of landing sites managed by private owners in Thailand. The survey was conducted by interviewing private landing site owners, managers of fishery cooperatives, middlemen, and fishers. The results of interviews were summarized with respect to scale of business, fisheries, transaction, types of people associated with landing sites, location, and daily schedule. Landing sites were located along canals in coastal provinc...

  8. Southern Thailand Bryophytes III: A preliminary study on non-epiphyllous taxa in lowland areas

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    Tamás Pócs

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Examination of a collection of non-epiphyllous bryophytes from lowland areas of Phang Nga, Phuket and Surat Thani province yielded 38 liverwort and 29 moss species. Microlejeunea filicuspis (Steph. Heinrichs. et al., is new to Thailand and additional ten proved to be rarely recorded in this country, being hitherto known only from one other locality. Locality data and habitats are provided for each species and information on oil bodies is given for several species.

  9. Consuming iodine enriched eggs to solve the iodine deficiency endemic for remote areas in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Teeyapant Punthip; Srijantr Pongsant; Charoensiriwatana Wiyada; Wongvilairattana Jintana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence showed that the occurrence of iodine deficiency endemic areas has been found in every provinces of Thailand. Thus, a new pilot programme for elimination of iodine deficiency endemic areas at the community level was designed in 2008 by integrating the concept of Sufficient Economic life style with the iodine biofortification of nutrients for community consumption. Methods A model of community hen egg farm was selected at an iodine deficiency endemic area in North E...

  10. Renewable energy in Thailand; Renewable Energy in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morstadt, Till [Lorenz and Partners, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2016-01-15

    The following article should represent an overview of the situation of the energy sector in Thailand (I), in particular is referred to the recent Energy Plan 2036 (II.). The focus of this plan - and, accordingly, this paper - is on renewable energy. In addition to the general importance of renewable energy for Thailand the article should deal in detail with the various funding opportunities that the Thai government makes available to investors (III). In addition, under IV. the foreign Investors restrictions in force and possible exemptions thereof are discussed. Finally, it should, as far as possible, a view be given to future developments (V.). [German] Der nachfolgende Beitrag soll einen Ueberblick ueber die Situation des Energiesektors in Thailand darstellen (1.), wobei insbesondere Bezug genommen wird auf den kuerzlich veroeffentlichten Energieplan 2036 (II.). Der Fokus dieses Planes - und dementsprechend dieses Beitrages - liegt auf erneuerbaren Energien. Neben der allgemeinen Bedeutung erneuerbarer Energien fuer Thailand soll detailliert auf die einzelnen Foerdermoeglichkeiten eingegangen werden, die die thailaendische Regierung Investoren zur Verfuegung stellt (111.). Zudem werden unter IV. die fuer auslaendische Investoren geltenden Beschraenkungen und moegliche Befreiungen hiervon eroertert. Abschliessend soll, soweit moeglich, ein Ausblick auf zukuenftige.Entwicklungen gegeben werden (V.).

  11. Influence of agricultural activities, forest fires and agro-industries on air quality in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phairuang, Worradorn; Hata, Mitsuhiko; Furuuchi, Masami

    2017-02-01

    Annual and monthly-based emission inventories in northern, central and north-eastern provinces in Thailand, where agriculture and related agro-industries are very intensive, were estimated to evaluate the contribution of agricultural activity, including crop residue burning, forest fires and related agro-industries on air quality monitored in corresponding provinces. The monthly-based emission inventories of air pollutants, or, particulate matter (PM), NOx and SO2, for various agricultural crops were estimated based on information on the level of production of typical crops: rice, corn, sugarcane, cassava, soybeans and potatoes using emission factors and other parameters related to country-specific values taking into account crop type and the local residue burning period. The estimated monthly emission inventory was compared with air monitoring data obtained at monitoring stations operated by the Pollution Control Department, Thailand (PCD) for validating the estimated emission inventory. The agro-industry that has the greatest impact on the regions being evaluated, is the sugar processing industry, which uses sugarcane as a raw material and its residue as fuel for the boiler. The backward trajectory analysis of the air mass arriving at the PCD station was calculated to confirm this influence. For the provinces being evaluated which are located in the upper northern, lower northern and northeast in Thailand, agricultural activities and forest fires were shown to be closely correlated to the ambient PM concentration while their contribution to the production of gaseous pollutants is much less.

  12. Geographical Distribution and Status of Actias Moths in Thailand

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    Surachai CHOLDUMRONGKUL

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographical distribution and status of Actias moths was assessed at 46 forest stations throughout Thailand from January 2004 to December 2006. At each station, an eighteen watt black light was operated against a white sheet from 6:00 pm to 6:00 am daily. All Actias moths were observed and collected twice during the trapping period at 10:00 pm and 6:00 am. Distribution, abundance, seasonality and status were analyzed. Three out of the four Actias species previously encountered in Thailand were collected: A. maenas Doubleday, A. selene Hübner and A. rhodopneuma Röber. A. maenas was the most widespread species in the country with an average of 0.001037 individuals/spot sample and was found all year round. The highest abundance was in Narathiwat province, the northernmost border of the Sundaic region. A. selene was found at higher latitudes ranging from 20 °N at Doi Chiang Dao, Chiang Mai to 13 °N at Prachub Kirikhan province with an average of 0.003303 individuals/spot sample and were found all year round, with the highest abundance in July. By applying IUCN Categories & Criteria A. maenas and A. selene were designated as Vulnerable (VU and Near Threatened (NT species respectively. A. rhodopneuma moths were found only at Doi Phuka National Park, Nan province with 0.000263 individuals/spot sample from February to April and are therefore designated as a Critically Endangered (CR species. A. sinensis was not found during this study and is therefore assigned the status of extinct (EX.

  13. Soil-transmitted helminthiases and health behaviors among schoolchildren and community members in a west-central border area of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Waikagul, Jitra; Maipanich, Wanna; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Pubampen, Somchit

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of soil-transmitted helminthic infections and health behaviors related to infections in schoolchildren and villagers of a community (4 hamlets) was studied in Hauy Kayeng subdistrict, Thong Pha Phum district, in the north of Kanchanaburi Province. The intestinal helminth infection rate of the schoolchildren was 15.6%. Hookworm infection was the most prominent (9.8%), followed by Trichuris trichiura (6.2%), and Ascaris lumbricoides (2.2%). The community showed higher prevalence rates and was infected with more types of intestinal helminths than the schoolchildren. Thirty-five point two percent (35.2%) of the residents were infected with soil-transmitted helminths, 30.5% with hookworm, 3.4% with A. lumbricoides and 2.2% with T. trichiura. Almost all hookworm cases (94.3%) were light intensity infections, while only 1.3% were heavy infections. Moreover, the hookworm infection rate in the community was found to be much higher when a stool culture method was used (39.1%). With this technique, 2.3% Strongyloides stercoralis infections were detected in the community population. Examination of the health behavior of the study samples showed that approximately 75% always defecated in a toilet. Schoolchildren who always wore shoes comprised 67%, which was lower than the community, at 85%.

  14. Longitudinal in vitro surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to common anti-malarials in Thailand between 1994 and 2010

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    Parker Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has existed in Thailand for several decades. Furthermore, Thailand serves as a sentinel for drug-resistant malaria within the Greater Mekong sub-region. However, the drug resistance situation is highly dynamic, changing quickly over time. Here parasite in vitro drug sensitivity is reported for artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, chloroquine and quinine, across Thailand. Methods Blood was drawn from patients infected with P. falciparum in seven sentinel provinces along Thai international borders with Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, and Malaysia. In vitro parasite sensitivity was tested using the World Health Organization’s microtest (mark III (between 1994 and 2002 and the histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP2-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in 2010. Following World Health Organization protocol, at least 30 isolates were collected for each province and year represented in this study. Where possible, t-tests were used to test for significant differences. Results There appears to be little variation across study sites with regard to parasite sensitivity to chloroquine. Quinine resistance appears to have been rising prior to 1997, but has subsequently decreased. Mefloquine sensitivity appears high across the provinces, especially along the north-western border with Myanmar and the eastern border with Cambodia. Finally, the data suggest that parasite sensitivity to artemisinin and its derivatives is significantly higher in provinces along the north-western border with Myanmar. Conclusions Parasite sensitivity to anti-malarials in Thailand is highly variable over time and largely mirrors official drug use policy. The findings with regard to reduced sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives are supported by recent reports of reduced parasite clearance associated with artemisinin. This trend is alarming since artemisinin is considered the last defence against malaria. Continued

  15. Epidemiology of hand foot mouth disease in Northern Thailand in 2016: A prospective cohort study

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    Panupong Upala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between the meteorological data and the number of hand foot mouth disease (HFMD cases in 2016 in Northern Thailand, and to estimate the medical costs. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted. Data on numbers of HFMD cases were collected from 49 hospitals in three different provinces in Northern Thailand: 16 hospitals from Chiang Rai Province, 7 hospitals from Pha Yao Province, and 26 hospitals from Chiang Mai Province. A questionnaire had been developed and tested for validity and reliability before used. The specific form for collecting meteorological data was developed and used in the field. All information was recorded in the same data spread sheet before analysis. Chi-square and correlation tests were used for explaining the epidemiology of HFMD in the areas. An alpha error at 0.05 was used to determine the statistical significance level. Results: A total of 8 261 cases were analyzed in the study. 56.0% were males, 97.5% aged less than 6 years, 82.6% were out-patient department (OPD cases, 75.5% were reported in raining season, and 43.2% were from Chiang Mai Province. The number of HFMD cases had statistically significant correlations with temperature, air pressure, relative humidity, and rainfall amount. Averagely, 216 baht and 3 678 baht per case per visit had to be expended for medical cost in OPD and IPD cases, respectively. Most of the cases had been reported in the border areas: Thai-Myanmar, and Thai-Lao. Conclusions: Thailand health care system should provide a concrete schedule for taking care of HFMD patients during raining season, and should develop an effective preventive and control program for HFMD particularly among children less than 6 years.

  16. Molecular detection and identification of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in cattle in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shinuo; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Yu, Longzheng; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Yan; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yamagishi, Junya; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Inpankaew, Tawin; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan

    2012-09-01

    Although Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infections cause economic losses in the cattle industry in northern Thailand, there is inadequate information on Babesia isolates present in the area. Therefore, to determine the prevalence and genetic relationship between Babesia isolates, we screened 200 blood samples of cattle from Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang provinces of northern Thailand. A nested polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting B. bovis spherical body protein 2 (BboSBP2) and B. bigemina rhoptry-associated protein 1a (BbiRAP-1a) genes revealed a prevalence of 12 and 21 % for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively, while that of mixed infections was 6.5 % samples. The prevalences of B. bovis in Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang were 9.5, 3.7, and 25.5 %, respectively. For B. bigemina, the prevalences were 15.8, 12.9, and 39.2 % in Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang, respectively. Mixed infections with B. bovis and B. bigemina were 6.3 % in Chiang Rai, 1.9 % in Chiang Mai, and 13.7 % in Lumpang. The identical sequences of either BboSBP2 gene or BbiRAP-1a gene were shared among the Babesia isolates in the three provinces of northern Thailand. Further analysis using the internal transcribed spacer gene revealed at least four genotypes for B. bovis and five genotypes for B. bigemina in northern Thailand, while the sequences present great genetic diversities in the different isolates. Overall, we have demonstrated a high prevalence and polymorphism of Babesia parasites in northern Thailand calling for the need to design effective control programs for bovine babesiosis.

  17. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The spec......Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established...... crustacean, the remainder hide under shale, rocks and coral blocks, often in small intra- or interspecific family flocks. The behaviour was also noted for some of the species. It is presumed that galeommatid species go through a lengthy planktonic phase....

  18. Heptageniidae (Insecta, Ephemeroptera of Thailand

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    Boonsatien Boonsoong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nine genera and twenty-two species of heptageniid mayflies from Thailand are defined in this present work as well as one suggested further subgenus, Compsoneuria (Siamoneuria kovaci (species “incertae sedis” including some particular characters. Taxonomic remarks, diagnoses, line drawings of key characters, distribution, habitat and biological data, and a larval key to the genera and species are provided. The chorionic eggs of eight genera and eight species were observed and shown using a scanning electron microscope.

  19. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, significant corporate governance reforms have been introduced and are underway, including reforms in the structure and function of the board of directors of listed companies, the establishment of the Thai Institute of Directors Association and the Department of Special Investigation, the adoption by the Stock Exchange of Thailand (SET) of 15 principles of good corporate governance, and draft legislation to reinforce the rights of minority shareholders. In addition, the Securities ...

  20. Migrant and Refugee Patient Perspectives on Travel and Tuberculosis along the Thailand-Myanmar Border: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Tabitha; Nosten, Francois; Foster, Angel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Thailand-Myanmar border separates two very different health systems. The healthcare system in eastern Myanmar remains underdeveloped as a result of decades of instability. Comparatively, Tak province, Thailand has more healthcare resources. In this Thai border province government hospitals and non-governmental organizations provide tuberculosis (TB) treatment to migrants and refugees. Objectives Our overall study aimed to explore accessibility of TB treatment, TB surveillance and health system responsiveness specific to migrant and refugee populations in Tak province. In this paper, we focus on the perspectives of migrant and refugee TB patients with respect to travel and treatment in Tak province. Methods In 2014 we conducted focus group discussions with 61 TB, Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection, and multidrug-resistant TB patients in Tak province. We analyzed the data for content and themes and documented individual travel trajectories. Results and Discussion Migrants are travelling with active TB within the country and between Thailand and Myanmar. Migrants primarily travelled to obtain treatment but two participants reported travelling home to seek family care in Myanmar before returning to Thailand for treatment. Travel, while expensive and arduous, is an adaptive strategy that migrants use to access healthcare. Conclusions Migrant’s need for travel points to larger difficulties associated with healthcare access in the border region. Long distance travel with an infectious disease can be seen as an indicator that local healthcare is not available or affordable. These findings suggest that public health officials from both sides of the border should discuss the factors that contribute to travel with active TB and explore potential solutions to mitigate disease transmission in migrant populations. PMID:27509036

  1. Modifying homes for persons with physical disabilities in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongsiri, Sirinart; Ploylearmsang, Chanuttha; Hawsutisima, Katanyu; Riewpaiboon, Wachara; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2017-02-01

    Thailand passed the Persons with Disabilities Empowerment Act in 2007. The Act, which is in compliance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ensures that registered persons with disabilities are entitled to home environment modifications' benefits up to a maximum of 20 000 baht (670 United States dollars); however, the Act's enforcement is still weak in Thailand. In 2013, researchers developed a home modification programme, consisting of a multidisciplinary team of medical and nonmedical practitioners and volunteers, to modify homes for persons with disabilities. The programme recruited participants with physical disabilities and assessed their functioning difficulties. Participants' homes were modified to address identified functioning difficulties. The project was implemented in four provinces in collaboration with staff from 27 district hospitals located in north-eastern Thailand. After the home modifications, all 43 recruited participants reported reduced difficulties in all areas, except for participants with severe degrees of difficulties, such as those reporting being unable to walk and unable to get up from the floor. The participants' quality of life had also improved. The average EQ-5D-5L score, measuring quality of life, increased by 0.203 - from 0.346 at baseline to 0.549 after the modifications. Home modifications in low-resourced settings are technically and financially feasible and can lead to reducing functioning difficulties and improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities. Implementation requires government subsidies to finance home modifications and the availability of technical guidelines and training on home modifications for implementing agents.

  2. Recent paleoseismic investigations in Northern and Western Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Wood

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent paleoseismic investigations have identified a number of active faults in Northern and Western Thailand. Northern Thailand is an intraplate basin and range province, comprised of north-south-trending Cenozoic intermontane grabens and half grabens, bounded by north- to northwest-striking normal to normal-oblique faults and northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults. The basin-bounding normal faults are marked by steep, linear range fronts with triangular facets and wineglass canyons and have slip rates of 0.1 to 0.8 mm/yr. Based on limited data, the average vertical displacement-per-event is about 1.0 to 1.5 m. These faults are characterized by recurrence intervals of thousands to tens of thousands of years and are capable of generating earthquakes up to moment magnitude (M 7, and larger. The northeast-striking strike-slip faults are marked by shutter ridges, and deflected drainages. Slip rates are 3 mm/yr or less. Western Thailand is dissected by a number of northwest- and north-northwest-striking, right-lateral strike-slip faults related to the Sagaing Fault in Myanmar. Although showing much less activity than the faults in neighboring Myanmar, these faults display abundant evidence for late Quaternary movement, including shutter ridges, sag ponds, and laterally offset streams. The slip rate on these faults is estimated to be 0.5 to 2.0 mm/yr. These faults are considered capable of generating maximum earthquakes of up to M 71/2.

  3. Modifying homes for persons with physical disabilities in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploylearmsang, Chanuttha; Hawsutisima, Katanyu; Riewpaiboon, Wachara; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Problem Thailand passed the Persons with Disabilities Empowerment Act in 2007. The Act, which is in compliance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ensures that registered persons with disabilities are entitled to home environment modifications’ benefits up to a maximum of 20 000 baht (670 United States dollars); however, the Act’s enforcement is still weak in Thailand. Approach In 2013, researchers developed a home modification programme, consisting of a multidisciplinary team of medical and nonmedical practitioners and volunteers, to modify homes for persons with disabilities. The programme recruited participants with physical disabilities and assessed their functioning difficulties. Participants’ homes were modified to address identified functioning difficulties. Local setting The project was implemented in four provinces in collaboration with staff from 27 district hospitals located in north-eastern Thailand. Relevant changes After the home modifications, all 43 recruited participants reported reduced difficulties in all areas, except for participants with severe degrees of difficulties, such as those reporting being unable to walk and unable to get up from the floor. The participants’ quality of life had also improved. The average EQ-5D-5L score, measuring quality of life, increased by 0.203 – from 0.346 at baseline to 0.549 after the modifications. Lessons learnt Home modifications in low-resourced settings are technically and financially feasible and can lead to reducing functioning difficulties and improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities. Implementation requires government subsidies to finance home modifications and the availability of technical guidelines and training on home modifications for implementing agents. PMID:28250515

  4. Hematology of Wild Caught Hoplobatrachus rugulosus in Northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suthirote MEESAWAT; Noppadon KITANA; Jirarach KITANA

    2016-01-01

    The rice field frog Hoplobatrachus rugulosus is an important anuran species found in wetlands throughout Thailand. At present, the hematological parameters of wild populations are unknown. Therefore, hematological and morphological characteristics of peripheral blood cells of wild-caught H. rugulosus were examined. Thirty-three adult frogs (17 male and 16 female frogs) were collected from a natural population in Nan Province, northern Thailand during the wet season of 2014. Blood samples were analyzed by packed cell volume (PCV) and blood cell counts from hemocytometer and Giemsa-stained blood smears. The mean PCV of male frogs (30.70% ± 6.07%) was significantly higher than that of the female frogs (25.09% ± 4.85%). The mean number of lymphocytes and neutrophils also showed significant sex-related differences. Moreover, the morphometric analysis of blood cells revealed dimensions as follows:erythrocytes (17.96 ± 1.44 µm length × 11.50 ± 1.09 µm width), immature erythrocytes (14.91 ± 2.20 µm diameter), thrombocytes (13.93 ± 3.14 µm length × 7.05 ± 1.31 µm width), lymphocytes (11.01 ± 2.69 µm diameter), monocytes (12.04 ± 2.40 µm diameter), neutrophils (12.58 ± 2.08 µm diameter), basophils (13.60 ± 2.17 µm diameter) and eosinophils (12.33 ± 2.95 µm diameter). Overall, the hematological parameters obtained in this study could be regarded as the first report and a crucial baseline data of wild H. rugulosus in Thailand that can be used for monitoring the health status of this anuran.

  5. Detection and phylogenetic characterization of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in a captive wild boar in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Sariya, Ladawan; Prompiram, Phirom; Tantawet, Siriporn; Suraruangchai, Duangkhamol; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Sangkachai, Nareerat; Suksai, Parut; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was studied in different types of wild boar captive settings in Thailand, including a wildlife breeding research station, zoo, and commercial wild boar farm, which were located in different locations of Thailand. Fifty-one fecal samples were collected and screened for HEV RNA and then analyzed. One sample obtained from a wildlife breeding research station in Ratchaburi province was HEV positive. Phylogenetic characterization revealed that the virus was HEV genotype 3 and belongs to subgroup 3e, which is closely related to HEV recently isolated from domestic pigs and humans in the country. It was hypothesized that HEV is shared among wild boars, domestic pigs, and humans in Thailand.

  6. Nurse preparedness for the non-communicable disease escalation in Thailand: a cross-sectional survey of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Nicholas D; Rajataramya, Benjaporn; Tanomsingh, Saengchom; Ronis, David L; Potempa, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Chronic diseases are now the largest cause of mortality in Thailand, and form an increasingly large portion of the healthcare landscape. In the Thai health system, many patients with chronic conditions receive care and disease management services from nurses, yet specialized training in chronic diseases is not currently part of standard nursing degree programs. Given the evolving epidemiology of the Thailand population, we questioned whether practicing nurses remain confident in their knowledge and skills in chronic disease management. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-efficacy survey of nurses in eight randomly-selected provinces in Thailand, receiving 468 responses. Nurse self-efficacy was analyzed in prominent chronic disease types, including cancer, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, and pulmonary diseases. Factors, such as geographic location, education level, continuing education experience, and hospital size, were found to significantly affect nurse self-efficacy levels; nurses highly prioritized additional training in heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, followed by hypertension, cancer, and diabetes.

  7. Seroprevalence of Babesia infections of dairy cows in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Hiroshi; Zhou, Lijia; Kim, Chulmin; Inpankaew, Tawin; Sununta, Chainirun; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Xuan, Xuenan; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2010-06-24

    The present study was conducted to demonstrate the epidemiological distribution of bovine babesiosis in the northern regions of Thailand. A total of 700 serum samples of dairy cows in the northern provinces (Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, Lumpang, and Mae Hong Sorn) were tested for antibodies against Babesia bovis and B. bigemina. Species-specific enzyme-linked (rRAP-1/CTs) were performed. According to the results, 517 (73.8%) and 484 (69.1%) were positive for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively. In addition, 370 (52.9%) were positive for mixed infections by both ELISAs. On the other hand, all samples were also examined by the indirect fluorescent-antibody test (IFAT) with B. bovis- and B. bigemina-infected blood smears. According to the IFAT, 482 (68.8%) and 531 (75.8%) were positive for these infections, respectively. The overall concordances between the ELISA and IFAT techniques were 93.6% and 90.7% for B. bovis and B. bigemina infections, respectively. These results indicated that babesia infections are widespread in the northern parts of Thailand. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the epidemiology of Babesia infections using rRAP-1/CT-based ELISAs in these areas.

  8. Increasing incidence of human melioidosis in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Chaisuksant, Seksan; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Chaowagul, Wipada; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J

    2010-06-01

    Melioidosis is a serious community-acquired infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. A prospective cohort study identified 2,243 patients admitted to Sappasithiprasong Hospital in northeast Thailand with culture-confirmed melioidosis between 1997 and 2006. These data were used to calculate an average incidence rate for the province of 12.7 cases of melioidosis per 100,000 people per year. Incidence increased incrementally from 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.2-10.0) in 2000 to 21.3 (95% CI = 19.2-23.6) in 2006 (P /= 45 years, and either known or undiagnosed diabetes were independent risk factors for melioidosis. The average mortality rate from melioidosis over the study period was 42.6%. The minimum estimated population mortality rate from melioidosis in 2006 was 8.63 per 100,000 people (95% CI = 7.33-10.11), the third most common cause of death from infectious diseases in northeast Thailand after human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis.

  9. Quality aspects of raw goat milk in Lower Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwat Wasiksiri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the quality and safety of raw goat milk in Lower Southern Thailand duringAugust to September 2008. Milk samples were collected from five farms in Songkhla, Yala, and Pattani Province of which thepH, acidity, specific gravity, milk fat, solid not fat, total solid, total plate count, Coliform count, and antibiotic residue weretested. The results did not show any significant difference (p>0.05 on pH and total plate count among samples from eachfarm. However, acidity, specific gravity, milk fat, solid not fat, and total solid varied between farms depending on feed supplyand management. Means of total bacteria count and Coliform count of most samples were in TACF standard quality (log3.720 cfu/ml and log 1.892 cfu/ml, respectively, except four samples had higher Coliform contamination. Additionally,a higher proportion (22.7 % of samples with antibiotic residue was found.

  10. Chronicle of malaria epidemics in Thailand, 1980-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konchom, Supawadee; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Chuprapawan, Sirichai; Thimasarn, Krongthong; Kidson, Chev; Yimsamran, Surapon; Rojanawatsirivet, Chaiporn

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of malaria epidemics in Thailand was reviewed from the malaria surveillance report of the National Malaria Control Program. The literature review revealed that the four epidemic periods recorded during 1980-2000 almost always occurred in the provinces and districts located along international borders. Malaria epidemics are caused by various factors such as: extensive population movement, multi-drug resistance development, low immune status of the population, lack of knowledge and appropriate personal protection against mosquito biting, and the re-emergence of malaria transmission in low malarious areas. Such factors can lead to changes in the parasite ratio and appearance of malaria epidemics throughout the country. Evidence related to the burden of malaria epidemics was also reviewed to identify causal factors that will be helpful in future research.

  11. Integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Sereerat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative investigation had three research aims: 1 To study the history and background of the hotel industry in Isan; 2 To study the current situation and problems with using art in order to develop the tourism industry in Thailand; 3 To study the integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand. Nine hotels were selected from four provinces in North-eastern Thailand as the research population and the research sample was composed of 86 individuals. Tools used for data collection were survey, observation, interview, focus group discussion and workshop. Results show that hoteliers in North-eastern Thailand developed their businesses as a reaction to the economic crisis and failing trade. To attract more tourists to the region, hotel managers integrated traditional Thai art to their businesses, especially local Isan art. This investigation of nine hotels in Isan identified nine areas in which art has been integrated into hotel businesses. These are paintings, sculptures, architecture, literature, music and dance , the four Buddhist necessities of life (food, accommodation, clothing and medicine, beliefs, customs and ceremonies. By integrating elements of each of these categories into their hotels, business owners and managers have been able to generate extra trade

  12. Morphology and Molecular Phylogeny of Raillietina spp. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Davaineidae) from Domestic Chickens in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Rojanapaibul, Amnat; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-12-01

    Raillietina species are prevalent in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand. Their infection may cause disease and death, which affects the public health and economic situation in chicken farms. The identification of Raillietina has been based on morphology and molecular analysis. In this study, morphological observations using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) coupled with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) gene were employed for precise identification and phylogenetic relationship studies of Raillietina spp. Four Raillietina species, including R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus, and Raillietina sp., were recovered in domestic chickens from 4 districts in Phayao province, Thailand. LM and SEM observations revealed differences in the morphology of the scolex, position of the genital pore, number of eggs per egg capsule, and rostellar opening surface structures in all 4 species. Phylogenetic relationships were found among the phylogenetic trees obtained by the maximum likelihood and distance-based neighbor-joining methods. ITS2 and ND1 sequence data recorded from Raillietina sp. appeared to be monophyletic. The query sequences of R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus, and Raillietina sp. were separated according to the different morphological characters. This study confirmed that morphological studies combined with molecular analyses can differentiate related species within the genus Raillietina in Thailand.

  13. A dominant clone of Leptospira interrogans associated with an outbreak of human leptospirosis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D; Petkanchanapong, Wimol; Limpaiboon, Roongrueng; Apiwatanaporn, Apichat; Slack, Andrew T; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; White, Nicholas J; Feil, Edward J; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J

    2007-10-31

    A sustained outbreak of leptospirosis occurred in northeast Thailand between 1999 and 2003, the basis for which was unknown. A prospective study was conducted between 2000 and 2005 to identify patients with leptospirosis presenting to Udon Thani Hospital in northeast Thailand, and to isolate the causative organisms from blood. A multilocus sequence typing scheme was developed to genotype these pathogenic Leptospira. Additional typing was performed for Leptospira isolated from human cases in other Thai provinces over the same period, and from rodents captured in the northeast during 2004. Sequence types (STs) were compared with those of Leptospira drawn from a reference collection. Twelve STs were identified among 101 isolates from patients in Udon Thani. One of these (ST34) accounted for 77 (76%) of isolates. ST34 was Leptospira interrogans, serovar Autumnalis. 86% of human Leptospira isolates from Udon Thani corresponded to ST34 in 2000/2001, but this figure fell to 56% by 2005 as the outbreak waned (p = 0.01). ST34 represented 17/24 (71%) of human isolates from other Thai provinces, and 7/8 (88%) rodent isolates. By contrast, 59 STs were found among 76 reference strains, indicating a much more diverse population genetic structure; ST34 was not identified in this collection. Development of an MLST scheme for Leptospira interrogans revealed that a single ecologically successful pathogenic clone of L. interrogans predominated in the rodent population, and was associated with a sustained outbreak of human leptospirosis in Thailand.

  14. A dominant clone of Leptospira interrogans associated with an outbreak of human leptospirosis in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janjira Thaipadungpanit

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A sustained outbreak of leptospirosis occurred in northeast Thailand between 1999 and 2003, the basis for which was unknown.A prospective study was conducted between 2000 and 2005 to identify patients with leptospirosis presenting to Udon Thani Hospital in northeast Thailand, and to isolate the causative organisms from blood. A multilocus sequence typing scheme was developed to genotype these pathogenic Leptospira. Additional typing was performed for Leptospira isolated from human cases in other Thai provinces over the same period, and from rodents captured in the northeast during 2004. Sequence types (STs were compared with those of Leptospira drawn from a reference collection. Twelve STs were identified among 101 isolates from patients in Udon Thani. One of these (ST34 accounted for 77 (76% of isolates. ST34 was Leptospira interrogans, serovar Autumnalis. 86% of human Leptospira isolates from Udon Thani corresponded to ST34 in 2000/2001, but this figure fell to 56% by 2005 as the outbreak waned (p = 0.01. ST34 represented 17/24 (71% of human isolates from other Thai provinces, and 7/8 (88% rodent isolates. By contrast, 59 STs were found among 76 reference strains, indicating a much more diverse population genetic structure; ST34 was not identified in this collection.Development of an MLST scheme for Leptospira interrogans revealed that a single ecologically successful pathogenic clone of L. interrogans predominated in the rodent population, and was associated with a sustained outbreak of human leptospirosis in Thailand.

  15. Fatal melioidosis in goats in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonpitak, Walaiporn; Sornklien, Chulabha; Chawanit, Mongkol; Pavasutthipaisit, Suvarin; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Hantrakun, Viriya; Amornchai, Premjit; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Day, Nicholas P J; Yingst, Samuel; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2014-08-01

    Bangkok, Thailand, is a city considered to be at low risk for melioidosis. We describe 10 goats that died of melioidosis in Bangkok. Half of them were born and reared in the city. Multilocus sequence typing ruled out an outbreak. This finding challenges the assumption that melioidosis is rarely acquired in central Thailand.

  16. Knowledge Management in Higher Education in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumjit, Surat

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how knowledge management (KM) is applied to higher education in Thailand, and it will also examine whether higher education in Thailand is ready to combine KM with their educational missions in terms of teaching, research, administration, and strategic planning. Knowledge creation and social networking frameworks are used to…

  17. Thailand top destination for medical tourists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finch, Steve

    ... is the unofficial leader of medical tourism in Thailand, itself the most popular destination for medical travellers in the world, though accurate data on this fast-growing industry remain elusive. The Ministry of Public Health claimed Thailand received 2.5 million medical tourists last year, but medical tourism directories, like Novasans .com, co...

  18. Inclusive Education in Thailand: Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapanya, Sermsap; Dunlap, Diane

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Thailand passed legislation on the educational provisions for students with disabilities to mandate the implementation of inclusive education. This article provides a historical overview of special education in Thailand and the emergence of inclusive education as it moves from policy to practice. To further identify the challenges faced…

  19. Inclusive Education in Thailand: Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapanya, Sermsap; Dunlap, Diane

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Thailand passed legislation on the educational provisions for students with disabilities to mandate the implementation of inclusive education. This article provides a historical overview of special education in Thailand and the emergence of inclusive education as it moves from policy to practice. To further identify the challenges faced…

  20. Southeast Asian Broadcasting: The Emergence of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatol, Karl W.; Bittner, John R.

    The historical development and evolution of broadcasting in Thailand, from its beginning in 1919, is narrated. Governmental control of broadcasting is discussed briefly, and the development of Southeast Asia's first television station, Thai Television Channel 4, is also surveyed. Today, radio broadcasting in Thailand utilizes A.M., F.M., and F.M.…

  1. Building Bridges of Understanding. People of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. Language Research Center.

    This book attempts to provide cultural information that will enable an American to communicate effectively with people in Thailand. The book discusses differences between American and Thai culture in such areas as food, laws, customs, religion, language, dress, and basic attitudes. Background information is given on Thailand and the…

  2. Population genetic structuring in Opisthorchis viverrini over various spatial scales in Thailand and Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprom, Nonglak; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Andrews, Ross H; Ando, Katsuhiko; Laha, Thewarach; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Webster, Joanne P; Petney, Trevor N

    2012-01-01

    Khon Kaen Province in northeast Thailand is known as a hot spot for opisthorchiasis in Southeast Asia. Preliminary allozyme and mitochondrial DNA haplotype data from within one endemic district in this Province (Ban Phai), indicated substantial genetic variability within Opisthorchis viverrini. Here, we used microsatellite DNA analyses to examine the genetic diversity and population structure of O. viverrini from four geographically close localities in Khon Kaen Province. Genotyping based on 12 microsatellite loci yielded a mean number of alleles per locus that ranged from 2.83 to 3.7 with an expected heterozygosity in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of 0.44-0.56. Assessment of population structure by pairwise F(ST) analysis showed inter-population differentiation (Pviverrini over a small spatial scale which is similar to that found at a larger scale. This provides the basis for the investigation of the role of parasite genetic diversity and differentiation in transmission dynamics and control of O. viverrini.

  3. Smart disaster mitigation in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimmanee, S.; Ekkawatpanit, C.; Asanuma, H.

    2016-04-01

    Thailand is notoriously exposed to several natural disasters, from heavy thunder storms to earthquakes and tsunamis, since it is located in the tropical area and has tectonic cracks underneath the ground. Besides these hazards flooding, despite being less severe, occurs frequently, stays longer than the other disasters, and affects a large part of the national territory. Recently in 2011 have also been recorded the devastating effects of major flooding causing the economic damages and losses around 50 billion dollars. Since Thailand is particularly exposed to such hazards, research institutions are involved in campaigns about monitoring, prevention and mitigation of the effects of such phenomena, with the aim to secure and protect human lives, and secondly, the remarkable cultural heritage. The present paper will first make a brief excursus on the main Thailand projects aimed at the mitigation of natural disasters, referring to projects of national and international relevance, being implemented, such as the ESCAP1999 (flow regime regulation and water conservation). Adaptable devices such as foldable flood barriers and hydrodynamically supported temporary banks have been utilized when flooding. In the second part of the paper, will be described some new ideas concerning the use of smart and biomimicking column structures capable of high-velocity water interception and velocity detection in the case of tsunami. The pole configuration is composite cylindrical shell structure embedded with piezoceramic sensor. The vortex shedding of the flow around the pole induces the vibration and periodically strains the piezoelectric element, which in turn generates the electrical sensorial signal. The internal space of the shell is filled with elastic foam to enhance the load carrying capability due to hydrodynamic application. This more rigid outer shell inserted with soft core material resemble lotus stem in nature in order to prolong local buckling and ovalization of column

  4. Postgraduate psychiatric training in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratta-Apha, Woraphat; Sitdhiraksa, Nantawat; Saisavoey, Nattha; Lortrakul, Manote; Udomratn, Pichet

    2009-01-01

    In Thailand, after medical students graduated from medical schools, the general practitioners have to work for the government for at least three years. Then, they can enroll in postgraduate training program. Postgraduate training usually takes three to four years. All of the psychiatric training programs are supervised and monitored by the board of education of the Royal College of Psychiatrists of Thailand (RCPsychT). One of the missions of all training institutes is to prepare residents to be the high qualified psychiatrists to serve the mental well-being of Thai people. Additionally, they should teach the learners to be the leaders in academic and research fields in psychiatry. Currently, there are nine psychiatric training institutions in Thailand, most of which are running by university programs. The training program core curriculum composes of the compulsory rotations such as general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, neurology, consultation-liaison psychiatry, mental hospital psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. Moreover, the residents also have three months for elective in each program. The learning process includes practicing in an out-patient and in-patient unit under psychiatric staff supervision, individual and group supervision, case conference, journal club, book club and grand round etc. Research in field of psychiatry and social sciences is also compulsory for board examination. The RCPsychT approved two Certificate Diplomas including Diploma of Thai Board of Psychiatry, and Diploma of Thai Board of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. There are only nine psychiatric training institutes and only thirty to forty residents enrolled in these programs in each year. The compact and collaboration of all training institutes bring about the benefits in efficiency programs management by regular meeting of representatives from each institute. They keep the standard of training program to progress in the same vision and direction. Furthermore, residents

  5. My Study Experience in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    TO be honest, I had little idea what I was going to learn when I was offered an opportunity to attend the course entitled "Enhancing Women’s Role in Rural Development," to be held in Thailand from October 20 to November 28, 1997. After having worked with the All-China Women’s Federation (ACWF) for more than ten years, I’m not saying I don’t know anything about the urgent need to give full recognition of women’s important contributions to

  6. Thailand's Work and Health Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Matthew; Strazdins, Lyndall; Dellora, Tarie; Khamman, Suwanee; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Sleigh, Adrian C

    2010-09-01

    Thailand has experienced a rapid economic transition from agriculture to industry and services, and from informal to formal employment. It has much less state regulation and worker representation relative to developed nations, who underwent these transitions more slowly and sequentially, decades earlier. We examine the strengthening of Thai government policy and legislation affecting worker's health, responding to international norms, a new democratic constitution, fear of foreign importer embargos and several fatal workplace disasters. We identify key challenges remaining for Thai policy makers, including legislation enforcement and the measurement of impacts on worker's mental and physical health.

  7. Music Healing Rituals in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussakorn Binson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the music healing rituals from North, Northeast and Southern Thailand. In general, these healing rituals bring together supportive elements from the family, the community and spiritual entities with the shaman as a conductor. Shaman utilizes music in corporate the community as a whole including elicits the support from the spiritual entitles. Traditional music healing process played the role as enticement to recruit spirits, distract the patients from experiencing unpleasant in their body. Even in today’s modern society these healing rituals have persisted, as they are inseparable from these regions’ animistic beliefs system.

  8. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba species from natural water sources in the northeastern part of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammaratana, Thani; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Boonmars, Thidarut

    2016-04-01

    Acanthamoeba are found in the environment, particularly in water, all over the world. The genus is currently classified into 20 different genotypes, T1-T20. In this study, 63 natural water samples from 11 provinces in northeast Thailand were collected and cultured on non-nutrient agar plates. Positive samples by culture were subsequently analyzed by molecular methods. The identification of Acanthamoeba was based on morphological features and molecular techniques using PCR and DNA sequencing. The results showed that 10 samples out of 63 were positive (15.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that seven samples were T4, one sample was similar to T3, and the other two samples were similar to T5. This is the first report demonstrating the contamination of Acanthamoeba species in natural water sources in northeast Thailand.

  9. The Impact of Cricket Farming on Rural Livelihoods, Nutrition and the Environment in Thailand and Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz

    published life cycle assessments that have been conducted on insects for food and feed. Empirical data collected in Thailand and Kenya in 2014 and 2015 are presented in Papers III, IV and V. Paper III uses life cycle assessment technique to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with current......, agriculture, food safety, and conservation. In Paper II, a total of six life cycle assessment (LCA) studies were found to have been carried out in Europe. Each LCA had unique goals and scope, functional units, and impact categories. Future LCAs are recommended to address existing gaps in knowledge...... of feed that contains maize meal and soy meal. In Thailand, results from a study (Paper IV) of 49 cricket farms in three provinces found that farmers took up cricket farming to diversify their existing agricultural livelihood strategies and provide significant income to rural households. Social and human...

  10. Iodine content in salt sold in sea coastal province, Thailand:quality reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sora Yasri; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To call for attention that the problem of iodine deficiency and low salt quality can still be seen in sea coastal province.Methods:province of Thailand were collected. All samples were passed to the laboratory for the analysis of iodine content. The basic screening tool was I-KIT test (Mahidol University, Thailand), which was the standard test used in previous survey.Results:A total of 225 salt samples from each available marine salt shop in the sea coastal iodine content (100 mg/L). It gave the iodine content failure rate equal to 0%. Of overall 225 samples, there was no sample that could pass the acceptable criteria of Conclusions: Intensive research of the iodine content in salt sold and available in a sea coastal province of Thailand shows that the salt sold in salt shop in this sea coastal province is not locally available from marine salt field but from the dirt salt field from remote provinces because of the higher cost of marine salt. As a result, the control of salt quality in any areas is still needed. The use of iodine fortification should be applied to any areas, sea coastal or non sea coastal.

  11. Line transect estimates of Irrawaddy dolphin abundance along the eastern Gulf Coast of Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen eHines

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective conservation of coastal marine mammals is largely dependent on reliable knowledge of their abundance, as well as the ecological and human factors driving their distribution. In developing countries, lack of resources and capacity frequently impedes research needed to estimate abundance and to determine the ecological requirements of coastal marine mammals and the impact of threats related to coastal development and fisheries. Over the course of five years, we developed practical research methods and trained local scientists in Thailand to use accepted line transect distance sampling methods for abundance assessment. The study focused on a little-known coastal and freshwater species found throughout Southeast Asia, namely the Irrawaddy dolphin, which has been sighted regularly along the coast of the eastern Gulf of Thailand. During five years of line transect boat surveys in Trat Province, the eastern-most province in Thailand, we found an average of 423 dolphins distributed within 12km of the coast. Compared to other abundance estimates of coastal Irrawaddy dolphins in Southeast Asia, this is a relatively large number. This population could extend into the northern coast of Cambodia, where surveys are currently being planned. The Thai government has begun talks with Cambodia about a transboundary marine protected area that would include areas in both countries where coastal Irrawaddy dolphins are found. Other analyses include photo-identification, modeling environmental factors that determine presence, determination of fresh vs. salt water foraging using stable isotopes, and an assessment of threats. Collaboration between scientists in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam is further needed to determine dolphin movement and habitat use across borders.

  12. Using geo-informatics for landslide risk map in northern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammapala, Prasong; Weng, Jingnong

    2015-12-01

    The Kingdom of Thailand has been facing with natural disasters every year: landslide, drought, wind storm, landslide etc. especially, the last decade the natural disaster was most frequency and devastated vast areas. Furthermore, landslide occurrences have become more and more recurrence and human impacts have been increasing on seriously natural disasters problem during the past couple of decades. The study has been designed to analyze the risk landslide areas for landslide management in Phetchabun province, Thailand. This study aim to apply the geo-informatics technology, create landslide risk map, and develop landslide monitoring and warning systems used for formulating preparedness and recovery plans. This analyzed the concerned physical and environmental factors though statistical techniques and spatial analysis. The analyzed factors included with river, elevation, street, land use, sub-basin area, slope, drainage and rainfall. Potential Surface Analysis (PSA) technique has been used for analysis included with overlaying and Weighting-Rating Model for landslide risk area. The validation model compared with historical data. The result could show risk areas of landslide in Phetchabun province that high risk areas are covering north-eastern and central of province. In addition, we divided risk area as three levels; high risky, moderate and less. Furthermore, the consequences can be protect or relieved by using appropriate measures; including both publicizing risk information and be prepared for the happening of such disasters. However, some of spatial data have to up to date and improve to high accuracy.

  13. Anemia, iron deficiency and thalassemia among adolescents in Northeast Thailand: results from two independent surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansuwan, Anupong; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan; Himakhun, Boonmee; Dangwiboon, Samrit

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of adolescent anemia, iron deficiency and thalassemia were examined in 2 provinces of northeast Thailand. Blood specimens were collected from adolescent subjects aged 15-17 years in 2 areas; 185 (85 males and 100 females) in Mukdahan province and 313 (116 males and 197 females) in Roi-Et. RBC parameters, serum ferritin levels, Hb and DNA analyses for the identification of common thalassemia genes in Thailand were investigated. The prevalences of anemia were found to be 21.1% (8.1 in male and 13.0 in female) and 16.6% (8.9 in male and 7.7 in female) in Mukdahan and Roi-Et province, respectively. Iron deficiency was observed to be 24.3% in Mukdahan and 14.7% in Roi-Et. Various types of thalassemia were identified in 62.2 and 58.8% of the subject populations, respectively. The proportions of iron deficiency, thalassemia and combined thalassemia and iron deficiency among anemic subjects were 10.2, 53.8 and 30.8% in Mukdahan, and 7.7, 67.3 and 9.6% in Roi-Et. Hematological characteristics were analyzed and are presented. It is concluded that thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies rather than iron deficiency are major causes of adolescent anemia which should be taken into account in public health strategies for the control of anemia in the region.

  14. Folk toys in Central Thailand: Product development for a creative economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Pichetpruth

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Folk toys in Central Thailand are a part of local Thai local wisdom. Creative folk toys are a part of cultural heritage and Thai creative and sustainable economic development. So, this research aimed to study 1 the indigenous folk toys in central Thailand, 2 the toy production problems and solution guidelines, and 3 the toy product development for the creative economy. The study employed a qualitative research method. The target group consisted of the selected communities in Nonthaburi Province, Ayutthaya Province and Suphanburi Province and folk toy sources. The informants were: 15 folk toy enterprise presidents, government officers and local experts as the key informants, 45 folk toy enterprise members as the causal informants and 45 customers as the general informants. Data were collected by means of interview, observation, focus group discussion and workshop from field study. Qualitative data were analyzed by inductive analysis method with triangular verification and the research results were presented by a descriptive analysis method. The research results revealed that folk toys in Central Thailand were derived from local indigenous knowledge that was created and transmitted through the generations for at least 700 years. Most of the folk toys in Central Thailand were produced by natural, local and easily found materials, using natural colors. The beauty, styles and quality of natural and man-made children’s toys were based on parental competency. Moreover, creation of folk toys is a form of Thai handicraft. Thai people truly believe that toys are symbols of parental love and attention and the tools to build up children’s growth in terms of lifestyle and creative mind. The findings show that folk toys in Central Thailand are made of special soil, wood, bamboo, lan leaf, tan leaf and coconut shell. Folk toys are categorized in four groups: 1 fun toys, such as krataewien, explosive bamboo, king drum, nangkop drum, rhythm coconut shell

  15. Dengue in Thailand and Cambodia: An Assessment of the Degree of Underrecognized Disease Burden Based on Reported Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Ole; Yoon, In-Kyu; Vong, Sirenda; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Gibbons, Robert V.; Mammen, Mammen P.; Ly, Sowath; Buchy, Philippe; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Buathong, Rome; Huy, Rekol; Letson, G. William; Sabchareon, Arunee

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease incidence data are needed to guide decision-making for public health interventions. Although dengue is a reportable disease in Thailand and Cambodia, the degree that reported incidence underrecognizes true disease burden is unknown. We utilized dengue incidence calculated from laboratory-confirmed outpatient and inpatient cases in prospective cohort studies to estimate the magnitude of dengue underrecognition and to establish more accurate disease burden estimates for these countries. Methods and Findings Cohort studies were conducted among children aged dengue field site consortium over at least 2 dengue seasons. Age-group specific multiplication factors (MFs) were computed by comparing data from three cohort studies to national surveillance data in the same province and year. In Thailand, 14,627 person-years of prospective cohort data were obtained in two provinces and 14,493 person-years from one province in Cambodia. Average annual incidence of laboratory-confirmed dengue was 23/1,000 and 25/1,000 in Thailand, and 41/1,000 in Cambodia. Calculated MFs in these provinces varied by age-group and year (range 0.4–29). Average age-group specific MFs were then applied to country-level reporting data and indicated that in Thailand a median 229,886 (range 210,612–331,236) dengue cases occurred annually during 2003–2007 and a median 111,178 (range 80,452–357,135) cases occurred in Cambodia in children dengue cases was 8.7 and 2.6-fold in Thailand, and 9.1 and 1.4-fold in Cambodia, respectively. During the high-incidence year 2007, >95,000 children in Thailand and >58,000 children in Cambodia were estimated to be hospitalized due to dengue. Conclusion Calculating MFs by comparing prospective cohort study data to locally-reported national surveillance data is one approach to more accurately assess disease burden. These data indicate that although dengue is regularly reported in many countries, national surveillance data significantly

  16. Molecular evidence for novel tick-associated spotted fever group rickettsiae from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Cornet, Jean-Paul; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2003-03-01

    Ticks are of considerable medical and veterinary importance because they directly harm the host through their feeding action and indirectly through vectoring many bacterial pathogens. Despite many ticks being known from Thailand, very little is known about the bacteria they may harbor. We report here the results of a survey of tick-associated bacteria in Thailand. A total of 334 individuals representing 14 species of ticks in five genera were collected from 10 locations in Thailand and were examined for the human pathogens, Borrelia, Francisella, Rickettsia, and the common arthropod endosymbionts, Wolbachia, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using specific primers. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 30% (9/30) of Amblyomma testudinarium (Koch, 1844) collected from Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Nayok Province and 16.84% (16/95) of Hemaphysalis ornithophila (Hoogstraal and Kohls, 1959) collected from Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Nayok Province and Khao Ang Rue Nai Wildlife Sanctuary, Chachoengsao Province. Rickettsial DNA was not detected in any of the other tick species and no DNA of Borrelia, Francisella, or Wolbachia was detected in any of 14 tick species. Phylogenetic relationships among the rickettsiae detected in this study and those of other rickettsiae were inferred from comparison of sequences of the 17-kDa antigen gene, the citrate synthase gene (gltA), and the 190-kDa outer membrane protein gene (ompA). Results indicated that the three Thai rickettsiae detected in this study represent new rickettsial genotypes and form a separate cluster among the spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  17. Exploring spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Nitin K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is a major public health problem in Thailand. The Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has been trying to monitor and control this disease for many years. The methodology and the results from this study could be useful for public health officers to develop a system to monitor and prevent diarrhea outbreaks. Methods The objective of this study was to analyse the epidemic outbreak patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province, Northern Thailand, in terms of their geographical distributions and hotspot identification. The data of patients with diarrhea at village level and the 2001–2006 population censuses were collected to achieve the objective. Spatial analysis, using geographic information systems (GIS and other methods, was used to uncover the hidden phenomena from the data. In the data analysis section, spatial statistics such as quadrant analysis (QA, nearest neighbour analysis (NNA, and spatial autocorrelation analysis (SAA, were used to identify the spatial patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province. In addition, local indicators of spatial association (LISA and kernel density (KD estimation were used to detect diarrhea hotspots using data at village level. Results The hotspot maps produced by the LISA and KD techniques showed spatial trend patterns of diarrhea diffusion. Villages in the middle and northern regions revealed higher incidences. Also, the spatial patterns of diarrhea during the years 2001 and 2006 were found to represent spatially clustered patterns, both at global and local scales. Conclusion Spatial analysis methods in GIS revealed the spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province from the year 2001 to 2006. To implement specific and geographically appropriate public health risk-reduction programs, the use of such spatial analysis tools may become an integral component in the epidemiologic description, analysis, and risk assessment of diarrhea.

  18. Verifying causes of death in Thailand: rationale and methods for empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polprasert Warangkana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cause-specific mortality statistics by age and sex are primary evidence for epidemiological research and health policy. Annual mortality statistics from vital registration systems in Thailand are of limited utility because about 40% of deaths are registered with unknown or nonspecific causes. This paper reports the rationale, methods, and broad results from a comprehensive study to verify registered causes in Thailand. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths was selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling approach, distributed across 28 districts located in nine provinces of Thailand. Registered causes were verified through medical record review for deaths in hospitals and standard verbal autopsy procedures for deaths outside hospitals, the results of which were used to measure validity and reliability of registration data. Study findings were used to develop descriptive estimates of cause-specific mortality by age and sex in Thailand. Results Causes of death were verified for a total of 9,644 deaths in the study sample, comprised of 3,316 deaths in hospitals and 6,328 deaths outside hospitals. Field studies yielded specific diagnoses in almost all deaths in the sample originally assigned an ill-defined cause of death at registration. Study findings suggest that the leading causes of death in Thailand among males are stroke (9.4%; transport accidents (8.1%; HIV/AIDS (7.9%; ischemic heart diseases (6.4%; and chronic obstructive lung diseases (5.7%. Among females, the leading causes are stroke (11.3%; diabetes (8%; ischemic heart disease (7.5%; HIV/AIDS (5.7%; and renal diseases (4%. Conclusions Empirical investigation of registered causes of death in the study sample yielded adequate information to enable estimation of cause-specific mortality patterns in Thailand. These findings will inform burden of disease estimation and economic evaluation of health policy choices in the country. The

  19. Flooding in Thailand: flee, fight or float

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan S Sophonpanich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The severity of recent flooding in Thailand and the probability of future flooding have triggered a re-assessment of coping mechanisms employed by both the Thai population and the government.

  20. Waardevolle lessen na overstromingen in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, S.N.; Van der Meer, M.T.; Hardeman, B.

    2012-01-01

    Een verkenningsmissie na de overstromingen in Thailand in 2011 heeft meer inzicht gegeven in het functioneren van het waterkeringssysteem tijdens de ramp. Dijken bleken kwetsbaar door overloop, evenals de aansluitingen tussen dijken en constructies.

  1. Current particle and nanoparticle technology in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wiwut Tanthapanichakoon

    2008-01-01

    This report gives a brief introduction to key Thai organizations, including research institutions and academic departments, active in particle technology. This is followed by a description of the latest trend of powder technology and nanoparticle technology in Thailand.

  2. Transsexual emergence: gender variant identities in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocha, Witchayanee

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to understanding of emergent gender/sexual identities in Thailand. Thailand has become a popular destination for sex change operations by providing the medical technology for a complete transformation, with relatively few procedures and satisfactory results at a reasonable price. Data were gathered from 24 transsexual male-to-female sex workers working in Pattaya and Patpong, well-known sex-tourism hot spots in Thailand. Findings suggest the emergence of new understandings of gender/sexual identity. Sex-tourism/sex work significantly illuminates the process through which gender is contested and re-imagined. The coming together of cultures in Thailand's sex industry, coupled with advances in medical technology, has resulted in the emergence of new concepts of gender.

  3. Marketing contraceptives in rural Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viravaidya, M

    1988-01-01

    It can be difficult to administer and motivate field workers in family planning programs. In the case of social marketing, the last distributors in the chain are small shopkeepers who keep part of the final sale price. Thus contraceptives become part and parcel of their routine business, and the margin becomes both their remuneration and their motivation. In Thailand and most other countries with social marketing programs, part of the selling price also returns to the program, providing some degree of cost recovery. As family planning succeeds and per capita incomes rise, individuals will be able to pay an increasing part of the total cost of family planning. In the interim, international agencies and governments will continue to provide subsidies. In rural countries like Thailand, social marketing programs can be initiated and expanded relatively rapidly because they build on an existing infrastructure; they can also reach the most distant parts of the country. Skills of local advertising agencies are available in practically all Third World countries. Sales are a reliable record of progress and can be used to suggest innovations or practical solutions to problems. Small shopkeepers often feel more comfortable vending contraceptives than many experts would expect and as members of the community, intuitively know what the community's standards are. Individuals handling oral contraceptives often require some training and supervision by full-time staff who can answer questions that arise; local physicians may also be notified of the program for referral of problem cases. If there is a problem with social marketing programs, it is that they are sometimes too successful--leading to large bills for contraceptive commodities. However, if evaluated in terms of cost-effectiveness, they are less expensive than their alternatives. Along with access to voluntary sterilization and community-based distribution programs, social marketing is a keystone in the arch of family

  4. Thailand: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    of Burmese refugees, migrant workers , and political dissidents living in Thailand. Backed by human rights groups’ reports, some U.S. lawmakers have...tensions with Malaysia , as many of the leaders are thought to cross the border fairly easily. Despite these links, foreign elements apparently have not...Highlights Army Abuse in South,” from Human Rights Watch webpage at http://www.hrw.org/legacy/english/docs/2008/03/26/thaila18346.htm. 5 “Southern Thailand

  5. Specific intronic p53 mutation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paramee; Thongsuksai; Pleumjit; Boonyaphiphat; Puttisak; Puttawibul; Wanna; Sudhikaran

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate p53 mutations in esophageal cancer in a high-risk population,and correlate them with smoking,alcohol consumption and betel chewing.METHODS:One hundred and sixty-five tumor samples of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC) obtained from a university hospital in Songkhla province,Southern Thailand were investigated for p53 mutations in exons 5-8,using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis,followed by direct sequencing.A polymerase chain reactionrestric...

  6. Genetic diversity of the msp-1, msp-2, and glurp genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates along the Thai-Myanmar borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanungnit Congpuong; Rungniran Sukaram; Yuparat Prompan; Aibteesam Dornae

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the genetic diversity at the msp-1, msp-2, and glurp genes of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) isolates from 3 endemic areas in Thailand: Tak, Kanchanaburi and Ranong provinces. Methods:A total of 144 P. falciparum isolates collected prior to treatment during January, 2012 to June, 2013 were genotyped. DNA was extracted;allele frequency and diversity of msp-1, msp-2, and glurp genes were investigated by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results:P. falciparum isolates in this study had high rate of multiple genotypes infection (96.5%) with an overall mean multiplicity of infection of 3.21. The distribution of allelic families of msp-1 was significantly different among isolates from Tak, Kanchanaburi, and Ranong but not for the msp-2. K1 and MAD20 were the predominant allelic families at the msp-1 gene, whereas alleles belonging to 3D7 were more frequent at the msp-2 gene. The glurp gene had the least diverse alleles. Population structure of P. falciparum isolates from Tak and Ranong was quite similar as revealed by the presence of similar proportions of MAD20 and K1 alleles at msp-1 loci, 3D7 and FC27 alleles at msp-2 loci as well as comparable mean MOI. Isolates from Kanchanaburi had different structures;the most prevalent alleles were K1 and RO33. Conclusions: The present study shows that P. falciparum isolates from Tak and Ranong provinces had similar allelic pattern of msp-1 and msp-2 and diversity but different from Kanchanaburi isolates. These allelic variant profiles are valuable baseline data for future epidemiological study of malaria transmission and for continued monitoring of polymorphisms associated with antimalarial drug resistance in these areas.

  7. Identification of major Streptococcus suis serotypes 2, 7, 8 and 9 isolated from pigs and humans in upper northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutravong, Thitima; Angkititrakul, Sunpetch; Jiwakanon, Netchanok; Wongchanthong, Wanlaya; Dejsirilerts, Surang; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infections occur in many provinces of north-eastern Thailand, knowledge concerning the prevalence of the common S. suis serotypes (1, 1/2, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14 and 16) among healthy and diseased pigs in upper northeastern Thailand remains limited. This study investigated S. suis isolates from pigs (healthy and diseased) and also from humans using 11 conventional biochemical tests, 16S rDNA PCR and sequence analysis and multiplex PCR genotyping of porcine cps and gdh. Thirty-three isolates were obtained between 2009 and 2012 from blood or cerebrospinal fluid of patients from northeastern Thailand previously diagnosed with S. suis infection, based on clinical symptoms and laboratory diagnosis using 11 biochemical tests and PCR detection of 16S rDNA and cps. Eleven S. suis isolates were obtained between 2006 and 2009 from diseased pigs with clinical signs and laboratory diagnoses. In addition, 43 isolates obtained from 741 nasal swab cultures of slaughtered pigs between 2011 and 2012 were included. All three methods showed similar sensitivity in detection of S. suis from clinical and diseased pig specimens, although in healthy pigs, the 11 conventional biochemical methods yielded 2.3% false positives, and the gdh PCR detection method exhibited 31% false negatives. S. suis was present among healthy pigs in 8 of 10 provinces in upper northeastern Thailand, giving an average prevalence of 5.7% (range 1%-17%) using conventional methods together with 16S rDNA PCR assay. False positives by conventional methods were due to species with similar phenotypes, such as viridian streptococci, and are not statistically different from those obtained with the 16S rDNA PCR method, and the false negatives using gdh PCR assay will require further investigation. As S. suis was recovered from both diseased and healthy pigs, raw or undercooked pork products should be considered unsafe for handling or consumption in these regions of Thailand.

  8. Gulf of Thailand Maritime Law Enforcement Interoperability Initiative Workshop in Chonburi, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR) is a Department of Defense (DoD) organization within the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). CCMR News Article CCMR conducts the sixth Gulf of Thailand Maritime Law Enforcement Interoperability Initiative Workshop in Chonburi, Thailand, 16 to 20 June, 2014.

  9. Sea snake harvest in the gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cao, Nguyen; Thien Tao, Nguyen; Moore, Amelia; Montoya, Alfred; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Broad, Kenneth; Voris, Harold K; Takacs, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    Conservation of sea snakes is virtually nonexistent in Asia, and its role in human-snake interactions in terms of catch, trade, and snakebites as an occupational hazard is mostly unexplored. We collected data on sea snake landings from the Gulf of Thailand, a hotspot for sea snake harvest by squid fishers operating out of the ports of Song Doc and Khanh Hoi, Ca Mau Province, Vietnam. The data were collected during documentation of the steps of the trading process and through interviewers with participants in the trade. Squid vessels return to ports once per lunar synodic cycle and fishers sell snakes to merchants who sort, package, and ship the snakes to various destinations in Vietnam and China for human consumption and as a source of traditional remedies. Annually, 82 t, roughly equal to 225,500 individuals, of live sea snakes are brought to ports. To our knowledge, this rate of harvest constitutes one of the largest venomous snake and marine reptile harvest activities in the world today. Lapemis curtus and Hydrophis cyanocinctus constituted about 85% of the snake biomass, and Acalyptophis peronii, Aipysurus eydouxii, Hydrophis atriceps, H. belcheri, H. lamberti, and H. ornatus made up the remainder. Our results establish a quantitative baseline for characteristics of catch, trade, and uses of sea snakes. Other key observations include the timing of the trade to the lunar cycle, a decline of sea snakes harvested over the study period (approximately 30% decline in mass over 4 years), and the treatment of sea snake bites with rhinoceros horn. Emerging markets in Southeast Asia drive the harvest of venomous sea snakes in the Gulf of Thailand and sea snake bites present a potentially lethal occupational hazard. We call for implementation of monitoring programs to further address the conservation implications of this large-scale marine reptile exploitation. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Making schools healthy among Burmese migrants in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takeshi; Win, Thar; Maung, Cynthia; Ray, Paw; Kaji, Aiko; Tanabe, Aya; Jimba, Masamine; Kobayashi, Jun

    2013-06-01

    In Thailand, a health-promoting school (HPS) program is in place nationwide. However, this policy has not covered Burmese migrant schools. Therefore, to ensure the feasibility of the implementation of a HPS program, we conducted evaluations and an intervention on school health in migrant schools in Thailand. We included 44 primary-level schools in the Tak province in 2008. We were able to evaluate the results of the intervention in 43 of 44 schools in the subsequent year. For measurement, we used a comprehensive school-health checklist with five components: 'personal health and life skills', 'healthy school environment', 'health and nutrition services', 'common disease control and prevention', 'school and community partnership'. The checklist contained 59 items; item scores ranged from 0 to 3. We compared the results of the two surveys (performed before and after the intervention) by calculating the mean score of each item. A 1.3-fold increase was seen in the mean of all items measured in the evaluation (from 1.7 to 2.2, n= 43). Out of the five components, the greatest difference was detected in 'school and community partnership', which increased from 1.0 to 2.4. Notably, the mean score of item 4 of component 5, 'clear definition of the roles and responsibilities with the Burmese community', increased from 0.4 to 2.7. Although further study is necessary to investigate the association between our intervention and the improvements among schools, our school health evaluation and intervention were successfully implemented in Burmese migrant schools.

  11. Duean sip, théâtre de l’ethnorégionalisme sud. Les nomades de la mer et le cycle rituel du dixième mois dans la province de Phang Nga (sud de la Thaïlande Duean sip, Theater of the Southern Ethnoregionalism. The Sea Nomads and the Tenth Lunar Month Ritual Complex in the Phang Nga Province (Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Ferrari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available La cérémonie bouddhique du dixième mois lunaire, connue comme la fête des morts et des revenants, revêt dans la région de Phang Nga, au sud de la Thaïlande une importance et un rôle qui vont bien au-delà de sa signification religieuse. Il s’agit en effet d’un complexe rituel qui, en s’emboîtant avec les cérémonies du festival végétarien des Sino-Thaïs et avec d’autres cérémonies propres aux nomades de la mer (Moken, Moklen et Urak Lawoi, met en scène les fondements des relations interethniques qui caractérisent la région. Le partage du territoire et des rôles sociaux dans celui-ci sont au cœur de ce cycle rituel, qui devient de fait le théatre de l’ethnorégionalisme du sud de la Thaïlande.The bouddhist ceremony of the tenth lunar month, dedicated to the dead and the hungry ghosts, is a paramount feature in the region of Phang Nga, Southern Thailand. Its importance and role go well beyond its religious meaning. Indeed, it is a ritual ensemble which, by overlapping with the vegetarien festival of the Sino-Thais and with ceremonises held by the Sea Gypsies (Moken, Moklen and Urak Lawoi, displays the very foundations of the interethnic relationships that characterize the region. The sharing of the territory and of the social roles distributed within the region are the core of the ritual cycle, which is thus the theater of Southern Thai’s ethnoregionalism.

  12. Distributed generation and centralized power system in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    The paper examines and discusses conflicts between the development of distributed power and centralized power system in Thailand.......The paper examines and discusses conflicts between the development of distributed power and centralized power system in Thailand....

  13. A new species of Jasminum (Oleaceae) from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalermglin, P.; Kiew, R.

    2013-01-01

    In revising the distribution and conservation status of Jasminum in Thailand, a new species, Jasminum bhumibolianum Chalermglin, was discovered in NE Thailand. It is described and illustrated and its conservation status is assessed as Critically Endangered.

  14. Privatization of data communication services by domestic satellite in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reowilaisuk, Rianchai

    A summary of privatization of satellite communication services in Thailand is presented. A background of satellite communication in Thailand is given. Satellite communication providers, both government and private, are listed. Steps toward privatization and laws governing telecommunications are addressed.

  15. A new species of Jasminum (Oleaceae) from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalermglin, P.; Kiew, R.

    2013-01-01

    In revising the distribution and conservation status of Jasminum in Thailand, a new species, Jasminum bhumibolianum Chalermglin, was discovered in NE Thailand. It is described and illustrated and its conservation status is assessed as Critically Endangered.

  16. The Adjustment of the Manufacturing Labors in the Northeastern, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlasun Thuninart

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Northeastern labors used to live in the community cultures moved to work at the garment factory. The capitalism and the national economic and social development plan of Thailand were the causes. The policy of this plan was to make Thailand modern and emphasized development of an economic power. The Northeastern labors lacked of the lands for planting and turned to be head over heels in dept. They migrated to be the labors in the industry section for themselves, their families and the rural communities can survive under the capitalism context. The purpose of the article was to study the adjustment of the manufacturing labors in the garment manufacturing in Khon Khaen province located in Northeast of Thailand. Approach: It was a qualitative research. Data collection included interviews and participant observations and document analysis. Research data was classified into groups on study topic and analyzed on the purpose of study by using descriptive analysis. Informants included 60 key informants were the labors, the owned factory and the officer. Results: The result of this research was the adjustment causes of the labors who worked at the garment factory has divided into 3 conflict levels were as follows: (1 practicing, (2 norm and (3 value and ideal. These causes made them by adjusting themselves to economy acculturation for sufficient economy, namely employees stopped working when they earned enough money and the adjustment in duration of work hours was not strict. The Northeastern labors adjusted themselves for stopped working with traditional condition that was called “Heatsipsong”. It was the cultural capital of the Northeastern labors and the adjustment from cultural integration of the labors. The Northeastern labors enjoyed working as collective work and the rule and duty in work were held to a family and kinship structure; however, the rule and duty in the scheduling and assigning of employees was up to a

  17. A new record of Paragonimus other than P. westermani in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangsiruji, Achariya; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Kameoka, Yosuke; Donsakul, Thawat; Binchai, Sutheewan; Ketudat, Punsin

    2006-01-01

    Field surveys of Paragonimus in Surat Thani Province, southern Thailand, revealed a new record of a lung fluke species other than P. westermani. The metacercariae were obtained from the crab, Ranguna smalleyi. The cysts of the metacercariae were spherical in shape and the larval body in the cysts contained pinkish granules. Fully mature adult worms were obtained from experimental infections with a rat and a ferret. The adult worms from the two host animals resembled each other, except for size, and had the anatomical characteristics of P. bangkokensis, ie the cuticular spines were arranged mainly in groups, the ovaries were highly branched, while the testes were more simply divided. Chromosomal preparations of the testes showed a haploid number of 11. As no sequence data of P. bangkokensis has been deposited in the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ nucleotide database, the ITS2 region was sequenced using the metacercariae as starting material. A similarity search of P. bangkokensis ITS2 sequence using the BLAST program revealed that there was only one base difference between this population and P. harinasutai occurring in central Thailand. The result may suggest a close relationship between P. bangkokensis and P. harinasutai. This is the first description of Paragonimus species other than P. westermani occurring in southern Thailand.

  18. A study on attitude towards blood donation among people in a rural district, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2000-09-01

    Blood and blood components are important in many situations. At present, there is only a donation system for blood banks to get blood in Thailand. Although the blood bank process has been founded in Thailand for many years, there is still an insufficient amount of blood for use. There are misguided attitudes on blood donation among the people in the rural areas. This study has been designed as a cross-sectional descriptive study to study attitude towards blood donation among the people in Bang Sapan District, Prachuab Kiri Khan Province, Thailand. Data from self-administered questionnaires were collected and statistical analysis was performed. We found that people in that area had a rather good attitude but this was still found in less than 50%. We found the attitude of the subjects only significantly correlated with the level of education. We concluded that improving the people's attitude on blood donation is important. We suggest that every blood bank should design a program for providing knowledge in order to improve the attitude of the people in that area. We also suggest that knowledge on blood donation should be repeatedly taught at any education level including the school system. This study can provided preliminary results for other studies.

  19. Riparian Ficus tree communities: the distribution and abundance of riparian fig trees in northern Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornwiwan Pothasin

    Full Text Available Fig trees (Ficus are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010-2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1 calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2 measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance.

  20. Riparian Ficus tree communities: the distribution and abundance of riparian fig trees in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    Fig trees (Ficus) are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010-2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1) calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2) measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha) were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious) from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance.

  1. Estimation of Black Carbon Emissions from Dry Dipterocarp Forest Fires in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubonwan Chaiyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the estimation of black carbon emissions from dry dipterocarp forest fires in Thailand. Field experiments were set up at the natural forest, Mae Nam Phachi wildlife sanctuary, Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. The dead leaves were the main component consumed of the surface biomass with coverage higher than 90% in volume and mass. The dead leaves load was 342 ± 190 g∙m−2 and followed by a little mass load of twig, 100 g∙m−2. The chemical analysis of the dead leaves showed that the carbon content in the experimental biomass fuel was 45.81 ± 0.04%. From the field experiments, it was found that 88.38 ± 2.02% of the carbon input was converted to carbon released to the atmosphere, while less than 10% were left in the form of residues, and returned to soil. The quantity of dead leaves consumed to produce each gram of carbon released was 2.40 ± 0.02 gdry biomass burned. From the study, the emissions factor of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulate matter (PM2.5 and black carbon amounted 1329, 90, 26.19 and 2.83 g∙kg−1dry biomass burned, respectively. In Thailand, the amount of black carbon emissions from dry dipterocarp forest fires amounted 17.43 tonnes∙y−1.

  2. Impact of a Food Safety Campaign on Streptococcus suis Infection in Humans in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Dan; Kerdsin, Anusak; Akeda, Yukihiro; Chiranairadul, Piphat; Loetthong, Phacharaphan; Tanburawong, Nutchada; Areeratana, Prasanee; Puangmali, Panarat; Khamisara, Kasean; Pinyo, Wirasinee; Anukul, Rapeepun; Samerchea, Sutit; Lekhalula, Punpong; Nakayama, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kouji; Hirose, Masayo; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Dejsirilert, Surang; Oishi, Kazunori

    2017-06-01

    AbstractStreptococcus suis is an important zoonotic pathogen in swine and humans that causes sepsis and meningitis. Our previous study in Thailand showed that the prevalence of S. suis infection in humans, especially in northern areas of Thailand, and the transmission of the pathogen occurred mainly through the consumption of traditional raw pork products. Considering the high incidence proportion and mortality rate of the disease as an important public health problem, we implemented a food safety campaign in the Phayao Province in northern Thailand in 2011. We evaluated the effects of a food safety campaign by comparing the sociodemographic, clinical, and bacteriological characteristics of cases before and after the campaign. The follow-up study showed a marked decrease of the incidence proportion in the first 2 years, indicating the effectiveness of the campaign. In the third year, however, the incidence proportion slightly increased again, indicating the existence of deep-rooted cultural behaviors and the necessity of continuous public health intervention. Furthermore, epidemiological analysis of the cases made it possible to estimate the infectivity of the pathogen via the oral route of infection. In the present study, we showed the effectiveness of the food safety campaign for controlling the S. suis infection, and we present a role model public health intervention for prevalent areas affected by S. suis infection in humans.

  3. Characterization on mosaic glass found at Phu Khao Thong, southern area of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won-in, K.; Thongkam, Y.; Dhanmanonda, W.; Tancharakorn, S.; Tanthanuch, W.; Kamwanna, T.; Thongleurm, C.; Dararutana, P.

    2013-03-01

    Glasses in forms of ornament and decorative objects have been found in Thailand for several hundred years. The mosaic glass used in this work was only one piece that excavated at Phu Khao thong archaeological site in Ranong Province, southern area of Thailand. Micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μ-XRF) based on synchrotron radiation was firstly carried out to analyze its elemental composition and distribution. Scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and (PIXE) were also used to characterize the composition. The main composition of this mosaic glass sample found in Thailand was a lead-based silicate glass. The colorations were affected from transition metals, especially iron, copper and manganese. It was shown that although it look-liked the same, but the main composition was differ to that of Persia and South Asia, especially the lead content. However, it demonstrated the long distance trade or exchange network of the ancient time.

  4. Wolbachia infections in mosquitoes and their predators inhabiting rice field communities in Thailand and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwatanaratanabutr, Itsanun; Zhang, Chongxing

    2016-07-01

    Wolbachia are inherited, endocytoplasmic bacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods. Here is the first systematic report on the study of Wolbachia infection in mosquitoes and their predators from both Thailand and China. In Thailand, 632 mosquito specimens (20 spp.) and 424 insect predators (23 spp.) were collected from the rice agroecosystem, mostly from the Central region, followed by the Northeast, the North and the South and were inhabiting rice fields, wetlands and ditches. In China, 928 mosquitoes (15 spp.) and 149 insect predators (16 spp.) were collected from rice fields along the Weishan Lake in Shandong province. Specimens were classified in the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Odonata and Hemiptera. Using wsp, ftsZ, 16S rRNA and groE gene amplifications, Wolbachia were detected in 12 mosquito spp. and 6 predator spp. from Thailand and 11 mosquito spp. and 5 predator spp. from China. The relative Wolbachia densities of these species were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the predator, Agriocnemis femina, had the highest bacterial densities. These results imply that Wolbachia of supergroup B are distributed throughout these insects, probably via horizontal transmission in rice agroecosystems.

  5. Travelling waves in the occurrence of dengue haemorrhagic fever in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Derek A. T.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Huang, Norden E.; Endy, Timothy P.; Nisalak, Ananda; Ungchusak, Kumnuan; Burke, Donald S.

    2004-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne virus that infects 50-100 million people each year. Of these infections, 200,000-500,000 occur as the severe, life-threatening form of the disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Large, unanticipated epidemics of DHF often overwhelm health systems. An understanding of the spatial-temporal pattern of DHF incidence would aid the allocation of resources to combat these epidemics. Here we examine the spatial-temporal dynamics of DHF incidence in a data set describing 850,000 infections occurring in 72 provinces of Thailand during the period 1983 to 1997. We use the method of empirical mode decomposition to show the existence of a spatial-temporal travelling wave in the incidence of DHF. We observe this wave in a three-year periodic component of variance, which is thought to reflect host-pathogen population dynamics. The wave emanates from Bangkok, the largest city in Thailand, moving radially at a speed of 148km per month. This finding provides an important starting point for detecting and characterizing the key processes that contribute to the spatial-temporal dynamics of DHF in Thailand.

  6. Molecular detection of Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes from northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inpankaew, Tawin; Jiyipong, Tawisa; Wongpanit, Kannika; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Kengradomkij, Chanya; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xiao, Lihua; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the individual and herd-level prevalence and genotype of Cryptosporidium and to identify putative risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes in northeast Thailand. Fecal samples from 600 water buffaloes of 287 farms in six provinces were collected and tested using DMSO-modified acid-fast staining and polymerase chain reaction. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in buffaloes was 5.7 and 8.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The provinces with highest infected Cryptosporidium were located in the Sakon Nakhon Basin in the northern part of the region. In addition, higher herd prevalence was observed among farms with more than five buffaloes (30%) than those with five or less animals (16.2%). Thirty (88.2%) of the 34 Cryptosporidium-positive samples were Cryptosporidium parvum and four (11.8%) were Cryptosporidium ryanae.

  7. Modeling the hospital burden of common infectious diseases with application to northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardkaew, Jurairat; Tongkumchum, Phattrawan

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to identify the incidence patterns of the most common infectious diseases, including acute diarrhea, pyrexia of unknown origin, hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, and pneumonia, in the 7 provinces of northeastern Thailand, based on individual hospital case records of infectious disease routinely reported from 1999 to 2004. Log-linear regression analysis with age-group, season, and district as factors was used, with data from all 4 diseases as outcomes combined into 1 model. confirmed that the highest incidence of each infectious disease occurred in children aged less than 5 years of age, with particularly high rates for diarrhea. In addition, the burden of pyrexia of unknown origin was found to be lower in districts bordering Laos, and the incidence rates were higher from April to June in 1999-2001 and 2004 and from July to September in 2002-2003. Higher incidence rates also occurred in most rural districts of Loei and Udon Thani provinces.

  8. An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2009-10-01

    Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

  9. Stenostomum cf. leucops (Platyhelminthes in Thailand: a surface observation using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arin Ngamniyom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenostomum contains small turbellaria that are widely distributed in freshwater environments worldwide. However, there are only rare reports or studies of this genus from Thailand. Therefore, the objective of this study was to report S. cf. leucops in Thailand collected from Pathum Thani Province. The worm morphology and surface topography using scanning electron microscopy were determined. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree of S. cf. leucops was analysed with 17 flatworms based on the 18S ribosomal DNA sequences. The phylogenetic relationship shared a common ancestry of Catenulida species, and S. cf. leucops displayed a monophyletic pattern within Stenostomum spp. The results of the morphological and molecular data are discussed. These results may increase the knowledge of freshwater microturbellarians in Thailand.

  10. Towards a Curriculum for the Thai Lao of Northeast Thailand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, John

    2015-01-01

    This article considers a fundamental issue in language planning, namely, whether or not to introduce a curriculum for the mother tongue (MT), in the wider context of a complex language planning situation in Thailand. It details recent moves in the consideration of this issue for the Thai Lao (Isan) of Northeast Thailand, Thailand's largest…

  11. A Revised Checklist of Chigger Mites (Acari: Trombiculidae) From Thailand, with the Description of Three New Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisiri, Kittipong; Stekolnikov, Alexandr A; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Morand, Serge

    2016-03-01

    Chigger mites of Thailand were studied on the basis of larvae collected from 19 small mammal species (17 species of Rodentia, 1 species of Erinaceomorpha, and 1 species of Scandentia) and revision of published data. Samples of 38 trombiculid species were collected from 11 provinces. Three new species were described: Trombiculindus kosapani sp. nov., Helenicula naresuani sp. nov., and Walchia chavali sp. nov. Ten species were recorded in Thailand for the first time: Leptotrombidium sialkotense Vercammen-Grandjean and Langston, 1976; Leptotrombidium subangulare Wen and Xiang, 1984; Leptotrombidium tenompaki Stekolnikov, 2013; Leptotrombidium turdicola Vercammen-Grandjean and Langston, 1976; Leptotrombidium yunlingense Yu, Yang, Zhang and Hu, 1981; Lorillatum hekouensis Yu, Chen and Lin, 1996; Helenicula pilosa (Abonnenc and Taufflieb, 1957); Gahrliepia xiaowoi Wen and Xiang, 1984; Walchia minuscuta Chen, 1978; and Walchia ventralis (Womersley, 1952). In all, 99 chigger mite species were considered; the presence of 93 species was established in Thailand by original data or properly documented records in the scientific literature. Evidence for 64 species records of 147 from a previous checklist of Thai chiggers (Tanskul 1993) remains unknown. Distribution of chigger species by geographical regions of Thailand is discussed.

  12. Environment Changes of Lampao Dam Communities in Northeast Thailand

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    Winyoo Sata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this research was to study the environment change of Lampao Dam communities in Northeast Thailand, being a case study of the Sa-Adnathom community, Lamklong sub-district, Muang, Kalasin province, adjacent to the Lampao Dam. Approach: A qualitative research, it started with a review of literature and related researches. Field data were collected by way of interviews and both participant and non-participant observations, involving 15 informants including senior-villagers, who had lived in the village some 10-20 years. The research data were descriptively analyzed and presented. Results: As a result its was found that the Lampao Dam communities date back 200 years to the era of Chiangsom Kingdom. Deserted due to deadly epidemics, the area was later on repopulated by migrants from Yang Talad district, Kalasin province. A new community, called Sa-Adnathom, was born. Prior to the inception of the National Plan for Social and Economic Development in 1961, the environment of this community was complete with fertile land and natural resource abundance. People lived in harmony with nature and relied on resources from it for their livelihood, especially from Nong Waeng reservoir, Phan and Yang streams and Khoke Ngoo forest. But with the implementation of the first Plan for Social and Economic Development in 1961-1966 the Thai government started the construction of the Lampao Dam in 1963. Completed in 1968, the Dam took land from the villagers, part of which were simply flooded. This forced the village farmers to change their means of livelihood from relying on forest and rivers to production methods which by necessity involved purchase of machines and usage of chemical fertilizers. In short, a change from farming to fishing in Lampao Dam. Their values also changed from local exchanges of goods to money economy, which only led to household debts, increasing with rising degree of consumerism. Eventually people in the

  13. US fossil fuel technologies for Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehring, W.A.; Dials, G.E.; Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Traczyk, P.A.

    1990-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has been encouraging other countries to consider US coal and coal technologies in meeting their future energy needs. Thailand is one of three developing countries determined to be a potentially favorable market for such exports. This report briefly profiles Thailand with respect to population, employment, energy infrastructure and policies, as well as financial, economic, and trade issues. Thailand is shifting from a traditionally agrarian economy to one based more strongly on light manufacturing and will therefore require increased energy resources that are reliable and flexible in responding to anticipated growth. Thailand has extensive lignite deposits that could fuel a variety of coal-based technologies. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors could utilize this resource and still permit Thailand to meet emission standards for sulfur dioxide. This option also lends itself to small-scale applications suitable for private-sector power generation. Slagging combustors and coal-water mixtures also appear to have potential. Both new construction and refurbishment of existing plants are planned. 18 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, František; Pachanawan, Adithepchaikarn; Kamchoo, Kanda

    2013-04-01

    A new nematode species, Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Rhabdochonidae), is described from the intestine of the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. It is mainly characterized by medium-sized, bifurcate deirids, the presence of 14 anterior prostomal teeth and distinct basal teeth, length ratio of the muscular and glandular portions of esophagus (1:6-9), length of the left spicule (669-774 μm), absence of a dorsal barb on the right spicule, length ratio of spicules (1:4.9-6.0), arrangement of genital papillae, and smooth eggs without filaments or swellings. In addition, specifically unidentified fourth-stage larvae of Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) sp., morphologically similar to R. hypsibarbi, were recorded from the red-tailed tinfoil Barbonymus altus (Günther) (Cyprinidae) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. Rhabdochona hypsibarbi is the fourth nominal species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 reported from fishes in Thailand and the second species of the nominotypical subgenus found in this country.

  15. Effects of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation on dengue epidemics in Thailand, 1996-2005

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    Klinchan Suratsawadee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive vector control efforts, dengue epidemics continue to occur throughout Southeast Asia in multi-annual cycles. Weather is considered an important factor in these cycles, but the extent to which the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO is a driving force behind dengue epidemics remains unclear. Methods We examined the temporal relationship between El Niño and the occurrence of dengue epidemics, and constructed Poisson autoregressive models for incidences of dengue cases. Global ENSO records, dengue surveillance data, and local meteorological data in two geographically diverse regions in Thailand (the tropical southern coastal region and the northern inland mountainous region were analyzed. Results The strength of El Niño was consistently a predictor for the occurrence of dengue epidemics throughout time lags from 1 to 11 months in the two selected regions of Thailand. Up to 22% (in 8 northern inland mountainous provinces and 15% (in 5 southern tropical coastal provinces of the variation in the monthly incidence of dengue cases were attributable to global ENSO cycles. Province-level predictive models were fitted using 1996-2004 data and validated with out-of-fit data from 2005. The multivariate ENSO index was an independent predictor in 10 of the 13 studied provinces. Conclusion El Niño is one of the important driving forces for dengue epidemics across the geographically diverse regions of Thailand; however, spatial heterogeneity in the effect exists. The effects of El Niño should be taken into account in future epidemic forecasting for public health preparedness.

  16. Problems and solutions of Chinese culture teaching in five high schools in Suratthani province of Thailand%探究泰国素叻他尼府5所高中汉语文化教学的问题与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏旭明

    2016-01-01

    通过调查泰国素叻他尼府高中汉语文化的教学情况,发现影响文化教学质量的因素包括:缺少统一的标准、汉语教育不连贯、教师缺乏培训、教学方法缺少文化实践、学生水平低、教材不统一、教学资源参差不齐。采取合理政策改善泰国汉语文化教学质量至关重要。%This paper investigated Chinese language and culture teaching situation in Suratthani′s high school Thailand.The survey found that factors affecting teaching quality of Chinese culture included lack of uniform standards inconsistency of Chi⁃nese education lack of teaching training lack of cultural practices in teaching ways low Chinese level of students textbooks and teaching resources were not uniform and uneven.In order to improve the teaching quality of Chinese language and culture in Thai⁃land reasonable strategies are essential.

  17. The burden of hospitalized lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in rural Thailand.

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    Alicia M Fry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We describe the epidemiology of hospitalized RSV infections for all age groups from population-based surveillance in two rural provinces in Thailand. METHODS: From September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007, we enrolled hospitalized patients with acute lower respiratory tract illness, who had a chest radiograph ordered by the physician, from all hospitals in SaKaeo and Nakhom Phanom Provinces. We tested nasopharyngeal specimens for RSV with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays and paired-sera from a subset of patients with IgG enzyme immunoassay. Rates were adjusted for enrollment. RESULTS: Among 11,097 enrolled patients, 987 (8.9% had RSV infection. Rates of hospitalized RSV infection overall (and radiographically-confirmed pneumonia were highest among children aged<1 year: 1,067/100,000 (534/100,000 radiographically-confirmed pneumonia and 1-4 year: 403/100,000 (222/100,000, but low among enrolled adults aged≥65 years: 42/100,000. Age<1 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=13.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.7, 22.5 and 1-4 year (aOR=8.3, 95% CI 5.0, 13.9 were independent predictors of hospitalized RSV infection. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of hospitalized RSV lower respiratory tract illness among children<5 years was high in rural Thailand. Efforts to prevent RSV infection could substantially reduce the pneumonia burden in children aged<5 years.

  18. Migrant tuberculosis patient needs and health system response along the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Naomi; Nosten, Francois; Foster, Angel M

    2017-10-01

    This article aims to identify how the health system in Tak province, Thailand has responded to migrants' barriers to tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Our qualitatively driven multi-methods project utilized focus group discussions, key informant interviews, and a survey of community health volunteers to collect data in 2014 from multiple perspectives. Migrants identified legal status and transportation difficulties as the primary barriers to seeking TB treatment. Lack of financial resources and difficulties locating appropriate and affordable health services in other Thai provinces or across the border in Myanmar further contributed to migrants' challenges. TB care providers responded to barriers to treatment by bringing care out into the community, enhancing patient mobility, providing supportive services, and reaching out to potential patients. Interventions to improve migrant access and adherence to TB treatment necessarily extend outside of the health system and require significant resources to expand equitable access to treatment. Although this research is specific to the Thailand-Myanmar border, we anticipate that the findings will contribute to broader conversations around the inputs that are necessary to address disparities and inequities. Our study suggests that migrants need to be provided with resources that help stabilize their financial situation and overcome difficulties associated with their legal status in order to access and continue TB treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  19. Diversity of Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. and their symbiotic entomopathogenic nematodes from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Saiprom, Natnaree; Waterfield, Nick R; Ke Long, Phan; Bode, Helge B; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2012-01-01

    Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. are bacterial symbionts of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs). In this study, we isolated and characterized Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. from across Thailand together with their associated nematode symbionts, and characterized their phylogenetic diversity. EPNs were isolated from soil samples using a Galleria-baiting technique. Bacteria from EPNs were cultured and genotyped based on recA sequence. The nematodes were identified based on sequences of 28S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer regions. A total of 795 soil samples were collected from 159 sites in 13 provinces across Thailand. A total of 126 EPNs isolated from samples taken from 10 provinces were positive for Xenorhabdus (n = 69) or Photorhabdus spp. (n = 57). Phylogenetic analysis separated the 69 Xenorhabdus isolates into 4 groups. Groups 1, 2 and 3 consisting of 52, 13 and 1 isolates related to X. stockiae, and group 4 consisting of 3 isolates related to X. miraniensis. The EPN host for isolates related to X. stockiae was S. websteri, and for X. miraniensis was S. khoisanae. The Photorhabdus species were identified as P. luminescens (n = 56) and P. asymbiotica (n = 1). Phylogenenic analysis divided P. luminescens into five groups. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of 45 and 8 isolates defined as subspecies hainanensis and akhurstii, respectively. One isolate was related to hainanensis and akhurstii, two isolates were related to laumondii, and one isolate was the pathogenic species P. asymbiotica subsp. australis. H. indica was the major EPN host for Photorhabdus. This study reveals the genetic diversity of Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. and describes new associations between EPNs and their bacterial symbionts in Thailand.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for Opisthorchis viverrini infections in upper Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaewnongiew, Kesorn; Singthong, Seri; Kutchamart, Saowalux; Tangsawad, Sasithorn; Promthet, Supannee; Sailugkum, Supan; Wongba, Narong

    2014-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is an ongoing public health problem in Northeast Thailand. Despite continuous efforts for decades by healthcare organizations to overcome this problem, infection rates remain high. To enable related personnel to identify and address the various issues effectively, a cross-sectional study was performed to investigate prevalence and risk factors for opisthorchiasis. The target group was 3,916 Thai residents of Northeast Thailand who were 15 or over. Participants were recruited using the 30 clusters sampling technique. The data were gathered through questionnaires, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and stool examinations for parasite eggs (using the Modified Kato Katz method). The data were analyzed using descriptive and inference statistics; in order to ascertain the risk factors and test them using the odds ratio and multiple logistic regressions. The prevalence of opisthorchiasis was 22.7% (95%CI: 0.26 to 0.24). The province with the highest prevalence was Nakhorn Phanom (40.9%; female to male ratio =1:1.2). The age group with the highest prevalence was 40-49 year olds. All age groups had a prevalence >20%. Four of seven provinces had a prevalence >20%. The factors related to opisthorchiasis were (a) sex, (b) age (especially > 50), (c) proximity and duration living near a water body, and (d) eating raw and/or fermented fish. In order to reduce the prevalence of opisthorchiasis, the focus in populations living in upper Northeast Thailand should be changing their eating behaviors as appropriate to their tradition and context.

  1. Princess of Thailand returns to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Tuesday, 17 November 2015, HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand visited CERN. Princess Sirindhorn was visiting the Laboratory for the fifth time, following her last visit in 2010.   Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand (center) witnesses the signing of the collaboration agreement between CERN and SLRI, represented by Rolf Heuer (right) and Professor Sarawut Sujitjorn (left) respectively. The Princess was accompanied by a delegation that included the Director of the Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI) in Thailand, Professor Sarawut Sujitjorn, and a large group of Thailand’s Diplomatic Representatives in Switzerland. Upon her arrival, Princess Sirindhorn was welcomed by CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer and the Director-General Designate, Fabiola Gianotti. At CERN, the Princess was given a brief update on the Laboratory’s activities since her last visit, in April 2010. Later on, she witnessed the signature of the f...

  2. Participatory, Tourist Consumer Behavior-Based, Integrated Tourism Marketing Plan For Chainat Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nak Gulid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study Tourist Consumer Behavior, Tourism Market Segmentation, and Tourism Product Positioning in Chainat Province, Thailand. Quantitative analysis is employed in this study. Four hundred Thai tourists who have traveled to Chainat province at least once are the respondents who filled out the questionnaires. Multiple regression analysis has been used in this study. The majority of the Thai tourists are single females between the ages of 25 and 34, employees in the private sector with monthly incomes lower than Baht 10,000 (about USD 300, and are residents in the central region of Thailand. The results show that attitude toward destination, behavioral intention, and destination equity has strong influences on tourist consumer behavior.

  3. Cervical cancer screening in Thailand: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriamporn, Supannee; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Parkin, Max

    2006-01-01

    In Thailand, there have been no 'organized' programmes of screening for cervical cancer. For the most part, screening has been unsystematic or provided to women 'on demand'. In 2002, the Department of Medical Services of the Ministry of Public Health proposed the screening of the entire population of women in Thailand at 5-yearly intervals from the ages of 35 to 60 years. As a first step, measures to increase the capacity for obtaining and interpreting papanicolaou (Pap) smears have been put in place. Research studies have examined the effectiveness of screening with Pap smears in Thailand, and confirmed that, as elsewhere, protection is related to the number of previous tests and the time elapsed since the most recent one. Coverage of the population remains low. Other methods of screening are being investigated in Thailand, including visual inspection following acetic acid (VIA), followed by immediate treatment of observed lesions by cryotherapy ('see and treat'). Other research studies have examined the acceptability and performance of self-sampling as a means of obtaining Pap smears, and the use of mobile clinics to increase coverage of at-risk women in rural settings. Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been used to identify high-risk women, or to help decide which women with low-grade abnormality on cytology should undergo more intensive follow-up. Prevalence of HPV in normal women in Thailand is 9-20%, but HPV testing has not been used on any systematic basis to date. Current screening programmes in Thailand are not very effective. The national cancer control programme aims to increase the coverage of screening. The population-based cancer registry will provide an effective and economical method of evaluating the impact of early diagnosis and screening at community level.

  4. The status on contamination monitoring in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinakhom, Fookiat [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1997-06-01

    Thailand has embarked upon the development of nuclear energy for peaceful utilizations since 1961 when the Atomic Energy for Peace Act was enacted. The Atomic Energy Commission (Thai AEC) was established under section 5 of this Act having power and duty of carrying out matters concerning atomic energy for peace. The applications of nuclear energy in Thailand, at present are exclusively in medicine, education, research and industry. In this paper, the following items are described on contamination monitoring: controllable monitoring, uncontrollable monitoring, standardization of monitoring instruments, and decontamination and waste management. (G.K.)

  5. Opisthorchiasis in Thailand: Review and current status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natthawut Kaewpitoon; Soraya J Kaewpitoon; Prasit Pengsaa

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini (O.viverrini)remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR,Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis,obstructive jaundice, hepatornegaly, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and cholangiocarcinoma. The liver fluke infection was induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas of Thailand.Health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in high-risk areas.

  6. BULLYING AND CYBERBULLYING IN THAILAND: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruthaychonnee Sittichai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bullying is a severe problem, especially in schools, including the relatively new phenomenon of cyberbullying (via mobile phones and the internet. Research in Western countries suggests that over the last decade, cyberbullying accounts for about one-quarter to one-third of all bullying. Here we review research on cyberbullying, and bullying in general, in an eastern culture, Thailand. Eight relevant reports were found; however only three explicitly discussed cyberbullying. Reports were mainly quantitative, and did not consistently distinguish (cyber bullying from general aggression. Suggestions are made for future research in this area, in Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries.

  7. Thailand: Country Report on Labelling and Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chitanondh, Hatai; World Health Organization

    2003-01-01

    Thailand: Country Report on Labelling and Packaging Introduction From 1981 to 2001 there were dramatic changes in tobacco consumption in Thailand. The total number of smokers rose from 9.7 million in 1981 to 10.6 million two decades later. Smoking prevalence declined from 35.2% to 22.5% during the same period. The male smoking rate decreased from 63.2% to 42.9%, while female prevalence fell from 5.4% to 2.4.%. Per capita consumption rose from about 774 in 1970 to 1 087 in 1980. Since that t...

  8. The taxation of wealth transfers in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Rodthong, Ratichai

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London This thesis examines the case for a wealth transfer tax in Thailand, against the background, inter alia, of the failure of Thailand’s defunct tax law on estate and inheritance (the Estate and Inheritance Tax Act, 1933). Thailand has a significant problem with income and wealth distribution, with an increasing gulf between the rich and the poor—a root cause of the nation’s ongoing pol...

  9. Evidence to support karyotypic variation of the mosquito, Anopheles peditaeniatus in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choochote, Wej

    2011-01-01

    Eight isoline colonies of Anopheles peditaeniatus Leicester (Diptera: Culicidae) were established from wild-caught females collected from buffalo-baited traps at 8 localities in Thailand. They showed 2 types of X (X(2), X(3)) and 4 types of Y (Y(2), Y(3), Y(4), Y(5)) chromosomes based on the number and amount of major block(s) of heterochromatin present in the heterochromatic arm, and were tentatively designated as Forms B (X(2), X(3), Y(2)), C (X(3), Y(3)), D (X(3), Y(4)) and E (X(2), X(3), Y(5)). Form B was found in Nan, Ratchaburi, and Chumphon provinces; Form C was obtained in Chon Buri province; Form D was recovered in Kamphaeng Phet province; and Form E was acquired in Chiang Mai, Udon Thani, and Ubon Ratchathani provinces. Crossing studies among the 8 isoline colonies, which were representative of 4 karyotypic forms of An. peditaeniatus, revealed genetic compatibility in providing viable progenies and synaptic salivary gland polytene chromosomes through F(2)-generations, thus suggesting the conspecific nature of these karyotypic forms. These results were supported by the very low intraspecific sequence variations (0.0 - 1.1%) of the nucleotide sequences in ribosomal DNA (ITS2) and mitochondrial DNA (COI and COII) of the 4 forms.

  10. Green Tobacco Sickness among Thai Traditional Tobacco Farmers, Thailand

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    T Saleeon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional Thai tobacco (Nicotiana abacus L. is known as a non-Virginia type whose mature leaf contains three to four times more nicotine than that of a Virginia type. As such, the process of Thai traditional tobacco production may lead to adverse health effects such as green tobacco sickness (GTS.Objective: To investigate the prevalence of GTS and risk factors related to GTS among Thai traditional tobacco farmers in Nan province, northern Thailand.Methods: 473 Thai traditional tobacco farmers from rural areas in Nan province were randomly selected and interviewed in person by means of questionnaires and environmental survey. Statistical analyses were used to identify potential risk factors for GTS.Results: The prevalence of GTS was 22.6% (95% CI 19.1% to 26.6%. Multivariate analysis showed various risk factors associated with GTS including gender of the farmer (ORadj 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.73, smoking (ORadj 4.36, 95% CI 1.41 to 13.47, skin rash (ORadj 0.36, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.68, wearing a wet suit (ORadj 1.91, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.23, process of curing tobacco leaves (ORadj 0.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.16, and watering tobacco plants (ORadj 0.42, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.72.Conclusion: The process of traditional Thai tobacco production can result in increased dermal exposure and can be considered a major risk factor for GTS. Body soaking during watering may further increase adverse health effects related to GTS.

  11. The spatial dynamics of dengue virus in Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand.

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    Piraya Bhoomiboonchoo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is endemic to the rural province of Kamphaeng Phet, Northern Thailand. A decade of prospective cohort studies has provided important insights into the dengue viruses and their generated disease. However, as elsewhere, spatial dynamics of the pathogen remain poorly understood. In particular, the spatial scale of transmission and the scale of clustering are poorly characterized. This information is critical for effective deployment of spatially targeted interventions and for understanding the mechanisms that drive the dispersal of the virus.We geocoded the home locations of 4,768 confirmed dengue cases admitted to the main hospital in Kamphaeng Phet province between 1994 and 2008. We used the phi clustering statistic to characterize short-term spatial dependence between cases. Further, to see if clustering of cases led to similar temporal patterns of disease across villages, we calculated the correlation in the long-term epidemic curves between communities. We found that cases were 2.9 times (95% confidence interval 2.7-3.2 more likely to live in the same village and be infected within the same month than expected given the underlying spatial and temporal distribution of cases. This fell to 1.4 times (1.2-1.7 for individuals living in villages 1 km apart. Significant clustering was observed up to 5 km. We found a steadily decreasing trend in the correlation in epidemics curves by distance: communities separated by up to 5 km had a mean correlation of 0.28 falling to 0.16 for communities separated between 20 km and 25 km. A potential explanation for these patterns is a role for human movement in spreading the pathogen between communities. Gravity style models, which attempt to capture population movement, outperformed competing models in describing the observed correlations.There exists significant short-term clustering of cases within individual villages. Effective spatially and temporally targeted interventions deployed within villages may

  12. Childhood trauma, country report (Thailand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junnanond, C; Ruangkanchanasetr, S; Chunharas, A

    1993-10-01

    In Thailand, each year approximately 15,000 people die from accidents, a figure exceeded only by cardiovascular diseases. Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) is the principal cause of death and injuries in children of all ages except preschool group. In 1988 there were 554,452 cases of injuries out of which 10,031 died from MVA. In Bangkok alone MVA accounts for an average of 300 childhood and teenage death and 1,900 cases of injuries each year. Falls, burns and poisonings are relatively high in children less than 4 years old while MVA and injuries from sharp and blunt objects of both accidental and non-accidental cases increase with age and become the two leading causes of injury in older children. The sex ratio (F:M) in preschool ages are 1:1.4 and 1:2 in preteen. Poisonings, though less common, are considered to be very important because of their severity. Drugs, hydrocarbon, insecticides, lead and corrosive substances are leading agents. As for injuries caused by animals, 150 cases of rabies were reported each year while around 5,000 cases of snake bites were found in 1987 and 20 per cent of the victims were children. The study from Ramathibodi Hospital revealed that the majority of accidents (65-72%) occur at home and 20 per cent in the street in children younger than 12 years. Peak incidence were found between 5-9 pm. During weekend and holidays the incidence is higher. Ninety-five per cent of the accidents reported were mild cases, 15 per cent moderate, 3 per cent severe and less than 1 per cent caused death.

  13. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-07-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases. We retrospectively studied all the cases of carbamate poisoning due to occupational exposure recorded in the Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance system during 2005 to 2010. Demographic data, clinical manifestations and severity were analyzed statistically. During the study period, 3,183 cases were identified, of which 170 (5.3%) were deemed to be due to occupational exposure. Ninety-six cases (56.5%) and 35 cases (20.6%) were poisoned by carbofuran and methomyl, respectively. Carbofuran is sold as a 3% grain and applied by sowing; methomyl is sold as a liquid and is applied by spraying. The majority of poisoned patients did not wear personal protective equipment (PPE) while applying the carbamates. The clinical manifestations of occupational carbofuran poisoning recorded were nausea and vomiting (82.3%), headaches (56.3%) and miosis (19.8%). The clinical manifestations of methomyl poisoning were nausea and vomiting (74.3%), headaches (57.1%) and palpitations (11.4%). Most patients in both groups had mild symptoms. Only one case in each group required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation support. There were no deaths and the lengths of hospitalization ranged from 2 hours to 2 days. Occupational carbamate poisoning cases in our series were mostly mild and the patients recovered quickly. There were only rare cases of serious symptoms. Lack of knowledge and inadequate PPE were the major factors contributing to occupational poisoning. Educating agricultural workers about correct precautions and pesticide use could minimize this type of poisoning.

  14. Outbreak of chickenpox in a refugee camp of northern Thailand

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    Camélique Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although chickenpox is a generally mild, self-limited illness of children, it can cause fatal disease in adults. Accumulating reports from tropical countries showed a high prevalence of seronegativity among the adults, implying that varicella diseases could become a heavy burden in tropical countries. However, in the situation of humanitarian emergencies in tropical areas, chickenpox has largely been ignored as a serious communicable disease, due to lack of data regarding varicella mortality and hospital admissions in such a context. This is the first report describing an outbreak of chickenpox in a refugee camp of tropical region. In 2008, we experienced a varicella outbreak in ethnic Lao Hmong refugee camp in Phetchabun Province, northern Thailand. The attack rate was 4.0% (309/7,815 and this caused 3 hospitalizations including one who developed severe varicella pneumonia with respiratory failure. All hospitalizations were exclusively seen in adults, and the proportion of patients ≥15 years old was 13.6% (42/309. Because less exposure to varicella-zoster virus due to low population density has previously been suggested to be one of the reasons behind higher prevalence of susceptible adults in tropics, the influx of displaced people from rural areas to a densely populated asylum might result in many severe adult cases once a varicella outbreak occurs. Control interventions such as vaccination should be considered even in refugee camp, if the confluence of the risk factors present in this situation.

  15. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Dental Health Workers, Southern Thailand

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    Somsiri Decharat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to describe the socioeconomic situation of dental health work and work characteristics and to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among dental health workers. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 124 dental health workers and 124 persons in the reference group, matched to dental health workers by gender, were recruited from the workers who worked at the same 17 community hospitals in Nakhon Si Thammarat province, Thailand. Information was collected by using questionnaire. Data analysis comprised descriptive and analytical components. Results and Discussion. 75.8% were female and 24.2% were male dental health workers. 91.9% of subjects had worked >5 years. Most subjects worked for >8 hours per day and worked >6 days per week, at 63.7% and 53.2%, respectively. 100% of subjects worked in public institutions, and 68% also worked in both public and private institutions. Most subjects (52.4% did not exercise. Daily activity, gender, duration of work, hours worked per day, days worked per week, and physical activity were significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms at <0.001. Conclusion. The prevention and reduction of MSDs among dentists should include improving their education in dental ergonomics.

  16. Asymptomatic malaria infections among foreign migrant workers in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanyanan Kritsiriwuthinan; Warunee Ngrenngarmlert

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the prevalence of malaria infections among foreign migrant workers in Thailand. Methods:Giemsa-stained thin and thick blood films were prepared from blood samples of294 foreign migrant workers recruited in the study. Microscopic examination of these blood films was performed for malaria detection.Results: Blood film examination revealed 1.36%malaria infections in these294 subjects. All positive cases were male Myanmar workers in which their blood films only ring stage ofPlasmodium spp. was found at low parasite density (mean=144parasites/μL of blood). The prevalence of malaria infections was not significantly different among foreign migrant workers classified by age, gender, and resident province (P>0.05). Thin blood films of these workers also showed78.91%hypochromic erythrocytes and 61.9%relative Eosinophilia.Conclusions:These findings indicate a high risk of malaria transmission. Therefore active malaria surveillance by using molecular methods with more sensitive and specific than microscopy should be considered for malaria control in foreign migrant workers.

  17. Ecosystem Services Tradeoffs: A Case Study of Chiang Khong, Thailand

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    Apisom Intralawan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent transformation of land in the Mekong River Basin has been dramatic. The changes have contributed to an increased standard of living resulting from economic and agricultural expansion, increasing urbanization and modernization. However, the changes have also resulted in major degradation of ecosystems and the services which ecosystems provide. Despite acknowledgement of the loss of the ecosystem benefits, the integration of ecosystem services tradeoffs into land use decisions is still limited. Land managers and policy makers are facing challenges in balancing the positive effects of economic development and the long term negative impacts on the environment. This paper is based on a case study of one of the fastest growing towns along the Mekong River, namely Chiang Khong, Chiang Rai Province, Thailand. Data on the change of land use and land cover for different biomes over the past 40 years have been obtained from satellite image classification. The valuation of ecosystem services of different biomes has been quantified in monetary terms. During the last four decades, the estimated change in the value of ecosystem services in Chiang Khong shows a net decline of roughly US$ 440 million - from US$ 1,896 million/year in 1976 to US$ 1,455 million/year in 2015. There is a risk that this decline in ecosystem services will further increase if ecosystem services valuations are not included in decision making processes related to the planned economic development (infrastructure expansion, new industrial park development in Chiang Khong.

  18. Triassic carbonate rocks in the Phatthalung area, Peninsular Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampornmaha, Apsorn

    Carbonate rocks in the Phatthalung area and others in Peninsular Thailand have been known as the Permian Rat Buri Limestone. The study area is characterized by several isolated limestone mountains and is located in Phatthalung province. Micropaleontological study of these carbonate rocks indicates that they should be assigned a late Early to Late Triassic age. The Chaiburi Formation is newly proposed and divided into three members: the Phukhaothong Dolomite, Chiak Limestone and Phanomwang Limestone in ascending order. The Phukhaothong Dolomite consists of thickly bedded to massive dolomite and yields Neospathodus kummeli Sweet, N. waageni Sweet, N. cfr. waageni Sweet and other conodonts that indicate Dienerian to Smithian (Early Triassic). The Chiak Limestone Member consists of bedded and laminated limestone with intercalated thin chert layers and nodules. This limestone commonly yields Early Triassic to Middle Triassic conodonts such as Neospathodus timorensis (Nogami) and Neospathodus kockeli (Tatge), both reliable indicators of latest Spathian to early Anisian, and rare occurrences of Neogondolella bulgarica (Budurov and Stefanov), an indicator of the middle Anisian. The Phanomwang Limestone Member is mostly massive limestone with intercalated reef limestone (coral buildups) and yields abundant fossils that indicate Carnian (Late Triassic). Microfacies analysis and stratigraphic sequences of carbonate rocks in this area show the gradual change of depositional environment from low to high energy conditions.

  19. A Model of Appropriate Self-Adjustment of Farmers who Grow Para Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis in Northeast Thailand

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    Montri Srirajlao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Para Rubber was an economic wood growing in Northeast Thailand playing economic and social role. The objectives of this research were to study: (1 the economic, social and cultural lifestyle and (2 the appropriate adjustment model of agriculturists or farmers growing Para Rubber in Northeast Thailand. Approach: The research area covered 6 provinces: Mahasarakam, Roi-ed, Khon Kaen, Nongkai, Udontani and Loei. The samples were selected by Purposive Sampling including: 90 experts, 60 practitioners and 60 general people. The instruments using for collecting data were: (1 The Interview Form, (2 The Observation Form, (3 Focus Group Discussion and (4 Workshop, investigated by Triangulation. Data were analyzed according to the specified objectives and presented in descriptive analysis. Results: The farmers' lifestyle in traditional period of Northeast Thailand was to earn their living from producing by themselves and sharing resources with each other including: rice farming, farm rice growing, vegetable garden growing, searching for natural food without cost wasting one's capital. When it was period of changing, the price of traditional industrial crop was lowered, the agriculturists began to grow Para Rubber instead since the promotion of governmental industrial section. For the economic, social and cultural changes, found that the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation, had more revenue. But, the mechanism of market price and selling had stability was attached with political situation. For the pattern of adjustment of the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation in Northeast Thailand, found that there was an adjustment in individual level for developing their self study by applying body of knowledge learned by experience of successful people by being employed in cutting Para Rubber in The Southern of Thailand as well as the academic support and selling to serve the need of farmers. Conclusion/Recommendations: Para Rubber

  20. Educational Innovation in Thailand: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kristan

    2009-01-01

    The Ministry of Education in the country of Thailand recently announced the establishment of two distinct educational tracks--a conventional/ traditional track and an unconventional/progressive/alternative track. This decision was perhaps guided by the success of innovative pilot education programs in the country, collectively called "the…

  1. Approaches to Lao Minors Working in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.C. Huijsmans (Roy)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies have observed in Thailand a growing number of working Lao minors. By law, these may be regarded as victims of human trafficking. This paper observes, however, that some older teenagers who are still under 18 may be seeking and finding legitimate working positions. The

  2. The Teaching Practicum in Thailand: Three Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phairee, Chatpong; Sanitchon, Nalinee; Suphanangthong, Irada; Graham, Steve; Prompruang, Jidapa; de Groot, Freek Olaf; Hopkins, Dave

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the teaching practicum in Thailand as it occurs in three settings: "Rajabhats"--four-year universities which offer an additional period of teaching practice, and where the vast majority of EFL teachers are educated; regular universities; and a TESOL short course certificate program for non-Thais preparing to teach English as…

  3. Area Handbook Series: Thailand. A Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    of the baht-see Glossary. 7 Includes fresh and canned fish, crustaceans , and mollusks. Source: Based on information from Bank of Thailand, Quarterly...364 Published Country Studies (Area Handbook Series) 550-65 Afghanistan 550-153 Ghana 550-98 Albania 550-87 Greece 550-44 Algeria 550-78 Guatemala 550

  4. Scientific Literacy and Thailand Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuenyong, Chokchai; Narjaikaew, Pattawan

    2009-01-01

    Education and political leaders worldwide are increasingly placing emphasis on developing scientific literacy. This also is the case in Thailand with science education influenced by educational reform in 1999, in which the goals of science education are shaped by the notion of scientific literacy. Thai science education emphasizes the scientific…

  5. Girls' and Women's Education in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    Statistically, Thailand has eliminated gender disparity in access to education. Reasons that four women's conferences made very little impression on education reform could be no significant or overt discrimination against girls' enrollment and employment; education opportunity as more an issue of class (affordability) than gender (culture); and…

  6. Tourism Expenditures and Environment in Thailand

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    Malliga Sompholkrang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tourism activities affect the environment of different destinations, which is influenced by different tourists’ consumption. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between inbound tourist expenditures and three main environmental dimensions, which are carbon dioxide emission from transport, energy demand, and water usage, in Thailand. This paper employs Vector Autoregressive (VAR models to determine the relationship of variables. Data from Ministry of Energy, Bank of Thailand, Metropolitan Electricity Authority, Provincial Waterworks Authority, National Statistical Office, Department of Tourism, and Tourism Authority of Thailand between 1988 and 2012 have been applied in the model. Note that, energy demand is represented by total electricity consumption of hotel and accommodation sector in Thailand, while water usage is represented by the total water consumption of tourists. This study found the relationships among tourists’ expenditures, carbon dioxide emission from transport, energy demand, and water usage. Therefore, the policies recommendations may be essential to prepare the optimal schemes and budgets for encountering the environmental impacts from tourism business expansion.

  7. Gynostemma (Cucurbitaceae) in Thailand and Malesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.; Duyfjes, B.E.E.

    2007-01-01

    The genus Gynostemma is represented in Thailand and Malesia by four species of which the extremely variable G. pentaphyllum is widespread covering the whole area. Seven forms are recognized in G. pentaphyllum, of which three are new: forma fasciculare W.J. de Wilde & Duyfjes, forma grandiflorum W.J.

  8. Thailand - Country Development Partnership : Social Protection

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2002-01-01

    The Thailand Country Development Partnership for Social Protection (CDP-SP) is a collaborative program of policy development and technical assistance between the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection and the Bank and was launched in July 2001. CDP-SP operates in three key policy areas: labor markets; social insurance; and social assistance and safety nets. This report reviews the objecti...

  9. Production, Consumption and Imagination in Rural Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Jonathan; Ritchie, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Transformation of Thailand's rural areas from agricultural production to arenas of consumption of a constructed "rural idyll" is illustrated in cases of a hotel with a "working rice farm," and an elite school. The school (and companion resident "village") created an idealized rural past for rich consumers who wanted a…

  10. Why Thailand should consider promoting neonatal circumcision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Grimes, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Male circumcision (MC) has been proven to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. The WHO and UNAIDS jointly recommend the international community consider MC as an HIV prevention measure. MC reduces the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men, urinary tract infections among children and penile cancer. Lowering the prevalence of STIs in men may reduce the incidence of STIs among women. High levels of adult MC are difficult to achieve in cultures where it has not been customary. Adult MC is associated with a high prevalence of post-operative complications. Neonatal male circumcision (NC) is simpler, safer, and cheaper. Higher coverage with MC can be achieved through NC. Thailand is a good country to promoting NC for the following reasons: most HIV infections are contracted through heterosexual transmission, there is a low MC rate, most newborn deliveries occur in hospitals, there is a relatively strong health care infrastructure and Thailand has well developed HIV care services. Issues of concern regarding promoting NC include length of time before seeing benefits, cost effectiveness of the intervention, the burden to the health care delivery system and concerns about children's rights. NC is an efficacious HIV prevention strategy that should be considered by those involved in HIV/AIDS prevention planning in Thailand. Further studies are needed to determine whether NC should be promoted in Thailand.

  11. Implementing Functional Behavior Assessment in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opartkiattikul, Watinee; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Dempsey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is aiming to improve special education practices, and inclusive education has been introduced and mandated by national laws in the past few years. However, inclusive practices are challenging for many Thai teachers and schools. Many teachers are unprepared to support students with diverse needs and to deal with behavior problems. To…

  12. Chinese Economic and Trade Delegation in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Yiyi

    2013-01-01

    <正>Thailand and China are close neighbors and have a long history of friendly relations laying a solid foundation for the current State-level ties.This year,they have elevated bilateral relations to a comprehensive strategic partnership that will bring numerous benefits.This was the gist of remarks by Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra in her meeting

  13. Cigarette consumption among foreign tourists in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termsirikulchai, Lakkhana; Kengganpanich, Mondha; Benjakul, Sarunya; Kengganpanich, Tharadol

    2012-06-01

    To explore the cigarette consumption among foreign tourists in Thailand. The data in this cross-sectional survey is collected by interviewing 655 foreign tourist smokers with questionnaires in congested areas including Suvarnabhum International Airport, Khao San Road, shopping centers and tourist attraction sites. The data was collected in October, 2010, analyzed by descriptive statistic and the crude magnitude of cigarette consumption was calculated. The findings indicated that 62.9% of tourists were male and 58.9% were from European countries and 22.7% were from Asian countries. 59.2% smoked cigarettes sold in Thailand and were taxed legally. In that amount, 55.7% smoked imported cigarettes and only 3.5% smoked Thai cigarettes. 40.8% had brought cigarettes from their countries or bought cigarettes from Duty Free shops with the amount allowed by Thai law. The top 2 popular brands were Marlboro and L&M. The main reason why they bought imported cigarettes in Thailand was that the price was cheaper or the same when compared with that in their countries. The cigarette consumption share crudely calculated was around 8.90 million packs. Foreign tourists smoked imported cigarettes distributed in Thailand and cigarettes brought from abroad. So, Free Trade Agreement in bilateral level or multilateral level need to be reviewed and should separate cigarettes from other goods. The tax barrier excise tax measure and permission law of carrying in 200 sticks should be reviewed in order to control cigarette consumption effectively.

  14. Isolation of avian reoviruses associated with diseases of chickens in southern Thailand

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    Antarasena, C.

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available During 1994-1999, infectious agents associated with different disease conditions were investigated in three separate outbreaks of disease in southern Thailand. The first outbreak was in native chickens from Nakhon Si Thammarat province resulting in sudden death with liver and kidney congestions. The second was in 38-day-old broilers from Krabi province. The lame birds showed signs of depression and bilateral hock joints swelling. The last case was in 19-week-old laying chickens from Phang-nga province manifested by depression, paleness and greenish-diarrhea. The causative agents were isolated in embryonating chicken eggs and chick embryo liver (CELi cells. A characteristic cytopathic effect (CPE of multinucleated syncytial cells and progressive detachment of cells from the monolayer into culture fluid was apparent in the first passage in CELi cells within 24 hours postinoculation (PI. The isolates were adapted to replicate in Vero cells and the CPE characterized by focal areas of cell fusion occurred 48 hours PI. The indirect fluorescent antibody test demonstrated viral antigens characterized by granular fluorescent masses in the cytoplasm of large multinucleated syncytial cells in both cell types. Cross-virus neutralization test revealed an antigenic relationship between the three separate isolates and avian reovirus strain S1133. Transmission electron microscopic study of 3 agents showed the nonenveloped, icosahedral particles, 60-80 nm in diameter with a double-capsid shell and it formed crystalline arrays in the cytoplasm of infected Vero cells. The viruses designated NK 917/ 37, Kb 538/40 and Pn 1212/42 were classified in the family Reoviridae. Coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus were also recovered from the lame bird of the second outbreak and considered as a secondary invader. These findings confirmed a variety of clinical signs caused by avian reovirus infection in three species of chicken in southern Thailand.

  15. Modeling future demand for energy resources: A study of residential electricity usage in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilagupta, Prapassara

    1999-12-01

    Thailand has a critical need for effective long-term energy planning because of the country's rapidly increasing energy consumption. In this study, the demand for electricity by the residential sector is modeled using a framework that provides detailed estimates of the timing and spatial distribution of changes in energy demand. A population model was developed based on the Cohort-Component method to provide estimates of population by age, sex and urban/non-urban residency in each province. A residential electricity end user model was developed to estimate future electricity usage in urban and non-urban households of the seventy-six provinces in Thailand during the period 1999--2019. Key variables in this model include population, the number of households, family household size, and characteristics of eleven types of electric household appliance such as usage intensity, input power, and saturation rate. The methodology employed in this study is a trending method which utilizes expert opinion to estimate future variables based on a percentage change from the most current value. This study shows that from 1994 to 2019 Thailand will experience an increase in population from 55.4 to 83.6 million. Large percentage population increases will take place in Bangkok, Nonthaburi, Samut Prakarn, Nakhon Pathom and Chonburi. At a national level, the residential electricity consumption will increase from approximately 19,000 to 8 1,000 GWh annually. Consumption in non-urban households will be larger than in urban households, with respective annual increases of 8.0% and 6.2% in 2019. The percent increase of the average annual electricity consumption will be four times the average annual percent population increase. Increased electricity demand is largely a function of increased population and increased demand for high-energy appliances such as air conditioners. In 1994, air conditioning was responsible for xx% of total residential electricity demand. This study estimates that in

  16. Distribution of clay minerals in surface sediments of the western Gulf of Thailand: Sources and transport patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Shengfa; Fang, Xisheng; Qiao, Shuqing; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Kornkanitnan, Narumol

    2015-06-01

    A high density sampling program during two joint China-Thailand scientific cruises in 2011-2012 included collection of 152 gravity box cores in the Gulf of Thailand (GoT). Samples from the top 5 cm of each core were analyzed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral content. Several systemic analytical approaches were applied to examine the distribution pattern and the constraint factors of clay minerals in the surface sediments of the western GoT. The clay minerals mainly comprise illite, kaolinite, chlorite and smectite, having the average weight percent distributions of 50%, 34%, 14% and 2%, respectively. Based on the spatial distribution characteristics and statistical results, the study area can be classified into three provinces. Province I contains high concentrations of smectite, and covers the northern GoT, sediments in this province are mainly from rivers discharging into the upper GoT, especially the Chao Phraya and Mae Klong Rivers. Sediments in Province II are characterized by higher values of illite, located in the central GoT, where fine sediments are contributed by the Mekong River and from the South China Sea. Province Ш, in the coastal regions of southwestern GoT close to Malaysia, exhibits a clay mineral assemblage with complex distribution patterns, and may contain terrestrial materials from the Mae Klong River as well as re-suspended sediments. Results of integrative analysis also demonstrate that the hydrodynamic environment in the study area, especially the seasonal various circumfluence and eddies, play an important role in the spatial distribution and dispersal of clay fraction in sediments.

  17. Time of highest tuberculosis death risk and associated factors: an observation of 12 years in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyud Moolphate

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Saiyud Moolphate1,2, Myo Nyein Aung1,3, Oranuch Nampaisan1, Supalert Nedsuwan4, Pacharee Kantipong5, Narin Suriyon6, Chamnarn Hansudewechakul6, Hideki Yanai7, Norio Yamada2, Nobukatsu Ishikawa21TB/HIV Research Foundation, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 2Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association (RIT-JATA, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Pharmacology, University of Medicine, Mandalay, Myanmar; 4Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Chiang Rai Regional Hospital, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 5Department of Health Service System Development, Chiang Rai Regional Hospital, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 6Provincial Health Office, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 7Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fukujuji Hospital, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: Northern Thailand is a tuberculosis (TB endemic area with a high TB death rate. We aimed to establish the time of highest death risk during TB treatment, and to identify the risk factors taking place during that period of high risk.Patients and methods: We explored the TB surveillance data of the Chiang Rai province, Northern Thailand, retrospectively for 12 years. A total of 19,174 TB patients (including 5,009 deaths were investigated from 1997 to 2008, and the proportion of deaths in each month of TB treatment was compared. Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the characteristics of patients who died in the first month of TB treatment. A total of 5,626 TB patients from 2005 to 2008 were included in this regression analysis.Result: The numbers of deaths in the first month of TB treatment were 38%, 39%, and 46% in the years 1997–2000, 2001–2004, and 2005–2008, respectively. The first month of TB treatment is the time of the maximum number of deaths. Moreover, advancing age, HIV infection, and being a Thai citizen were significant factors contributing to these earlier deaths in the course of TB treatment.Conclusion: Our findings have pointed to the specific time period and

  18. A new species of Desmodium (Leguminosae; tribe Desmodieae) from Thailand and Laos and two new distribution records and lectotypification for Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saisorn, Witsanu; Balslev, Henrik; Chantaranothai, Pranom

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Desmodium (Leguminosae), D. brevipedicellatum from Thailand and Laos is described and illustrated. Two taxa, D. concinnum and D. laxiflorum subsp. lacei are reported as new for Thailand.......A new species of Desmodium (Leguminosae), D. brevipedicellatum from Thailand and Laos is described and illustrated. Two taxa, D. concinnum and D. laxiflorum subsp. lacei are reported as new for Thailand....

  19. Genetic characterization of 2008 reassortant influenza A virus (H5N1, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongphatcharachai Manoosak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In January and November 2008, outbreaks of avian influenza have been reported in 4 provinces of Thailand. Eight Influenza A H5N1 viruses were recovered from these 2008 AI outbreaks and comprehensively characterized and analyzed for nucleotide identity, genetic relatedness, virulence determinants, and possible sites of reassortment. The results show that the 2008 H5N1 viruses displayed genetic drift characteristics (less than 3% genetic differences, as commonly found in influenza A viruses. Based on phylogenetic analysis, clade 1 viruses in Thailand were divided into 3 distinct branches (subclades 1, 1.1 and 1.2. Six out of 8 H5N1 isolates have been identified as reassorted H5N1 viruses, while other isolates belong to an original H5N1 clade. These viruses have undergone inter-lineage reassortment between subclades 1.1 and 1.2 and thus represent new reassorted 2008 H5N1 viruses. The reassorted viruses have acquired gene segments from H5N1, subclade 1.1 (PA, HA, NP and M and subclade 1.2 (PB2, PB1, NA and NS in Thailand. Bootscan analysis of concatenated whole genome sequences of the 2008 H5N1 viruses supported the reassortment sites between subclade 1.1 and 1.2 viruses. Based on estimating of the time of the most recent common ancestors of the 2008 H5N1 viruses, the potential point of genetic reassortment of the viruses could be traced back to 2006. Genetic analysis of the 2008 H5N1 viruses has shown that most virulence determinants in all 8 genes of the viruses have remained unchanged. In summary, two predominant H5N1 lineages were circulating in 2008. The original CUK2-like lineage mainly circulated in central Thailand and the reassorted lineage (subclades 1.1 and 1.2 predominantly circulated in lower-north Thailand. To prevent new reassortment, emphasis should be put on prevention of H5N1 viruses circulating in high risk areas. In addition, surveillance and whole genome sequencing of H5N1 viruses should be routinely performed for

  20. A new species of Parategastes Sars, 1904 from the Thale Noi Lake, southern Thailand (Copepoda, Harpacticoida, Tegastidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanida Saetang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parategastes pholpunthini sp. n. is described and illustrated based on material collected in the Thale Noi Lake, Phatthalung province, southern Thailand. This species can be distinguished from its congeners by the number segments of female antennule, the lengths of rami and basis of P1, the shape of middle inner seta of P4 exp-3, shape of P5, and relative lengths of spine at apically of baseoendopod of P5. The differences among Parategastes species are pointed out and they are compared with the new species. An identification key to species of the genus Parategastes are proposed.

  1. THE IMPACT OF ASIAN FINANCIAL CRISIS ON BANK PERFORMANCE: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FORM THAILAND AND MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fadzlan Sufian; Muzafar Shah Habibullah

    2009-01-01

    .... We find that liquidity is negatively related to Thailand banks' profitability, but not in Malaysia, while network embeddedness has negative relationship with Malaysian banks, but not Thailand banks...

  2. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the taxa that are currently known from Thailand or may be expected, lists of species synonymies, species descriptions and lists of representative specimens.

  3. E-Learning Readiness in the Academic Sector of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohajaratsang, Thanomporn

    2009-01-01

    As e-learning in the academic sector serves as a crucial driving force in the development of e-learning in Thailand, this article looks at e-learning readiness in Thailand with a focus on the academic sector. The article is divided into four parts: (1) a brief history of e-learning in Thailand; (2) the infrastructure related to e-learning…

  4. A study of Swedish tourists going on vacation in thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Rong; Panto, Sitthiphon

    2010-01-01

    Date: 2010-05-25 Program: International Marketing Course Master Thesis International Marketing (EFO705) Authors Ms. RongPan Mr. Sitthiphon Panto Teacher Tobias Eltebrandt Title A study of Swedish tourist going on vacation in Thailand Research question Which factors affect Swedish travelers’ decision making in choosing Thailand as a traveling destination? Target audience This report could be beneficial for Tourism Authority of Thailand. The target audiences including Government sector who resp...

  5. Food safety in Thailand 4: comparison of pesticide residues found in three commonly consumed vegetables purchased from local markets and supermarkets in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompon Wanwimolruk

    2016-09-01

    in a few central provinces of Thailand and did not reflect for the whole country as sample sizes were small. Risk assessment due to consuming these pesticide contaminated vegetables, still remains to be evaluated. However, remarkably high incidence rates of detected pesticides give warning to the Thai authorities to implement proper regulations on pesticide monitoring program. Similar incidence of pesticide contamination found in the vegetables bought from local markets and supermarkets raises question regarding the quality of organic vegetables domestically sold in Thailand. This conclusion excludes Thai export quality vegetables and fruits routinely monitored for pesticide contamination before exporting.

  6. Ganoderma sichuanense (Ganodermataceae, Polyporales new to Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anan Thawthong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma sichuanense (Ganodermataceae is a medicinal mushroom originally described from China and previously confused with G. lucidum. It has been widely used as traditional medicine in Asia since it has potential nutritional and therapeutic values. We collected 8 specimens of Ganoderma species from Thailand and show that they represent the first record of G. sichuanenese for Thailand. In this paper, we describe our specimens of Ganoderma sichuanense based on fresh basidiomes, and provide line drawings and photographs. The data from macro- and microscopic features are consistent with the characteristics of the species. Analysis of ITS sequence data indicates that the Thai collections cluster in same species clade as the epitype of G. sichuanense.

  7. An insight into rheumatology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that rheumatic diseases constitute a common health care problem in Thailand, improvements in rheumatology education, research and health care are still required. Low numbers of rheumatologists, their uneven distribution, lack of time to perform both clinical and basic research, lack of patient compliance and restricted access to effective medication comprise some of the barriers that need to be overcome to establish rheumatology education, research and care with a Western-country benchmark. The annual academic activities provided by the Thai Rheumatism Association for rheumatologists, general practitioners, allied health professionals and patients can advance only some forms of education and health care. Better cooperation between the Thai Rheumatism Association, the Royal College of Physicians of Thailand, the Ministry of Public Health and the Thai government is needed to improve rheumatology training, care and research in the country.

  8. Population genetic structuring in Opisthorchis viverrini over various spatial scales in Thailand and Lao PDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonglak Laoprom

    Full Text Available Khon Kaen Province in northeast Thailand is known as a hot spot for opisthorchiasis in Southeast Asia. Preliminary allozyme and mitochondrial DNA haplotype data from within one endemic district in this Province (Ban Phai, indicated substantial genetic variability within Opisthorchis viverrini. Here, we used microsatellite DNA analyses to examine the genetic diversity and population structure of O. viverrini from four geographically close localities in Khon Kaen Province. Genotyping based on 12 microsatellite loci yielded a mean number of alleles per locus that ranged from 2.83 to 3.7 with an expected heterozygosity in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of 0.44-0.56. Assessment of population structure by pairwise F(ST analysis showed inter-population differentiation (P<0.05 which indicates population substructuring between these localities. Unique alleles were found in three of four localities with the highest number observed per locality being three. Our results highlight the existence of genetic diversity and population substructuring in O. viverrini over a small spatial scale which is similar to that found at a larger scale. This provides the basis for the investigation of the role of parasite genetic diversity and differentiation in transmission dynamics and control of O. viverrini.

  9. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Bangladesh, India and Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Bang-ladesh-China People’s Friendship Association (BCPFA), the Unity International Foundation of India (UIFI), the India-China Society and the Thai-Chinese Friendship Association (TCFA), from November 7 to 22, 2005, a CPAFFC delegation led by its Vice President Wang Yunze paid a visit to Bangladesh, India and Thailand, where they were accorded warm and friendly reception. The BCPFA attached great importance to the CPAFFC delegation’s visit.

  10. Explaining Democratic Instability in Thailand 1992- 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    groups were more vocal in the 1988 election and gained more support from the urban-educated electorate , which believed that it was time for the...342. 140 House Speaker Yongyuth Tiyaphairat, a member of the PPP, was convicted of electoral fraud in July 2008, giving grounds for the courts to...Robert B. Albritton, Thawilwadee Bureekul, “Developing electoral Democracy in Developing Nations: Thailand,” A Comparative Survey of Democracy

  11. Genus Schistochila Dumort. (Schistochilaceae, Marchantiophyta in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwisa Juengprayoon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of the genus Schistochila Dumort. in Thailand is presented, based on the study of fresh and herbarium specimens. Five species are recognized, namely S. aligera (Nees & Blume J.B. Jack & Steph., S. blumei (Nees Trevis., S. nuda Horik., S. sciurea (Nees Schiffn., and S. yakushimensis Ohnishi & Deguchi. In addition, a key to species, descriptions and line drawings are provided, and notes on the ecology and geographical distribution of the species.

  12. Leveraging Emerging Technologies in Southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    After East Timor announced their intentions to secede from Indonesia and form an independent nation in 1999, Thailand, while still recovering from...2004), 1. 10 continental Southeast Asia. Insular Southeast Asia is home to the world’s largest Muslim country, Indonesia , where approximately 200...points along their journeys to China, Canton to be specific. One of the earliest Islamic relics in insular Southeast Asia is the headstone of a Javanese

  13. The effects of medical tourism: Thailand's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaRanong, Anchana; NaRanong, Viroj

    2011-05-01

    To explore the positive and negative effects of medical tourism on the economy, health staff and medical costs in Thailand. The financial repercussions of medical tourism were estimated from commerce ministry data, with modifications and extrapolations. Survey data on 4755 foreign and Thai outpatients in two private hospitals were used to explore how medical tourism affects human resources. Trends in the relative prices of caesarean section, appendectomy, hernia repair, cholecystectomy and knee replacement in five private hospitals were examined. Focus groups and in-depth interviews with hospital managers and key informants from the public and private sectors were conducted to better understand stakeholders' motivations and practices in connection with these procedures and learn more about medical tourism. Medical tourism generates the equivalent of 0.4% of Thailand's gross domestic product but has exacerbated the shortage of medical staff by luring more workers away from the private and public sectors towards hospitals catering to foreigners. This has raised costs in private hospitals substantially and is likely to raise them in public hospitals and in the universal health-care insurance covering most Thais as well. The "brain drain" may also undermine medical training in future. Medical tourism in Thailand, despite some benefits, has negative effects that could be mitigated by lifting the restrictions on the importation of qualified foreign physicians and by taxing tourists who visit the country solely for the purpose of seeking medical treatment. The revenue thus generated could then be used to train physicians and retain medical school professors.

  14. Smoking prevalence among monks in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungskulniti, Nipapun; Charoenca, Naowarut; Kengganpanich, Tharadol; Kusolwisitkul, Wilai; Pichainarong, Natchaporn; Kerdmongkol, Patcharaporn; Silapasuwan, Phimpan; Hamann, Stephen L; Arpawong, Thalida Em

    2012-09-01

    Previous studies among Buddhist monks in Thailand have reported smoking rates to be as high as 55%. Because 95% of Thais are Buddhist, monks are highly influential in establishing normative behavioral patterns. As the first population-based study on smoking among Buddhist monks in Thailand, this study aims to determine the smoking prevalence in six regions of the country, and to examine smoking knowledge, risk perceptions, behaviors, and associated demographics among full-fledged and novice monks (n = 6,213). Results demonstrated that the overall prevalence for current smoking monks is 24.4% (95% confidence interval [24.453, 24.464]), with regional differences ranging from 14.6% (North) to 40.5% (East). Findings suggest that integrating prevention and cessation programming into religious courses may be one avenue for reaching many incoming monks. Further, involving monks in tobacco control education and setting a nonsmoking standard among them is vital to the success of reducing smoking rates among the general population in Thailand.

  15. Malaria-associated rubber plantations in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Maneekan, Pannamas; Pimnon, Suntorn

    2013-01-01

    Rubber forestry is intentionally used as a land management strategy. The propagation of rubber plantations in tropic and subtropic regions appears to influence the economical, sociological and ecological aspects of sustainable development as well as human well-being and health. Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries are the world's largest producers of natural rubber products; interestingly, agricultural workers on rubber plantations are at risk for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. The idea of malaria-associated rubber plantations (MRPs) encompasses the complex epidemiological settings that result from interactions among human movements and activities, land cover/land use changes, agri-environmental and climatic conditions and vector population dynamics. This paper discusses apparent issues pertaining to the connections between rubber plantations and the populations at high risk for malaria. The following questions are addressed: (i) What are the current and future consequences of rubber plantations in Thailand and Southeast Asia relative to malaria epidemics or outbreaks of other vector-borne diseases? (ii) To what extent is malaria transmission in Thailand related to the forest versus rubber plantations? and (iii) What are the vulnerabilities of rubber agricultural workers to malaria, and how contagious is malaria in these areas?

  16. A cross-sectional study on intestinal parasitic infections in rural communities, northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-12-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed.

  17. Chikungunya and dengue virus infections during pregnancy: seroprevalence, seroincidence and maternal-fetal transmission, southern Thailand, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasopwattana, K; Suntharasaj, T; Petmanee, P; Suddeaugrai, O; Geater, A

    2016-01-01

    Limited information is available on the seroprevalence of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection and maternal-fetal transmission incidence of CHIKV and dengue virus (DENV) infections during the 2008-2009 CHIKV outbreak in southern Thailand. A community-based post-epidemic seroprevalence study was conducted in parturient women admitted to the Thepa District Hospital in Songkhla Province, Thailand, for delivery from November 2009 to May 2010. The women were tested for chikungunya (CHIK) IgM/IgG and dengue (DEN) IgM/IgG. Cord blood samples were also tested for CHIK IgM or DEN IgM in women who tested positive for CHIK IgM or DEN IgM, respectively. The seroprevalence of CHIKV infection (CHIK IgM or IgG positive) was 227/319 (71·2%) with pre-outbreak seroprevalence (IgM-/IgG+) of 43·6% and the seroprevalence of DENV infection was 288/319 (90·3%). Complications during pregnancy, newborn outcomes and congenital anomalies were not different in those who had recent, remote or no CHIKV infections. None of the newborns whose mothers were CHIK or DEN IgM positive had cord blood positive for both CHIK and DEN IgM. In conclusion, both CHIKV and DENV are endemic in southern Thailand; during the recent CHIKV outbreak CHIK seroprevalence increased from 43·6% to 71·2%.

  18. Diversity of root-associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in a rubber tree plantation chronosequence in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Laetitia; Lesueur, Didier; Bräu, Lambert; Davison, John; Jairus, Teele; Robain, Henri; Robin, Agnès; Vasar, Martti; Wiriyakitnateekul, Wanpen; Öpik, Maarja

    2016-11-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is of major economic importance in Southeast Asia and for small land holders in Thailand in particular. Due to the high value of latex, plantations are expanding into unsuitable areas, such as the northeast province of Thailand where soil fertility is very low and therefore appropriate management practices are of primary importance. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) contribute to plant growth through a range of mechanisms and could play a key role in a more sustainable management of the rubber plantations. We described the diversity of AMF associated with rubber tree roots in Northeast Thailand in relation to tree age and soil parameters along a chronosequence of rubber tree plantations. Cassava fields were included for comparison. Rubber tree and cassava roots harbored high diversity of AMF (111 Virtual Taxa, VT), including 20 novel VT. AMF VT richness per sample was consistently high (per site mean 16 to 21 VT per sample) along the chronosequence and was not related to soil properties. The composition of AMF communities differed between cassava and rubber tree plantations and was influenced by soil texture and nutrient content (sand, K, P, Ca). AMF community composition gradually shifted with the age of the trees. Our results suggest that the high diversity of AMF in this region is potentially significant for maintaining high functionality of AMF communities.

  19. Investigating Consumer Insight by Using Completion Techniques: A Case Study of a Motorcycle Accessory Shop in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With almost 10% of the world’s motorcycles in use in Thailand, this indicates that Thailand is a big market for motorcycle accessories in the world. This qualitative research aims to investigate consumer insight by using completion techniques (sentence completion and story completion. Three respondents were deployed by using accidental sampling. Respondents were recruited to complete questionnaires when they entered the motorcycle accessory shop and were reported as male, currently studying, and at least 12 years old. The research was conducted in a motorcycle accessory shop in Sakon Nakhon province, Thailand. From the results of the story completion tests, all participants agreed to take part in a promotion which gave a 10% discount for membership card holders. They came to the motorcycle accessory shop by the recommendation of friends (positive Word-Of-Mouth. Moreover, consumers are satisfied when a seller can give them information or suggestions on motorcycle accessories as well as providing good after-sales service. When motorcycle accessory shoppers are satisfied with a motorcycle accessory shop, they will return to the shop and hence demonstrate consumer loyalty.

  20. Distribution of dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) mutant alleles in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongdee, Pimwan; Kuesap, Jiraporn; Rungsihirunrat, Kanchana; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Mungthin, Mathirut; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of prevalence and distribution of pvdhfr and pvdhps mutations were performed in 169 samples collected from patients with Plasmodium vivax infection who attended the malaria clinics in the provinces along the three international borders of Thailand (Thai-Myanmar, Thai-Cambodian, and Thai-Malaysian borders). SNP-haplotypes of the pvdhfr at amino acid positions 13, 33, 57, 58, 61, 117, and 173 and of the pvdhps at positions 383 and 553 were examined by nested PCR-RFLP. Significant differences in the prevalence and distribution of pvdhfr and pvdhps combination alleles were observed in P. vivax isolates collected from all the three border areas. The most prevalent combination alleles were triple mutant pvdhfr 57L/58R/117T alleles/double wild-type pvdhps alleles (n=18), double mutant pvdhfr 58R/117N alleles/double wild-type pvdhps alleles (n=10), and triple mutant pvdhfr 58R/61M/117N alleles/double wild-type pvdhps alleles (n=52) or with single mutant pvdhps 383G allele (n=28), respectively. These information on prevalence and patterns of pvdhfr and pvdhps polymorphisms obtained from the present study suggest the presence of SP pressure on P. vivax isolates in Thailand which could be linked to the introduction of malaria from neighboring countries. Results did not support the application of SP for P. vivax control program in Thailand as well as the neighboring countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeast region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Huyen, Nguyen Xuan; Shinuo, Cao; Inpankaew, Tawin; Maklon, Khuanwalai; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Ueno, Akio; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2011-06-10

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan disease that is mainly caused by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina and is characterized by significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The disease is widespread in the northeastern region of Thailand, where an increasingly large part of the livestock is composed of water buffaloes. The present study was therefore conducted to investigate the epidemiological distribution of B. bovis and B. bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand. A total of 305 buffalo blood samples were randomly collected from five provinces and simultaneously analyzed by the nested PCR (nPCR) assay, ELISA, and IFAT techniques. The overall prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 11.2% and 3.6% by nPCR, 14.7% and 5.9% by ELISA, and 16.8% and 5.6% by IFAT, respectively. The high concordance between the molecular and the serological detection tests revealed the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic assays used for the detection of infection as well as the endemic stability status of the parasites in the surveyed areas. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and location but not gender. Our data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bovis and B. bigemina infection in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand which will likely be very beneficial for management and control programs of this disease.

  2. Morphology and developmental rate of blowflies Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies in Thailand: application in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukontason, Kom; Piangjai, Somsak; Siriwattanarungsee, Sirisuda; Sukontason, Kabkaew L

    2008-05-01

    The larval morphology and developmental rate of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), the two most forensically important blowfly species in Thailand, are presented. Morphological comparison of the third instar of both species revealed different characteristics (e.g., body appearance, cephalopharyngeal skeleton, dorsal cuticular spines between the prothorax and mesothorax, and feature of the posterior spiracle), thereby, allowing correct identification. A data analysis was conducted in Chiang Mai province, Northern Thailand during 2000-2001 on the developmental rate of both flies under natural ambient temperature and a natural light-dark photoperiod. The results indicated that larvae of C. megacephala developed more rapidly in April, pupariation initiated at 84 h at temperatures averaging 31.4 degrees C, and the larvae grew slower in the rainy season and winter. Similarly, rapid development of C. rufifacies larvae appeared in the summer, with a pupariation period as short as 96 h in June (average temperature 27.4 degrees C). Analysis of the median body length of C. megacephala and C. rufifacies larvae in different seasons of the years 2000-2001 in Thailand revealed that both species developed rapidly in the summer; pupariation of C. rufifacies initiated at 144 h, while C. megacephala initiated pupariation at 156 h. This information is potentially useful for estimating the postmortem interval of a corpse in forensic investigations, where the corpse becomes infesting with these fly species.

  3. Selection and spread of artemisinin-resistant alleles in Thailand prior to the global artemisinin resistance containment campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldin Talundzic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion poses a major threat to the global effort to control malaria. Tracking the spread and evolution of artemisinin-resistant parasites is critical in aiding efforts to contain the spread of resistance. A total of 417 patient samples from the year 2007, collected during malaria surveillance studies across ten provinces in Thailand, were genotyped for the candidate Plasmodium falciparum molecular marker of artemisinin resistance K13. Parasite genotypes were examined for K13 propeller mutations associated with artemisinin resistance, signatures of positive selection, and for evidence of whether artemisinin-resistant alleles arose independently across Thailand. A total of seven K13 mutant alleles were found (N458Y, R539T, E556D, P574L, R575K, C580Y, S621F. Notably, the R575K and S621F mutations have previously not been reported in Thailand. The most prevalent artemisinin resistance-associated K13 mutation, C580Y, carried two distinct haplotype profiles that were separated based on geography, along the Thai-Cambodia and Thai-Myanmar borders. It appears these two haplotypes may have independent evolutionary origins. In summary, parasites with K13 propeller mutations associated with artemisinin resistance were widely present along the Thai-Cambodia and Thai-Myanmar borders prior to the implementation of the artemisinin resistance containment project in the region.

  4. Fishborne trematodes in cultured Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and wild-caught fish from Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiriya, Benjamaporn; Clausen, Jesper Hedegaard; Inpankaew, Tawin

    2013-01-01

    was to determine the prevalence of FZT metacercarial infections in Nile tilapia from cage and pond aquaculture systems and in wild-caught fish from Suphan Buri, Nakhon Pathom and Chachoengsao provinces, Thailand. Fish were collected from four cages in Suphan Buri and four ponds in Nakhon Pathom provinces between...... September-October 2011 and April-May 2012 and wild-caught fish were collected in May 2012. All fish were examined for metacercariae by a pepsin digestion and metacercariae identified using morphological and molecular methods. During the first sampling of tilapia the prevalence of metacercariae in cage...... falcatus, Haplorchis pumilio and Procerovum varium. The results revealed a low risk for FZT in Nile tilapia cultured in cage and pond aquaculture systems. However, the high prevalence of FZT in wild-caught fish indicates a high potential for spillover from wild reservoir hosts and underscores the need...

  5. Two new species of the megadiverse lentic diving-beetle genus Hydrovatus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae described from NE Thailand

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    Olof Bistrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe two new Hydrovatus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Hydrovatini from the province of Khon Kaen, Isan region in NE Thailand. Hydrovatus is the third most species rich genus of diving beetles (Dytiscidae. It occurs on all continents except Antarctica and now numbers 210 currently recognized species. Both new species, H. diversipunctatus sp. n. and H. globosus sp. n., were collected at lights and are only known from the type locality “Khon Kaen” (a city and province. Diagnoses based on morphology for the separation from closely related species are given together with illustrations of male genitalia and habitus photos. We provide a determination key to Old World species of the pustulatus species group and to Oriental species of the oblongipennis species group.

  6. Foreigners’ wives: Cross-cultural marriage of rural Thai women in Isan, Thailand

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    Chantaya Pomsema

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was twofold: 1 To study the background of cross-cultural marriage in Isan, Thailand; 2 To study cross-cultural marriage rituals of Isan women, Thailand. The study was carried out from February 2012 to February 2014 and was conducted in Khon Kaen, Udon Thani, and Nong Khai provinces. The research sample was composed of 80 individuals. The data collection tools were survey, interviews, observations and focus-group discussions. Results found that the main reason for Isan women marrying foreign men was poverty. They not only wanted to raise family income, but also reciprocate their parents for raising them. As for the foreign men, all had been married before. Some had divorced their former wives, some sons or daughters and some had health problems. Most foreign men were impressed by the good care provided by Isan women, who also had no debt burden. Prior to their marriage with foreign men, most Isan women in the research sample used to work in restaurants in Bangkok, Phuket or other tourist areas. The study found that most weddings followed Isan traditions. The parents, seniors, and relatives participating in the wedding ceremony were seen as witnesses. The bride’s parents received a dowry in cash. Most newly wedded Isan women went to live abroad with their husbands. Their children from previous marriages often went to live with their grandparents. Although many couples have successful marriages, some may experience problems later on. Further study should concern these problems.

  7. Evaluating Adaptive Governance Approaches to Sustainable Water Management in North-West Thailand

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    Clark, Julian R. A.; Semmahasak, Chutiwalanch

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive governance is advanced as a potent means of addressing institutional fit of natural resource systems with prevailing modes of political-administrative management. Its advocates also argue that it enhances participatory and learning opportunities for stakeholders over time. Yet an increasing number of studies demonstrate real difficulties in implementing adaptive governance `solutions'. This paper builds on these debates by examining the introduction of adaptive governance to water management in Chiang Mai province, north-west Thailand. The paper considers, first, the limitations of current water governance modes at the provincial scale, and the rationale for implementation of an adaptive approach. The new approach is then critically examined, with its initial performance and likely future success evaluated by (i) analysis of water stakeholders' opinions of its first year of operation; and (ii) comparison of its governance attributes against recent empirical accounts of implementation difficulty and failure of adaptive governance of natural resource management more generally. The analysis confirms the potentially significant role that the new approach can play in brokering and resolving the underlying differences in stakeholder representation and knowledge construction at the heart of the prevailing water governance modes in north-west Thailand.

  8. Locomotor behavioral responses of Anopheles minimus and Anopheles harrisoni to alpha-cypermethrin in Thailand.

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    Malaithong, Naritsara; Tisgratog, Rungarun; Tainchum, Krajana; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Bangs, Michael J; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2011-09-01

    Excito-repellency responses of 3 test populations, representing 2 sibling species within the Minimus Complex, Anopheles minimus and An. harrisoni, were characterized for contact irritant and noncontact repellent actions of chemicals during and after exposure to alpha-cypermethrin at half the recommended field (0.010 g/m2), the recommended field (0.020 g/m2), and double the recommended field concentration (0.040 g/m2), using an excito-repellency escape chamber system. Two field populations of An. minimus and An. harrisoni collected from the malaria-endemic areas in Tak and Kanchanuburi provinces in western Thailand, respectively, were tested along with a laboratory population of An. minimus maintained since 1993. Females of all 3 test populations rapidly escaped after direct contact with treated surfaces for each concentration. In general, increased escape responses in the An. minimus test populations were proportionate to increased insecticide dosages. The greatest escape response for An. harrisoni was observed at the operational field concentration of alpha-cypermethrin. The noncontact repellency response to alpha-cypermethrin was comparatively weak for all 3 test populations, but significantly different from each paired contact test and respective noncontact controls. We conclude that strong contact irritancy is a major action of alpha-cypermethrin, whereas noncontact repellency plays no role in the escape responses of 2 species in the Minimus Complex in Thailand.

  9. Seasonal patterns of aflatoxin M1 contamination in commercial pasteurised milk from different areas in Thailand.

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    Suriyasathaporn, Witaya; Nakprasert, Watinee

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) levels were determined in pasteurised milk from five commercial trademarks produced in different areas in Thailand. One hundred and twenty milk samples were collected from local markets in Chiang Mai province, Thailand, to evaluate AFM1 concentrations using immunoaffinity columns and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The overall median AFM1 level was 0.023 µg L(-1) ranging from 0.004 to 0.293 µg L(-1). All trademarks had average AFM1 concentrations lower than 0.05 µg L(-1), with those in Trademarks 3 to 5 being higher than Trademarks 1 and 2 (P < 0.01). All trademarks had different seasonal patterns of AFM1, even though operating in the same area. However, only Trademark 3 showed significant differences of AFM1 levels between seasons. The results suggested that farm management factors, rather than environment factors, were likely to be the main cause of AFM1 contamination in dairy products.

  10. Factors affecting survival time of cholangiocarcinoma patients: a prospective study in Northeast Thailand.

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    Woradet, Somkiattiyos; Promthet, Supannee; Songserm, Nopparat; Parkin, Donald Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a major health problem and cause of death among people in Northeastern Thailand. In this prospective study 171 patients newly diagnosed with CCA by physicians in 5 tertiary hospitals in four provinces of northeastern of Thailand between February and July 2011 were followed up to January 2012. The outcome was survival time from diagnosis to death. A total of 758.4 person-months of follow-up were available. The mortality rate was 16.9 per 100 person-months (95%CI: 14.1-20.1). The median survival time among CCA patients was 4.3 months (95%CI: 3.3-5.1). Cox's proportional hazard model was used to study the independent effects of factors affecting survival time among patients. Statistically significant factors included advanced stage at diagnosis (HR: 2.5, 95%CI: 1.7-3.8), presentation with jaundice (HR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.1-2.4) or ascites (HR: 2.8, 95%CI: 1.8-4.4), and positive serum carcinoembryonic antigen (HR: 2.3, 95%CI: 1.2-4.3). Patients who had received standard treatment had a better prognosis that those who did not (HR: 0.5, 95%CI: 0.3-0.7).

  11. Characteristics, socioeconomic benefits and household livelihoods of beef buffalo and beef cattle farming in Northeast Thailand

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    Eva Schlecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the Thai economy experiences rapid growth, agricultural systems, i.e. crop-livestock systems, are changing rapidly. On account of these changes, buffalo and cattle production has to be re-examined in terms of performance characteristics and roles of livestock for farm households in order to initiate suitable development programmes. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the present characteristics of beef buffalo and beef cattle farms in Northeast Thailand. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, 121 randomly selected beef buffalo and beef cattle farms were interviewed in Nakhon Ratchasima province between October 2007 and May 2008. Both buffaloes and cattle were mostly integrated in mixed crop-livestock systems with medium to large farm sizes (7.9 ha, whereof less than half of the area was used for livestock. Family members were mainly responsible for the different activities of livestock farming and salaried labourers were only found on large-scale farms. The dominant roles of livestock were income generation to build up wealth or savings, the coverage of expected and unexpected expenses and earning of regular and additional income. Another important issue was the improvement of the social status, which increased with herd size. In order to improve farmers’ livelihoods and develop sustainable farming systems in Northeast Thailand the changing economic circumstances of cattle and especially buffalo production should receive more attention of researchers, governmental institutions and stakeholders.

  12. Association between Opisthorchis viverrini and Leptospira spp. infection in endemic Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Chinh Dang; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Arimatsu, Yuji; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob

    2016-10-13

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is an important foodborne trematodiasis in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia. Interestingly, the opisthorchiasis endemic region overlaps with an area of leptospirosis emergence. Here we report an association between opisthorchiasis and leptospirosis in Thailand. Of 280 sera collected from villagers living around the Lawa wetland complex in Khon Kaen province, 199 (71%) were seropositive for leptospirosis by immunochromatography. Individuals with O. viverrini infection had a significantly higher rate of leptospirosis than those without (P=0.001). Significant higher leptospirosis prevalence was found in males than females (P=0.002). However, females but not males with O. viverrini infection showed a significantly higher seroprevalence of leptospirosis. Twenty-one of 35 environmental samples from the lake (water, mud and fish skin mucus) were positive for Leptospira spp. DNA sequencing, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic analysis of some positive nested PCR products revealed both pathogenic and intermediate pathogenic strains of Leptospira in the samples. Strikingly, O. viverrini metacercariae from the fish were positive for L. interrogans. These results suggest a close association between opisthorchiasis and leptospirosis. Contact with water, mud or eating raw fish harboring liver fluke metacercariae may be risk factors for Leptospira infection.

  13. Respiratory Tract Problems among Wood Furniture Manufacturing Factory Workers in the Northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soongkhang, I; Laohasiriwong, W

    2015-01-01

    Wood furniture manufacturing factory workers are at high risk of exposure to wood dust in wood working processes. Wood dust exposure could cause respiratory symptoms, such as reduce lung function, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. The Northeast region of Thailand has many wood furniture manufacturing factories. However, limited studies were carried out to explore the effect of wood dust exposure on workers. This study aimed to assess the respiratory symptoms and determine factors associated with these symptoms among wood furniture manufacturing factory workers. This cross-sectional analytical research used a multistage random sampling to select 511 workers from three provinces in the Northeast of Thailand. The data was collected using a structured questionnaire interview. The content validity of questionnaire was tested by 3 experts and had a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.82. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions. The result indicated that 29.94% of these workers had respiratory symptoms, including coughing(18.79%), nasal secretion (15.66%), and stuffy nose (15.07%). Factors that were significantly associated with respiratory symptoms (p-value factory workers had respiratory symptoms with related to both personal preventive behaviors and their working environments. Therefore, the raising awareness for using personal protective equipment during work will help them to prevent from various respiratory track problems.

  14. Virus isolations from mosquitoes collected during the 1982 Japanese encephalitis epidemic in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, C J; Ussery, M A; Nisalak, A; Hoke, C H; Andre, R G; Burke, D S

    1986-01-01

    From 16 June to 15 August, 1982 CDC light traps were used to collect mosquitoes in the province of Kamphaengphet, N. Thailand. 353,042 mosquitoes comprising 59 species were collected and identified, and 345,173 were placed in pools for attempted virus isolation by inoculation of C6/36 Aedes albopictus mosquito cell cultures. Viruses were isolated from 63 mosquito pools. These comprised 56 flaviviruses, identified as 35 isolates of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus strains, 18 strains of Tembusu (TEM) virus and three untyped flaviviruses (FLA); three alphaviruses, identified as the first isolates of Getah (GET) virus to have been made in Thailand; and four viruses which are still unidentified. Most virus isolates were from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes collected in carbon dioxide baited light traps. JE virus was isolated only over a ten-day period and the last isolate was obtained one week before the peak of admission of human encephalitis cases at Kamphaengphet Provincial Hospital. Rapid screening of isolates grown on Ae. pseudoscutellaris (LSTM-AP-61) mosquito cells by indirect immunofluorescence using flavivirus group-specific and JE-specific monoclonal antibodies showed a high degree of correlation with plaque reduction neutralization tests. An antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test successfully identified about 50% of the JE virus positive pools, but the method saved considerable processing time.

  15. The life cycle and effectiveness of insecticides against the bed bugs of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannayod, Suttida; Chanbang, Yaowaluk; Buranapanichpan, Sawai

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the life cycle and effectiveness of insecticides against bed bugs in Thailand. Bed bugs from dwelling places in Chon Buri and Chiang Mai provinces were determined to be Cimex hemipterus and Cimex lectularius, respectively. Both bed bug species were reared by feeding on rabbit blood at 2-day intervals in laboratory conditions at 28-32 degrees C with 75% relative humidity. The duration from egg to adult stages took 39.9 +/- 7.0 and 36.9 +/- 8.2 days in C. hemipterus and C. lectularius, respectively. The insecticides, propetamphos 20% CS, pirimiphos-methyl 50% EC, bifenthrin 25% WP and alpha-cypermethrin 5% SC, were tested against adult C. lectularius using a Potter spray tower. The concentrations at which 50% of bed bugs were either dead or moribund (ED50) for propetamphos and pirimiphos-methyl were 6.67 and 14.93 mg/m2 for the active ingredients on day 3 and the ED50 for bifenthrin and alpha-cypermethrin were 1,767.76 and 353.55 mg/m2, respectively. The results reveal C. lectularius in Thailand has a tendency to develop pyrethroid resistance.

  16. Follow-up the outcome of treatment of inhalant users in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanaphithuk, Wirut; Ratanasiri, Amornrat; Kanato, Manop

    2013-07-01

    Drug treatment in Thailand is categorized into three types, namely voluntary system, correctional system, and compulsory system. The latter is under Inhalants Law and Drug Addict Rehabilitation Act 2002 A.D. Follow-up the outcome of the compulsory system treatment in inhalant user on probation program and evaluate hospital referrals and the process of follow-up in community. A survey questionnaire adopted from KKU-VOUDIT was used in the present study in nine selected provinces of Thailand. Nine hundred ninety two people formed the study population and were divided into 95 administrators, 71 stakeholders, and 760 inhalant users. Inhalant users were classified as experimental (56.8%), harmful (24.2%), dependent (13.9%), and psychosis (5.1%). Majority of inhalant users were male (95.0%), 12 to 19 (61.3%), single (83.4%). In this group, 15.5% were students while 45.1% were temporarily employed, and 40.3% were unemployed. Most inhalant users never reused (72.2%). However some users re-used but were not incarcerated (12.2%) while others re-used and were incarcerated (15.5%). As the targets are youths, sub-district administrative organization, basic education office, and primary healthcare organizations should come together to bring about necessary changes.

  17. Exploring Legal Restrictions, Regulatory Reform, and Geographic Disparities in Abortion Access in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Grady; Sheehy, Grace; Chinthakanan, Orawee; Foster, Angel M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite decades of advocacy among Thai governmental and nongovernmental actors to remove abortion from the country’s 1957 Criminal Code, this medically necessary service remains significantly legally restricted. In 2005, in the most recent regulatory reform to date, the Thai Medical Council established regulatory measures to allow a degree of physician interpretation within the confines of the existing law. Drawing on findings from a review of institutional policies and legislative materials, key informant interviews, and informal discussions with health service providers, government representatives, and nonprofit stakeholders, this article explores how legal reforms and health policies have shaped the abortion landscape in Thailand and influenced geographic disparities in availability and accessibility. Notwithstanding a strong medical community and the recent introduction of mifepristone for medication abortion (also known as medical abortion), the narrow interpretation of the regulatory criteria by physicians further entrenches these disparities. This article examines the causes of subnational disparities, focusing on the northern provinces and the western periphery of Thailand, and explores strategies to improve access to abortion in this legally restricted setting. PMID:28630551

  18. Attitudes of adolescents and parents towards premarital sex in rural Thailand: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridawruang, Chaweewan; Crozier, Kenda; Pfeil, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore attitudes of Thai parents and adolescents towards premarital sex. Data were collected from 11 focus groups with 30 Thai parents and 36 adolescents aged 15-19 years old in rural areas of Udon Thani province, Thailand and examined using thematic analysis. Four themes were identified from the data: the social judgement of girls; boys have nothing to lose; considering risks and parents as problem solvers. All themes relate to the continuing existence of double standards concerning the social norm for premarital sex as applied to young women on one side and young men on the other. The influence of traditional values is still very strong in rural north-eastern Thailand. The findings highlight teenagers' need for more support from their parents. The promotion of open, honest communication between parents and teens is important to overcome difficulties of social judgements and align thinking between old and new social values. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid waste management in Thailand: an overview and case study (Tha Khon Yang sub-district).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalang, Nachalida; Clarke, Beverley Dawn; Ross, Kirstin Elizabeth

    2017-01-11

    Due to rapid urbanization, solid waste management (SWM) has become a significant issue in several developing countries including Thailand. Policies implemented by the Central Thai Government to manage SWM issues have had only limited success. This article reviews current municipal waste management plans in Thailand and examines municipal waste management at the local level, with focus on the Tha Khon Yang sub-district surrounding Mahasarakham University in Mahasarakham Province. Within two decades this area has been converted from a rural to an urban landscape featuring accommodation for over 45,000 university students and a range of business facilities. This development and influx of people has outpaced the government's ability to manage municipal solid waste (MSW). There are significant opportunities to improve local infrastructure and operational capacity; but there are few mechanisms to provide and distribute information to improve community participation in waste management. Many community-based waste management projects, such as waste recycling banks, the 3Rs (reduce, reuse and recycle), and waste-to-biogas projects have been abandoned. Additionally, waste from Tha Kon Yang and its surrounding areas has been transferred to unsanitary landfills; there is also haphazard dumping and uncontrolled burning of waste, which exacerbate current pollution issues.

  20. Molecular detection and identification of Bartonella species in rat fleas from northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Colton, Leah; Sangmaneedet, Somboon; Suksawat, Fanan; Evans, Brian P; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2013-09-01

    The presence of Bartonella species in Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Rattus spp. (R. exulans, R. norvegicus, and R. rattus) in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand was investigated. One hundred ninety-three fleas obtained from 62 rats, were screened by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region, and the presence of Bartonella DNA was confirmed by using the citrate synthase gene. Bartonella DNA was detected in 59.1% (114 of 193) of fleas examined. Sequencing demonstrated the presence of Bartonella spp. similar to B. elizabethae, B. rattimassiliensis, B. rochalimae, and B. tribocorum in the samples tested with a cutoff for sequence similarity ≥ 96% and 4 clustered together with the closest match with B. grahamii (95.5% identity). If X. cheopis proves to be a competent vector of these species, our results suggest that humans and animals residing in this area may be at risk for infection by several zoonotic Bartonella species.

  1. New earthworm species of the genus Amynthas Kinberg, 1867 from Thailand (Clitellata: Megascolecidae

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    Ueangfa Bantaowong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Four new species of terrestrial earthworms from the zebrus-group in the genus Amynthas Kinberg, 1867, are described from Nan province, north Thailand: Amynthas phatubensis sp. n., from Tham Pha Tub Arboretum, Amynthas tontong sp. n., from Tontong Waterfall, Amynthas borealis sp. n., from Chaloemprakiat district, and Amynthas srinan sp. n., from Srinan National Park.After comparing with the two closely related Laos species Amynthas chandyi Hong, 2008 and Amynthas namphouinensis Hong, 2008, the four new species show clear morphological differences, and also it is confirmed that there are no previous records of the species described here. Amynthas phatubensis sp. n. is the largest (longest sized of these earthworms and is the only species that lives in limestone habitats. The genital characters are different among them and also from the two Laotian species. Molecular systematics would be a good method for further analysis of the diversity and species boundaries in SE Asian Amynthas.

  2. Study of factors influencing intestinal parasitic infections in a rural community in northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwansaksri, Jamsai; Garnngarndee, Upatham; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Soogarun, Supan

    2003-01-01

    We performed a survey in a rural village, in Nam Som District, Udon Thani Province, northeastern Thailand, focusing on intestinal parasitic infections and possible related personal factors. From a survey of the 178 villagers, we found the intestinal parasitic infection rate equal to 26.4% (47 cases). Further factor analysis was performed to find whether factors were related to the intestinal parasitic infections among the subjects. Of the total 20 factors analyzed, only three factors showed significant correlations with intestinal parasitic infections. The three factors were average annual income (p = 0.007), having a toilet (p = 0.040) and eating undercooked food (p = 0.010). The factors identified are the common problem described in many studies, the poor sanitation of the villagers. The economic status of the subjects is still an important factor influencing intestinal parasites among this sample of the Thai rural population.

  3. Geochemical characteristics of the oceanic island- type volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; ZHANG Zhibin; CHONGPAN Chonglakmani

    2009-01-01

    The oceanic island volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand, are usually covered by Lower Carboniferous and Upper Permian shallow-water carbonate rocks, with the Hawaii rocks and potash trachybasalt being the main rock types. The alkaline series is dominant with sub-alkaline series occurring in few cases. The geochemical characteristics are described as follows: the major chemical compositions are characterized by high TiO2, high P2O5 and medium K2O; the rare-earth elements are characterized by right-inclined strong LREE-enrichment patterns; the trace element patterns are of the upward-bulging K-Ti enrichment type; multi-component plots falling within the fields of oceanic island basalts and alkali basalts, belonging to the oceanic island-type volcanic rocks, which are similar to the equivalents in Deqin and Gengma (the Changning-Menglian zone) of Yunnan Province, China.

  4. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Grasses in Thailand

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    Jinaporn Wongwatanapaiboon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85–38.51, 31.13–42.61, and 3.10–5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification. The total reducing sugars in most grasses ranging from 500–600 mg/g grasses (70–80% yield were obtained. Subsequently, 11 types of grasses were selected as feedstocks for the ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF. The enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were utilized for hydrolysis and the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis, were applied for cofermentation at 35°C for 7 days. From the results, the highest yield of ethanol, 1.14 g/L or 0.14 g/g substrate equivalent to 32.72% of the theoretical values was obtained from Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass. When the yields of dry matter were included in the calculations, Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass gave the yield of ethanol at 1,091.84 L/ha/year, whereas the leaves of dwarf napier grass showed the maximum yield of 2,720.55 L/ha/year (0.98 g/L or 0.12 g/g substrate equivalent to 30.60% of the theoretical values.

  5. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Grasses in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwatanapaiboon, Jinaporn; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Burapatana, Vorakan; Inochanon, Ratanavalee; Winayanuwattikun, Pakorn; Yongvanich, Tikamporn; Chulalaksananukul, Warawut

    2012-01-01

    The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85–38.51, 31.13–42.61, and 3.10–5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification. The total reducing sugars in most grasses ranging from 500–600 mg/g grasses (70–80% yield) were obtained. Subsequently, 11 types of grasses were selected as feedstocks for the ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). The enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were utilized for hydrolysis and the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis, were applied for cofermentation at 35°C for 7 days. From the results, the highest yield of ethanol, 1.14 g/L or 0.14 g/g substrate equivalent to 32.72% of the theoretical values was obtained from Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass. When the yields of dry matter were included in the calculations, Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass gave the yield of ethanol at 1,091.84 L/ha/year, whereas the leaves of dwarf napier grass showed the maximum yield of 2,720.55 L/ha/year (0.98 g/L or 0.12 g/g substrate equivalent to 30.60% of the theoretical values). PMID:23097596

  6. Urinary pesticide metabolites in school students from northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwet, Parinya; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Chantara, Somporn; Barr, Dana B

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated exposure to pesticides among secondary school students aged 12-13 years old in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Pesticide-specific urinary metabolites were used as biomarkers of exposure for a variety of pesticides, including organophosphorus insecticides, synthetic pyrethroid insecticides and selected herbicides. We employed a simple solid-phase extraction with analysis using isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). A total of 207 urine samples from Thai students were analyzed for 18 specific pesticide metabolites. We found 14 metabolites in the urine samples tested; seven of them were detected with a frequency > or=17%. The most frequently detected metabolites were 2-[(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl) sulfanyl] succinic acid (malathion dicarboxylic acid), para-nitrophenol (PNP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TPCY; metabolite of chlorpyrifos), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (c-DCCA and t-DCCA; metabolite of permethrin) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; metabolite of pyrethroids). The students were classified into 4 groups according to their parental occupations: farmers (N=60), merchants and traders (N=39), government and company employees (N=52), and laborers (N=56). Children of farmers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of pyrethroid insecticide metabolites than did other children (p<0.05). Similarly, children of agricultural families had significantly higher pyrethroid metabolite concentrations. Males had significantly higher values of PNP (Mann-Whitney test, p=0.009); however, no other sex-related differences were observed. Because parental occupation and agricultural activities seemed to have little influence on pesticide levels, dietary sources were the likely contributors to the metabolite levels observed.

  7. The potential of cellulosic ethanol production from grasses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwatanapaiboon, Jinaporn; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Burapatana, Vorakan; Inochanon, Ratanavalee; Winayanuwattikun, Pakorn; Yongvanich, Tikamporn; Chulalaksananukul, Warawut

    2012-01-01

    The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85-38.51, 31.13-42.61, and 3.10-5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification. The total reducing sugars in most grasses ranging from 500-600 mg/g grasses (70-80% yield) were obtained. Subsequently, 11 types of grasses were selected as feedstocks for the ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). The enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were utilized for hydrolysis and the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis, were applied for cofermentation at 35 °C for 7 days. From the results, the highest yield of ethanol, 1.14 g/L or 0.14 g/g substrate equivalent to 32.72% of the theoretical values was obtained from Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass. When the yields of dry matter were included in the calculations, Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass gave the yield of ethanol at 1,091.84 L/ha/year, whereas the leaves of dwarf napier grass showed the maximum yield of 2,720.55 L/ha/year (0.98 g/L or 0.12 g/g substrate equivalent to 30.60% of the theoretical values).

  8. Trauma response to the Asian tsunami: Krabi Hospital, Southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Luke J; Travis, Angela R

    2006-04-01

    The date 26 December 2004 saw a massive tidal wave propagated from a 9.0 Richter scale suboceanic earthquake off the coast of Sumatra in South-East Asia. It swept across the Indian Ocean over a matter of hours leaving destruction in its wake. In Southern Thailand, Krabi Hospital, that province's major tertiary health centre, received the majority of the region's tsunami victims. Well-rehearsed contingency plans were in place to cope with 10, 20 and 40 trauma victims in the case of an extreme event. By the end of 26 December some 500 injured people had been treated at Krabi Hospital: well in excess of the 'worst case scenario' planning. Over the following days a total of 1357 tsunami victims were treated. Over the course of the day victims were able to move through the hospitals' system and gain appropriate treatment. This was achieved through the almost superhuman dedication of the hospitals' well-trained nursing and medical staff. In addition to this were large numbers of both Thai and foreign volunteers, who aided people with basic necessities such as providing them with food, water and clothing as well as simple human comfort, some also acting as translators for the health-care workers and the masses of injured and displaced people. Makeshift wards were constructed in halls and little used areas of the hospital, using army style stretchers to accommodate the wounded. Even though the disaster contingency plans at Krabi Hospital were utterly overrun, the fact that well-thought out and practised strategies were in place saved incalculable lives. The message is clear: practised responses to mass trauma situations will save lives and allows health-care teams to coordinate well in the face of overwhelming odds without panic. All centres should routinely practise disaster response through scenario-based training.

  9. Heliconema longissimum (Ortlepp, 1923) (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from Pisodonophis boro (Teleostei: Ophichthidae) in Thailand, with remarks on the taxonomy of the Proleptinae Schulz, 1927.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Frantisek; Taraschewski, Horst; Anantaphruti, Malinee Thairungroj; Maipanich, Wanna; Laoprasert, Thitiporn

    2007-01-01

    Physalopterid nematodes identified as Heliconema longissimum (Ortlepp, 1923) were collected from the stomach of rice-paddy eels Pisodonophis boro (Hamilton) (Anguilliformes: Ophichthidae) from two brackish-water localities (mangroves) in Thailand: one in Phan-Nga Province, southwestern Thailand, northeast of Phuket Island, and one in Ranong Province, near the border with Myanmar. Study of the morphology of this hitherto insufficiently known nematode species, including its first SEM examination, enabled a detailed redescription of H. longissimum. Present taxonomic problems in the subfamily Proleptinae Schulz, 1927 are discussed, where a new delimitation of Proleptus Dujardin, 1845, Heliconema Travassos, 1919 and Paraleptus Wu, 1927 is proposed based on the cephalic dentation. H. minnanensis [sic] Damin & Heqing, 2001 is transferred to Paraleptus Wu, 1927 as P. minnanensis (Damin & Heqing, 2001) n. comb. and Paraleptus chiloscyllii Yin & Zhang, 1983 transferred by Damin & Heqing (2001) to Heliconema, is retained in Paraleptus. H. ahiri Karve, 1941 is considered a junior synonym of H. longissimum (Ortlepp, 1923). The present finding of H. longissimum in Pisodonophis boro represents the first host record and the first record of this nematode from Thailand.

  10. Poultry-handling Practices during Avian Influenza Outbreak, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja J Olsen; Laosiritaworn, Yongjua; Pattanasin, Sarika; Prapasiri, Prabda; Scott F Dowell

    2005-01-01

    With poultry outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 continuing in Thailand, preventing human infection remains a priority. We surveyed residents of rural Thailand regarding avian influenza knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results suggest that public education campaigns have been effective in reaching those at greatest risk, although some high-risk behavior continues.

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rubber Industry in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jawjit, W.; Kroeze, C.; Rattanapan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Rubber production has been taking place in Thailand for many decades. Thailand is currently the world's largest natural rubber producer. We present emissions of greenhouse gases associated with the production of fresh latex, and three primary rubber products, including concentrated latex, block rubb

  12. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the

  13. Review: Askew, Mark (ed.: Legitimacy Crisis in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napisa Waitoolkiat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume: Askew, Mark (ed. (2010, Legitimacy Crisis in Thailand, Chiang Mai, Thailand: Silkworm Books (= King Prajadhipok’s Institute Yearbook No. 5 (2008/09. ISBN 978-974-9511-97-8, 340 pages

  14. Leading with Ideas : Skills for Growth and Equity in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    In Thailand, enhancing workforce skills and promoting innovation is part of the country's strategy to facilitate the transformation toward a more knowledge-intensive and creative economy generating good jobs. This report provides valuable insight for Thailand to develop the skills necessary to boost ideas-led growth and equity. The report draws on findings from employer surveys, analyses T...

  15. An Expert System Adviser for Tourists Planning To Visit Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanosatha, Vinita

    This document reports on an examination of the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of an interactive computer program. The program is called an expert system adviser, and is for tourists planning on visiting Thailand. The expert system contains well-organized information that provides detailed coverage of Thailand. The…

  16. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the

  17. Inferring Ethnolinguistic Vitality in a Community of Northeast Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, John Charles

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of ethnolinguistic vitality as the framework for a sociolinguistic survey measuring attitudes to multilingualism and reporting on the experiences of a community of Northeast Thailand (Isan) that forms part of Thailand's largest minority. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of participants in a…

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rubber Industry in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jawjit, W.; Kroeze, C.; Rattanapan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Rubber production has been taking place in Thailand for many decades. Thailand is currently the world's largest natural rubber producer. We present emissions of greenhouse gases associated with the production of fresh latex, and three primary rubber products, including concentrated latex, block

  19. Educational Expenditures in Thailand: Development, Trends, and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarik, Danuvas

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the trends of education expenditure policy during the past few decades, as well as the recent allocation and distribution of education expenditure in Thailand. It also focuses on the development of the substance of education policy in Thailand. Political connection with the education expenditure policy is also…

  20. Inter-regional mating compatibility among Bactrocera dorsalis populations in Thailand (Diptera,Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinvinijkul, Suksom; Srikachar, Sunyanee; Kumjing, Phatchara; Weera Kimjong; Sukamnouyporn, Weerawan; Polchaimat, Nongon

    2015-01-01

    Mating compatibility among recently colonized (wildish) populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) from different geographic origins in Thailand was assessed through inter-regional mating tests. Outdoor octagonal nylon screen field cages containing single potted mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) were used. Sexual compatibility was determined using the index of sexual isolation (ISI), the male relative performance index (MRPI), and the female relative performance index (FRPI). The ISI values indicated that the northern population of Bactrocera dorsalis from Chiang Mai province was sexually compatible with the southern population of Bactrocera dorsalis (previously Bactrocera papayae) from Nakhon Si Thammarat province. The MRPI values showed that the northern males had a slightly higher tendency to mate than southern males, while the FRPI data reflected that females of both origins participated equally in matings. In all combinations there were no differences between homotypic and heterotypic couples in mating latency. Southern males tended to mate first with southern females, followed by northern males mating with northern females, while the latest matings involved heterotypic couples, in particular northern males mating with southern females. Overall, more couples were collected from higher parts of the field cage and the upper tree canopy, while there were no differences between the origins of flies in terms of elevation of couples within the cage. Laboratory assessments of fecundity showed no differences in the average number of eggs resulting from inter-regional crosses. Development of immature stages was also equal in the two hybrid crosses, with no differences found in the number of pupae produced, percentage pupal recovery, and percent adult emergence. The practical implication of this study is that colony of Bactrocera dorsalis derived from any northern or southern region of Thailand can potentially be used in sterile insect technique programs against this

  1. The enhancement of adaptation and psychological well-being among victims of flooding and landslide in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Nongnut; Suntayakorn, Chanjar; Sangkaewsri, Roongsri; Longchupol, Chaowanee; Lohitpintu, Itsareat; Kumsri, Tongbai

    2010-03-01

    To explore the needs of potential enhancement for adaptation and to examine the effectiveness of the potential enhancement program for adaptation and psychological well-being among victims of flooding and landslide in Lublae district Uttaradit Province, Thailand. 3 step of research and development; the needs of potential enhancement for adaptation among victims of flooding and landslide were analyzed by focus group discussion, the potential enhancement program (PEP) was designed by brainstorming of three groups of stakeholder; victims, health volunteers and health personnel and the effectiveness of PEP was tested by the difference of adaptation and psychological well-being perception among victims of flooding and landslide between before and after intervention. Thumbun Maepou, Lublae district, Uttaradit Province, Thailand. The needs of potential enhancement among victims of flooding and landslide were set up warning network along the risk canal and mountain, first aid training for health volunteer, and program of psychological health promotion. The PEP composed of community flooding and landslide rehearsal training, health education and dissemination and knowledge management. Total adaptation and psychological wellbeing of samples after intervention were significantly higher than that of before intervention at 0.05 and 0.001, respectively. The restoration of adaptation and psychological well-being among victims of flooding and landslide were essential to maintained holistic health.

  2. EFFECTS OF THE DECEMBER 2004 TSUNAMI AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT IN SOUTHERN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchai Thanawood

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A quake-triggered tsunami lashed the Andaman coast of southern Thailand on December 26, 2004 at around 9.30 am local time. It was the first to strike the shorelines of southern Thailand in living memory. Coastal provinces along the Andaman coast suffered a total of 5,395 deaths – more than half of whom were foreign tourists, with another 2,822 reported missing. Of the 6 affected coastal provinces, Phang Nga was the worst-hit province with some 4,224 lives lost and 7,003 ha of land area devastated. Takua Pa District, which was a prime tourist area with numerous beach resorts, was the most severely affected area in Phang Nga Province.Through the use of the aerial photographs and Ikonos images, it was found that 4,738 ha of Takua Pa District’s coastal area were affected by the tsunami. The tsunami run-up heights of 7-8, 5-7 and 10-12 metres, were observed at, respectively, Ban Namkhem, Pakarang Cape and Ban Bangnieng in Takua Pa District. The tsunami caused heavy damage to houses, tourist resorts, fishing boats and gear, culture ponds and crops, and consequently affected the livelihood of large numbers of the coastal communities. The destructive wave impacted not only soil and water resources, but also damaged healthy coral reefs, sea grass beds and beach forests. The surviving victims faced psychosocial stresses resulting from the loss of their loved ones, being rendered homeless and fears of another tsunami. The tsunami effects on human settlements, livelihoods, coastal resources, natural environment together with the psychosocial well being of the coastal communities have contributed to the degradation of the coastal ecosystems.Following the 2004 event, it has become apparent that the country’s disaster management strategies need to be strengthened through the implementation of mitigation and preparedness options to enhance the community’s resilience to natural events such as tsunami. The improved strategies are discussed in this paper.

  3. Correlates of HIV Testing Experience among Migrant Workers from Myanmar Residing in Thailand: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patou Masika Musumari

    Full Text Available Thailand continues to attract an increasing number of migrant workers (MW from neighboring countries including mainly Myanmar, Cambodia, and Laos; however, little is known about the extent to which MWs from these countries have access to HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. We used data from the baseline survey of the Prevention of HIV/AIDS among MWs in Thailand (PHAMIT-2 project to document the prevalence of, and factors associated with, HIV testing among MWs from Myanmar, the largest group of MWs in Thailand.The baseline survey of PHAMIT-2 was conducted in 2010 among MWs from Myanmar, Cambodia, and Laos in 10 purposely-selected provinces of Thailand. Of the 1,034 participants who qualified for the analysis to identify correlates of HIV testing, only 5.3% reported ever having been tested for HIV. Factors associated with HIV testing included having a secondary or higher education level (AOR, 2.58; CI, 1.36-4.90; P = 0.004, being female (AOR, 1.96; CI, 1.05-3.66; P = 0.033, knowing someone who died of AIDS (AOR, 1.81; CI, 1.00-3.27; P = 0.048, working in the fishery sector (AOR, 2.51; CI, 1.28-4.92; P = 0.007, and not having a work permit (AOR, 3.71; CI, 1.36-10.13; P = 0.010.Our study, in addition to revealing significantly low HIV testing among MWs from Myanmar, identifies important barriers to HIV testing which could be addressed through interventions that promote migrants' culturally-sensitive and friendly service, for example by facilitating flow of information about places for HIV testing, availability of language assistance, and ensuring confidentiality of HIV testing.

  4. [Analysis methods for educational needs assessment for family caregivers of HIV positive or AIDS patients in Thailand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, P; Gagnayre, R; d'Ivernois, J F

    2001-03-01

    Identification of educational needs of natural helpers for the home-based care of persons living with HIV or AIDS. Surin, Thailand. The very significant increase in the number of persons living with aids in Thailand, (1995: 20,154 notified cases; 1996: 23,309 cases; 1997: 25,064 cases), and the insufficiency of medical care for patients within Thailand's health structures, have driven Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to put in place since 1996 a home-based care project in Surin province (North-Eastern Thailand). In Thai culture, the sick are commonly cared for by one family member, known as the natural helper. An evaluation of the health situation showed that natural helpers who took care of a family member living with HIV or aids were not prepared for this situation. In order to better define the tasks that they ought to perform, we carried out a needs assessment in three interdependent steps: a records analysis of the activities delegated to natural helpers by nurses; an enquiry on the acceptability of natural helpers to carry out these cares and on the perceived usefulness of being trained; an expert consensus on the cares to be carried out by the natural helpers, obtained by the Delphi method. Twenty seven cares were identified as being able to be provided by natural helpers. They constitute as a list of reference for the training for natural helpers. This work has shown a social coherence between the different actors of the project. At no stage was the role of the natural helpers questioned. On the contrary, natural helpers have a privileged place within the family and in the home-based care programme. Natural helpers will allow continuity of care between the health structures and the patient's home.

  5. Implementation of forest cover and carbon mapping in the Greater Mekong subregion and Malaysia project - A case study of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungkul, S.; Suraswasdi, C.; Phonekeo, V.

    2014-02-01

    The Great Mekong Subregion (GMS) contains one of the world's largest tropical forests and plays a vital role in sustainable development and provides a range of economic, social and environmental benefits, including essential ecosystem services such as climate change mitigation and adaptation. However, the forest in this Subregion is experiencing deforestation rates at high level due to human activities. The reduction of the forest area has negative influence to the environmental and natural resources issues, particularly, more severe disasters have occurred due to global warming and the release of the greenhouse gases. Therefore, in order to conduct forest management in the Subregion efficiently, the Forest Cover and Carbon Mapping in Greater Mekong Subregion and Malaysia project was initialized by the Asia-Pacific Network for Sustainable Forest Management and Rehabilitation (APFNet) with the collaboration of various research institutions including Institute of Forest Resource Information Technique (IFRIT), Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF) and the countries in Sub region and Malaysia comprises of Cambodia, the People's Republic of China (Yunnan province and Guangxi province), Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam. The main target of the project is to apply the intensive use of recent satellite remote sensing technology, establishing regional forest cover maps, documenting forest change processes and estimating carbon storage in the GMS and Malaysia. In this paper, the authors present the implementation of the project in Thailand and demonstrate the result of forest cover mapping in the whole country in 2005 and 2010. The result of the project will contribute towards developing efficient tools to support decision makers to clearly understand the dynamic change of the forest cover which could benefit sustainable forest resource management in Thailand and the whole Subregion.

  6. Australia's double standard on Thailand's alcohol warning labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Since 2010, members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), including Australia, have opposed Thailand's proposal for graphic warnings on alcohol containers. This paper aims to provide an account of the arguments for/against Thailand and to examine the arguments' legal and political validity. This paper reviews primary WTO records in relation to Thailand's proposal to reveal the arguments for/against Thailand's proposal. The paper analyses these arguments in light of WTO cases to identify the legal strengths and weaknesses of Thailand's position. The paper then considers whether the attacks on Thailand by Australia are justified in light of the Australian Government's position on (i) alcohol warning labels in Australia and (ii) tobacco plain packaging. The legal arguments against Thailand are: only harmful alcohol consumption should be prevented; there is no evidence that graphic warning labels can reduce alcohol-related harm; the labels unnecessarily restrict international trade. There are some legal weaknesses in Thailand's proposal. Yet, Australia's opposition to Thailand cannot be justified whilst Australia is (i) mandating pregnancy-related alcohol warnings in Australia and (ii) defending its plain packaging law against similar WTO attacks. No WTO member is obliged to challenge another member for being non-compliant. The case tests the willingness of WTO members like Australia to respect the autonomy of other countries to pursue their public health goals and trial novel interventions. Australia's actions suggest it is willing to protect its alcohol industry at the expense of public health in Thailand. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  8. Simulation of Seasonal Circulations and Thermohaline Variabilities in the Gulf of Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitima ASCHARIYAPHOTHA; Prungchan WONGWISES; Somchai WONGWISES; Usa Wannasingha HUMPHRIES; YOU Xiaobao

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), the seasonal thermohaline feature and the ocean circulation in the Gulf of Thailand (GoT), situated between 6°N to 14°N latitude and 99°E to 105°E longitude, were studied numerically with 37 × 97 orthogonal curvilinear grid and 10 vertical sigma levels conforming to a realistic bottom topography. A spin-up phase of the first model run was executed using wind stress calculated from climatological monthly mean wind, restoring-type surface heat and salt, and climatological monthly mean fresh water flux data. In this paper, the temperature and salinity fields taken from Levitus94 data sets and the calculated temperature and salinity from the model run for 12-month mean and for each season are presented where the winter, summer, rainy, and end of the rainy seasons of Thailand are represented by the months January, April, July, and October, respectively. The simulated circulations are also described. The results show that the temperature in the GoT is warmer than the temperature of the other parts connected to the South China Sea (SCS). At any depth of inflow from SCS into the GoT, the salinity is high, but in the outflow from the GoT at the surface, the salinity is low. The strong circulations are clockwise during summer and the rainy seasons of Thailand, which are the East Asian monsoon periods, northeasterly and southwesterly during summer. They occur near Pattani and Narathiwat provinces during summer and in the central GoT during the rainy seasons. Sensitivity experiments were designed to investigate the effects of wind forcing and open boundary conditions. Wind forcing is shown to be the important factor for generating the circulation in the GoT. The lateral velocity at the open boundaries is of considerable importance to current circulation for the rainy and end of the rainy seasons, with insignificant effect for the winter and summer seasons of Thailand.

  9. Isolation rates of Burkholderia pseudomallei among the four regions in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarasamee, A; Trakulsomboon, S; Kusum, M; Dejsirilert, S

    1997-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the isolation rates of Burkholderia pseudomallei among community-based hospitals located in the central, north, northeast, and south of Thailand. A questionnaire inquiring about the number of isolation of B. pseudomallei from various clinical specimens during 1994-95 were mailed to 141 community-based hospitals. Of these, 125 hospitals (88.6%) responded to the questionnaire. Microbiological laboratory was not available in thirty hospitals. Data from 95 remaining hospitals with capability to do bacterial culture showed that B. pseudomallei was never isolated in 49 hospitals. Eleven, 9, 19 and 7 hospitals where B. pseudomallei has been isolated, are located in the central, north, northeast and south of Thailand respectively. From these 46 hospitals, a total of 1,131 strains of B. pseudomallei were isolated from 407,263 specimens in 1994 and 1,165 strains from 440,541 specimens in 1995. However, the isolation was most frequent in northeastern hospitals, which accounted for 890 and 964 strains in 1994 and 1995 respectively while only 94, 76, 71 and 83, 75, 43 strains were simultaneously isolated during the 2-year period in those located in central, north and south respectively. The isolation rates of B. speudomallei in 1994 and 1995 were 4.2 and 4.1 per 1,000 clinical specimens in northeastern hospitals as compared to 1.1, 1.8, 1.1 and 1.1, 1.2, 0.7 in those located in central, north and south respectively. Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Ratchasima, Buri Ram, Khon Kaen and Udon Thani were the five provinces which exhibited the highest isolation rates as follows; 244, 150, 147, 127, 100 and 218, 128, 114, 119, 58, in 1994 and 1995, respectively. It was concluded that B.pseudomallei was most commonly isolated in the northeast of Thailand. Under-recognition of B. pseudomallei may prevail not only in other parts of Thailand but in some areas of the northeast as well.

  10. Distribution and abundance of Opisthorchis viverrini metacercariae in cyprinid fish in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinlaor, Somchai; Onsurathum, Sudarat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Pinlaor, Porntip; Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Chaidee, Apisit; Haonon, Ornuma; Limviroj, Wutipong; Tesana, Smarn; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2013-12-01

    To increase public health awareness for prevention of opisthorchiasis caused by eating raw freshwater fish, the distribution and abundance of Opisthorchis viverrini metacercariae (OV MC) was investigated in freshwater fish obtained from 20 provinces in northeastern Thailand between April 2011 and February 2012. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 12,890 fish consisting of 13 species randomly caught from 26 rivers, 10 dams, and 38 ponds/lakes. Fish, were collected in each of the rainy and winter seasons from each province. Fish were identified, counted, weighed, and digested using pepsin-HCl. Samples were examined for OV MC by a sedimentation method, and metacercariae were identified under a stereomicroscope. OV MC were found in 6 species of fish; i.e., Cyclocheilichthys armatus, Puntius orphoides, Hampala dispar, Henicorhynchus siamensis, Osteochilus hasselti, and Puntioplites proctozysron from localities in 13 provinces. Among the sites where OV MC-infected fish were found, 70.0% were dams, 23.7% were ponds/lakes, and 7.7% were rivers. The mean intensity of OV MC ranged from 0.01 to 6.5 cysts per fish (or 1.3-287.5 cysts per kg of fish). A high mean intensity of OV MC per fish (>3 cysts) was found in 5 provinces: Amnat Charoen (6.5 cysts), Nakhon Phanom (4.3), Mukdahan (4.1), Khon Kaen, (3.5) and Si Sa Ket (3.4). In conclusion, OV MC are prevalent in natural cyprinid fish, with the infection rate varying according to fish species and habitats.

  11. Genetic diversity of the msp-1,msp-2,and glurp genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates along the Thai-Myanmar borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanungnit; Congpuong; Rungniran; Sukaram; Yuparat; Prompan; Aibteesam; Dornae

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the genetic diversity at the msp—1,msp—2,and glurp genes of Plasmodium falciparum(P.falciparum) isolates from 3 endemic areas in Thailand:Tak.Kanchanaburi and Ranong provinces.Methods:A total of 144 P.falciparum isolates collected prior to Irealmenl during January.2012 to June,2013 were genotyped.DNA was extracted:allele frequency and diversity of msp-1.msp-2,and glurp genes were investigated by nested polymerase chain reaction.Results:P.falciparum isolates in this study had high rate of multiple genotypes infection(96.5%)with an overall mean multiplicity of infection of 3.21.The distribution of allelic families of msp-1was significantly different among isolales from Tak.kanchanahnri.and Ranong but not for the msp-2.K1 and MAD20 were the predominant allelic families at the msp-1 gene,whereas alleles belonging to 3D7 were more frequent at the msp-2 gene.The glurp gene had the least diverse alleles.Population structure of P.falciparum isolates from Tak and Ranong was quite similar as revealed by the presence of similar proportions of MAD20 and K1 alleles at msp-1 loci.3D7 and FC27 alleles at msp-2 loci as well as comparable mean MOI.Isolates from Kanchanaburi had different structures;the most prevalent alleles were K1 and RO33.Conclusions:The present study shows that P.falciparum isolates from Tak and Ranong provinces had similar allelic pattern of msp—1 and msp—2 and diversity but different from Kanchanaburi isolates.These allelic variant profiles are valuable baseline data for future epidemiological study of malaria transmission and for continued monitoring of polymorphisms associated with antimalarial drug resistance in these areas.

  12. An assessment of Thailand's biofuel development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, S.; Salam, P. Abdul; Shrestha, Pujan

    2013-01-01

    . The policies, measures and incentives for the development of biofuel include targets, blending mandates and favorable tax schemes to encourage production and consumption of biofuels. Biofuel development improves energy security, rural income and reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but issues related....... The authors estimate that sustainably-derived agricultural crop residues alone could amount to 10.4 × 106 bone dry tonnes per year. This has the technical potential of producing 1.14-3.12 billion liters per year of ethanol to possibly displace between 25%-69% of Thailand's 2011 gasoline consumption...

  13. Biodiversity of the Betta smaragdina (Teleostei: Perciformes in the northeast region of Thailand as determined by mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanon Kowasupat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, there are currently five recognized species members of the bubble-nesting Betta genus, namely Betta splendens, B. smaragdina, B. imbellis, B. mahachaiensis and B. siamorientalis. In 2010, we indicated the possibility, based on COI barcoding evidence, that there might be two additional species, albeit cryptic, related to the type-locality B. smaragdina in some provinces in the northeast of Thailand. In the present study, after a more extensive survey of the northeast, and phylogenetic analyses based on COI and ITS1 sequences, the B. smaragdina group may be composed of at least 3 cryptic species members. The phylogenetic positions of these B. smaragdina group members in the bubble-nesting bettas' tree together with those of their congeners have been consolidated by better DNA sequence quality and phylogenetic analyses. With a better supported tree, the species statuses of B. siamorientalis and the Cambodian B. smaragdina-like fish, B. stiktos, are also confirmed.

  14. Biodiversity of the Betta smaragdina (Teleostei: Perciformes) in the northeast region of Thailand as determined by mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowasupat, Chanon; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Laosinchai, Parames; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Phongdara, Amornrat; Wanna, Warapond; Senapin, Saengchan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee

    2014-01-01

    In Thailand, there are currently five recognized species members of the bubble-nesting Betta genus, namely Betta splendens, B. smaragdina, B. imbellis, B. mahachaiensis and B. siamorientalis. In 2010, we indicated the possibility, based on COI barcoding evidence, that there might be two additional species, albeit cryptic, related to the type-locality B. smaragdina in some provinces in the northeast of Thailand. In the present study, after a more extensive survey of the northeast, and phylogenetic analyses based on COI and ITS1 sequences, the B. smaragdina group may be composed of at least 3 cryptic species members. The phylogenetic positions of these B. smaragdina group members in the bubble-nesting bettas' tree together with those of their congeners have been consolidated by better DNA sequence quality and phylogenetic analyses. With a better supported tree, the species statuses of B. siamorientalis and the Cambodian B. smaragdina-like fish, B. stiktos, are also confirmed. PMID:25606392

  15. Biodiversity of the Betta smaragdina (Teleostei: Perciformes) in the northeast region of Thailand as determined by mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowasupat, Chanon; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Laosinchai, Parames; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Phongdara, Amornrat; Wanna, Warapond; Senapin, Saengchan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee

    2014-12-01

    In Thailand, there are currently five recognized species members of the bubble-nesting Betta genus, namely Betta splendens, B. smaragdina, B. imbellis, B. mahachaiensis and B. siamorientalis. In 2010, we indicated the possibility, based on COI barcoding evidence, that there might be two additional species, albeit cryptic, related to the type-locality B. smaragdina in some provinces in the northeast of Thailand. In the present study, after a more extensive survey of the northeast, and phylogenetic analyses based on COI and ITS1 sequences, the B. smaragdina group may be composed of at least 3 cryptic species members. The phylogenetic positions of these B. smaragdina group members in the bubble-nesting bettas' tree together with those of their congeners have been consolidated by better DNA sequence quality and phylogenetic analyses. With a better supported tree, the species statuses of B. siamorientalis and the Cambodian B. smaragdina-like fish, B. stiktos, are also confirmed.

  16. The discovery of Kerivoula krauensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae in southern peninsular Thailand provides new information on the distribution and conservation status of this data deficient species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bounsavane Douangboubpha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In August 2013, an adult male Kerivoula krauensis was captured in a harp trap set in forest understorey in Bala Forest, Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary, Narathiwat Province, Thailand. This is only the second locality recorded for the species, the first outside Malaysia, and represents a range extension of 254 km, northwards from Krau Wildlife Reserve, Malaysia. This discovery has important conservation implications suggesting that the species is more widespread than previously thought but also confirms previous findings that it appears to live in very low population densities as compared to other Kerivoula found in the same habitat. Information on its taxonomy, echolocation call, distribution and ecology is included. In addition, the new material from Thailand is briefly compared to other known species from the country

  17. Petroleum systems of the Malay Basin Province, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2002-01-01

    The offshore Malay Basin province is a Tertiary oil and gas province composed of a complex of half grabens that were filled by lacustrine shales and continental clastics.These deposits were overlain by clastics of a large delta system that covered the basin.Delta progradation was interupted by transgressions of the South China Sea to the southeast, which finally flooded the basin to form the Gulf of Thailand.Oil and gas from the Oligocene to Miocene lacustrine shales and Miocene deltaic coals is trapped primarily in anticlines formed by inversion of the half grabens during the late Miocene.Hydrocarbon reserves that have been discovered amount to 12 billion barrels of oil equivalent.The U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the estimated quantities of conventional oil, gas and condensate that have the potential to be added to reserves by the year 2025 for this province is 6.3 billion barrels of oil equivalent (BBOE) (U. S. Geological Survey World Energy Assessment Team, 2000).

  18. Optimising steel hub location in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaradhorn Boontaveeyuwat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The optimal location of a steel hub in Thailand was analysed by applying aspecific research methodology designed to evaluate locations near the seaports. The growth of Thailand’s steel industry has become a centre of attention in the last decade, resulting in substantial efforts to form a distribution service centre to minimise the logistic costs associated with handling large steel flows in the future. The main analysis of the steel hublocation focused on areas situated near Laem Cha Bang, Map Ta Phut and Prachuab ports since these top three ports are considered important in terms of their steel throughput in Thailand. The transport costs associated with the shipment and inland transport together with port tariffs were calculated for the proposed scenarios of steel hub establishment andthese were compared with the existing situation without steel hub. The findings showed that a steel hub located near Laem Cha Bang port was the optimal option involving a saving of 9.4% on the total system costs incurred under the existing situation.

  19. Detection of Zika Virus Infection in Thailand, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buathong, Rome; Hermann, Laura; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Nisalak, Ananda; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Akrasewi, Passakorn; Plipat, Tanarak

    2015-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen with reported cases in Africa, Asia, and large outbreaks in the Pacific. No autochthonous ZIKV infections have been confirmed in Thailand. However, there have been several cases reported in travelers returning from Thailand. Here we report seven cases of acute ZIKV infection in Thai residents across the country confirmed by molecular or serological testing including sequence data. These endemic cases, combined with previous reports in travelers, provide evidence that ZIKV is widespread throughout Thailand.

  20. Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda of Vientiane province and municipality, Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Kotov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the first faunistic report on the Laotian Cladocera from diverse habitats in Vientiane province, Central Laos. We counted a total of 70 species, belonging to 37 genera, which is realistically close to an estimated 77 species. The five most common species were Diaphanosoma excisum, Ephemeroporus cf. barroisi, Anthalona harti, Macrothrix spinosa and Chydorus cf. eurynotus. The fauna is typically Oriental/Southeast (SE Asian, showing a strong similarity with neighbouring countries and especially Thailand. We discussed the current taxonomical status of the species and provided illustrations of the main taxa for future comparison. There are no surprising faunistic elements, except for a few new records for SE Asia (Matralona freyi, Ilyocryptus thailandensis. Our data is preliminary, as the fauna of Laos remains insufficiently studied. As for SE Asia as a whole, a significant number of taxa is in need of taxonomical revision.

  1. Phenetic structure of two Bactrocera tau cryptic species (Diptera: Tephritidae) infesting Momordica cochinchinensis (Cucurbitaceae) in Thailand and Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Kitthawee, Sangvorn

    2013-04-01

    Morphometric variation with respect to wing venation patterns was explored for 777 specimens of the Bactrocera tau complex collected in Thailand (nine provinces) and Laos (one locality). Cryptic species B. tau A and C were identified based on their wing shape similarity to published reference images. In Thailand, the B. tau A species was identified in four provinces and the B. tau C species in seven provinces, and both species in one locality of Laos. The objective of the study was to explain the geographic variation of size and shape in two cryptic species collected from the same host (Momordica cochinchinensis). Although collected from the same host, the two species did not show the same morphological variance: it was higher in the B. tau A species, which currently infests a wide range of different fruit species, than in the B. tau C species, which is specific to only one fruit (M. cochinchinensis). Moreover, the two species showed a different population structure. An isolation by distance model was apparent in both sexes of species C, while it was not detected in species A. Thus, the metric differences were in apparent accordance with the known behavior of these species, either as a generalist (species A) or as a specialist (species C), and for each species our data suggested different sources of shape diversity: genetic drift for species C, variety of host plants (and probably also pest-host-relationship) for species A. In addition to these distinctions, the larger species, B. tau C, showed less sexual size and shape dimorphism. The data presented here confirm the previously established wing shape differences between the two cryptic species. Character displacement has been discussed as a possible origin of this interspecific variation. The addition of previously published data on species A from other hosts allowed the testing of the character displacement hypothesis. The hypothesis was rejected for interspecific shape differences, but was maintained for size

  2. Land Use and Natural Resources Planning for Sustainable Ecotourism Using GIS in Surat Thani, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Murayama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the land use and natural resources for future sustainable ecotourism site planning using GIS as a tool. The study is based on 2007 land use land cover data and ecotourism suitability data which are then integrated with other GIS datasets to evaluate the land use and natural resources at a district level in Surat Thani province. The final step of this study was the prioritization of the area that is best suited for ecotourism in assessing ecotourism sustainability in Surat Thani province. The result is useful for tourism facilities development and ecotourism resource utilization where ecotourism could be more developed. Additionally, the results can be used for managers and planners working in local and central governments and other non-governmental organizations. These integrated approaches cover complex and universal issues such as sustainable development of ecotourism, biodiversity conservation and protected area management in a tropical and developing country such as Thailand. Moreover, it is believed that this study can be used as a basis for evaluating the suitability of other areas for ecotourism. In addition, it may also serve as a starting point for more complex studies in the future.

  3. An illustrated key to powder post beetles (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae associated with rubberwood in Thailand, with new records and a checklist of species found in Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Sittichaya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated key to seventeen species of Bostrichidae recorded in association with rubberwood in Thailand is provided. A checklist is given of nine species infesting rubberwood sawn timber in sawmills in southern Thailand, with information on distribution, host trees and biology. Three species are recorded for the first time from Thailand: Cephalotoma tonkinea Lesne, Lyctoxylon dentatum (Pascoe, and Minthea reticulata Lesne.

  4. United States - Thailand Free Trade Agreement Negotiations: Potential Effects on Pharmaceutical Patent Protection in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Laohapakakul, Duangrat

    2006-01-01

    Benefits and losses that a country would get from entering into a free trade agreement are often controversial and rise to national debate. This is especially apparent for negotiations between developed and developing countries, where there are large discrepancies between the bargaining power and the policies on national growth and development of each party. Numerous debates have dealt with the topics covered under the current U.S. – Thailand Free Trade Agreement (FTA) nego...

  5. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance in Thailand and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soebiyanto, Radina

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of malaria transmission in Thailand and Indonesia to assist in the understanding and reducing the incidence of the deadly disease. Satellite observations are being integrated into this work, and this is described herein.

  6. The Challenges of Accelerating Connected Government and Beyond: Thailand Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asanee Kawtrakul; Intiraporn Mulasastra; Tawa Khampachua; Somchoke Ruengittinun

    2011-01-01

      Key issues to make Thailand more dynamic, competitive and prepared for ASEAN economic integration are the implementation of Internal Smart with eGovernment, International Smart with intergovernmental...

  7. Invisible in Thailand: documenting the need for protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Green

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Rescue Committee (IRC has conducted asurvey to document the experiences of Burmese people livingin border areas of Thailand and assess the degree to whichthey merit international protection as refugees.

  8. Epidemiological Investigation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kedougou in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pornruangwong, Srirat; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat

    2011-01-01

    with Salmonella Kedougou isolates of human origin from United States and of animal origin from the United Kingdom. Methods: Data from 13,976 Salmonella infections of which 253 were Salmonella Kedougou collected in Thailand between 2002 and 2008 were analyzed by logistic regression. Antimicrobial susceptibility...... testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed on selected Salmonella Kedougou strains causing infections in Thailand (n = 66), and compared to isolates from the United States (n = 5) and the United Kingdom (n = 20). Results: Logistic analysis revealed season (hot/dry; p = 0....... Three strains recovered from human stool in Thailand were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins: two harbored blaCTX-M-63 and one blaCMY-2. PFGE revealed 45 unique clusters. Isolates obtained from humans in Thailand and the United States presented identical PFGE profiles suggesting a travel...

  9. 7 CFR 319.56-47 - Certain fruits from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... indica), mangosteen (Garcinia mangoestana L.), pineapple (Ananas comosus), and rambutan (Nephelium...) Growing conditions. Litchi, longan, mango, mangosteen, pineapple, and rambutan must be grown in a... Thailand. (b) Treatment. Litchi, longan, mango, mangosteen, pineapple, and rambutan must be treated...

  10. Four new species of Xyris (Xyridaceae) from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phonsena, P.; Chantaranothai, P.; Meesawat, A.

    2012-01-01

    Four new species of Xyris (Xyridaceae), X. bituberosa, X. buengkanensis, X. emarginata, and X. thailandica from North-Eastern Thailand are described and illustrated. A provisional conservation assessment for each species is given.

  11. Shigella from Humans in Thailand During 1993 to 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangtrakulnonth, A.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Vieira, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    clustered in, around, and west of Bangkok. Serotypes 2a and 3a also clustered in southern Thailand, whereas var X clustered north and northeast of Bangkok. In conclusion, looking at Shigella species, Thailand changed from being a developing country to a developed country between 1995 and 1996. In addition......In Thailand during 1993-2006, a total of 9063 Shigella isolates from different medical centers were serotyped and trends over time and. spatial clustering analyzed. Of 3583 cases with age information, 1315 (37%) cases were from children between 0 and 4 years and 684 (1.9%) from children between 5....... Most infections occurred during July and August, and fewest in December. S. flexneri clustered around Bangkok, and Shigella sonnei in southern Thailand. Most S. flexneri infections were caused by serotype 2a (1590 of 4035) followed by serotype var X (1249). For both serotypes, a pronounced decrease...

  12. A revision of Garnotia (Gramineae) in Malesia and Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, J.F.; Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Garnotia (Gramineae) in Malesia and Thailand has eight taxa, one new, and with one new combination. Garnotia tenella also occurs in Oman. A nomenclatural history, key, descriptions, and notes are provided.

  13. Helminths in rodents from Wet Markets in Thailand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Ribas; W. Saijuntha; T. Agatsuma; C. Thongjun; K. Lamsan; S. Poonlaphdecha

    2016-01-01

    ... ( and ) were surveyed in eight traditional wet markets in Udon Thani, Thailand. Thirteen species of helminths were recovered, seven of which are potentially zoo-notic, with an overall prevalence of 89.8...

  14. Molecular epidemiology of bovine Babesia spp. and Theileria orientalis parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Cao, Shinuo; Iguchi, Aiko; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Zhou, Mo; Vudriko, Patrick; Changbunjong, Tanasak; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Moonarmart, Walasinee; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Wongsawang, Witsanu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle production represents the largest cattle population in Thailand. Their productivity is constrained by tick-borne diseases such as babesiosis and theileriosis. In this study, we determined the prevalence of Babesia bigemina, Babesia bovis and Theileria orientalis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic markers that were used for detection of the above parasites were sequenced to determine identities and similarity for Babesia spp. and genetic diversity of T. orientalis. Furthermore the risk factors for the occurrence of the above protozoan parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern parts of Thailand were assessed. A total of 329 blood samples were collected from beef cattle in 6 provinces. The study revealed that T. orientalis was the most prevalent (30.1%) parasite in beef cattle followed by B. bigemina (13.1%) and B. bovis (5.5%). Overall, 78.7% of the cattle screened were infected with at least one of the above parasites. Co-infection with Babesia spp. and T. orientalis was 30.1%. B. bigemina and T. orientalis were the most prevalent (15.1%) co-infection although triple infection with the three parasites was observed in 3.0% of the samples. Sequencing analysis revealed that B. bigemina RAP1 gene and B. bovis SBP2 gene were conserved among the parasites from different cattle samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the T. orientalis MPSP gene from parasites isolated from cattle in north and northeast Thailand was classified into types 5 and 7 as reported previously. Lack of tick control program was the universal risk factor of the occurrence of Babesia spp. and T. orientalis infection in beef cattle in northern and northeastern Thailand. We therefore recommend training of farmers on appropriate tick control strategies and further research on potential vectors for T. orientalis and elucidate the effect of co-infection with Babesia spp. on the pathogenicity of T. orientalis infection on beef in northern and northeastern Thailand

  15. The Projection of Shoreline Based on the MIROC-ESM Climate Model along the Coast of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritphring, S.; Udo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Thailand is littoral country with the coastal zone including the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea. They are economic important areas where 23 provinces are located with approximately 12 millions of population living in this areas. The coasts are characterized by geologic nature of landforms as sandy beach and dunes, coastal wetland, rocky coast, cliff coast and islands. Thailand's coast has been developed significantly since the last 3 decades; moreover, population growth and the demand for coastal living are ongoing pressures. Therefore, the potential impacts of climate change on existing coastal hazards are likely to increase. The impacts of sea level rise are probable to lead to the greater coastal inundation and erosion that may cause damage and loss to property, infrastructure and the environment. Although Thailand has approximately 2,700 km of shoreline, few researches have been conducted on coastal zone impacts and adaptations to climate change until now. Therefore, this study aimed to project the shoreline change along Thailand's coast due to the global sea level rise based on the climate scenario MIROC-ESM RCP4.5. The projection shoreline analysed by Bruun based on the assumption that in response to sea level rise, shore profiles would respond by acting to maintain their morphology relative to still water levels. It is a simple geometric model of nearshore profile evolution under rising sea level that is often assumed to work on all sandy shorelines. Moreover, the influences of land subsidence associated with sea level rise were taken into account in this study. The observed data as well as secondary data were used for modelling the 23 representative sandy beaches along the coast. Beach slope were observed as well as grain size sampling for model input. Wave buoys located along the coast were used for wave height and period detection. The results indicated shoreline retreat more than 2 m at the end of century when the land subsidence was not considered

  16. Refractory Minerals in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Qinguo; LI Jing; LIU Jiehua; LIU Yanjun

    2004-01-01

    Henan province is very rich in refractory minerals of many varieties including silica, dolomite, graphite,pearlite, sepiolite, olivine, and sillimanite group minerals, besides the abundant reserves of fireclay and bauxite,which lay a good foundation for the development of the refractories industry of the province. The paper introduces the reserves, distribution and character of the refractory minerals in Henan province.

  17. Thailand, A beauty hub for everyone? : Internationalizing Thai Aesthetic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Aesthetic surgery becomes another option of beauty. Interested Patients seeking for choices offered outside their homeland for more benefits. Thailand maybe one of those choices people is now interested in. Thai aesthetic industry may prove to be one of the most wanted destinations because of its expertise and relatively low cost with impressive service. Problem: “How should Thailand improve its Aesthetic service attractiveness to drive its potential to the level of internationa...

  18. Modelling the distribution of pig production and diseases in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Thanapongtharm, Weerapong

    2015-01-01

    This thesis, entitled “Modelling the distribution of pig production and diseases in Thailand”, presents many aspects of pig production in Thailand including the characteristics of pig farming system, distribution of pig population and pig farms, spatio-temporal distribution and risk of most important diseases in pig at present, and the suitability area for pig farming. Spatial distribution and characteristics of pig farming in Thailand were studied using time-series pig population data to des...

  19. Financial Inclusion, Financial Regulation, and Financial Education in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Tambunlertchai, Kanittha

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of financial inclusion in Thailand through the lens of an institutional analysis, which takes into consideration the desired outcomes, the service providers and enabling agencies, and the regulatory context that shape the existing provision of financial inclusion in Thailand. In discussing the achievement of the desired outcomes in terms of financial inclusion, the issues of financial education and financial regulation, which provide the contexts within which th...

  20. Current status of Tc-99m production in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoen, Sakda [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2003-03-01

    Technetium-99m is the workhorse of nuclear medicine and currently accounts for over 80% of all in vivo diagnostic procedures. In Thailand, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) had experiences in production of Technetium-99m by solvent extraction process and alternative technology for Technetium-99m generator based on zirconium molybdate and titanium molybdate gel generators were also studied. The paper describes past experiences and future plan of Technetium-99m production in Thailand. (author)