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Sample records for kallman syndrome phenotype

  1. The carpenter syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Erkan; Oğuz, Haldun; Safak, Mustafa Asim; Samim, Erdal

    2004-03-01

    Carpenter syndrome (Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type II), first described in 1901, consists of acrocephaly, syndactyly, polydactyly, congenital heart disease, mental retardation, hypogenitalism, cryptorchidism, obesity, umbilical hernia and bony abnormalities. We report a 6 years old boy presenting as a union of these malformations and also having bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory disturbances are not common among Carpenter syndrome patients. According to our knowledge, this is the first Carpenter syndrome case whose hearing loss is demonstrated by auditory brainstem response (ABR) test.

  2. Phenotypic variability in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Lavinia; Rusu, Cristina; Butnariu, Lacramioara; Panzaru, Monica; Braha, Elena; Volosciuc, M; Popescu, Roxana; Gramescu, Mihaela; Bujoran, C; Martiniuc, Violeta; Covic, M; Gorduza, E V

    2013-01-01

    Patau syndrome has an incidence of 1/10.000-20.000, the clinical diagnosis being suggested by the triad cleft lip and palate, microphthalmia/anophthalmia and postaxial polydactyly. Most frequent cytogenetic abnormality is free and homogeneous trisomy 13 (80.0%), rarely being detected trisomy mosaics or Robertsonian translocations. The objective of the study was to identify phenotypic features of trisomy 13. The retrospective study was conducted on a trial group of 14 cases diagnosed cytogenetically with trisomy 13 between January 2000 and December 2012 at lasi Medical Genetics Centre. Of the 14 cases, 3 were evaluated pathologically (two aborted foetuses and one stillborn), 8 cases were detected in the neonatal period, and 3 in infancy. Clinical diagnosis was supported by the identification of a model of abnormal development, mainly characterized by: maxillary cleft (lip and palate--5 cases; lip--1 case), ocular abnormalities (microphthalmia/anophthalmia--7 cases; cyclopia--1 case), postaxial polydactyly (7 cases), scalp defects (6 cases), congenital heart anomalies (10 cases, 6 patients with atrial septal defect), complete holoprosencephaly (4 cases), ear abnormalities (11 cases), broad nasal root (10 cases). An important issue in confirming the phenotypic variability of Patau syndrome is that the classic clinical triad was identified only in one case. Patau syndrome is a disease with variable expression and is characterized by a pattern of abnormal prenatal development characterized by facial dysmorphia, polydactyly and severe birth defects (heart, brain) that generate an increased in utero and perinatal mortality.

  3. Neurobehavioral phenotype of Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, D H; Boone, K B; Miller, B L; Swerdloff, R S

    2000-01-01

    A defined genetic syndrome with neurobehavioral components offers an unusual paradigm for the correlation of genetic defects with neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The power of the combination of detailed behavioral, neuroanatomical, and genetic studies has been demonstrated in studies of other conditions involving the sex chromosomes, such as Fragile X syndrome (Mazzocco [2000] Ment Retard Develop Disabil Res Rev. 6:96-106) and Turner syndrome (Ross [2000] Ment Retard Develop Disabil Res Rev. 6:135-141). Although the behavioral and neurologic difficulties that have been identified in Klinefelter syndrome (KS) are in most cases milder than the consequences of many other genetic syndromes, the deficits in KS cause significant morbidity, representing a more common, but poorly understood, subtype of those with learning disabilities. Both as children and as adults, KS subjects appear to offer a powerful genetic model for the study of language and language-based learning disabilities. Although it has been proposed that the language-based learning difficulties of KS boys are similar to those of nonaneuploidic dyslexics [Bender et al., 1986; Geschwind et al., 1998], this is not yet well established. The co-morbid frontal-executive dysfunction observed in KS is also a likely contributor to learning difficulties and, perhaps, social cognition, in many KS patients. It is also proposed that altered left-hemisphere functioning, whether causing, or due to, altered functional and anatomical cerebral dominance, is at the core of KS subjects' language problems. Although X chromosomal loci can provide only part of the picture, the study of KS subjects, a population with a relatively homogeneous etiology for dyslexia/dysphasia and frontal-executive dysfunction, offers many advantages over such a study in the general population, in which both dyslexia and attentional disorders are quite genetically heterogeneous [Decker and Bender, 1988; Pennington, 1990; Grigorenko et al., 1997

  4. The Behavioural Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsler, K.; Oliver, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to examine the notion of a behavioural phenotype for Angelman syndrome and identify methodological and conceptual influences on the accepted presentation. Methods: Studies examining the behavioural characteristics associated with Angelman syndrome are reviewed and methodology is described. Results:…

  5. Cognitive Phenotype of Velocardiofacial Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Frederick; Biswas, Asit B.; Gumber, Rohit; Singh, Niraj

    2011-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, includes developmental disabilities, frequently including intellectual disability (ID) and high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. VCFS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of…

  6. The behavioral phenotype of the Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles A

    2010-11-15

    The Angelman syndrome is clinically delineated by the combination of seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other ones involving severe developmental handicap. In this review the core neurological features of the syndrome are discussed with a focus on those behaviors that make Angelman syndrome a prototypical genetic disorder expressing a behavioral phenotype. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. [Variant phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Jiménez, Rosa; García García, Marta; García Puig, Juan

    2011-01-29

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) and LNS variants are due to mutations in the HPRT1 gene causing HPRT enzymatic activity deficiency. We report a patient presenting a variant phenotype and a major genetic defect. The mutation has been previously reported as always associated with complete Lesch-Nyhan phenotype. We analyzed the presence of complete HPRT mRNA in this patient, in two patients with the complete Lesch Nyhan syndrome phenotype, and in control subjects. We found a minor amount of normal HPRT mRNA in the present patient but also in the two patients with splice mutation and the complete Lesch Nyhan syndrome phenotype. To our knowledge, this patient is the first report of a major genetic defect, with no detectable enzymatic activity, and a partial HPRT deficiency phenotype. Our results question the hypothesis of a normally spliced HPRT cDNA as the sole cause of the patient partial phenotype. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Syndromic (phenotypic) diarrhea in early infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Bodemer Christine; Brousse Nicole; Roquelaure Bertrand; Vinson Christine; Goulet Olivier; Cézard Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea (SD), also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD) or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE), is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN). To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000–400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorph...

  9. Syndromic (phenotypic) diarrhea in early infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Bodemer Christine; Brousse Nicole; Roquelaure Bertrand; Vinson Christine; Goulet Olivier; Cézard Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea (SD), also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD) or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE), is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN). To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000–400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorph...

  10. Notched delta, phenotype, and Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Christian M; Kelley, Kent R; Nordli, Douglas R

    2005-08-01

    The notched delta pattern is one of the characteristic EEG features found in Angelman syndrome patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the notched delta pattern as a detection tool for Angelman syndrome patients by analyzing its frequency in a tertiary care pediatric center, its specificity for Angelman syndrome, and the age at which it was observed. The authors performed a retrospective review of the video-EEG recordings of all the patients who had either the notched delta pattern or a phenotype consistent with Angelman syndrome. The notched delta was observed in 1.1% of all the EEGs performed. Its specificity for Angelman syndrome was evaluated at 38%. The youngest age at which it was noted was 14 months. The results indicate that the notched delta pattern is relatively rare, but more frequent than expected, and is easily recognizable. The pattern was observed not only in Angelman syndrome patients, but also in children with a spectrum of conditions wider than reported. It is a powerful detection tool for Angelman syndrome when correlated to a suggestive phenotype, and the association of these features should raise suspicion for Angelman syndrome in both infants and adults.

  11. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  12. Syndromic (phenotypic diarrhea in early infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodemer Christine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea (SD, also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN. To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000–400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorphism including prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism. Hairs are woolly, easily removed and poorly pigmented. Severe and persistent diarrhea starts within the first 6 months of life (≤ 1 month in most cases and is accompanied by severe malabsorption leading to early and relentless protein energy malnutrition with failure to thrive. Liver disease affects about half of patients with extensive fibrosis or cirrhosis. There is currently no specific biochemical profile, though a functional T-cell immune deficiency with defective antibody production was reported. Microscopic analysis of the hair show twisted hair (pili torti, aniso- and poilkilotrichosis, and trichorrhexis nodosa. Histopathological analysis of small intestine biopsy shows non-specific villous atrophy with low or no mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and no specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium. The etiology remains unknown. The frequent association of the disorder with parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggests a genetic origin with an autosomal recessive mode of transmission. Early management consists of total PN. Some infants have a rather milder phenotype with partial PN dependency or require only enteral feeding. Prognosis of this syndrome is poor, but most patients now survive, and about half of the patients may be weaned from PN at adolescence, but experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Disease name

  13. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

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    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.; Delicado, A.; Palacios, J. [La Paz Hospital, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newborn infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Understanding the basis for Down syndrome phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is a collection of features that are caused by trisomy for human Chromosome 21. While elevated transcript levels of the more than 350 genes on the chromosome are primarily responsible, it is likely that multiple genetic mechanisms underlie the numerous ways in which development and function diverge in individuals with trisomy 21 compared to euploid individuals. We consider genotype-phenotype interactions with the goal of producing working concepts that will be useful for approaches to ameliorate the effects of trisomy.

  15. The Down Syndrome Behavioural Phenotype: Taking a Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah; Most, David; Philofsky, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to show a specific behavioural phenotype, or a pattern of strengths and challenges in functioning across different domains of development. It is argued that a developmental approach to researching the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype, including an examination of the dynamic process of the unfolding…

  16. The Down Syndrome Behavioural Phenotype: Taking a Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah; Most, David; Philofsky, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to show a specific behavioural phenotype, or a pattern of strengths and challenges in functioning across different domains of development. It is argued that a developmental approach to researching the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype, including an examination of the dynamic process of the unfolding…

  17. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: Evolution of the Phenotype

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    Passarge, Eberhard; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The medical case history of a 2-year-old girl who developed, during the second year of life, the classical phenotype (typical appearance) indicative of the deLange syndrome, with both mental and physical impairment. (KW)

  18. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Moran; Monica Arriaga; Gustavo Rodriguez; Segundo Moran

    2012-01-01

    Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese...

  19. Additional phenotypic features of Muenke syndrome in 2 Dutch families.

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    de Jong, Tim; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Hoogeboom, A Jeannette M

    2011-03-01

    In about 30% of the patients with syndromal craniosynostosis, a genetic mutation can be traced. For the purpose of adequate genetic counseling and treatment of these patients, the full spectrum of clinical findings for each specific mutation needs to be appreciated. The Pro250Arg mutation in the FGFR3 gene is found in patients with Muenke syndrome and is one of the most frequently encountered mutations in craniosynostosis syndromes. A number of studies on the relationship between genotype and phenotype concerning this specific mutation have been published. Two Dutch families with Muenke syndrome were screened for the reported characteristics of this syndrome and for additional features. New phenotypical findings were hypoplasia of the frontal sinus, ptosis of the upper eyelids, dysplastic elbow joints with restricted elbow motion, and mild cutaneous syndactyly. Incidentally, polydactyly, severe ankylosis of the elbow, fusion of cervical vertebrae, and epilepsy were found. Upper eyelid ptosis is thought to be pathognomonic for Saethre-Chotzen syndrome but was also observed in our series of patients with Muenke syndrome. Because Muenke and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome can have similar phenotypes, DNA analysis is needed to distinguish between these syndromes, even when a syndrome diagnosis is already made in a family member.

  20. Challenging behavior: Behavioral phenotypes of some genetic syndromes

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    Buha Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging behavior in individuals with mental retardation (MR is relatively frequent, and represents a significant obstacle to adaptive skills. The frequency of specific forms and manifestations of challenging behavior can depend on a variety of personal and environmental factors. There are several prominent theoretical models regarding the etiology of challenging behavior and psychopathology in persons with MR: behavioral, developmental, socio-cultural and biological. The biological model emphasizes the physiological, biochemical and genetic factors as the potential source of challenging behavior. The progress in the field of genetics and neuroscience has opened the opportunity to study and discover the neurobiological basis of phenotypic characteristics. Genetic syndromes associated with MR can be followed by a specific set of problems and disorders which constitutes their behavioral phenotype. The aim of this paper was to present challenging behaviors that manifest in the most frequently studied syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. The concept of behavioral phenotype implies a higher probability of manifesting specific developmental characteristics and specific behaviors in individuals with a certain genetic syndrome. Although the specific set of (possible problems and disorders is distinctive for the described genetic syndromes, the connection between genetics and behavior should be viewed through probabilistic dimension. The probabilistic concept takes into consideration the possibility of intra-syndrome variability in the occurrence, intensity and time onset of behavioral characteristics, at which the higher variability the lower is the specificity of the genetic syndrome. Identifying the specific pattern of behavior can be most important for the process of early diagnosis and prognosis. In addition, having knowledge about behavioral phenotype can be a landmark in

  1. Towards a Behavioral Phenotype for Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Rebecca H.; Hastings, Richard P.; Reilly, Sheena; Cass, Hilary; Charman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    A study compared 143 girls (ages 6-14) with Rett syndrome with 85 girls with severe mental retardation on the Developmental Behavior Checklist. Girls with Rett syndrome presented more "autistic relating" and fewer antisocial behaviors. When compared to children with autism, they did not present with classic autistic behavioral features. (Contains…

  2. Phenotype in 18 Danish subjects with genetically verified CHARGE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husu, E; Hove, Hd; Farholt, Stense

    2012-01-01

    Husu E, Hove HD, Farholt S, Bille M, Tranebjaerg L, Vogel I, Kreiborg S. Phenotype in 18 Danish subjects with genetically verified CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE (coloboma of the eye, heart defects, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia and ear anomalies and/or hearing loss...... problems (12/15) were other frequent cranial nerve dysfunctions. Three-dimensional reconstructions of MRI scans showed temporal bone abnormalities in >85%. CHARGE syndrome present a broad phenotypic spectrum, although some clinical features are more frequently occurring than others. Here, we suggest...

  3. Adult Phenotypes in Angelman- and Rett-Like Syndromes

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    Willemsen, M.H.; Rensen, J.H.M.; van Schrojenstein-Lantman de Valk, H.M.J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Kleefstra, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes share a range of clinical characteristics, including intellectual disability (ID) with or without regression, epilepsy, infantile encephalopathy, postnatal microcephaly, features of autism spectrum disorder, and variable other neurological symptoms. The phenotypic spectrum generally has been well studied in children; however, evolution of the phenotypic spectrum into adulthood has been documented less extensively. To obtain more insight into natural course and prognosis of these syndromes with respect to developmental, medical, and socio-behavioral outcomes, we studied the phenotypes of 9 adult patients who were recently diagnosed with 6 different Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes. Methods All these patients were ascertained during an ongoing cohort study involving a systematic clinical genetic diagnostic evaluation of over 250, mainly adult patients with ID of unknown etiology. Results We describe the evolution of the phenotype in adults with EHMT1, TCF4, MECP2, CDKL5, and SCN1A mutations and 22qter deletions and also provide an overview of previously published adult cases with similar diagnoses. Conclusion These data are highly valuable in adequate management and follow-up of patients with Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes and accurate counseling of their family members. Furthermore, they will contribute to recognition of these syndromes in previously undiagnosed adult patients. PMID:22670143

  4. Phenotypic variability of cat-eye syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Leegte, B; Van Essen, AJ

    2001-01-01

    Cat-Eye syndrome (CES) is a disorder with a variable pattern of multiple congenital anomalies of which coloboma of the iris and anal atresia are the best known. CES is cyogenetically characterised by the presence of an extra bisatellited marker chromosome, which represents an inverted dicentric dupl

  5. Phenotypic variability of cat-eye syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Leegte, B; Van Essen, AJ

    2001-01-01

    Cat-Eye syndrome (CES) is a disorder with a variable pattern of multiple congenital anomalies of which coloboma of the iris and anal atresia are the best known. CES is cyogenetically characterised by the presence of an extra bisatellited marker chromosome, which represents an inverted dicentric

  6. The phenotypic spectrum of dystonia in Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ha, Ainhi D; Parratt, Kaitlyn L; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2012-01-01

    Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome (MTS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by deafness and dystonia. However the phenotypic expression of dystonia has not been systematically defined. We report clinical, neurophysiological, and ophthalmological data on 6 subjects from 3 Australian kindreds...

  7. KBG syndrome and the establishment of its neuropsychological phenotype

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    Egger, J.I.M.; Dongen, L. van; Stumpel, C.; Wingbermü hle, P.A.M.; Kleefstra, T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: KBG syndrome is caused by a mutation in the ANKRD11 gene, characterized by short stature and specific dental, craniofacial and skeletal anomalies. Scarce literature on the phenotypical presentation mention delayed speech and motor development as well as mild to moderate intellectual disab

  8. Phenotype and Natural History in Marshall-Smith Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaw, Adam C.; van Balkom, Inge D. C.; Bauer, Mislen; Cole, Trevor R. P.; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Van Haeringen, Arie; Holmberg, Eva; Knight, Samantha J. L.; Mortier, Geert; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Puseljic, Silvija; Zenker, Martin; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Marshall-Smith syndrome (MSS) is a distinctive entity of unknown etiology with fewer than 50 patients described in the medical literature to date. Through an International collaboration and use of an online wiki to facilitate data collection and sharing, we further delineate the phenotype and natura

  9. Behavioral Phenotype in the 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2010-01-01

    The 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome (9qSTDS) is clinically characterized by mental retardation, childhood hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. Haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene has been demonstrated to be responsible for its core phenotype. In a significant number of patients behavioral abnormal

  10. Ethnic differences in the phenotypic expression of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Qiao, Jie

    2013-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine problem affecting women of reproductive age and is investigated from many regions of the world. Some reports have indicated ethnic difference in its manifestation. This review addressed the evidences for ethnic variation in the expression of PCOS phenotypes and explored the potential ethnic-specific diagnosis of this syndrome. To determine ethnic variation, community prevalence and clinical and metabolic problems, including hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhoea/amenorrhoea, polycystic ovaries, obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome, had been compared from differing backgrounds and populations. Moreover, a link between ethnicity and variation in the metabolic phenotype of PCOS had also been identified. East Asian women with PCOS have a lower BMI and a milder hyperandrogenic phenotype, but with the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome. South Asians in particular have a high prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, and are at risk for type 2 diabetes, with central obesity more than BMI reflecting their metabolic risk. African American and Hispanic women are more obese and more prone to metabolic problems. Besides, there is a higher prevalence of hirsutism among women of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean origin. Ethnically appropriate guidelines are needed for identifying anthropometric thresholds for better screening and diagnosis in high-risk ethnic groups.

  11. Low bone turnover phenotype in Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Petersen, Janne; Ravn, Kirstine;

    2014-01-01

    Background:Patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at risk of having low bone mass and low-energy fractures.Methods:We characterised bone metabolism by both bone formation and resorption markers in blood in a RTT population of 61 girls and women and 122 well-matched healthy controls. Levels of N...... of the lumbar spine (vBMADspine) and femoral neck (vBMADneck). We examined biochemical bone marker levels overall, and stratified to persons younger than age 25 years or equal to or older than age 25 years.Results:The RTT patients had reduced levels of all biochemical bone markers (p...

  12. The Phenotypic and Pathological Features of Prune-Belly Syndrome

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    Davut ŞAHİN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prune-belly syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by musculature deficiency in the abdominal wall, lower urinary tract obstruction, other urinary tract anomalies, and bilateral cryptorchidism. The syndrome is commonly associated with pulmonary, skeletal, cardiac, and gastrointestinal defects. Over 95% of patients are male. Urinary tract disease is the major prognostic factor with the complications of pulmonary hypoplasia and end stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine phenotypic and pathologicalfeatures of fetuses with this syndrome.Material and Method: Six fetuses with prune-belly syndrome were evaluated by postmortem pathological investigation. Characteristic features of the fetuses with this syndrome as well as additional anomalies were evaluated.Results: Five fetuses were male while one was female. Gestational age ranged from 15 to 22 weeks. A urethral pathology that prevented urinary outflow from the bladder was present in all cases. Marked bladder distension with atrophy of the bladder smooth muscle and abdominal distension with muscular atrophy were also seen in all. Crypto-orchidism, Potter face, pes equinovarus, pulmonary hypoplasia and obstructive renal dysplasia were among the additional noteworthy anomalies.Conclusion: The pathogenesis of prune-belly syndrome is controversial. More studies are required on the inheritance, etiology and pathogenesis of the prune belly syndrome. Factors affecting the bilaminar and trilaminar germ layer during early 2-3. embryonic week may be considered to explain the pathogenesis of the anomalies seen with this syndrome.

  13. Klinefelter syndrome (KS): genetics, clinical phenotype and hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, M; Rochira, V; Pasquali, D; Balercia, G; Jannini, E A; Ferlin, A

    2017-02-01

    Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) is characterized by an extreme heterogeneity in its clinical and genetic presentation. The relationship between clinical phenotype and genetic background has been partially disclosed; nevertheless, physicians are aware that several aspects concerning this issue are far to be fully understood. By improving our knowledge on the role of some genetic aspects as well as on the KS, patients' interindividual differences in terms of health status will result in a better management of this chromosomal disease. The aim of this review is to provide an update on both genetic and clinical phenotype and their interrelationships.

  14. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  15. Neurological phenotypes for Down syndrome across the life span

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the neurological phenotype of Down syndrome (DS) in early development, childhood, and aging. Neuroanatomic abnormalities in DS are manifested as aberrations in gross brain structure as well as characteristic microdysgenetic changes. As the result of these morphological abnormalities, brain circuitry is impaired. While an intellectual disability is ubiquitous in DS, there is a wide range of variation in cognitive performance and a growing understanding between aberrant bra...

  16. SATB2-associated syndrome presenting with Rett-like phenotypes.

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    Lee, J S; Yoo, Y; Lim, B C; Kim, K J; Choi, M; Chae, J-H

    2016-06-01

    The SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) was proposed recently, after the SATB2 gene was initially discovered to be associated with isolated cleft palate. This syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability with delayed speech development, facial dysmorphism, cleft or high-arched palate, and dentition problems. Here, we describe two novel SATB2 sequence variants in two unrelated patients presenting with Rett-like phenotypes. We performed trio-based whole-exome sequencing in a 17-month-old girl presenting with severe retardation and Rett-like phenotypes, which revealed a de novo missense variant in SATB2 (p.Glu396Gln). Moreover, targeted sequencing of the SATB2 gene was performed in a 2-year-old girl with severe psychomotor retardation, facial hypotonia, and cleft palate who also exhibited some features of Rett syndrome. A nonsense variant in SATB2 was identified in this patient (p.Arg459*). This study expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of SAS. SATB2 variants should be considered in cases with psychomotor retardation alone or in any cases with Rett-like phenotypes, regardless of the typical features of SAS such as cleft palate.

  17. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese PCOS patients. Levels of sexual hormone binding globulin are decreased, and levels of free androgens are increased in obese PCOS patients. Weight loss treatment is important for overweight or obese PCOS patients, but not necessary for normal weight PCOS patients, who only need to avoid increasing their body weight. Obesity decreases or delays several infertility treatments. The differences in the hormonal and metabolic profile, as well as the different focus and response to treatment between obese and non obese PCOS patients suggest that obesity has to be considered as a characteristic for classification of PCOS phenotypes.

  18. "Bartter-like" phenotype in Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emma, Francesco; Pizzini, Carla; Tessa, Alessandra; Di Giandomenico, Silvia; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Santorelli, Filippo M; Bertini, Enrico; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2006-03-01

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a mitochondrial disease caused by large deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most patients the disease is characterized by mtDNA heteroplasmy, where a mixture of wild-type and mutated mtDNA co-exist within cells in variable proportion, modulating the severity of the phenotype in different tissues. We report on the case of a 14-year-old child with classical symptoms of KSS and a renal phenotype characterized by hypokalaemic alkalosis, hypomagnesaemia, hyperreninaemia, hyperaldosteronism and nephrocalcinosis, resembling Bartter syndrome. Analysis of mtDNA demonstrated an 8,661 bp deletion involving eight mitochondrial genes. Uneven degrees of mtDNA heteroplasmy were demonstrated in several tissues, ranging from 24% to 60% of deleted/total mtDNA. Variable degrees of expression of mitochondrial enzymes were also found in biopsy specimens of renal and skeletal muscle by histocytochemistry. In particular, preserved cytochrome c oxidase was observed in tubular structures within medullary rays. It is proposed that a "Bartter-like" phenotype can arise in some patients with KSS as a result of heteroplasmy. In these cases aldosterone-responsive tubular structures have been spared during renal embryogenesis, allowing for the development of hypokalaemic alkalosis in response to salt and water losses from the more damaged tubular segments.

  19. Down syndrome phenotypes: The consequences of chromosomal imbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Schipper, R.; Sun, Z.; Gonsky, R.; Gerwehr, S.; Graham, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Carpenter, N.; Say, B. (H.A. Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Daumer, C. (Univ. of Munich (Germany)) (and others)

    1994-05-24

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and congenital heart disease. Besides a characteristic set of facial and physical features, DS is associated with congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract, an increased risk of leukemia, immune system defects, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Moreover, DS is a model for the study of human aneuploidy. Although usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, subsets of the phenotypic features of DS may be caused by the duplication of small regions of the chromosome. The physical map of chromosome 21 allows the molecular definition of the regions duplicated in these rare cases of partial trisomy. As a first step in identifying the genes responsible for individual DS features and their pathophysiology, a panel of cell lines derived from 16 such individuals has been established and the molecular break points have been determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern blot dosage analysis of 32 markers unique to human chromosome 21. Combining this information with detailed clinical evaluations of these patients, the authors have now constructed a [open quotes]phenotypic map[close quotes] that includes 25 features and assigns regions of 2-20 megabases as likely to contain the genes responsible. This study provides evidence for a significant contribution of genes outside the D21S55 region to the DS phenotypes, including the facies, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and mental retardation. This strongly suggests DS is a contiguous gene syndrome and augurs against a single DS chromosomal region responsible for most of the DS phenotypic features.

  20. Clinical Phenotype of Musladin-Lueke Syndrome in 2 Beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, R A; Logan, M A; Guo, L T; Apte, S S; Bader, H; O'Brien, D P; Johnson, G; Shelton, G D

    2017-03-01

    Musladin-Lueke syndrome (MLS), previously termed Chinese Beagle syndrome, is an autosomal-recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by extensive fibrosis of the skin and joints that was first identified in Beagles in the 1970s. Recent research identified a founder mutation (c.660C>T; p.R221C) in the ADAMTSL2 gene in Beagles with MLS. Here, we report the detailed clinical phenotype and laboratory findings in 2 Beagles affected with MLS. We discuss these findings in relation to the human disorder geleophysic dysplasia (GD), which also arises from recessive ADAMTSL2 mutations, and recent findings in Adamtsl2-deficient mice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. HRAS mutation analysis in Costello syndrome: genotype and phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Lin, Angela E; Stabley, Deborah L; Nicholson, Linda; Scott, Charles I; Doyle, Daniel; Aoki, Yoko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Zackai, Elaine H; Lapunzina, Pablo; Gonzalez-Meneses, Antonio; Holbrook, Jennifer; Agresta, Cynthia A; Gonzalez, Iris L; Sol-Church, Katia

    2006-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare condition comprising mental retardation, distinctive facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities (typically pulmonic stenosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and/or atrial tachycardia), tumor predisposition, and skin and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Recently mutations in HRAS were identified in 12 Japanese and Italian patients with clinical information available on 7 of the Japanese patients. To expand the molecular delineation of Costello syndrome, we performed mutation analysis in 34 North American and 6 European (total 40) patients with Costello syndrome, and detected missense mutations in HRAS in 33 (82.5%) patients. All mutations affected either codon 12 or 13 of the protein product, with G12S occurring in 30 (90.9%) patients of the mutation-positive cases. In two patients, we found a mutation resulting in an alanine substitution in position 12 (G12A), and in one patient, we detected a novel mutation (G13C). Five different HRAS mutations have now been reported in Costello syndrome, however genotype-phenotype correlation remains incomplete.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by ultrasonography and MR imaging

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    Senocak, Efsun Urger; Oguz, Kader Karli; Akata, Deniz [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Haliloglu, Goknur [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Kandemir, Omer [Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Woman' s Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype is characterized by neurogenic arthrogryposis, facial anomalies, polyhydramnios and lung hypoplasia. Prenatal US is crucial in showing Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype in addition to demonstrating reduced fetal movements or akinesia as an underlying aetiological factor as early as the 14th week of gestation. Several reports of prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by US have been published. In this report, MRI findings providing prenatal diagnosis are presented. (orig.)

  3. Phenotypic and behavioral variability within Angelman Syndrome group with UPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridman Cintia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Angelman syndrome (AS (developmental delay, mental retardation, speech impairment, ataxia, outbursts of laughter, seizures can result either from a 15q11-q13 deletion, or from paternal uniparental disomy (UPD, imprinting, or UBE3A mutations. We describe here the phenotypic and behavioral variability detected in eight UPD patients out of a group of 58 AS patients studied. All of them presented developmental delay, mental retardation, ataxia, speech impairment, and frequent drooling. Only one had microcephaly, whereas in two of them the OFC (head circumference was above the 98th percentile. The weight of all patients was above the 50th percentile, and in three of them the height was above the 90th percentile. Three were able to say a few words and to communicate by gestures. Two patients presented hyperphagia, and three presented skin picking, common features in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. Four patients (4/7 had wide-spaced teeth. Five presented seizures, and two others did not manifest frequent laughter. One patient was very different from the others, as he showed a better understanding and abilities to communicate, to play video games and to draw. We suggest here that there seems to be an extreme phenotypic and behavioral variability within the UPD group, and that both typical patients and those with mental retardation, language impairment, happy disposition, and hyperactivity should be tested for AS.

  4. Restless abdomen: a phenotypic variant of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, Hernando; Iranzo, Alex; Rye, David B; Santamaría, Joan

    2011-09-27

    A diagnosis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) requires an urge to move the legs in combination with sensory leg discomfort. Localization of the symptoms to other body areas in the absence of leg involvement is not recognized as part of the phenotypic spectrum of RLS. We describe 3 patients who presented with sensorimotor symptoms confined to the abdominal wall and, with the exception of not involving the legs, satisfied the primary and secondary diagnostic criteria for RLS. Patients underwent detailed clinical history, video-polysomnography, abdominal imaging, and serologic and genotyping assessment. Unpleasant abdominal symptoms emerged at night during periods of rest and were accompanied by an urge to move and temporized by movement. Patients reported sleep onset and sleep maintenance insomnia due to their abdominal symptomatology. Abdominal imaging was normal. Secondary features included periodic leg movements of sleep (PLMS), and dramatic symptom amelioration with the D(2)-D(3) dopaminergic agonist pramipexole. Two subjects were anemic. Conventional RLS emerged in one subject and resolved after dose escalation. Each subject was homozygous for the most common RLS/PLMS-associated risk allele in the BTBD9 gene. Our observations indicate that the restricted abdominal symptomatology manifest in our subjects represents a phenotypic variant of RLS. Physicians should be vigilant to the existence of this unique phenotype when encountering subjects who present with insomnia and abnormal abdominal sensations. Our experience emphasizes the importance of supportive clinical features in rendering a correct diagnosis such that the most cost-effective workups and treatment can be realized.

  5. Phenotypic variability in gap junction syndromic skin disorders: experience from KID and Clouston syndromes' clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Niepokój, Katarzyna; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Giza, Aleksandra; Mordasewicz-Goliszewska, Maria; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa

    2015-08-01

    Connexins belong to the family of gap junction proteins which enable direct cell-to-cell communication by forming channels in adjacent cells. Mutations in connexin genes cause a variety of human diseases and, in a few cases, result in skin disorders. There are significant differences in the clinical picture of two rare autosomal dominant syndromes: keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Clouston syndrome), which are caused by GJB2 and GJB6 mutations, respectively. This is despite the fact that, in both cases, malfunctioning of the same family proteins and some overlapping clinical features (nail dystrophy, hair loss, and palmoplantar keratoderma) is observed. KID syndrome is characterized by progressive vascularizing keratitis, ichthyosiform erythrokeratoderma, and neurosensory hearing loss, whereas Clouston syndrome is characterized by nail dystrophy, hypotrichosis, and palmoplantar keratoderma. The present paper presents a Polish patient with sporadic KID syndrome caused by the mutation of p.Asp50Asn in GJB2. The patient encountered difficulties in obtaining a correct diagnosis. The other case presented is that of a family with Clouston syndrome (caused by p.Gly11Arg mutation in GJB6), who are the first reported patients of Polish origin suffering from this disorder. Phenotype diversity among patients with the same genotypes reported to date is also summarized. The conclusion is that proper diagnosis of these syndromes is still challenging and should always be followed by molecular verification.

  6. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-11-11

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents.

  7. The neurobehavioral and molecular phenotype of Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Fitzpatrick, Sarah; Shaffer, Rebecca; Melnyk, Sophia; Begtrup, Amber H; Fox, Emma; Schaefer, Tori L; Mathieu-Frasier, Lauren; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy; Horn, Paul A; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, speech impairment, gait ataxia, and a unique behavioral profile. AS is caused by loss of maternal expression of the paternally imprinted UBE3A gene. In this study we aim to contribute to understanding of the neurobehavioral phenotype of AS with particular focus on the neuropsychiatric presentation of the disorder. We also undertake initial exploration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels in AS. Twelve individuals ages 3 years or older with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of AS underwent detailed medical history, phenotypic characterization, and BDNF plasma sampling. The results of this study demonstrate that individuals with AS suffer from significant developmental delay, impaired adaptive behavior, and sleep disruption. Additionally, hyperactivity/impulsivity appears to be the primary behavioral domain noted in these individuals. The majority of individuals in this project met criteria for autism spectrum disorder on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS); however, a negative correlation was noted between ADOS score and developmental age. BDNF plasma levels in AS individuals were significantly elevated compared to neurotypical controls. This is the first report of abnormal BDNF levels in AS, and one that necessitates larger future studies. The results provide a clue to understanding abnormal neuronal development in AS and may help guide future AS research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS is a rare developmental disorder which primarily affects males and has a relative prevalence of 1 in 25,000 in the general population. AAS patients usually present with developmental complications including short stature and facial, skeletal and urogenital anomalies. The spectrum of genotype-phenotype correlations in AAS is unclear and mutations of the FGD1 gene on the proximal short arm of chromosome X account for only 20% of the incidence of the disorder. Failure to identify pathogenic variants in patients referred for FGD1 screening suggests heterogeneity underlying pathophysiology of the condition. Furthermore, overlapping features of AAS with several other developmental disorders increase the complexity of diagnosis. Cytoskeletal signaling may be involved in the pathophysiology of AAS. The FGD1 protein family has a role in activation of CDC42 (Cell Division Control protein 42 homolog which has a core function in remodeling of extracellular matrix and the transcriptional activation of many modulators of development. Therefore, mutations in components in the EGFR1 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1 signaling pathway, to which CDC42 belongs, may contribute to pathophysiology. Parallel sequencing strategies (so-called next generation sequencing or high throughput sequencing enables simultaneous production of millions of sequencing reads that enormously facilitate cost-effective identification of cryptic mutations in heterogeneous monogenic disorders. Here we review the source of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in the context of AAS and discuss the applicability of next generation sequencing for identification of novel mutations underlying AAS.

  9. Preliminary evidence for a cognitive phenotype in Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, M M; Kelley, R I

    2001-09-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare, X-linked, recessive disorder that affects almost exclusively males. It is characterized by short stature, cardioskeletal myopathy, cyclic neutropenia, increased excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid in the urine, and moderate hypocholesterolemia. The objective of the present study was to assess whether BTHS presents with a cognitive phenotype. Preliminary data were collected from five kindergarten or first-grade boys with BTHS. An abbreviated psychoeducational test battery was administered to each boy, and parents of each boy completed standardized behavior rating scales. Data from 120 boys of similar age or grade level were used for one comparison group; a subset of this sample comprised a comparison group that was individually matched on age and grade level to one of the five boys with BTHS. Preliminary data reflect a higher incidence of cognitive difficulties in boys with BTHS relative to both comparison groups. Boys with BTHS had significantly lower visual spatial skills, but comparable reading-related skills, when compared with either group. Although based on a small sample size, the preliminary data presented in this work are the first indication of a cognitive phenotype associated with BTHS.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS is a devastating and refractory generalized epilepsy affecting children and adolescents. In this study we report the results of resective surgery in 18 patients with LGS phenotype who underwent single-lobe/lesionectomy or multilobe resection plus multiple subpial transection and/or callosotomy. After surgery, seven patients became completely seizure-free (Engel Class I and five almost seizure-free (Engel Class II. Additional four had significant seizure control (Engel Class III, and two had no change in seizure frequency (Engel Class IV. Of the 4 patients without any lesion on brain MRI, 2 ended with Engel Class II, 1 with III and the other with IV in Engels’ classification. Mean intelligence quotient (IQ increased from 56.1 ± 8.1 (mean ± SD before operation to 67.4 ± 8.2 (mean ± SD after operation, a significant improvement (P=0.001. Results also indicated that the younger the patient at surgery, or the shorter the interval between onset of seizure and resective operation, the better the intellectual outcome. Our data suggest that resective epilepsy surgery can be successful in patients with LGS phenotype as long as the EEG shows dominance of discharges in one hemisphere and corresponding ipsilateral imaging findings, even with contralateral ictal discharges.

  11. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  12. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zizhen; Jaeger, Jochen C; Ruzzo, Walter L; Morale, Cecile Z; Emond, Mary; Francke, Uta; Milewicz, Dianna M; Schwartz, Stephen M; Mulvihill, Eileen R

    2007-01-01

    Background Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value < 3 × 10-6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status). An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater. PMID:17850668

  13. Insulin resistance and endocrine characteristics of the different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panidis, Dimitrios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Misichronis, Georgios; Papadakis, Efstathios; Betsas, George; Katsikis, Ilias; Macut, Djuro

    2012-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by oligo- or anovulation (ANOV), biochemical or clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenemia (HA) and PCOs. Four phenotypes of PCOS exist [phenotype 1 (ANOV + HA + PCO), phenotype 2 (ANOV + HA), phenotype 3 (HA + PCO) and phenotype 4 (ANOV + PCO)] but the differences between them are not well studied. We compared markers of insulin resistance (IR) and endocrine characteristics between the different PCOS phenotypes. We prospectively studied 1212 consecutive women with PCOS and 254 BMI-matched healthy women. Phenotypes 1-4 were present in 48.2, 30.7, 9.7 and 11.4% of patients, respectively. BMI did not differ between the four phenotypes and controls. Both normal weight and overweight/obese women with phenotypes 1 and 2 were more insulin resistant than controls. Overweight/obese, but not normal weight, women with phenotype 4 were more insulin resistant than controls, while IR in women with phenotype 3 did not differ from controls regardless of obesity. In normal weight subjects, women with phenotypes 1 and 2 were more insulin resistant than women with phenotype 4. In overweight/obese subjects, women with phenotype 1 were more insulin resistant than women with phenotypes 2 and 3 and women with phenotype 4 were more insulin resistant than those with phenotype 3. Circulating androgens were higher in normal weight and overweight/obese PCOS patients with phenotypes 1-3 compared with those with phenotype 4, and higher in normal weight PCOS patients with phenotype 1 than in those with phenotype 2. Phenotype 1 is associated with more IR and more pronounced HA than phenotype 2. Phenotypes 2 and 4 with obesity, are also characterized by IR. In contrast, phenotype 3 is not associated with IR.

  14. Phenotype of a child with Angelman syndrome born to a woman with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, John R

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the phenotype, from early childhood to adolescence, of a girl with Angelman syndrome (AS) born following a maternal transmission of a germline paternal 15q11.2-q13 deletion. During early childhood, she showed a typical AS phenotype, such as jerky movements, poor sleep, high voltage electroencephalography pattern, epilepsy, and a severe developmental disability. As she grew older, indications of phenotypical traits similar to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) appeared, in particular hyperphagic behavior and a body fat distribution similar to that reported in PWS. She generally showed cheerful AS behavior and had the characteristic outbursts of laughter, but her attitude to other people did not reflect the usual shared enjoyment of interaction seen in children with AS. In unfamiliar surroundings, she withdrew socially, similar to children with PWS, and her insistence on the same, rigid routines was similar to behavior patterns in PWS. The dysmorphic facial features that characterize AS were blurred in adolescence. The specified features that this AS patient had in common with PWS were hardly incidental and, if verified by upcoming case reports of children born to women with a paternal 15q11.2-q13 deletion, they may show new aspects of genetic imprinting. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Waardenburg syndrome type II: phenotypic findings and diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X Z; Newton, V E; Read, A P

    1995-01-02

    The Waardenburg syndrome (WS) consists of at least two distinct autosomal dominant hereditary disorders. WS Type I has been mapped to the distal part of chromosome 2q and the gene identified as PAX3. Other gene(s) are responsible for WS Type II. Mapping WS Type II requires accurate diagnosis within affected families. To establish diagnostic criteria for WS Type II, 81 individuals from 21 families with Type II WS were personally studied, and compared with 60 personally studied patients from 8 families with Type I and 253 cases of WS (Type I or II) from the literature. Sensorineural hearing loss (77%) and heterochromia iridum (47%) were the two most important diagnostic indicators for WS Type II. Both were more common in Type II than in Type I. Other clinical manifestations, such as white forelock and skin patches, were more frequent in Type I. We estimate the frequency of phenotypic traits and propose diagnostic criteria for WS Type II. In practice, a diagnosis of WS Type II can be made with confidence given a family history of congenital hearing loss and pigmentary disorders, where individuals have been accurately measured for ocular distances to exclude dystopia canthorum.

  16. Study on phenotypic and cytogenetic characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋陆茜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate phenotype,cell differentiation and cytogenetic properties of bone marrow(BM) mesenchymal stem cells(MSC)separated from the myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) patients,and to analyze cytogenetic

  17. Global transcriptional disturbances underlie Cornelia de Lange syndrome and related phenotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuan, Bo; Pehlivan, Davut; Karaca, Ender; Patel, Nisha; Charng, Wu-Lin; Gambin, Tomasz; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Sutton, V Reid; Yesil, Gozde; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Tos, Tulay; Koparir, Asuman; Koparir, Erkan; Beck, Christine R; Gu, Shen; Aslan, Huseyin; Yuregir, Ozge Ozalp; Al Rubeaan, Khalid; Alnaqeb, Dhekra; Alshammari, Muneera J; Bayram, Yavuz; Atik, Mehmed M; Aydin, Hatip; Geckinli, B Bilge; Seven, Mehmet; Ulucan, Hakan; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ozen, Mustafa; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that presents with extensive phenotypic variability, including facial dysmorphism, developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID...

  18. [Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome: phenotypic diversity and association to colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Matilde; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Capellá, Gabriel; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Blanco, Ignacio

    2013-07-21

    Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by hyperplastic polyps (HP) occasionally associated with serrated adenomas (SA) or mixed polyps (MP) and defined by clinical criteria (OMS/Cleveland). HPS is heterogeneous regarding the number and size of polyps, and it is associated with colorectal cáncer (CRC) and a family history. Its genetic basis is unknow. We describe individuals with HPS criteria from a series of families assessed in our Unit of Genetic Advice for colonic polyposis. Our objective is to identify the clinical characteristics of this syndrome. Retrospective study of 197 families with colonic polyposis (1998-2011), identifying patients with HPS criteria. To know the number of polyps, we took into account polypectomies and/or the histologic study of surgical samples. Polyps were classified into adenomas, serrated lesiones (HP and SA) and MP. Genetic studies revealed: microsatellite instability (MSI), MUTYH gene variants (p.Tyr165Cys, p.Gly382Asp and p.Glu396GlyfsX43) and APC gene. Eighteen individuals, with a median age of 51.1 years, had criteria of HPS (11M/7F). Number of HP varied between 14 and 100 coexisting with classical adenomas, SA and MP in 14 individuals (77.8%). Localization of polyps: ascending and descending colon in 13 individuals (72.2%) and only descending colon in 5 (27.8%). A CRC was detected in 10/18 (55.6%) patients, and 3 of them had a double CRC, a family history in 3 patients (16.7%) and a history of HPS in one. IMS was not detected in 8 CRC nor in 3 adenomas studied; we detected 2/13 heterozygous mutations in the MUTYH gene (p.Gly382Asp) and one variant with an unknown biological significance in the APC gene (p.Ser926Pro). The phenotypic variability of HPS difficults its identification, hence it is important to adhere to the clinical criteria established for its classification as well as to establish screening guidelines for CRC on the basis of its high incidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  19. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  20. Syndromic albinism: a review of genetics and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2003-12-01

    There are several syndromes of albinism associated with systemic pathology. These include Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (CHS), Hermansky-Pudlack Syndrome (HPS), Griscelli Syndrome (GS), Elejalde Syndrome (ES) and Cross-McKusick-Breen Syndrome (CMBS). In the last several years the genetic defects underlying some of these syndromes have been described. HPS is related to 7 genes in humans. GS is related to 3 genes: MYOVA, Rab-27A, and melanophilin (Mlph). CHS is related to one gene: LYST. The genetic defects in ES and CMBS are yet to be defined. Syndromic forms of albinism are associated with defects in the packaging of melanin and other cellular proteins. As such they are distinct from oculocutaneous albinism, which is associated with defects in the production of melanin (e.g., TRP1, P gene, and tyrosinase).

  1. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother's radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges.

  2. Defining the phenotype associated with microduplication reciprocal to Sotos syndrome microdeletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novara, Francesca; Stanzial, Franco; Rossi, Elena

    2014-01-01

    NSD1 point mutations, submicroscopic deletions and intragenic deletions are the major cause of Sotos syndrome, characterized by pre-postnatal generalized overgrowth with advanced bone age, learning disability, seizures, distinctive facial phenotype. Reverse clinical phenotype due to 5q35...

  3. Early Learning and Adaptive Behaviour in Toddlers with Down Syndrome: Evidence for an Emerging Behavioural Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Background: Though the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype has been described as involving relative strengths in visuo-spatial processing and sociability, and relative weaknesses in verbal skills and motor planning, the early emergence of this phenotypic pattern of strengths and weaknesses has not yet been fully explored. Method: In this study, we…

  4. A developmental, longitudinal investigation of autism phenotypic profiles in fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Michelle; Martin, Gary E; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Losh, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeting overlapping behavioral phenotypes in neurogenetic disorders can help elucidate gene-behavior relationships. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been studied as a model for this approach, and important areas of phenotypic overlap and divergence have been documented. However, few studies have examined how the manifestation of ASD-related phenotypes in FXS may change over development, a question which has important implications for conceptualizin...

  5. Further patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Passarge, E.; Horsthemke, B. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (Germany)

    1995-04-10

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} decribes a patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype compared to Angelman syndrome patients with a 15q deletion. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  7. Phenotype of apoptotic lymphocytes in children with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Ghada M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS is the most common and best-known chromosomal disorder and is associated with several other pathologic conditions including immunodeficiency which makes a significant contribution to morbidity and mortality. Various immunological theories and observations to explain the predisposition of individuals with DS to various infections have been published, one of which is increased apoptotic cells. Aim The aim of this study was to identify the effect of apoptosis on both types of cells of specific immune response (T and B lymphocytes in children with DS using Annexin V staining of phosphatidyserine (PS as a specific marker of early apoptosis. Subjects and methods The study included 17 children with karyotypically ascertained DS (7 males and 10 females. Their ages ranged from 4 months to 14 years with mean age of 5.7 ± 4.35 years. Seventeen age and sex matched healthy children were included in the study as controls. Patients or controls with infections were excluded from the study. Complete blood picture, immunophenotyping, analysis of apoptosis using Annexin V was done at National cancer Institute to all children included in this study. Results Although CBC, differential count, relative and absolute number of CD3+ and CD16+ did not show significant differences between DS children and control group, the relative and the absolute size of apoptotic CD3+ T lymphocytes, and the relative size of apoptotic CD19+ B lymphocytes were significantly higher in DS children than in controls. On the other hand, no significant difference was detected as regards the absolute size of CD19+ B lymphocytes in DS children and in controls Conclusion our finding of increased early apoptotic cells (especially T cells in DS children may emphasize the fact that the function of cells- and not their number- is main mechanism responsible for the impairment of the immune system in DS children and may further add to the known fact that cellular

  8. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Female, 6 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: - - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Otolaryngology. Congenital defects. Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). DISTURBED ARTICULATION WAS DIAGNOSED: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed.

  9. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tatton-Brown (Katrina); A. Murray (Anna); S. Hanks (Sandra); J. Douglas (Jenny); R. Armstrong (Ruth); S. Banka (Siddharth); L.M. Bird (Lynne); C.L. Clericuzio (Carol); V. Cormier-Daire (Valerie); T. Cushing (Tom); F. Flinter (Frances); S. Jacquemont (Sébastien); S. Joss (Shelagh); E. Kinning (Esther); S.A. Lynch; A. Magee (Alex); V. Mcconnell (Vivienne); A. Medeira (Ana); K. Ozono (Keiichi); M. Patton (Michael); J. Rankin (Julia); D.J. Shears (Deborah); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); M. Splitt (M.); V. Strenger (Volker); K.E. Stuurman (Kyra); C. Taylor (Clare); H. Titheradge (Hannah); L. van Maldergem (Lionel); I.K. Temple; T.J. Cole (Trevor); S. Seal (Sheila); N. Rahman (Nazneen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWeaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with E

  10. Analysis of phenotype and genotype information for the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhzadeh, S; Kade, C; Keyser, B; Stuhrmann, M; Arslan-Kirchner, M; Rybczynski, M; Bernhardt, A M; Habermann, C R; Hillebrand, M; Mir, T; Robinson, P N; Berger, J; Detter, C; Blankenberg, S; Schmidtke, J; von Kodolitsch, Y

    2012-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is considered a clinical diagnosis. Three diagnostic classifications comprising first, Marfan genotype with a causative FBN1 gene mutation; second, Marfan phenotype with clinical criteria of the original Ghent nosology (Ghent-1); and third, phenotype with clinical criteria of its current revision (Ghent-2) in 300 consecutive persons referred for confirmation or exclusion of Marfan syndrome (150 men, 150 women aged 35 ± 13 years) were used. Sequencing of TGBR1/2 genes was performed in 128 persons without FBN1 mutation. Marfan genotype was present in 140, Ghent-1 phenotype in 139, and Ghent-2 phenotype in 124 of 300 study patients. Marfan syndrome was confirmed in 94 and excluded in 129 persons consistently by all classifications, but classifications were discordant in 77 persons. With combined genotype and phenotype information confirmation of Marfan syndrome was finally achieved in 126 persons by Ghent-1 and in 125 persons by Ghent-2 among 140 persons with Marfan genotype, and exclusion was accomplished in 139 persons by Ghent-1 and in 141 persons by Ghent-2 among 160 persons without Marfan genotype. In total, genotype information changed final diagnoses in 22 persons with Ghent-1, and in 32 persons with Ghent-2. It is concluded that genotype information is essential for diagnosis or exclusion of Marfan syndrome.

  11. Cardiovascular Malformations in CHARGE Syndrome with DiGeorge Phenotype: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushi Yasuda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both CHARGE syndrome and DiGeorge anomaly are frequently accompanied by cardiovascular malformations. Some specific cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B and truncus arteriosus are frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, while conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are overrepresented in patients with CHARGE syndrome. CHD7 gene mutation is identified in approximately two-thirds of patients with CHARGE syndrome, and chromosomal microdeletion at 22q11.2 is found in more than 95% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is occasionally accompanied by DiGeorge phenotype. We report two patients with dysmorphic features of both CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Although both of the two cases did not have 22q11.2 deletion, they had typical dysmorphic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B. They also had characteristic features of CHARGE syndrome including ear malformation, genital hypoplasia, limb malformation, and endocrinological disorders. CHD7 gene mutation was confirmed in one of the two cases. When a patient with cardiovascular malformations frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome does not have 22q11.2 deletion, we suggest that associated malformations characteristic of CHARGE syndrome should be searched for.

  12. Intermediate Phenotype between ADULT Syndrome and EEC Syndrome Caused by R243Q Mutation in TP63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koichi; Satoh, Chisei; Maekawa, Ryuta; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Iseki, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: A patient who had ectrodactyly, dry skin, exfoliative dermatitis, and hypodontia with peg-shaped teeth, but not cleft lip and palate, is described. Ectrodactyly with a tooth anomaly is recognized in both acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome and ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome. These 2 syndromes are caused by heterozygous mutations in the transcriptional factor gene p63. Mutation analysis of p63 gene showed a heterozygous mutation c.728G>A, p.Arg243Gln (previously referred to as R204Q) in the patient, but not in his parents. Therefore, this was a sporadic case of the p63 mutation–associated disorder. Although the mutation has been mostly reported in EEC syndrome patients, the present case did not have cleft lip and palate. Furthermore, the present case did not exhibit freckling or some of the other ectodermal dysplasia phenotypes typical of ADULT syndrome. The concept of ELA syndrome proposed by Prontera in 2011 resolves the problem confronted in diagnosing the present case. ELA syndrome is an acronym of EEC/limb–mammary syndrome/ADULT syndromes, and these 3 syndromes are united into a unique entity. This system can classify p63 mutation–associated disorders simply without interfering with treatment. PMID:28293528

  13. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  14. Fine-grained facial phenotype-genotype analysis in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Peter; Hannes, Femke; Suttie, Michael; Devriendt, Koen; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Faravelli, Francesca; Forzano, Francesca; Parekh, Susan; Williams, Steve; McMullan, Dominic; South, Sarah T; Carey, John C; Quarrell, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by anomalies of the short arm of chromosome 4. About 55% of cases are due to de novo terminal deletions, 40% from unbalanced translocations and 5% from other abnormalities. The facial phenotype is characterized by hypertelorism, protruding eyes, prominent glabella, broad nasal bridge and short philtrum. We used dense surface modelling and pattern recognition techniques to delineate the milder facial phenotype of individuals with a small terminal deletion (breakpoint within 4p16.3) compared to those with a large deletion (breakpoint more proximal than 4p16.3). Further, fine-grained facial analysis of several individuals with an atypical genotype and/or phenotype suggests that multiple genes contiguously contribute to the characteristic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome facial phenotype.

  15. WDR35 mutation in siblings with Sensenbrenner syndrome: a ciliopathy with variable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacino, Carlos A; Dhar, Shweta U; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2012-11-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents a WDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype-phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases.

  16. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease...

  17. Neurodevelopmental outcome in Angelman syndrome: Genotype-phenotype correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Line Granild Bie; Thaulov, Per; Trillingsgaard, Anegen

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, lack of speech, and epileptic seizures. Previous studies have indicated that children with AS due to 15q11.2-q13 deletions have a more severe developmental delay and present more often...

  18. Environmental Influences on the Behavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsler, Kate; Oliver, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Using observational methods, we examined the social influences on laughing and smiling behavior in children with Angelman syndrome by systematically manipulating aspects of social interaction. Seven boys and 4 girls who were between 4 and 11 years of age and who had a confirmed maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 completed the study. Each…

  19. Behavioural phenotype in Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter; F. van Dijk; J.J. Stolker; R.C.M. Hennekam

    2009-01-01

    Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLs) is an X-linked inherited disorder characterised by unusual facial features, abnormal fat distribution and intellectual disability. As many genetically determined disorders are characterised not only by physical features but also by specific behaviour, we stu

  20. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Juergen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Gueet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N. A.; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-> 5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease comple

  1. The phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome ameliorates with aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Zoe A.; Louwers, Yvonne V.; Fong, Sharon Lie; Valkenburg, Olivier; Birnie, Erwin; de Jong, Frank H.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of aging on the features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Design: Retrospective longitudinal follow-up study. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patient(s): Patients with PCOS, diagnosed according to the 2003 Rotterdam criteria, who visited the outpatient clinic on c

  2. The phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome ameliorates with aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Zoe A.; Louwers, Yvonne V.; Fong, Sharon Lie; Valkenburg, Olivier; Birnie, Erwin; de Jong, Frank H.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of aging on the features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Design: Retrospective longitudinal follow-up study. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patient(s): Patients with PCOS, diagnosed according to the 2003 Rotterdam criteria, who visited the outpatient clinic on

  3. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : Genetic determinants of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Valkenburg (Olivier)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was first described in 1935 by Stein and Leventhal as an association of amenorrhoea, obesity and a typical, polycystically enlarged, appearance of the ovaries at laparatomy1. Taking into account the absence of advanced

  4. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : Genetic determinants of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Valkenburg (Olivier)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was first described in 1935 by Stein and Leventhal as an association of amenorrhoea, obesity and a typical, polycystically enlarged, appearance of the ovaries at laparatomy1. Taking into account the absence of advanced imaging techni

  5. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : Genetic determinants of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Valkenburg (Olivier)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was first described in 1935 by Stein and Leventhal as an association of amenorrhoea, obesity and a typical, polycystically enlarged, appearance of the ovaries at laparatomy1. Taking into account the absence of advanced imaging techni

  6. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic syndromes with intellectual disability: comparison of adaptive profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nuovo, Santo; Buono, Serafino

    2011-10-30

    The study of distinctive and consistent behaviors in the most common genetic syndromes with intellectual disability is useful to explain abnormalities or associated psychiatric disorders. The behavioral phenotypes revealed outcomes totally or partially specific for each syndrome. The aim of our study was to compare similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles of the five most frequent genetic syndromes, i.e. Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Fragile-X syndrome (fully mutated), taking into account the relation with chronological age and the overall IQ level. The research was carried out using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (beside the Wechsler Intelligence scales to obtain IQ) with a sample of 181 persons (107 males and 74 females) showing genetic syndromes and mental retardation. Syndrome-based groups were matched for chronological age and mental age (excluding the Angelman group, presenting with severe mental retardation). Similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles are described, relating them to IQs and maladaptive behaviors. The results might be useful in obtaining a global index of adjustment for the assessment of intellectual disability level as well as for educational guidance and rehabilitative plans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous Analysis of the Behavioural Phenotype, Physical Factors, and Parenting Stress in People with Cornelia De Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulffaert, J.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, I.; Kroonenberg, P.; Scholte, E.; Bhuiyan, Z.; Hennekam, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Studies into the phenotype of rare genetic syndromes largely rely on bivariate analysis. The aim of this study was to describe the phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) in depth by examining a large number of variables with varying measurement levels. Virtually the only suitable multivariate technique for this is categorical…

  8. A Turner syndrome neurocognitive phenotype maps to Xp22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Frederick F

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turner syndrome (TS is associated with a neurocognitive phenotype that includes selective nonverbal deficits, e.g., impaired visual-spatial abilities. We previously reported evidence that this phenotype results from haploinsufficiency of one or more genes on distal Xp. This inference was based on genotype/phenotype comparisons of individual girls and women with partial Xp deletions, with the neurocognitive phenotype considered a dichotomous trait. We sought to confirm our findings in a large cohort (n = 47 of adult women with partial deletions of Xp or Xq, enriched for subjects with distal Xp deletions. Methods Subjects were recruited from North American genetics and endocrinology clinics. Phenotype assessment included measures of stature, ovarian function, and detailed neurocognitive testing. The neurocognitive phenotype was measured as a quantitative trait, the Turner Syndrome Cognitive Summary (TSCS score, derived from discriminant function analysis. Genetic analysis included karyotyping, X inactivation studies, fluorescent in situ hybridization, microsatellite marker genotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization. Results We report statistical evidence that deletion of Xp22.3, an interval containing 31 annotated genes, is sufficient to cause the neurocognitive phenotype described by the TSCS score. Two other cardinal TS features, ovarian failure and short stature, as well as X chromosome inactivation pattern and subject's age, were unrelated to the TSCS score. Conclusion Detailed mapping suggests that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in Xp22.3, the distal 8.3 megabases (Mb of the X chromosome, is responsible for a TS neurocognitive phenotype. This interval includes the 2.6 Mb Xp-Yp pseudoautosomal region (PAR1. Haploinsufficiency of the short stature gene SHOX in PAR1 probably does not cause this TS neurocognitive phenotype. Two genes proximal to PAR1 within the 8.3 Mb critical region, STS and NLGN4X, are

  9. Genotype and phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome - impact of androgen receptor polymorphism and skewed X inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A; Hertz, J M; Gravholt, C H

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic variation of Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is wide and may by caused by various genetic and epigenetic effects. Skewed inactivation of the supra-numerical X chromosome and polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) have been suggested as plausible causes. We wanted to describe X...

  10. Developing an Early Reading Intervention Aligned with the Down Syndrome Behavioral Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an early reading intervention for children with Down syndrome based on the related behavioral phenotype. The intervention targeted learning of letter-sound correspondences, reading of decodable and high frequency words, and phonological awareness. We evaluated the feasibility and potential efficacy of the…

  11. Honing in on the Social Phenotype in Williams Syndrome Using Multiple Measures and Multiple Raters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Magargee, Erin T.

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype of Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by difficulties with establishment and maintenance of friendships despite high levels of interest in social interaction. Here, parents and teachers rated 84 children with WS ages 4-16 years using two commonly-used measures assessing aspects of social functioning: the Social Skills…

  12. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We ident...

  13. Mastery Motivation in Children with Intellectual Disability: Is There Evidence for a Down Syndrome Behavioural Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Cuskelly, Monica; Browning, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the current study was to provide empirical evidence to support or refute assumptions of phenotypic deficits in motivation for children with Down syndrome (DS). Children with moderate intellectual disability (MID) associated with etiologies other than DS were recruited in an extension of a previous study that involved children…

  14. The impact of metabolic syndrome and CRP on vascular phenotype in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh Dehnavi, R.; Beishuizen, E.D.; Ree, M.A. van de; Le Cessie, S.; Huisman, M.V.; Kluft, C.; Princen, H.M.G.; Tamsma, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The burden of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients is variable. We hypothesize that metabolic syndrome (MS) and low-grade systemic inflammation modify the extent of atherosclerosis in DM2. Methods: Vascular phenotype was determined using the following endothe

  15. Behavioral phenotype in the 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome: a report about two adult patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Egger, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    The 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome (9qSTDS) is clinically characterized by mental retardation, childhood hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. Haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene has been demonstrated to be responsible for its core phenotype. In a significant number of patients behavioral abnormal

  16. High cognitive functioning and behavioral phenotype in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, Heather J; Gray, B A; Bent-Williams, A; Zori, R T

    2006-09-15

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies attributable to the presence of a mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 12p. The syndrome presents with a recognizable pattern of findings including: pigmentary skin changes, characteristic facial features (sparse anterior scalp hair, flattened midface, macrostomia, and coarsening of the facial features), and developmental delay. The developmental phenotype of PKS is quite variable, but most are considered to fall into the profound range of developmental retardation. We report on an individual with classical features of PKS with development significantly better than that reported in the literature. Developmental and behavioral testing in this individual alters the range of developmental expectation in PKS, and highlights the need for consideration of chromosomal analysis in individuals with normal or near-normal intelligence if other physical phenotypic features of PKS are present.

  17. The phenotype of multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1: report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couser, Natario L; Masood, Maheer M; Strande, Natasha T; Foreman, Ann Katherine M; Crooks, Kristy; Weck, Karen E; Lu, Mei; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Roche, Myra; Evans, James P; Berg, Jonathan S; Powell, Cynthia M

    2015-09-01

    The Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome 1 (MCAHS1) has been described in two families to date. We describe a 2-year-old Mexican American boy with the syndrome and additional manifestations not yet reported as part of the phenotype. The patient presented with severe hypotonia, microphallus and left cryptorchidism, and was later diagnosed with epilepsy and severe cortical visual impairment. He also had supernumerary nipples, pectus excavatum, a short upturned nose, fleshy ear lobes, and a right auricular pit. Massively parallel exome sequencing and analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygous missense (Trp136Gly and Ser859Thr) variants in the PIGN gene. This report extends and further defines the phenotype of this syndrome.

  18. Phenotypic variation among brothers with the McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ruth H; Jung, Hans H; Tison, François; Lee, Soohee; Danek, Adrian

    2007-01-15

    McLeod syndrome is an X-linked multisystem disorder affecting red blood cells, the peripheral and central nervous systems, and skeletal and cardiac muscle. No clear correlations of the clinical findings with the genotype of XK mutations have yet been uncovered. Here, we report the clinical features and progression in 10 affected brothers from 4 families with McLeod syndrome. There is significant variation in clinical presentation within families, including in causes of morbidity and mortality. This phenotypic variation, despite shared mutations, suggests the action of disease-modifying factors that may explain some of the difficulties with genotype-phenotype correlation in McLeod syndrome. (c) 2006 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Epilepsy and cataplexy in Angelman syndrome. Genotype-phenotype correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granild Bie Mertz, Line; Christensen, Rikke; Vogel, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, epilepsy, and low threshold for laughter. Aims: We investigated the occurrence and severity of epilepsy and laughter-induced loss of postural muscle tone determined by the different genetic...... subtypes. Methods: This study included 39 children with AS. Deletion breakpoints were determined by high resolution CGH microarray (1 x 1 M Agilent). Clinical data were based on a parent interview and medical record review. Results: All patients with AS based on a deletion had epilepsy. Epilepsy...

  20. A further case of a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a patient with Angelman syndrome molecular defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Molfetta, Greice Andreotti; Felix, Temis Maria; Riegel, Mariluce; Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de Faria; de Pina Neto, João Monteiro

    2002-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are distinct human neurogenetic disorders; however, a clinical overlap between AS and PWS has been identified. We report on a further case of a patient showing the PWS phenotype with the AS molecular defect. Despite the PWS phenotype, the DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN revealed an AS pattern. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed normal chromosomes 15 and microsatellite analysis showed heterozygous loci inside and outside the 15q11-13 region. The presence of these atypical cases could be more frequent than previously expected and we reinforce that the DNA methylation analysis is important for the correct diagnosis of severe mental deficiency, congenital hypotonia and obesity.

  1. A further case of a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a patient with Angelman syndrome molecular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are distinct human neurogenetic disorders; however, a clinical overlap between AS and PWS has been identified. We report on a further case of a patient showing the PWS phenotype with the AS molecular defect. Despite the PWS phenotype, the DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN revealed an AS pattern. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed normal chromosomes 15 and microsatellite analysis showed heterozygous loci inside and outside the 15q11-13 region. The presence of these atypical cases could be more frequent than previously expected and we reinforce that the DNA methylation analysis is important for the correct diagnosis of severe mental deficiency, congenital hypotonia and obesity.

  2. Angelman syndrome: insights into genomic imprinting and neurodevelopmental phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabb, Angela M; Judson, Matthew C; Zylka, Mark J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2011-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe genetic disorder caused by mutations or deletions of the maternally inherited UBE3A gene. UBE3A encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is expressed biallelically in most tissues but is maternally expressed in almost all neurons. In this review, we describe recent advances in understanding the expression and function of UBE3A in the brain and the etiology of AS. We highlight current AS model systems, epigenetic mechanisms of UBE3A regulation, and the identification of potential UBE3A substrates in the brain. In the process, we identify major gaps in our knowledge that, if bridged, could move us closer to identifying treatments for this debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of the fragile X syndrome: phenotype and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Medina Gómez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers confirm that fragile X syndrome is the leading cause of hereditary intellectual disability, but it is still largely unknown by educational professionals, health professionals and social service workers. An early detection could avoid transmission of the genetic disorder and would enable the establishment of the most appropriate interventions for each person. Great progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the neurodevelopmental disorder. In this article, an extensive review about the most relevant studies and contributions that have been made so far concerning its molecular, brain, cognitive and conceptual interactions, the tools to sift in order to detect possible affected people, and also some tips on interventions. Nevertheless there should be continued progress in order to improve the assessment and the assistance in each particular case.

  4. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Ljubković, J. [Department of Pathology, Forensic Medicine and Cytology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Gabrić Pandurić, D. [Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Saltvig, I. [Jessenius Faculty of Medicine of Commenius, University in Bratislava, Martin (Slovakia); Kutsche, K. [Institute of Human Genetics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Krželj, V. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2012-09-21

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins) diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*). They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene.

  5. Epilepsy and cataplexy in Angelman syndrome. Genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granild Bie Mertz, Line; Christensen, Rikke; Vogel, Ida; Hertz, Jens Michael; Østergaard, John R

    2016-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, epilepsy, and low threshold for laughter. We investigated the occurrence and severity of epilepsy and laughter-induced loss of postural muscle tone determined by the different genetic subtypes. This study included 39 children with AS. Deletion breakpoints were determined by high resolution CGH microarray (1×1M Agilent). Clinical data were based on a parent interview and medical record review. All patients with AS based on a deletion had epilepsy. Epilepsy was present in 3/4 children with UBE3A mutation, and 4/5 with pUPD. Onset of epilepsy occurred earlier in deletion cases compared to pUPD or UBE3A mutations cases. Laughter-induced postural muscle tone loss occurred only among deletion cases. We found no differences in severity of epilepsy between children with a larger Class I or a smaller Class II deletions, or between the total group with a deletion compared to children with pUPD or a UBE3A mutation. The drugs most frequently prescribed were benzodiazepines in monotherapy, or a combination of benzodiazepines and valproic acid. Epilepsy is very common in patients with AS, especially in patients with a deletion. Postural muscle tone loss and collapsing during outbursts of laughter were seen in patients with a deletion only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurodevelopmental outcome in Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Line Granild Bie; Thaulov, Per; Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Christensen, Rikke; Vogel, Ida; Hertz, Jens Michael; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, lack of speech, and epileptic seizures. Previous studies have indicated that children with AS due to 15q11.2-q13 deletions have a more severe developmental delay and present more often autistic features than those with AS caused by other genetic etiologies. The present study investigated the neurodevelopmental profiles of the different genetic etiologies of AS, and examined the evolution of mental development and autistic features over a 12-year period in children with a 15q11.2-q13 deletion. This study included 42 children with AS. Twelve had a Class I deletion, 18 had Class II deletions, three showed atypical large deletions, five had paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) and four had UBE3A mutations. Children with a deletion (Class I and Class II) showed significantly reduced developmental age in terms of visual perception, receptive language, and expressive language when compared to those with a UBE3A mutation and pUPD. Within all subgroups, expressive language performance was significantly reduced when compared to the receptive performance. A follow-up study of seven AS cases with 15q11.2-q13 deletions revealed that over 12 years, the level of autistic features did not change, but both receptive and expressive language skills improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Omphalocele in Miller-Dieker syndrome: Expanding the phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D. [Toronto Hospital-General Division, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moola, S.; Yarkoni, D. [Toronto Hospital-General Division, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    We report on a patient prenatally diagnosed with omphalocele, mild cerebral ventriculomegaly, nuchal fold thickening, and cystic changes in the umbilical cord who was found postnatally to have lissencephaly type I. Prenatal chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype; however, postnatal high resolution banding and FISH analysis, using a probe for locus D17S379 in chromosome region 17p13.3, demonstrated a deletion at 17p13.3 consistent with Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS). A review documented four more cases with MDS/isolated lissencephaly/17p-, with omphalocele. Because MDS is a contiguous gene disorder, we speculate that a gene or genes in this region have a major role in the closure of the lateral folds or the return of the midgut from the body stalk to the abdomen at 5-11 weeks of gestation. Prenatal diagnosis of omphalocele with mild ventriculomegaly should prompt FISH analysis for a deletion in 17p13.3. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Plasma lipidomics discloses metabolic syndrome with a specific HDL phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Cabré, Rosanna; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Victor, Victor M; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-12-01

    Lipidomics reveals a remarkable diversity of lipids in human plasma. In this study, we have performed an in-depth lipidomic analysis of human plasma from healthy individuals and subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in order to determine the lipidomic profile that allows prognosis of a pathological subpopulation with altered high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. The MetS population was categorized as having pathological or nonpathological HDL. Anthropometric parameters, cardiovascular risk markers, and lipoprotein subclasses of HDL and low-density lipoproteins were also evaluated. Lipidomic analysis revealed 357 differential molecules that were clustered (k means) in the two groups. The molecules identified in the whole lipidome showed that MetS subjects presented lower levels of glycerolipids and higher levels of glycerophospholipids with respect to control subjects. In contrast, when only statistically differential lipids were taken into account, differences were found between the two groups in almost cases. Furthermore, levels of saturated fatty acids were higher in patients with pathological HDL levels than in controls, whereas levels of unsaturated fatty acids were lower. These results highlight the potential of lipidomics as a clinical tool for risk assessment and monitoring of disease.

  9. Multigenerational pedigree with STAR syndrome: A novel FAM58A variant and expansion of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Nicole J; Kruisselbrink, Teresa; Cousin, Margot A; Blackburn, Patrick R; Klee, Eric W; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Lanpher, Brendan C

    2017-05-01

    STAR syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant disorder characterized by toe Syndactyly, Telecanthus, Anogenital malformations, and Renal malformations, and is caused by loss-of-function variants in FAM58A. Our proband presented with the hallmark features of STAR syndrome, as well as some additional less typical features including tethered cord and hearing loss. The proband's mother and maternal half-sister had similar clinical histories, but had variability in phenotypic severity. Clinical whole exome sequencing revealed a novel pathogenic nonsense variant, c.651G>A (p.Trp217X; NM_152274), in FAM58A in the proband, mother, and maternal half-sister. This pedigree represents the 11-13th patients described with STAR syndrome and the third instance of familial inheritance. To our knowledge, this is the first occurrence of a nonsense variant in FAM58A described in individuals with STAR syndrome and the phenotype in this pedigree suggests that tethered cord and hearing loss are features of STAR syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Phenotypic overlapping of trisomy 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inage, Eisuke; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Minowa, Kei; Akimoto, Nahoko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy of 12p is a rare chromosomal abnormality, which sometimes coexists with other chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient with a supernumerary chromosome involving chromosomes 12 and 14, which was confirmed by array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). He had developmental delay and dysmorphic features overlapped with those of Pallister-Killian syndrome, which is derived from an isodicentric chromosome 12. The microblepharon identified in our patient is a characteristic feature of 12p trisomy. Further patients are needed to establish the phenotypic difference between trisomy 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome.

  11. Mosaicism for c.431_454dup in ARX causes a mild Partington syndrome phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Diness, Birgitte; Stahlhut, Michelle;

    2014-01-01

    to expand. Detection of the duplication by DNA sequencing was difficult due to preferential sequencing of the normal allele, demonstrating the superiority of fragment length analysis in mosaic cases. The clinical symptoms were mild to moderate developmental delay with only the hand dystonia to suggest...... Partington syndrome. This patient is the first male reported to be mosaic for the duplication, and his clinical features are subtle. This study shows that in males with a phenotype of mild Partington syndrome and in heterozygous females fragment length analysis should be preferred over DNA sequencing....

  12. The Syndrome of Frontonasal Dysplasia, Callosal Agenesis, Basal Encephalocele, and Eye Anomalies - Phenotypic and Aetiological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2004-01-01

    We report ten sporadic cases of Brazilian patients with facial midline defects, callosal agenesis, basal encephalocele, and ocular anomalies. This very rare cluster of anomalies has been well reported before. However, only until recently it is recognized as a syndrome belonging to frontonasal dysplasia spectrum. The ten cases confirm a distinct clinical entity and help to define the phenotype more precisely than previously. Up to now etiology remains unknown, although we conjecture that it is due to a mutation in TGIF gene.

  13. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  14. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Willem MA; Egger, Jos IM; Willemsen, Marjolein H; de Leijer, Gert JM; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturbances, communication deficits, and motor perseverations. Data on psychological dysfunctions are so far not available. Previous studies have suggested that the loss of one copy of the gene SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) is related to the neurobehavioral phenotype. Additional genes proximal to SHANK3 are also likely to play a role in the phenotype of patients with larger deletions. The present paper describes two adult brothers with an identical 2.15 Mb 22qter (22q13.32q13.33) deletion, of whom the youngest was referred for evaluation of recurrent mood changes. In both patients, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed hypoplasia of the vermis cerebelli. Extensive clinical examinations led to a final diagnosis of atypical bipolar disorder, of which symptoms fully remitted during treatment with a mood stabilizer. In the older brother, a similar psychopathological picture appeared to be present, although less severe and with a later onset. It is concluded that the behavioral phenotype of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome comprises absent or delayed speech and perseverations with associated autistic-like features, whereas its psychopathological phenotype comprises an atypical bipolar disorder. The latter may have implications for the treatment regime of the syndrome-related behavioral disturbances. PMID:22570549

  15. Social phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders and Williams syndrome: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eAsada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD and Williams syndrome (WS both are neurodevelopmental disorders, each with a unique social phenotypic pattern. This review article aims to define the similarities and differences between the social phenotypes of ASD and WS. We review studies that have examined individuals with WS using diagnostic assessments such as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS, cross-syndrome direct comparison studies, and studies that have individually examined either disorder. We conclude that (1 Individuals with these disorders show quite contrasting phenotypes for face processing (i.e., preference to faces and eyes and sociability (i.e., interest in and motivation to interact with others, and (2 Although the ADOS and a direct comparison study on pragmatic language ability suggest more deficits in ASD, individuals with WS are similarly impaired on social cognition and communicative skills. In light of these results, we discuss how cross-syndrome comparisons between ASD and WS can contribute to developmental theory, cognitive neuroscience, and the development and choice of clinical treatments.

  16. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Hyperandrogenism and phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome are not associated with differences in obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mumm, Hanne; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Sørensen, Jens Aage

    2015-01-01

    controls according to Danish national guidelines. PCOS phenotypes were based on the Rotterdam criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, delivery by emergency cesarean section, preterm delivery and anthropometric measures in the newborn....... RESULTS: The incidence of adverse obstetric outcomes and anthropometric measures among the newborns were comparable between different phenotypes of PCOS and patients with HA. During oral glucose tolerance test, patients had higher risk of gestational diabetes mellitus compared to controls; odds ratio (95......OBJECTIVES: To investigate obstetric outcomes in Danish women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and isolated hyperandrogenism (HA) and describe the risk of adverse obstetric outcomes in women with PCOS and HA compared to controls. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Odense...

  18. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killen Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  19. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Wilson, William A; Pierce, Andrew J

    2012-10-30

    Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  20. Imprinting center analysis in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients with typical and atypical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprubí, Cristina; Coll, Maria Dolors; Villatoro, Sergi; Gabau, Elisabeth; Kamli, Amine; Martínez, Maria Jesus; Poyatos, David; Guitart, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are genetic disorders caused by a deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal or maternal chromosome 15, respectively. This deficiency is due to the deletion of the 15q11-q13 region, parental uniparental disomy of the chromosome 15, or imprinting defect (ID). Mutation of the UBE3A gene causes approximately 10% of AS cases. In this present study, we describe the molecular analysis and phenotypes of two PWS patients and four AS patients with ID. One of the PWS patients has a non-familial imprinting center (IC) deletion and displayed a severe phenotype with an atypical PWS appearance, hyperactivity and psychiatric vulnerability. The other PWS and AS patients did not present genetic abnormalities in the IC, suggesting an epimutation as the genetic cause. The methylation pattern of two AS patients showed a faint maternal band corresponding to a mosaic ID. One of these mosaic patients displayed a mild AS phenotype while the other displayed a PWS-like phenotype.

  1. [Phenotype-genotype correlation analysis of 12 cases with Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Peng, Ying; Xia, Yan; Li, Haoxian; Zhu, Huimin; Pan, Qian; Yin, Fei; Wu, Lingqian

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with Angelman syndrome/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS) and assess the application value of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP array) for such diseases. Twelve AS/PWS patients were diagnosed through SNP array, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and karyotype analysis. Clinical characteristics were analyzed. Deletions ranging from 4.8 Mb to 7.0 Mb on chromosome 15q11.2-13 were detected in 11 patients. Uniparental disomy (UPD) was detected in only 1 patient. Patients with deletions could be divided into 2 groups, including 7 cases with class I and 4 with class II. The two groups however had no significant phenotypic difference. The UPD patient had relatively better development and language ability. Deletions of 6 patients were confirmed by FISH to be of de novo in origin. The risk to their sibs was determined to be less than 1%. The phenotypic differences between AS/PWS patients with class I and class II deletion need to be further studied. SNP array is useful in detecting and distinguishing of patients with deletion or UPD. This method may be applied for studying the genotype-phenotype association and the mechanism underlying AS/PWS.

  2. Associations of menstrual cycle irregularities with age, obesity and phenotype in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panidis, Dimitrios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Papadakis, Efstathios; Chatzis, Panagiotis; Kandaraki, Eleni A; Tsourdi, Elena A; Macut, Djuro; Bjekic-Macut, Jelica; Marthopoulos, Apostolos; Katsikis, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Limited data suggest that menstrual cycle abnormalities are more pronounced in younger and more obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We aimed to evaluate the association between menstrual cycle pattern and age, obesity and PCOS phenotype in a large population of women with PCOS. We studied 1,297 women with PCOS and divided them according to: a) age in ≤ 20, 21-30 and > 30 years old, b) body mass index in normal weight, overweight and obese and c) PCOS phenotype in phenotype 1 (anovulation, hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries), 2 (anovulation and hyperandrogenemia without polycystic ovaries), 3 (hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries without anovulation) and 4 (anovulation and polycystic ovaries without hyperandrogenemia). The proportion of women with regular menstrual cycles progressively increased in the older age groups, being 8.1, 10.5 and 12.7% in women ≤ 20, 21-30 and > 30 years old, respectively (p = 0.037). The proportion of women with regular menstrual cycles did not differ between normal weight and obese women but was higher in overweight women (9.3, 9.4 and 13%, respectively; p = 0.020). The proportion of women with regular cycles alternating with irregular cycles was highest in women with phenotype 4, intermediate in women with phenotype 2 and lowest in women with phenotype 1 (74.3, 69.4 and 61.7%, respectively; p = 0.027). Menstrual cycle pattern is more irregular in women with the "classic" PCOS phenotypes than in phenotype 4 but appears to normalize with ageing. On the other hand, obesity does not appear to have an important effect on menstrual cycle pattern in PCOS.

  3. Inhibition of CDK5 Alleviates the Cardiac Phenotypes in Timothy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LouJin Song

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available L-type calcium channel CaV1.2 plays an essential role in cardiac function. The gain-of-function mutations in CaV1.2 have been reported to be associated with Timothy syndrome, a disease characterized by QT prolongation and syndactyly. Previously we demonstrated that roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor, could rescue the phenotypes in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from Timothy syndrome patients. However, exactly how roscovitine rescued the phenotypes remained unclear. Here we report a mechanism potentially underlying the therapeutic effects of roscovitine on Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes. Our results using roscovitine analogs and CDK inhibitors and constructs demonstrated that roscovitine exhibits its therapeutic effects in part by inhibiting CDK5. The outcomes of this study allowed us to identify a molecular mechanism whereby CaV1.2 channels are regulated by CDK5. This study provides insights into the regulation of cardiac calcium channels and the development of future therapeutics for Timothy syndrome patients.

  4. Rambam-Hasharon syndrome of psychomotor retardation, short stature, defective neutrophil motility, and Bombay phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, M; Etzioni, A; Eidlitz-Markus, T; Avidor, I; Varsano, I; Shechter, Y; Orlin, J B; Gershoni-Baruch, R

    1992-10-01

    We describe 2 Arab patients, both offspring of unrelated consanguineous matings, with unusual facial appearance, severe mental retardation, microcephaly, cortical atrophy, seizures, hypotonia, dwarfism, and recurrent infections with neutrophilia. Neutrophil motility was markedly decreased but the opsonophagocytic activity was normal. Both patients lack the red blood cell (RBC) H antigen and manifest the Bombay (hh) phenotype. Familial endocardial fibroelastosis and familial tetralogy of Fallot segregated independently in one family. The occurrence of the same syndrome in 2 unrelated families suggests that the various aspects of the disorder are the pleiotropic effects of a single mutation. Homozygosity-by-descent for a deletion involving contiguous genes may explain the findings in this syndrome. Alternatively, a mutation which involves an ubiquitous GDP fucose donor rather than the enzyme (alpha 2-L-fucosyltransferase) or its substrate (glcNAc) may account for the pleiotropic manifestations in this syndrome.

  5. Behavioral Phenotype and Autism Spectrum Disorders in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Lucia; Di Filippo, Teresa; Roccella, Michele

    2015-09-30

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a congenital disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation, limb abnormalities, intellectual disability, and behavioral problems. Cornelia de Lange syndrome is associated with abnormalities on chromosomes 5, 10 and X. Heterozygous point mutations in three genes (NIPBL, SMC3 and SMC1A), are responsible for approximately 50-60% of CdLS cases. CdLS is characterized by autistic features, notably excessive repetitive behaviors and expressive language deficits. The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology is comparatively high in CdLS. However, the profile and developmental trajectories of these ASD characteristics are potentially different to those observed in individuals with idiopathic ASD. A significantly higher prevalence of self-injury are evident in CdLS. Self-injury was associated with repetitive and impulsive behavior. This study describes the behavioral phenotype of four children with Cornelia de Lange syndrome and ASDs and rehabilitative intervention that must be implemented.

  6. The Acrocallosal Syndrome in A Neonate With Further Widening of Phenotypic Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish SINGHAL*

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Singhal R, Pandit S, Saini A, Singh P, Dhawan N. The Acrocallosal Syndrome in A Neonate With Further Widening of Phenotypic Expression. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring;8(2:60-64. The presentation of the typical characteristics of the acrocallosal syndrome (ACLS are hypoplasia/agenesis of corpus callosum, moderate to severe mental retardation, characteristic craniofacial abnormalities, distinctive digitalmalformation, and growth retardation in a neonate.An Indian neonate presented on day 1 of life (youngest in the literature to be reported with combination of abnormalities consistent with the acrocallosal syndrome and some additional findings. The baby, born to non-consanguineous, healthy parents, presented with macrocephaly, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, polydactyly of the hands and feet, duplication of hallux, hypotonia, recurrent cyanotic episodes, rib anomalies, dextro-positioning of heart, and delayed fallof umbilical cord.As the mode of inheritance of ACLS is autosomal recessive, the risk of recurrence is 25%. Genetic counselling is of prime importance, Polydactyly, and central nervous system malformations can be detected by ultrasonography in the second trimester, but due to variability of presentation, prenatal diagnosis may not always be possible.References1. Schinzel A. Postaxial polydactyly, hallux duplication, absence of corpus callosum, macencephaly and severemental retardation: a new syndrome? Helv Paediatr Acta 1979:34:141-146.2. Schinzel A. The acrocallosal syndrome: expansion of the phenotypic spectrum. Clin Dysmorphol 1994;3:31-34.3. Schinzel A, Schmid W. Hallux duplication, postaxial Polydactyly, absence of corpus callosum, severe mental retardation and additional anomalies in two unrelated patients: a new syndrome. Am J Med Genet 1980;6:241-249.4. Moeschler JB, Pober BR, Holmes LB, Graham JM Jr. Acrocallosal syndrome: new findings. Am J Med Genet 1989;32:195-199.5. Schinzel A

  7. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Different Obesity Phenotype in Iranian Male Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payab, Moloud; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Merati, Yaser; Esteghamati, Alireza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Hematabadi, Mahboobeh; Rashidian, Hoda; Shirzad, Nooshin

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, especially when concentrated in the abdominal area, is often associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Stress, particularly occupational stress, is one of the most important factors contributing to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome components among different populations. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as the criteria for metabolic syndrome and its risk factors and different obesity phenotype in a population of military personnel aged 20 to 65 years. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data are extracted from the database of a military hospital (2,200 participants). The records of participants contained information such as age, marital status, educational level, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, history of drug use and smoking, as well as the results of tests including lipid profile and fasting blood glucose. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as well as two national criteria were used to identify metabolic syndrome among participants. Data analysis was p1erformed using SPSS version 16. The average age of participants was 33.37 (7.75) years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Iranian cutoff was 26.6% for the waist circumference >90 cm (585 persons) and 19.6% for the waist circumference >95 cm (432 persons). The rate of metabolic syndrome was identified as 11.1% (432 cases) according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results of the current study identified that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among military individuals is less than other populations, but the prevalence of the syndrome is higher than other military personnel in other countries.

  8. Strain-dependence of the Angelman Syndrome phenotypes in Ube3a maternal deficiency mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Heather A; Dao, An T; Levine, Amber T; Lee, Wai Ling; Mehta, Natasha M; Mehra, Shubhangi; Weeber, Edwin J; Anderson, Anne E

    2017-08-16

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder, most commonly caused by deletion or mutation of the maternal allele of the UBE3A gene, with behavioral phenotypes and seizures as key features. Currently no treatment is available, and therapeutics are often ineffective in controlling AS-associated seizures. Previous publications using the Ube3a maternal deletion model have shown behavioral and seizure susceptibility phenotypes, however findings have been variable and merit characterization of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. In this study, we extend previous studies comparing the effect of genetic background on the AS phenotype by investigating the behavioral profile, EEG activity, and seizure threshold. AS C57BL/6J mice displayed robust behavioral impairments, spontaneous EEG polyspikes, and increased cortical and hippocampal power primarily driven by delta and theta frequencies. AS 129 mice performed poorly on wire hang and contextual fear conditioning and exhibited a lower seizure threshold and altered spectral power. AS F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J × 129) showed milder behavioral impairments, infrequent EEG polyspikes, and fewer spectral power alterations. These findings indicate the effect of common genetic backgrounds on the Ube3a maternal deletion behavioral, EEG, and seizure threshold phenotypes. Our results will inform future studies on the optimal strain for evaluating therapeutics with different AS-like phenotypes.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide restores a normal morphological phenotype in Werner syndrome fibroblasts, attenuates oxidative damage and modulates mTOR pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talaei, F.; van Praag, V. M.; Henning, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) protein is involved in DNA repair and its truncation causes Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with a premature aging phenotype. WRN protein mutation is currently known as the primary cause of WS. In cultured WS fibroblasts, we found an increase in cytosoli

  10. Hydrogen sulfide restores a normal morphological phenotype in Werner syndrome fibroblasts, attenuates oxidative damage and modulates mTOR pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talaei, F.; van Praag, V. M.; Henning, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) protein is involved in DNA repair and its truncation causes Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with a premature aging phenotype. WRN protein mutation is currently known as the primary cause of WS. In cultured WS fibroblasts, we found an increase in cytosoli

  11. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal;

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation ...

  12. Genetic and phenotypic dissection of 1q43q44 microdeletion syndrome and neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with mutations in ZBTB18 and HNRNPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Depienne, Christel; Nava, Caroline; Keren, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Subtelomeric 1q43q44 microdeletions cause a syndrome associating intellectual disability, microcephaly, seizures and anomalies of the corpus callosum. Despite several previous studies assessing genotype-phenotype correlations, the contribution of genes located in this region to the specific featu...

  13. Quantitative, Phenotypical, and Functional Characterization of Cellular Immunity in Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Justine; Rohrer, Tilman R; Kaestner, Michael; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Gortner, Ludwig; Sester, Urban; Sester, Martina; Schmidt, Tina

    2017-05-15

    Infections and autoimmune disorders are more frequent in Down syndrome, suggesting abnormality of adaptive immunity. Although the role of B cells and antibodies is well characterized, knowledge regarding T cells is limited. Lymphocyte subpopulations of 40 children and adolescents with Down syndrome and 51 controls were quantified, and phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific effector T cells were analyzed with flow cytometry after polyclonal and pathogen-specific stimulation (with varicella-zoster virus [VZV] and cytomegalovirus [CMV]). Results were correlated with immunoglobulin (Ig) G responses. Apart from general alterations in the percentage of lymphocytes, regulatory T cells, and T-helper 1 and 17 cells, all major T-cell subpopulations showed higher expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Polyclonally stimulated effector CD4+ T-cell frequencies were significantly higher in subjects with Down syndrome, whereas their inhibitory receptor expression (programmed cell death 1 [PD-1] and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 [CTLA-4]) was similar to that of controls and cytokine expression profiles were only marginally altered. Pathogen-specific immunity showed age-appropriate levels of endemic infection, with correlation of CMV-specific cellular and humoral immunity in all subjects. Among VZV IgG-positive individuals, a higher percentage of VZV-specific T-cell-positive subjects was seen in those with Down syndrome. Despite alterations in lymphocyte subpopulations, individuals with Down syndrome can mount effector T-cell responses with similar phenotype and functionality as controls but may require higher effector T-cell frequencies to ensure pathogen control.

  14. Silver-Russell Syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: Opposite Phenotypes with Heterogeneous Molecular Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Õunap, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are 2 clinically opposite growth-affecting disorders belonging to the group of congenital imprinting disorders. The expression of both syndromes usually depends on the parental origin of the chromosome in which the imprinted genes reside. SRS is characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation with various additional clinical features such as hemihypertrophy, relative macrocephaly, fifth finger clinodactyly, and triangular facies. BWS is an overgrowth syndrome with many additional clinical features such as macroglossia, organomegaly, and an increased risk of childhood tumors. Both SRS and BWS are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and for clinical diagnosis, different diagnostic scoring systems have been developed. Six diagnostic scoring systems for SRS and 4 for BWS have been previously published. However, neither syndrome has common consensus diagnostic criteria yet. Most cases of SRS and BWS are associated with opposite epigenetic or genetic abnormalities in the 11p15 chromosomal region leading to opposite imbalances in the expression of imprinted genes. SRS is also caused by maternal uniparental disomy 7, which is usually identified in 5-10% of the cases, and is therefore the first imprinting disorder that affects 2 different chromosomes. In this review, we describe in detail the clinical diagnostic criteria and scoring systems as well as molecular causes in both SRS and BWS. PMID:27587987

  15. Neuhauser syndrome: a rare association of megalocornea and mental retardation. Review of the literature and further phenotype delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, B E; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Orozco-Castellanos, R; Arnaud, L; Macías-Gómez, N M; Barros-Nuñez, P

    2013-01-01

    Megalocornea can be observed as an isolated abnormality that is inherited by an X-linked mechanism, or it can be associated with other entities. Megalocornea-mental retardation syndrome, also known as Neuhauser syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive congenital disorder that presents with megalocornea, mental retardation, hypotonia, and facial dysmorphism, among other signs. With the report of this new case, and after an extensive review of the literature, we attempt to delineate the Neuhauser syndrome phenotype.

  16. Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15: A milder phenotype?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottani, A.; Robinson, W.P.; DeLoizer-Blanchet, C.D.; Engel, E.; Morris, M.A.; Schmitt, Thun-Hohenstein, L.; Schinzel, A. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-05-15

    The Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, seizures, gait disturbances, and a typical age-dependent facial phenotype. Most cases are due to an interstitial deletion on the maternally inherited chromosome 15, in the critical region q11-q13. Rare cases also result from paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In a group of 14 patients with sporadic AS diagnosed in Switzerland, we found 2 unrelated females with paternal isodisomy for the entire chromosome 15. Their phenotypes were milder than usually seen in this syndrome: one girl did not show the typical AS facial changes; both patients had late-onset mild seizures; as they grow older, they had largely undisturbed gross motor functions, in particular no severe ataxia. Both girls were born to older fathers (45 and 43 years old, respectively). The apparent association of a relatively milder phenotype in AS with paternal uniparental disomy will have to be confirmed by detailed clinical descriptions of further patients. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Global transcriptional disturbances underlie Cornelia de Lange syndrome and related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Pehlivan, Davut; Karaca, Ender; Patel, Nisha; Charng, Wu-Lin; Gambin, Tomasz; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Sutton, V Reid; Yesil, Gozde; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Tos, Tulay; Koparir, Asuman; Koparir, Erkan; Beck, Christine R; Gu, Shen; Aslan, Huseyin; Yuregir, Ozge Ozalp; Al Rubeaan, Khalid; Alnaqeb, Dhekra; Alshammari, Muneera J; Bayram, Yavuz; Atik, Mehmed M; Aydin, Hatip; Geckinli, B Bilge; Seven, Mehmet; Ulucan, Hakan; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ozen, Mustafa; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R

    2015-02-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that presents with extensive phenotypic variability, including facial dysmorphism, developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), abnormal extremities, and hirsutism. About 65% of patients harbor mutations in genes that encode subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex, including NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8. Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome (WDSTS), which shares CdLS phenotypic features, is caused by mutations in lysine-specific methyltransferase 2A (KMT2A). Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 2 male siblings clinically diagnosed with WDSTS; this revealed a hemizygous, missense mutation in SMC1A that was predicted to be deleterious. Extensive clinical evaluation and WES of 32 Turkish patients clinically diagnosed with CdLS revealed the presence of a de novo heterozygous nonsense KMT2A mutation in 1 patient without characteristic WDSTS features. We also identified de novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 or SMC1A that affected RNA splicing in 2 independent patients with combined CdLS and WDSTS features. Furthermore, in families from 2 separate world populations segregating an autosomal-recessive disorder with CdLS-like features, we identified homozygous mutations in TAF6, which encodes a core transcriptional regulatory pathway component. Together, our data, along with recent transcriptome studies, suggest that CdLS and related phenotypes may be "transcriptomopathies" rather than cohesinopathies.

  18. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, although is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with four-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function.

  19. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  20. Metabolic and carbohydrate characteristics of different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ebru; Türkçüoğlu, Ilgın; Ata, Barış; Karaer, Abdullah; Kırıcı, Pınar; Eraslan, Sevil; Taşkapan, Çağatay; Berker, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of various metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients with or without hyperandrogenism. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cross-sectional study involving women with PCOS as diagnosed according to the Androgen Excess (AE) Society definition (n=504) and women with normoandrogenemic PCOS (n=183). Anthropometrics, lipid profile, glucose, insulin, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and reproductive hormone levels were evaluated. Results Women with PCOS diagnosed according to the AE Society had a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome compared with the normoandrogenemic PCOS phenotype: odds ratio (OR) 2.95 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–7.21]. There was no significant difference in the prevalence glucose intolerance test between the groups [OR: 2.15, 95% CI 0.71–6.56]. The prevalence of low high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol in the group under the AE-PCOS Society criteria was higher than that of the normoandrogenemic PCOS group [OR: 2.82, 95%CI 1.29–3.36]. Conclusion The risks of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease may vary among the phenotypes of PCOS based on the Rotterdam criteria. This new data may be of reference in informing women with PCOS, although further prospective studies are needed to validate this proposition. PMID:27990089

  1. Neurobehavioral phenotype in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5 syndrome includes Rett syndrome variant with early onset seizures, early onset epileptic encephalopathy; and severe developmental delay. Autistic features have often been reported in literature, but detailed reports of the behavior of these individuals are lacking. We describe the clinical picture of a girl aged 15 years 9 months affected by CDKL5 syndrome, with special attention to the neurobehavioral phenotype. The evaluation showed, apart from a profound intellectual disability, the presence of atypical features of behavior, mainly in relating to people, in imitation, and in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus justifying the diagnosis of comorbid autism spectrum disorder. A formal assessment of the behavior, through appropriate tools, is necessary to choose the most appropriate rehabilitative intervention and to characterize in more detail the CDKL5 syndrome phenotype. We propose a testing protocol for the neurobehavioral assessment of these patients.

  2. Resolving clinical diagnoses for syndromic cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes using whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengelly, R J; Upstill-Goddard, R; Arias, L; Martinez, J; Gibson, J; Knut, M; Collins, A L; Ennis, S; Collins, A; Briceno, I

    2015-11-01

    Individuals from three families ascertained in Bogota, Colombia, showing syndromic phenotypes, including cleft lip and/or palate, were exome-sequenced. In each case, sequencing revealed the underlying causal variation confirming or establishing diagnoses. The findings include very rare and novel variants providing insights into genotype and phenotype relationships. These include the molecular diagnosis of an individual with Nager syndrome and a family exhibiting an atypical incontinentia pigmenti phenotype with a missense mutation in IKBKG. IKBKG mutations are typically associated with preterm male death, but this variant is associated with survival for 8-15 days. The third family exhibits unusual phenotypic features and the proband received a provisional diagnosis of Pierre Robin sequence (PRS). Affected individuals share a novel deleterious mutation in IRF6. Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndrome and contribute to nonsyndromic cleft lip phenotypes but have not previously been associated with a PRS phenotype. Exome sequencing followed by in silico screening to identify candidate causal variant(s), and functional assay in some cases offers a powerful route to establishing molecular diagnoses. This approach is invaluable for conditions showing phenotypic and/or genetic heterogeneity including cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes where many underlying causal genes have not been identified. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, A.R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  4. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Non-syndromic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: clinical presentation and genotype-phenotype relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioude, Frédéric; Bouligand, Jérôme; Trabado, Séverine; Francou, Bruno; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Chanson, Philippe; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) results from abnormal gonadotropin secretion, and it is characterized by impaired pubertal development. CHH is caused by defective GNRH release, or by a gonadotrope cell dysfunction in the pituitary. Identification of genetic abnormalities related to CHH has provided major insights into the pathways critical for the development, maturation, and function of the reproductive axis. Mutations in five genes have been found specifically in Kallmann's syndrome, a disorder in which CHH is related to abnormal GNRH neuron ontogenesis and is associated with anosmia or hyposmia. In combined pituitary hormone deficiency or in complex syndromic CHH in which gonadotropin deficiency is either incidental or only one aspect of a more complex endocrine disorder or a non-endocrine disorder, other mutations affecting GNRH and/or gonadotropin secretion have been reported. Often, the CHH phenotype is tightly linked to an isolated deficiency of gonadotropin secretion. These patients, who have no associated signs or hormone deficiencies independent of the deficiency in gonadotropin and sex steroids, have isolated CHH. In some familial cases, they are due to genetic alterations affecting GNRH secretion (mutations in GNRH1, GPR54/KISS1R and TAC3 and TACR3) or the GNRH sensitivity of the gonadotropic cells (GNRHR). A minority of patients with Kallmann's syndrome or a syndromic form of CHH may also appear to have isolated CHH, but close clinical, familial, and genetic studies can reorient the diagnosis, which is important for genetic counseling in the context of assisted reproductive medicine. This review focuses on published cases of isolated CHH, its clinical and endocrine features, genetic causes, and genotype-phenotype relationships.

  6. Dubowitz syndrome is a complex comprised of multiple, genetically distinct and phenotypically overlapping disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R Stewart

    Full Text Available Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister and an unpublished patient (Patient 3. Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002 and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼ 3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463-65,963,102, hg18, which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤ 1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of

  7. A three generation X-linked family with Kabuki syndrome phenotype and a frameshift mutation in KDM6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Damien; Shears, Debbie; Benoit, Valérie; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare malformation syndrome characterized by a typical facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, cardiac malformation, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. In 55-80% of patients with Kabuki syndrome, a mutation in MLL2 is identified. Recently, eight patients with Kabuki syndrome and a mutation in KDM6A were described. In this report, we describe two brothers with a mutation in KDM6A inherited from their mother and maternal grandmother. The two boys have Kabuki-like phenotypes whereas the mother and grandmother present with attenuated phenotypes. This family represents the first instance of hereditary X-linked Kabuki syndrome. We present a short literature review of the patients described with a mutation in KDM6A.

  8. Concurrence of fragile X syndrome and 47, XYY in an individual with a Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, Heather J; Keller, Kory L; Gray, Brian A; Zori, Roberto T

    2003-01-15

    We report on a 34-year-old developmentally disabled man referred to our clinic for evaluation of possible Prader-Willi syndrome on the basis of obesity and voracious appetite. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis revealed a 47, XYY karyotype and the presence of a trinucleotide repeat expansion resulting in fragile X syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of concurrence of XYY and fragile X syndrome in the medical literature. Review of sex chromosome abnormalities associated with fragile X syndrome and phenotypic considerations are presented.

  9. Auditory pathology in cri-du-chat (5p-) syndrome: phenotypic evidence for auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, D

    2007-10-01

    5p-(cri-du-chat syndrome) is a well-defined clinical entity presenting with phenotypic and cytogenetic variability. Despite recognition that abnormalities in audition are common, limited reports on auditory functioning in affected individuals are available. The current study presents a case illustrating the auditory functioning in a 22-month-old patient diagnosed with 5p- syndrome, karyotype 46,XX,del(5)(p13). Auditory neuropathy was diagnosed based on abnormal auditory evoked potentials with neural components suggesting severe to profound hearing loss in the presence of cochlear microphonic responses and behavioral reactions to sound at mild to moderate hearing levels. The current case and a review of available reports indicate that auditory neuropathy or neural dys-synchrony may be another phenotype of the condition possibly related to abnormal expression of the protein beta-catenin mapped to 5p. Implications are for routine and diagnostic specific assessments of auditory functioning and for employment of non-verbal communication methods in early intervention.

  10. Recognition of the Cornelia de Lange syndrome phenotype with facial dysmorphology novel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Wolf, L; Orin, M; Larizza, L; Gervasini, C; Krantz, I D; Deardoff, M A

    2016-05-01

    Facial analysis systems are becoming available to healthcare providers to aid in the recognition of dysmorphic phenotypes associated with a multitude of genetic syndromes. These technologies automatically detect facial points and extract various measurements from images to recognize dysmorphic features and evaluate similarities to known facial patterns (gestalts). To evaluate such systems' usefulness for supporting the clinical practice of healthcare professionals, the recognition accuracy of the Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) phenotype was examined with FDNA's automated facial dysmorphology novel analysis (FDNA) technology. In the first experiment, 2D facial images of CdLS patients with either an NIPBL or SMC1A gene mutation as well as non-CdLS patients which were assessed by dysmorphologists in a previous study were evaluated by the FDNA technology; the average detection rate of experts was 77% while the system's detection rate was 87%. In the second study, when a new set of NIPBL, SMC1A and non-CdLS patient photos was evaluated, the detection rate increased to 94%. The results from both studies indicated that the system's detection rate was comparable to that of dysmorphology experts. Therefore, utilizing such technologies may be a useful tool in a clinical setting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Perfluorocarbons and Gilbert syndrome (phenotype) in the C8 Health Study Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongmin [Cancer Center, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 265050-9190 (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Hebei United University, Hebei 063000 (China); Ducatman, Alan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, West Virginia University (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University (United States); Clinical Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University (United States); Zhang, Jianjun [Department of Biostatistics, School Public Health, West Virginia University (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Gilbert syndrome (GS) is an inherited defect of bilirubin conjugation, most commonly caused by a gene mutation for the enzyme UGT1A. GS is known to affect the metabolism and excretion of drugs and xenobiotics. Perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) are bio-persistent environmental contaminants that affect metabolic regulation. In this study, we examined the associations of GS phenotype and serum PFCs in the C8 Health Study Population. Materials and methods: Using 2005–2006 data from a large PFC-exposure population survey, we compared serum PFCs concentrations between GS and non GS clinical phenotypes, in a cross sectional design, adjusting for standard risk factors, including age, BMI, smoking status, socioeconomic status and gender. Results: Among 10 PFC compounds considered, only perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) was seen at a significantly higher concentration in GS men and women. Conclusion: PFHxA exposure may be associated with GS. Our findings do not support increased exposure in GS for other PFCs. - Highlights: • Most serum PFCs are not associated with clinically evident Gilbert syndrome. • However, serum perfluorohexanoic acid is positively associated. • The investigation addresses the clinical presentation, not the genetic mutation.

  12. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy.

  13. Unmasking Evans syndrome: T-cell phenotype and apoptotic response reveal autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T; Manno, Catherine S; Axsom, Kelly M; Andrews, Timothy; Choi, John K; Greenbaum, Barbara H; McMann, Joseph M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Travis, Susan F; Grupp, Stephan A

    2005-03-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis. Clinical manifestations of ALPS vary but typically include autoimmune cytopenias, organomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and increased risk of malignancies. A similar spectrum of symptoms may be seen in some patients with Evans syndrome (ES), a hematologic disorder defined by autoimmune destruction of at least 2 hematologic cell types. We hypothesized that a subset of patients diagnosed with ES may have ALPS. We screened 12 children with ES by flow cytometric analysis for CD4-/CD8- (double negative) T cells (DNTs) and with the definitive test for ALPS, defective in vitro Fas-mediated apoptosis. Six of the patients had elevated DNTs, suggestive of ALPS and also had defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. The other 6 patients displayed normal T-cell apoptosis; 5 of whom had normal DNTs, and 1 had a borderline result. Thus, 7 (58%) of 12 patients with ES had elevated DNTs suggestive of ALPS, with functional confirmation in 6 of 7. This suggests that analysis of DNTs may be a sensitive first-line screening test, serving as a marker of patients who should undergo definitive testing for ALPS. Our data further suggest that a number of patients with ES may have ALPS, a novel finding with important therapeutic implications.

  14. Genotype-phenotype correlations in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Behavioral characteristics and changes with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Joanna; Penhallow, Jessica; Ansari, Morad; Barton, Stephanie; Bourn, David; FitzPatrick, David R; Goodship, Judith; Hammond, Peter; Roberts, Catherine; Welham, Alice; Oliver, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder associated with unusual facial features, limb abnormalities, a wide range of health conditions, and intellectual disability. Mutations in five genes that encode (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulate (NIPBL, HDAC8) the cohesin complex have been identified in up to 70% of individuals. Genetic cause remains unknown for a proportion of individuals. There is substantial heterogeneity in all aspects of CdLS but very little is known about what predicts phenotypic heterogeneity. In this study, we evaluated genotype-phenotype associations in 34 individuals with CdLS. Participants with NIPBL mutations had significantly lower self help skills and were less likely to have verbal skills relative to those who were negative for the NIPBL mutation. No significant differences were identified between the groups in relation to repetitive behavior, mood, interest and pleasure, challenging behavior, activity, impulsivity, and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder whilst controlling differences in self help skills. Significant correlations indicating lower mood, interest and pleasure, and increased insistence on sameness with older age were identified for those who were NIPBL mutation positive. The findings suggest similarities in the behavioral phenotype between those with and without the NIPBL mutation once differences in self help skills are controlled for. However, there may be subtle differences in the developmental trajectory of these behaviors according to genetic mutation status in CdLS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mutation Spectrum and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Krantz, Ian D.; Musio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder. Clinical features include growth retardation, intellectual disability, limb defects, typical facial dysmorphism, and other systemic involvement. The increased understanding of the genetic basis of CdLS has led to diagnostic improvement and expansion of the phenotype. Mutations in five genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8), all regulators or structural components of cohesin, have been identified. Approximately 60% of CdLS cases are due to NIPBL mutations, 5% caused by mutations in SMC1A, RAD21, and HDAC8 and one proband was found to carry a mutation in SMC3. To date, 311 CdLS-causing mutations are known including missense, nonsense, small deletions and insertions, splice site mutations, and genomic rearrangements. Phenotypic variability is seen both intra- and intergenically. This article reviews the spectrum of CdLS mutations with a particular emphasis on their correlation to the clinical phenotype. PMID:24038889

  16. Congenital Heart Disease in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: Phenotype and Genotype Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Schrier, Samantha A.; Li, Jennifer; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Kline, Antonie D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Jackson, Laird S.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Krantz, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has been reported to occur in 14–70% of individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, OMIM 122470) and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality when present. Charts from a cohort of 479 patients with CdLS were reviewed for cardiac evaluations, gene testing and information to determine phenotypic severity. Two hundred fifty-nine individuals had either documented structural defects or minor cardiac findings. The presence of CHD was then quantified as a function of mutation status and severity of CdLS: mild, moderate, or severe. Different types of CHD were also evaluated by mutation status to assess for any genotype –phenotype correlation. NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were equally likely to have CHD, although the number of SMC1A and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were small in comparison. Structural CHDs were more likely to be present in individuals with moderate and severe CdLS than in the mild phenotype. This study evaluates the trends of CHD seen in the CdLS population and correlates these findings with genotype. PMID:22965847

  17. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlation in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Krantz, Ian D; Musio, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder. Clinical features include growth retardation, intellectual disability, limb defects, typical facial dysmorphism, and other systemic involvement. The increased understanding of the genetic basis of CdLS has led to diagnostic improvement and expansion of the phenotype. Mutations in five genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8), all regulators or structural components of cohesin, have been identified. Approximately 60% of CdLS cases are due to NIPBL mutations, 5% caused by mutations in SMC1A, RAD21, and HDAC8 and one proband was found to carry a mutation in SMC3. To date, 311 CdLS-causing mutations are known including missense, nonsense, small deletions and insertions, splice site mutations, and genomic rearrangements. Phenotypic variability is seen both intra- and intergenically. This article reviews the spectrum of CdLS mutations with a particular emphasis on their correlation to the clinical phenotype. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Web-based phenotyping for Tourette Syndrome: Reliability of common co-morbid diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Sabrina M; Illmann, Cornelia; Gauvin, Caitlin; Osiecki, Lisa; Egan, Crystelle A; Greenberg, Erica; Eckfield, Monika; Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Pauls, David L; Batterson, James R; Berlin, Cheston M; Malaty, Irene A; Woods, Douglas W; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Mathews, Carol A

    2015-08-30

    Collecting phenotypic data necessary for genetic analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders is time consuming and costly. Development of web-based phenotype assessments would greatly improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of genetic research. However, evaluating the reliability of this approach compared to standard, in-depth clinical interviews is essential. The current study replicates and extends a preliminary report on the utility of a web-based screen for Tourette Syndrome (TS) and common comorbid diagnoses (obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)). A subset of individuals who completed a web-based phenotyping assessment for a TS genetic study was invited to participate in semi-structured diagnostic clinical interviews. The data from these interviews were used to determine participants' diagnostic status for TS, OCD, and ADHD using best estimate procedures, which then served as the gold standard to compare diagnoses assigned using web-based screen data. The results show high rates of agreement for TS. Kappas for OCD and ADHD diagnoses were also high and together demonstrate the utility of this self-report data in comparison previous diagnoses from clinicians and dimensional assessment methods.

  19. Founder mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome and associated ciliopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymanska Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS is an autosomal recessive lethal condition that is a ciliopathy. MKS has marked phenotypic variability and genetic heterogeneity, with mutations in nine genes identified as causative to date. Methods Families diagnosed with Meckel-Gruber syndrome were recruited for research studies following informed consent. DNA samples were analyzed by microsatellite genotyping and direct Sanger sequencing. Results We now report the genetic analyses of 87 individuals from 49 consanguineous and 19 non-consanguineous families in an unselected cohort with reported MKS, or an associated severe ciliopathy in a kindred. Linkage and/or direct sequencing were prioritized for seven MKS genes (MKS1, TMEM216, TMEM67/MKS3, RPGRIP1L, CC2D2A, CEP290 and TMEM237 selected on the basis of reported frequency of mutations or ease of analysis. We have identified biallelic mutations in 39 individuals, of which 13 mutations are novel and previously unreported. We also confirm general genotype-phenotype correlations. Conclusions TMEM67 was the most frequently mutated gene in this cohort, and we confirm two founder splice-site mutations (c.1546 + 1 G > A and c.870-2A > G in families of Pakistani ethnic origin. In these families, we have also identified two separate founder mutations for RPGRIP1L (c. 1945 C > T p.R649X and CC2D2A (c. 3540delA p.R1180SfsX6. Two missense mutations in TMEM67 (c. 755 T > C p.M252T, and c. 1392 C > T p.R441C are also probable founder mutations. These findings will contribute to improved genetic diagnosis and carrier testing for affected families, and imply the existence of further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  20. Founder mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome and associated ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanska, Katarzyna; Berry, Ian; Logan, Clare V; Cousins, Simon Rr; Lindsay, Helen; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Malik-Sharif, Saghira; Castle, Bruce; Ahmed, Mushtag; Bennett, Chris; Carlton, Ruth; Johnson, Colin A

    2012-10-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive lethal condition that is a ciliopathy. MKS has marked phenotypic variability and genetic heterogeneity, with mutations in nine genes identified as causative to date. Families diagnosed with Meckel-Gruber syndrome were recruited for research studies following informed consent. DNA samples were analyzed by microsatellite genotyping and direct Sanger sequencing. We now report the genetic analyses of 87 individuals from 49 consanguineous and 19 non-consanguineous families in an unselected cohort with reported MKS, or an associated severe ciliopathy in a kindred. Linkage and/or direct sequencing were prioritized for seven MKS genes (MKS1, TMEM216, TMEM67/MKS3, RPGRIP1L, CC2D2A, CEP290 and TMEM237) selected on the basis of reported frequency of mutations or ease of analysis. We have identified biallelic mutations in 39 individuals, of which 13 mutations are novel and previously unreported. We also confirm general genotype-phenotype correlations. TMEM67 was the most frequently mutated gene in this cohort, and we confirm two founder splice-site mutations (c.1546 + 1 G > A and c.870-2A > G) in families of Pakistani ethnic origin. In these families, we have also identified two separate founder mutations for RPGRIP1L (c. 1945 C > T p.R649X) and CC2D2A (c. 3540delA p.R1180SfsX6). Two missense mutations in TMEM67 (c. 755 T > C p.M252T, and c. 1392 C > T p.R441C) are also probable founder mutations. These findings will contribute to improved genetic diagnosis and carrier testing for affected families, and imply the existence of further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  1. Further insight into the phenotype associated with a mutation in the ORC6 gene, causing Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Stavit Allon; Khayat, Morad; Etty, Daniel-Spiegl; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex subunits cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The disease manifests a triad of short stature, small ears, and small and/or absent patellae with variable expressivity. We report on the identification of a homozygous deleterious mutation in the ORC6 gene in previously described fetuses at the severe end of the Meier-Gorlin spectrum. The phenotype included severe intrauterine growth retardation, dislocation of knees, gracile bones, clubfeet, and small mandible and chest. To date, the clinical presentation of ORC6-associated Meier-Gorlin syndrome has been mild compared to other the phenotype associated with other loci. The present report expands the clinical phenotype associated with ORC6 mutations to include severely abnormal embryological development suggesting a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.

  2. Expanding the phenotype of 22q11 deletion syndrome: the MURCS association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliana, Vera; Giordano, Nicola; Caselli, Rossella; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Ariani, Francesca; Marcocci, Claudio; Gianetti, Elena; Martini, Giuseppe; Papakostas, Panagiotis; Rollo, Fabio; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Priolo, Manuela; Renieri, Alessandra; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2008-01-01

    The MURCS association [Müllerian Duct aplasia or hypoplasia (M), unilateral renal agenesis (UR) and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia (CS)] manifests itself as Müllerian Duct aplasia or hypoplasia, unilateral renal agenesis and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia. We report on a 22-year-old woman with bicornuate uterus, right renal agenesis, C2-C3 vertebral fusion (MURCS association) and 22q11.2 deletion. Angio-MRI revealed the aberrant origin of arch arteries. Hashimoto thyroiditis, micropolycystic ovaries with a dermoid cyst in the right ovary and mild osteoporosis were also diagnosed. Accurate revision of radiographs enabled us also to identify thoracolumbar and lumbosacral vertebral-differentiation defects. Audiometry and echocardiogram were normal. Bone densitometry showed osteoporosis. As per our evaluation, the patient had short stature, obesity (BMI 30.7) and facial features suggestive of the 22q11 deletion syndrome. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis showed a de-novo 22q11.2 deletion confirmed by array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis. We discuss whether this is a casual association or whether it is an additional syndrome owing to the well known phenotype extensive variability of the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  3. Behavioral phenotype and autism spectrum disorders in Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Parisi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation, limb abnormalities, intellectual disability, and behavioral problems. Cornelia de Lange syndrome is associated with abnormalities on chromosomes 5, 10 and X. Heterozygous point mutations in three genes (NIPBL, SMC3 and SMC1A, are responsible for approximately 50-60% of CdLS cases. CdLS is characterized by autistic features, notably excessive repetitive behaviors and expressive language deficits. The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD symptomatology is comparatively high in CdLS. However, the profile and developmental trajectories of these ASD characteristics are potentially different to those observed in individuals with idiopathic ASD. A significantly higher prevalence of self-injury are evident in CdLS. Self-injury was associated with repetitive and impulsive behavior. This study describes the behavioral phenotype of four children with Cornelia de Lange syndrome and ASDs and rehabilitative intervention that must be implemented.

  4. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  5. Genetic and environmental dissections of sub-phenotypes of metabolic syndrome in the chinese population: a twin-based heritability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Haiping; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We perform a comprehensive heritability study on multiple phenotypes related to metabolic syndrome using Chinese twins to assess the genetic and environmental effects in determining the variation and covariation of the phenotypes in the Chinese population. Methods: The studied sample...... of the phenotypes. Conclusions: Our results showed significant genetic contributions to the sub-phenotypes of metabolic syndrome. Although pleiotropic genetic control may exist for some physiologically similar phenotypes, our results do not support a common genetic mechanism among the phenotypes covered in our...

  6. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  7. [Angelman syndrome: physical characteristics and behavioural phenotype in 37 patients with confirmed genetic diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Manso, M; Campistol, J; Monros, E; Póo, P; Vernet, A M; Pineda, M; Sans, A; Colomer, J; Conill, J J; Sanmartí, F X

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterised by mental retardation, ataxic gait, epilepsy, absence of language and a special series of physical traits behavioural phenotype. Its incidence is estimated as one in every 20,000 individuals. On the basis of discoveries made in molecular biology, patients can be classified as belonging to five types: deletion, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting defects, mutation of the UBE3A ubiquitin protein ligase gene and unidentified mechanism (15% 20% of patients). Some studies report significant correlations between the phenotype and the genetic cause. We reviewed, retrospectively, 37 patients suffering from AS with a positive genetic study and who had been controlled for at least two years in the Neurological Service at the Hospital Sant Joan de D u. Data was collected on physical characteristics, behavioural phenotype, type of communication, sleep disorders and the medication they needed, as well as epilepsy, start age, types of seizures, medication, schooling and social integration. 87% of cases were due to de novo deletion, 8% were caused by UPD, and 5% had their origins in imprinting defects. The average age of diagnosis was 6.5 years. The sleep disorders present in 48% of the patients required medication in 67% of cases, and 95% presented epilepsy. The most frequent seizures were myoclonic, tonic clonic and atonic. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was the characteristic found in the AS in 68%. The most effective treatment was afforded by valproate and clonazepam. As regards the phenotype, no differences were found according to the genetic alteration. The most effective treatment for the sleep disorders was melatonin. Epilepsy was an almost constant finding in our series, as was cognitive affectation. Lastly, it must be pointed out that educational and socio occupational integration is difficult for patients suffering from AS.

  8. Referral bias in defining the phenotype and prevalence of obesity in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeh, Uche; Yildiz, Bulent O; Azziz, Ricardo

    2013-06-01

    The described phenotype of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has been primarily based on findings in a referred (self or otherwise) population. It is possible that the phenotype of PCOS would be different if the disorder were to be detected and studied in its natural (unbiased) state. Our objective was to compare the phenotype of PCOS detected in an unselected population with that identified in a referral population. Participants included 292 PCOS patients identified at a tertiary care outpatient facility (referral PCOS) and 64 PCOS women (unselected PCOS) identified through the screening of a population of 668 seeking a pre-employment physical. Among the women undergoing a pre-employment physical, 563 did not demonstrate features of the disorder (unselected controls). All PCOS subjects met the National Institutes of Health 1990 criteria for the disorder. We estimated prevalence of obesity and severity of disease burden. Referral PCOS subjects had greater mean body mass index and hirsutism score and higher degrees of hyperandrogenemia, were more likely to be non-Hispanic White (83.90%), and demonstrated a more severe PCOS subphenotype than unselected PCOS or unselected controls. The prevalence of obesity and severe obesity in referral PCOS was 2.3 and 2.5 times greater than estimates of the same in unselected PCOS and 2.2 and 3.8 times greater than estimates in unselected controls, respectively. Alternatively, unselected PCOS subjects had a prevalence of obesity and severe obesity and a mean body mass index similar to those of the general population from which they were derived. The phenotype of PCOS, including the racial/ethnic mix, severity of presentation, and rate of obesity, is affected significantly by whether the PCOS subject arises from a referral population or through unselected screening, likely reflecting the degree of patient concern and awareness and access to healthcare.

  9. The autistic phenotype in Down syndrome: differences in adaptive behaviour versus Down syndrome alone and autistic disorder alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Anastasia; Perelli, Valentina; Bozza, Margherita; Bargagna, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    The autistic phenotype in Down syndrome (DS) is marked by a characteristic pattern of stereotypies, anxiety and social withdrawal. Our aim was to study adaptive behaviour in DS with and without autistic comorbidity using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS), the Childhood Autism Rating Scales (CARS) and the DSM IV-TR criteria. We assessed 24 individuals and established three groups: Down syndrome (DS), DS and autistic disorder (DS-AD), and autistic disorder (AD). The DS and DS-AD groups showed statistically significantly similar strengths on the VABS (in receptive and domestic skills). The DS and DS-AD subjects also showed similar strengths on the CARS (in imitation and relating), differing significantly from the AD group. The profile of adaptive functioning and symptoms in DS-AD seemed to be more similar to that found in DS than to the profile emerging in AD. We suggest that the comorbidity of austistic symptoms in DS hampered the acquisition of adaptive skills more than did the presence of DS alone.

  10. Cleft palate and ADULT phenotype in a patient with a novel TP63 mutation suggests lumping of EEC/LM/ADULT syndromes into a unique entity: ELA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Paolo; Garelli, Emanuela; Isidori, Ilenia; Mencarelli, Amedea; Carando, Adriana; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Donti, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome is a rare condition belonging to the group of ectodermal dysplasias caused by TP63 mutations. Its clinical phenotype is similar to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (EEC) and limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), and differs from these disorders mainly by the absence of cleft lip and/or palate. We report on a 39-year-old patient who was found to be heterozygous for a c.401G > T (p.Gly134Val) de novo mutation of TP63. This patient had the ADULT phenotype associated with cleft palate. Our findings, rather than extend the clinical spectrum of ADULT syndrome, suggest that cleft palate can no longer be considered an element for differential diagnosis for ADULT, EEC, and LMS. Our data, added to other reports on overlapping phenotypes, support the combining of these three phenotypes into a unique entity that we propose to call "ELA syndrome," which is an acronym of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate, limb-mammary, and ADULT syndromes.

  11. Resistance training improves isokinetic strength and metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira PFA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pedro Ferreira Alves Oliveira,1 André Bonadias Gadelha,2 Rafael Gauche,2 Flávio Macedo Lahud Paiva,2 Martim Bottaro,2 Lauro C Vianna,2 Ricardo Moreno Lima2 1Department of Physical Education, Instituto Federal de Brasília, 2College of Physical Education, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil Purpose: To examine the effects of resistance training (RT on metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. Patients and methods: Twenty-two postmenopausal women (65.0±4.2 years underwent 12 weeks of whole body progressive training with intensity prescribed based on rating of perceived exertion. Dominant knee extension strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer before and after the intervention. Moreover, all volunteers had blood samples collected for lipid profile, glycemic control, and C-reactive protein analyses. Waist circumference and arterial blood pressure were also measured at baseline and after the training period. Student’s t-tests for paired samples and repeated measures ANOVA were used to compare dependent variables, and statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results: Isokinetic muscle strength significantly increased (P<0.01 with training. It was observed that waist circumference as well as total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels significantly decreased with training (P<0.01. Total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, an important marker of cardiovascular disease incidence, was also significantly reduced (from 3.91±0.91 to 3.60±0.74; P<0.01 after the program. Blood glucose, basal insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were also significantly reduced (P<0.01. No significant alterations were observed for resting blood pressure, triglycerides, or C-reactive protein. Conclusion: Based on the observed results, it can be concluded that a 12-week progressive RT program, besides increasing isokinetic muscle strength, induces beneficial alterations

  12. Phenotypic analysis of individuals with Costello syndrome due to HRAS p.G13C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Hopkins, Elizabeth; Sol-Church, Katia; Stabley, Deborah L; Axelrad, Marni E; Doyle, Daniel; Dobyns, William B; Hudson, Cindy; Johnson, John; Tenconi, Romano; Graham, Gail E; Sousa, Ana Berta; Heller, Raoul; Piccione, Maria; Corsello, Giovanni; Herman, Gail E; Tartaglia, Marco; Lin, Angela E

    2011-04-01

    Costello syndrome is characterized by severe failure-to-thrive, short stature, cardiac abnormalities (heart defects, tachyarrhythmia, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)), distinctive facial features, a predisposition to papillomata and malignant tumors, postnatal cerebellar overgrowth resulting in Chiari 1 malformation, and cognitive disabilities. De novo germline mutations in the proto-oncogene HRAS cause Costello syndrome. Most mutations affect the glycine residues in position 12 or 13, and more than 80% of patients share p.G12S. To test the hypothesis that subtle genotype-phenotype differences exist, we report the first cohort comparison between 12 Costello syndrome individuals with p.G13C and individuals with p.G12S. The individuals with p.G13C had many typical findings including polyhydramnios, failure-to-thrive, HCM, macrocephaly with posterior fossa crowding, and developmental delay. Subjectively, their facial features were less coarse. Statistically significant differences included the absence of multifocal atrial tachycardia (P-value = 0.033), ulnar deviation of the wrist (P < 0.001) and papillomata (P = 0.003), and fewer neurosurgical procedures (P = 0.024). Fewer individuals with p.G13C had short stature (height below -2 SD) without use of growth hormone (P < 0.001). The noteworthy absence of malignant tumors did not reach statistical significance. Novel ectodermal findings were noted in individuals with p.G13C, including loose anagen hair resulting in easily pluckable hair with a matted appearance, different from the tight curls typical for most Costello syndrome individuals. Unusually long eye lashes requiring trimming are a novel finding we termed dolichocilia. These distinctive ectodermal findings suggest a cell type specific effect of this particular mutation. Additional patients are needed to validate these findings.

  13. More than meets the eye: The evolving phenotype of Weill-Marchesani syndrome-diagnostic confusion with geleophysic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, Allen L; Wilcox, William R; Reinstein, Eyal

    2013-12-01

    The criteria for diagnosing and distinguishing between Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) and geleophysic dysplasia (GD) are inexact and often overlap. We report the clinical findings and evolving phenotype for a period of 18 years in a patient whose diagnosis, and distinguishing characteristics, transformed from GD to WMS. Molecular testing demonstrated novel mutations in the ADAMTS10 gene confirming a diagnosis of autosomal recessive WMS in the proposita. We further report on phenotypic features not classically linked to WMS. These findings indicate that the Weill-Marchesani phenotype may be developed and is not always apparent in early childhood.

  14. The modifier effect of the BDNF gene in the phenotype of the WAGRO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Raquel; Pérez, José M Carbonell; Balsera, Aránzazu Margallo; Rodríguez, Guillermo Gervasini; Moreno, Trinidad Herrera; García de Cáceres, Mayte; Serrano, Marta González-Carpio; Freijo, Felipe Casanueva; Ruiz, Juan Ramón González; Angueira, Francisco Barros; Pérez, Pilar Méndez; Estévez, Manuela Núñez; Gómez, Enrique Galán

    2013-03-10

    Individuals who are carriers of deletions of various sizes that cause haploinsufficiency in the contiguous WT1 and PAX6 genes, located on chromosome 11p13 approximately 4 Mb centromeric to the BDNF gene, are susceptible to Wilms tumor, aniridia, mental retardation, genitourinary anomalies and obesity (WAGRO syndrome). The molecular characterization of the wide deletion 11p15.1p12 arr (18676926-36576388) x1 dn in a child with 3 years and 4 months of age only affected by aniridia, predicts not only other serious associated diseases, but also allows us to hypothesize a specific phenotype of mental impairment, conduct alterations and childhood obesity, possibly added to the onset of metabolic alterations. The variable appearance and/or description of haploinsufficiency for obesity susceptibility in the WAGR syndrome mainly depends on the critical region located within 80 kb of exon 1 of BDNF. The relationship between genetic variation based on the genotype combinations of the 4 gene SNPs tagging the BDNF gene and the body mass index (BMI) was studied. The polymorphic variability was similarly distributed in 218 children suffering a severe and non-syndromic obesity from families at high risk for obesity, as compared with 198 controls. The corroborated role of the BDNF gene as highly susceptible to severe syndromic obesity has not already been evidenced in the molecular basis of overweight attributed to the common polygenic principles. Its potential role as risk modifier variant to provoke more severe phenotype has not yet been demonstrated. Some genetic variants of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have resulted in important disorders of energy balance, but it is essential to know exactly their deleterious human capacity because they play a fundamental role in the development and plasticity of the central nervous system in regulating food intake. The existence of polymorphic amino acid changes of unknown functional significance in patients carrying the

  15. Associations between salivary gland histopathologic diagnoses and phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome among 1,726 registry participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, Troy E; Cox, Darren; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2011-01-01

    To examine associations between labial salivary gland (LSG) histopathology and other phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS).......To examine associations between labial salivary gland (LSG) histopathology and other phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS)....

  16. Mild phenotype in a 15-year-old boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevieve, D; Cormier-Daire, V; Sanlaville, D; Faivre, L; Gosset, P; Allart, L; Picq, M; Munnich, A; Romana, S; de Blois, Mc; Vekemans, M

    2003-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, coarse face, pigmentary skin changes, seizures, severe mental retardation, and the presence of an extra metacentric chromosome i(12p) confined to skin fibroblasts only. Here, we report on an unusual case of i(12p) in a 15-year-old boy presenting with mild mental retardation, minor facial features (long face, prognathism, short neck), normal weight, length, and OFC parameters as well as hyperpigmented streaks. The boy attended normal school until the age of 14 years. Because of hyperpigmented stripes, chromosome analysis was performed on skin fibroblasts. This study showed that 37% of the cells had an additional isochromosome for the short arm of chromosome 12. This observation illustrates the phenotypic variability of i(12p) and emphasizes the importance of skin fibroblasts chromosome analysis in patients with pigmentary skin changes.

  17. The spectrum of the behavioral phenotype in boys and adolescents 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Cordeiro, Lisa; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    The behavioral phenotype of 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) includes increased risks for developmental delays, language-based learning disabilities, executive dysfunction/ADHD, and socialemotional difficulties. However there is significant variability between individuals with 47,XXY, and many children and adolescents have minimal or no behavioral features while others have quite significant involvement. This paper describes behavioral features in a cohort of 57 children and adolescents with 47,XXY, including results on standardized measures of behavior (BASC-2), attention (Conner's Rating Scales), and social skills (Social Responsiveness Scale). A subset was directly assessed for autism spectrum disorders using the ADOS and ADIR. We discuss our results within the context of previous literature, including implications for genetic counseling, recommendations for care, and areas for future research.

  18. Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome: Clinical phenotypes, outcome and the development of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goules, Andreas V; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-07-01

    Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome (pSS) is a complex autoimmune disease with distinct clinical phenotypes and variable outcomes. The systemic form of the disease is characterized by immune complex mediated manifestations and is complicated by lymphoma as a result of a polyclonal B cell hyperactivity that is evolving into B cell malignancy. In the past decades, well-established clinical and serological markers have been described in the literature to identify high-risk patients and to predict lymphoma development. However, specific biologic treatments have proven ineffective to control the disease. Significant research effort has been made to reveal the major underlying biological events in this subgroup and identify biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. In this review, we summarize the current data for the proposed histological, molecular and genetic biomarkers.

  19. Expanding the phenotype of Triple X syndrome: A comparison of prenatal versus postnatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigby, Kristen; D'Epagnier, Cheryl; Howell, Susan; Reicks, Amy; Wilson, Rebecca; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    Triple X syndrome (47, XXX) occurs in approximately 1:1,000 female births and has a variable phenotype of physical and psychological features. Prenatal diagnosis rates of 47, XXX are increasing due to non-invasive prenatal genetic testing. Previous studies suggest that prenatal diagnosed females have better neurodevelopmental outcomes. This cross-sectional study describes diagnosis, physical features, medical problems, and neurodevelopmental features in a large cohort of females with 47, XXX. Evaluation included review of medical and developmental history, physical exam, cognitive, and adaptive testing. Medical and developmental features were compared between the prenatal and postnatal diagnosis groups using rate calculations and Fisher's exact test. Cognitive and adaptive tests scores were compared using t-tests. Seventy-four females age 6 months-24 years (mean 8.3 years) participated. Forty-four (59.5%) females were in the prenatal diagnosis group. Mean age of postnatal diagnosis was 5.9 years; developmental delay was the most common indication for postnatal genetic testing. Common physical features included hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, clinodactyly, and hypotonia. Medical problems included dental disorders (44.4%), seizure disorders (16.2%), genitourinary malformations (12.2%). The prenatal diagnosis group had higher verbal (P < 0.001), general ability index (P = 0.004), and adaptive functioning scores (P < 0.001). Rates of ADHD (52.2% vs. 45.5%, P = 0.77) and learning disabilities (39.1% vs. 36.3%, P = 1.00) were similar between the two groups. These findings expand on the phenotypic features in females with Triple X syndrome and support that prenatally ascertained females have better cognitive and functional outcomes. However, prenatally diagnosed females are still at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Genetic counseling and treatment recommendations are summarized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions.

  1. MECP2 deletions and genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Elisa; Longo, Ilaria; Ottimo, Federica; Speciale, Caterina; Sampieri, Katia; Katzaki, Eleni; Artuso, Rosangela; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; D'Ambrogio, Tatiana; Vonella, Giuseppina; Zappella, Michele; Hayek, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Agatino; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that represents one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation in girls. MECP2 point mutations in exons 2-4 account for about 80% of classic Rett cases and for a lower percentage of variant patients. We investigated the genetic cause in 77 mutation-negative Rett patients (33 classic, 31 variant, and 13 Rett-like cases) by searching missed MECP2 defects. DHPLC analysis of exon 1 and MLPA analysis allowed us to identify the defect in 17 Rett patients: one exon 1 point mutation (c.47_57del) in a classic case and 16 MECP2 large deletions (15/33 classic and 1/31 variant cases). One identical intragenic MECP2 deletion, probably due to gonadal mosaicism, was found in two sisters with discordant phenotype: one classic and one "highly functioning" preserved speech variant. This result indicates that other epigenetic or genetic factors, beside MECP2, may contribute to phenotype modulation. Three out of 16 MECP2 deletions extend to the adjacent centromeric IRAK1 gene. A putative involvement of the hemizygosity of this gene in the ossification process is discussed. Finally, results reported here clearly indicate that MECP2 large deletions are a common cause of classic Rett, and MLPA analysis is mandatory in MECP2-negative patients, especially in those more severely affected (P = 0.044). (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Metformin Alleviates Aging Cellular Phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seul-Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2017-02-13

    Metformin is a popular antidiabetic biguanide, which has been considered as a candidate drug for cancer treatment and aging prevention. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating disease characterized by premature aging and severe age-associated complications leading to death. The effects of metformin on HGPS dermal fibroblasts remain largely undefined. In this study, we investigated whether metformin could exert a beneficial effect on nuclear abnormalities and delay senescence in fibroblasts derived from HGPS patients. Metformin treatment partially restored normal nuclear phenotypes, delayed senescence, activated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, and decreased reactive oxygen species formation in HGPS dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, metformin reduced the number of phosphorylated histone variant H2AX-positive DNA damage foci and suppressed progerin protein expression, compared to the control. Furthermore, metformin-supplemented aged mice showed higher splenocyte proliferation and mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 2 than the control mice. Collectively, our results show that metformin treatment alleviates the nuclear defects and premature aging phenotypes in HGPS fibroblasts. Thus, metformin can be considered a promising therapeutic approach for life extension in HGPS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Genotype/phenotype Insights from Partial Deletion Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eKarmiloff-Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genotype-phenotype relations in human social cognition has been enhanced by the study of Williams syndrome (WS. Indeed, individuals with WS present with a particularly strong social drive, and researchers have sought to link deleted genes in the WS Critical Region (WSCR of chromosome 7q11.23 to this unusual social profile. In this paper, we provide details of two case studies of children with partial genetic deletions in the WSCR: an 11-year-old female with a deletion of 24 of the 28 WS genes, and a 14-year-old male who presents with the opposite profile, i.e. the deletion of only 4 genes at the telomeric end of the WSCR. We tested these two children on a large battery of standardised and experimental social perception and social cognition tasks - both implicit and explicit - as well as standardised social questionnaires and general psychometric measures. Our findings reveal a partial WS socio-cognitive profile in the female, contrasted with a more autistic-like profile in the male. We discuss the implications of these findings for genotype/phenotype relations, as well as the advantages and limitations of animal models and of case study approaches.

  4. The behavioural phenotype in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS): from infancy to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillen, A; Devriendt, K; Legius, E; Prinzie, P; Vogels, A; Ghesquière, P; Fryns, J P

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution the current status and recent findings of the behavioural phenotype in VCFS (22q11 deletion) are discussed with regard to motor development, cognition and neurodevelopment, and behaviour and temperament. Motor: hypotonia in infancy, gross-motor milestones are delayed, problems with coordination and balance from preschool age on, problems with tempo/speed during adolescence. Cognition and neurodevelopment: learning disabilities (82-100%), intellectual disability (45%), better verbal abilities than performal abilities, poor attention and concentration, visuo-perceptual-spatia problems, good (auditory) memory. An important subgroup of children (55%) has a non-verbal learning disability (NLD). Behaviour and social-emotional development AD(H)D, withdrawn and shy, person-dependent social problems in relationships with peers, anxious, risk for child psychiatric problems as well as for the development of psychiatric problems during adolescence and early adulthood. Information on the behavioural phenotype in VCFS (22q11 deletion) is of great importance to clinicians as an aid to syndrome diagnosis, but even more to parents because it offers immense direct practical value to the management of the behaviour of their child. Appropriate counseling and information on the long-term expectations, and better insight in the behaviour will lead to the development of realistic ways of coping with their child.

  5. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children with Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down…

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome : a series of 136 patients from the Eurofever Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, R.; Gerard, L.; Kuemmerle-Deschner, J.; Lachmann, H. J.; Kone-Paut, I.; Cantarini, L.; Woo, P.; Naselli, A.; Bader-Meunier, B.; Insalaco, A.; AI-Mayoutl, S. M.; Ozen, S.; Hofer, M.; Frenkel, J.; Modesto, C.; Nikishina, I.; Schwarz, T.; Martino, S.; Meini, A.; Quartier, P.; Martini, A.; Ruperto, N.; Neven, B.; Gattorno, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate genetic, demographic and clinical features in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) from the Eurofever Registry, with a focus on genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive disease severity markers. Methods A web-based registry retrospectively collected

  7. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children with Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down…

  8. Trisomy 1q43 syndrome: a consistent phenotype with macrocephaly, characteristic face, developmental delay and cardiac anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Jackson, K.E.; Tsien, F.; Marble, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Trisomy 1q43 syndrome: a consistent phenotype with macrocephaly, characteristic face, developmental delay and cardiac anomalies: Patients with trisomy (1)(q42-qter) present with psychomotor retardation, macrocephaly, occasional presence of facial capillary naevi, cardio-vascular anomalies and small

  9. An Extra X or Y Chromosome: Contrasting the Cognitive and Motor Phenotypes in Childhood in Boys with 47,XYY Syndrome or 47,XXY Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L.; Zeger, Martha P. D.; Kushner, Harvey; Zinn, Andrew R.; Roeltgen, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to contrast the cognitive phenotypes in boys with 47,XYY (XYY) karyotype and boys with 47,XXY karyotype [Klinefelter syndrome, (KS)], who share an extra copy of the X-Y pseudoautosomal region but differ in their dosage of strictly sex-linked genes. Methods: Neuropsychological evaluation of general cognitive…

  10. Evidence for a discrete behavioral phenotype in the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenworthy, L.; Charnas, L. [National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-11-20

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, cognitive impairment, and renal tubular dysfunction. Although there is a wide range of intellectual function in affected individuals, it is often compromised by a high prevalence of maladaptive behaviors, including tantrums, stubbornness, and stereotypy. Whether these behaviors simply reflect the multiple disabilities found in some developmentally impaired individuals with or without OCRL, or a specific genetically-determined behavioral phenotype of OCRL, is unknown. Controls were matched for sex, age, visual impairment, and adaptive functioning and compared with OCRL patients on three standardized measures of adaptive/maladaptive behaviors. Forty-three matched pairs of OCRL and control subjects were identified. Both groups were similar in communication, daily living, socialization, and motor skills, in socioeconomic status, and in measures of parental stress. Individuals with OCRL displayed significantly more severe maladaptive behaviors than control boys, as measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), with 41% of the difference between the two groups attributable to the diagnosis of OCRL. Twelve maladaptive behaviors measured on the VABS appeared more frequently in OCRL than in controls. Five of these 12 behaviors, i.e., temper tantrums, irritability, complex repetitive behaviors (stereotypy)/mannerisms, obsessions/unusual preoccupations, and negativism, were identified by discriminant function analysis to significantly distinguish between controls and OCRL individuals. The diagnosis of OCRL is associated with a behavioral phenotype consisting of temper tantrums, stereotypy, stubbornness, and obsessions/unusual preoccupations. This phenotype cannot be attributed solely to the visual, motor, and intellectual disabilities characteristic of OCRL, and may represent a specific effect of the OCRL gene on the central nervous system. 57 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Observation of phenotypic variation among Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) from Delhi and Srinagar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Marwaha, Raman Kumar; Dhingra, Atul; Nisar, Sobia; Mani, Kaliavani; Masoodi, Shariq; Chakraborty, Semanti; Rashid, Aafia

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder that demonstrates ethnic and regional differences. To assess the phenotypic variability among Indian PCOS women, we evaluated clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters of these women being followed in two tertiary care institutions located in Delhi and Srinagar. A total of 299 (210 PCOS diagnosed by Rotterdam 2003 criteria and 89 healthy) women underwent estimation of T4, TSH, LH, FSH, total testosterone, prolactin, cortisol, 17OHP, and lipid profile, in addition to post OGTT, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose measurements. Among women with PCOS, mean age, age of menarche, height, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and serum LH were comparable. PCOS women from Delhi had significantly higher BMI (26.99 ± 5.38 versus 24.77 ± 4.32 kg/m(2); P = 0.01), glucose intolerance (36 versus 10%), insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR (4.20 ± 3.39 versus 3.01 ± 2.6; P = 0.006) and QUICKI (0.140 ± 0.013 versus 0.147 ± 0.015; P = 0.03) while PCOS from Srinagar had higher FG score (12.12 ± 3.91 versus 10.32 ± 2.22; P = 0.01) and serum total testosterone levels (0.65 ± 0.69 versus 0.86 ± 0.41 ng/ml; P = 0.01. Two clear phenotypes, i.e. obese hyperinsulinaemic dysglycemic women from Delhi and lean hyperandrogenic women from Srinagar are emerging. This is the first report on North Indian women with PCOS showing phenotypic differences in clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters despite being in the same region.

  12. Molecular diagnostics of Meckel-Gruber syndrome highlights phenotypic differences between MKS1 and MKS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consugar, Mark B; Kubly, Vickie J; Lager, Donna J; Hommerding, Cynthia J; Wong, Wai Chong; Bakker, Egbert; Gattone, Vincent H; Torres, Vicente E; Breuning, Martijn H; Harris, Peter C

    2007-06-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a recessively inherited, lethal disorder characterized by renal cystic dysplasia, occipital encephalocele, polydactyly and biliary dysgenesis. MKS is genetically heterogeneous with three loci mapped and two identified; MKS1 (17q23) and MKS3 (8q22.1). MKS1 is part of the Finnish disease heritage, while MKS3 has been described exclusively in consanguineous Asian families. Here we aimed to establish molecular diagnostics for MKS, determine the importance of MKS1 and MKS3 in non-consanguineous populations, and study genotype/phenotype correlations. The coding regions of MKS1 and MKS3 were screened for mutations by direct sequencing in 17 families clinically diagnosed with MKS in the US or The Netherlands. The clinical phenotype was compared to genic and allelic effects. Both mutations were identified in ten families; five MKS1 and five MKS3. All but two were compound heterozygotes, consistent with their non-consanguineous nature. The MKS1-Fin(major) mutation accounted for 7/10 MKS1 mutations; two novel changes were additionally detected. Seven novel mutations were found in MKS3, including three missense changes. We concluded that MKS1 and MKS3 account for the majority of MKS in non-consanguineous populations of European origin. Polydactyly is usually found in MKS1 but rare in MKS3. Cases with no, or milder, CNS phenotypes were only found in MKS3; hypomorphic missense mutations may be associated with less severe CNS outcomes. This study is consistent with further genetic heterogeneity of MKS, but underlines the value of molecular diagnostics of the known genes to aid family planning decisions.

  13. Novel mutation in Sjogren-Larsson syndrome is associated with divergent neurologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathleen; Holden, Kenton R; S'Aulis, Dana; Amador, Claudia; Matheus, M Gisele; Rizzo, William B

    2013-10-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is an inherited disorder of lipid metabolism caused by mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene that codes for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes and alcohols and is characterized by ichthyosis, intellectual disability, and spastic diplegia/quadriplegia. The authors describe 2 unrelated Honduran patients who carried the same novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1309A>T, p.K437X) and ALDH3A2 DNA haplotype, but widely differed in disease severity. One patient exhibited spastic quadriplegia with unusual neuroregression, whereas the other patient had the usual static form of spastic diplegia with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Biochemical analyses showed a similar profound deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and impaired fatty alcohol metabolism in both patients' cultured fibroblasts. These results indicate that variation in the neurologic phenotype of Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is not strictly determined by the ALDH3A2 mutation or the biochemical defect as expressed in cultured fibroblasts, but by unidentified epigenetic/environmental factors, gene modifiers, or other mechanisms.

  14. Evidence that methylation of the FMR-I locus is responsible for variable phenotypic expression of the fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConkie-Rosell, A.; Lachiewicz, A.M.; Spiridigliozzi, G.A.; Shoenwald, S. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)); Tarleton, J.; Phelan, M.C. (Greenwood Genetics Center, Greenwood, SC (United States)); Goonewardena, P. (Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, CA (United States)); Ding, X.; Brown, W.T. (Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States))

    1993-10-01

    DNA at the FMR-1 locus was analyzed by Southern blot using probe StB12.3 in an unusual fragile X family with six brothers, three of whom are affected with fragile X to varying degrees, two of whom are nonpenetrant carriers, and one of whom is unaffected. Fragile X chromosome studies, detailed physical examinations, and psychological testing were completed on all six. Two of the affected brothers and the two nonpenetrant brothers were found to be methylation mosaics. The three affected males spanned the phenotypic and cognitive spectrum of the fragile X syndrome. A correlation was seen between the degree of methylation and the phenotypic expression identified in the three affected males. The two males initially classified as nonpenetrant were found to have mild phenotypic expression which consisted of minor cognitive deficits and a partial physical phenotype. These two, who were negative on fragile X chromosome studies, were found on DNA analysis to have large broad smears, with approximately 97% of the DNA unmethylated. The results described here indicate that some [open quotes]nonpenetrant[close quotes] carrier males may have varying amounts of methylation of the FMR-1 region, which can result in mild expression of the fragile X syndrome. The apparently mild phenotypic and cognitive expression of the fragile X syndrome in the two males, initially classified as nonpenetrant, who are mosaic for hypermethylation of an expansion of the CGG repeat in the premutation range, indicates that expression of the syndrome is not confined to males with large, hypermethylated expansions (full mutation) but has instead a gradient effect with a threshold for the full expression of the phenotype. 41 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3–100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35–3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease. PMID:26925314

  16. [Effects of pregnancy and changes in body weight on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes according to the Rotterdam criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echiburú, Bárbara; Ladrón de Guevara, Amanda; Pereira, Cecilia; Pérez, Constanza; Michael, Pía; Crisosto, Nicolás; Sir-Petermann, Teresa

    2014-08-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is tightly associated with insulin resistance and obesity and characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic oligo-anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology when fully expressed. The 2003 Rotterdam consensus proposed that two or three of these features were necessary to make the diagnosis, which generated four phenotypes. Several studies have suggested that these phenotypes could differ in their metabolic and endocrine characteristics and that they could vary in the same patient when analyzed throughout life. To determine if the initial classification of PCOS phenotypes is modified by different physiological conditions. We performed a non-concurrent prospective analysis of 88 women with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The effect of physiological conditions such as changes in body weight, pregnancy and ageing more than five years on PCOS phenotype expression was analyzed. Twenty four percent of women became pregnant, 37% decreased and 24% increased their body weight during follow up. These conditions modified significantly the proportion of the different phenotypes (c2 = 32.2, p change to a better phenotype (p = 0.047) and even a normalization of the PCOS condition in 27% of the patients. On the other hand, an increase in body weight modifying body mass index in one unit, conferred an 8% probability of changing to a worst phenotype. Pregnancy and changes in body weight significantly modify PCOS phenotypes.

  17. Angelman syndrome caused by deletion: a genotype-phenotype correlation determined by breakpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Kette D; Varela, Monica Castro; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik; Andrade, Joaquina Queiroz; Grossmann, Rosi; Kok, Fernando; Marques-Dias, Maria Joaquina

    2013-07-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 15q11-q13, the most common genetic mechanism associated with Angelman syndrome (AS), is highly associated with a severe phenotype. However, deletion is not a genetically homogeneous group as it is composed by two main groups: Class I with breakpoints at BP1 (proximal) and BP3 (distal) and Class II present breakpoints at BP2 (proximal) and BP3 (distal). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the breakpoint on the electroclinical profile. We evaluated 16 patients with AS caused by 15q11-13 deletion (6 were Class I; 10 were Class II). We characterized epilepsy features by clinical history obtained from parents and caretakers with a pre-standard questionnaire. These data were corroborated by medical records, contact with previous physicians, and video-EEG monitoring. Suggestive EEG patterns for AS were classified according to the classical description of Boyd et al. (1988). AS patients with BP1-BP3 deletion had significantly more daily and disabling seizures than AS patients with BP1-BP2 deletion. They also presented a significant higher frequency of status epilepticus and epilepsy aggravated by fever. Need for polytherapy was significantly more frequent in BP1-BP3 patients. EEG features were similar in both groups. This study shows a significant correlation between the two deletion classes and AS clinical, but not the electrographic phenotype. Epilepsy is more severe and refractory to treatment in patients with larger deletions. Deletion is not a homogeneous group and knowledge on the breakpoint may have a clinical implication and represent an important factor in parental counseling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. GLUT1-deficiency syndrome: Report of a four-generation Norwegian family with a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Nakken, Karl O; Haavardsholm, Kathrine C; Selmer, Kaja Kristine

    2017-05-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is a rare metabolic encephalopathy with a wide variation of clinical phenotypes. Familial variants are often milder than de novo cases, and may therefore remain undiagnosed. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical course of GLUT1-DS in a four-generation Norwegian family where the oldest generations had never received any treatment. Through interviews and clinical investigations, we characterized a family of 26 members, where 11 members had symptoms strongly suggesting GLUT1-DS. All members were offered genetic testing of the SLC2A1 gene. Affected members were offered treatment with ketogenic diet, and the effect of the treatment was registered. We sequenced the SLC2A1 gene in 13 members, and found that 10, all with symptoms, had the c.823G>A (p.Ala275Thr) variant. All affected members had experienced early-onset epilepsy, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesias, and most had mild learning disability. Moreover, some had symptoms and signs of a distal neuropathy in addition to reduced sense of orientation and excessive daytime sleep. Their load of symptoms had decreased over the years, although that they never had received any treatment. Nevertheless, those who started dietary treatment all experienced an improved quality of life. We report a four-generation family with GLUT1-DS where the disease has a mild course, even when untreated. In addition to classical GLUT1-DS features, we also describe symptoms which have never been reported in GLUT1-DS previously. As such, this family extends the phenotypic spectrum of GLUT1-DS and underlines the importance of diagnosing also relatively mildly affected patients, even in adult life, as they also seem to benefit from dietary treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Turner Syndrome Genotype and phenotype and their effect on presenting features and timing of Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alwan, I; M, Khadora; Amir; G, Nasrat; A, Omair; L, Brown; M, Al Dubayee; M, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder caused by abnormalities of the X chromosome. We aimed to describe the phenotypic characteristics of TS patients and evaluate their association with presenting clinical characteristics and time at diagnosis. Methods We studied females diagnosed with TS at King Abdul Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh between 1983 and 2010. Patients were classified based upon karyotype into females with classical monosomy 45,X (group A) and females with other X chromosome abnormalities (mosaic 45,X/46,XX, Xqisochromosomes, Xp or Xq deletion) (group B). Clinical features of the two groups were analyzed. Results Of the 52 patients included in the study, 16(30.8%) were diagnosed with classical monosomy 45,X and the rest with other X chromosome abnormalities. Only 19(36.5%) patients were diagnosed in infancy and the remaining during childhood or later (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5,95%CI 1.27–15.90, p=0.02). Short stature was universal in group A versus 77.8% in group B. All patients in group A had primary amenorrhea compared with 63.2% of those in group B (P = 0.04); the rest of group B had secondary amenorrhea. Cardiovascular abnormalities were higher in group A (OR=3.50, 95%CI 0.99–12.29, p-value =0.05). Renal defects and recurrent otitis media were similar in both groups. Conclusion This study suggests that karyotype variations might affect the phenotype of TS; however, it may not reliably predict the clinical presentation. Chromosomal analysis for all suspected cases of TS should be promptly done at childhood in order to design an appropriate management plan early in life. PMID:25246887

  20. Down Syndrome Cognitive Phenotypes Modeled in Mice Trisomic for All HSA 21 Homologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belichenko, Pavel V.; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M.; Becker, Ann; Wagner, Grant E.; Lysenko, Larisa V.; Yu, Y. Eugene; Mobley, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy for chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. The genomic regions on human chromosome 21 (HSA21) are syntenically conserved with regions on mouse chromosomes 10, 16, and 17 (Mmu10, Mmu16, and Mmu17). Recently, we created a genetic model of DS which carries engineered duplications of all three mouse syntenic regions homologous to HSA21. This ‘triple trisomic’ or TTS model thus represents the most complete and accurate murine model currently available for experimental studies of genotype-phenotype relationships in DS. Here we extended our initial studies of TTS mice. Locomotor activity, stereotypic and repetitive behavior, anxiety, working memory, long-term memory, and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus were examined in the TTS and wild-type (WT) control mice. Changes in locomotor activity were most remarkable for a significant increase in ambulatory time and a reduction in average velocity of TTS mice. No changes were detected in repetitive and stereotypic behavior and in measures of anxiety. Working memory showed no changes when tested in Y-maze, but deficiency in a more challenging T-maze test was detected. Furthermore, long-term object recognition memory was significantly reduced in the TTS mice. These changes were accompanied by deficient long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus, which was restored to the WT levels following blockade of GABAA receptors with picrotoxin (100 μM). TTS mice thus demonstrated a number of phenotypes characteristic of DS and may serve as a new standard by which to evaluate and direct findings in other less complete models of DS. PMID:26230397

  1. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

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    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  2. Clinical phenotype and prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Zhi Zhang; Jian-Qiu Sheng; Shi-Rong Li; Hong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To descr ibe systematically the clinical characteristics and phenotype of HNPCC families and the prevalence of HNPCC in the general population of CRC patients in China.METHODS: HNPCC kindreds and CRC patients were from two sources. One was that we consecutively investigated kindreds and patients by ourselves. And the other was the published Chinese and foreign literature related to Chinese HNPCC syndrome. There were 142 HNPCC families fulfilling AC Ⅰ and/or AC Ⅱ including 57 families with detailed data, and 3874 general primary CRC patients in all. All statistical tests were two-sided.RESULTS: In AC Ⅰ families, the number of Lynch syndrome Ⅰ and Ⅱ families were 25 (47.2%) and 28 (52.8%)respectively. There were 215 patients (82.4%) with CRC,67 patients (25.7%) with extracolonic cancer and 50patients (19.2%) with multiple primary cancers. In all CRC patients, multiple primary CRC were in 41 patients (19.1%),and the first-CRC was right-sided colorectal cancer in 143 patients (66.5%) and rectal cancer in 44 patients (20.5%). 8.8% and 19.2% of the first cancer were CRC and extracolonic cancers. Among those patients whose first cancer was CRC, 66.8% and 19.9% were right-sided colorectal cancer and rectal cancer, respectively. The similar results were found in AC Ⅱ families. Normal distribution was only found in the distribution of the age of diagnosis of the first cancer in both AC Ⅰ families (coefficient of skewness: u = 0.81, 0.20<0.40<P<0.50;coefficient of kurtosis: u = 1.13, 0.20<P<0.40, α = 0.20)and AC Ⅱ families (coefficient of skewness: u = 0.63, P>0.5>0.20; coefficient of kurtosis: u = 0.84, 0.20<0.40<P<0.50,α = 0.20), but not found in the distribution of the age of diagnosis of the first CRC. When patients with HNPCC-associated cancer suffered from the first malignant tumor in HNPCC families diagnosed by AC Ⅰ and AC Ⅱ, the mean age and median age were 45.1±12.7 years and 44.0 years,45.2±12.7 years and 44.5 years

  3. A Comprehensive Phenotypic Investigation of the "Pod-Shattering Syndrome" in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Maria L; Attene, Giovanna; Rodriguez, Monica; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Fois, Davide; Nanni, Laura; Gioia, Tania; Albani, Diego M; Papa, Roberto; Rau, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Seed shattering in crops is a key domestication trait due to its relevance for seed dispersal, yield, and fundamental questions in evolution (e.g., convergent evolution). Here, we focused on pod shattering in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most important legume crop for human consuption in the world. With this main aim, we developed a methodological pipeline that comprises a thorough characterization under field conditions, including also the chemical composition and histological analysis of the pod valves. The pipeline was developed based on the assumption that the shattering trait itself can be treated in principle as a "syndrome" (i.e., a set of correlated different traits) at the pod level. We characterized a population of 267 introgression lines that were developed ad-hoc to study shattering in common bean. Three main objectives were sought: (1) to dissect the shattering trait into its "components," of level (percentage of shattering pods per plant) and mode (percentage of pods with twisting or non-twisting valves); (2) to test whether shattering is associated to the chemical composition and/or the histological characteristics of the pod valves; and (3) to test the associations between shattering and other plant traits. We can conclude the following: Very high shattering levels can be achieved in different modes; shattering resistance is mainly a qualitative trait; and high shattering levels is correlated with high carbon and lignin contents of the pod valves and with specific histological charaterstics of the ventral sheath and the inner fibrous layer of the pod wall. Our data also suggest that shattering comes with a "cost," as it is associated with low pod size, low seed weight per pod, high pod weight, and low seed to pod-valves ratio; indeed, it can be more exaustively described as a syndrome at the pod level. Our work suggests that the valve chemical composition (i.e., carbon and lignin content) can be used for a high troughput phenotyping

  4. Multimodal therapy for category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in UPOINTS phenotyped patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Vittorio; Marras, Emanuela; Restelli, Antonella; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The complex network of etiological factors, signals and tissue responses involved in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) cannot be successfully targeted by a single therapeutic agent. Multimodal approaches to the therapy of CP/CPPS have been and are currently being tested, as in the frame of complex diagnostic-therapeutic phenotypic approaches such as the urinary, psychosocial, organ-specific, infection, neurological and muscle tenderness (UPOINTS) system. In this study, the effect of combination therapy on 914 patients diagnosed, phenotyped and treated in a single specialized prostatitis clinic was analyzed. Patients received α-blockers, Serenoa repens (S. repens) extracts combined or not with supplements (lycopene and selenium) and, in the presence of documented or highly suspected infection, antibacterial agents. Combination treatment induced marked and significant improvements of National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) prostatitis symptom scores, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) sexual dysfunction scores, urinary peak flow rates and bladder voiding efficiency. These improvements, assessed after a 6-month course of therapy, were sustained throughout a follow-up period of 18 months. A clinically appreciable reduction of ≥6 points of the total NIH-CPSI score was achieved in 77.5% of patients subjected to combination therapy for a period of 6 months. When the patients were divided in two cohorts, depending on the diagnosis of CP/CPPS [inflammatory (IIIa) vs. non-inflammatory (IIIb) subtypes], significant improvements of all signs and symptoms of the syndrome were observed in both cohorts at the end of therapy. Intergroup comparison showed that patients affected by the IIIa sub-category of CP/CPPS showed more severe signs and symptoms (NIH-CPSI total, pain and quality of life impact scores, and Qmax) at baseline when compared with IIIb patients. However, the improvement of symptoms after

  5. Multimodal therapy for category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in UPOINTS phenotyped patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAGRI, VITTORIO; MARRAS, EMANUELA; RESTELLI, ANTONELLA; WAGENLEHNER, FLORIAN M.E.; PERLETTI, GIANPAOLO

    2015-01-01

    The complex network of etiological factors, signals and tissue responses involved in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) cannot be successfully targeted by a single therapeutic agent. Multimodal approaches to the therapy of CP/CPPS have been and are currently being tested, as in the frame of complex diagnostic-therapeutic phenotypic approaches such as the urinary, psychosocial, organ-specific, infection, neurological and muscle tenderness (UPOINTS) system. In this study, the effect of combination therapy on 914 patients diagnosed, phenotyped and treated in a single specialized prostatitis clinic was analyzed. Patients received α-blockers, Serenoa repens (S. repens) extracts combined or not with supplements (lycopene and selenium) and, in the presence of documented or highly suspected infection, antibacterial agents. Combination treatment induced marked and significant improvements of National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) prostatitis symptom scores, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) sexual dysfunction scores, urinary peak flow rates and bladder voiding efficiency. These improvements, assessed after a 6-month course of therapy, were sustained throughout a follow-up period of 18 months. A clinically appreciable reduction of ≥6 points of the total NIH-CPSI score was achieved in 77.5% of patients subjected to combination therapy for a period of 6 months. When the patients were divided in two cohorts, depending on the diagnosis of CP/CPPS [inflammatory (IIIa) vs. non-inflammatory (IIIb) subtypes], significant improvements of all signs and symptoms of the syndrome were observed in both cohorts at the end of therapy. Intergroup comparison showed that patients affected by the IIIa sub-category of CP/CPPS showed more severe signs and symptoms (NIH-CPSI total, pain and quality of life impact scores, and Qmax) at baseline when compared with IIIb patients. However, the improvement of symptoms after

  6. MicroRNA-145 restores contractile vascular smooth muscle phenotype and coronary collateral growth in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Rebecca; Terry, Russell; Chaplin, Jennifer; Smith, Erika; Musiyenko, Alla; Russell, James C; Lincoln, Thomas; Rocic, Petra

    2013-04-01

    Transient, repetitive occlusion stimulates coronary collateral growth (CCG) in normal animals. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) switch to synthetic phenotype early in CCG, then return to contractile phenotype. CCG is impaired in the metabolic syndrome. We determined whether impaired CCG was attributable to aberrant VSMC phenotypic modulation by miR-145-mediated mechanisms, and whether restoration of physiological miR-145 levels in metabolic syndrome (JCR rat) improved CCG. CCG was stimulated by transient, repetitive left anterior descending artery occlusion and evaluated after 9 days by coronary blood flow measurements (microspheres). miR-145 was delivered to JCR VSMCs via adenoviral vector (miR-145-Adv). In JCR rats, miR-145 was decreased late in CCG (≈ 2-fold day 6; ≈ 4-fold day 9 versus SD), which correlated with decreased expression of smooth muscle-specific contractile proteins (≈ 5-fold day 6; ≈ 10-fold day 9 versus SD), indicative of VSMCs' failure to return to the contractile phenotype late in CCG. miR-145 expression in JCR rats (miR-145-Adv) on days 6 to 9 of CCG completely restored VSMCs contractile phenotype and CCG (collateral/normal zone flow ratio was 0.93 ± 0.09 JCR+miR-145-Adv versus 0.12 ± 0.02 JCR versus 0.87 ± 0.02 SD). Restoration of VSMC contractile phenotype through miR-145 delivery is a highly promising intervention for restoration of CCG in the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Digastric Muscle Phenotypes of the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is frequently associated with complex difficulties in oromotor development, feeding, and swallowing. However, the muscle phenotypes underlying these deficits are unclear. We tested the hypotheses that the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS has significantly altered myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoform profiles of the muscles involved in feeding and swallowing, as well as reductions in the speed of these movements during behavioral assays. SDS-PAGE, immunofluorescence, and qRT-PCR were used to assess MyHC isoform expression in pertinent muscles, and functional feeding and swallowing performance were quantified through videofluoroscopy and mastication assays. We found that both the anterior digastric (ADG and posterior digastric (PDG muscles in 11-day old and 5-6 week old Ts65Dn groups showed significantly lower MyHC 2b protein levels than in age-matched euploid control groups. In videofluoroscopic and videotape assays used to quantify swallowing and mastication performance, 5-6 week old Ts65Dn and euploid controls showed similar swallow rates, inter-swallow intervals, and mastication rates. In analysis of adults, 10-11 week old Ts65Dn mice revealed significantly less MyHC 2b mRNA expression in the posterior digastric, but not the anterior digastric muscle as compared with euploid controls. Analysis of MyHC 2b protein levels across an adult age range (10-53 weeks of age revealed lower levels of MyHC 2b protein in the PDG of Ts65Dn than in euploids, but similar levels of MyHC 2b in the ADG. Cumulatively, these results indicate biochemical differences in some, but not all, muscles involved in swallowing and jaw movement in Ts65Dn mice that manifest early in post-natal development, and persist into adulthood. These findings suggest potential utility of this model for future investigations of the mechanisms of oromotor difficulties associated with Down syndrome.

  8. Lyme Disease Diagnosed by Alternative Methods: A Phenotype Similar to That of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, David M; Miller, Ruth R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Parker, Shoshana M; Morshed, Muhammad G; Steiner, Theodore S; Singer, Joel; Shojania, Kam; Tang, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    A subset of patients reporting a diagnosis of Lyme disease can be described as having alternatively diagnosed chronic Lyme syndrome (ADCLS), in which diagnosis is based on laboratory results from a nonreference Lyme specialty laboratory using in-house criteria. Patients with ADCLS report symptoms similar to those reported by patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We performed a case-control study comparing patients with ADCLS and CFS to each other and to both healthy controls and controls with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Subjects completed a history, physical exam, screening laboratory tests, 7 functional scales, reference serology for Lyme disease using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria, reference serology for other tick-associated pathogens, and cytokine expression studies. The study enrolled 13 patients with ADCLS (12 of whom were diagnosed by 1 alternative US laboratory), 25 patients with CFS, 25 matched healthy controls, and 11 SLE controls. Baseline clinical data and functional scales indicate significant disability among ADCLS and CFS patients and many important differences between these groups and controls, but no significant differences between each other. No ADCLS patient was confirmed as having positive Lyme serology by reference laboratory testing, and there was no difference in distribution of positive serology for other tick-transmitted pathogens or cytokine expression across the groups. In British Columbia, a setting with low Lyme disease incidence, ADCLS patients have a similar phenotype to that of CFS patients. Disagreement between alternative and reference laboratory Lyme testing results in this setting is most likely explained by false-positive results from the alternative laboratory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Phenotype and Tissue Expression as a Function of Genetic Risk in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Cindy T.; Mosbruger, Tim; Saxena, Richa; Welt, Corrine K.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and replication analyses have identified (n = 5) or replicated (n = 10) DNA variants associated with risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in European women. However, the causal gene and underlying mechanism for PCOS risk at these loci have not been determined. We hypothesized that analysis of phenotype, gene expression and metformin response as a function of genotype would identify candidate genes and pathways that could provide insight into the underlying mechanism for risk at these loci. To test the hypothesis, subjects with PCOS (n = 427) diagnosed according to the NIH criteria (< 9 menses per year and clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism) and controls (n = 407) with extensive phenotyping were studied. A subset of subjects (n = 38) underwent a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy for RNA sequencing and were subsequently treated with metformin for 12 weeks with standardized outcomes measured. Data were analyzed according to genotype at PCOS risk loci and adjusted for the false discovery rate. A gene variant in the THADA locus was associated with response to metformin and metformin was a predicted upstream regulator at the same locus. Genotype at the FSHB locus was associated with LH levels. Genes near the PCOS risk loci demonstrated differences in expression as a function of genotype in adipose including BLK and NEIL2 (GATA4 locus), GLIPR1 and PHLDA1 (KRR1 locus). Based on the phenotypes, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), and upstream regulatory and pathway analyses we hypothesize that there are PCOS subtypes. FSHB, FHSR and LHR loci may influence PCOS risk based on their relationship to gonadotropin levels. The THADA, GATA4, ERBB4, SUMO1P1, KRR1 and RAB5B loci appear to confer risk through metabolic mechanisms. The IRF1, SUMO1P1 and KRR1 loci may confer PCOS risk in development. The TOX3 and GATA4 loci appear to be involved in inflammation and its consequences. The data suggest potential PCOS subtypes and point to

  10. Associations between speech features and phenotypic severity in Treacher Collins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS, OMIM 154500) is a rare congenital disorder of craniofacial development. Characteristic hypoplastic malformations of the ears, zygomatic arch, mandible and pharynx have been described in detail. However, reports on the impact of these malformations on speech are few. Exploring speech features and investigating if speech function is related to phenotypic severity are essential for optimizing follow-up and treatment. Methods Articulation, nasal resonance, voice and intelligibility were examined in 19 individuals (5–74 years, median 34 years) divided into three groups comprising children 5–10 years (n = 4), adolescents 11–18 years (n = 4) and adults 29 years and older (n = 11). A speech composite score (0–6) was calculated to reflect the variability of speech deviations. TCS severity scores of phenotypic expression and total scores of Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) measuring orofacial dysfunction were used in analyses of correlation with speech characteristics (speech composite scores). Results Children and adolescents presented with significantly higher speech composite scores (median 4, range 1–6) than adults (median 1, range 0–5). Nearly all children and adolescents (6/8) displayed speech deviations of articulation, nasal resonance and voice, while only three adults were identified with multiple speech aberrations. The variability of speech dysfunction in TCS was exhibited by individual combinations of speech deviations in 13/19 participants. The speech composite scores correlated with TCS severity scores and NOT-S total scores. Speech composite scores higher than 4 were associated with cleft palate. The percent of intelligible words in connected speech was significantly lower in children and adolescents (median 77%, range 31–99) than in adults (98%, range 93–100). Intelligibility of speech among the children was markedly inconsistent and clearly affecting the understandability

  11. A PTPN11 allele encoding a catalytically impaired SHP2 protein in a patient with a Noonan syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Martinelli, Simone; Pannone, Luca; Lo, Ivan Fai-Man; Shi, Lisong; Edelmann, Lisa; Tartaglia, Marco; Luk, Ho-Ming; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-09-01

    The RASopathies are a relatively common group of phenotypically similar and genetically related autosomal dominant genetic syndromes caused by missense mutations affecting genes participating in the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that include Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML, formerly LEOPARD syndrome). NS and NSML can be difficult to differentiate during infancy, but the presence of multiple lentigines, café au lait spots, and specific cardiac defects facilitate the diagnosis. Furthermore, individual PTPN11 missense mutations are highly specific to each syndrome and engender opposite biochemical alterations on the function of SHP-2, the protein product of that gene. Here, we report on a 5-year-old male with two de novo PTPN11 mutations in cis, c.1471C>T (p.Pro491Ser), and c.1492C>T (p.Arg498Trp), which are associated with NS and NSML, respectively. This boy's phenotype is intermediate between NS and NSML with facial dysmorphism, short stature, mild global developmental delay, pulmonic stenosis, and deafness but absence of café au lait spots or lentigines. The double-mutant SHP-2 was found to be catalytically impaired. This raises the question of whether clinical differences between NS and NSML can be ascribed solely to the relative SHP-2 catalytic activity.

  12. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome with mild phenotypic features confirmed by UBR1 gene testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naim Alkhouri; Barbara Kaplan; Marsha Kay; Amy Shealy; Carol Crowe; Susanne Bauhuber; Nartin Zenker

    2008-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and is characterized by hypoplastic nasal alae, mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, short stature, scalp defects, dental abnormalities and abnormal hair patterns. Growth hormone deficiency, hypopituitarism, and impaired glucagon secretion response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia have been reported. Congenital heart defects have also been described in this condition. Mental retardation is typically moderate to severe in patients with JBS; however, normal intelligence can occur. In the pancreas, there is a selective defect of acinar tissue, whereas the islets of Langerhans and ducts are preserved. Diabetes has been reported in older children, suggesting the progressive nature of pancreatic disease. The molecular basis of JBS has recently been mapped to chromosome 15q15-q21 with identified mutations in the UBR1 gene. We report the case of a 7-year-old female with pancreatic insufficiency and mild phenotypic features, in whom the diagnosis of JBS was established using recently described molecular testing for the UBR1 gene.

  13. Mild Angelman syndrome phenotype due to a mosaic methylation imprinting defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Laura C; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Boutis, Paula; Buiting, Karin; Weksberg, Rosanna; Williams, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder causing severe to profound intellectual disability, absent or very limited speech and a high risk for seizures. AS is caused by a loss of function of the maternally-derived UBE3A allele due to one of several mechanisms including imprinting defects (ImpDs). We present a girl with AS due to a mosaic ImpD who has relatively high developmental function (VABS-II composite score of 76) and communication skills (as demonstrated in supplemental video links). Given the patient's relatively mild developmental impairment, without clinical evidence of seizures, gait disturbance or inappropriate laughter, the diagnosis of AS was not initially suspected. Initial laboratory testing for AS was inconclusive but additional studies suggested mosaic ImpD and characteristic EEG findings provided further support for the clinical diagnosis. Our patient, along with other case reports of children with AS and relatively mild phenotypes, raises the question as to whether there exists an undiagnosed group of individuals with mild intellectual disability and expressive speech delays due to mosaic methylation defects of the chromosome 15q11.2-13 region. Population studies may be needed to determine if such an undiagnosed group exists. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Vitamin D receptor signaling improves Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cellular phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreienkamp, Ray; Croke, Monica; Neumann, Martin A; Bedia-Diaz, Gonzalo; Graziano, Simona; Dusso, Adriana; Dorsett, Dale; Carlberg, Carsten; Gonzalo, Susana

    2016-05-24

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating incurable premature aging disease caused by accumulation of progerin, a toxic lamin A mutant protein. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear morphological abnormalities, altered signaling pathways, genomic instability, and premature senescence. Here we uncover new molecular mechanisms contributing to cellular decline in progeria. We demonstrate that HGPS cells reduce expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and DNA repair factors BRCA1 and 53BP1 with progerin accumulation, and that reconstituting VDR signaling via 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) treatment improves HGPS phenotypes, including nuclear morphological abnormalities, DNA repair defects, and premature senescence. Importantly, we discovered that the 1,25D/VDR axis regulates LMNA gene expression, as well as expression of DNA repair factors. 1,25D dramatically reduces progerin production in HGPS cells, while stabilizing BRCA1 and 53BP1, two key factors for genome integrity. Vitamin D/VDR axis emerges as a new target for treatment of HGPS and potentially other lamin-related diseases exhibiting VDR deficiency and genomic instability. Because progerin expression increases with age, maintaining vitamin D/VDR signaling could keep the levels of progerin in check during physiological aging.

  15. Rapamycin reverses cellular phenotypes and enhances mutant protein clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kan; Graziotto, John J; Blair, Cecilia D; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Erdos, Michael R; Krainc, Dimitri; Collins, Francis S

    2011-06-29

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging. HGPS is most commonly caused by a de novo single-nucleotide substitution in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that partially activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, producing an abnormal lamin A protein termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin in dividing cells adversely affects the integrity of the nuclear scaffold and leads to nuclear blebbing in cultured cells. Progerin is also produced in normal cells, increasing in abundance as senescence approaches. Here, we report the effect of rapamycin, a macrolide antibiotic that has been implicated in slowing cellular and organismal aging, on the cellular phenotypes of HGPS fibroblasts. Treatment with rapamycin abolished nuclear blebbing, delayed the onset of cellular senescence, and enhanced the degradation of progerin in HGPS cells. Rapamycin also decreased the formation of insoluble progerin aggregates and induced clearance through autophagic mechanisms in normal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest an additional mechanism for the beneficial effects of rapamycin on longevity and encourage the hypothesis that rapamycin treatment could provide clinical benefit for children with HGPS.

  16. NIPBL rearrangements in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: evidence for replicative mechanism and genotype–phenotype correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Davut; Hullings, Melanie; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia G.; Loy, Elizabeth; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem congenital anomaly disorder characterized by mental retardation, limb abnormalities, distinctive facial features, and hirsutism. Mutations in three genes involved in sister chromatid cohesion, NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3, account for ~55% of CdLS cases. The molecular etiology of a significant fraction of CdLS cases remains unknown. We hypothesized that large genomic rearrangements of cohesin complex subunit genes may play a role in the molecular etiology of this disorder. Methods Custom high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization analyses interrogating candidate cohesin genes and breakpoint junction sequencing of identified genomic variants were performed. Results Of the 162 patients with CdLS, for whom mutations in known CdLS genes were previously negative by sequencing, deletions containing NIPBL exons were observed in 7 subjects (~5%). Breakpoint sequences in five patients implicated microhomology-mediated replicative mechanisms—such as serial replication slippage and fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication—as a potential predominant contributor to these copy number variations. Most deletions are predicted to result in haploinsuflciency due to heterozygous loss-of-function mutations; such mutations may result in a more severe CdLS phenotype. Conclusion Our findings suggest a potential clinical utility to testing for copy number variations involving NIPBL when clinically diagnosed CdLS cases are mutation-negative by DNA-sequencing studies. PMID:22241092

  17. Interruption of progerin–lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M.P.; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin–lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA–β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin–lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging. PMID:27617860

  18. Interruption of progerin-lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-Mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong; Park, Bum-Joon

    2016-10-03

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin-lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA-β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin-lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging.

  19. A case of apparent trisomy 21 without the Down's syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramopoulos, D; Kennerknecht, I; Barbi, G; Eckert, D; Delabar, J M; Maunoury, C; Hallberg, A; Petersen, M B

    1997-01-01

    We describe a case of apparent trisomy 21 that does not fulfill the criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Down's syndrome (DS). Our patient was subjected to karyotype analysis and found to have full, non-mosaic trisomy 21 in both blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts, while examination of the term placenta, which was performed earlier in the course of a different study, had shown mosaicism (73%) for trisomy 21. FISH analysis showed no obvious rearrangement of the DS chromosomal region in any of the chromosomes 21. Molecular analysis using polymorphic markers on chromosome 21 verified the existence of trisomy for the entire long arm of the chromosome and showed that the origin of the extra chromosome was maternal and was probably the result of a mitotic error. In contrast with the above, the clinical evaluation using the Jackson checklist of 25 signs failed to establish the diagnosis of DS. We believe that our patient might present mosaicism in other tissues that are not available for analysis and can be regarded as an extreme example in the continuous spectrum of karyotype phenotype associations in mosaic cases. Images PMID:9222973

  20. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance.

  1. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L Rider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome (THES. This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome.

  2. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissay, Véronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C H; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) cause non-dystrophic myotonia and/or periodic paralysis. In this study, we investigated whether cardiac arrhythmias or channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome can be part of the clinical phenotype associated with SCN4A variants and whether patients with Brugada syndrome present with non-dystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis and related gene mutations. We therefore screened seven families with different SCN4A variants and non-dystrophic myotonia phenotypes for Brugada syndrome and performed a neurological, neurophysiological and genetic work-up in 107 Brugada families. In the families with an SCN4A-associated non-dystrophic myotonia, three patients had a clinical diagnosis of Brugada syndrome, whereas we found a remarkably high prevalence of myotonic features involving different genes in the families with Brugada syndrome. One Brugada family carried an SCN4A variant that is predicted to probably affect function, one family suffered from a not genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia, one family was diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy (DMPK gene) and one family had a Thomsen disease myotonia congenita (CLCN1 variant that affects function). Our findings and data suggest a possible involvement of SCN4A variants in the pathophysiological mechanism underlying the development of a spontaneous or drug-induced type 1 electrocardiographic pattern and the occurrence of malignant arrhythmias in some patients with Brugada syndrome.

  3. Anthropometric indices to identify metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype: a comparison between the three stages of adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Feliciano Pereira; Franciane Rocha Faria; Eliane Rodrigues de Faria; Helen Hermana Miranda Hermsdorff; Maria do Carmo Gouveia Peluzio; Sylvia do Carmo Castro Franceschini; Silvia Eloiza Priore

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HW) in a representative adolescent sample; as well as to establish which anthropometric indicator better identifies MS and HW, according to gender and adolescent age. METHODS: This cross sectional study had the participation of 800 adolescents (414 girls) from 10-19 years old. Anthropometric indicators (body mass index, waist perimeter, waist/stature ratio, waist/hip ratio, and cent...

  4. Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Phenotypes Using Updated Criteria for Polycystic Ovarian Morphology: An Assessment of Over 100 Consecutive Women Self-reporting Features of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Nina M.; Podolski, Amanda J.; Brooks, Eric D; Chizen, Donna R.; Pierson, Roger A.; Lehotay, Denis C; Lujan, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and its distinct clinical phenotypes were assessed using 3 sets of international diagnostic criteria in women self-reporting concerns over outward features of PCOS. Revised ultrasonographic criteria for polycystic ovaries (PCO) based on modern ultrasound technology were used. Of the participants, 53%, 62%, and 70% were diagnosed with PCOS using National Institutes of Health, Androgen Excess and PCOS Society, and Rotterdam criteria, respective...

  5. 14q12 microdeletions excluding FOXG1 give rise to a congenital variant Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Carolyn J; Ho, Gladys; Bettella, Elisa; Knapman, Alisa; Collins, Felicity; Hackett, Anna; McKenzie, Fiona; Darmanian, Artur; Peters, Gregory B; Fagan, Kerry; Christodoulou, John

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome is a clinically defined neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females. Usually sporadic, Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene in ∼90-95% of classic cases and 40-60% of individuals with atypical Rett syndrome. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene have been associated with the early-onset seizure variant of Rett syndrome and mutations in FOXG1 have been associated with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. We report the clinical features and array CGH findings of three atypical Rett syndrome patients who had severe intellectual impairment, early-onset developmental delay, postnatal microcephaly and hypotonia. In addition, the females had a seizure disorder, agenesis of the corpus callosum and subtle dysmorphism. All three were found to have an interstitial deletion of 14q12. The deleted region in common included the PRKD1 gene but not the FOXG1 gene. Gene expression analysis suggested a decrease in FOXG1 levels in two of the patients. Screening of 32 atypical Rett syndrome patients did not identify any pathogenic mutations in the PRKD1 gene, although a previously reported frameshift mutation affecting FOXG1 (c.256dupC, p.Gln86ProfsX35) was identified in a patient with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. There is phenotypic overlap between congenital Rett syndrome variants with FOXG1 mutations and the clinical presentation of our three patients with this 14q12 microdeletion, not encompassing the FOXG1 gene. We propose that the primary defect in these patients is misregulation of the FOXG1 gene rather than a primary abnormality of PRKD1.

  6. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1 to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2 to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3 to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female, seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH, and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ, who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not

  7. Histiocytoid cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome: phenotypes linked by truncating variants in NDUFB11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Gillian; Homfray, Tessa; Till, Jan; Roses-Noguer, Ferran; Buchan, Rachel J.; Wilkinson, Sam; Wilk, Alicja; Walsh, Roddy; John, Shibu; McKee, Shane; Stewart, Fiona J.; Murday, Victoria; Taylor, Robert W.; Ashworth, Michael; Baksi, A. John; Daubeney, Piers; Prasad, Sanjay; Barton, Paul J.R.; Cook, Stuart A.; Ware, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Variants in NDUFB11, which encodes a structural component of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC), were recently independently reported to cause histiocytoid cardiomyopathy (histiocytoid CM) and microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS syndrome). Here we report an additional case of histiocytoid CM, which carries a de novo nonsense variant in NDUFB11 (ENST00000276062.8: c.262C > T; p.[Arg88*]) identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) of a family trio. An identical variant has been previously reported in association with MLS syndrome. The case we describe here lacked the diagnostic features of MLS syndrome, but a detailed clinical comparison of the two cases revealed significant phenotypic overlap. Heterozygous variants in HCCS (which encodes an important mitochondrially targeted protein) and COX7B, which, like NDUFB11, encodes a protein of the MRC, have also previously been identified in MLS syndrome including a case with features of both MLS syndrome and histiocytoid CM. However, a systematic review of WES data from previously published histiocytoid CM cases, alongside four additional cases presented here for the first time, did not identify any variants in these genes. We conclude that NDUFB11 variants play a role in the pathogenesis of both histiocytoid CM and MLS and that these disorders are allelic (genetically related). PMID:28050600

  8. The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (congenital absence of uterus and vagina – phenotypic manifestations and genetic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquier Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome affects at least 1 out of 4500 women and has for a long time been considered as a sporadic anomaly. Congenital absence of upper vagina and uterus is the prime feature of the disease which, in addition, is often found associated with unilateral renal agenesis or adysplasia as well as skeletal malformations (MURCS association. The phenotypic manifestations of MRKH overlap various other syndromes or associations and thus require accurate delineation. Since MRKH manifests itself in males, the term GRES syndrome (Genital, Renal, Ear, Skeletal might be more appropriate when applied to both sexes. The MRKH syndrome, when described in familial aggregates, seems to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with an incomplete degree of penetrance and variable expressivity. This suggests the involvement of either mutations in a major developmental gene or a limited chromosomal deletion. Until recently progress in understanding the genetics of MRKH syndrome has been slow, however, now HOX genes have been shown to play key roles in body patterning and organogenesis, and in particular during genital tract development. Expression and/or function defects of one or several HOX genes may account for this syndrome.

  9. Maturation Phenotype of Peripheral Blood Monocyte/Macrophage After Stimulation with Lipopolysaccharides in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fandiño, Oscar A; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Charúa-Guindic, Luis; Escobedo, Galileo; Schmulson, Max J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Abnormal immune regulation and increased intestinal permeability augmenting the passage of bacterial molecules that can activate immune cells, such as monocytes/macrophages, have been reported in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim was to compare the maturation phenotype of monocytes/macrophages (CD14+) from IBS patients and controls in the presence or absence of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS), in vitro. Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of 20 Rome II-IBS patients and 19 controls and cultured with or without LPS for 72 hours. The maturation phenotype was examined by flow cytometry as follows: M1-Early (CD11c+CD206−), M2-Advanced (CD11c−CD206+CX3CR1+); expression of membrane markers was reported as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The Mann-Whitney test was used and significance was set at P < 0.05. Results In CD14+ cells, CD11c expression decreased with vs without LPS both in IBS (MFI: 8766.0 ± 730.2 vs 12 920.0 ± 949.2, P < 0.001) and controls (8233.0 ± 613.9 vs 13 750.0 ± 743.3, P < 0.001). M1-Early cells without LPS, showed lower CD11c expression in IBS than controls (MFI: 11 540.0 ± 537.5 vs 13 860.0 ± 893.7, P = 0.040), while both groups showed less CD11c in response to LPS (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the percentage of “Intermediate” (CD11c+CD206+CX3CR1+) cells without LPS, was higher in IBS than controls (IBS = 9.5 ± 1.5% vs C = 4.9 ± 1.4%, P < 0.001). Finally, fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) expression on M2-Advanced cells was increased when treated with LPS in controls but not in IBS (P < 0.001). Conclusions The initial phase of monocyte/macrophage maturation appears to be more advanced in IBS compared to controls. However, the decreased CX3CR1 in patients with IBS, compared to controls, when stimulated with LPS suggests a state of immune activation in IBS. PMID:28044051

  10. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children With Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J; King, Seth A; Davidson, Kimberly A; Puranik, Cynthia S; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J

    2015-08-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down syndrome would increase children's learning of phonological awareness, letter sounds, and words. Five children with Down syndrome, ages 6 to 8 years, participated in a multiple baseline across participants single case design experiment in which response to an adapted phonological awareness intervention was compared with response to the nonadapted program. Results indicate a functional relation between the adapted program and phonological awareness. Suggestions for future research and implications for practice are provided.

  11. Craniofacial and anthropometric phenotype in ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (Hay-Wells syndrome) in a cohort of 17 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, V Reid; Plunkett, Katie; Dang, Diane X; Lewis, Richard A; Bree, Alanna F; Bacino, Carlos A

    2009-09-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome are well-characterized clinical entities caused by mutations in the TP63 gene. While AEC and Rapp-Hodgkin had been thought to be clinically distinct entities, the elucidation of their molecular etiology confirmed that they are a clinical continuum as opposed to distinct disorders. We have evaluated 17 patients with AEC syndrome using a systematic clinical approach. In our study, we have identified new features and others that were thought to occur only rarely. These include short stature and poor weight gain with preservation of head circumference in nearly all subjects, trismus in 35% and hypospadias in 78% of males. In addition, we describe the frequency of phenotypic features and demonstrate the extreme clinical variability in the largest cohort of AEC individuals reported in the literature thus far.

  12. Genomic imprinting: genetic mechanisms and phenotypic consequences in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Fridman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal 15q11-q13 region is of great interest in Human Genetics because many structural rearrangements have been described for it (deletions, duplications and translocations leading to phenotypes resulting in conditions such as the Prader-Willi (PWS and Angelman (AS syndromes which were the first human diseases found to be related to the differential expression of parental alleles (genomic imprinting. Contrary to Mendelian laws where the parental inheritance of genetic information does not influence gene expression, genomic imprinting is characterized by DNA modifications that produce different phenotypes depending on the parental origin of the mutation. Clinical manifestation of PWS appears when the loss of paternally expressed genes occurs and AS results from the loss of a maternally expressed gene. Different genetic mechanisms can lead to PWS or AS, such as deletions, uniparental disomy or imprinting mutation. In AS patients an additional class occurs with mutations on the UBE3A gene. Studies of PWS and AS patients can help us to understand the imprinting process, so that other genomic regions with similar characteristics can be located, and different syndromes can have their genetic mechanisms elucidated.O segmento cromossômico 15q11-q13 é de grande interesse em Genética Humana uma vez que diversos rearranjos estruturais têm sido descritos nessa região (deleções, duplicações e translocações resultando em fenótipos diferentes como os das síndromes de Prader-Willi (PWS e Angelman (AS, que foram as primeiras doenças humanas a serem relacionadas com a expressão diferencial de alelos parentais (imprinting genômico. Contrário às leis de Mendel onde a herança parental da informação genética não influencia a expressão gênica, o imprinting genômico é caracterizado por modificações no DNA que produzem diferentes fenótipos dependendo da origem parental da mutação. A manifestação clínica da PWS aparece quando

  13. A neurodevelopmental survey of Angelman syndrome with genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Jennifer K; Tan, Wen-Hann; Horowitz, Lucia T; Bacino, Carlos A; Skinner, Steven A; Barbieri-Welge, Rene; Bauer-Carlin, Astrid; Beaudet, Arthur L; Bichell, Terry Jo; Lee, Hye-Seung; Sahoo, Trilochan; Waisbren, Susan E; Bird, Lynne M; Peters, Sarika U

    2010-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deletion on chromosome 15, uniparental disomy, imprinting defect, or UBE3A mutation. It is characterized by intellectual disability with minimal speech and certain behavioral characteristics. We used standardized measures to characterize the developmental profile and to analyze genotype-phenotype correlations in AS. The study population consisted of 92 children, between 5 months and 5 years of age, enrolled in a Natural History Study. Each participant was evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID-III), the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (VABS-II), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. Seventy-four percent had a deletion and 26% had uniparental disomy, an imprinting defect or a UBE3A mutation ("non-deletion"). The mean +/- standard deviation BSID-III cognitive scale developmental quotient (DQ) was 40.5 +/- 15.5. Participants with deletions were more developmentally delayed than the non-deletion participants in all BSID-III domains except in expressive language skills. The cognitive DQ was higher than the DQ in each of the other domains, and the receptive language DQ was higher than the expressive language DQ. In the [ corrected] VABS-II, deletion participants had weaker motor and language skills than the non-deletion participants. Children with AS have a distinct developmental and behavioral profile; their cognitive skills are stronger than their language and motor skills, and their receptive language skills are stronger than expressive language skills. Developmental outcomes are associated with genotype, with deletion patients having worse outcomes than non-deletion patients.

  14. Bivariate linkage analysis of the insulin resistance syndrome phenotypes on chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Donna M; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura; Puppala, Sobha; Dyer, Thomas D; Leach, Robin J; O'Connell, Peter; Stern, Michael P; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic abnormalities of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) have been shown to aggregate in families and to exhibit trait-pair correlations, suggesting a common genetic component. A broad region on chromosome 7q has been implicated in several studies to contain loci that cosegregate with IRS-related traits. However, it is not clear whether such loci have any common genetic (pleiotropic) influences on the correlated traits. Also, it is not clear whether the chromosomal regions contain more than one locus influencing the IRS-related phenotypes. In this study we present evidence for linkage of five IRS-related traits [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), In split proinsulin (LSPI), In triglycerides (LTG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC)] to a region at 7q11.23. Subsequently, to gain further insight into the genetic component(s) mapping to this region, we explored whether linkage of these traits is due to pleiotropic effects using a bivariate linkage analytical technique, which has been shown to localize susceptibility regions with precision. Four hundred forty individuals from 27 Mexican American families living in Texas were genotyped for 19 highly polymorphic markers on chromosome 7. Multipoint variance component linkage analysis was used to identify genetic location(s) influencing IRS-related traits of obesity (BMI and WC), dyslipidemia (LTG and HDLC), and insulin levels (LSPI); the analysis identified a broad chromosomal region spanning approximately 24 cM. To gain more precision in localization, we used a bivariate linkage approach for each trait pair. These analyses suggest localization of most of these bivariate traits to an approximately 6-cM region near marker D7S653 [7q11.23, 103-109 cM; a maximum bivariate LOD of 4.51 was found for the trait pair HDLC and LSPI (the LODeq score is 3.94)]. We observed evidence of pleiotropic effects in this region on obesity and insulin-related trait pairs.

  15. A neurodevelopmental survey of Angelman syndrome with genotype-phenotype correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Jennifer K.; Tan, Wen-Hann; Horowitz, Lucia T.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Skinner, Steven A.; Barbieri-Welge, Rene; Bauer-Carlin, Astrid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Lee, Hye-Seung; Sahoo, Trilochan; Waisbren, Susan E.; Bird, Lynne M.; Peters, Sarika U.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deletion on chromosome 15, uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting defect, or UBE3A mutation. It is characterized by intellectual disability with minimal speech and certain behavioral characteristics. We used standardized measures to characterize the developmental profile and to analyze genotype-phenotype correlations in AS. Method The study population consisted of 92 children, between 5 months and 5 years of age, enrolled in a Natural History Study. Each participant was evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Third Edition) (BSID-III), the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (Second Edition) (VABS-II), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. Results 74% had a deletion and 26% had UPD, an imprinting defect or a UBE3A mutation (“non-deletion”). The mean±standard deviation (SD) BSID-III cognitive scale developmental quotient (DQ) was 40.5±15.5. Participants with deletions were more developmentally delayed than the non-deletion participants in all BSID-III domains except in expressive language skills. The cognitive DQ was higher than the DQ in each of the other domains, and the receptive language DQ was higher than the expressive language DQ. In the VABS-II, deletion participants had weaker motor and language skills than the non-deletion participants. Conclusion Children with AS have a distinct developmental and behavioral profile; their cognitive skills are stronger than their language and motor skills, and their receptive language skills are stronger than expressive language skills. Developmental outcomes are associated with genotype, with deletion patients having worse outcomes than non-deletion patients. PMID:20729760

  16. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  17. Stewart-Treves syndrome angiosarcoma expresses phenotypes of both blood and lymphatic capillaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Stanczyk; Magdalena Gewartowska; Marcin Swierkowski; Bartlomiej Grala; Marek Maruszynski

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of angiosarcoma in oedematous tissue is referred to as Stewart-Treves syndrome (STS).This rare and fatal complication is associated with chronic post mastectomy lymphoedema and radiotherapy for breast cancer.Angiosarcoma spread is facilitated by the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and lymph vessels (lymphangiogenesis).In the future antiangiogenic therapy may improve the poor outcome of current treatments.There was evidence that blocking the angiogenenesis would inhibit progression of angiosarcoma.It seems reasonable to hypothesize that blocking the lymphangiogenesis may yield similar results.Although angiosarcomas commonly derive from blood vessels,in case of STS angiosarcomas chronic lymphoedema may suggest its lymphatic origin.The goal of this study was to visualize interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of STS angiosarcoma.Methods On tissue samples obtained from STS angiosarcoma we have performed:first colour stereoscopic lymphography to visualise the morphology of lymphatic vessels and extracellular spaces,second immunohistochemical staining specific for lymphatic vessels endothelium (LYVE-1) and blood endothelial cells (CD31,factor Ⅷ) and prolymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C) for precise identification of lymphatic endothelia.STS angiosarcoma morphology was assessed by comparison of pictures obtained on lymphography,microscopy and confocal microscopy.Results STS angiosarcomas present heterogenous morphology with areas dominated by hemangiosarcoma and lymphangiosarcoma structures.STS angiosarcoma expressed phenotypes of both blood and lymphatic endothelia.LYVE-1 and VEGF-C is expressed by STS angiosarcoma and may be used to discriminate tumour differentiation.Morphology of lymphatic vessels and spaces in the tumour suggest absence of their normal lymphatic function.Conclusions Our results confirmed both hemangio-and lymphangiogenic origin of STS angiosarcoma

  18. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  19. Presenting phenotype and clinical evaluation in a cohort of 22 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Biamino, Elisa; Sorasio, Lorena; Banaudi, Elena; Peruzzi, Licia; Forzano, Serena; di Cantogno, Ludovica Verdun; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo

    2007-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WS) is a rare multi-system genomic disorder, caused by 7q11.23 microdeletion with a prevalence of 1/7500-1/20,000 live births. Clinical phenotype includes typical facial dysmorphism (elfin face), mental retardation associated with a peculiar neuropsychological profile and congenital heart defects. We investigated 22 WS patients (mean age of 9.7 years, range 1 day to 39 years) with a multi-specialist follow-up protocol comprehensive of neuropsychological, cardiologic, nephrologic, ophthalmologic, endocrinologic, gastroenterologic, odontostomatologic and orthopaedic evaluations. The mean age at diagnosis was 5.38 years, being 1.02 years when genetic evaluation was requested for congenital heart defects (CHD) and 10.68 years in case of mental retardation and/or abnormal neuropsychological profile without an evident CHD. All patients showed facial dysmorphisms, with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) as the most common cardiovascular anomaly (12/22), followed by peripheral pulmonary stenosis (9/22); interestingly, in one patient we detected a total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR), confirming the possible association of this rare CHD with WS. Hypertension was detected by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in 7/22 cases. A cognitive assessment was performed in 13 patients older than 6 years, showing various degrees of mental retardation in 12 and a normal intelligence quotient (IQ) in a single patient; evaluation of developmental milestones revealed various grades of developmental delay in all the patients younger than 6 years. Chiari malformation type 1 was found in 3 patients. Our study underlines a remarkable diagnostic delay in patients who present to genetic evaluation because of mental retardation and/or peculiar neuropsychological profile lacking an evident cardiopathy and confirms the multi-systemic nature of WS leading to a high clinical presentation's variability and complex follow-up strategies.

  20. Neuroanatomical phenotype of Klinefelter syndrome in childhood: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Daniel M; Hoeft, Fumiko; Lai, Song; Lackey, John; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith; Reiss, Allan L

    2011-05-04

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a genetic disorder characterized by a supernumerary X chromosome. As such, KS offers a naturally occurring human model for the study of both X-chromosome gene expression and androgen on brain development. Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed neuroanatomical variations associated with KS, but have differed widely with respect to subject inclusion criteria, including mosaicism, pubertal status, and history of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), all factors likely to influence neurodevelopment. We conducted a voxel-based morphometry study of regional gray and white matter (GM and WM, respectively) volumes in 31 KS males (mean age, 9.69 ± 1.70 years) and 36 typically developing (TD) male controls (10.99 ± 1.72 years). None of the participants with KS had received TRT, and all were prepubertal and had nonmosaic 47,XXY karyotypes. After controlling for age, males with KS showed trends (0.05 < p < 0.10) for significantly reduced total gray matter volume (TGMV) and total white matter volume (TWMV), relative to TD males. After controlling for TGMV and age, the KS group had significantly increased sensorimotor and parietal-occipital GM and significantly reduced amygdalar, hippocampal, insular, temporal, and inferior frontal GM relative to TD controls. After controlling for TWMV and age, the KS group had significantly increased left parietal WM as well as significantly reduced frontal and temporal WM. These findings are indicative of a characteristic prepubertal neuroanatomical phenotype that may be associated with cognitive-behavioral features of KS. This work offers new insight into the relationships among X-chromosome gene expression, neuroanatomy, and cognitive-behavioral functions impaired in KS, including language and attention.

  1. Phenotypic variation and genetic heterogeneity in Léri-Weill syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiller, S; Spranger, S; Schechinger, B; Fukami, M; Merker, S; Drop, S L; Tröger, J; Knoblauch, H; Kunze, J; Seidel, J; Rappold, G A

    2000-01-01

    Léri-Weill syndrome (LWS) or dyschondrosteosis represents a short stature syndrome characterised by the mesomelic shortening of the forearms and lower legs and by bilateral Madelung deformity of the wrists...

  2. Phenotype and genotype in 17 patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, S.M.; Lombardi, P.M.; van Essen, A.J.; Wakeling, E.L.; Castle, B.; Temple, I.K.; Kumar, V.K.A.; Writzl, K.; Hennekam, R.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or focal dermal hypoplasia is a highly variable, X-linked dominant syndrome with abnormalities of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. In 2007, mutations in the PORCN gene were found to be causative in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Method: A series of 17 patients with Goltz-G

  3. Phenotype and genotype in 17 patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, S. M.; Lombardi, M. P.; van Essen, A. J.; Wakeling, E. L.; Castle, B.; Temple, I. K.; Kumar, V. K. A.; Writzl, K.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or focal dermal hypoplasia is a highly variable, X-linked dominant syndrome with abnormalities of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. In 2007, mutations in the PORCN gene were found to be causative in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Method: A series of 17 patients with Goltz-G

  4. Executive dysfunctions as part of the behavioural phenotype of Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Janssen, G.T.L.; Aken, L. van; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aarskog syndrome (AAS) also called Aarskog-Scott syndrome faciodigitogenital syndrome or faciogenital dysplasia is a genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder, first described in 1970 by the Norwegian pediatrician Dagfin Aarskog and further delineated by Scott in 1971. It is a pr

  5. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureni V. Mullegama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5 is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  6. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria a

  7. Knockdown of fbxl10/kdm2bb rescues chd7 morphant phenotype in a zebrafish model of CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balow, Stephanie A; Pierce, Lain X; Zentner, Gabriel E; Conrad, Patricia A; Davis, Stephani; Sabaawy, Hatem E; McDermott, Brian M; Scacheri, Peter C

    2013-10-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a sporadic autosomal-dominant genetic disorder characterized by a complex array of birth defects so named for its cardinal features of ocular coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, growth retardation, genital abnormalities, and ear abnormalities. Approximately two-thirds of individuals clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome have heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7), an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler. To examine the role of Chd7 in development, a zebrafish model was generated through morpholino (MO)-mediated targeting of the zebrafish chd7 transcript. High doses of chd7 MO induce lethality early in embryonic development. However, low dose-injected embryos are viable, and by 4 days post-fertilization, morphant fish display multiple defects in organ systems analogous to those affected in humans with CHARGE syndrome. The chd7 morphants show elevated expression of several potent cell-cycle inhibitors including ink4ab (p16/p15), p21 and p27, accompanied by reduced cell proliferation. We also show that Chd7 is required for proper organization of neural crest-derived craniofacial cartilage structures. Strikingly, MO-mediated knockdown of the jumonji domain-containing histone demethylase fbxl10/kdm2bb, a repressor of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, rescues cell proliferation and cartilage defects in chd7 morphant embryos and can lead to complete rescue of the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. These results indicate that CHARGE-like phenotypes in zebrafish can be mitigated through modulation of fbxl10 levels and implicate FBXL10 as a possible therapeutic target in CHARGE syndrome.

  8. Hyperandrogenemia in polycystic ovary syndrome: exploration of the role of free testosterone and androstenedione in metabolic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Schwetz, Verena; Rabe, Thomas; Giuliani, Albrecht; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome. We analyzed the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic parameters in a cross-sectional study including 706 polycystic ovary syndrome and 140 BMI-matched healthy women. Polycystic ovary syndrome women were categorized into 4 groups: normal androstenedione and normal free testosterone (NA/NFT), elevated androstenedione and normal free testosterone (HA/NFT), normal androstenedione and elevated free testosterone (NA/HFT), elevated androstenedione and free testosterone (HA/HFT). Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels (HA/HFT and NA/HFT) have an adverse metabolic profile including 2 h glucose, HbA1c, fasting and 2 h insulin, area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda), triglycerides, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to NA/NFT (p<0.05 for all age- and BMI-adjusted analyses). In binary logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and BMI, odds ratio for insulin resistance was 2.78 (1.34-5.75, p = 0.006) for polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/HFT compared to NA/NFT. We found no significantly increased risk of metabolic disorders in polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/NFT. In multiple linear regression analyses (age- and BMI-adjusted), we found a significant negative association between androstenedione/free testosterone-ratio and area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol-ratio and a positive association with Matsuda-index, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05 for all). Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels but not with isolated androstenedione elevation have an adverse metabolic phenotype. Further, a higher androstenedione/free testosterone

  9. Hyperandrogenemia in polycystic ovary syndrome: exploration of the role of free testosterone and androstenedione in metabolic phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Lerchbaum

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome. METHODS: We analyzed the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic parameters in a cross-sectional study including 706 polycystic ovary syndrome and 140 BMI-matched healthy women. Polycystic ovary syndrome women were categorized into 4 groups: normal androstenedione and normal free testosterone (NA/NFT, elevated androstenedione and normal free testosterone (HA/NFT, normal androstenedione and elevated free testosterone (NA/HFT, elevated androstenedione and free testosterone (HA/HFT. RESULTS: Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels (HA/HFT and NA/HFT have an adverse metabolic profile including 2 h glucose, HbA1c, fasting and 2 h insulin, area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda, triglycerides, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to NA/NFT (p<0.05 for all age- and BMI-adjusted analyses. In binary logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and BMI, odds ratio for insulin resistance was 2.78 (1.34-5.75, p = 0.006 for polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/HFT compared to NA/NFT. We found no significantly increased risk of metabolic disorders in polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/NFT. In multiple linear regression analyses (age- and BMI-adjusted, we found a significant negative association between androstenedione/free testosterone-ratio and area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol-ratio and a positive association with Matsuda-index, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05 for all. CONCLUSIONS: Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels but not with isolated androstenedione elevation have an adverse metabolic phenotype

  10. Recent insights into genotype-phenotype relationships in patients with Rett syndrome using a fine grain scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Colombo, Barbara; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Masciadri, Maura; Foglia, Silvia; Antonietti, Alessandro; Tavian, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting around 1 in 10,000 female births. The clinical picture of RTT appears quite heterogeneous for each single feature. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been associated with the onset of RTT. The most known gene function consists of transcriptional repression of specific target genes, mainly by the binding of its methyl binding domain (MBD) to methylated CpG nucleotides and recruiting co-repressors and histone deacetylase binding to DNA by its transcription repressor domain (TRD). This study aimed at evaluating a cohort of 114 Rett syndrome (RTT) patients with a detailed scale measuring the different kinds of impairments produced by the syndrome. The sample included relatively large subsets of the most frequent mutations, so that genotype-phenotype correlations could be tested. Results revealed that frequent missense mutations showed a specific profile in different areas of impairment. The R306C mutation, considered as producing mild impairment, was associated to a moderate phenotype in which behavioural characteristics were mainly affected. A notable difference emerged by comparing mutations truncating the protein before and after the nuclear localization signal; such a difference concerned prevalently the motor-functional and autonomy skills of the patients, affecting the management of everyday activities.

  11. Irisin and the Metabolic Phenotype of Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry J Hirsch

    Full Text Available Hyperphagia, low resting energy expenditure, and abnormal body composition contribute to severe obesity in Prader Willi syndrome (PWS. Irisin, a circulating myokine, stimulates "browning" of white adipose tissue resulting in increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. Irisin has not been previously studied in PWS.Compare plasma and salivary irisin in PWS adults and normal controls. Examine the relationship of irisin to insulin sensitivity and plasma lipids.A fasting blood sample for glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, adinopectin, and irisin was obtained from 22 PWS adults and 54 healthy BMI-matched volunteers. Saliva was collected for irisin assay in PWS and controls.Fasting glucose (77 ± 9 vs 83 ± 7 mg/dl, p = 0.004, insulin (4.1 ± 2.0 vs 7.9 ± 4.7 μU/ml, p<0.001, and triglycerides (74 ± 34 vs 109 ± 71 mg/dl, p = 0.007 were lower in PWS than in controls. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was lower (0.79 ± 0.041 vs 1.63 ± 1.02, p<0.001 and insulin sensitivity (QUICKI was higher (0.41 ± 0.04 vs 0.36 ± 0.03, p<0.001 in PWS. Plasma irisin was similar in both groups, but salivary irisin (64.5 ± 52.0 vs 33.0 ± 12.1ng/ml, plasma leptin (33.5 ± 24.2 vs 19.7 ± 19.3 ng/ml and plasma adinopectin (13.0 ± 10.8 vs 7.6 ± 4.5μg/ml were significantly greater in PWS (p<0.001. In PWS, plasma irisin showed positive Pearson correlations with total cholesterol (r = 0.58, p = 0.005, LDL-cholesterol (r = 0.59, p = 0.004, and leptin (r = 0.43, p = 0.045. Salivary irisin correlated negatively with HDL-cholesterol (r = -0.50, p = 0.043 and positively with LDL-cholesterol (r = 0.51, p = 0.037 and triglycerides (r = 0.50, p = 0.041.Salivary irisin was markedly elevated in PWS although plasma irisin was similar to levels in controls. Significant associations with plasma lipids suggest that irisin may contribute to the metabolic phenotype of PWS.

  12. QTLs of factors of the metabolic syndrome and echocardiographic phenotypes: the hypertension genetic epidemiology network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Simone Giovanni

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study of the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN we have shown that metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors were moderately and significantly associated with echocardiographic (ECHO left ventricular (LV phenotypes. Methods The study included 1,393 African Americans and 1,133 whites, stratified by type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM status. Heritabilities of seven factor scores based on the analysis of 15 traits were sufficiently high to pursue QTL discovery in this follow-up study. Results Three of the QTLs discovered relate to combined MetS-ECHO factors of "blood pressure (BP-LV wall thickness" on chromosome 3 at 225 cM with a 2.8 LOD score, on chromosome 20 at 2.1 cM with a 2.6 LOD score; and for "LV wall thickness" factor on chromosome 16 at 113.5 with a 2.6 LOD score in whites. The remaining QTLs include one for a "body mass index-insulin (BMI-INS" factor with a LOD score of 3.9 on chromosome 2 located at 64.8 cM; one for the same factor on chromosome 12 at 91.4 cM with a 3.3 LOD score; one for a "BP" factor on chromosome 19 located at 67.8 cM with a 3.0 LOD score. A suggestive linkage was also found for "Lipids-INS" with a 2.7 LOD score located on chromosome 11 at 113.1 cM in African Americans. Of the above QTLs, the one on chromosome 12 for "BMI-INS" is replicated in both ethnicities, (with highest LOD scores in African Americans. In addition, the QTL for "LV wall thickness" on chromosome 16q24.2-q24.3 reached its local maximum LOD score at marker D16S402, which is positioned within the 5th intron of the cadherin 13 gene, implicated in heart and vascular remodeling. Conclusion Our previous study and this follow-up suggest gene loci for some crucial MetS and cardiac geometry risk factors that contribute to the risk of developing heart disease.

  13. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Christopher A; Parenti, Ilaria; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Ousager, Lilian B; Puisac, Beatriz; Hernández-Marcos, María; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lusa-Bernal, Silvia; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Braunholz, Diana; Bueno-Martinez, Inés; Clark, Dinah; Cooper, Nicola S; Curry, Cynthia J; Fisher, Richard; Fryer, Alan; Ganesh, Jaya; Gervasini, Cristina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Guo, Yiran; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hopkin, Robert J; Kaur, Maninder; Keating, Brendan J; Kibaek, María; Kinning, Esther; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kline, Antonie D; Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina; Larizza, Lidia; Li, Yun R; Liu, Xuanzhu; Mariani, Milena; Picker, Jonathan D; Pié, Ángeles; Pozojevic, Jelena; Queralt, Ethel; Richer, Julie; Roeder, Elizabeth; Sinha, Anubha; Scott, Richard H; So, Joyce; Wusik, Katherine A; Wilson, Louise; Zhang, Jianguo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Casale, César H; Ström, Lena; Selicorni, Angelo; Ramos, Feliciano J; Jackson, Laird G; Krantz, Ian D; Das, Soma; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kaiser, Frank J; FitzPatrick, David R; Pié, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth failure, intellectual disability, limb malformations, and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in five genes, encoding subunits of the cohesin complex (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) and its regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8), account for at least 70% of patients with CdLS or CdLS-like phenotypes. To date, only the clinical features from a single CdLS patient with SMC3 mutation has been published. Here, we report the efforts of an international research and clinical collaboration to provide clinical comparison of 16 patients with CdLS-like features caused by mutations in SMC3. Modeling of the mutation effects on protein structure suggests a dominant-negative effect on the multimeric cohesin complex. When compared with typical CdLS, many SMC3-associated phenotypes are also characterized by postnatal microcephaly but with a less distinctive craniofacial appearance, a milder prenatal growth retardation that worsens in childhood, few congenital heart defects, and an absence of limb deficiencies. While most mutations are unique, two unrelated affected individuals shared the same mutation but presented with different phenotypes. This work confirms that de novo SMC3 mutations account for ∼ 1%-2% of CdLS-like phenotypes. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: facial phenotype changing with age: study of 19 Italian patients and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, L; Zollino, M; Mainardi, P Cerruti; Gurrieri, F; Rivieri, F; Soli, F; Verri, R; Albertini, E; Favaron, E; Zignani, M; Orteschi, D; Bianchi, P; Faravelli, F; Forzano, F; Seri, M; Wischmeijer, A; Turchetti, D; Pompilii, E; Gnoli, M; Cocchi, G; Mazzanti, L; Bergamaschi, R; De Brasi, D; Sperandeo, M P; Mari, F; Uliana, V; Mostardini, R; Cecconi, M; Grasso, M; Sassi, S; Sebastio, G; Renieri, A; Silengo, M; Bernasconi, S; Wakamatsu, N; Neri, G

    2009-03-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS; OMIM #235730) is a genetic condition caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZEB2 gene, and characterized by typical face, moderate-to-severe mental retardation, epilepsy, Hirschsprung disease, and multiple congenital anomalies, including genital anomalies (particularly hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and eye defects. Since the first delineation by Mowat et al. [Mowat et al. (1998); J Med Genet 35:617-623], approximately 179 patients with ZEB2 mutations, deletions or cytogenetic abnormalities have been reported primarily from Europe, Australia and the United States. Genetic defects include chromosome 2q21-q23 microdeletions (or different chromosome rearrangements) in few patients, and ZEB2 mutations in most. We report on clinical and genetic data from 19 Italian patients, diagnosed within the last 5 years, including six previously published, and compare them with patients already reported. The main purpose of this review is to underline a highly consistent phenotype and to highlight the phenotypic evolution occurring with age, particularly of the facial characteristics. The prevalence of MWS is likely to be underestimated. Knowledge of the phenotypic spectrum of MWS and of its changing phenotype with age can improve the detection rate of this condition.

  15. The Syndrome of Frontonasal Dysplasia, Callosal Agenesis, Basal Encephalocele, and Eye Anomalies – Phenotypic and Aetiological Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We report ten sporadic cases of Brazilian patients with facial midline defects, callosal agenesis, basal encephalocele, and ocular anomalies. This very rare cluster of anomalies has been well reported before. However, only until recently it is recognized as a syndrome belonging to frontonasal dysplasia spectrum. The ten cases confirm a distinct clinical entity and help to define the phenotype more precisely than previously. Up to now etiology remains unknown, although we conjecture that it is due to a mutation in TGIF gene.

  16. Variable expressivity of ciliopathy neurological phenotypes that encompass Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome is caused by complex de-regulated ciliogenesis, Shh and Wnt signalling defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Natarajan, Subaashini; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris; Johnson, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    The ciliopathies are a group of heterogeneous diseases with considerable variations in phenotype for allelic conditions such as Meckel–Gruber syndrome (MKS) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS) even at the inter-individual level within families. In humans, mutations in TMEM67 (also known as MKS3) cause both MKS and JBTS, with TMEM67 encoding the orphan receptor meckelin (TMEM67) that localizes to the ciliary transition zone. We now describe the Tmem67tm1(Dgen/H) knockout mouse model that recapitulates the brain phenotypic variability of these human ciliopathies, with categorization of Tmem67 mutant animals into two phenotypic groups. An MKS-like incipient congenic group (F6 to F10) manifested very variable neurological features (including exencephaly, and frontal/occipital encephalocele) that were associated with the loss of primary cilia, diminished Shh signalling and dorsalization of the caudal neural tube. The ‘MKS-like’ group also had high de-regulated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling associated with hyper-activated Dishevelled-1 (Dvl-1) localized to the basal body. Conversely, a second fully congenic group (F > 10) had less variable features pathognomonic for JBTS (including cerebellar hypoplasia), and retention of abnormal bulbous cilia associated with mild neural tube ventralization. The ‘JBTS-like’ group had de-regulated low levels of canonical Wnt signalling associated with the loss of Dvl-1 localization to the basal body. Our results suggest that modifier alleles partially determine the variation between MKS and JBTS, implicating the interaction between Dvl-1 and meckelin, or other components of the ciliary transition zone. The Tmem67tm1(Dgen/H) line is unique in modelling the variable expressivity of phenotypes in these two ciliopathies. PMID:23283079

  17. Variable expressivity of ciliopathy neurological phenotypes that encompass Meckel-Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome is caused by complex de-regulated ciliogenesis, Shh and Wnt signalling defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Natarajan, Subaashini; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris; Johnson, Colin A

    2013-04-01

    The ciliopathies are a group of heterogeneous diseases with considerable variations in phenotype for allelic conditions such as Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS) even at the inter-individual level within families. In humans, mutations in TMEM67 (also known as MKS3) cause both MKS and JBTS, with TMEM67 encoding the orphan receptor meckelin (TMEM67) that localizes to the ciliary transition zone. We now describe the Tmem67(tm1(Dgen/H)) knockout mouse model that recapitulates the brain phenotypic variability of these human ciliopathies, with categorization of Tmem67 mutant animals into two phenotypic groups. An MKS-like incipient congenic group (F6 to F10) manifested very variable neurological features (including exencephaly, and frontal/occipital encephalocele) that were associated with the loss of primary cilia, diminished Shh signalling and dorsalization of the caudal neural tube. The 'MKS-like' group also had high de-regulated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling associated with hyper-activated Dishevelled-1 (Dvl-1) localized to the basal body. Conversely, a second fully congenic group (F > 10) had less variable features pathognomonic for JBTS (including cerebellar hypoplasia), and retention of abnormal bulbous cilia associated with mild neural tube ventralization. The 'JBTS-like' group had de-regulated low levels of canonical Wnt signalling associated with the loss of Dvl-1 localization to the basal body. Our results suggest that modifier alleles partially determine the variation between MKS and JBTS, implicating the interaction between Dvl-1 and meckelin, or other components of the ciliary transition zone. The Tmem67(tm1(Dgen/H)) line is unique in modelling the variable expressivity of phenotypes in these two ciliopathies.

  18. Genes, Brain Development and Psychiatric Phenotypes in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Schaer, Marie; Eliez, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) has been in the focus of intensive research over the last 15 years. The syndrome represents a homogeneous model for studying the effect of a decreased dosage of genes on the development of brain structure and function and, consequently, on the emergence of schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder. In this review, we…

  19. Further delineation of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: phenotypic and genotypic description of 16 novel patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweier, C.; Sticht, H.; Bijlsma, E.K.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Boonen, S.; Fryer, A.; Greally, M.T.; Hoffmann, L.; Hollander, N.S. den; Jongmans, M.; Kant, S.G.; King, M.D.; Lynch, S.A.; McKee, S.; Midro, A.T.; Park, S.M.; Ricotti, V.; Tarantino, E.; Wessels, M.; Peippo, M.; Rauch, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Haploinsufficiency of the gene encoding for transcription factor 4 (TCF4) was recently identified as the underlying cause of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), an underdiagnosed mental-retardation syndrome characterised by a distinct facial gestalt, breathing anomalies and severe mental

  20. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  1. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  2. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  3. Two further cases of Ohdo syndrome delineate the phenotypic variability of the condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, SM; Ades, LC; Amor, D; Liebelt, J; Bankier, A; Baker, E; Wilson, M; Savarirayan, R

    Ohdo syndrome (MIM 249620) is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by blepharophimosis, ptosis, dental hypoplasia, hearing impairment and intellectual disability. A wide range of dysmorphic features and congenital abnormalities have been described in cases reported as Ohdo and Ohdo-like

  4. [Proteus syndrome. Expansion of the phenotype. Apropos of 3 pediatric cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsmans, R F; Schrander-Stumpel, C R; Koopman, R J; Hoorntje, T M; Starink, T M

    1992-01-01

    In 1979 Cohen et Hayden and in 1983 Wiedemann et al. delineated a syndrome consisting of partial gigantism of the hands and/or feet, nevi, hemihypertrophy, subcutaneous tumors, macrocephaly or other skull anomalies and possible accelerated growth and visceral affections. Hitherto the literature pertaining to this syndrome consists of somewhat more than 100 cases of which some, that have been described previously or subsequently under other headings, were rediagnosed as being Proteus syndromes. Of these, more than half show vascular anomalies closely resembling those observed in the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, but in the Proteus syndrome appear to be more haphazardly distributed over the integument. We report 3 pediatric patients with the Proteus syndrome, all showing cutaneous angiodysplasias. These patients were initially diagnosed as suffering from "severe or atypical Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome". In one of these, cardiac tumors were observed soon after birth which subsequently showed spontaneous involution and were therefore considered to be rhabdomyomas. In the Proteus syndrome cardiac pathology is rare, and cardiac tumors have not been described previously. Moreover, we observed umbilical hernia in two of our patients, a feature which has hitherto not been reported in patients with the Proteus syndrome. In all our patients a broad thoracic cage resembling a "body-builders chest", asymmetrical and disproportional macrodactyly and broad, flat feet were conspicuous. These broad, flat feet with macrodactyly and large spaces between the first and second digits were designed by the parents of one of our patient as "chimpanzee's feet". Macrodactyly, "chimp's" feet and a broad thoracic cage are considered by us to be clinical hallmarks of the Proteus syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster.

  6. A de novo 15q13.2q13.3 deletion in a boy with an Angelman syndrome like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barøy, Tuva; Misceo, Doriana; Braaten, Oivind; Helle, Johan R; Fannemel, Madeleine; Strømme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 11-year-old boy investigated for a clinical suspicion of Angelman syndrome (AS) (OMIM 105830) who was found to carry a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 15q13.2q13.3. The deletion overlaps the critical region for the newly recognized recurrent 15q13.3 deletion syndrome. This is the first report of a patient with 15q13.3 deletion syndrome with clinical features similar to that of AS, thus broadening the phenotypic spectrum associated with the 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenotypic consequences of copy number variation: insights from Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndrome mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guénola Ricard

    Full Text Available A large fraction of genome variation between individuals is comprised of submicroscopic copy number variation of genomic DNA segments. We assessed the relative contribution of structural changes and gene dosage alterations on phenotypic outcomes with mouse models of Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndromes. We phenotyped mice with 1n (Deletion/+, 2n (+/+, 3n (Duplication/+, and balanced 2n compound heterozygous (Deletion/Duplication copies of the same region. Parallel to the observations made in humans, such variation in gene copy number was sufficient to generate phenotypic consequences: in a number of cases diametrically opposing phenotypes were associated with gain versus loss of gene content. Surprisingly, some neurobehavioral traits were not rescued by restoration of the normal gene copy number. Transcriptome profiling showed that a highly significant propensity of transcriptional changes map to the engineered interval in the five assessed tissues. A statistically significant overrepresentation of the genes mapping to the entire length of the engineered chromosome was also found in the top-ranked differentially expressed genes in the mice containing rearranged chromosomes, regardless of the nature of the rearrangement, an observation robust across different cell lineages of the central nervous system. Our data indicate that a structural change at a given position of the human genome may affect not only locus and adjacent gene expression but also "genome regulation." Furthermore, structural change can cause the same perturbation in particular pathways regardless of gene dosage. Thus, the presence of a genomic structural change, as well as gene dosage imbalance, contributes to the ultimate phenotype.

  8. Phenotypic consequences of copy number variation: insights from Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndrome mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Guénola; Molina, Jessica; Chrast, Jacqueline; Gu, Wenli; Gheldof, Nele; Pradervand, Sylvain; Schütz, Frédéric; Young, Juan I; Lupski, James R; Reymond, Alexandre; Walz, Katherina

    2010-11-23

    A large fraction of genome variation between individuals is comprised of submicroscopic copy number variation of genomic DNA segments. We assessed the relative contribution of structural changes and gene dosage alterations on phenotypic outcomes with mouse models of Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndromes. We phenotyped mice with 1n (Deletion/+), 2n (+/+), 3n (Duplication/+), and balanced 2n compound heterozygous (Deletion/Duplication) copies of the same region. Parallel to the observations made in humans, such variation in gene copy number was sufficient to generate phenotypic consequences: in a number of cases diametrically opposing phenotypes were associated with gain versus loss of gene content. Surprisingly, some neurobehavioral traits were not rescued by restoration of the normal gene copy number. Transcriptome profiling showed that a highly significant propensity of transcriptional changes map to the engineered interval in the five assessed tissues. A statistically significant overrepresentation of the genes mapping to the entire length of the engineered chromosome was also found in the top-ranked differentially expressed genes in the mice containing rearranged chromosomes, regardless of the nature of the rearrangement, an observation robust across different cell lineages of the central nervous system. Our data indicate that a structural change at a given position of the human genome may affect not only locus and adjacent gene expression but also "genome regulation." Furthermore, structural change can cause the same perturbation in particular pathways regardless of gene dosage. Thus, the presence of a genomic structural change, as well as gene dosage imbalance, contributes to the ultimate phenotype.

  9. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Thomas; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Chevalier, Claire; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Afinowi, Nurudeen; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Cowling, Belinda S; Birling, Marie-Christine; Champy, Marie-France; Reymond, Alexandre; Herault, Yann

    2016-02-01

    The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+) or a duplication (Dup/+) of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice.

  10. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Thomas; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Chevalier, Claire; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Afinowi, Nurudeen; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Cowling, Belinda S.; Birling, Marie-Christine; Champy, Marie-France; Reymond, Alexandre; Herault, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+) or a duplication (Dup/+) of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice. PMID:26872257

  11. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arbogast

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+ or a duplication (Dup/+ of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice.

  12. Natural History and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Female X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Yamamura

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: This study revealed that phenotypes in female XLAS patients may be severe, but genotype does not help to predict the disease severity. Clinicians must therefore pay careful attention to the clinical course and appropriate treatment in females with XLAS.

  13. Behavioral phenotype in a child with Prader-Willi syndrome and comorbid 47, XYY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkar, Pooja; Kabasakalian, Anahid; Taylor, Bonnie; Doernberg, Ellen; Ferretti, Casara Jean; Uzunova, Genoveva; Hollander, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report a 12-year-old male with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and 47, XYY syndrome. Genetic work up revealed 47, XYY karyotype. PWS diagnosis was made by polymerase chain reaction methylation and maternal uniparental disomy (mUPD) was determined to be the etiology. Review of distinct behavioral features, possible interplay between the two syndromes and considerations for diagnoses are presented. To our knowledge, this is the first report of behavioral features in PWS with comorbid 47, XYY. PMID:27672550

  14. Robinow syndrome: phenotypic variability in a family with a novel intragenic ROR2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Del Gaudio, Daniela; Peters, Hartmut; Justino, Henri; Ott, Claus-Eric; Mundlos, Stefan; Bacino, Carlos A

    2008-11-01

    Robinow syndrome comprises dysmorphic facial features, short stature, brachymesomelia, segmental spine defects, and genital hypoplasia. The range of severity in this disorder is broad. We report on the clinical and molecular findings of two sib pairs from the same extended family with Robinow syndrome due to a novel intragenic ROR2 deletion involving exons 6 and 7 that could not be detected by sequencing. The affected individuals exhibited variability with respect to the cleft lip, cleft palate, and cardiac findings and for the presence in one of the patients of syringomyelia, which has not been previously reported in Robinow syndrome.

  15. Non dominant-negative KCNJ2 gene mutations leading to Andersen-Tawil syndrome with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Maren M; Zumhagen, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Rogers, Jane; Böckelmann, Doris; Rinné, Susanne; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Decher, Niels; Schulze-Bahr, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by dysmorphic features, periodic paralyses and abnormal ventricular repolarization. After genotyping a large set of patients with congenital long-QT syndrome, we identified two novel, heterozygous KCNJ2 mutations (p.N318S, p.W322C) located in the C-terminus of the Kir2.1 subunit. These mutations have a different localization than classical ATS mutations which are mostly located at a potential interaction face with the slide helix or at the interface between the C-termini. Mutation carriers were without the key features of ATS, causing an isolated cardiac phenotype. While the N318S mutants regularly reached the plasma membrane, W322C mutants primarily resided in late endosomes. Co-expression of N318S or W322C with wild-type Kir2.1 reduced current amplitudes only by 20-25 %. This mild loss-of-function for the heteromeric channels resulted from defective channel trafficking (W322C) or gating (N318S). Strikingly, and in contrast to the majority of ATS mutations, neither mutant caused a dominant-negative suppression of wild-type Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 currents. Thus, a mild reduction of native Kir2.x currents by non dominant-negative mutants may cause ATS with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

  16. Associations among genotype, clinical phenotype, and intracellular localization of trafficking proteins in ARC syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Holly; Galmes, Romain; Gogolina, Ekaterina; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Reay, Kim; Banushi, Blerida; Bruce, Christopher K.; Cullinane, Andrew R.; Romero, Rene; Chang, Richard; Ackermann, Oanez; Baumann, Clarisse; Cangul, Hakan; Celik, Fatma Cakmak; Aygun, Canan; Coward, Richard; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Sibbles, Barbara; Inward, Carol; Kim, Chong Ae; Klumperman, Judith; Knisely, A. S.; Watson, Steven P.; Gissen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposisrenal dysfunctioncholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 33 homologue B (VPS33B) and VPS33B interacting protein, apicalbasolateral polarity regulator (VIPAR). Cardinal features of ARC include congenit

  17. Associations among genotype, clinical phenotype, and intracellular localization of trafficking proteins in ARC syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Holly; Galmes, Romain; Gogolina, Ekaterina; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Reay, Kim; Banushi, Blerida; Bruce, Christopher K.; Cullinane, Andrew R.; Romero, Rene; Chang, Richard; Ackermann, Oanez; Baumann, Clarisse; Cangul, Hakan; Celik, Fatma Cakmak; Aygun, Canan; Coward, Richard; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Sibbles, Barbara; Inward, Carol; Kim, Chong Ae; Klumperman, Judith; Knisely, A. S.; Watson, Steven P.; Gissen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposisrenal dysfunctioncholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 33 homologue B (VPS33B) and VPS33B interacting protein, apicalbasolateral polarity regulator (VIPAR). Cardinal features of ARC include congenit

  18. Phenotypic Analysis of Individuals With Costello Syndrome due to HRAS p.G13C

    OpenAIRE

    Gripp, Karen W.; Hopkins, Elizabeth; Sol-Church, Katia; Stabley, Deborah L.; Axelrad, Marni E.; Doyle, Daniel; Dobyns, William B; Hudson, Cindy; Johnson, John; Tenconi, Romano; Graham, Gail E.; Sousa, Ana Berta; Heller, Raoul; Piccione, Maria; Corsello, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Costello syndrome is characterized by severe failure-to-thrive, short stature, cardiac abnormalities (heart defects, tachyarrhythmia, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)), distinctive facial features, a predisposition to papillomata and malignant tumors, postnatal cerebellar overgrowth resulting in Chiari 1 malformation, and cognitive disabilities. De novo germline mutations in the proto-oncogene HRAS cause Costello syndrome. Most mutations affect the glycine residues in position 12 or 13, ...

  19. Testosterone to dihydrotestosterone ratio as a new biomarker for an adverse metabolic phenotype in the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, J; Hofer, D; Trummer, C; Ulbing, M; Harger, A; Pieber, T; Owen, L; Keevil, B; Brabant, G; Lerchbaum, E; Obermayer-Pietsch, B

    2015-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disease with many different aspects, including hyperandrogenism and metabolic disturbances. Clinical phenotypes show different patterns of steroid hormones that have been investigated to some extent. This study intended to determine the role of the testosterone (TT) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) ratio (TT/DHT ratio) in PCOS patients and to further assess the correlation of this ratio with hormonal, anthropometric, and metabolic parameters. Serum samples of 275 premenopausal PCOS patients fulfilling Rotterdam criteria and 35 BMI-matched, premenopausal, healthy controls were analyzed for testosterone, DHT, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androstenedione using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We measured total levels of testosterone and DHT and calculated unbound hormone levels as well as the ratio of testosterone to DHT. Further, impaired glucose tolerance, basal and stimulated serum insulin levels, metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance according to the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) were assessed. PCOS patients showed significantly higher levels of TT (P DHT (P DHT ratio was significantly higher in PCOS patients (P DHT levels (P = .072). In PCOS patients alone, the TT/DHT ratio was significantly higher in obese patients (P DHT ratio with various adverse anthropometric, hormonal, lipid and liver parameters and parameters of glucose metabolism were found. Our data provide evidence for a strong link between a high TT/DHT ratio and an adverse metabolic phenotype in PCOS patients. This correlation was only found in PCOS patients, suggesting the TT/DHT ratio to be a new biomarker for an adverse metabolic phenotype in PCOS patients.

  20. High salivary testosterone-to-androstenedione ratio and adverse metabolic phenotypes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, J; Lindheim, L; Adaway, J; Trummer, C; Lerchbaum, E; Pieber, T R; Keevil, B; Obermayer-Pietsch, B

    2017-04-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by a combination of hormonal and metabolic disturbances, such as insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, anovulation and hyperandrogenism. Clinical phenotypes of PCOS show different patterns of steroid hormones that have been investigated to some extent. This study aimed to establish a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of salivary testosterone and androstenedione and to describe the salivary testosterone-to-androstenedione (T/A4) ratio as a new tool for the assessment of hyperandrogenism and metabolic health. Saliva and serum samples of 274 patients with PCOS and 51 healthy women were used for the quantification of steroid hormones. A comprehensive clinical and metabolic assessment was performed. Salivary testosterone and androstenedione were measured via LC-MS/MS. The salivary T/A4 ratio was calculated and correlated with hormones and metabolic parameters. Salivary testosterone (P < 0·001), androstenedione (P < 0·001) and the salivary T/A4 ratio (P < 0·001) were significantly higher in patients with patients compared to healthy women. In patients with PCOS, a high salivary T/A4 ratio was associated with an adverse metabolic phenotype, that is glucose intolerance (P = 0·019), insulin resistance (P < 0·001), metabolic syndrome (P < 0·001), obesity (P < 0·001) and oligo-/anovulation (P = 0·001). Significant correlations of the salivary T/A4 ratio with adverse metabolic parameters were found. Quantification of salivary androgens provides an attractive alternative to serum analysis and helps in characterizing metabolic health in women with PCOS. Our data show a strong link between a high salivary T/A4 ratio and an adverse metabolic phenotype in patients with PCOS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinical phenotyping of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and correlation with symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoskes, Daniel A; Nickel, J Curtis; Dolinga, Robert; Prots, Donna

    2009-03-01

    To propose a clinical phenotype system (urinary, psychosocial, organ specific, infection, neurologic/systemic, and tenderness [UPOINT]) to classify patients with urologic pelvic pain to help understand the etiology and guide therapy. We wished to validate this system in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). CPPS is a heterogeneous syndrome with a variable treatment response. A total of 90 men with CPPS were retrospectively classified in each domain of our UPOINT system and the symptoms were measured using the Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index. The percentage of patients positive for each domain was 52%, 34%, 61%, 16%, 37%, and 53% for the urinary, psychosocial, organ specific, infection, neurologic/systemic, and tenderness domains, respectively. Of the 90 patients, 22% were positive for only 1 domain, and a significant stepwise increase was found in the total Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index score as the number of positive domains increased. A symptom duration of >2 years was associated with an increase in positive domains (2.9 +/- 0.21 vs 2.3 +/- 0.14, P = .01). Comparing the total Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index score with the presence of each domain revealed significantly increased symptoms in patients positive for the urinary, psychosocial, organ specific, and neurologic/systemic domains. When this analysis was repeated for the pain subscore, the psychosocial, neurologic/systemic, and tenderness domains had significantly greater scores. Only the psychosocial and neurologic domains influenced the patients' quality of life. Applying the UPOINT system to patients with CPPS can discriminate clinical phenotypes, allowing for hypothesis testing for etiology and therapy. The number of positive domains correlated with symptom severity and a longer duration of symptoms increased the number of positive domains. Because each domain has specific targeted therapies, we propose that multimodal therapy might best be guided by the UPOINT phenotype.

  2. Genotype-phenotype relationships in the low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome: a study of 156 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupon, Raoul; Rosmorduc, Olivier; Boëlle, Pierre Yves; Chrétien, Yves; Corpechot, Christophe; Chazouillères, Olivier; Housset, Chantal; Barbu, Véronique

    2013-09-01

    The low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC; OMIM 171060) is a peculiar form of intrahepatic cholelithiasis occurring in young adults, associated with ABCB4/MDR3 gene sequence variations. Our aim was to determine the genotype-phenotype relationships in 156 consecutive patients with the criteria of LPAC syndrome. A variant was detected in 79 (61 missense and 18 truncating sequence variants), 63 being monoallelic. The clinical features (age at onset, high prevalence in women, frequency and severity of acute and chronic complications, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy [ICP]) were similar in the patients with or without ABCB4 gene sequence variation. Truncating variations were associated with an earlier onset of symptoms both in women and men. Acute and chronic biliary complications were variant-independent. Half of the women who had pregnancy developed ICP. The frequency of ICP and fetal complications were similar in patients with missense and truncating variants. The LPAC syndrome is more frequent in women and highly associated with ICP. Half of the patients harbored missense or truncating variants of the ABCB4 gene. The characteristics of the patients without detectable variant are similar to those with variant, indicating that yet unexplored regions of the ABCB4 and other genes may be involved. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  3. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Dabbaghmaneh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia, Ultrasound were applied in order to find the cyst. Tests included prolactin, dehydroepiandrodion sulfate, and oral glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose, blood sugar two hours later, triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein. Data were submitted to SPSS software, version 11.5 and then analyzed by chi-square tests. Results: The serum cholesterol mean in four phenotypes had a statistically significant relationship with non-PCOS patients(p<0.05. Mean of serum cholesterol in oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary phenotype (195.09±30.28 was higher than the other phenotypes. Mean of serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein(LDL-C were significantly higher in patients with Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian phenotype(130.046±26.27 and oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype(138.58±28.34 compared with non-infected individuals. Serum glucose mean in all phenotype was higher than non-infected after two hours and it showed a significant relation in oligomenorrhea and also polycystic ovarian phenotype(98.03 ± 20.98 versus 87.5±12.97 with non-infected individuals. Conclusion: Biochemical factors that lead to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases is increased in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Therefore, it should be attended in prevention programs

  4. Attention deficits predict phenotypic outcomes in syndrome-specific and domain-specific ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim eCornish

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Attentional difficulties, both at home and in the classroom, are reported across a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, exactly how attention influences early socio-cognitive learning remains unclear. We addressed this question both concurrently and longitudinally in a cross-syndrome design, with respect to the communicative domain of vocabulary and to the cognitive domain of early literacy, and then extended the analysis to social behavior. Participants were young children (aged 4 to 9 years at Time 1 with either Williams syndrome (WS, N=26 or Down syndrome (DS, N=26 and typically developing controls (N=103. Children with WS displayed significantly greater attentional deficits (as indexed by teacher report of behavior typical of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD than children with DS, but both groups had greater attentional problems than the controls. Despite their attention differences, children with DS and those with WS were equivalent in their cognitive abilities of reading single words, both at Time 1 and 12 months later, at Time 2, although they differed in their early communicative abilities in terms of vocabulary. Greater ADHD-like behaviors predicted poorer subsequent literacy for children with DS, but not for children with WS, pointing to syndrome-specific attentional constraints on specific aspects of early development. Overall, our findings highlight the need to investigate more precisely whether and, if so, how, syndrome-specific profiles of behavioral difficulties constrain learning and socio-cognitive outcomes across different domains.

  5. Gender, genotype, and phenotype differences in Smith-Magenis syndrome: a meta-analysis of 105 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, E A; Girirajan, S; Finucane, B; Patel, P I; Lupski, J R; Smith, A C M; Elsea, S H

    2007-06-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by developmental delay and mental retardation, a distinctive behavioral phenotype, and sleep disturbance. We undertook a comprehensive meta-analysis to identify genotype-phenotype relationships to further understand the clinical variability and genetic factors involved in SMS. Clinical and molecular information on 105 patients with SMS was obtained through research protocols and a review of the literature and analyzed using Fisher's exact test with two-tailed p values. Several differences in these groups of patients were identified based on genotype and gender. Patients with RAI1 mutation were more likely to exhibit overeating, obesity, polyembolokoilamania, self-hugging, muscle cramping, and dry skin and less likely to have short stature, hearing loss, frequent ear infections, and heart defects when compared with patients with deletion, while a subset of small deletion cases with deletions spanning from TNFRSF13B to MFAP4 was less likely to exhibit brachycephaly, dental anomalies, iris abnormalities, head-banging, and hyperactivity. Significant differences between genders were also identified, with females more likely to have myopia, eating/appetite problems, cold hands and feet, and frustration with communication when compared with males. These results confirm previous findings and identify new genotype-phenotype associations including differences in the frequency of short stature, hearing loss, ear infections, obesity, overeating, heart defects, self-injury, self-hugging, dry skin, seizures, and hyperactivity among others based on genotype. Additional studies are required to further explore the relationships between genotype and phenotype and any potential discrepancies in health care and parental attitudes toward males and females with SMS.

  6. A Novel Letrozole Model Recapitulates Both the Reproductive and Metabolic Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Alexander S; Thackray, Varykina G; Ryan, Genevieve E; Tolson, Kristen P; Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A; Semaan, Sheila J; Poling, Matthew C; Iwata, Nahoko; Breen, Kellie M; Duleba, Antoni J; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Shimasaki, Shunichi; Webster, Nicholas J; Mellon, Pamela L

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) pathophysiology is poorly understood, due partly to lack of PCOS animal models fully recapitulating this complex disorder. Recently, a PCOS rat model using letrozole (LET), a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor, mimicked multiple PCOS phenotypes, including metabolic features absent in other models. Given the advantages of using genetic and transgenic mouse models, we investigated whether LET produces a similar PCOS phenotype in mice. Pubertal female C57BL/6N mice were treated for 5 wk with LET, which resulted in increased serum testosterone and normal diestrus levels of estradiol, similar to the hyperandrogenemia and follicular phase estrogen levels of PCOS women. As in PCOS, ovaries from LET mice were larger, polycystic, and lacked corpora lutea versus controls. Most LET females were acyclic, and all were infertile. LET females displayed elevated serum LH levels and higher Lhb mRNA in the pituitary. In contrast, serum FSH and Fshb were significantly reduced in LET females, demonstrating differential effects on gonadotropins, as in PCOS. Within the ovary, LET females had higher Cyp17, Cyp19, and Fsh receptor mRNA expression. In the hypothalamus, LET females had higher kisspeptin receptor mRNA expression but lower progesterone receptor mRNA levels. LET females also gained more weight than controls, had increased abdominal adiposity and adipocyte size, elevated adipose inflammatory mRNA levels, and impaired glucose tolerance, mirroring the metabolic phenotype in PCOS women. This is the first report of a LET paradigm in mice that recapitulates both reproductive and metabolic PCOS phenotypes and will be useful to genetically probe the PCOS condition.

  7. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    OpenAIRE

    MH Dabbaghmaneh; T. Naderi; Akbarzadeh,M.; HR Tabatabaee; Z Zareh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia), Ultrasound...

  8. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, B.W.M. van; Koolen, D.A.; Brueton, L.; McMullan, D.; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Ades, L.C.; Peters, G.; Gibson, K.; Moloney, S.; Novara, F.; Pramparo, T.; Bernardina, B. Dalla; Zoccante, L.; Balottin, U.; Piazza, F.; Pecile, V.; Gasparini, P.; Guerci, V.; Kets, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Veltman, J.A.; Leeuw, N. de; Wilson, M.; Antony, J.; Reitano, S.; Luciano, D.; Fichera, M.; Romano, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Zuffardi, O.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic

  9. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, B.W.M. van; Koolen, D.A.; Brueton, L.; McMullan, D.; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Ades, L.C.; Peters, G.; Gibson, K.; Moloney, S.; Novara, F.; Pramparo, T.; Bernardina, B. Dalla; Zoccante, L.; Balottin, U.; Piazza, F.; Pecile, V.; Gasparini, P.; Guerci, V.; Kets, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Veltman, J.A.; Leeuw, N. de; Wilson, M.; Antony, J.; Reitano, S.; Luciano, D.; Fichera, M.; Romano, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Zuffardi, O.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic fea

  10. 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome: further expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, F H; Morrison, N; Murray, R; Iremonger, J; Stephen, J; Maher, E; Tolmie, J; Jackson, A P

    2009-01-01

    Microdeletions of the 17q21.31 region are associated with hypotonia, oromotor dyspraxia, an apparently characteristic face, moderate learning disability and have an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 16,000. Here we report 3 individuals who extend further the phenotypic spectrum observed with microdeletions of the 17q21.31 region. They all have learning disability, hypotonia, and craniofacial dysmorphism in keeping with previous reported cases. One case has iris-choroid coloboma and partial situs inversus, 2 features that are newly recorded phenotype abnormalities. These deletions were detected from a cohort of 600 individuals with learning disability and congenital anomalies, reflecting that 17q21.31 microdeletions are a common finding in such cases. FISH analysis demonstrated that each of the deletions occurred as de novo events. The deleted region in our cases encompasses the previously defined critical region for 17q21.31, and includes CRHR1 and MAPT, putative candidate genes for the 17q21.31 phenotype. The 17q21.31 microdeletion phenotype is perhaps more variable than previously described despite haploinsufficiency for the same genes in many cases.

  11. Cancer risk and genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, M.H.; Kets, C.M.; Murphy-Ryan, M.; Yntema, H.G.; Evans, D.G.; Colas, C.; Moller, P.; Hes, F.J.; Hodgson, S.V.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Aretz, S.; Heinimann, K.; Garcia, E.B.; Douglas, F.; Spigelman, A.; Timshel, S.; Lindor, N.M.; Vasen, H.F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with germline PTEN mutations are at high risk of developing benign and malignant tumours. We aimed to evaluate the cumulative risk of several types of cancer and of dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease, LDD). In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hama

  12. Exome sequencing extends the phenotypic spectrum for ABHD12 mutations: from syndromic to nonsyndromic retinal degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, K.M.; Avila-Fernandez, A.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Corton, M.; Perez-Carro, R.; Martin-Garrido, E.; Lopez-Molina, M.I.; Blanco-Kelly, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Garcia-Ruiz, P.J.; Val, J. Del; Gioia, S.A. Di; Klevering, B.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Vazquez, C.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Garcia-Sandoval, B.; Hoyng, C.B.; Collin, R.W.J.; Rivolta, C.; Ayuso, C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the genetic causes underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and to describe the associated phenotype. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred forty-seven unrelated families affected by arRP and 33 unrelated families affected by retinitis pigmentosa (

  13. Systemic vascular phenotypes of Loeys-Dietz syndrome in a child carrying a de novo R381P mutation in TGFBR2: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uike, Kiyoshi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Togao, Osamu; Nagao, Michinobu; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Nagata, Hazumu; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-11-12

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome, also known as Marfan syndrome type II, is a rare connective tissue disorder caused by dominant mutations in transforming growth factor-beta receptors (TGFBR1 and 2). We report a 7-year-old Japanese boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who carried a novel, de novo missense mutation in TGFBR2 (c.1142g > c, R381P). He showed dysmorphic faces and skeletal malformations that were typical in previous cases with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. The cardiac studies disclosed the presence of markedly dilated aortic root and patent ductus aorteriosus. The cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography (MRA) detected the tortuous appearances of the bilateral middle cerebral and carotid arteries. This study depicts the systemic vascular phenotypes of a child with Loeys-Dietz syndrome that were caused by a novel heterozygous mutation of TGFR2. A large cohort with serial imaging studies for vascular phenotypes will be useful for delineating the genotype-phenotype correlations of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

  14. Phenotype and genotype in 103 patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Saskia M.; Shaw, Adam C.; Bikker, Hennie; Luedecke, Hermann-Josef; van der Tuin, Karin; Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Belligni, Elga; Biamino, Elisa; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Cobben, JanMaarten; de Man, Stella A.; Den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Di Donato, Nataliya; Garavelli, Livia; Gronborg, Sabine; Herkert, Johanna C.; Hoogeboom, A. Jeannette M.; Jamsheer, Aleksander; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; Magnani, Cinzia; Marcelis, Carlo; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Nielsen, Maartje; Otten, Ellen; Ousager, Lilian B.; Pilch, Jacek; Plomp, Astrid; Poke, Gemma; Poluha, Anna; Posmyk, Renata; Rieubland, Claudine; Silengo, Margharita; Simon, Marleen; Steichen, Elisabeth; Stumpel, Connie; Szakszon, Katalin; Polonkai, Edit; van den Ende, Jenneke; van der Steen, Antony; van Essen, Ton; van Haeringen, Arie; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Mannens, Marcel M.; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2015-01-01

    Tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities, and subdivided in TRPS I, caused by mutations in TRPS1, and TRPS II, caused by a contiguous gene deletion affecting (amongst others) TRPS1 and EXT1. We performed a collaborative international study t

  15. Hypersociability in the behavioral phenotype of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Dijkman, M.W.; Radke, S.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de; Vries, B. de; Kessels, R.P.C.; Koolen, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome with its characteristic features including developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, and anomalies of the brain and multiple organ systems was recently described. As to its behavioral profile, scarce data from clinical

  16. Evidence of a Distinct Behavioral Phenotype in Young Boys with Fragile X Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J.; Bodfish, James W.; Hazlett, Heather C.; Lightbody, Amy A.; Reiss, Allan L.; Piven, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Objective: How does the behavioral expression of autism in fragile X syndrome (FXS + Aut) compare with idiopathic autism (iAut)? Although social impairments and restricted, repetitive behaviors are common to these variants of autism, closer examination of these symptom domains may reveal meaningful similarities and differences. To this end, the…

  17. Development and behaviour in Marshall-Smith syndrome : an exploratory study of cognition, phenotype and autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, I. D. C.; Shaw, A.; Vuijk, P. J.; Franssens, M.; Hoek, H. W.; Hennekam, R. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Marshall-Smith syndrome (MSS) is an infrequently described entity characterised by failure to thrive, developmental delay, abnormal bone maturation and a characteristic face. In studying the physical features of a group of patients, we noticed unusual behavioural traits. This urged us to

  18. Phenotypic spectrum and prevalence of INPP5E mutations in Joubert Syndrome and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Brancati, Francesco; Silhavy, Jennifer; Iannicelli, Miriam; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Scott, Eric; Spencer, Emily; Gabriel, Stacey; Thomas, Sophie; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Chaouch, Malika; Cilio, Maria Roberta; de Jong, Mirjam M.; Kayserili, Hulya; Ogur, Gonul; Poretti, Andrea; Signorini, Sabrina; Uziel, Graziella; Zaki, Maha S.; Johnson, Colin; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathies sharing a peculiar midbrain-hindbrain malformation known as the 'molar tooth sign'. To date, 19 causative genes have been identified, all coding for proteins of the primary cilium. There is clinic

  19. The Behavioural Phenotype of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: A Study of 56 Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Emanuele; Villa, L.; Selicorni, A.; Molteni, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated functional and behavioural variables of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) in a large sample of individuals. The aim of this study is to provide greater insight into the clinical, behavioural and cognitive characteristics that are associated with CdLS. Methods: In total, 56 individuals with CdLS…

  20. The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome : 18 new affected individuals from 14 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountain, Michael D; Aten, Emmelien; Cho, Megan T; Juusola, Jane; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A; Ray, Joseph W; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Graham, Brett H; Bacino, Carlos A; Potocki, Lorraine; van Haeringen, Arie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Mancias, Pedro; Northrup, Hope; Kukolich, Mary K; Weiss, Marjan M; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Mathijssen, Inge B; Levesque, Sebastien; Meeks, Naomi; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Lemke, Danielle; Hamosh, Ada; Lewis, Suzanne K; Race, Simone; Stewart, Laura L; Hay, Beverly; Lewis, Andrea M; Guerreiro, Rita L; Bras, Jose T; Martins, Marcia P; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Peeters, Els; Stumpel, Connie; Stegmann, Sander; Bok, Levinus A; Santen, Gijs W E; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Truncating mutations in the maternally imprinted, paternally expressed gene MAGEL2, which is located in the Prader-Willi critical region 15q11-13, have recently been reported to cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, a Prader-Willi-like disease that manifests as developmental delay/intellectual disabi

  1. Mapping of pain phenotypes in female patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripp, Dean A; Nickel, J Curtis; Wong, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) patients report multiple pain locations outside the pelvis. No research has examined pain using a whole-body diagram, pain-associated adjustment factors, or the impact of pain in multiple body areas on patients' quality of life (QoL)....

  2. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Lenz-Majewski syndrome: facial palsy, cleft palate and hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Visudtibhan, Anannit; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Chunharas, Amornsri

    2004-07-01

    We report a sporadic case of Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) with newly recognized manifestations including facial palsy, cleft palate and hydrocephalus developing later in infancy. The clinical course of the patient and neuroimaging studies are described. Increased intracranial pressure was recognized and treated early with the aim of preventing neurological morbidity.

  3. Phenotypic spectrum and prevalence of INPP5E mutations in Joubert Syndrome and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Brancati, Francesco; Silhavy, Jennifer; Iannicelli, Miriam; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Scott, Eric; Spencer, Emily; Gabriel, Stacey; Thomas, Sophie; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Chaouch, Malika; Cilio, Maria Roberta; de Jong, Mirjam M.; Kayserili, Hulya; Ogur, Gonul; Poretti, Andrea; Signorini, Sabrina; Uziel, Graziella; Zaki, Maha S.; Johnson, Colin; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathies sharing a peculiar midbrain-hindbrain malformation known as the 'molar tooth sign'. To date, 19 causative genes have been identified, all coding for proteins of the primary cilium. There is clinic

  4. Mutations in Kir2.1 cause the developmental and episodic electrical phenotypes of Andersen's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaster, NM; Tawil, R; Tristani-Firouzi, M; Canun, S; Bendahhou, S; Tsunoda, A; Donaldson, MR; Iannaccone, ST; Brunt, E; Barohn, R; Clark, J; Deymeer, F; George, AL; Fish, FA; Hahn, A; Nitu, A; Ozdemir, C; Serdaroglu, P; Subramony, SH; Wolfe, G; Fu, YH; Ptacek, LJ

    2001-01-01

    Andersen's syndrome is characterized by periodic paralysis, cardiac arrhythmias, and dysmorphic features. We have mapped an Andersen's locus to chromosome 17q23 (maximum LOD = 3.23 at theta = 0) near the inward rectifying potassium channel gene KCNJ2. A missense mutation in KCNJ2 (encoding D71V) was

  5. Redefining the non-dystrophic myotonic syndromes : phenotypic characterisation based on genetic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, J.

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1 gives a general introduction to non-dystrophic myotonic syndromes (NDMs). Chapter 2 comprises a systematic review about drug treatment for myotonia. Three small crossover studies evaluated myotonia in myotonic dystrophy. Unfortunately, for the treatment of myotonia in NDMs we were unable t

  6. Phenotype-Environment Interactions in Genetic Syndromes Associated with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Penny; Oliver, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The research literature notes both biological and operant theories of behavior disorder in individuals with intellectual disabilities. These two theories of genetic predisposition and operant reinforcement remain quite distinct; neither theory on its own is sufficient to explain challenging behavior in genetic syndromes and an integrated approach…

  7. The "double a" phenotype: Portending allgrove′s syndrome and averting adrenal crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allgrove′s syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder with only about 70 cases reported thus far and is characterized by alacrima, achalasia, and ACTH insensitivity among other clinical features. However, it has a widely variable clinical presentation, which may result in such cases remaining undiagnosed. Objective: To report a patient with impending Allgrove′s syndrome and to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion in diagnosing the same. Materials and Methods: A 2.5-year-old girl was diagnosed with impending Allgrove′s syndrome on the basis of clinical presentation, barium swallow study, Schirmer′s test, and hormonal evaluation. Results: A 2.5-year-old girl, born of non-consanguineous marriage, presented with failure to thrive and developmental delay with occasional vomiting on taking solid or semi-solid food for past 6 months. Examination revealed stunted weight (SDS of -4.4 and height (SDS of -4.76, and barium swallow showed presence of achalasia. On direct questioning, her mother mentioned presence of decreased tears on crying since birth, and Schirmer′s test confirmed the presence of dry eyes. Baseline ACTH was slightly elevated with normal basal and post-ACTH stimulation serum cortisol. Based on these findings, impending Allgrove′s syndrome was diagnosed with a plan for follow-up study of adrenal function. Conclusions: Allgrove′s syndrome may be an under diagnosed disorder as aclarima is often overlooked. However, a high index of clinical suspicion may help in avoiding adrenal crisis by diagnosing the condition early.

  8. Tetrasomy 12pter-12p13.31 in a girl with partial Pallister-Killian syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Melotte, Cindy; Salden, Ivo; Riegel, Mariluce; Trifnov, Vladimir; Polityko, Anna; Rumyantseva, Natalia; Naumchik, Irina; Starke, Heike; Matthijs, Gert; Schinzel, Albert; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Liehr, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    A dysmorphic patient was shown to carry a small supernumerary marker chromosome. Multicolor, centromere-multicolor and regular FISH experiments proved the marker to be an analphoid 12pter derived isochromosome. Microdissection of the marker followed by reverse painting and array CGH analysis showed that the isochromosome contains approximately 6 Mb of 12pter-12p13.31 derived sequence. This is only the second report of a marker with a neocentromere 12pter and the molecular fine mapping of the duplicated region further refines the 12p region defining the Pallister-Killian syndrome phenotype. In addition, we show the feasibility of using microdissected chromosomes or chromosomal fragments to molecularly map the chromosomal breakpoints on array CGH. This technology may aid in the identification of chromosomal translocation breakpoints.

  9. Stathmin 1 is involved in the highly proliferative phenotype of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; de Melo Campos, Paula; Favaro, Patricia; Lazarini, Mariana; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-02-01

    Stathmin 1 is an important cytoplasmic microtubule-destabilizing protein that plays critical roles in proliferation and accurate chromosome segregation through regulation of microtubule dynamics. High levels of Stathmin 1 expression have been reported in leukemia and solid tumors. However, Stathmin 1 has not been studied in myelodysplastic syndrome cells. We, herein, report that significantly higher Stathmin 1 levels were observed in proliferating hematopoietic cells, in high-risk MDS and acute leukemia cells. In addition, Stathmin 1 silencing in U937 and Namalwa leukemia cells reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity. Our data suggest that Stathmin 1 expression may be related to the highly proliferative phenotype of hematopoietic cells and add new insights into the participation of Stathmin 1 in hematological malignancies.

  10. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimeno Mariona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9. Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers.

  11. Heterogeneous Phenotype of Long QT Syndrome Caused by the KCNH2-H562R Mutation: Importance of Familial Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; García-Molina, Esperanza; Salar-Alcaraz, Mariela; Peñafiel-Verdú, Pablo; Sánchez-Muñoz, Juan J; Martínez Sánchez, Juan; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentín; Valdés Chávarri, Mariano; García Alberola, Arcadio; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2015-10-01

    Long QT syndrome is an inherited ion channelopathy that leads to syncope and sudden death. Because of the heterogeneous phenotype of this disease, genetic testing is fundamental to detect individuals with concealed long QT syndrome. In this study, we determined the features of a family with 13 carriers of the KCNH2-H562R missense mutation, which affects the pore region of the HERG channel. We identified the KCNH2-H562R mutation in a 65-year-old man with a prolonged QTc interval who had experienced an episode of torsade de pointes. Subsequently, a total of 13 mutation carriers were identified in the family. Carriers (age 48 [26] years; 46% males) underwent clinical evaluation, electrocardiography and echocardiography. The mean (standard deviation) QTc in carriers was 493 (42) ms (3 [23%] showed normal QTc); 6 (46%) had symptoms (4, syncope; 1, sudden death; 1, aborted sudden death [proband]). While under treatment with beta-blockers, 11 of 12 carriers (92%) remained asymptomatic at 5 years of follow-up (1 patient required left cardiac sympathectomy). The QTc shortening with beta-blockers was 50 (37) ms. There was 1 sudden death in a patient who refused treatment. Family study is essential in the interpretation of a genetic testing result. This article describes the heterogeneous and variable phenotype of a large family with the KCNH2-H562R mutation and highlights the role of genetic study for the appropriate identification of at-risk individuals who would benefit from treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  13. [Neuropsychiatric phenotype of Angelman syndrome and clinical care: report of seven cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote-Orozco, Juan E; Mera-Solarte, Paola Del Rocío; Espinosa-García, Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a lack or reduction of expression of UBE3A located within chromosome 15, which codes for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A, which has a key role in synaptic development and neural plasticity. Its main features are developmental delay/intellectual disability, lack of speech, a characteristic behavioural profile, and epilepsy. We describe clinical features and management of seven cases with 15q11-13 deletion. Due to their life expectancy, knowing and managing its comorbidities is crucial to improve their quality of life. We review the diagnosis and long-term clinical care of patients with Angelman syndrome. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  14. Phenotypic aspects of oral strains of Candida albicans in children with down's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to characterize the biological aspects of oral strains of C. albicans in children with Down's syndrome. These yeasts were analyzed as to their macromorphological and enzymatic aspects and were tested as to their in vitro susceptibility to antifungal drugs using broth microdilution to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. The morphotyping revealed that all oral C. albicans isolates from children with Down's syndrome promoted the formation of fringes regardless of size, while the control group presented smaller fringes. All oral C. albicans strains produced proteinase, but those with phospholipolytic activity showed greater enzyme capacity in the test group. In vitro susceptibility showed that all oral C. albicans isolates were sensitive to the drugs used.

  15. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of PORCN variants in two males with syndromic microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paul D; Van Esch, Hilde; Fieremans, Nathalie; Froyen, Guy; Slavotinek, Anne; Deprest, Jan; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-04-01

    Variants in PORCN are a cause of Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia, an X-linked dominant disorder affecting heterozygous females and until now considered to be embryonic lethal in males. Exome sequencing was performed in a family in which two male siblings were characterized by microphthalmia and additional congenital anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia, spina bifida and cardiac defects. Surprisingly, we identified a maternally inherited variant in PORCN present in both males as well as in two female siblings. This represents the first finding of a PORCN variant in non-mosaic males affected with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. The apparently asymptomatic mother showed extreme skewing of X-inactivation (90%), an asymptomatic female sibling showed skewing of 88%, and the second female sibling affected with cutis aplasia of the scalp showed X-inactivation considered within the normal range.

  16. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome: notable intrafamilial phenotypic variability in a large family with Q28X TWIST mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, Hélène; Biswas, Partha; Kumaramanickavel, Govindsamy; Stoetzel, Corinne; Quillet, Renaud; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Lajeunie, Elisabeth; Renier, Dominique; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne

    2002-05-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by craniosynostosis, ptosis, and limb and external ear abnormalities. Variable expressivity is a well-known phenomenon in this disorder. A large Indian family has been recently identified as carrying a nonsense TWIST mutation (Q28 X) in 17 members, of whom 16 were examined in detail. Only 4 (25%) of the patients showed patent craniostenosis, namely, oxycephaly. The penetrance of craniosynostosis in this family is lower than previously reported in the literature. Fifteen patients (93%) had moderate to severe ptosis. Minor limb and external ear abnormalities were present in most patients. Eyelid features were the hallmark of the disease for 12 members of the family, suggesting that mutations in TWIST may lead to a phenotype with mainly palpebral features and no craniostenosis. The clinical analysis of this large family clearly illustrates the significant variable expressivity, probably related to haploinsufficiency because of the TWIST mutation. This phenotypic variability remains unclear but could be the result of modifier genes and/or genetic background effect, as noticed previously in the transgenic twist-null heterozygous mice.

  17. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Shimamoto

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  18. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X) : A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girl

  19. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X): A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girls with Trisomy X), 58 children with ASD and 106…

  20. Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Chinese Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzhi Yang; Pu Dai; Xin Liu; Dongyang Kang; Xin Zhang; Weiyan Yang; Chengyong Zhou; Shiming Yang; Huijun Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the ...

  1. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyszynski, D.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lewanda, A.F. [Johnson Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Children`s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Beaty, T.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Balitomre, MD (United States)

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Syndrome of allergy, apraxia, and malabsorption: characterization of a neurodevelopmental phenotype that responds to omega 3 and vitamin E supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Claudia R; Agin, Marilyn C

    2009-01-01

    Verbal apraxia is a neurologically based motor planning speech disorder of unknown etiology common in autism spectrum disorders. Vitamin E deficiency causes symptoms that overlap those of verbal apraxia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane are vulnerable to lipid peroxidation and early destruction if vitamin E is not readily available, potentially leading to neurological sequelae. Inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and malabsorption of nutrients such as vitamin E and carnitine may contribute to neurological abnormalities. The goal of this investigation was to characterize symptoms and metabolic anomalies of a subset of children with verbal apraxia who may respond to nutritional interventions. A total of 187 children with verbal apraxia received vitamin E + polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation. A celiac panel, fat-soluble vitamin test, and carnitine level were obtained in patients having blood analyzed. A common clinical phenotype of male predominance, autism, sensory issues, low muscle tone, coordination difficulties, food allergy, and GI symptoms emerged. In all, 181 families (97%) reported dramatic improvements in a number of areas including speech, imitation, coordination, eye contact, behavior, sensory issues, and development of pain sensation. Plasma vitamin E levels varied in children tested; however, pretreatment levels did not reflect clinical response. Low carnitine (20/26), high antigliadin antibodies (15/21), gluten-sensitivity HLA alleles (10/10), and zinc (2/2) and vitamin D deficiencies (4/7) were common abnormalities. Fat malabsorption was identified in 8 of 11 boys screened. We characterize a novel apraxia phenotype that responds to polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E. The association of carnitine deficiency, gluten sensitivity/food allergy, and fat malabsorption with the apraxia phenotype suggests that a comprehensive metabolic workup is warranted. Appropriate screening may identify a subgroup of children with

  3. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Phenotypically directed multimodal therapy for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study using UPOINT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoskes, Daniel A; Nickel, J Curtis; Kattan, Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Large, controlled trials in chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) have failed due to patient heterogeneity. To phenotype CPPS patients, we developed the UPOINT system with 6 domains (Urinary, Psychosocial, Organ-Specific, Infection, Neurologic/Systemic and Tenderness). In this study, we treated patients with multimodal therapy based on the UPOINT phenotype and measured response after at least 6 months. Patients with CPPS were offered multimodal therapy based on the UPOINT phenotype (eg, Urinary: alpha blocker or antimuscarinic; Organ-specific: quercetin; Tenderness: physical therapy). One hundred patients agreed to therapy and were reexamined after 26 weeks. Primary endpoint was a minimum 6-point drop in NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI). Mean age was 46 years, and median symptom duration was 24 months. A median of 3 UPOINT domains were positive, the most common being Organ-specific (70%), Tenderness (64%), and Urinary (59%). With a median 50-week follow-up, 84% had at least a 6-point fall in CPSI. Number of domains and initial CPSI did not predict response. Mean changes (+/-SD) for CPSI subscores were pain 11.5+/-3.2 to 6.1+/-3.9, urine 4.7+/-3.1 to 2.6+/-2.0, QOL 9.1+/-2.3 to 4.5+/-2.8, and total 25.2+/-6.1 to 13.2+/-7.2 (all Pquality of life. Moreover, a placebo-controlled trial for every therapy combination is not feasible, and results using UPOINT compare favorably with all large trials of monotherapy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CC2D2A mutations in Meckel and Joubert syndromes indicate a genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Thomas, Sophie; Szenker, Emmanuelle; Audollent, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Babarit, Candice; Romano, Stéphane; Salomon, Rémi; Amiel, Jeanne; Esculpavit, Chantal; Gonzales, Marie; Escudier, Estelle; Leheup, Bruno; Loget, Philippe; Odent, Sylvie; Roume, Joëlle; Gérard, Marion; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Khung, Suonavy; Patrier, Sophie; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Bouvier, Raymonde; Martinovic, Jéléna; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Boddaert, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Encha-Razavi, Férechté; Valente, Enza Maria; Saad, Ali; Saunier, Sophie; Vekemans, Michel; Attié-Bitach, Tania

    2009-11-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a lethal fetal disorder characterized by diffuse renal cystic dysplasia, polydactyly, a brain malformation that is usually occipital encephalocele, and/or vermian agenesis, with intrahepatic biliary duct proliferation. Joubert syndrome (JBS) is a viable neurological disorder with a characteristic "molar tooth sign" (MTS) on axial images reflecting cerebellar vermian hypoplasia/dysplasia. Both conditions are classified as ciliopathies with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Allelism of MKS and JBS has been reported for TMEM67/MKS3, CEP290/MKS4, and RPGRIP1L/MKS5. Recently, one homozygous splice mutation with a founder effect was reported in the CC2D2A gene in Finnish fetuses with MKS, defining the 6th locus for MKS. Shortly thereafter, CC2D2A mutations were also reported in JBS. The analysis of the CC2D2A gene in our series of MKS fetuses, identified 14 novel truncating mutations in 11 cases. These results confirm the involvement of CC2D2A in MKS and reveal a major contribution of CC2D2A to the disease. We also identified three missense CC2D2A mutations in two JBS cases. Therefore, and in accordance with the data reported regarding RPGRIP1L, our results indicate phenotype-genotype correlations, as missense and presumably hypomorphic mutations lead to JBS while all null alleles lead to MKS.

  6. CC2D2A mutations in Meckel and Joubert syndromes indicate a genotype-phenotype correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Thomas, Sophie; Szenker, Emmanuelle; Audollent, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Babarit, Candice; Romano, Stéphane; Salomon, Rémi; Amiel, Jeanne; Esculpavit, Chantal; Gonzales, Marie; Escudier, Estelle; Leheup, Bruno; Loget, Philippe; Odent, Sylvie; Roume, Joëlle; Gérard, Marion; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Khung, Suonavy; Patrier, Sophie; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Bouvier, Raymonde; Martinovic, Jéléna; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Boddaert, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Encha-Razavi, Férechté; Valente, Enza Maria; Saad, Ali; Saunier, Sophie; Vekemans, Michel; Attié-Bitach, Tania

    2009-01-01

    The Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal fetal disorder characterized by diffuse renal cystic dysplasia, polydactyly, a brain malformation that is usually occipital encephalocele and/or vermian agenesis, with intrahepatic biliary duct proliferation. Joubert syndrome (JBS) is a viable neurological disorder with a characteristic “molar tooth sign” (MTS) on axial images reflecting cerebellar vermian hypoplasia/dysplasia. Both conditions are classified as ciliopathies with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Allelism of MS and JBS has been reported for TMEM67/MKS3, CEP290/MKS4, and RPGRIP1L/MKS5. Recently, one homozygous splice mutation with a founder effect was reported in the CC2D2A gene in Finnish fetuses with MKS, defining the 6th locus for MKS. Shortly thereafter, CC2D2A mutations were reported in JBS also. The analysis of the CC2D2A gene in our series of MKS fetuses, identified 14 novel truncating mutations in 11 cases. These results confirm the involvement of CC2D2A in MKS and reveal a major contribution of CC2D2A to the disease. We also identified three missense CC2D2A mutations in two JBS cases. Therefore and in accordance with the data reported regarding RPGRIP1L, our results indicate phenotype-genotype correlations, as missense and presumably hypomorphic mutations lead to JBS while all null alleles lead to MKS. PMID:19777577

  7. Dental phenotype in Jalili syndrome due to a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in the CNNM4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans U Luder

    Full Text Available Jalili syndrome denotes a recessively inherited combination of an eye disease (cone-rod dystrophy and a dental disorder (amelogenesis imperfecta, which is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Whereas the ophthalmic consequences of these mutations have been studied comprehensively, the dental phenotype has obtained less attention. A defective transport of magnesium ions by the photoreceptors of the retina is assumed to account for the progressive visual impairment. Since magnesium is also incorporated in the mineral of dental hard tissues, we hypothesized that magnesium concentrations in defective enamel resulting from mutations in CNNM4 would be abnormal, if a similar deficiency of magnesium transport also accounted for the amelogenesis imperfecta. Thus, a detailed analysis of the dental hard tissues was performed in two boys of Kosovan origin affected by Jalili syndrome. Retinal dystrophy of the patients was diagnosed by a comprehensive eye examination and full-field electroretinography. A mutational analysis revealed a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in CNNM4, a genetic defect which had already been identified in other Kosovan families and putatively results in loss-of-function of the protein. The evaluation of six primary teeth using light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that dental enamel was thin and deficient in mineral, suggesting a hypoplastic/hypomineralized type of amelogenesis imperfecta. The reduced mineral density of enamel was accompanied by decreased amounts of calcium, but significantly elevated levels of magnesium. In dentin, however, a similar mineral deficiency was associated with reduced magnesium and normal calcium levels. It is concluded that the c.1312 dupC mutation of CNNM4 results in mineralization defects of both enamel and dentin, which are associated with significantly abnormal magnesium concentrations. Thus, we could not disprove the hypothesis that a

  8. Partial duplication of 18q including a distal critical region for Edwards Syndrome in a patient with normal phenotype and oligoasthenospermia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, R; Monfort, S; Oltra, S; Ferrer-Bolufer, I; Roselló, M; Mayo, S; Martinez, F; Orellana, C

    2011-01-01

    Several authors have attempted to construct a phenotype map for duplications of different portions of chromosome 18 to identify a possible critical region (CR) for Edwards Syndrome. Partial duplications of 18q have been reported in the literature involving the distal CR in patients with some clinical features of Edwards Syndrome. Here, we describe a phenotypically normal male with a large duplication on chromosome 18 that involves the proposed distal CR. The lack of clinical features is remarkable, except for pathological semen analysis, which suggests that terminal 17.4 Mb of 18q do not contain the Edwards Syndrome CR. Alternatively, unknown modifier factors or undetected somatic mosaicism might cause incomplete penetrance of this duplication.

  9. From antibody to clinical phenotype, the black box of the antiphospholipid syndrome: pathogenic mechanisms of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Vivian X; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Groot, Philip G; de Laat, Bas

    2013-09-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is diagnosed by the combination of vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity and the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in plasma. In the last few years, a great effort has been made to unravel the mechanism by which aPLs cause thrombosis and a vast amount of mechanisms have been proposed. aPLs were proposed to induce a prothrombotic state by influencing the cellular blood compartment, the plasma compartment, the vascular wall and even metabolic pathways beyond the hemostatic system. However, due to the diversity in the mechanisms and the differences in the methodology, the focus of the mechanistical studies in this field seems to be largely diffused. It is hard to imagine that aPLs can exert such a diversity of effects, resulting in either thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity and the relationship between aPLs and the clinical manifestations remains to be a mysterious "black box". In an attempt to get insight in what takes place inside the black box, we have analyzed 126 mechanistical studies on aPLs and discussed differences in the type of antibodies that were used, the involvement of beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), and the criteria used to diagnose APS patients.

  10. Phenotype and genotype in 103 patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Saskia M; Shaw, Adam C; Bikker, Hennie

    2015-01-01

    Tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities, and subdivided in TRPS I, caused by mutations in TRPS1, and TRPS II, caused by a contiguous gene deletion affecting (amongst others) TRPS1 and EXT1. We performed a collaborative international study...... mobility, pain and in a minority an increased fracture rate. The hips can be markedly affected at a (very) young age. Intellectual disability is uncommon in TRPS I and, if present, usually mild. In TRPS II intellectual disability is present in most but not all, and again typically mild to moderate...

  11. 46, XY, del (3) (pter-->p25) syndrome: further delineation of the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, D; Vino, L; Vecchini, S; Fanos, V

    1999-12-01

    A boy with monosomy for the distal part of the short arm of chromosome 3 is described. The clinical features this patient has in common with the previously reported cases include pre- and post-natal growth delay, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism and mental retardation. In addition, minor abnormalities not previously reported were observed, such as snapping thumbs, dorsiflected big toes, connecting anterior and posterior fontanelles at birth, nasolacrimal duct stenosis and double urethral meatus. Conclusion These five new clinical findings may help in further delineation of the syndrome and allow its early recognition. A complete revision of clinical findings published in literature is reported.

  12. Principal genetic syndromes and autism: from phenotypes, proteins to genes%孤独性障碍及其相关的主要遗传综合征:从表型、蛋白到基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯萌; 王曼捷; Nanbert ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social skills, language, and behavior. It is now clear that autism is not a disease, but a syndrome characterized by phenotypic and genetic complexity. The etiology of autism is still poorly understood. Available evidence from a variety of sources strongly suggests that many genetic disorders are frequently associated with autism for their similar phenotypes. Based on this fact, this review begins by highlighting several principal genetic syndromes consistently associated with autism (fragile X, tuberous sclerosis, Angelman syndrome, Pader-Willi syndrome, Rett syndrome, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome). These genetic disorders include both chromosome disorders and single gene disorders. By comparing the similar phenotype, protein marker and candidate genes, we might make some breakthrough in the mechanism of autism and other genetic disorders.

  13. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K. [Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel); Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Genotype-Phenotype Characterization of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Confirmed by FISH: Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a multiple malformation and contiguous gene syndrome resulting from the deletion encompassing a 4p16.3 region. A microscopically visible terminal deletion on chromosome 4p (4p16→pter was detected in Case 1 with full blown features of WHS. The second case which had an interstitial microdeletion encompassing WHSC 1 and WHSC 2 genes at 4p16.3 presented with less striking clinical features of WHS and had an apparently “normal” karyotype. The severity of the clinical presentation was as a result of haploinsufficiency and interaction with surrounding genes as well as mutations in modifier genes located outside the WHSCR regions. The study emphasized that an individual with a strong clinical suspicion of chromosomal abnormality and a normal conventional cytogenetic study should be further investigated using molecular cytogenetic techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH.

  15. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  16. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  17. DDX3X mutations in two girls with a phenotype overlapping Toriello-Carey syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikow, Nicola; Granzow, Martin; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Karch, Stephanie; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Behl, Laura-Jane; Kaufmann, Lilian; Fischer, Christine; Evers, Christina; Schlesner, Matthias; Eils, Roland; Borck, Guntram; Zweier, Christiane; Bartram, Claus R; Carey, John C; Moog, Ute

    2017-05-01

    Recently, de novo heterozygous variants in DDX3X have been reported in about 1.5% of 2659 females with previously unexplained intellectual disability (ID). We report on the identification of DDX3X variants in two unrelated girls with clinical features of Toriello-Carey Syndrome (T-CS). In patient 1, the recurrent variant c.1703C>T; p.(P568L) was identified when reconsidering X-linked de novo heterozygous variants in exome sequencing data. In patient 2, the DDX3X variant c.1600C>G; p.(R534G) was also detected by exome sequencing. Based on these data, de novo heterozygous DDX3X variants should be considered not only in females with unexplained ID, but also in individuals with a clinical diagnosis of T-CS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Splicing factor gene mutations in the myelodysplastic syndromes: impact on disease phenotype and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Splicing factor gene mutations are the most frequent mutations found in patients with the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suggesting that spliceosomal dysfunction plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The aberrantly spliced target genes and deregulated cellular pathways associated with the commonly mutated splicing factor genes in MDS (SF3B1, SRSF2 and U2AF1) are being identified, illuminating the molecular mechanisms underlying MDS. Emerging data from mouse modeling studies indicate that the presence of splicing factor gene mutations can lead to bone marrow hematopoietic stem/myeloid progenitor cell expansion, impaired hematopoiesis and dysplastic differentiation that are hallmarks of MDS. Importantly, recent evidence suggests that spliceosome inhibitors and splicing modulators may have therapeutic value in the treatment of splicing factor mutant myeloid malignancies.

  19. The cellular phenotype of Roberts syndrome fibroblasts as revealed by ectopic expression of ESCO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra van der Lelij

    Full Text Available Cohesion between sister chromatids is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, the acetyltransferase Eco1/Ctf7 establishes cohesion during DNA replication in S phase and in response to DNA double strand breaks in G2/M phase. In humans two Eco1 orthologs exist: ESCO1 and ESCO2. Both proteins are required for proper sister chromatid cohesion, but their exact function is unclear at present. Since ESCO2 has been identified as the gene defective in the rare autosomal recessive cohesinopathy Roberts syndrome (RBS, cells from RBS patients can be used to elucidate the role of ESCO2. We investigated for the first time RBS cells in comparison to isogenic controls that stably express V5- or GFP-tagged ESCO2. We show that the sister chromatid cohesion defect in the transfected cell lines is rescued and suggest that ESCO2 is regulated by proteasomal degradation in a cell cycle-dependent manner. In comparison to the corrected cells RBS cells were hypersensitive to the DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C, camptothecin and etoposide, while no particular sensitivity to UV, ionizing radiation, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin was found. The cohesion defect of RBS cells and their hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents were not corrected by a patient-derived ESCO2 acetyltransferase mutant (W539G, indicating that the acetyltransferase activity of ESCO2 is essential for its function. In contrast to a previous study on cells from patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome, another cohesinopathy, RBS cells failed to exhibit excessive chromosome aberrations after irradiation in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our results point at an S phase-specific role for ESCO2 in the maintenance of genome stability.

  20. Elevated chemerin levels in Pakistani men: an interrelation with metabolic syndrome phenotypes.

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    Syeda Sadia Fatima

    Full Text Available Chemerin is a novel protein linked to adipocyte differentiation and the development of metabolic imbalances. We sought to examine the relationship of chemerin with metabolic syndrome disturbances including body fat percentage, serum lipid, glucose, insulin levels and body fat percentage in lean and obese volunteers. A cross-sectional study of 90 randomly selected healthy males from Pakistan were divided into three groups as per Body Mass Index (BMI criteria for South Asian Population. Anthropometric measurements were taken for BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference and body fat percentage, while serum analyses were performed for fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, fasting lipid profile and serum chemerin. Associations between serum chemerin levels and body fat and other metabolic syndrome parameters were performed using ANOVA and multiple regression analyses. Data was presented as Mean±SD. In all statistical analyses p-values <0.05 were considered significant. Circulating chemerin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects with BMI greater than 25 kg/m(2 compared with those with a BMI below 25 kg/m(2 (P = 0.001. Serum chemerin levels were found to be independently and significantly associated with serum levels of cholesterol (P = 0.0160; r = 0.255, fasting glucose (P = 0.002; r = 0.323, HOMA-IR (P = 0.004; r = 0.300 and hip circumference (P = 0.021; r = 0.246. This demonstrates that chemerin levels are associated with obesity and dyslipidemia and may play a role in the development of insulin resistance. This data suggests that chemerin may serve as an independent marker in diagnosing these conditions even before they become clinically symptomatic.

  1. FGFR2 mutation in a patient without typical features of Pfeiffer syndrome--The emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöttmann, Ricarda; Knaus, Alexej; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise; Spielmann, Malte

    2015-08-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (MIM: #101600) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder classically characterized by limb and craniofacial anomalies. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptors types 1 and 2 (FGFR1 and FGFR2). We applied a next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach comprising all 2877 genes currently known to be causative for one or more Mendelian diseases combined with the phenotype based computational tool PhenIX (Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes). We report on a patient presenting with multiple anomalies of hands and feet including brachydactyly and symphalangism. No clinical diagnosis could be established based on the clinical findings and testing of several genes associated with brachydactyly and symphalangism failed to identify mutations. Via next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach we then identified a novel de novo missense FGFR2 mutation affecting an amino acid reported to be mutated in Pfeiffer syndrome. Since our patient shows typical radiological findings of Pfeiffer syndrome in hands and feet but at the same time lacks several characteristic features such as clinical signs of craniosynostosis and prominent eyes we suggest introducing the term "FGFR2 associated phenotypes" for similar cases. Our results highlight the emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based bioinformatics strategies to establish clinical diagnoses.

  2. Definition of 5q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome Reveals Overlap with CHARGE Syndrome and 22q11 Deletion Syndrome Phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Charlotte Snijders; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; FitzPatrick, David R.; Romano, Corrado; Fichera, Marco; Vitello, Girolamo Aurelio; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Hoefsloot, Lies; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2014-01-01

    Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six pati

  3. Severe craniosynostosis with Noonan syndrome phenotype associated with SHOC2 mutation: clinical evidence of crosslink between FGFR and RAS signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Tomoru; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Kishi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-11-01

    Dysregulation in the RAS signaling cascade results in a family of malformation syndromes called RASopathies. Meanwhile, alterations in FGFR signaling cascade are responsible for various syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. In general, the phenotypic spectra of RASopathies and craniosynostosis syndromes do not overlap. Recently, however, mutations in ERF, a downstream molecule of the RAS signaling cascade, have been identified as a cause of complex craniosynostosis, suggesting that the RAS and FGFR signaling pathways can interact in the pathogenesis of malformation syndromes. Here, we document a boy with short stature, developmental delay, and severe craniosynostosis involving right coronal, bilateral lambdoid, and sagittal sutures with a de novo mutation in exon1 of SHOC2 (c.4A>G p.Ser2Gly). This observation further supports the existence of a crosslink between the RAS signaling cascade and craniosynostosis. In retrospect, the propositus had physical features suggestive of a dysregulated RAS signaling cascade, such as fetal pleural effusion, fetal hydrops, and atrial tachycardia. In addition to an abnormal cranial shape, which has been reported for this specific mutation, craniosynostosis might be a novel associated phenotype. In conclusion, the phenotypic combination of severe craniosynostosis and RASopathy features observed in the propositus suggests an interaction between the RAS and FGFR signaling cascades. Patients with craniosynostosis in combination with any RASopathy feature may require mutation screening for molecules in the FGFR-RAS signaling cascade.

  4. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family.

  5. Somatic frameshift mutations in the Bloom syndrome BLM gene are frequent in sporadic gastric carcinomas with microsatellite mutator phenotype

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    Matei Irina

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability has been reported at microsatellite tracts in few coding sequences. We have shown that the Bloom syndrome BLM gene may be a target of microsatelliteinstability (MSI in a short poly-adenine repeat located in its coding region. To further characterize the involvement of BLM in tumorigenesis, we have investigated mutations in nine genes containing coding microsatellites in microsatellite mutator phenotype (MMP positive and negative gastric carcinomas (GCs. Methods We analyzed 50 gastric carcinomas (GCs for mutations in the BLM poly(A tract aswell as in the coding microsatellites of the TGFβ1-RII, IGFIIR, hMSH3, hMSH6, BAX, WRN, RECQL and CBL genes. Results BLM mutations were found in 27% of MMP+ GCs (4/15 cases but not in any of the MMP negative GCs (0/35 cases. The frequency of mutations in the other eight coding regions microsatellite was the following: TGFβ1-RII (60 %, BAX (27%, hMSH6 (20%,hMSH3 (13%, CBL (13%, IGFIIR (7%, RECQL (0% and WRN (0%. Mutations in BLM appear to be more frequently associated with frameshifts in BAX and in hMSH6and/or hMSH3. Tumors with BLM alterations present a higher frequency of unstable mono- and trinucleotide repeats located in coding regions as compared with mutator phenotype tumors without BLM frameshifts. Conclusions BLM frameshifts are frequent alterations in GCs specifically associated with MMP+tumors. We suggest that BLM loss of function by MSI may increase the genetic instability of a pre-existent unstable genotype in gastric tumors.

  6. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridization testing in deletion bearing patients with Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, T; Peters, S U; Madduri, N S; Glaze, D G; German, J R; Bird, L M; Barbieri-Welge, R; Bichell, T J; Beaudet, A L; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic features, ataxia, seizures, and typical behavioural characteristics, including a happy sociable disposition. AS is caused by maternal deficiency of UBE3A (E6 associated protein ubiquitin protein ligase 3A gene), located in an imprinted region on chromosome 15q11-q13. Although there are four different molecular types of AS, deletions of the 15q11-q13 region account for approximately 70% of the AS patients. These deletions are usually detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies. The deletions can also be subclassified based on their size into class I and class II, with the former being larger and encompassing the latter. We studied 22 patients with AS due to microdeletions using a microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) assay to define the deletions and analysed their phenotypic severity, especially expression of the autism phenotype, in order to establish clinical correlations. Overall, children with larger, class I deletions were significantly more likely to meet criteria for autism, had lower cognitive scores, and lower expressive language scores compared with children with smaller, class II deletions. Children with class I deletions also required more medications to control their seizures than did those in the class II group. There are four known genes (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, & GCP5) that are affected by class I but not class II deletions, thus raising the possibility of a role for these genes in autism as well as the development of expressive language skills.

  7. Anthropometric indices to identify metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype: a comparison between the three stages of adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HW) in a representative adolescent sample; as well as to establish which anthropometric indicator better identifies MS and HW, according to gender and adolescent age. METHODS: This cross sectional study had the participation of 800 adolescents (414 girls) from 10-19 years old. Anthropometric indicators (body mass index, waist perimeter, waist/stature ratio, waist/hip ratio, and central/peripheral skinfolds) were determined by standard protocols. For diagnosis of MS, the criteria proposed by de Ferranti et al. (2004) were used. HW was defined by the simultaneous presence of increased waist perimeter (>75th percentile for age and sex) and high triglycerides (>100 mg/dL). The ability of anthropometric indicators was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. RESULTS: The prevalence of MS was identical to HW (6.4%), without differences between genders and the adolescence phases. The waist perimeter showed higher area under the curve for the diagnosis of MS, except for boys with 17-19 years old, for whom the waist/stature ratio exhibited better performance. For diagnosing HW, waist perimeter also showed higher area under the curve, except for boys in initial and final phases, in which the waist/stature ratio obtained larger area under the curve. The central/peripheral skinfolds had the lowest area under the curve for the presence of both MS and HW phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: The waist perimeter and the waist/stature showed a better performance to identify MS and HW in both genders and in all three phases of adolescence. PMID:25913494

  8. Anthropometric indices to identify metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype: a comparison between the three stages of adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Feliciano Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS and the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HW in a representative adolescent sample; as well as to establish which anthropometric indicator better identifies MS and HW, according to gender and adolescent age. METHODS: This cross sectional study had the participation of 800 adolescents (414 girls from 10-19 years old. Anthropometric indicators (body mass index, waist perimeter, waist/stature ratio, waist/hip ratio, and central/peripheral skinfolds were determined by standard protocols. For diagnosis of MS, the criteria proposed by de Ferranti et al. (2004 were used. HW was defined by the simultaneous presence of increased waist perimeter (>75th percentile for age and sex and high triglycerides (>100 mg/dL. The ability of anthropometric indicators was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. RESULTS: The prevalence of MS was identical to HW (6.4%, without differences between genders and the adolescence phases. The waist perimeter showed higher area under the curve for the diagnosis of MS, except for boys with 17-19 years old, for whom the waist/stature ratio exhibited better performance. For diagnosing HW, waist perimeter also showed higher area under the curve, except for boys in initial and final phases, in which the waist/stature ratio obtained larger area under the curve. The central/peripheral skinfolds had the lowest area under the curve for the presence of both MS and HW phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: The waist perimeter and the waist/stature showed a better performance to identify MS and HW in both genders and in all three phases of adolescence.

  9. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  10. [Anthropometric indices to identify metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype: a comparison between the three stages of adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Faria, Franciane Rocha de; Faria, Eliane Rodrigues de; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HW) in a representative adolescent sample; as well as to establish which anthropometric indicator better identifies MS and HW, according to gender and adolescent age. This cross sectional study had the participation of 800 adolescents (414 girls) from 10-19 years old. Anthropometric indicators (body mass index, waist perimeter, waist/stature ratio, waist/hip ratio, and central/peripheral skinfolds) were determined by standard protocols. For diagnosis of MS, the criteria proposed by de Ferranti et al. (2004) were used. HW was defined by the simultaneous presence of increased waist perimeter (>75th percentile for age and sex) and high triglycerides (>100mg/dL). The ability of anthropometric indicators was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. The prevalence of MS was identical to HW (6.4%), without differences between genders and the adolescence phases. The waist perimeter showed higher area under the curve for the diagnosis of MS, except for boys with 17-19 years old, for whom the waist/stature ratio exhibited better performance. For diagnosing HW, waist perimeter also showed higher area under the curve, except for boys in initial and final phases, in which the waist/stature ratio obtained larger area under the curve. The central/peripheral skinfolds had the lowest area under the curve for the presence of both MS and HW phenotype. The waist perimeter and the waist/stature showed a better performance to identify MS and HW in both genders and in all three phases of adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  12. Dissecting the phenotype of supernumerary marker chromosome 20 in a patient with syndromic Pierre Robin sequence: combinatorial effect of gene dosage and uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Kubota, Noriko; Arakawa, Michiko; Takayama, Masayoshi; Harada, Yukiko; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Nishi, Eriko; Hidaka, Eiko

    2015-06-01

    Clinical phenotypes in individuals with a supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) are mainly caused by gene dosage effects due to the genes located on the SMC. An additional effect may result from uniparental disomy (UPD). Consequently, the occurrence of UPD may be a confounding factor in identifying genotype-phenotype correlations in SMC syndromes. Here, we report on a patient that illustrates this problem; the phenotype of this patient was a consequence of a combined effect of gene dosage and UPD. The proband showed facial dysmorphisms, growth retardation and developmental delay. G-band karyotype of the proband's peripheral blood showed the presence of mosaic SMC. A SNP array analysis documented maternal UPD20 and 20p duplication. It is known that maternal UPD20 causes prenatal onset growth retardation and feeding difficulties. By contrast, duplication of 20p causes facial dysmorphisms, micrognathia, cleft palate, developmental delay and vertebral anomalies. Our classification of the proband's phenotype showed a mixture of these two effects. Therefore, we suggest the routine use of genome-wide SNP array towards the detailed genotype-phenotype correlations for SMC syndromes.

  13. [Can the behavioural phenotype of fragile X syndrome be attributed to mental retardation and to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Brun-Gasca, C

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) reveals itself as dysmorphic stigmata, systemic manifestations, neurological symptoms and cognitive-behavioural manifestations. Mental retardation (MR) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) nearly always appear as examples of this last case, but most patients also present a series of fairly common behavioural characteristics. The most characteristic types of conduct seen in FXS include: language problems, lack of attention, hyperactivity, anxiety, shyness, behavioural problems, stereotypical hand flapping, gaze aversion, obstinacy and aggressiveness. The purpose of this work is to determine which behavioural aspects of the syndrome are linked to the genetic specificity and are not, therefore, determined by MR and ADHD. Three groups of patients were compared: 30 children diagnosed as suffering from FXS, 30 children with MR caused by diverse aetiologies and 323 children diagnosed as suffering from ADHD. It was found that there were no significant differences between the IQ and the age of the FXS and MR groups. To determine the behavioural characteristics of the three groups the parents of the patients answered Achenbach's CBCL/4-18 survey. The results obtained show that certain types of conduct that are very typical of FXS are represented significantly more frequently in the FXS group than in the groups of patients with MR and ADHD. This behaviour includes: timidity, attachment to adults, shyness, repetition of certain actions over and over again, pronunciation and speech problems, fear of animals, situations or places, and concern for tidiness and cleanliness. These findings lend support to the idea that the behavioural phenotype of FXS is linked to the genetic disorder and is not, therefore, a consequence of MR or ADHD.

  14. Adrenocortical steroid response to ACTH in different phenotypes of non-obese polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinar Nese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenal androgen excess is frequently observed in PCOS. The aim of the study was to determine whether adrenal gland function varies among PCOS phenotypes, women with hyperandrogenism (H only and healthy women. Methods The study included 119 non-obese patients with PCOS (age: 22.2 ± 4.1y, BMI:22.5 ± 3.1 kg/m2, 24 women with H only and 39 age and BMI- matched controls. Among women with PCOS, 50 had H, oligo-anovulation (O, and polycystic ovaries (P (PHO, 32 had O and H (OH, 23 had P and H (PH, and 14 had P and O (PO. Total testosterone (T, SHBG and DHEAS levels at basal and serum 17-hydroxprogesterone (17-OHP, androstenedione (A4, DHEA and cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation were measured. Results T, FAI and DHEAS, and basal and AUC values for 17-OHP and A4 were significantly and similarly higher in PCOS and H groups than controls (p  Conclusion PCOS patients and women with H only have similar and higher basal and stimulated adrenal androgen levels than controls. All three hyperandrogenic subphenotypes of PCOS exhibit similar and higher basal and stimulated adrenal androgen secretion patterns compared to non-hyperandrogenic subphenotype.

  15. Pallister-Killian syndrome: A mild case diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Review of the literature and expansion of the phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielanska, M.M.; Khalifa, M.M.; Duncan, A.M.V. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-10-16

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare disorder characterized by a specific combination of anomalies, mental retardation and mosaic presence of a supernumerary isochromosome 12p which is tissue-limited. We report an atypical case of PKS with a mild phenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to demonstrate that the supernumerary marker chromosome identified in the patient`s fibroblasts was an isochromosome 12p. This study broadens the spectrum of PKS phenotype. It also illustrates the usefulness of fluorescence in situ hybridization in diagnosis of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and mild or atypical clinical findings. 40 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Germline PRKACA amplification leads to Cushing syndrome caused by 3 adrenocortical pathologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the pathology of 5 patients with germline PRKACA copy number gain and Cushing syndrome: 4 males and 1 female, aged 2 to 43 years, including a mother and son. Imaging showed normal or slightly enlarged adrenal glands in 4 patients and a unilateral mass in the fifth. Biochemically, the patients had corticotropin-independent hypercortisolism. Four underwent bilateral adrenalectomy; unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the patient with the adrenal mass. Pathologically, 3 patients, including the 1 with the tumor (adenoma), had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease with extranodular cortical atrophy and mild intracapsular and extracapsular extension of cortical cells. The other 2 patients had cortical hyperplasia and prominent capsular and extracapsular micronodular cortical hyperplasia. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed differences for synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and Ki-67 (nuclei) in the atrophic cortices (patients 1, 2, and 3) and hyperplastic cortices (patients 4 and 5) and for Ki-67 (nuclei) and vimentin in the extracortical nodules in the 2 groups of patients. β-Catenin stained the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclei of the adenoma. The patients were well at follow-up (1-23 years); 24-hour urinary cortisol excretion was elevated in the patient who had unilateral adrenalectomy.

  17. Comparison of phenotype in uniparental disomy and deletion Prader-Willi syndrome: Sex specific differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.; Langlois, S.; Robinson, W.P. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1996-10-16

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results primarily from either a paternal deletion of 15q11-q13 or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15. Birth parameters and clinical presentation of 79 confirmed UPD cases and 43 deletion patients were compared in order to test whether any manifestations differ between the two groups. There were no major clinical differences between the two classes analyzed as a whole, other than the presence of hypopigmentation predominantly in the deletion group. However, there was a significant bias in sex-ratio (P<.001) limited to the UPD group with a predominance (68%) of males. An equal number of males and females was observed in the deletion group. When analyzed by sex, several significant differences between the UPD and deletion groups were observed. Female UPD patients were found to be less severely affected than female deletion patients in terms of length of gavage feeding and a later onset of hyperphagia. Although these traits are likely to be influenced by external factors, they may reflect a milder presentation of female UPD patients which could explain the observed sex bias by causing under-ascertainment of female UPD. Alternatively, there may be an effect of sex on either early trisomy 15 survival or the probability of somatic loss of a chromosome from a trisomic conceptus. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT.

  19. Mosaic cri-du-chat syndrome in a girl with a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Lilia Maria de Azevedo; de Carvalho, Acácia Fernandes Lacerda; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas; Pinto, Paula Sanders Pereira; Silveira, Adriana; de Freitas, Lucy Magalhães; Falcão, Maria de Lourdes Lima

    2008-01-01

    We report on the clinical observation of a girl patient with few signs of cri-du-chat syndrome. The chromosomal analysis in lymphocyte culture showed 46,XX,del(5)(p15.3) in 38% of cells. Psychological tests revealed motor, perceptive and visual-spatial problems, as well as immaturity and emotional dependence. The phoniatric evaluation showed poor vocabulary, difficulty with repeating words or numbers in sequence, and better receptive than expressive language. The spectrographic measurements showed disturbance of fundamental frequency (F0) in vocal pronunciation. The anatomic findings of the laryngoscopic evaluation were normal, indicating that the voice and speech problems were functional disorders. The present case revealed moderate clinical signs and vocal disturbance associated with a low percentage of 5p- cells and the breakpoint at 5p15.3. The short terminal deletion with a possible loss of the critical region for cat-like cry and the presence of a normal cell line, explain the cry not so typical at birth (weak but not high-pitched), the intermediate values of F0, and the moderate mental retardation. This case is compared with other mosaic 5p- patients reported in the literature.

  20. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  1. Carotid intima-media thickness, dietary intake, and cardiovascular phenotypes in adolescents: relation to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croymans, Daniel M; Sanchez, Albert; Barth, Jacques D; Roberts, Christian K

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about the interrelationships between metabolic syndrome (MS), uric acid, and early carotid atherosclerosis with diet in adolescents. We investigated associations among diet, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), MS, uric acid, and other cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents. Two hundred forty-nine adolescents from 3 high schools in Central California-a predominately Hispanic (n = 119, 16.1 +/- 0.9 years old, 94% Hispanic), a mixed-ethnicity (n = 94, 15.7 +/- 1.2 years old), and a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) (n = 33, 17.0 +/- 1.3 years old) high school-were assessed for cIMT, blood lipids, uric acid, blood glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and dietary intake. Compared with SDA adolescents, the predominately Hispanic and mixed-ethnicity high school adolescents exhibited higher low-density lipoprotein and BMI percentile, whereas adolescents from the SDA and mixed-ethnicity high schools exhibited lower uric acid and fasting glucose levels than those from the Hispanic high school. After adjusting for age and sex, cIMT was only correlated with systolic blood pressure percentile (r = 0.16, P importance for the assessment of adolescent cardiovascular health. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Fetal phenotype of Prader-Willi syndrome due to maternal disomy for chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Herminé, A Coulomb; Aboura, A; Brisset, S; Cuisset, L; Castaigne, V; Labrune, P; Frydman, R; Tachdjian, G

    2003-11-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results from either paternal deletion of 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15 or imprinting center mutation. Prenatal diagnosis of PWS is currently indicated for chromosomal parental translocation involving chromosome 15 and for decreased fetal movements during the third trimester of gestation. Here we present the prenatal diagnosis of PWS during the first trimester of gestation and autopsy findings. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed for advanced maternal age at 13 weeks' gestation. CVS showed mosaicism including cells with a normal karyotype and cells with trisomy 15. Amniocentesis showed cells with a normal karyotype. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the fetus had a typical PWS abnormal methylation profile and maternal disomy for chromosome 15. Fetal ultrasound examination showed slightly enlarged lateral ventricles and hypoplasic male external genitalia without intra-uterine growth retardation. The autopsy showed a eutrophic male fetus with facial dysmorphy, hypoplasic genitalia, abnormal position of both feet and posterior hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. This report points out that in a karyotypically normal fetus with ambiguous male external genitalia and cerebral anomalies, extensive cytogenetic and molecular biology studies are strongly recommended because of risk of PWS. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A ring D chromosome in association with Down's syndrome-like phenotype

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    A. Wajntal

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available The case of a ten-years-old mentally retarded girl with Down's syndrome-like features whose chromosome analysis revealed an unusual mosaicism including 10% mitosis with a ring chromosome replacing a D chromosome is reported. The clinical features of the patient were considered similar to those described by Jacobsen (1966 and Emberger et al. (1971 who interpreted the ring chromosome present in their patients as being chromosome 15.Relata-se um caso de uma menina com 10 anos de idade, mentalmente retardada e com semelhanças com a síndrome de Down, cuja análise cromossômica revelou um mosaicismo pouco freqüente, incluindo 10% de mitoses com um cromossoma em anel substituindo um cromossoma D. O quadro clínico da paciente é similar ao descrito por Jacobsen (1966 e Emberger et al. (1971 que interpretaram a presença do cromossoma em anel em seus pacientes como sendo o cromossoma 15.

  4. Muenke syndrome with pigmentary disorder and probable hemimegalencephaly: An expansion of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Flores-Sarnat, Laura; El-Ruby, Mona O; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bridge, Peter; Eid, Maha M; El-Badry, Tarek H; Effat, Laila; Curatolo, Paolo; Temtamy, Samia A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a 2-year-old boy born to healthy, consanguineous parents. He had craniofacial asymmetry with left frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, proptosis, and low-set ears. In addition, he had curly, light hair, and oval hypomelanotic patches in the abdomen, lower limbs and back and one hyperpigmented patch in the groin without acanthosis nigricans. Cranial three-dimensional CT scan showed right-coronal, sagittal, and lambdoid suture synostoses. His cranial MRI at 2-months of age showed left hemimegalencephaly, hypoplasia of corpus callosum, and an abnormal configuration of hippocampus. In spite of these cranial findings, he had mild developmental delay and his neurological examination showed symmetric strength, tone and reflexes. Apart from febrile seizures, there was no history of epilepsy. The proband developed asymmetric hydrocephalus at the age of 18 months that required third ventriculostomy. Post-operative cranial MRI showed Chiari I- like malformation and asymmetry of cerebral hemispheres but less dysplastic cerebral cortex. Mutation analysis of FGFR3 showed a c.749C > G, p.Pro250Arg substitution. To the best of our knowledge, these manifestations have not been reported in patients with Muenke syndrome. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Visual sensorial impairments in neurodevelopmental disorders: evidence for a retinal phenotype in Fragile X Syndrome.

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    Rafaëlle Rossignol

    Full Text Available Visual sensory impairments are common in Mental Deficiency (MD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. These defects are linked to cerebral dysfunction in the visual cortical area characterized by the deregulation of axon growth/guidance and dendrite spine immaturity of neurons. However, visual perception had not been addressed, although the retina is part of the central nervous system with a common embryonic origin. Therefore, we investigated retinal perception, the first event of vision, in a murine model of MD with autistic features. We document that retinal function is altered in Fmr1 KO mice, a model of human Fragile X Syndrome. Indeed, In Fmr1 KO mice had a lower retinal function characterized by a decreased photoreceptors neuron response, due to a 40% decrease in Rhodopsin content and to Rod Outer Segment destabilization. In addition, we observed an alteration of the visual signal transmission between photoreceptors and the inner retina which could be attributed to deregulations of pre- and post- synaptic proteins resulting in retinal neurons synaptic destabilization and to retinal neurons immaturity. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated that retinal perception is altered in a murine model of MD with autistic features and that there are strong similarities between cerebral and retinal cellular and molecular defects. Our results suggest that both visual perception and integration must be taken into account in assessing visual sensory impairments in MD and ASD.

  6. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Yang

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2 cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0% and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0% were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0% had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14, which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  7. Paraoxonase 1 genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciumărnean, Lorena; Dronca, Eleonora; Vesa, Ştefan Cristian; Sâmpelean, Dorel; Buzoianu, Anca Dana; Achimaş-Cadariu, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (-108C>T, -162A>G and -909G>C) from the promoter region of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) gene on the enzyme activity, in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). The study group consisted of 61 individuals with MS and the control group of 73 individuals without MS, matched for age and gender. For each individual, clinical and genetic parameters with possible influence on PON1 activities (paraoxonase, arylesterase and lactonase) were measured. PON1 genotyping was performed with PCR-RFLP, using specific primers and restriction enzymes. We found no differences for distribution of PON1 -108C>T, -162A>G and -909G>C polymorphisms, between the two groups (p-NS). The -108C>T and -909G>C polymorphisms were associated with paraoxonase (p=0.03, p=0.006, respectively), arylesterase (p162A>G polymorphism was not associated with paraoxonase (p-NS) or lactonase (p-NS) activities, but influenced the arylesterase activity (p=0.03). PON1 activities were influenced by all three polymorphisms, regardless of the presence of MS.

  8. LRPPRC mutations cause a phenotypically distinct form of Leigh syndrome with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debray, François-Guillaume; Morin, Charles; Janvier, Annie; Villeneuve, Josée; Maranda, Bruno; Laframboise, Rachel; Lacroix, Jacques; Decarie, Jean-Claude; Robitaille, Yves; Lambert, Marie; Robinson, Brian H; Mitchell, Grant A

    2011-03-01

    The natural history of all known patients with French-Canadian Leigh disease (Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, MIM220111, SLSJ-COX), the largest known cohort of patients with a genetically homogeneous, nuclear encoded congenital lactic acidosis, was studied. 55 of 56 patients were homozygous for the A354V mutation in LRPPRC. One was a genetic compound (A354V/C1277Xdel8). Clinical features included developmental delay, failure to thrive, characteristic facial appearance and, in 90% of patients, acute crises that have not previously been detailed, either metabolic (fulminant lactic acidosis) and/or neurological (Leigh syndrome and/or stroke-like episodes). Survival ranged from 5 days to >30 years. 46/56 patients (82%) died, at a median age of 1.6 years. Of 73 crises, 38 (52%) were fatal. The immediate causes of death were multiple organ failure and/or Leigh disease. Major predictors of mortality during crises (pgenetic and/or environmental factors can influence outcome.

  9. Oxidative Stress -a Phenotypic Hallmark of Fanconi Anemia and Down Syndrome: The Effect of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassyouni, HT; Afifi, HH; Eid, MM; Kamal, RM; El-Gebali, HH; El-Saeed, GSM; Thomas, MM; Abdel-Maksoud, SA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of leukemia-prone diseases such as Fanconi anemia (FA) and Down syndrome (DS) Aim: To explore the oxidative stress state in children with DS and FA by estimating the levels of antioxidants (e.g., malondialdehyde [MDA], total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase [SOD] activity) and DNA damage, and to evaluate of the effect of antioxidant treatment on these patients. Subjects and methods The study included 32 children clinically diagnosed with (15 patients) and FA (17 patients) in addition to 17 controls matched for age and sex. MDA, total antioxidant capacity, SOD activity, and DNA damage were measured. Antioxidants including Vitamin A, E, and C were given to the patients according to the recommended daily allowance for 6 months. Clinical follow-up and re-evaluation were conducted for all patients. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, karyotyping, DNA damage, and oxidative stress were re-evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical computer program Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 14.0. Results: Children with FA and DS had elevated levels of oxidative stress and more DNA damage than controls. Oxidative stress parameters and DNA damage improved in FA and DS patients after antioxidant administration. Conclusion: Early administration of antioxidants to FA and DS patients is recommended for slowing of the disease course with symptoms amelioration and improvement of general health. PMID:26097763

  10. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Percival

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC, cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS, warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  11. Characterization of a 8q21.11 Microdeletion Syndrome Associated with Intellectual Disability and a Recognizable Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, María; Delicado, Alicia; Mansilla, Elena; de Torres, María Luisa; Vallespín, Elena; Fernandez, Luis; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Nevado, Julián; Simarro, Fernando Santos; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.; Lynch, Sally Ann; Sharkey, Freddie H.; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Belligni, Elga F.; Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Bermejo, Eva; Nowakowska, Beata; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Bocian, Ewa; Obersztyn, Ewa; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    We report eight unrelated individuals with intellectual disability and overlapping submicroscopic deletions of 8q21.11 (0.66–13.55 Mb in size). The deletion was familial in one and simplex in seven individuals. The phenotype was remarkably similar and consisted of a round face with full cheeks, a high forehead, ptosis, cornea opacities, an underdeveloped alae, a short philtrum, a cupid's bow of the upper lip, down-turned corners of the mouth, micrognathia, low-set and prominent ears, and mild finger and toe anomalies (camptodactyly, syndactyly, and broadening of the first rays). Intellectual disability, hypotonia, decreased balance, sensorineural hearing loss, and unusual behavior were frequently observed. A high-resolution oligonucleotide array showed different proximal and distal breakpoints in all of the individuals. Sequencing studies in three of the individuals revealed that proximal and distal breakpoints were located in unique sequences with no apparent homology. The smallest region of overlap was a 539.7 kb interval encompassing three genes: a Zinc Finger Homeobox 4 (ZFHX4), one microRNA of unknown function, and one nonfunctional pseudogen. ZFHX4 encodes a transcription factor expressed in the adult human brain, skeletal muscle, and liver. It has been suggested as a candidate gene for congenital bilateral isolated ptosis. Our results suggest that the 8q21.11 submicroscopic deletion represents a clinically recognizable entity and that a haploinsufficient gene or genes within the minimal deletion region could underlie this syndrome. PMID:21802062

  12. Motor Neuron Syndrome as a New Phenotypic Manifestation of Mutation 9185T>C in Gene MTATP6

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    Marisa Brum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mutation 9185T>C in ATP6 gene, associated with Leigh syndrome, was reported in only few families. Motor neuron disease (MND, both clinically and electrophysiologically, was not previously described in association with this mutation. Case Report. 33-year-old male, with family history of mitochondrial disease, presented with cognitive impairment, exercise intolerance, and progressive muscle weakness. Examination revealed global hypotonia, and proximal tetraparesis, without atrophy or fasciculation, pyramidal signs, or sensory symptoms. The laboratory findings revealed an increase of lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio; electromyogram showed chronic neurogenic compromise; muscle biopsy was suggestive of spinal muscular atrophy and mitochondriopathy; genetic study of SMN1 was negative but detected a homoplasmic mutation 9185T>C in ATP6 gene. His younger sister, with the same mutation, had cognitive impairment, ataxia, and muscle weakness. EMG showed axonal peripheral neuropathy. Conclusion. This case is unique because of the benignity and the coexistence of clinical, neurophysiological, and pathological findings suggestive of MND that, although described in mitochondrial disease, have not yet been reported in association with 9185T>C mutation. The present case contributes to the expansion of the phenotypic expressions of this particular mutation.

  13. Genealogy, natural history, and phenotype of Alström syndrome in a large Acadian kindred and three additional families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J D; Ludman, M D; Shea, S E; Salisbury, S R; Willi, S M; LaRoche, R G; Nishina, P M

    1997-12-12

    We describe a large Acadian kindred including 8 Alstrom Syndrome (AS) patients, with an age range of 4 to 26 at the time of clinical assessment. The affected subjects come from 5 nuclear families within this kindred. The phenotype includes early childhood retinopathy, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, truncal obesity, and acanthosis nigricans. In addition, hyperinsulinemia and hypertriglyceridemia with normal cholesterol levels were observed in most affected individuals tested. Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and growth retardation appear to be age-related manifestations that occur post-adolescence. Younger affected children are not overtly hyperglycemic and are normal or above average height for age. Although the AS patients in kindred 1 presumably carry the same mutation, many manifestations of the disease are variable. For example, of the 8 children in the Acadian kindred, 4 have scoliosis, 2 have had infantile cardiomyopathy, 2 are hypothyroid, 1 has had hepatic dysfunction and is hypertensive, and 4 have developed asthma. Seven subjects described in this kindred exhibit developmental delay. One additional manifestation not described widely in the literature, advanced bone age, was observed in all subjects tested. The clinical data from this large Acadian kindred, together with information obtained from 4 additional AS patients in 3 unrelated kindreds, confirm and extend clinical observations previously described. In addition, the Acadian kindred with multiple affected individuals, probably arising from a common founder, should allow for identification of the chromosomal localization of a gene causing AS.

  14. Reduction of NADPH-oxidase activity ameliorates the cardiovascular phenotype in a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

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    Victoria Campuzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a generalized arteriopathy due to elastin deficiency, presenting as stenoses of medium and large arteries and leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular complications. Deletion of a functional NCF1 gene copy has been shown to protect a proportion of WBS patients against hypertension, likely through reduced NADPH-oxidase (NOX-mediated oxidative stress. DD mice, carrying a 0.67 Mb heterozygous deletion including the Eln gene, presented with a generalized arteriopathy, hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy, associated with elevated angiotensin II (angII, oxidative stress parameters, and Ncf1 expression. Genetic (by crossing with Ncf1 mutant and/or pharmacological (with ang II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or NOX inhibitor apocynin reduction of NOX activity controlled hormonal and biochemical parameters in DD mice, resulting in normalized blood pressure and improved cardiovascular histology. We provide strong evidence for implication of the redox system in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular disease in a mouse model of WBS. The phenotype of these mice can be ameliorated by either genetic or pharmacological intervention reducing NOX activity, likely through reduced angII-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, anti-NOX therapy merits evaluation to prevent the potentially serious cardiovascular complications of WBS, as well as in other cardiovascular disorders mediated by similar pathogenic mechanism.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity and anticipation in Li-Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Hany; Hainaut, Pierre; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Choong, Soo Sin; Chan, Adelyne Sue Li; Tolkunov, Denis; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Kang, Wenfeng; Lim, Leon Li Wen; Krishnan, Shekhar; Chen, Kok-Siong; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Karsa, Mawar; Shamsani, Jannah; Levine, Arnold J; Chan, Chang S

    2014-10-28

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) and its variant form (LFL) is a familial predisposition to multiple forms of childhood, adolescent, and adult cancers associated with germ-line mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene. Individual disparities in tumor patterns are compounded by acceleration of cancer onset with successive generations. It has been suggested that this apparent anticipation pattern may result from germ-line genomic instability in TP53 mutation carriers, causing increased DNA copy-number variations (CNVs) with successive generations. To address the genetic basis of phenotypic disparities of LFS/LFL, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 13 subjects from two generations of an LFS kindred. Neither de novo CNV nor significant difference in total CNV was detected in relation with successive generations or with age at cancer onset. These observations were consistent with an experimental mouse model system showing that trp53 deficiency in the germ line of father or mother did not increase CNV occurrence in the offspring. On the other hand, individual records on 1,771 TP53 mutation carriers from 294 pedigrees were compiled to assess genetic anticipation patterns (International Agency for Research on Cancer TP53 database). No strictly defined anticipation pattern was observed. Rather, in multigeneration families, cancer onset was delayed in older compared with recent generations. These observations support an alternative model for apparent anticipation in which rare variants from noncarrier parents may attenuate constitutive resistance to tumorigenesis in the offspring of TP53 mutation carriers with late cancer onset.

  16. Genotype-phenotype correlation for congenital heart disease in Down syndrome through analysis of partial trisomy 21 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Gennari, Elena; Locatelli, Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Rocca, Alessandro; Donati, Costanza Maria; Conti, Letizia; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Seri, Marco; Vitale, Lorenza; Cocchi, Guido

    2017-06-23

    Among Down syndrome (DS) children, 40-50% have congenital heart disease (CHD). Although trisomy 21 is not sufficient to cause CHD, three copies of at least part of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) increases the risk for CHD. In order to establish a genotype-phenotype correlation for CHD in DS, we built an integrated Hsa21 map of all described partial trisomy 21 (PT21) cases with sufficient indications regarding presence or absence of CHD (n=107), focusing on DS PT21 cases. We suggest a DS CHD candidate region on 21q22.2 (0.96Mb), being shared by most PT21 cases with CHD and containing three known protein-coding genes (DSCAM, BACE2, PLAC4) and four known non-coding RNAs (DSCAM-AS1, DSCAM-IT1, LINC00323, MIR3197). The characterization of a DS CHD candidate region provides a useful approach to identify specific genes contributing to the pathology and to orient further investigations and possibly more effective therapy in relation to the multifactorial pathogenesis of CHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  18. Phenotypic differences between coryneform bacteria isolated from seminal fluid of healthy men and men with chronic prostatitis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iuri B; Gritsenko, Viktor A; Kuzmin, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    We compared the potential phenotypic properties of coryneform bacteria associated with chronic prostatitis syndrome (CPS), such as secretory inhibitor of lysozyme (SIL) and secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPMP). A total of 110 clinical isolates of coryneform bacteria isolated from the seminal fluid of healthy men and men with CPS were tested. SIPMP production was tested by inhibiting platelet microbicidal protein (PMP) bioactivity against Bacillus subtilis, and was expressed as percentage of inhibition of PMP bactericidal activity. SIL production was tested by inhibiting lysozyme activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus and was expressed in microgram per millilitre of inactivated lysozyme. A significantly higher proportion of CPS strains (58.7% vs. 19.2 %) was SIPMP-positive compared with non-CPS strains (P < 0.01). Of the CPS strains tested, 77.8% were SIL-positive compared with 34% of the non-CPS isolates (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the diagnosis of CPS should not rely solely on classical parameters, for example, the identification and counting of microorganisms, but the functional significance of these parameters must be estimated, possibly by the concentration of different bacterial substrains, detection of opportunistic microorganisms with pathogenic properties, such as pronounced resistance to the cationic antimicrobial peptides, and/or the ability to inhibit the antimicrobial host defence factors. PMID:19448644

  19. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

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    Stephen C Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  20. Can inherited thrombophilia modulate the clinical phenotype of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Horacio; Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Espinosa, Gerard; Tàssies, Dolors; Monteagudo, Joan; Reverter, Joan Carles; Cervera, Ricard

    2013-01-01

    The current case-control study was aimed to determine the prevalence and the clinical significance of inherited thrombophilia - factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin polymorphisms - in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). 100 patients with APS (77 with primary APS and 23 with systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]-APS), and 100 patients with first lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and 200 healthy individuals as a control groups were analysed. Patients and control group were tested for factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A gene polymorphism. Factor V Leiden variant was found in 1% of APS patients, in 3% of healthy individuals (p=0.49), and 16% of patients with first DVT (p<0.0005). Prothrombin gene polymorphism was found in 6% of APS patients and in 2.5% of healthy subjects (p=0.21), and 13% of patients with DVT (p=0.14). In primary APS patients, factor V Leiden was present in 1.3% (1/77) and prothrombin gene polymorphism in 6.5% (5/77). No patient with SLE-APS had factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene variant was present in only one patient (4.3%). Patients with prothrombin polymorphism had higher prevalence of venous thrombosis, with no statistical significance (80% vs. 47.9%, p=0.35). There were no differences in the prevalence of recurrent thrombosis before or after APS diagnosis in patients with or without prothrombin gene polymorphism. Factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin variant seem to play no role in either the development of APS or in the type of involved vessel, with no increased risk of re-thrombosis during follow-up.

  1. Hepatic Transporter Expression in Metabolic Syndrome: Phenotype, Serum Metabolic Hormones, and Transcription Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and the alteration of multiple metabolic hormones. Obesity rates have been rising worldwide, which increases our need to understand how this population will respond to drugs and exposure to other chemicals. The purpose of this study was to determine in lean and obese mice the ontogeny of clinical biomarkers such as serum hormone and blood glucose levels as well as the physiologic markers that correlate with nuclear receptor- and transporter-related pathways. Livers from male and female wild-type (WT) (C57BL/6) and ob/ob mice littermates were collected before, during, and after the onset of obesity. Serum hormone and mRNA levels were analyzed. Physiologic changes and gene expression during maturation and progression to obesity were performed and correlation analysis was performed using canonical correlations. Significant ontogenic changes in both WT and ob/ob mice were observed and these ontogenic changes differ in ob/ob mice with the development of obesity. In males and females, the ontogenic pattern of the expression of genes such as Abcc3, 4, Abcg2, Cyp2b10, and 4a14 started to differ from week 3, and became significant at weeks 4 and 8 in ob/ob mice compared with WT mice. In obese males, serum resistin, glucagon, and glucose levels correlated with the expression of most hepatic ATP-binding cassette (Abc) transporters, whereas in obese females, serum glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were correlated with most hepatic uptake transporters and P450 enzymes. Overall, the correlation between physiologic changes and gene expression indicate that metabolism-related hormones may play a role in regulating the genes involved in drug metabolism and transport.

  2. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

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    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (pAla substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure occurred sooner with two non

  3. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

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    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick P L; Christodoulou, John

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype.

  4. Is it the resistance training itself or the combined associated weight loss that improves the metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyluk O

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ozlem Soyluk,1 Gulistan Bahat21Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Capa, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Capa, Istanbul, TurkeyWe read the article entitled “Resistance training improves isokinetic strength and metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women” by Oliveira et al1 with great interest. In the study, the authors examined the effects of 12 weeks of resistance training (RT on metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. They reported that total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, blood glucose, basal insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were all significantly reduced with RT (P<0.01. Accordingly, they concluded that a 12-week progressive RT program induces beneficial alterations on metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. View original paper by Oliveira and colleagues.

  5. The variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance of the twist-null heterozygous mouse phenotype resemble those of human Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

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    Bourgeois, P; Bolcato-Bellemin, A L; Danse, J M; Bloch-Zupan, A; Yoshiba, K; Stoetzel, C; Perrin-Schmitt, F

    1998-06-01

    Most targeted gene mutations are recessive and analyses of gene function often focus on homozygous mutant phenotypes. Here we describe parts of the expression pattern of M-twist in the head of developing wild-type mice and present our analysis of the phenotype of heterozygous twist- null animals at around birth and in adults. A number of twist -null heterozygous mice present skull and limb defects and, in addition, we observed other malformations, such as defects in middle ear formation and the xyphoïd process. Our study is of interest to understand bone formation and the role of M-twist during this process, as within the same animal growth of some bones can be accelerated while for others it can be delayed. Moreover, we show here that expressivity of the mouse mutant heterozygous phenotype is dependent on the genetic background. This information might also be helpful for clinicians, since molecular defects affecting one allele of the human H-twist ( TWIST ) gene were identified in patients affected with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS). Expressivity of this syndrome is variable, although most patients present craniofacial and limb malformations resembling those seen in mutant mice. Thus the mutant mouse twist -null strain might be a useful animal model for SCS. The twist -null mutant mouse model, combined with other mutant mouse strains, might also help in an understanding of the etiology of morphological abnormalities that appear in human patients affected by other syndromes.

  6. Novel homozygous mutation in DSP causing skin fragility-woolly hair syndrome: report of a large family and review of the desmoplakin-related phenotypes.

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    Al-Owain, M; Wakil, S; Shareef, F; Al-Fatani, A; Hamadah, E; Haider, M; Al-Hindi, H; Awaji, A; Khalifa, O; Baz, B; Ramadhan, R; Meyer, B

    2011-07-01

    Desmoplakin is an important cytoskeletal linker for the function of the desmosomes. Linking desmoplakin to certain types of cardiocutaneous syndromes has been a hot topic recently. Skin fragility-woolly hair syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder involving the desmosomes and is caused by mutation in the desmoplakin gene (DSP). We report five members from a large family with skin fragility-woolly hair syndrome. The index is a 14-year-old girl with palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair, variable alopecia, dystrophic nails, and excessive blistering to trivial mechanical trauma. No cardiac symptoms were reported. Although formal cardiac examination was not feasible, the echocardiographic evaluation of the other two affected younger siblings was normal. Homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis revealed a high LOD score region in the short arm of chromosome 6 that harbors the DSP. Full sequencing of the DSP showed a novel homozygous c.7097 G>A (p.R2366H) mutation in all affected members, and the parents were heterozygous. This is the report of the third case/family of the skin fragility-woolly hair syndrome in the literature. We also present a clinical and molecular review of various desmoplakin-related phenotypes, with emphasis on onset of cardiomyopathy. The complexity of the desmoplakin and its variable presentations warrant introducing the term 'desmoplakinopathies' to describe all the phenotypes related to defects in the desmoplakin.

  7. Generational Association Studies of Dopaminergic Genes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS Subjects: Selecting Appropriate Phenotypes for Reward Dependence Behaviors

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    Frank Fornari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal behaviors involving dopaminergic gene polymorphisms often reflect an insufficiency of usual feelings of satisfaction, or Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS. RDS results from a dysfunction in the “brain reward cascade,” a complex interaction among neurotransmitters (primarily dopaminergic and opioidergic. Individuals with a family history of alcoholism or other addictions may be born with a deficiency in the ability to produce or use these neurotransmitters. Exposure to prolonged periods of stress and alcohol or other substances also can lead to a corruption of the brain reward cascade function. We evaluated the potential association of four variants of dopaminergic candidate genes in RDS (dopamine D1 receptor gene [DRD1]; dopamine D2 receptor gene [DRD2]; dopamine transporter gene [DAT1]; dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene [DBH]. Methodology: We genotyped an experimental group of 55 subjects derived from up to five generations of two independent multiple-affected families compared to rigorously screened control subjects (e.g., N = 30 super controls for DRD2 gene polymorphisms. Data related to RDS behaviors were collected on these subjects plus 13 deceased family members. Results: Among the genotyped family members, the DRD2 Taq1 and the DAT1 10/10 alleles were significantly (at least p < 0.015 more often found in the RDS families vs. controls. The TaqA1 allele occurred in 100% of Family A individuals (N = 32 and 47.8% of Family B subjects (11 of 23. No significant differences were found between the experimental and control positive rates for the other variants. Conclusions: Although our sample size was limited, and linkage analysis is necessary, the results support the putative role of dopaminergic polymorphisms in RDS behaviors. This study shows the importance of a nonspecific RDS phenotype and informs an understanding of how evaluating single subset behaviors of RDS may lead to spurious results. Utilization of a nonspecific

  8. Evaluation of Cellular Phenotypes Implicated in Immunopathogenesis and Monitoring Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV/Leprosy Cases

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    Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem Beatriz Wagner; Sales, Anna Maria; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; de Oliveira, Ariane Leite; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Background It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR). However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. Methods/Principal Findings Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%), dropping significantly (p<0,05) during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%). Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. Conclusion/Significance These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells interesting tool

  9. Evaluation of cellular phenotypes implicated in immunopathogenesis and monitoring immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV/leprosy cases.

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    Carmem Beatriz Wagner Giacoia-Gripp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR. However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%, dropping significantly (p<0,05 during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%. Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells

  10. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cridu chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization

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    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang,Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2007-07-03

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  11. Trafficking defect and proteasomal degradation contribute to the phenotype of a novel KCNH2 long QT syndrome mutation.

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    Anton Mihic

    Full Text Available The Kv11.1 (hERG K+ channel plays a fundamental role in cardiac repolarization. Missense mutations in KCNH2, the gene encoding Kv11.1, cause long QT syndrome (LQTS and frequently cause channel trafficking-deficiencies. This study characterized the properties of a novel KCNH2 mutation discovered in a LQT2 patient resuscitated from a ventricular fibrillation arrest. Proband genotyping was performed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. The electrophysiological and biochemical properties of the mutant channel were investigated after expression in HEK293 cells. The proband manifested a QTc of 554 ms prior to electrolyte normalization. Mutation analysis revealed an autosomal dominant frameshift mutation at proline 1086 (P1086fs+32X; 3256InsG. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that wild-type Kv11.1 and mutant channels coassemble. Western blot showed that the mutation did not produce mature complex-glycosylated Kv11.1 channels and coexpression resulted in reduced channel maturation. Electrophysiological recordings revealed mutant channel peak currents to be similar to untransfected cells. Co-expression of channels in a 1∶1 ratio demonstrated dominant negative suppression of peak Kv11.1 currents. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that mutant channels were not present at the plasma membrane. Mutant channel trafficking rescue was attempted by incubation at reduced temperature or with the pharmacological agents E-4031. These treatments did not significantly increase peak mutant currents or induce the formation of mature complex-glycosylated channels. The proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin increased the protein levels of the mutant channels demonstrating proteasomal degradation, but failed to induce mutant Kv11.1 protein trafficking. Our study demonstrates a novel dominant-negative Kv11.1 mutation, which results in degraded non-functional channels leading to a LQT2 phenotype.

  12. Brittle cornea syndrome ZNF469 mutation carrier phenotype and segregation analysis of rare ZNF469 variants in familial keratoconus.

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    Davidson, Alice E; Borasio, Edmondo; Liskova, Petra; Khan, Arif O; Hassan, Hala; Cheetham, Michael E; Plagnol, Vincent; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Tuft, Stephen J; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2015-01-06

    Brittle cornea syndrome 1 (BCS1) is a rare recessive condition characterized by extreme thinning of the cornea and sclera, caused by mutations in ZNF469. Keratoconus is a relatively common disease characterized by progressive thinning and ectasia of the cornea. The etiology of keratoconus is complex and not yet understood, but rare ZNF469 variants have recently been associated with disease. We investigated the phenotype of BCS1 carriers with known pathogenic ZNF469 mutations, and recruited families in which aggregation of keratoconus was observed to establish if rare variants in ZNF469 segregated with disease. Patients and family members were recruited and underwent comprehensive anterior segment examination, including corneal topography. Blood samples were donated and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequence and splice sites of ZNF469 were PCR amplified and Sanger sequenced. Four carriers of three BCS1-associated ZNF469 loss-of-function mutations (p.[Glu1392Ter], p.[Gln1930Argfs*6], p.[Gln1930fs*133]) were examined and none had keratoconus. One carrier had partially penetrant features of BCS1, including joint hypermobility. ZNF469 sequencing in 11 keratoconus families identified 9 rare (minor allele frequency [MAF] ≤ 0.025) variants predicted to be potentially damaging. However, in each instance the rare variant(s) identified, including two previously reported as potentially keratoconus-associated, did not segregate with the disease. The presence of heterozygous loss-of-function alleles in the ZNF469 gene did not cause keratoconus in the individuals examined. None of the rare nonsynonymous ZNF469 variants identified in the familial cohort conferred a high risk of keratoconus; therefore, genetic variants contributing to disease pathogenesis in these 11 families remain to be identified. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences.

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    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre H

    2015-09-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders, and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Expanding the phenotypic profile of Kleefstra syndrome: A female with low-average intelligence and childhood apraxia of speech.

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    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lawson, Patrick; Sprouse, Courtney; Stapleton, Emily; Sadeghin, Teresa; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder most commonly caused by deletion in the 9q34.3 chromosomal region and is associated with intellectual disabilities, severe speech delay, and motor planning deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first patient (PQ, a 6-year-old female) with a 9q34.3 deletion who has near normal intelligence, and developmental dyspraxia with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). At 6, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Intelligence testing (WPPSI-III) revealed a Verbal IQ of 81 and Performance IQ of 79. The Beery Buktenica Test of Visual Motor Integration, 5th Edition (VMI) indicated severe visual motor deficits: VMI = 51; Visual Perception = 48; Motor Coordination < 45. On the Receptive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test-R (ROWPVT-R), she had standard scores of 96 and 99 in contrast to an Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary-R (EOWPVT-R) standard scores of 73 and 82, revealing a discrepancy in vocabulary domains on both evaluations. Preschool Language Scale-4 (PLS-4) on PQ's first evaluation reveals a significant difference between auditory comprehension and expressive communication with standard scores of 78 and 57, respectively, further supporting the presence of CAS. This patient's near normal intelligence expands the phenotypic profile as well as the prognosis associated with KS. The identification of CAS in this patient provides a novel explanation for the previously reported speech delay and expressive language disorder. Further research is warranted on the impact of CAS on intelligence and behavioral outcome in KS. Therapeutic and prognostic implications are discussed.

  15. Association of a de novo 16q copy number variant with a phenotype that overlaps with Lenz microphthalmia and Townes-Brocks syndromes

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    Johnston Jennifer J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are etiologically and clinically heterogeneous. Lenz microphthalmia is a syndromic form that is typically inherited in an X-linked pattern, though the causative gene mutation is unknown. Townes-Brocks syndrome manifests thumb anomalies, imperforate anus, and ear anomalies. We present a 13-year-old boy with a syndromic microphthalmia phenotype and a clinical diagnosis of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Case Presentation The patient was subjected to clinical and molecular evaluation, including array CGH analysis. The clinical features included left clinical anophthalmia, right microphthalmia, anteriorly placed anus with fistula, chordee, ventriculoseptal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, posteriorly rotated ears, hypotonia, growth retardation with delayed bone age, and mental retardation. The patient was found to have an approximately 5.6 Mb deletion of 16q11.2q12.1 by microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization, which includes the SALL1 gene, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. Conclusions Deletions of 16q11.2q12.2 have been reported in several individuals, although those prior reports did not note microphthalmia or anophthalmia. This region includes SALL1, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. In retrospect, this child has a number of features that can be explained by the SALL1 deletion, although it is not clear if the microphthalmia is a rare feature of Townes-Brocks syndrome or caused by other mechanisms. These data suggest that rare copy number changes may be a cause of syndromic microphthalmia allowing a personalized genomic medicine approach to the care of patients with these aberrations.

  16. Mouse breast cancer model-dependent changes in metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes caused by maternal dioxin exposure and dietary fat.

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    La Merrill, Michele; Baston, David S; Denison, Michael S; Birnbaum, Linda S; Pomp, Daniel; Threadgill, David W

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in fat are associated with increased susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Increased adipose tissue that is caused by high-fat diets (HFD) results in altered storage of lipophilic toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which may further increase susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. Because both TCDD and HFD are associated with increased breast cancer risk, we examined their effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes in three mouse models of breast cancer: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), Tg(MMTV-Neu)202Mul/J (HER2), and TgN(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul/J (PyMT), all on an FVB/N genetic background. Pregnant mice dosed with 1 microg/kg of TCDD or vehicle on gestational day 12.5 were placed on a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) at parturition. Body weights, percent body fat, and fasting blood glucose were measured longitudinally, and triglycerides were measured at study termination. On HFD, all cancer models reached the pubertal growth spurt ahead of FVB controls. Among mice fed HFD, the HER2 model had a greater increase in body weight and adipose tissue from puberty through adulthood compared with the PyMT and DMBA models. However, the DMBA model consistently had higher fasting blood glucose levels than the PyMT and HER2 models. TCDD only impacted serum triglycerides in the PyMT model maintained on HFD. Because the estrogenic activity of the HFD was three times lower than that of the LFD, differential dietary estrogenic activities did not drive the observed phenotypic differences. Rather, the HFD-dependent changes were cancer model dependent. These results show that cancer models can have differential effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes even before cancers arise.

  17. Subtelomeric deletions of chromosome 6p: molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three new cases with phenotypic overlap with Ritscher-Schinzel (3C) syndrome.

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    Descipio, Cheryl; Schneider, Lori; Young, Terri L; Wasserman, Nora; Yaeger, Dinah; Lu, Fengmin; Wheeler, Patricia G; Williams, Marc S; Bason, Lynn; Jukofsky, Lori; Menon, Ammini; Geschwindt, Ryan; Chudley, Albert E; Saraiva, Jorge; Schinzel, Albert A G L; Guichet, Agnes; Dobyns, William E; Toutain, Annick; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2005-04-01

    We have identified six children in three families with subtelomeric deletions of 6p25 and a recognizable phenotype consisting of ptosis, posterior embryotoxon, optic nerve abnormalities, mild glaucoma, Dandy-Walker malformation, hydrocephalus, atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and mild mental retardation. There is considerable clinical overlap between these children and individuals with the Ritscher-Schinzel (or cranio-cerebello-cardiac (3C)) syndrome (OMIM #220210). Clinical features of 3C syndrome include craniofacial anomalies (macrocephaly, prominent forehead and occiput, foramina parietalia, hypertelorism, down-slanting palpebral fissures, ocular colobomas, depressed nasal bridge, narrow or cleft palate, and low-set ears), cerebellar malformations (variable manifestations of a Dandy-Walker malformation with moderate mental retardation), and cardiac defects (primarily septal defects). Since the original report, over 25 patients with 3C syndrome have been reported. Recessive inheritance has been postulated based on recurrence in siblings born to unaffected parents and parental consanguinity in two familial cases. Molecular and cytogenetic mapping of the 6p deletions in these three families with subtelomeric deletions of chromosome 6p have defined a 1.3 Mb minimally deleted critical region. To determine if 6p deletions are common in 3C syndrome, we analyzed seven unrelated individuals with 3C syndrome for deletions of this region. Three forkhead genes (FOXF1 and FOXQ1 from within the critical region, and FOXC1 proximal to this region) were evaluated as potential candidate disease genes for this disorder. No deletions or disease-causing mutations were identified.

  18. 唐氏综合征表型与基因的相关性%Correlation between genes and phenotypes in Down' s syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江美燕; 偶健; 李红

    2013-01-01

    Down' s syndrome results form abnormal meiosis of 21 chromosome and has many kinds of abnormal phenotypes,for example,cognitive impairment,learning disability,mental retardation,congenital heart defect,early onset of Alzeimer' s disease and leukaemia.There are different each phenotypes among Down' s syndrome individuals.That is,not each individual will have all kinds of these abnormal phenotypes,moreover,the severe degree of each phenotype is also various,which may be related to the environment and genetic factors.Therefore,It is important to identify the correlation between genes and phenotyes,which has very important significance for susceptibility gene locating and gene therapy.This article will review the progress in the correlation between genes and phenotypes in patients and animal models with Down' s syndrome.%唐氏综合征(Down’s syndrome,DS)是由于21号染色体的配子减数分裂异常造成的,并且会出现异常的表型,例如,认知损害、学习和记忆能力降低、智力低下、先天性心脏病、早发的阿尔茨海默病以及白血病等.DS个体之间会出现表型的差异,即并不是每个DS患者都会出现所有表型,以及每种表型的严重程度在DS患者之间也是有差异的,这种差异可能与环境、遗传因素有关.因此明确表型和基因的相关性对于致病基因的定位及以后的基因治疗都有着非常重要的意义.现对DS患者以及动物模型的表型和基因相关性研究的进展进行综述.

  19. Systematic reanalysis of partial trisomy 21 cases with or without Down syndrome suggests a small region on 21q22.13 as critical to the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Cicchini, Elena; Locatelli, Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza; Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Rocca, Alessandro; Poletti, Giulia; Seri, Marco; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Cocchi, Guido

    2016-06-15

    A 'Down Syndrome critical region' (DSCR) sufficient to induce the most constant phenotypes of Down syndrome (DS) had been identified by studying partial (segmental) trisomy 21 (PT21) as an interval of 0.6-8.3 Mb within human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), although its existence was later questioned. We propose an innovative, systematic reanalysis of all described PT21 cases (from 1973 to 2015). In particular, we built an integrated, comparative map from 125 cases with or without DS fulfilling stringent cytogenetic and clinical criteria. The map allowed to define or exclude as candidates for DS fine Hsa21 sequence intervals, also integrating duplication copy number variants (CNVs) data. A highly restricted DSCR (HR-DSCR) of only 34 kb on distal 21q22.13 has been identified as the minimal region whose duplication is shared by all DS subjects and is absent in all non-DS subjects. Also being spared by any duplication CNV in healthy subjects, HR-DSCR is proposed as a candidate for the typical DS features, the intellectual disability and some facial phenotypes. HR-DSCR contains no known gene and has relevant homology only to the chimpanzee genome. Searching for HR-DSCR functional loci might become a priority for understanding the fundamental genotype-phenotype relationships in DS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Alessandro; Bernardini, Laura; Sabolic Avramovska, Vesna; Zanni, Ginevra; Loddo, Sara; Sukarova-Angelovska, Elena; Parisi, Valentina; Capalbo, Anna; Tumini, Stefano; Travaglini, Lorena; Mancini, Francesca; Duma, Filip; Barresi, Sabina; Novelli, Antonio; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tarani, Luigi; Bertini, Enrico; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-05-16

    The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS.

  1. LINE-1 methylation in visceral adipose tissue of severely obese individuals is associated with metabolic syndrome status and related phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcot Valérie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in the regulation of genes found to be differentially expressed in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT of severely obese subjects with (MetS+ versus without (MetS- metabolic syndrome (MetS. Long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1 elements DNA methylation levels (%meth in blood, a marker of global DNA methylation, have recently been associated with fasting glucose, blood lipids, heart diseases and stroke. Aim To test whether LINE-1%meth levels in VAT are associated with MetS phenotypes and whether they can predict MetS risk in severely obese individuals. Methods DNA was extracted from VAT of 34 men (MetS-: n = 14, MetS+: n = 20 and 152 premenopausal women (MetS-: n = 84; MetS+: n = 68 undergoing biliopancreatic diversion for the treatment of obesity. LINE-1%meth levels were assessed by pyrosequencing of sodium bisulfite-treated DNA. Results The mean LINE-1%meth in VAT was of 75.8% (SD = 3.0%. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that LINE-1%meth was negatively associated with fasting glucose levels (β = -0.04; P = 0.03, diastolic blood pressure (β =  -0.65; P = 0.03 and MetS status (β = -0.04; P = 0.004 after adjustments for the effects of age, sex, waist circumference (except for MetS status and smoking. While dividing subjects into quartiles based on their LINE-1%meth (Q1 to Q4: lower %meth to higher %meth levels, greater risk were observed in the first (Q1: odds ratio (OR = 4.37, P = 0.004 and the second (Q2: OR = 4.76, P = 0.002 quartiles compared to Q4 (1.00 when adjusting for age, sex and smoking. Conclusions These results suggest that lower global DNA methylation, assessed by LINE-1 repetitive elements methylation analysis, would be associated with a greater risk for MetS in the presence of obesity.

  2. 1031-1034delTAAC (Leu125Stop: a novel familial UBE3A mutation causing Angelman syndrome in two siblings showing distinct phenotypes

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    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50 mutations in the UBE3A gene (E6-AP ubiquitin protein ligase gene have been found in Angelman syndrome patients with no deletion, no uniparental disomy, and no imprinting defect. Case Presentation We here describe a novel UBE3A frameshift mutation in two siblings who have inherited it from their asymptomatic mother. Despite carrying the same UBE3A mutation, the proband shows a more severe phenotype whereas his sister shows a milder phenotype presenting the typical AS features. Conclusions We hypothesized that the mutation Leu125Stop causes both severe and milder phenotypes. Potential mechanisms include: i maybe the proband has an additional problem (genetic or environmental besides the UBE3A mutation; ii since the two siblings have different fathers, the UBE3A mutation is interacting with a different genetic variant in the proband that, by itself, does not cause problems but in combination with the UBE3A mutation causes the severe phenotype; iii this UBE3A mutation alone can cause either typical AS or the severe clinical picture seen in the proband.

  3. 1031-1034delTAAC (Leu125Stop): a novel familial UBE3A mutation causing Angelman syndrome in two siblings showing distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Molfetta, Greice Andreotti; Ferreira, Cristiane Ayres; Vidal, Daniel Onofre; Giuliani, Liane de Rosso; Maldonado, Maria José; Silva, Wilson Araujo

    2012-12-20

    More than 50 mutations in the UBE3A gene (E6-AP ubiquitin protein ligase gene) have been found in Angelman syndrome patients with no deletion, no uniparental disomy, and no imprinting defect. We here describe a novel UBE3A frameshift mutation in two siblings who have inherited it from their asymptomatic mother. Despite carrying the same UBE3A mutation, the proband shows a more severe phenotype whereas his sister shows a milder phenotype presenting the typical AS features. We hypothesized that the mutation Leu125Stop causes both severe and milder phenotypes. Potential mechanisms include: i) maybe the proband has an additional problem (genetic or environmental) besides the UBE3A mutation; ii) since the two siblings have different fathers, the UBE3A mutation is interacting with a different genetic variant in the proband that, by itself, does not cause problems but in combination with the UBE3A mutation causes the severe phenotype; iii) this UBE3A mutation alone can cause either typical AS or the severe clinical picture seen in the proband.

  4. Digit ratios by computer-assisted analysis confirm lack of anatomical evidence of prenatal androgen exposure in clinical phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Lehotay Denis C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that women with four clinical phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS do not demonstrate anatomical evidence of elevated prenatal androgen exposure as judged by a lower ratio of the index (2D to ring (4D finger. However, those findings conflicted with a previous study where women with PCOS had lower right hand 2D:4D compared to healthy female controls. Both these studies used Vernier calipers to measure finger lengths - a method recently shown to be less reliable at obtaining finger length measurements than computer-assisted analysis. Methods Ninety-six women diagnosed with PCOS according to the 2003 Rotterdam criteria had their finger lengths measured with computer-assisted analysis. Participants were categorized into four recognized phenotypes of PCOS and their 2D:4D compared to healthy female controls (n = 48 and men (n = 50. Results Digit ratios assessed by computer-assisted analysis in women with PCOS did not differ from female controls, but were significantly lower in men. When subjects were stratified by PCOS phenotype, 2D:4D did not differ among phenotypes or when compared to female controls. Conclusion Computer-assisted measurements validated that digit ratios of women with PCOS do not show anatomical evidence of increased prenatal androgen exposure.

  5. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridization testing in deletion bearing patients with Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahoo, T; Peters, S U; Madduri, N S; Glaze, D G; German, J R; Bird, L M; Barbieri-Welge, R; Bichell, T J; Beaudet, A L; Bacino, C A

    2006-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic features, ataxia, seizures, and typical behavioural characteristics, including a happy sociable disposition...

  6. Delineation of the phenotype associated with 7q36.1q36.2 deletion: long QT syndrome, renal hypoplasia and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Rossella; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Ariani, Francesca; Longo, Ilaria; Meloni, Ilaria; Vonella, Giuseppina; Acampa, Maurizio; Auteri, Alberto; Vicari, Stefano; Orsi, Alessandra; Hayek, Giuseppe; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca

    2008-05-01

    Terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 7 are well known and are frequently associated with hypotelorism or holoprosencephaly due to the involvement of the SHH gene located in 7q36.3. These deletions are easily detectable with routine subtelomeric MLPA analysis. Deletions affecting a more proximal part of 7q36, namely bands 7q36.1q36.2 are less common, and may be missed by subtelomeric MLPA analysis. We report a 9-year-old girl with a 5.27 Mb deletion in 7q36.1q36.2, and compare her to literature patients proposing a phenotype characterized by mental retardation, unusual facial features, renal hypoplasia and long QT syndrome due to loss of the KCNH2 gene. These characteristics are sufficiently distinct that the syndrome may be diagnosed on clinical grounds.

  7. MICrocephaly, disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome: A clinico-radiologic phenotype linked to calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MICrocephaly, disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH syndrome, a rare X-linked disorder, generally seen in girls, is characterized by neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, and disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia. It is caused by inactivating calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK gene mutations. We report a 2-year-old girl with severe neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, minimal pontine hypoplasia, cerebellar hypoplasia, and normal looking corpus callosum, with whom the conventional cytogenetic studies turned out to be normal, and an array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH analysis showed CASK gene duplication at Xp11.4. Our case highlights the importance of using clinico-radiologic phenotype to guide genetic investigation and it also confirms the role of a-CGH analysis in establishing the genetic diagnosis of MICPCH syndrome, when conventional cytogenetic studies are inconclusive.

  8. Search of phenotype related candidate genes using gene ontology-based semantic similarity and protein interaction information: application to Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet, Raimon; Gallardo-Chacon, Joan-Josep; Caminal, Pere; Perera, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for finding phenotype candidate genes starting from a set of known related genes. This is accomplished by automatically mining and organizing the available scientific literature using Gene Ontology-based semantic similarity. As a case study, Brugada syndrome related genes have been used as input in order to obtain a list of other possible candidate genes related with this disease. Brugada anomaly produces a typical alteration in the Electrocardiogram and carriers of the disease show an increased probability of sudden death. Results show a set of semantically coherent proteins that are shown to be related with synaptic transmission and muscle contraction physiological processes.

  9. Classical phenotype of Laron syndrome in a girl with a heterozygous mutation and heterozygous polymorphism of the growth hormone receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, Orit; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Rubinstein, Menachem; Nousia-Arvanitakis, Sanda; Laron, Zvi

    2004-03-01

    We describe here a 19 month-old girl with classical Laron syndrome (LS). Molecular analysis of the GH receptor gene in the patient and her parents was performed. The patient was found to be heterozygous for a mutation in exon 4 (R43X) and heterozygous for a polymorphism in exon 6 (Gly168Gly). Her mother was also heterozygous for R43X but homozygous for the polymorphism. In the father, a heterozygous polymorphism was found. Contrary to previous assumptions that only homozygous patients express the typical phenotype, this patient shows all the classical features of LS, despite being a heterozygote for a pathological defect.

  10. THE KABUKI (NIIKAWA-KUROKI) SYNDROME - FURTHER DELINEATION OF THE PHENOTYPE IN 29 NON-JAPANESE PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHRANDERSTUMPEL, C; MEINECKE, P; WILSON, G; GILLESSENKAESBACH, G; TINSCHERT, S; KONIG, R; PHILIP, N; RIZZO, R; SCHRANDER, J; PFEIFFER, L; MAATKIEVIT, A; VANDERBURGT, [No Value; VANESSEN, T; LATTA, E; HILLIG, U; VERLOES, A; JOURNEL, H; FRYNS, JP

    The Kabuki (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome was reported in 1981 by Niikawa et al. [19] and Kuroki et al. [15] in a total of ten unrelated Japanese children with a characteristic array of multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. The syndrome is characterized by a distinct face, mild to

  11. GENERAL OVERGROWTH IN THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - VARIABILITY IN THE PHENOTYPIC-EXPRESSION OF THE FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, BBA; ROBINSON, H; STOLTEDIJKSTRA, [No Value; GI, CVTP; DIJKSTRA, PF; VANDOOM, J; HALLEY, DJJ; OOSTRA, BA; TURNER, G; NIERMEIJER, MF

    1995-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, which often presents in childhood with overgrowth, may in some cases show some diagnostic overlap with classical Sotos syndrome. We describe four fragile X patients with general overgrowth, all of whom are from families with other affected relatives who show the classic Marti

  12. GAPO syndrome : a new case of this rare syndrome and a review of the relative importance of different phenotypic features in diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, W; Hall, RK; Roset, JP; Boukari, A; Tenenbaum, H; Walter, B

    1999-01-01

    The case of GAPO syndrome reported here is the 24th recorded case, 23 cases having been published previously. The 29-year-old male under discussion presents all the typical features of the syndrome, having short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features. total alopecia and pseudoanodontia. Orally, t

  13. GAPO syndrome : a new case of this rare syndrome and a review of the relative importance of different phenotypic features in diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, W; Hall, RK; Roset, JP; Boukari, A; Tenenbaum, H; Walter, B

    1999-01-01

    The case of GAPO syndrome reported here is the 24th recorded case, 23 cases having been published previously. The 29-year-old male under discussion presents all the typical features of the syndrome, having short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features. total alopecia and pseudoanodontia. Orally,

  14. SLC9A6 mutations cause X-linked mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy, and ataxia, a phenotype mimicking Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Gregor D; Selmer, Kaja K; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E; Undlien, Dag E; Strømme, Petter

    2008-04-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations.

  15. Critical region in 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome: Report of two phenotypically distinct patients, one with an additional deletion in Alagille syndrome region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Susana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard cytogenetic analysis has revealed to date more than 30 reported cases presenting interstitial deletions involving region 2q31-q32, but with poorly defined breakpoints. After the postulation of 2q31.2q32.3 deletion as a clinically recognizable disorder, more patients were reported with a critical region proposed and candidate genes pointed out. Results We report two female patients with de novo chromosome 2 cytogenetically visible deletions, one of them with an additional de novo deletion in chromosome 20p12.2p12.3. Patient I presents a 16.8 Mb deletion in 2q31.2q32.3 while patient II presents a smaller deletion of 7 Mb in 2q32.1q32.3, entirely contained within patient I deleted region, and a second 4 Mb deletion in Alagille syndrome region. Patient I clearly manifests symptoms associated with the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome, like the muscular phenotype and behavioral problems, while patient II phenotype is compatible with the 20p12 deletion since she manifests problems at the cardiac level, without significant dysmorphisms and an apparently normal psychomotor development. Conclusions Whereas Alagille syndrome is a well characterized condition mainly caused by haploinsufficiency of JAG1 gene, with manifestations that can range from slight clinical findings to major symptoms in different domains, the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome is still being delineated. The occurrence of both imbalances in reported patient II would be expected to cause a more severe phenotype compared to the individual phenotype associated with each imbalance, which is not the case, since there are no manifestations due to the 2q32 deletion. This, together with the fact that patient I deleted region overlaps previously reported cases and patient II deletion is outside this common region, reinforces the existence of a critical region in 2q31.3q32.1, between 181 to 185 Mb, responsible for the clinical phenotype.

  16. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type Ⅱ assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Zhai; Xin; Jin; Yan; Gong; Ling-Hui; Qu; Chen; Zhao; Zhao-Hui; Li

    2015-01-01

    ·AIM: To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II(USH2).· METHODS: The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect,exons of 103 known RDs-associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome(USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and Sanger sequencing.·RESULTS: The patient in the family occurred hearing loss(HL) and retinitis pigmentosa(RP) without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C >T and c.1969 C >T, in the MYO7 A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.· CONCLUSION: We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7 A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7 A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7 A mutations.

  17. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2.METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger sequencing.RESULTS:The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL and retinitis pigmentosa (RP without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.CONCLUSION:We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  18. Prevalence of overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome and atypical cardiometabolic phenotypes in the adult Romanian population: PREDATORR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, S; Moţa, M; Popa, A; Moţa, E; Serafinceanu, C; Guja, C; Catrinoiu, D; Hâncu, N; Lichiardopol, R; Bala, C; Popa, A; Roman, G; Radulian, G; Timar, R; Mihai, B

    2016-09-01

    The objectives were to assess the prevalence of overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS), and to evaluate the characteristics of the metabolically unhealthy lean (MUHL) and metabolically healthy overweight/obese (MHO) phenotypes in a Romanian population-based sample from the PREDATORR study. PREDATORR was an epidemiological study with a stratified, cross-sectional, cluster random sampling design. Participants were classified into four cardiometabolic phenotypes based on the BMI, the cut-off value being 25 kg/m(2), and the presence of MetS (defined according to the Harmonization definition 2009): MUHL, MHO, metabolically healthy lean (MHL) and metabolically unhealthy overweight/obese (MUHO). Overall, 2681 subjects aged 20-79 years were included in the analysis. The overall age and sex-adjusted prevalence of obesity was 31.90 %, overweight was 34.7 %, abdominal obesity was 73.90 % and MetS was 38.50 %. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MHO phenotype was 31.60 %, while MUHL phenotype prevalence was 3.90 %. MUHL and MHO participants had a cardiometabolic profile, kidney function and CVD risk intermediary between MHL and MUHO. MUHL had higher odds of being associated with CVD risk (OR 5.8; p obesity, prediabetes, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia than MHL, while MHO phenotype was associated with hypo-HDL cholesterolemia (OR 3.1; p = 0.002), prediabetes (OR 2.9; p obesity. PREDATORR study showed a high prevalence of obesity/overweight, abdominal obesity and MetS in the adult Romanian population, and their association with kidney function and several cardiometabolic factors.

  19. Expanding the phenotype of alopecia-contractures-dwarfism mental retardation syndrome (ACD syndrome): description of an additional case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell-Apacik, Chayim; Hardt, Michael; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Klopocki, Eva; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Heinrich, Uwe; von Voss, Hubertus

    2008-09-01

    Alopecia-contractures-dwarfism mental retardation syndrome (ACD syndrome; OMIM 203550) is a very rare genetic disorder with distinct features. To our knowledge, there have been four cases documented to date. In addition, another three patients, previously described as having IFAP syndrome (OMIM %308205), may also have ACD syndrome. We report on one patient with short stature, total alopecia, ichthyosis, photophobia, seizures, ectrodactyly, vertebral anomalies, scoliosis, multiple contractures, mental retardation, and striking facial and other features (e.g. microdolichocephaly, missing eyebrows and eyelashes, long nose, large ears) consistent with ACD syndrome. Results of laboratory testing in the literature case reports were normal, although in none of them, array-CGH (microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization) analysis was performed. In conclusion, the combination of specific features, including total alopecia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and skeletal anomalies are suggestive of ACD syndrome. We propose that children with this syndrome undergo a certain social pediatric protocol including EEG diagnostics, ophthalmological investigation, psychological testing, management of dermatologic and orthopedic problems, and genetic counseling.

  20. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Lima

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  1. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors.

  2. A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Olsson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (p(raw = 2.3 × 10⁻⁶, p(genome = 0.01. Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2 gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA, a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p < 0.0001. When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation.

  3. Genotype‐phenotype relationships in the low‐phospholipid‐associated cholelithiasis syndrome: A study of 156 consecutive patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poupon, Raoul; Rosmorduc, Olivier; Boëlle, Pierre Yves; Chrétien, Yves; Corpechot, Christophe; Chazouillères, Olivier; Housset, Chantal; Barbu, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The low‐phospholipid‐associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC; OMIM 171060) is a peculiar form of intrahepatic cholelithiasis occurring in young adults, associated with ABCB4/MDR3 gene sequence variations...

  4. Using the avian mutant talpid2 as a disease model for understanding the oral-facial phenotypes of oral-facial-digital syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. Schock

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD is a ciliopathy that is characterized by oral-facial abnormalities, including cleft lip and/or palate, broad nasal root, dental anomalies, micrognathia and glossal defects. In addition, these individuals have several other characteristic abnormalities that are typical of a ciliopathy, including polysyndactyly, polycystic kidneys and hypoplasia of the cerebellum. Recently, a subset of OFD cases in humans has been linked to mutations in the centriolar protein C2 Ca2+-dependent domain-containing 3 (C2CD3. Our previous work identified mutations in C2CD3 as the causal genetic lesion for the avian talpid2 mutant. Based on this common genetic etiology, we re-examined the talpid2 mutant biochemically and phenotypically for characteristics of OFD. We found that, as in OFD-affected individuals, protein-protein interactions between C2CD3 and oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 protein (OFD1 are reduced in talpid2 cells. Furthermore, we found that all common phenotypes were conserved between OFD-affected individuals and avian talpid2 mutants. In light of these findings, we utilized the talpid2 model to examine the cellular basis for the oral-facial phenotypes present in OFD. Specifically, we examined the development and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs when C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis was impaired. Our studies suggest that although disruptions of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis do not affect CNCC specification or proliferation, CNCC migration and differentiation are disrupted. Loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis affects the dispersion and directional persistence of migratory CNCCs. Furthermore, loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis results in dysmorphic and enlarged CNCC-derived facial cartilages. Thus, these findings suggest that aberrant CNCC migration and differentiation could contribute to the pathology of oral-facial defects in OFD.

  5. The rem Mutations in the ATP-Binding Groove of the Rad3/XPD Helicase Lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome-Like Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelone, Beth A.; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease. PMID:25500814

  6. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  7. Identification of novel deletions of 15q11q13 in Angelman syndrome by array-CGH: molecular characterization and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A; German, Jennifer R; Shaw, Chad A; Bird, Lynne M; Kimonis, Virginia; Anselm, Irinia; Waisbren, Susan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Peters, Sarika U

    2007-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, absent speech, ataxia, and a happy disposition. Deletions of the 15q11q13 region are found in approximately 70% of AS patients. The deletions are sub-classified into class I and class II based on their sizes of approximately 6.8 and approximately 6.0, respectively, with two different proximal breakpoints and a common distal breakpoint. Utilizing a chromosome 15-specific comparative genomic hybridization genomic microarray (array-CGH), we have identified, determined the deletion sizes, and mapped the breakpoints in a cohort of 44 cases, to relate those breakpoints to the genomic architecture and derive more precise genotype-phenotype correlations. Interestingly four patients of the 44 studied (9.1%) had novel and unusually large deletions, and are reported here. This is the first report of very large deletions of 15q11q13 resulting in AS; the largest deletion being >10.6 Mb. These novel deletions involve three different distal breakpoints, two of which have been earlier shown to be involved in the generation of isodicentric 15q chromosomes (idic15). Additionally, precise determination of the deletion breakpoints reveals the presence of directly oriented low-copy repeats (LCRs) flanking the recurrent and novel breakpoints. The LCRs are adequate in size, orientation, and homology to enable abnormal recombination events leading to deletions and duplications. This genomic organization provides evidence for a common mechanism for the generation of both common and rare deletion types. Larger deletions result in a loss of several genes outside the common Angelman syndrome-Prader-Willi syndrome (AS-PWS) critical interval, and a more severe phenotype.

  8. Contribution of G71R mutation to Gilbert’s syndrome phenotype in a Greek patient:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassiliki; Kalotychou; Maria; Karakosta; Revekka; Tzanetea; Aleka; Stamoulakatou; Kostas; Konstantopoulos; Yannis; Rombos

    2011-01-01

    Gilbert’s syndrome is characterized by a benign indirect hyperbilirubinemia.It has often been underestimated and undiagnosed because of its mild symptoms;al-though it is not as rare as was once believed when its frequency was estimated using data originating from biochemical tests.Based on molecular techniques,the occurrence of Gilbert’s syndrome has changed,increas-ing to 10% in the Caucasian population.This molecular defect was described,by Bosma et al,in 1995,and af-fects the promoter region of the UGT 1A1 gene.In this case report,our aim is to present a new combination of two molecular defects in a Greek patient with Gilbert’ s syndrome.A 13-year-old Greek girl was examined for Gilbert’s syndrome using molecular techniques,and an uncommon genotype was revealed comprising the rare mutation G71R in trans with A(TA)7TAA motif.TheG71R mutation according to the literature,as well as our epidemiological data,is rare in Caucasians,while it is common in Asian populations.This is the first case study in the Greek population to report a new genotype for Gilbert’s syndrome manifestation in the Caucasian population.

  9. Characterization of a 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome associated with intellectual disability and a recognizable phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Palomares; A. Delicado; E. Mansilla; M.L. de Torres; E. Vallespín; L. Fernandez; V. Martinez-Glez; S. García-Miñaur; J. Nevado; F.S. Simarro; V.L. Ruiz-Perez; S.A. Lynch; F.H. Sharkey; A.C. Thuresson; G. Annerén; E.F. Belligni; M.L. Martínez-Fernández; E. Bermejo; B. Nowakowska; A. Kutkowska-Kazmierczak; E. Bocian; E. Obersztyn; M.L. Martínez-Frías; R.C.M. Hennekam; P. Lapunzina

    2011-01-01

    We report eight unrelated individuals with intellectual disability and overlapping submicroscopic deletions of 8q21.11 (0.66-13.55 Mb in size). The deletion was familial in one and simplex in seven individuals. The phenotype was remarkably similar and consisted of a round face with full cheeks, a hi

  10. Characterization of isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum associated with coldwater disease or rainbow trout fry syndrome I : phenotypic and genomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ellen; Dalsgaard, Inger; Bernardet, Jean-Francois

    1997-01-01

    differences, which might be related to differences in pathogenicity. European isolates originating from clinical outbreaks of either RTFS or CND usually harboured one plasmid of 3.2 kb, whereas isolates originating from fish with different or no disease signs had other profiles. Phenotypically, the Danish...

  11. The survey of central obesity and BMI associated with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The results revealed no significant relationship between female adolescents’ obesity and various phenotypes of PCOS. However, adolescents should be informed about the long-term hyperandrogenic outcomes which are accompanied by insulin secretion and endanger their health after the age of 40 years.

  12. The Klinefelter syndrome is associated with high recurrence of copy number variations on the X chromosome with a potential role in the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, M S; Pecile, V; Cleva, L; Speltra, E; Selice, R; Di Mambro, A; Foresta, C; Ferlin, A

    2016-03-01

    The Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder in males, characterized by at least one supernumerary X chromosome (most frequent karyotype 47,XXY). This syndrome presents with a broad range of phenotypes. The common characteristics include small testes and infertility, but KS subjects are at increased risk of hypogonadism, cognitive dysfunction, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and autoimmune disorders, which are present in variable proportion. Although part of the clinical variability might be linked to a different degree of testicular function observed in KS patients, genetic mechanisms of the supernumerary X chromosome might contribute. Gene-dosage effects and parental origin of the supernumerary X chromosome have been suggested to this regard. No study has been performed analyzing the genetic constitution of the X chromosome in terms of copy number variations (CNVs) and their possible involvement in phenotype of KS. To this aim, we performed a SNP arrays analysis on 94 KS and 85 controls. We found that KS subjects have more frequently than controls X-linked CNVs (39/94, [41.5%] with respect to 12/42, [28.6%] of females, and 8/43, [18.6%] of males, p < 0.01). The number of X-linked CNVs in KS patients was 4.58 ± 1.92 CNVs/subject, significantly higher with respect to that found in control females (1.50 ± 1.29 CNVs/subject) and males (1.14 ± 0.37 CNVs/subject). Importantly, 94.4% X-linked CNVs in KS subjects were duplications, higher with respect to control males (50.0%, p < 0.001) and females (83.3%, p = 0.1). Half of the X-linked CNVs fell within regions encompassing genes and most of them (90%) included genes escaping X-inactivation in the regions of X-Y homology, particularly in the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) and Xq21.31. This study described for the first time the genetic properties of the X chromosome in KS and suggests that X-linked CNVs (especially duplications) might contribute to the clinical

  13. Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome: report of a child with phenotypic overlap with ulnar-mammary syndrome and a new mutation in TP63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Tanaka, June; Winder, Alison; Vargervik, Karin; Haggstrom, Anita; Bamshad, Michael

    2005-10-01

    We report on a new patient with clinical findings consistent with acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. The child had sparse hair, extensive freckling, lacrimal duct stenosis, oligodontia, dystrophic nails, reduced sweating, and bilateral athelia. Examination of his hands showed ulnar ray hypoplasia with bilateral fifth finger brachydactyly and camptodactyly. He also had surgical repair of an imperforate anus. Mutation analysis of TP63 showed a single nucleotide substitution, c.G518A, predicting a novel missense mutation, p.V114M in exon 4. This is the third mutation to be reported in TP63 in ADULT syndrome.

  14. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil-Rodriguez, M.C.; Deardorff, M.A.; Ansari, M.; Tan, C.A.; Parenti, I.; Baquero-Montoya, C.; Ousager, L.B.; Puisac, B.; Hernandez-Marcos, M.; Teresa-Rodrigo, M.E.; Marcos-Alcalde, I.; Wesselink, J.J.; Lusa-Bernal, S.; Bijlsma, E.K.; Braunholz, D.; Bueno-Martinez, I.; Clark, D.; Cooper, N.S.; Curry, C.J.; Fisher, R.; Fryer, A.; Ganesh, J.; Gervasini, C.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Guo, Y.; Hakonarson, H.; Hopkin, R.J.; Kaur, M.; Keating, B.J.; Kibaek, M.; Kinning, E.; Kleefstra, T.; Kline, A.D.; Kuchinskaya, E.; Larizza, L.; Li, Y.R.; Liu, X.; Mariani, M.; Picker, J.D.; Pie, A.; Pozojevic, J.; Queralt, E.; Richer, J.; Roeder, E.; Sinha, A.; Scott, R.H.; So, J.; Wusik, K.A.; Wilson, L.; Zhang, Jianguo; Gomez-Puertas, P.; Casale, C.H.; Strom, L.; Selicorni, A.; Ramos, F.J.; Jackson, L.G.; Krantz, I.D.; Das, S.; Hennekam, R.C.; Kaiser, F.J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Pie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth failure, intellectual disability, limb malformations, and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in five genes, encoding subunits of the cohesin complex (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) and its regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8), account for

  15. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome : phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bissay, Veronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C. H.; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C.; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the alpha-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the alpha-subunit of the skeletal voltag

  16. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil-Rodriguez, M.C.; Deardorff, M.A.; Ansari, M.; Tan, C.A.; Parenti, I.; Baquero-Montoya, C.; Ousager, L.B.; Puisac, B.; Hernandez-Marcos, M.; Teresa-Rodrigo, M.E.; Marcos-Alcalde, I.; Wesselink, J.J.; Lusa-Bernal, S.; Bijlsma, E.K.; Braunholz, D.; Bueno-Martinez, I.; Clark, D.; Cooper, N.S.; Curry, C.J.; Fisher, R.; Fryer, A.; Ganesh, J.; Gervasini, C.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Guo, Y.; Hakonarson, H.; Hopkin, R.J.; Kaur, M.; Keating, B.J.; Kibaek, M.; Kinning, E.; Kleefstra, T.; Kline, A.D.; Kuchinskaya, E.; Larizza, L.; Li, Y.R.; Liu, X.; Mariani, M.; Picker, J.D.; Pie, A.; Pozojevic, J.; Queralt, E.; Richer, J.; Roeder, E.; Sinha, A.; Scott, R.H.; So, J.; Wusik, K.A.; Wilson, L.; Zhang, Jianguo; Gomez-Puertas, P.; Casale, C.H.; Strom, L.; Selicorni, A.; Ramos, F.J.; Jackson, L.G.; Krantz, I.D.; Das, S.; Hennekam, R.C.; Kaiser, F.J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Pie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth failure, intellectual disability, limb malformations, and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in five genes, encoding subunits of the cohesin complex (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) and its regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8), account for

  17. EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME TYPE-IV - PHENOTYPIC CONSEQUENCES OF A SPLICING MUTATION IN ONE COL3A1 ALLELE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SILLENCE, DO; CHIODO, AA; CAMPBELL, PE; COLE, WG

    1991-01-01

    The features of a child with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS IV) resulting from a mutation in one COL3A1 allele were studied. The child was heterozygous for a G- to A-transition at the splice donor site of intron 41. It resulted in the splicing out of the exon 41 encoded sequence from alpha-1(II

  18. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ansari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth failure, intellectual disability, limb malformations, and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in five genes, encoding subunits of the cohesin complex (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) and its regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8), account ...

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor may affect the phenotype of women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, O.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Themmen, A. P.; de Jong, F. H.; Hofman, A.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Laven, J. S. E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by ovarian dysfunction. The association with obesity and insulin resistance is well established. Steroid hormones play a central role in the regulation of both ovarian function and body composition. This study aims to assess the influence

  20. The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: Clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Nikkel (Sarah); A. Dauber (Andrew); S. de Munnik (Sonja); M. Connolly (Meghan); R.L. Hood (Rebecca L); O. Caluseriu (Oana); J.A. Hurst (Jane); U. Kini (Usha); M.J.M. Nowaczyk; A. Afenjar (Alexandra); B. Albrecht; J.E. Allanson (Judith E); P. Balestri (Paolo); T. Ben-Omran (Tawfeg); F. Brancati (Fred); I. Cordeiro (Isabel); B.S. Da Cunha (Bruna Santos); P.F. Delaney (Peter); A. Destrée (Anne); D.R. Fitzpatrick (David); F. Forzano (Francesca); N. Ghali (Neeti); G. Gillies (Greta); J. Harwood; Y. Hendriks; D. Héron (Delphine); A. Hoischen (Alex); E.M. Honey (Engela Magdalena); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); J. Ibrahim (Jennifer); C. Jacob (Claire); S.G. Kant (Sarina); C.A. Kim (Chong); E.P. Kirk (Edwin P); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); D. Lacombe (Denis); C. van der Lee (Christiaan); I.F.M. Lo (Ivan F M); L.S. Lucas (Luiza S); F. Mari (Francesca); V. Mericq (Veronica); J.S. Moilanen (Jukka S); S.T. Møller (Sanne Traasdahl); S. Moortgat (Stephanie); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); K. Pope (Kate); S. Price (Susan); A. Renieri (Alessandra); J. Sá (Joaquim); J. Schoots (Jeroen); E.L. Silveira (Elizabeth L); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); A. Slavotinek (Anne); I.K. Temple; I. van der Burgt (Ineke); B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); J.D. Weisfeld-Adams (James D); M.L. Whiteford (Margo L); D. Wierczorek (Dagmar); J.M. Wit (Jan); C.F.O. Yee (Connie Fung On); P. Beaulieu (Patrick); S.M. White (Sue M); B. Bulman; E. Bongers (Ernie); H. Brunner (Han); M. Feingold (Murray); K.M. Boycott (Kym)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA ba

  1. Severe lymphedema, intestinal lymphangiectasia, seizures and mild mental retardation: further case of Hennekam syndrome with a severe phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, F; Faravelli, F; Loy, A; Di Rocco, M

    2002-07-22

    We report on an Italian patient affected by severe lymphedema of lower limbs, genitalia and face, intestinal lymphangiectasia, seizures, and moderate mental retardation. He has a flat face, flat nasal bridge, and hypertelorism. We propose that he presents with a severe form of Hennekam syndrome.

  2. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: Phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bissay (Véronique); S. van Malderen (Sophie); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); J. Lissens (Jurgen); U. Peeters (Uschi); D. Daneels (Dorien); A.C. Jansen (Anna C.); G. Pappaert (Gudrun); P. Rugada (Pedro); J. De Keyser (Jacques); S. van Dooren (Sonia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal vo

  3. Additional case of Marden-Walker syndrome: support for the autosomal-recessive inheritance adn refinement of phenotype in a surviving patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Zappella, M; Orsi, A; Hayek, G

    2001-02-01

    In this report, we present a 14-year-old girl, born to consanguineous parents, who presented with severe mental retardation, hypotonia, short stature, and congenital joint contractures. The craniofacial features were scaphocephaly, thin/long and immobile face, marked hypoplasia of the midface, temporal narrowness, blepharophimosis, palpebral ptosis, and strabismus. The combination of such a distinctive craniofacial appearance and psychomotor retardation allows us to recognize a new case of the Marden-Walker syndrome. Our patient represents one of the rare cases in which consanguineous mating supports the autosomal-recessive pattern of inheritance of this condition. Furthermore, through refining the phenotype of a surviving patient, this report may contribute to a better recognition of this disorder in older affected children.

  4. The behavioral phenotype in fragile X: symptoms of autism in very young children with fragile X syndrome, idiopathic autism, and other developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S J; Wehner, D E; Hagerman, R

    2001-12-01

    This study was designed to explore the behavioral phenotype of autism in a group of young children with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Twenty-four children with FXS, ages 21 to 48 months, were compared with two well-matched groups: 27 children with autism (AD) and 23 children with other developmental delays (DD), on two standardized autism instruments, as well as on measures of development and adaptive behavior. Two FXS subgroups emerged. One subgroup (n = 16) did not meet study criteria for autism. Their profiles on the autism instruments and the developmental instruments were virtually identical to the other DD group. The other FXS subgroup (n = 8, or 33% of the total FXS group) met study criteria for autism. Their profiles on the autism instruments were virtually identical to the group with autism. The finding of two FXS subgroups raises a hypothesis of additional genetic influences in the FXS autism group, warranting further genetic studies.

  5. Patient-specific and genome-edited induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes elucidate single cell phenotype of Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ping; Sallam, Karim; Wu, Haodi; Li, Yingxin; Itzhaki, Ilanit; Garg, Priyanka; Zhang, Ying; Vermglinchan, Vittavat; Lan, Feng; Gu, Mingxia; Gong, Tingyu; Zhuge, Yan; He, Chunjiang; Ebert, Antje D.; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Churko, Jared; Hu, Shijun; Sharma, Arun; Lam, Chi Keung; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Bers, Donald M.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Brugada Syndrome is a disorder associated with characteristic ECG precordial ST elevation and predisposes afflicted patients to ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Despite marked achievements in outlining the organ level pathophysiology of the disorder, the understanding of human cellular phenotype has lagged due to lack of adequate human cellular models of the disorder. Methods and Results We recruited two patients with Type 1 Brugada Syndrome (BrS) carrying two different SCN5A variants and two healthy controls. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from their skin fibroblasts by using integration-free Sendai virus. We utilized directed differentiation to create purified populations of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). BrS iPSC-CMs showed reductions in inward Na+ current density and reduced maximal upstroke velocity of action potential compared to healthy control iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, BrS iPSC-CMs showed increased burden of triggered activity, abnormal Ca2+ transients, and beating interval variation. Correction of the causative variant by genome editing was performed and resultant iPSC-CMs showed resolution of triggered activity and abnormal Ca2+ transients. Gene expression profiling of iPSC-CMs showed clustering of BrS compared to controls. Furthermore, BrS iPSC-CM gene expression correlated with gene expression from BrS human cardiac tissue gene expression. Conclusions Patient-specific iPSC-CMs are able to recapitulate single cell phenotype features of BrS, including blunted inward sodium current, increased triggered activity and abnormal Ca2+ handling. This novel human cellular model creates future opportunities to further elucidate cellular disease mechanism and identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27810048

  6. The Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse bleb phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Petros; Makrygiannis, Apostolos K; Chalepakis, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Fras1 and the structurally related proteins Frem1, Frem2, and Frem3, comprise a novel family of extracellular matrix proteins, which localize in a similar fashion underneath the lamina densa of epithelial basement membranes. They are involved in the structural adhesion of the skin epithelium to its underlying mesenchyme. Deficiency in the individual murine Fras1/Frem genes gives rise to the bleb phenotype, which is equivalent to the human hereditary disorder Fraser syndrome, characterized by cryptophthalmos (hidden eyes), embryonic skin blistering, renal agenesis, and syndactyly. Recent studies revealed a functional cooperation between the Fras1/Frem gene products, in which Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 are simultaneously stabilized at the lowermost region of the basement membrane by forming a macromolecular ternary complex. Loss of any of these proteins results in the collapse of the protein assembly, thus providing a molecular explanation for the highly similar phenotypic defects displayed by the respective mutant mice. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, and interplay between the proteins of the Fras1/Frem family and further propose a possible scenario for the evolution of the corresponding genes.

  7. A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Shin, Jin Ho; Chai, Yun; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-03-01

    We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1-7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations.

  8. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  9. Phenotypic variability in Waardenburg syndrome resulting from a 22q12.3-q13.1 microdeletion involving SOX10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelena, Brezo; Christina, Lam; Eric, Vilain; Fabiola, Quintero-Rivera

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by pigmentation abnormalities of the skin, hair, and iris, as well as sensorineural hearing loss. Contiguous gene deletions encompassing SOX10 are rare, which limits conclusions about genotype-phenotype correlation regarding patient prognosis and management. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by characterizing a 2.4 Mb deletion [arr[hg19] 22q12.3-q13.1 (36467502-38878207)x1] encompassing SOX10 and 53 additional RefSeq genes in a 15-year-old female with atypical WS. The patient presented with developmental delay, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, hypotonia, and bilateral finger contractures. Published genomic and phenotypic profiles of patients with SOX10-encompassing deletions point toward several plausible candidate gene that could account for the considerable clinical heterogeneity. These studies suggest the existence of modifiers among the co-deleted, dosage-sensitive genes (e.g., MYH9) and among genes whose effect may depend on the unmasking of recessive mutations (e.g., PLA2G6). Finally, we highlight evidence illustrating extensive interconnectivity of SOX10-hypothesizing that haploinsufficiency of SOX10 may "unmask" subtler effects on expression or epistasis associated with variants in SOX10 targets (e.g., DHH), in its partners (e.g., PAX3, EGR2), and in genes with functional overlap (e.g., SOX8, SOX9).

  10. Use of the UPOINT phenotype system in treating Chinese patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiao; Zhao, Cheng; Ou, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Long; Zeng, Feng; Qi, Lin; Tang, Zheng-Yan; Dun, Jin-Geng; Liu, Long-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The urinary, psychosocial, organ-specific, infection, neurological/systemic and tenderness (UPOINT) phenotype system has been validated to be an effective phenotype system in classifying patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) in western populations. To validate the utility of the UPOINT system and evaluate the effect of multimodal therapy based on the UPOINT system in Chinese patients with CP/CPPS, we performed this study. Chinese patients with CP/CPPS were prospectively offered multimodal therapy using the UPOINT system and re-examined after 6 months. A minimum 6-point drop in National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptoms Index (NIH-CPSI) was set to be the primary endpoint. Finally, 140 patients were enrolled in the study. The percentage of patients with each domain was 59.3%, 45.0%, 49.3%, 22.1%, 37.9%, and 56.4% for the UPOINT, respectively. The number of positive domains significantly correlated with symptom severity, which is measured by total NIH-CPSI scores (r = 0.796, Pquality of life 6.56 ± 2.44 to 4.06 ± 1.98, and total 22.99 ± 7.28 to 14.29 ± 5.70 (all Ppatients with CP/CPPS and directing therapy.

  11. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S;

    2007-01-01

    suspected to have JPS. RESULTS: By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis...... polyposis, gastric cancer, and HHT was identified, which should have implications for counselling and surveillance. Histopathological results in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes must be critically interpreted. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  12. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Phenotypes of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Real de Asua; Pedro Parra; Ramón Costa; Fernando Moldenhauer; Carmen Suarez

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the confluence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerotic damage and cardiovascular events remain extremely rare in adults with Down syndrome (DS). We aim to determine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders in an adult cohort with DS and to compare our findings with adults without DS. Methods Cross-sectional study of 51 consecutively selected adults with DS living in the community and 51 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tert...

  13. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity and anticipation in Li–Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ariffin, Hany; Hainaut,Pierre; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Choong, Soo Sin; Chan, Adelyne Sue Li; Tolkunov, Denis; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Kang, Wenfeng; Lim, Leon Li Wen; Krishnan, Shekhar; Chen, Kok-Siong; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Karsa, Mawar; Shamsani, Jannah; Levine, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Germ-line mutation in the tumor suppressor TP53 causes Li–Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a complex predisposition to multiple cancers. Types of cancers and ages at diagnosis vary among subjects and families, with apparent genetic anticipation: i.e., earlier cancer onset with successive generations. It has been proposed that anticipation is caused by accumulation of copy-number variations (CNV) in a context of TP53 haploinsufficiency. Using genome/exome sequencing, we found no evidence of increased ...

  14. Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong Yuan; Guo, Cheng Xiu; Zhu, Fu Fan; Qu, Peng Peng; Lin, Wan Jun; Xiong, Jing

    2013-03-01

    The Rotterdam criteria extend the phenotypic spectrum of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical features of a large-scale clinic based on the samples of Chinese women and to evaluate the value of Rotterdam criteria on Chinese PCOS women. One thousand four hundred and four Chinese women were involved in our study, among whom, 719 cases were diagnosed as PCOS based on 2003 Rotterdam criteria, and 685 women without history of hyperandrogenism and with regular menstrual cycles were recruited as control. Clinical features, ultrasonographic (ovarian follicle number and volume), hormonal and metabolic parameters were commenced as outcome measures. Among 719 PCOS women, 6.1 % had hirsutism, 13.3 % had acne, 21.1 % had hyperandrogenism, 94.2 % had polycystic ovaries on ultrasonographic examination, and 88.6 % had menstrual abnormality. About one-third of the total PCOS patients were insulin resistant. The most frequent PCOS phenotype is the non-hyperandrogenic phenotype (O + P). Total testosterone, LH/FSH ratio, body mass index (BMI), and Ferriman and Gallwey scores (F-G) were all significantly higher in PCOS groups compared with non-PCOS group. Women with PCOS and obesity had higher serum testosterone, fasting insulin, longer menstrual cycle and larger ovarian follicle number, and LH/FSH ratio, estradiol or ovarian volume were similar between obese and normal BMI women. The LH level was statistically lower in the obese PCOS group. Rotterdam criteria are generally applicable to Chinese population. Chinese women with PCOS showed lower rates of hyperandrogenemia, hirsutism, obesity, and insulin resistance. Obesity aggravates menstrual irregularity and increases the follicle number and serum total testosterone level.

  15. Upregulation of Haploinsufficient Gene Expression in the Brain by Targeting a Long Non-coding RNA Improves Seizure Phenotype in a Model of Dravet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A. There are currently no treatments, but the upregulation of SCN1A healthy allele represents an appealing therapeutic strategy. In this study we identified a novel, evolutionary conserved mechanism controlling the expression of SCN1A that is mediated by an antisense non-coding RNA (SCN1ANAT. Using oligonucleotide-based compounds (AntagoNATs targeting SCN1ANAT we were able to induce specific upregulation of SCN1A both in vitro and in vivo, in the brain of Dravet knock-in mouse model and a non-human primate. AntagoNAT-mediated upregulation of Scn1a in postnatal Dravet mice led to significant improvements in seizure phenotype and excitability of hippocampal interneurons. These results further elucidate the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and outline a possible new approach for the treatment of this and other genetic disorders with similar etiology.

  16. 9q33.3q34.11 microdeletion: new contiguous gene syndrome encompassing STXBP1, LMX1B and ENG genes assessed using reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambot, Sophie; Masurel, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Marle, Nathalie; Thevenon, Julien; Perez-Martin, Stéphanie; Dulieu, Véronique; Huet, Frédéric; Plessis, Ghislaine; Andrieux, Joris; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Billy-Lopez, Gipsy; Coutton, Charles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Heron, Delphine; Rooryck, Caroline; Goldenberg, Alice; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Joly-Hélas, Géraldine; Calenda, Patricia; Kuentz, Paul; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Callier, Patrick; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    The increasing use of array-CGH in malformation syndromes with intellectual disability could lead to the description of new contiguous gene syndrome by the analysis of the gene content of the microdeletion and reverse phenotyping. Thanks to a national and international call for collaboration by Achropuce and Decipher, we recruited four patients carrying de novo overlapping deletions of chromosome 9q33.3q34.11, including the STXBP1, the LMX1B and the ENG genes. We restrained the selection to these three genes because the effects of their haploinsufficency are well described in the literature and easily recognizable clinically. All deletions were detected by array-CGH and confirmed by FISH. The patients display common clinical features, including intellectual disability with epilepsy, owing to the presence of STXBP1 within the deletion, nail dysplasia and bone malformations, in particular patellar abnormalities attributed to LMX1B deletion, epistaxis and cutaneous-mucous telangiectasias explained by ENG haploinsufficiency and common facial dysmorphism. This systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deletion allowed us to identify genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations and complications that require personalized follow-up, in particular for renal, eye, ear, vascular and neurological manifestations.

  17. A single nucleotide variant in the FMR1 CGG repeat results in a "Pseudodeletion" and is not associated with the fragile X syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Massimiliano; Forzano, Francesca; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola; Faravelli, Francesca; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Di Maria, Emilio; Grasso, Marina

    2008-05-01

    The molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome relies on the detection of the pathogenic CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. Deletions and point mutations have occasionally been reported. Rare polymorphisms might mimic a deletion by Southern blot analysis, leading to false-positive results. We describe a novel rare nucleotide substitution within the CGG repeat. The proband was a woman with a positive family history of mental retardation. Southern blot analysis showed an additional band consistent with a deletion in the region detected by the StB12.3 probe. Sequencing of this region revealed a G>C transversion that interrupts the CGG repeat and introduces an EagI site. The same variant was observed in both the healthy son and father of the proband, supporting the hypothesis that the nucleotide substitution is a silent polymorphism, the frequency of which we estimated to be less than 1% in the general population. These findings argue for a pathogenic role of nucleotide variants within the CGG repeat and suggest possible consequences of unexpected findings in the molecular diagnostics of fragile X syndrome. Thus, although the sequence context of a single nucleotide substitution may not predict possible effects on mRNA or protein function, a specific change in the higher order structures of DNA or mRNA may be functionally relevant in the pathological phenotype.

  18. A Single Nucleotide Variant in the FMR1 CGG Repeat Results in a “Pseudodeletion” and Is Not Associated with the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Massimiliano; Forzano, Francesca; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola; Faravelli, Francesca; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Di Maria, Emilio; Grasso, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome relies on the detection of the pathogenic CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. Deletions and point mutations have occasionally been reported. Rare polymorphisms might mimic a deletion by Southern blot analysis, leading to false-positive results. We describe a novel rare nucleotide substitution within the CGG repeat. The proband was a woman with a positive family history of mental retardation. Southern blot analysis showed an additional band consistent with a deletion in the region detected by the StB12.3 probe. Sequencing of this region revealed a G>C transversion that interrupts the CGG repeat and introduces an EagI site. The same variant was observed in both the healthy son and father of the proband, supporting the hypothesis that the nucleotide substitution is a silent polymorphism, the frequency of which we estimated to be less than 1% in the general population. These findings argue for a pathogenic role of nucleotide variants within the CGG repeat and suggest possible consequences of unexpected findings in the molecular diagnostics of fragile X syndrome. Thus, although the sequence context of a single nucleotide substitution may not predict possible effects on mRNA or protein function, a specific change in the higher order structures of DNA or mRNA may be functionally relevant in the pathological phenotype. PMID:18403614

  19. Improvement of the Rett syndrome phenotype in a MeCP2 mouse model upon treatment with levodopa and a dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesna, Karolina; de la Caridad, Olga; Petazzi, Paolo; Soler, Marta; Roa, Laura; Saez, Mauricio A; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora; Artuch-Iriberri, Rafael; Molero-Luis, Marta; Vidal, August; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2014-11-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental autism spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the gene coding for methyl CpG-binding protein (MeCP2). The disease is characterized by abnormal motor, respiratory, cognitive impairment, and autistic-like behaviors. No effective treatment of the disorder is available. Mecp2 knockout mice have a range of physiological and neurological abnormalities that resemble the human syndrome and can be used as a model to interrogate new therapies. Herein, we show that the combined administration of Levodopa and a Dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor in RTT mouse models is well tolerated, diminishes RTT-associated symptoms, and increases life span. The amelioration of RTT symptomatology is particularly significant in those features controlled by the dopaminergic pathway in the nigrostratium, such as mobility, tremor, and breathing. Most important, the improvement of the RTT phenotype upon use of the combined treatment is reflected at the cellular level by the development of neuronal dendritic growth. However, much work is required to extend the duration of the benefit of the described preclinical treatment.

  20. Maternal TLR4 and NOD2 gene variants, pro-inflammatory phenotype and susceptibility to early-onset preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas B van Rijn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered maternal inflammatory responses play a role in the development of preeclampsia and the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP syndrome. We examined whether allelic variants of the innate immune receptors Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2, that impair the inflammatory response to endotoxin, are related to preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We determined five common mutations in TLR4 (D299G and T399I and NOD2 (R702W, G908R and L1007fs in 340 primiparous women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia, of whom 177 women developed HELLP syndrome and in 113 women with a history of only uneventful pregnancies as controls. In addition, we assessed plasma levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor in a subset of 214 women included at least six months after delivery. After adjustment for maternal age and chronic hypertension, attenuating allelic variants of TLR4 were more common in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia than in controls (OR 2.9 [95% CI 1.2-6.7]. Highest frequencies for TLR4 variants were observed in women who developed HELLP syndrome (adjusted OR 4.1 [95% CI 1.7-9.8]. In addition, high levels of interleukin-6 and fibrinogen were associated with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. Combined positivity for any of the TLR4 and NOD2 allelic variants and high levels of interleukin-6 was 6.9-fold more common in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia (95% CI 2.1-23.2 compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an association of common TLR4 and NOD2 gene variants, and pro-inflammatory phenotype with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. These findings suggest involvement of the maternal innate immune system in severe hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

  1. Generation and characterization of two novel mouse models exhibiting the phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome: Apob48-/-Lepob/ob mice devoid of ApoE or Ldlr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J; McCormick, Jocelyn; Helmering, Joan; Kim, Ki Won; Wang, Minghan; Fordstrom, Preston; Kaufman, Stephen A; Lindberg, Richard A; Véniant, Murielle M

    2008-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of disorders including obesity, insulin resistance, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. To date, few animal models have been described to recapitulate the phenotypes of the syndrome. In this study, we generated and characterized two lines of triple-knockout mice that are deficient in either apolipoprotein E (Apoe(-/-)) or low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr(-/-)) and express no leptin (Lep(ob/ob)) or apolipoprotein B-48 but exclusively apolipoprotein B-100 (Apob(100/100)). These two lines are referred to as Apoe triple-knockout-Apoe 3KO (Apoe(-/-)Apob(100/100)Lep(ob/ob)) and Ldlr triple-knockout-Ldlr 3KO (Ldlr(-/-)Apob(100/100)Lep(ob/ob)) mice. Both lines develop obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, only Apoe 3KO mice are hyperglycemic and glucose intolerant and are more obese than Ldlr 3KO mice. To evaluate the utility of these lines as pharmacological models, we treated both with leptin and found that leptin therapy ameliorated most metabolic derangements. Leptin was more effective in improving glucose tolerance in Ldlr 3KO than Apoe 3KO animals. The reduction of plasma cholesterol by leptin in Ldlr 3KO mice can be accounted for by its suppressive effect on food intake. However, in Apoe 3KO mice, leptin further reduced plasma cholesterol independently of its effect on food intake, and this improvement correlated with a smaller plaque lesion area. These effects suggest a direct role of leptin in modulating VLDL levels and, likewise, the lesion areas in VLDL-enriched animals. These two lines of mice represent new models with features of the metabolic syndrome and will be useful in testing therapies targeted for combating the human condition.

  2. The new total Western diet for rodents does not induce an overweight phenotype or alter parameters of metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Stephany P; Hintze, Korry J; Ward, Robert E; Larson, Deanna P; Lefevre, Michael; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents and its macro- and micronutrient components on weight gain and biomarkers of metabolic function in mice compared to a 45% fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet and the standard AIN93G diet. We hypothesized that mice fed the TWD would have increased body fat with indicators of metabolic syndrome similar to mice consuming the DIO diet. As expected, DIO-fed mice acquired a metabolic syndrome phenotype typified by increased energy intake, increased body weight gain, increased fat mass, higher fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and higher plasma leptin relative to the AIN93G diet. Mice fed a macronutrient-modified (MM) diet (with standard vitamin and mineral composition) had a similar response, albeit to a lesser degree than mice fed the DIO diet. Mice fed a vitamin- and mineral-modified diet (with standard macronutrient composition) were not different from mice fed the AIN93G diet. Surprisingly, the TWD (with modified macronutrients, vitamins and minerals) did not significantly affect any of these parameters, despite the fact that the TWD macronutrient profile was identical to the MM diet. These data suggest that, in the context of the TWD, vitamin and mineral intakes in mice that reflect a Western dietary pattern inhibit the hyperphagia and resulting increased weight gain associated with the higher fat content of the TWD. In conclusion, these observations underscore the need to consider the influence of micronutrient intakes in pre-clinical models of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  3. Developmental phenotype in Phelan-McDermid (22q13.3 deletion) syndrome: a systematic and prospective study in 34 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Renée J; Ruiter, Selma A J; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Flapper, Boudien C T; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A

    2016-01-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS) or 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay, cognitive deficits, and behaviour in the autism spectrum. Knowledge about developmental and behavioural characteristics of this rare chromosomal disorder is still limited despite a rapid growing number of diagnoses. Our aim was to study a new and relatively large cohort to further characterize the developmental phenotype of children with PMS. We performed a descriptive study of children with a 22q13.3 deletion including SHANK3, aged 8 to 178 months, who were systematically (n = 34) and longitudinally (n = 29) assessed with standardized instruments: Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition; Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, third edition; and Vineland Screener for Social and Adaptive Behavior. Maximal developmental functioning ranged from 34 to 52 months depending on the developmental domain. In general, children performed poorest in the domain of language and best on the domain of motor (young children) or cognitive development (older children). At the individual level, 25 % scored better for receptive and 18 % for expressive language, whereas 22 % scored better for fine and 33 % for gross motor function. Developmental quotients were higher in younger children and decreased with age for all developmental domains, with 38 % of the children showing no improvement of cognitive developmental functioning. Almost all children (33/34) had significant deficits in adaptive behaviour. Children with very small deletions, covering only the SHANK3, ACR, and RABL2B genes, had a more favourable developmental phenotype. Cognitive, motor, and especially language development were significantly impaired in all children with PMS but also highly variable and unpredictable. In addition, deficits in adaptive behaviour further hampered their cognitive development. Therefore, cognitive and behavioural characteristics should be

  4. Membrane frizzled-related protein gene–related ophthalmological syndrome: 30-month follow-up of a sporadic case and review of genotype-phenotype correlation in the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaci, Rosachiara; Zenteno, Juan C.; Casubolo, Cristina; Delfini, Elisabetta; Macaluso, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report a new sporadic case of membrane frizzled-related protein gene (MFRP)-related syndrome with a 30-month follow-up, and to review the literature for genotype-phenotype correlation in MFRP mutations. Methods A complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed at presentation and 30 months later, including best-corrected visual acuity test, slit lamp examination, fundoscopy, kinetic perimetry, electroretinography, fundus imaging (color, red-free, and autofluorescence), and morphologic-biometric analysis of the eye structures with an optical biometer, anterior-segment optical coherence tomography, retinal optical coherence tomography, and a confocal scanning laser for optic nerve head study. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes and nucleotide sequencing of the complete MFRP gene were performed. The literature on cases of posterior microphthalmos and retinitis pigmentosa associated with MFRP mutations was reviewed. Results A 33-year-old female patient presented with posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa with patches of retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and scarce pigment mobilization, foveoschisis, and optic nerve drusen. After 30 months, progression of rod-cone retinal degeneration was detected. One obligate carrier showed a normal eye phenotype. A homozygote mutation in the MFRP gene (c.492delC), predicting a truncated protein (P166fsX190), was identified with genetic analysis. To our knowledge, 17 cases of MFRP-related syndrome have been reported in the literature, including the patient described herein. The phenotype of the syndrome, expressivity, and age of onset varied among and within the affected families. However, all patients sharing homozygous mutation c.492delC (alternatively named c.498delC) showed a complete phenotype (including foveoschisis and optic nerve head drusen), and similar fundus characteristics. Conclusions A new sporadic case of MFRP-related syndrome is reported

  5. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Phenotypes of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Real de Asua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the confluence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerotic damage and cardiovascular events remain extremely rare in adults with Down syndrome (DS. We aim to determine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders in an adult cohort with DS and to compare our findings with adults without DS.MethodsCross-sectional study of 51 consecutively selected adults with DS living in the community and 51 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Madrid, Spain. Epidemiological data (age and gender, anthropometric data (body mass index and waist-to-height ratio, coexisting clinical conditions, and laboratory data (fasting glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, creatinine, thyroid hormones, vitamins, and lipid profile were measured and compared between the groups.ResultsAdults with DS were significantly younger and more often men with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than controls. Their waist-to-height ratio was higher, and they more frequently had abdominal obesity. The results of an analysis adjusted for age and gender revealed no differences in fasting insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment indexes, or lipid profile between adults with DS and controls.ConclusionAdults with DS presented a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. However, we found no differences in lipid profile, prevalence of insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome between adults with DS and controls.

  6. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Skauli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant.

  7. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome: A New Phenotype within the Spectrum of Smoking-Related Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Portillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE is a recently defined syndrome, in which centrilobular and/or paraseptal emphysemas in upper lung zones coexist with pulmonary fibrosis in lower lobes in individuals. These patients have a characteristic lung function profile, with unexpected subnormal dynamic and static lung volumes, contrasting with a significant reduction of carbon monoxide transfer (DLco and exercise hypoxemia. Pulmonary hypertension is highly prevalent in CPFE and is the leading determinant of death. Tobacco smoking has been proposed as the main factor in its etiology, though the pathophysiology and its natural history remain to be determined. High-resolution computed axial tomography is the mandatory tool to confirm the diagnosis. Currently, there is no consensus about its treatment since those published to date on this issue are limited to well-characterised series of cases; hence, a better understanding of this entity may help in the development of future therapeutic approaches.

  8. Similarities in the phenotype of the auditory neural substrate in children with Asperger syndrome and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Verkasalo, E; Kujala, T; Jussila, K; Mattila, M L; Moilanen, I; Näätänen, R; Suominen, K; Korpilahti, P

    2005-08-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder of brain function characterized by deficits in social interaction including difficulties in understanding emotional expressions. Children with AS share some of the behavioural characteristics with their parents and AS seems to run particularly in the male members of the same families. The aim of the present study was to determine whether similarities could be found between children with AS and their parents at central auditory processing. It was found that in children with AS the sound encoding, as reflected by the exogenous components of event-related potentials, was similarly abnormal as in both their mothers and fathers. However, their abnormal cortical auditory discrimination, as indexed by the prolonged latency of the mismatch negativity, resembled that of their fathers but not that of their mothers. The present results suggest that complex genetic mechanisms may contribute to auditory abnormalities encountered in children with AS.

  9. Mutations in a guanylate cyclase GCY-35/GCY-36 modify Bardet-Biedl syndrome-associated phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin A Mok

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are pleiotropic and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defective development and function of the primary cilium. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS proteins localize to the base of cilia and undergo intraflagellar transport, and the loss of their functions leads to a multisystemic ciliopathy. Here we report the identification of mutations in guanylate cyclases (GCYs as modifiers of Caenorhabditis elegans bbs endophenotypes. The loss of GCY-35 or GCY-36 results in suppression of the small body size, developmental delay, and exploration defects exhibited by multiple bbs mutants. Moreover, an effector of cGMP signalling, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, EGL-4, also modifies bbs mutant defects. We propose that a misregulation of cGMP signalling, which underlies developmental and some behavioural defects of C. elegans bbs mutants, may also contribute to some BBS features in other organisms.

  10. Loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations cause a phenotypic spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like features, ocular hypertelorism, large fontanelle and X-linked inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Frank J.; Ansari, Morad; Braunholz, Diana; Concepción Gil-Rodríguez, María; Decroos, Christophe; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Fincher, Christopher T.; Kaur, Maninder; Bando, Masashige; Amor, David J.; Atwal, Paldeep S.; Bahlo, Melanie; Bowman, Christine M.; Bradley, Jacquelyn J.; Brunner, Han G.; Clark, Dinah; Del Campo, Miguel; Di Donato, Nataliya; Diakumis, Peter; Dubbs, Holly; Dyment, David A.; Eckhold, Juliane; Ernst, Sarah; Ferreira, Jose C.; Francey, Lauren J.; Gehlken, Ulrike; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hall, Bryan D.; Hennekam, Raoul; Hudgins, Louanne; Hullings, Melanie; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Yntema, Helger; Innes, A. Micheil; Kline, Antonie D.; Krumina, Zita; Lee, Hane; Leppig, Kathleen; Lynch, Sally Ann; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Mannini, Linda; Mckee, Shane; Mehta, Sarju G.; Micule, Ieva; Mohammed, Shehla; Moran, Ellen; Mortier, Geert R.; Moser, Joe-Ann S.; Noon, Sarah E.; Nozaki, Naohito; Nunes, Luis; Pappas, John G.; Penney, Lynette S.; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Petersen, Michael B.; Puisac, Beatriz; Revencu, Nicole; Roeder, Elizabeth; Saitta, Sulagna; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Schindeler, Karen L.; Siu, Victoria M.; Stark, Zornitza; Strom, Samuel P.; Thiese, Heidi; Vater, Inga; Willems, Patrick; Williamson, Kathleen; Wilson, Louise C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Wierzba, Jolanta; Musio, Antonio; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Pié, Juan; Christianson, David W.; Krantz, Ian D.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL, encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for >80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ∼5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutations in the X-linked gene HDAC8 as the cause of a small number of CdLS cases. Here, we report a cohort of 38 individuals with an emerging spectrum of features caused by HDAC8 mutations. For several individuals, the diagnosis of CdLS was not considered prior to genomic testing. Most mutations identified are missense and de novo. Many cases are heterozygous females, each with marked skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood DNA. We also identified eight hemizygous males who are more severely affected. The craniofacial appearance caused by HDAC8 mutations overlaps that of typical CdLS but often displays delayed anterior fontanelle closure, ocular hypertelorism, hooding of the eyelids, a broader nose and dental anomalies, which may be useful discriminating features. HDAC8 encodes the lysine deacetylase for the cohesin subunit SMC3 and analysis of the functional consequences of the missense mutations indicates that all cause a loss of enzymatic function. These data demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in HDAC8 cause a range of overlapping human developmental phenotypes, including a phenotypically distinct subgroup of CdLS. PMID:24403048

  11. Síndrome de Aarskog: hallazgos fenotípicos en una cohorte de pacientes Aarskog syndrome: phenotypic findings in a cohort of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Hernández García

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los hallazgos fenotípicos de 7 pacientes diagnosticados de síndrome de Aarskog en el servicio de Genética del Hospital Pediátrico Docente «William Soler». Las características fenotípicas que estuvieron presentes en todos los pacientes fueron el pico de viuda, las extremidades cortas y la braquidactilia. Les siguieron en orden de frecuencia (85 % la nariz pequeña, el puente nasal ancho y el filtrum largo y ancho. Otras dismorfias faciales encontradas (71 % fueron la frente amplia, las narinas antevertidas, el hipertelorismo, el cuello corto y el surco simiano. Se discute la posibilidad de que exista algún sesgo de detección debido a que el examinador presta mayor atención a la cara que a otros segmentos corporales. La criptorquidia, que distingue y da nombre al síndrome, se encontró en un porcentaje menor de individuos (60 %. En dos casos se encontró hipoplasia renal, hallazgo ocasional en la literatura consultada. En ningún caso se constató retraso mental. Las diferencias fenotípicas halladas pudieran atribuirse a las diferencias moleculares reportadas en la literatura.The phenotypic fndings of 7 patients who were diagnosed Aarskog syndrome in the Service of Genetics of «William Soler» Pediatric Teaching Hospital were presented. The phenotypic characteristics appearing in all patients were widow's peak, short extremities and brachydactilia. They were followed in order of frequency (85 % by small nose, wide nasal bridge and long and wide filtrum. Other facial dismorphies (71 % were wide forehead, anteverted narines, hypertelorism, short neck and simian crease. It is discussed the possibility that there is some bias of detection due to the fact that the examiner pays more attention to the face than to other body segments. Criptorchydia, that distinguishes and gives name to the syndrome, was found in a lower percent of individuals (60 %. Renal hypoplasia, an occasional finding in the consulted literature, was

  12. Clinical phenotype study of Prader-Willi syndrome in 13 neonates%新生儿Prader-Willi综合征13例临床表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹实娜; 何玺玉; 王春枝; 杨尧; 王艳; 吴虹林; 李昊

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析Prader-Willi综合征(PWS)新生儿期的临床表现,为临床早期筛选及进一步行分子诊断提供帮助.方法 回顾性分析2009年8月至2011年8月在北京军区总医院附属八一儿童医院依据MS-PCR和MS-MLPA方法确诊为PWS患儿的诊断、分型和临床表型资料,分析中国PWS新生儿期典型特征.结果 13例PWS进入分析,男9例,女4例,确诊年龄4~28 d.足月儿10例,早产儿2例,过期产儿1例.孕母高龄9例(69.2%),羊水污染8例(61.5%),羊水过多3例(23.1%),胎膜早破5例(38.5%),异常胎位4例(30.8%),宫内窘迫9例(69.2%).9例为父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失致病,4例为母源性同源二倍体.4例母源性同源二倍体患儿均可见中枢性肌张力低下和皮肤色素减退,吸吮缓慢2例(50.0%)、哭声微弱3例(75.0%)、男性隐睾1例(25.0%)、女性小阴唇3例(75.0%);均未见特殊面容和唾液黏稠,均不需特殊喂养.9例父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失患儿均可见中枢性肌张力低下、皮肤色素减退和哭声微弱,吸吮缓慢2例(22.2%)、需特殊喂养7例(77.8%)、特殊面容5例(55.6%)、男性隐睾7例(77.8%)、阴茎短小4例(44.4%)、女性小阴唇1例(11.1%)、唾液黏稠5例(55.6%).结论 母源性同源二倍体患儿的特殊面容和男性生殖器发育不全的发生率低于父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失患儿.新生儿期皮肤色素减退及中枢性肌张力低下是中国PWS新生儿普遍存在的特征,可作为进一步行PWS分子诊断的初步筛选指标.%Objective To summarize the clinical phenotype charateristics of Prader-Willi syndrome in neonates for screening earlier and making further molecular genetic diagnosis for appropriate patients. Methods The data from thirteen Prader-Willi syndrome neonates that had been definitely diagnosed with molecular biological methods from August 2009 to August 2011 were collected retrospectively. For each patient, the presence or absence of the major and minor features

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and CdLS-like phenotypes with observed and predicted levels of mosaicism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Morad; Poke, Gemma; Ferry, Quentin; Williamson, Kathleen; Aldridge, Roland; Meynert, Alison M; Bengani, Hemant; Chan, Cheng Yee; Kayserili, Hülya; Avci, Şahin; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Lampe, Anne K; Redeker, Egbert; Homfray, Tessa; Ross, Alison; Falkenberg Smeland, Marie; Mansour, Sahar; Parker, Michael J; Cook, Jacqueline A; Splitt, Miranda; Fisher, Richard B; Fryer, Alan; Magee, Alex C; Wilkie, Andrew; Barnicoat, Angela; Brady, Angela F; Cooper, Nicola S; Mercer, Catherine; Deshpande, Charu; Bennett, Christopher P; Pilz, Daniela T; Ruddy, Deborah; Cilliers, Deirdre; Johnson, Diana S; Josifova, Dragana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Wakeling, Emma; Kinning, Esther; Stewart, Fiona; Flinter, Frances; Girisha, Katta M; Cox, Helen; Firth, Helen V; Kingston, Helen; Wee, Jamie S; Hurst, Jane A; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Tolmie, John; Vogt, Julie; Tatton–Brown, Katrina; Chandler, Kate; Prescott, Katrina; Wilson, Louise; Behnam, Mahdiyeh; McEntagart, Meriel; Davidson, Rosemarie; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Mehta, Sarju G; McKee, Shane A; Mohammed, Shehla; Holden, Simon; Park, Soo-Mi; Holder, Susan E; Harrison, Victoria; McConnell, Vivienne; Lam, Wayne K; Green, Andrew J; Donnai, Dian; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Donnelly, Deirdre E; Nellåker, Christoffer; Taylor, Martin S; FitzPatrick, David R

    2014-01-01

    Background Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem disorder with distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and growth failure as prominent features. Most individuals with typical CdLS have de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in NIPBL with mosaic individuals representing a significant proportion. Mutations in other cohesin components, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 and RAD21 cause less typical CdLS. Methods We screened 163 affected individuals for coding region mutations in the known genes, 90 for genomic rearrangements, 19 for deep intronic variants in NIPBL and 5 had whole-exome sequencing. Results Pathogenic mutations [including mosaic changes] were identified in: NIPBL 46 [3] (28.2%); SMC1A 5 [1] (3.1%); SMC3 5 [1] (3.1%); HDAC8 6 [0] (3.6%) and RAD21 1 [0] (0.6%). One individual had a de novo 1.3 Mb deletion of 1p36.3. Another had a 520 kb duplication of 12q13.13 encompassing ESPL1, encoding separase, an enzyme that cleaves the cohesin ring. Three de novo mutations were identified in ANKRD11 demonstrating a phenotypic overlap with KBG syndrome. To estimate the number of undetected mosaic cases we used recursive partitioning to identify discriminating features in the NIPBL-positive subgroup. Filtering of the mutation-negative group on these features classified at least 18% as ‘NIPBL-like’. A computer composition of the average face of this NIPBL-like subgroup was also more typical in appearance than that of all others in the mutation-negative group supporting the existence of undetected mosaic cases. Conclusions Future diagnostic testing in ‘mutation-negative’ CdLS thus merits deeper sequencing of multiple DNA samples derived from different tissues. PMID:25125236

  14. Opposing effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and free testosterone on metabolic phenotype in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Schwetz, Verena; Giuliani, Albrecht; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    To study the association of adrenal and ovarian androgen levels with metabolic parameters in a large cohort of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinic of an academic hospital. Six hundred twenty-two women with PCOS. None. Analysis of the association of endocrine dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and free testosterone (FT) parameters with metabolic measurements. In multivariate adjusted logistic regression analyses, the odds ratio (OR) for insulin resistance was statistically significantly higher (4.42, range: 2.26-8.67) for women with PCOS who had elevated FT levels compared with the women with normal DHEAS and FT levels (reference group). We found no statistically significant differences when women with PCOS with elevated DHEAS or a combined elevation of DHEAS and FT levels were compared with the reference group. Women with PCOS and a high DHEAS/FT ratio had a more beneficial metabolic profile compared with the women with a low DHEAS/FT ratio. In multivariate adjusted binary logistic regression analyses, we found a statistically significantly lower risk for insulin resistance in the women with PCOS in the highest DHEAS/FT-ratio quartile compared with women with PCOS in the lowest quartile (OR 0.35, range: 0.14-0.89). Our results suggest that the distinction between adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism is important when evaluating metabolic risk in PCOS. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The co-occurrence of Hashimoto thyroiditis in primary Sjogren's syndrome defines a subset of patients with milder clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramaschi, Paola; Biasi, Domenico; Caimmi, Cristian; Scambi, Cinzia; Pieropan, Sara; Barausse, Giovanni; Adami, Silvano

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate in a cohort of 100 consecutive patients affected by primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) the incidence of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and to compare the clinical features and the laboratory parameters of patients affected by pSS with and without concomitant HT. In 100 consecutive patients affected by pSS, the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases was recorded and a full examination of thyroid function obtained. HT was associated with pSS in 27 cases. The comparison between pSS cases with and without HT showed that only patients with isolated pSS had low C4 level [p = 0.032, OR (IC 95 %) 230 (13.13-4,046)]. In addition, only patients affected by pSS without HT had evidence of cryoglobulins, cutaneous vasculitis with palpable purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and development of lymphoma, although all these manifestations were observed in a 4.1-8.2 % of the cases, without reaching statistical significance. The association of HT in patients suffering from pSS defines a subset of patients with milder disease and normal C4 levels.

  16. Applicability of genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome and the correlation between language difficulties and disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Li, Y T; Hou, M

    2016-06-17

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a defect in the expression of the maternally inherited ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene in chromosome 15. The most common genetic defects include maternal deletions in chromosome 15q11-13; however, paternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defects allow for the identification of mutations in UBE3A in 10% of patients with AS. The aim of this study was to validate the clinical features and genetic polymorphisms of AS, and to discuss the relationship between functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Six children with AS (mean age = 32.57 months) presenting characteristic behavioral patterns of AS (frequent laughter and happy demeanor, hand flapping, and hypermotor behavior) were recruited to this study. The patients underwent a clinical evaluation (clinical history, dysmorphological and neurological examinations, and psychological evaluations) and paraclinical investigations [genetic tests (fluorescence in situ hybridization and methylation polymerase chain reaction), electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging]. We conclude that AS diagnosis cannot rely solely on genetic testing for polymorphisms in UBE3A and must consider its clinical characteristics. Moreover, functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found to be closely correlated. Therefore, UBE3A gene mutation analysis combined with comprehensive clinical evaluations may be suitable for the diagnosis of AS.

  17. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue......, and whole blood (WB), from 29 MetS cases and 44 controls. Co-expression network analysis for each tissue independently identified nine, six, and zero MetS-associated modules of coexpressed genes in ABD, GLU, and WB, respectively. Of 8,992 probesets expressed in ABD or GLU, 685 (7.6%) were expressed in ABD...... and 51 (0.6%) in GLU only. Differential eigengene network analysis of 8,256 shared probesets detected 22 shared modules with high preservation across adipose depots (D(ABD-GLU) = 0.89), seven of which were associated with MetS (FDR P100,000 individuals; rs10282458, affecting expression of RARRES2...

  18. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions.

  19. Elevation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 level in Pallister-Killian syndrome: implications for the postnatal growth retardation phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Kellogg, Emily; Fujiki, Katsunori; Kaur, Maninder; Tilton, Richard K; Noon, Sarah; Wilkens, Alisha; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D

    2015-06-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a multi-system developmental disorder caused by tetrasomy 12p that exhibits tissue-limited mosaicism. Probands with PKS often demonstrate a unique growth profile consisting of macrosomia at birth with deceleration of growth postnatally. We have previously demonstrated that cultured skin fibroblasts from PKS probands have significantly elevated expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP2). To further evaluate the role of IGFBP2 in PKS, the amount of IGFBP2 secreted from cultured skin fibroblast cell lines and serum IGFBP2 levels were measured in probands with PKS. Approximately 60% of PKS fibroblast cell lines secreted higher levels of IGFBP2 compared to control fibroblasts, although the remaining 40% of PKS samples produced comparable level of IGFBP2 to that of control fibroblasts. Serum IGFBP2 levels were also measured in PKS probands and were elevated in 40% of PKS probands. PKS probands with elevated IGFBP2 manifested with severe postnatal growth retardation. IGFBPs are the family of related proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and are typically thought to attenuate IGF action. We suggest that elevated IGFBP2 levels might play a role in the growth retardation phenotype of PKS.

  20. Activation of p53 in Down Syndrome and in the Ts65Dn Mouse Brain is Associated with a Pro-Apoptotic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramutola, Antonella; Pupo, Gilda; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Andrea; Lanzillotta, Chiara; Broekaart, Diede; Blarzino, Carla; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, resulting from trisomy of chromosome 21. The main feature of DS neuropathology includes early onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with deposition of senile plaques and tangles. We hypothesized that apoptosis may be activated in the presence of AD neuropathology in DS, thus we measured proteins associated with upstream and downstream pathways of p53 in the frontal cortex from DS cases with and without AD pathology and from Ts65Dn mice, at different ages. We observed increased acetylation and phosphorylation of p53, coupled to reduced MDM2/p53 complex level and lower levels of SIRT1. Activation of p53 was associated with a number of targets (BAX, PARP1, caspase-3, p21, heat shock proteins, and PGC1α) that were modulated in both DS and DS/AD compared with age-matched controls. In particular, the most relevant changes (increased p-p53 and acetyl-p53 and reduced formation of MDM2/p53 complex) were found to be modified only in the presence of AD pathology in DS. In addition, a similar pattern of alterations in the p53 pathway was found in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest that p53 may integrate different signals, which can result in a pro-apoptotic-phenotype contributing to AD neuropathology in people with DS.

  1. The role of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in immune phenotype and Th1/Th2 balance of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinling; Wei, Shu; Liu, Lixia; Shan, Fengping; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response of dendritic cells derived from monocytes (Mo-DCs) in the porcine peripheral blood following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Viral load assays indicated that PRRSV efficiently infected Mo-DCs but failed to replicate, whereas PRRSV infection of Mo-DCs decreased the expression of SLA-I, SLA-II, CD80 and CD40 compared with those of mock Mo-DCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the cytokine profiles using quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Results indicated apparent changes in IL-10 and IL-12 p40 expression but not in IFN-γ and TNF-α among Mo-DCs infected with PRRSV and uninfected Mo-DCs. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis of the altered Mo-DCs together with IL-4 and GM-CSF induction for 7days revealed the typical morphology and phenotype with 91.73% purity before infection with PRRSV. Overall, our data demonstrate that PRRSV impaired the normal antigen presentation of Mo-DCs and led to inadequate adaptive immune response by down-regulating the expression of SLA-I,SLA-II, CD80 and CD40. Enhanced Th2 -type cytokine IL-10 secretion and reduced Th1-type cytokines IL-12p40,IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion results in Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  2. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.

  3. The -413C > G substitution in the promoter of the FMR1 gene is not associated with the fragile X syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marina; Cecconi, Massimiliano; Boni, Stefania; Forzano, Francesca; Barbaresi, Maurizio; Memo, Luigi; Perroni, Lucia; Faravelli, Francesca; Di Maria, Emilio

    2010-04-01

    Most common inherited form of intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome is associated to an expansion of greater than 200 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome which causes transcriptional silencing and deficiency of the encoded protein FMRP. Molecular diagnosis is performed through a combination of PCR to identify fewer than 100-150 repeats and of Southern blot analysis to identify longer alleles and the methylation status of the FMR1 promoter. We present a family with one patient with mild mental retardation who showed an atypical profile at Southern analysis due to the -413C > G transversion located in the FMR1 promoter which had been described as possibly associated with mental retardation. We demonstrated this variant in other four family members along three generations, including the maternal grandfather who did not manifest any pathological feature. Though the -413C > G substitution was not found in a large control series, these findings allowed to exclude its role in determining the disease phenotype.

  4. Increased expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in Tourette syndrome: The key to understand the genetics of comorbid phenotypes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Becker, P.J. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)

    1996-02-16

    In a comparison of 80 common aphidicolin-induced fragile sites (FS) between 26 DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) and 24 control individuals, the mean of the summed break frequencies following mild aphidicolin pretreatment was significantly higher in TS individuals than in controls (P < 0.001). Other breakpoints encountered during this study, i.e., random breaks, breaks corresponding to rare FS, and breakpoints recorded by others but not listed as common FS according to the Chromosome Coordinating Meeting were listed as category II breakpoints. By using the most significantly different mean FS breakage figures between TS and control individuals, further stepwise discriminant analysis allowed identification of TS individuals from only a few sites in both the common FS and category II breakpoint groups. Future research needs to focus on confirmation of altered common fragile site expression in association with behavioral variation, whether expression of certain discriminatory sites concurs with specific comorbid disorder expression; the nature of the molecular alterations at these FS and the implications of a genomic instability phenotype for the mapping of a primary TS gene or genes. 45 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and characterization of the reciprocal microduplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Christopher A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial deletions of 3q29 have been