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Sample records for kainate receptors ka-rs

  1. Kainate induces various domain closures in AMPA and kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Frydenvang, Karla; Hald, Helle

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are key players in fast excitatory synaptic transmission within the central nervous system. These receptors have been divided into three subfamilies: the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate...... receptors. Kainate has previously been crystallized with the ligand binding domain (LBD) of AMPA receptors (GluA2 and GluA4) and kainate receptors (GluK1 and GluK2). Here, we report the structures of the kainate receptor GluK3 LBD in complex with kainate and GluK1 LBD in complex with kainate in the absence...... in the three kainate receptors, which is in contrast to the AMPA receptors where similar contacts are seen. It was revealed by patch clamp electrophysiology studies that kainate is a partial agonist at GluK1 with 36% efficacy compared to glutamate, which is in between the published efficacies of kainate at Glu...

  2. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2017-01-01

    synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor...... structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full...

  3. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

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    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  4. Kainate receptor modulation by sodium and chloride.

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    Plested, Andrew J R

    2011-01-01

    The kainate-type glutamate receptor displays strong modulation by monovalent anions and cations. This modulation is independent of permeation of the ion channel. Instead, structural, computational and biophysical evidence shows that receptor activity is controlled by binding of sodium and chloride ions at sites that stabilize active dimers of glutamate binding domains. Modulation by monovalent ions is a surprisingly general property across ion channel families. However, evidence of a physiological role for ion-dependent effects on glutamate receptors is lacking, perhaps reflecting the adventitious use of ions as structural components of the kainate receptor. "ergo, Hercules, vita humanior sine sale non quit degree […]" "Heaven known, a civilized life is impossible without salt" -Pliny the Elder, Natural History XXXI 88.

  5. Kainate receptors: multiple roles in neuronal plasticity.

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    Sihra, Talvinder S; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)- and AMPA-type, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors have been extensively invoked in plasticity. Until relatively recently, however, kainate-type receptors (KARs) had been the most elusive to study because of the lack of appropriate pharmacological tools to specifically address their roles. With the development of selective glutamate receptor antagonists, and knockout mice with specific KAR subunits deleted, the functions of KARs in neuromodulation and synaptic transmission, together with their involvement in some types of plasticity, have been extensively probed in the central nervous system. In this review, we summarize the findings related to the roles of KARs in short- and long-term forms of plasticity, primarily in the hippocampus, where KAR function and synaptic plasticity have received avid attention.

  6. Functional diversity and developmental changes in rat neuronal kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, T J; Huettner, J E

    2001-04-15

    1. Whole-cell currents evoked by kainate and the GluR5-selective agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tertbutylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA) were used to compare the physiological properties of kainate receptors expressed by neurons from rat hippocampus, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. 2. In contrast to kainate, which evoked desensitizing currents with similar decay rates and steady-state components in all three cell types, responses to ATPA were distinctly different in the three cell populations. Currents evoked by ATPA displayed a significant steady-state component in hippocampal neurons, but decayed rapidly to baseline in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. ATPA failed to evoke current in many of the spinal neurons. 3. ATPA caused steady-state desensitization in DRG cells with an IC50 of 41 nM. Recovery from desensitization of DRG cell receptors by ATPA was significantly slower than for any previously described agonist. In contrast, hippocampal kainate receptors recovered from desensitization by ATPA within a few seconds. 4. Half-maximal activation of kainate receptors in hippocampal neurons required 938 nM ATPA. In DRG cells treated with concanavalin A the EC50 for ATPA was 341 nM. ATPA evoked current in embryonic hippocampal neurons but with lower amplitude relative to kainate than in cultured postnatal neurons. 5. Collectively, these results highlight functional differences between neuronal kainate receptors that may reflect their distinct subunit composition and their diverse roles in synaptic transmission.

  7. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  8. Neto2 influences on kainate receptor pharmacology and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Liwei; Howe, James; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Neuropilin tolloid-like protein 2 (Neto2) is an auxiliary subunit of kainate receptors (KARs). It specifically regulates KARs, e.g., slows desensitization and deactivation, increases the rate of recovery from desensitization, promotes modal gating and increases agonist sensitivity. Although...

  9. 3-Substituted phenylalanines as selective AMPA- and kainate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymanska, Ewa; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of X-ray structures of ionotropic glutamate receptor constructs in complex with amino acid-based AMPA and kainate receptor antagonists, a series of rigid as well as flexible biaromatic alanine derivatives carrying selected hydrogen bond acceptors and donors have been synthesized...... in order to investigate the structural determinants for receptor selectivity between AMPA and the GluR5 subtype of kainate receptors. Compounds selective for either GluR5 or AMPA receptors were identified. One particular substituent position appeared to be of special importance for control of ligand...... selectivity. Using molecular modeling the observed structure-activity relationships at AMPA and GluR5 receptors were deduced....

  10. Presynaptic inhibition by kainate receptors converges mechanistically with presynaptic inhibition by adenosine and GABAB receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi, Dara; Frerking, Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Kainate receptors are widely reported to regulate the release of neurotransmitter in the CNS, but the mechanisms involved remain controversial. Previous studies have found that the kainate receptor agonist ATPA, which selectively activates Glu(K5)-containing kainate receptors, depresses glutamate release at Schaffer-collateral synapses in the hippocampus. In the present study, we provide pharmacological evidence that this depressant effect is mediated by Glu(K5)-containing heteromers, but is distinct from a similar depressant effect engaged by the kainate receptor agonist domoate. The depressant effect of ATPA is insensitive to antagonists for GABA(A), GABA(B), and adenosine receptors, and is also unaffected by lowering the release probability by reducing extracellular calcium. However, the effect of ATPA is partly occluded by prior activation of GABA(B) receptors and completely occluded by prior activation of adenosine receptors, suggesting a mechanistic convergence of heteromeric Glu(K5) kainate receptor signaling with GABA(B) receptors and adenosine receptors. The effects of domoate are partially occluded by both adenosine and GABA(B) receptor agonists, indicating at least a partial convergence of Glu(K5)-lacking kainate receptor signaling with these other pathways. The depressant effect of ATPA is not blocked by inhibition of serine/threonine protein kinases. These results suggest that ATPA and domoate inhibit glutamate release through mechanisms that converge with those of classical metabotropic receptor agonists, although they do so through different receptors.

  11. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  12. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

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    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  13. Role of GluK1 kainate receptors in seizures, epileptic discharges, and epileptogenesis.

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    Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine; Gasior, Maciej; Kaminski, Rafal M; Rogawski, Michael A

    2014-04-23

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit have an impact on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain regions, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are relevant to seizures and epilepsy. Here we used 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a potent and selective agonist of kainate receptors that include the GluK1 subunit, in conjunction with mice deficient in GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits to assess the role of GluK1 kainate receptors in provoking seizures and in kindling epileptogenesis. We found that systemic ATPA, acting specifically via GluK1 kainate receptors, causes locomotor arrest and forelimb extension (a unique behavioral characteristic of GluK1 activation) and induces myoclonic behavioral seizures and electrographic seizure discharges in the BLA and hippocampus. In contrast, the proconvulsant activity of systemic AMPA, kainate, and pentylenetetrazol is not mediated by GluK1 kainate receptors, and deletion of these receptors does not elevate the threshold for seizures in the 6 Hz model. ATPA also specifically activates epileptiform discharges in BLA slices in vitro via GluK1 kainate receptors. Olfactory bulb kindling developed similarly in wild-type, GluK1, and GluK2 knock-out mice, demonstrating that GluK1 kainate receptors are not required for epileptogenesis or seizure expression in this model. We conclude that selective activation of kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit can trigger seizures, but these receptors are not necessary for seizure generation in models commonly used to identify therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy.

  14. Role of desensitization and subunit expression for kainate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in murine neocortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S

    1999-01-01

    ) toxicity mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors, and (3) toxicity that can be mediated by kainate receptors when desensitization of the receptors is blocked. The indirect action at NMDA receptors was discovered because (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H...... nedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine (GYKI 53655), a selective AMPA receptor antagonist, abolished the remaining toxicity. These results indicated that kainate- and domoate-mediated toxicity involves both the NMDA and the AMPA receptors. Pretreatment of the cultures with concanavalin A to prevent desensitization...

  15. Topiramate selectively protects against seizures induced by ATPA, a GluR5 kainate receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Rafal M; Banerjee, Madhumita; Rogawski, Michael A

    2004-06-01

    Although the mechanism of action of topiramate is not fully understood, its anticonvulsant properties may result, at least in part, from an interaction with AMPA/kainate receptors. We have recently shown that topiramate selectively inhibits postsynaptic responses mediated by GluR5 kainate receptors. To determine if this action of topiramate is relevant to the anticonvulsant effects of the drug in vivo, we determined the protective activity of topiramate against seizures induced by intravenous infusion of various ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists in mice. Topiramate (25-100 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent elevation in the threshold for clonic seizures induced by infusion of ATPA, a selective agonist of GluR5 kainate receptors. Topiramate was less effective in protecting against clonic seizures induced by kainate, a mixed agonist of AMPA and kainate receptors. Topiramate did not affect clonic seizures induced by AMPA or NMDA. In contrast, the thresholds for tonic seizures induced by higher doses of these various glutamate receptor agonists were all elevated by topiramate. Unlike topiramate, carbamazepine elevated the threshold for AMPA- but not ATPA-induced clonic seizures. Our results are consistent with the possibility that the effects of topiramate on clonic seizure activity are due to functional blockade of GluR5 kainate receptors. Protection from tonic seizures may be mediated by other actions of the drug. Together with our in vitro cellular electrophysiological results, the present observations strongly support a unique mechanism of action of topiramate, which involves GluR5 kainate receptors.

  16. Stereostructure-activity studies on agonists at the AMPA and kainate subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors

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    Johansen, Tommy N; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2003-01-01

    -methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subtype of ionotropic Glu receptors in the presence or absence of an agonist has provided important information about ligand-receptor interaction mechanisms. The availability of these binding domain crystal structures has formed the basis for rational...... design of ligands, especially for the AMPA and kainate subtypes of ionotropic Glu receptors. This mini-review will focus on structure-activity relationships on AMPA and kainate receptor agonists with special emphasis on stereochemical and three-dimensional aspects....

  17. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

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    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  18. [3H]ATPA: a high affinity ligand for GluR5 kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, K; Legutko, B; Rizkalla, G; Deverill, M; Hawes, C R; Ellis, G J; Stensbol, T B; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Skolnick, P; Bleakman, D

    1999-12-01

    The pharmacological properties of [3H]ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid) are described. ATPA is a tert-butyl analogue of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid) that has been shown to possess high affinity for the GluR5 subunit of kainate receptors. [3H]ATPA exhibits saturable, high affinity binding to membranes expressing human GluR5 (GluR5) kainate receptors (Kd approximately 13 nM). No specific binding was observed in membranes expressing GluR2 and GluR6 receptors. Several compounds known to interact with the GluR5 kainate receptor inhibited [3H]ATPA binding with potencies similar to those obtained for competition of [3H]kainate binding to GluR5. Saturable, high affinity [3H]ATPA binding (Kd approximately 4 nM) was also observed in DRG neuron (DRG) membranes isolated from neonatal rats. The rank order potency of compounds to inhibit [3H]ATPA binding in rat DRG and GluR5 membranes were in agreement. These finding demonstrate that [3H]ATPA can be used as a radioligand to examine the pharmacological properties of GluR5 containing kainate receptors.

  19. The GluK4 kainate receptor subunit regulates memory, mood, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration.

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    Lowry, E R; Kruyer, A; Norris, E H; Cederroth, C R; Strickland, S

    2013-04-01

    Though the GluK4 kainate receptor subunit shows limited homology and a restricted expression pattern relative to other kainate receptor subunits, its ablation results in distinct behavioral and molecular phenotypes. GluK4 knockout mice demonstrated impairments in memory acquisition and recall in a Morris water maze test, suggesting a previously unreported role for kainate receptors in spatial memory. GluK4 knockout mice also showed marked hyperactivity and impaired pre-pulse inhibition, thereby mirroring two of the hallmark endophenotypes of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Furthermore, we found that GluK4 is a key mediator of excitotoxic neurodegeneration: GluK4 knockout mice showed robust neuroprotection in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following intrahippocampal injection of kainate and widespread neuroprotection throughout the hippocampus following hypoxia-ischemia. Biochemical analysis of kainate- or sham-treated wild-type and GluK4 knockout hippocampal tissue suggests that GluK4 may act through the JNK pathway to regulate the molecular cascades that lead to excitotoxicity. Together, our findings suggest that GluK4 may be relevant to the understanding and treatment of human neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Pharmacology and crystal structure of novel 2,3-quinoxalinediones at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Pasini, Diletta

    2017-01-01

    with the patho-physiology of CNS diseases such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Selective tool compounds are therefore needed to address the functional roles of different types of iGluRs. A few selective compounds that can discriminate between AMPA and kainate (KA) receptors are available. However...

  1. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity GluK5 kainate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Mouse GluK5 was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and radiolabelled with [3H]-kainate in receptor binding assays (Kd = 6.9 nM). Western immunoblotting indicated an Sf9 GluK5 band doublet corresponding to the glycosylated (128 kDa) and deglycosylated (111 kDa) protein, which was identical to the band...

  2. Kainate-type glutamate receptors modulating network activity in developing hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Juuri, Juuso

    2015-01-01

    Kainate-type of ionotropic glutamate (KA) receptors are associated with the modulation of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, and activity of neuronal networks. They are believed to have an important role in the development of neuronal connections. In this thesis, the role of KA receptors in the early brain development was assessed by conducting in vitro electrophysiological recordings from individual neurons at CA3 region in acute slices of neonatal rodent hippocampi. It was f...

  3. Structural and pharmacological characterization of phenylalanine-based AMPA receptor antagonists at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Frydenvang, Karla; Valadés, Elena Antón

    2012-01-01

    . A new series of phenylalanine derivatives that target iGluRs was reported to bind AMPA receptors. Herein we report our studies of these compounds at the kainate receptors GluK1-3. Several compounds bind with micromolar affinity at GluK1 and GluK3, but do not bind GluK2. The crystal structure of the most...... potent compound in the ligand binding domain of GluK1 revealed different modes of binding to GluK1 and GluA2, due primarily to residues Ser741 (GluK1) and Met729 (GluA2). The compound was shown to be slightly more potent at GluK1 than at AMPA receptors and to induce a domain closure similar...

  4. Computational study of the evolutionary relationships of the ionotropic receptors NMDA, AMPA and kainate in four species of primates.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Pedraza, Francy Johanna; Grupo de Bioquímica Molecular Computacional y Bioinformática, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 No. 43-82 Ed. 52, Bogotá,; Lareo, Leonardo René; Grupo de Bioquímica Molecular Computacional y Bioinformática, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 No. 43-82 Ed. 52, Bogotá,; Reyes-Montaño, Edgar Antonio; Grupo de Investigación en Proteínas (GRIP) Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Edificio 451, Bogotá

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To identify the influence of changes on the secondary structure and evolutionary relationship of NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors in Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus and Macaca mulatta. Materials and methods. We identified 91 sequences for NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors and analyzed with software for predicting secondary structure, phosphorylation sites, multiple alignments, selection of protein evolution models and phylogenetic prediction. Results. We found that s...

  5. Tonically Active Kainate Receptors (tKARs) : A Novel Mechanism Regulating Neuronal Function in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Segerstråle, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Fast excitatory transmission between neurons in the central nervous system is mainly mediated by L-glutamate acting on ligand gated (ionotropic) receptors. These are further categorized according to their pharmacological properties to AMPA (2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2- oxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid), NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid) and kainate (KAR) subclasses. In the rat and the mouse hippocampus, development of glutamatergic transmission is most dynamic during the first postnatal weeks. This...

  6. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel phenylalanine-based amino acids as kainate receptors ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Chałupnik, Paulina; Szczepańska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    A new series of carboxyaryl-substituted phenylalanines was designed, synthesized and pharmacologically characterized in vitro at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors as well as at cloned homomeric kainate receptors GluK1-GluK3. Among them, six compounds bound to GluK1 receptor subtypes with ...

  7. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity GluK5 kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-10-05

    Mouse GluK5 was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and radiolabelled with [(3)H]-kainate in receptor binding assays (Kd=6.9nM). Western immunoblotting indicated an Sf9 GluK5 band doublet corresponding to the glycosylated (128kDa) and deglycosylated (111kDa) protein, which was identical to the band pattern of native rat brain GluK5. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity kainate receptor GluK5 is described which is distinct from the profiles of other kainate receptors (GluK1-3). The 27 tested ligands generally show a preferential affinity to GluK1 over GluK5, the exceptions being: dihydrokainate, (S)-5-fluorowillardiine, (S)-glutamate and quisqualate, where the affinity is similar at GluK1 and GluK5. In contrast, quisqualate shows 40-fold higher affinity at GluK5 over GluK3 whereas (S)-1-(2'-amino-2'-caboxyethyl)thienol[3,4-d]pyrimidin-2,4-dione (NF1231), (RS)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)propionate (ATPA), dihydrokainate and (2S,4R)-4-methyl-glutamate (SYM2081) have higher affinity at GluK3 compared to GluK5. Since some studies have indicated that GluK5 is associated with various diseases in the central nervous system (e.g. schizophrenia, temporal lobe epilepsy, bipolar disorder), selective GluK5 ligands could have therapeutic potential. The distinct pharmacological profile of GluK5 suggests that it would be possible to design ligands with selectivity towards GluK5.

  8. Stimulation of lateral hypothalamic kainate receptors selectively elicits feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettes, Stacey R; Heyming, Theodore W; Stanley, B Glenn

    2007-12-12

    Glutamate and its receptor agonists, NMDA, AMPA, and KA, elicit feeding when microinjected into the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of satiated rats. However, determining the relative contributions of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and KA receptors (KARs) to LH feeding mechanisms has been difficult due to a lack of receptor selective agonists and antagonists. Furthermore, LH injection of KA produces behavioral hyperactivity, questioning a role for KARs in feeding selective stimulation. In the present study, we used the KAR agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), which selectively binds the GluR5 subunit of KARs, to stimulate feeding, presumably via KAR activation. Using ATPA, we tested whether: (1) LH injection of ATPA elicits feeding, (2) prior treatment with the non-selective AMPA/KAR antagonist, CNQX, suppresses ATPA-elicited feeding, and (3) LH injection of ATPA elicits behavioral patterns specific for feeding. We found that injection of ATPA (0.1 and 1 nmol) elicited an intense feeding response (e.g., 4.8+/-1.6 g) that was blocked by LH pretreatment with CNQX, but was unaffected by pretreatment with the AMPAR selective antagonist, GYKI 52466. Furthermore, minute-by-minute behavioral analysis revealed that LH injection of ATPA increased time spent feeding to 55% of the initial test period with little or no effects on other behaviors at any time. In contrast, LH injection of KA similarly increased feeding but also produced intense locomotor activity. These data suggest that selective activation of LH KARs containing GluR5 subunit(s) is sufficient to elicit feeding.

  9. Neto Auxiliary Subunits Regulate Interneuron Somatodendritic and Presynaptic Kainate Receptors to Control Network Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S. Wyeth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Netos are considered auxiliary subunits critical for kainate receptor (KAR function, direct evidence for their regulation of native KARs is limited. Because Neto KAR regulation is GluK subunit/Neto isoform specific, such regulation must be determined in cell-type-specific contexts. We demonstrate Neto1/2 expression in somatostatin (SOM-, cholecystokinin/cannabinoid receptor 1 (CCK/CB1-, and parvalbumin (PV-containing interneurons. KAR-mediated excitation of these interneurons is contingent upon Neto1 because kainate yields comparable effects in Neto2 knockouts and wild-types but fails to excite interneurons or recruit inhibition in Neto1 knockouts. In contrast, presynaptic KARs in CCK/CB1 interneurons are dually regulated by both Neto1 and Neto2. Neto association promotes tonic presynaptic KAR activation, dampening CCK/CB1 interneuron output, and loss of this brake in Neto mutants profoundly increases CCK/CB1 interneuron-mediated inhibition. Our results confirm that Neto1 regulates endogenous somatodendritic KARs in diverse interneurons and demonstrate Neto regulation of presynaptic KARs in mature inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

  10. Structure and affinity of two bicyclic glutamate analogues at AMPA and kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pinto, Andrea; Marconi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    and depression. In order to understand the function of different types of iGluRs, selective agonists are invaluable as pharmacological tool compounds. Here, we report binding affinities of two bicyclic, conformationally restricted analogues of glutamate (CIP-AS and LM-12b) at AMPA (GluA2 and GluA3) and kainate...... receptor subunits (GluK1-3 and GluK5). Both CIP-AS and LM-12b were found to be GluK3-preferring agonists, with Ki of 6 and 22 nM, respectively, at recombinant GluK3 receptors. The detailed binding mode of CIP-AS and LM-12b in the ligand-binding domains of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (GluA2-LBD...

  11. Assembly Stoichiometry of the GluK2/GluK5 Kainate Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors assemble as homo- or heterotetramers. One well-studied heteromeric complex is formed by the kainate receptor subunits GluK2 and GluK5. Retention motifs prevent trafficking of GluK5 homomers to the plasma membrane, but coassembly with GluK2 yields functional heteromeric receptors. Additional control over GluK2/GluK5 assembly seems to be exerted by the amino-terminal domains, which preferentially assemble into heterodimers as isolated domains. However, the stoichiometry of the full-length GluK2/GluK5 receptor complex has yet to be determined, as is the case for all non-NMDA glutamate receptors. Here, we address this question, using a single-molecule imaging technique that enables direct counting of the number of each GluK subunit type in homomeric and heteromeric receptors in the plasma membranes of live cells. We show that GluK2 and GluK5 assemble with 2:2 stoichiometry. This is an important step toward understanding the assembly mechanism, architecture, and functional consequences of heteromer formation in ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  12. Effects of pilocarpine and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przewlocka, B.; Labuz, D.; Machelska, H.; Przewlocki, R.; Turchan, J.; Lason, W. [Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 12 Smetna Street, 31-343 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-04-14

    The effects of pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding were studied in the rat hippocampal formation. Pilocarpine- but not kainate-induced seizures decreased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in dentate gyrus at 24 and 72 h after drug injection. Both convulsants decreased the messenger RNA level in CA1 pyramidal cells at 24 and 72 h, the effects of kainate being more profound. Kainate also decreased the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in CA3 region after 24 and 72 h, whereas pilocarpine decreased the messenger RNA level at 72 h only. At 3 h after kainate, but not pilocarpine, an increased binding of [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate in several apical dendritic fields of pyramidal cells was found. Pilocarpine reduced the [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in stratum lucidum only at 3 and 24 h after the drug injection. Pilocarpine but not kainate induced prolonged decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 gene expression in dentate gyrus. However, at the latest time measured, kainate had the stronger effect in decreasing both messenger RNA N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. The latter changes corresponded, however, to neuronal loss and may reflect higher neurotoxic potency of kainate.These data point to some differences in hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor regulation in pilocarpine and kainate models of limbic seizures. Moreover, our results suggest that the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level is more susceptible to limbic seizures than is [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in the rat hippocampal formation. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry.

  14. PSD-95 regulates synaptic kainate receptors at mouse hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuko; Kamiya, Haruyuki

    2016-06-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) are the third class of ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the unique roles in regulating synaptic transmission and circuit functions. In contrast to AMPA receptors (AMPARs), little is known about the mechanism of synaptic localization of KARs. PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density, is a candidate molecule that regulates the synaptic KARs. Although PSD-95 was shown to bind directly to KARs subunits, it has not been tested whether PSD-95 regulates synaptic KARs in intact synapses. Using PSD-95 knockout mice, we directly investigated the role of PSD-95 in the KARs-mediated components of synaptic transmission at hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse, one of the synapses with the highest density of KARs. Mossy fiber EPSCs consist of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated fast component and KAR-mediated slower component, and the ratio was significantly reduced in PSD-95 knockout mice. The size of KARs-mediated field EPSP reduced in comparison with the size of the fiber volley. Analysis of KARs-mediated miniature EPSCs also suggested reduced synaptic KARs. All the evidence supports critical roles of PSD-95 in regulating synaptic KARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroprotection of GluK1 kainate receptor agonist ATPA against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting GluK2 kainate receptor-JNK3 pathway via GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qian; Liu, Yong; Han, Dong; Xu, Jing; Zong, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2012-05-25

    It is well known that GluK2-containing kainate receptors play essential roles in seizure and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal death, while GluK1-containing kainate receptors could increase tonic inhibition of post-synaptic pyramidal neurons. This research investigated whether GluK1 could inhibit activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) signaling pathway mediated by the GluK2 in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. The results show that GluK1 activation by (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) at 1nmol per rat could inhibit the assembly of GluK2·Postsynaptic density 95·mixed lineage kinase 3 signaling module, activation of JNK3 and its downstream signal molecules. However, the inhibition of ATPA could be prevented by GluK1 antagonist NS3763, GluK1 antisense, and GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, ATPA played a neuroprotective role against cerebral ischemia. In sum, the findings indicate that activation of GluK1 by ATPA at specific dosages may promote GABA release, which then suppresses post-synaptic GluK2-JNK3 signaling-mediated cerebral ischemic injury via GABA(A)R.

  16. Differences in AMPA and Kainate Receptor Interactomes Facilitate Identification of AMPA Receptor Auxiliary Subunit GSG1L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie F. Shanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AMPA receptor (AMPA-R complexes consist of channel-forming subunits, GluA1-4, and auxiliary proteins, including TARPs, CNIHs, synDIG1, and CKAMP44, which can modulate AMPA-R function in specific ways. The combinatorial effects of four GluA subunits binding to various auxiliary subunits amplify the functional diversity of AMPA-Rs. The significance and magnitude of molecular diversity, however, remain elusive. To gain insight into the molecular complexity of AMPA and kainate receptors, we compared the proteins that copurify with each receptor type in the rat brain. This interactome study identified the majority of known interacting proteins and, more importantly, provides candidates for additional studies. We validate the claudin homolog GSG1L as a newly identified binding protein and unique modulator of AMPA-R gating, as determined by detailed molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and biochemical experiments. GSG1L extends the functional variety of AMPA-R complexes, and further investigation of other candidates may reveal additional complexity of ionotropic glutamate receptor function.

  17. Synaptic kainate receptors in interplay with INaP shift the sparse firing of dentate granule cells to a sustained rhythmic mode in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artinian, Julien; Peret, Angélique; Marti, Geoffrey; Epsztein, Jérôme; Crépel, Valérie

    2011-07-27

    Dentate granule cells, at the gate of the hippocampus, use coincidence detection of synaptic inputs to code afferent information under a sparse firing regime. In both human patients and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, mossy fibers sprout to form an aberrant glutamatergic network between dentate granule cells. These new synapses operate via long-lasting kainate receptor-mediated events, which are not present in the naive condition. Here, we report that in chronic epileptic rat, aberrant kainate receptors in interplay with the persistent sodium current dramatically expand the temporal window for synaptic integration. This introduces a multiplicative gain change in the input-output operation of dentate granule cells. As a result, their sparse firing is switched to an abnormal sustained and rhythmic mode. We conclude that synaptic kainate receptors dramatically alter the fundamental coding properties of dentate granule cells in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  18. Contribution of Aberrant GluK2-Containing Kainate Receptors to Chronic Seizures in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Angélique Peret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kainate is a potent neurotoxin known to induce acute seizures. However, whether kainate receptors (KARs play any role in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is not known. In TLE, recurrent mossy fiber (rMF axons form abnormal excitatory synapses onto other dentate granule cells that operate via KARs. The present study explores the pathophysiological implications of KARs in generating recurrent seizures in chronic epilepsy. In an in vitro model of TLE, seizure-like activity was minimized in mice lacking the GluK2 subunit, which is a main component of aberrant synaptic KARs at rMF synapses. In vivo, the frequency of interictal spikes and ictal discharges was strongly reduced in GluK2−/− mice or in the presence of a GluK2/GluK5 receptor antagonist. Our data show that aberrant GluK2-containing KARs play a major role in the chronic seizures that characterize TLE and thus constitute a promising antiepileptic target.

  19. Kainate Receptors in the Striatum: Implications for Excitotoxicity in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    finding regarding the anatomical organization of caudal intralaminar Pf, which provides a massive feed - the basal ganglia is the demonstration of multiple...Trends Neurosci. 12, 366- Bonanno et a!., 1998). Future behavioural studies of 375. baclofen in animal models should help ascertain the Ainhardekar...Glutamand inhibitoryn raptor mese dephc pncipal Charara, A., Blankstein, E., Smith, Y., 1999. Presynaptic kainate tory and inhibitory transmission on rat

  20. Soman Induces Ictogenesis in the Amygdala and Interictal Activity in the Hippocampus That Are Blocked by a GluR5 Kainate Receptor Antagonist In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    damage, with long-term neu- ological and behavioral consequences (McDonough et al., 986; Brown and Brix , 1998; Bajgar et al., 2004). Nerve gent–induced...raga MF, Aroniadou-Anderjaska V, Li H (2004) The physiological role of kainate receptors in the amygdala. Mol Neurobiol 30:127–141. rown MA, Brix KA

  1. Phenobarbital but not diazepam reduces AMPA/Kainate receptor mediated currents and exerts opposite actions on initial seizures in the neonatal rat hippocampus

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    Romain eNardou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam (DZP and phenobarbital (PB are extensively used as first and second line drugs to treat acute seizures in neonates and their actions are thought to be mediated by increasing the actions of GABAergic signals. Yet, their efficacy is variable with occasional failure or even aggravation of recurrent seizures questioning whether other mechanisms are not involved in their actions. We have now compared the effects of DZP and PB on ictal-like events (ILEs in an in vitro model of mirror focus (MF. Using the three-compartment chamber with the two immature hippocampi and their commissural fibers placed in 3 different compartments, kainate was applied to one hippocampus and PB or DZP to the contralateral one, either after one ILE or after many recurrent ILEs that produce an epileptogenic MF. We report that in contrast to PB, DZP aggravated propagating ILEs from the start and did not prevent the formation of MF. PB reduced and DZP increased the network driven Giant Depolarising Potentials suggesting that PB may exert additional actions that are not mediated by GABA signalling. In keeping with this, PB but not DZP reduced field potentials recorded in the presence of GABA and NMDA receptor antagonists. These effects are mediated by a direct action on AMPA/Kainate receptors since PB: i reduced AMPA/Kainate receptor mediated currents induced by focal applications of glutamate ; ii reduced the amplitude and the frequency of AMPA but not NMDA receptor mediated miniature EPSCs; iii augmented the number of AMPA receptor mediated EPSCs failures evoked by minimal stimulation. These effects persisted in MF. Therefore, PB exerts its anticonvulsive actions partly by reducing AMPA/Kainate receptors mediated EPSCs in addition to the pro-GABA effects. We suggest that PB may have advantage over DZP in the treatment of initial neonatal seizures since the additional reduction of glutamate receptors mediated signals may reduce the severity of neonatal seizures.

  2. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Characterisation of the effects of ATPA, a GLU(K5) kainate receptor agonist, on GABAergic synaptic transmission in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, V R J; Collingridge, G L

    2004-09-01

    Kainate receptors are implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in the CNS. Previously we demonstrated that (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective agonist for the GLU(K5) subtype of kainate receptor, depresses monosynaptically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. In the current study, we provide a more detailed characterisation of this effect. Firstly, our data demonstrate a rank order of potency of domoate>kainate>ATPA>alpha-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxalolyl)propionic acid Secondly, we confirm that the effects of ATPA are not mediated indirectly via the activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (i.e. either GABA(A) or GABA(B)). Thirdly, we show that the small increase in conductance induced by ATPA is insufficient to account for the depression of monosynaptic inhibition. Fourthly, we show that the effects of ATPA on IPSPs are antagonised by the GLU(K5)-selective antagonist (3S, 4aR, 6S, 8aR)-6-(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-decahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY382884). However, LY382884 is less potent as an antagonist of the effects of ATPA on IPSPs compared to its depressant effect on EPSPs.

  4. Proteolytic fragments of laminin promote excitotoxic neurodegeneration by up-regulation of the KA1 subunit of the kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Yu, Huaxu; Yu, Wei-Ming; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2008-12-29

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein laminin contributes to excitotoxic cell death in the hippocampus, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. To study this process, we disrupted laminin gamma1 (lamgamma1) expression in the hippocampus. Lamgamma1 knockout (KO) and control mice had similar basal expression of kainate (KA) receptors, but the lamgamma1 KO mice were resistant to KA-induced neuronal death. After KA injection, KA1 subunit levels increased in control mice but were unchanged in lamgamma1 KO mice. KA1 levels in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-KO mice were also unchanged after KA, indicating that both tPA and laminin were necessary for KA1 up-regulation after KA injection. Infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 into the hippocampus of lamgamma1 or tPA KO mice restored KA1 up-regulation and KA-induced neuronal degeneration. Interfering with KA1 function with a specific anti-KA1 antibody protected against KA-induced neuronal death both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel pathway for neurodegeneration involving proteolysis of the ECM and KA1 KA receptor subunit up-regulation.

  5. Effects of the kainate receptor agonist ATPA on glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallert, Marko; Malkki, Hemi; Segerstråle, Mikael; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2007-05-01

    Kainate type of glutamate receptors (KARs) modulate synaptic transmission in a developmentally regulated manner at several synapses in the brain. Previous studies have shown that KARs depress glutamatergic transmission at CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus and these receptors are tonically active during early postnatal development. Here we use the GluR5 subunit specific agonist ATPA to further characterize the role of KARs in the modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in area CA1 during the first two weeks of life. We find that the depressant effect of ATPA on evoked fEPSPs/EPSCs is smaller in the neonate (P3-P6) than in the juvenile (P14-P18) rat CA1, due to endogenous activity of KAR in the neonate. Further, in the neonate but not juvenile CA1, ATPA downregulates action-potential independent transmission (mEPSCs) and its effects are dependent on protein kinase C activity. ATPA-induced depression of fEPSPs in the neonate occludes the presynaptic component of long-term depression (LTD). In contrast, at P14-P18, ATPA prevents LTD indirectly via GABAergic mechanisms. These data show that GluR5 signaling mechanisms are developmentally regulated and suggest distinct functional role for KARs in the modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity at different stages of development.

  6. Role of AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors in the development and expression of amygdala kindling in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawski, M A; Kurzman, P S; Yamaguchi, S I; Li, H

    2001-01-01

    The role of AMPA and GluR5-containing kainate receptors in the development and expression of amygdala kindling was examined using the selective 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 [(1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-7,8-methylenedioxy-5H-2, 3-benzodiazepine] and the decahydroisoquinoline mixed AMPA receptor and GluR5 kainate receptor antagonist LY293558 {(3S,4aR,6R, 8aR)-6-[2-(1(2)H-tetrazole-5-yl)ethyl]decahydroisoquinoline- 3-carboxy lic acid)}. Administration of GYKI 52466 (5-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and LY293558 (10-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) prior to daily kindling stimulation in mice produced a dose-dependent suppression of the rate of development of behavioral kindled seizure activity and reduced the duration of the stimulation-induced electrographic afterdischarge. In drug-free stimulation sessions after the initial drug-treatment sessions, there was an acceleration in the rate of kindling development compared with the rate during the preceding drug-administration period; the "rebound" rate was also greater than the kindling rate in saline-treated control animals. In fully kindled animals, both GYKI 52466 and LY293558 produced a dose-dependent suppression of evoked seizures (ED(50), 19.3 and 16.7 mg/kg, respectively). Although AMPA receptors appear to be critical to the expression of kindled seizures, since kindling development progressed despite the suppression of behavioral seizure activity, AMPA receptors are less important to the kindling process. LY293558 was modestly less effective at suppressing behavioral seizures during kindling and was not superior to GYKI 52466 in retarding the overall extent of kindling development, indicating that GluR5 kainate receptors do not contribute to epileptogenesis in this model.

  7. High firing rate of neonatal hippocampal interneurons is caused by attenuation of afterhyperpolarizing potassium currents by tonically active kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstråle, Mikael; Juuri, Juuso; Lanore, Frédéric; Piepponen, Petteri; Lauri, Sari E; Mulle, Christophe; Taira, Tomi

    2010-05-12

    In the neonatal hippocampus, the activity of interneurons shapes early network bursts that are important for the establishment of neuronal connectivity. However, mechanisms controlling the firing of immature interneurons remain elusive. We now show that the spontaneous firing rate of CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons markedly decreases during early postnatal development because of changes in the properties of GluK1 (formerly known as GluR5) subunit-containing kainate receptors (KARs). In the neonate, activation of KARs by ambient glutamate exerts a tonic inhibition of the medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) by a G-protein-dependent mechanism, permitting a high interneuronal firing rate. During development, the amplitude of the apamine-sensitive K+ currents responsible for the mAHP increases dramatically because of decoupling between KAR activation and mAHP modulation, leading to decreased interneuronal firing. The developmental shift in the KAR function and its consequences on interneuronal activity are likely to have a fundamental role in the maturation of the synchronous neuronal oscillations typical for adult hippocampal circuitry.

  8. Pharmacology and crystal structure of novel 2,3-quinoxalinediones at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Pasini, Diletta

    2017-01-01

    , within the KA receptor family (GluK1-5) only compounds with selectivity towards GluK1 exist [1]. Thus, there is an unmet need for Tool compounds with selectivity towards the remaining KA receptor subunits. Here we report the pharmacology of a series of novel N1-substituted 2,3-quinoxalinediones, as well....... Functional electrophysiological (TEVC) experiments indeed showed these compounds to be antagonists at cloned, homomeric KA receptors. The structure and pharmacology will be valuable for design of new and more GluK3-selective quinoxalinedione analogues....

  9. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Jia, Yongheng; Pinaud, Raphael; Zhuo, Min

    2006-09-01

    GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs) are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  10. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaud Raphael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  11. Topiramate reduces excitability in the basolateral amygdala by selectively inhibiting GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptors on interneurons and positively modulating GABAA receptors on principal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Maria F M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Li, He; Rogawski, Michael A

    2009-08-01

    Topiramate [2,3:4,5-bis-O-(1-methylethylidene)-beta-D-fructopyranose sulfamate] is a structurally novel antiepileptic drug that has broad efficacy in epilepsy, but the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic activity are not fully understood. We have found that topiramate selectively inhibits GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic responses in rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) principal neurons and protects against seizures induced by the GluK1 kainate receptor agonist (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA). Here, we demonstrate that topiramate also modulates inhibitory function in the BLA. Using whole-cell recordings in rat amygdala slices, we found that 0.3 to 10 microM topiramate 1) inhibited ATPA-evoked postsynaptic currents recorded from BLA interneurons; 2) suppressed ATPA-induced enhancement of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from BLA pyramidal cells; and 3) blocked ATPA-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs, which is mediated by presynaptic GluK1 kainate receptors present on BLA interneurons. Topiramate (10 microM) had no effect on the AMPA [(R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid]-induced enhancement of spontaneous activity of BLA neurons. Thus, although topiramate inhibits GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated enhancement of interneuron firing, it promotes evoked GABA release, leading to a net inhibition of circuit excitability. In addition, we found that topiramate (0.3-10 microM) increased the amplitude of evoked, spontaneous, and miniature IPSCs in BLA pyramidal neurons, indicating an enhancement of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor responses. Taken together with our previous findings, we conclude that topiramate protects against hyperexcitability in the BLA by suppressing the GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated excitation of principal neurons by glutamatergic afferents, blocking the suppression of GABA release from interneurons mediated by presynaptic GluK1

  12. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors.

  13. Channel-opening kinetic mechanism for human wild-type GluK2 and the M867I mutant kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Wang, Congzhou; Park, Jae Seon; Niu, Li

    2010-11-02

    GluK2 is a kainate receptor subunit that is alternatively spliced at the C-terminus. Previous studies implicated GluK2 in autism. In particular, the methionine-to-isoleucine replacement at amino acid residue 867 (M867I) that can only occur in the longest isoform of the human GluK2 (hGluK2), as the disease (autism) mutation, is thought to cause gain-of-function. However, the kinetic properties of the wild-type hGluK2 and the functional consequence of this gain-of-function mutation at the molecular level are not well understood. To investigate whether the M867I mutation affects the channel properties of the human GluK2 kainate receptor, we have systematically characterized the rate and the equilibrium constants pertinent to channel opening and channel desensitization for this mutant and the wild-type hGluK2 receptor, along with the wild-type rat GluK2 kainate receptor (rGluK2) as the control. Our results show that the M867I mutation does not affect either the rate or the equilibrium constants of the channel opening but does slow down the channel desensitization rate by ~1.6-fold at saturating glutamate concentrations. It is possible that a consequence of this mutation on the desensitization rate is linked to facilitating the receptor trafficking and membrane expression, given the close proximity of M867 to the forward trafficking motif in the C-terminal sequence. By comparing the kinetic data of the wild-type human and rat GluK2 receptors, we also find that the human GluK2 has a ~3-fold smaller channel-opening rate constant but an identical channel-closing rate constant and thus a channel-opening probability of 0.85 vs 0.96 for rGluK2. Furthermore, the intrinsic equilibrium dissociation constant K(1) for hGluK2, like the EC(50) value, is ~2-fold lower than rGluK2. Our results therefore suggest that the human GluK2 is relatively a slowly activating channel but more sensitive to glutamate, as compared to the rat ortholog, despite the fact that the human and rat forms

  14. The GluR5 subtype of kainate receptor regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in areas CA1 and CA3 of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignes, M; Clarke, V R; Parry, M J; Bleakman, D; Lodge, D; Ornstein, P L; Collingridge, G L

    1998-01-01

    Activation of kainate receptors depresses excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. In the present study, we have utilised a GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA [(RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid], and a GluR5 selective antagonist, LY294486 [(3SR,4aRS,6SR,8aRS)-6-([[(1H-tetrazol-5-y l)methyl]oxy]methyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-decahydroisoquinoline-3 -carboxylic acid], to determine whether GluR5 subunits are involved in this effect. ATPA mimicked the presynaptic depressant effects of kainate in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. It depressed reversibly AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (field EPSPs) with an IC50 value of approximately 0.60 microM. The dual-component excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) and the pharmacologically isolated NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor-mediated EPSC were depressed to a similar extent by 2 microM ATPA (61 +/- 7% and 58 +/- 6%, respectively). Depressions were associated with an increase in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio suggesting a presynaptic locus of action. LY294486 (20 microM) blocked the effects of 2 microM ATPA on NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a reversible manner. In area CA3, 1 microM ATPA depressed reversibly mossy fibre-evoked synaptic transmission (by 82 +/- 10%). The effects of ATPA were not accompanied by any changes in the passive properties of CA1 or CA3 neurones. However, in experiments where K+, rather than Cs+, containing electrodes were used, a small outward current was observed. These results show that GluR5 subunits comprise or contribute to a kainate receptor that regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in both the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus.

  15. Differences in AMPA and kainate receptor interactomes facilitate identification of AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit GSG1L

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shanks, Natalie F; Savas, Jeffrey N; Maruo, Tomohiko; Cais, Ondrej; Hirao, Atsushi; Oe, Souichi; Ghosh, Anirvan; Noda, Yasuko; Greger, Ingo H; Yates, 3rd, John R; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) complexes consist of channel-forming subunits, GluA1-4, and auxiliary proteins, including TARPs, CNIHs, synDIG1, and CKAMP44, which can modulate AMPA-R function in specific ways...

  16. Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eJin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the main excitatory transmitter in the human brain. Drugs that affect the glutamatergic signaling will alter neuronal excitability. Ethanol inhibits glutamate receptors. We examined the expression level of glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in human post-mortem samples from alcoholics and compared the results to brain samples from control subjects. RNA from hippocampal dentate gyrus (HP-DG, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC samples from 21 controls and 19 individuals with chronic alcohol dependence were included in the study. Total RNA was assayed using quantitative RT-PCR. Out of the 16 glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA (2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-ylpropanoic acid receptor subunits GluA2 and GluA3; three kainate receptor subunits GluK2, GluK3 and GluK5 and five NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2C, GluN2D and GluN3A were significantly increased in the HP-DG region in alcoholics. In the OFC, mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A was increased, whereas in the DL-PFC, no differences in mRNA levels were observed. Our laboratory has previously shown that the expression of genes encoding inhibitory GABA-A receptors is altered in the HP-DG and OFC of alcoholics (Jin et al., 2011. Whether the changes in one neurotransmitter system drives changes in the other or if they change independently is currently not known. The results demonstrate that excessive long-term alcohol consumption is associated with altered expression of genes encoding glutamate receptors in a brain region-specific manner. It is an intriguing possibility that genetic predisposition to alcoholism may contribute to these gene expression changes.

  17. Involvement of AMPA/kainate and GABAA receptors in topiramate neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate abuse sequels involving oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Abuses of methylphenidate (MPH) as psychostimulant cause neural damage of brain cells. Neuroprotective properties of topiramate (TPM) have been indicated in several studies but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. The current study evaluates protective role of various doses of TPM and its mechanism of action in MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. The neuroprotective effects of various doses of TPM against MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated and then the action of TPM was studied in presence of domoic acid (DOM), as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist and bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, in isolated rat hippocampus. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity changes. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. TPM (70 and 100mg/kg) decreased MPH induced motor activity disturbances and inhibit MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. On the other hand pretreatment of animals with DOM or BIC, inhibit this effect of TPM and potentiate MPH induced motor activity disturbances and increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) level, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampal cells and decreased reduced form of glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity. It seems that TPM can protect cells of hippocampus from oxidative stress and neuroinflammation and it could be partly by activation of GABAA receptor and inhibition of AMPA/kainite receptor.

  18. Insights into the mechanisms of ifosfamide encephalopathy: drug metabolites have agonistic effects on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification in mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, J Y; Idle, J R; Vågbø, C B; Magistretti, P J

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic value of the alkylating agent ifosfamide has been limited by major side effects including encephalopathy. Although the underlying biochemical processes of the neurotoxic side effects are still unclear, they could be attributed to metabolites rather than to ifosfamide itself. In the present study, the effects of selected ifosfamide metabolites on indices of neuronal activity have been investigated, in particular for S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) and thiodiglycolic acid (TDGA). Because of structural similarities of SCMC with glutamate, the Ca(2+)(i) response of single mouse cortical neurons to SCMC and TDGA was investigated. SCMC, but not TDGA, evoked a robust increase in Ca(2+)(i) concentration that could be abolished by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), but only partly diminished by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK=801). Cyclothiazide (CYZ), used to prevent AMPA/kainate receptor desensitization, potentiated the response to SCMC. Because activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is known to induce proton influx, the intracellular pH (pH(i)) response to SCMC was investigated. SCMC caused a concentration-dependent acidification that was amplified by CYZ. Since H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) activity leads to similar cellular acidification, we tested its potential involvement in the pH(i) response. Application of the lactate transport inhibitor quercetin diminished the pH(i) response to SCMC and TDGA by 43 and 51%, respectively, indicating that these compounds may be substrates of MCTs. Taken together, this study indicates that hitherto apparently inert ifosfamide metabolites, in particular SCMC, activate AMPA/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification. Both processes could provide the biochemical basis of the observed ifosfamide-associated encephalopathy.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls activity-dependent maturation of CA1 synapses by downregulating tonic activation of presynaptic kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallert, Marko; Rantamäki, Tomi; Vesikansa, Aino; Anthoni, Heidi; Harju, Kirsi; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Taira, Tomi; Castren, Eero; Lauri, Sari E

    2009-09-09

    Immature hippocampal synapses express presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs), which tonically inhibit glutamate release. Presynaptic maturation involves activity-dependent downregulation of the tonic KAR activity and consequent increase in release probability; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this developmental process are unknown. Here, we have investigated whether brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a secreted protein implicated in developmental plasticity in several areas of the brain, controls presynaptic maturation by regulating KARs. Application of BDNF in neonate hippocampal slices resulted in increase in synaptic transmission that fully occluded the immature-type KAR activity in area CA1. Conversely, genetic ablation of BDNF was associated with delayed synaptic maturation and persistent presynaptic KAR activity, suggesting a role for endogenous BDNF in the developmental regulation of KAR function. In addition, our data suggests a critical role for BDNF TrkB signaling in fast activity-dependent regulation of KARs. Selective acute inhibition of TrkB receptors using a chemical-genetic approach prevented rapid change in synapse dynamics and loss of tonic KAR activity that is typically seen in response to induction of LTP at immature synapses. Together, these data show that BDNF-TrkB-dependent maturation of glutamatergic synapses is tightly associated with a loss of endogenous KAR activity. The coordinated action of these two receptor mechanisms has immediate physiological relevance in controlling presynaptic efficacy and transmission dynamics at CA3-CA1 synapses at a stage of development when functional contact already exists but transmission is weak.

  20. Synthesis and in vitro pharmacology at AMPA and kainate preferring glutamate receptors of 4-heteroarylmethylidene glutamate analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsson, Jon; Christensen, Jeppe K; Kristensen, Anders S;

    2003-01-01

    2-Amino-3-[3-hydroxy-5-(2-thiazolyl)-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (1) is a potent AMPA receptor agonist with moderate affinity for native kainic acid (KA) receptors, whereas (S)-E-4-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)glutamic acid (3) show high affinity for the GluR5 subtype of KA receptors and much lower...... affinity for the GluR2 subtype of AMPA receptors. As an attempt to develop new pharmacological tools for studies of GluR5 receptors, (S)-E-4-(2-thiazolylmethylene)glutamic acid (4a) was designed as a structural hybrid between 1 and 3. 4a was shown to be a potent GluR5 agonist and a high affinity ligand...

  1. Neuroprotection of GluR5-containing kainate receptor activation against ischemic brain injury through decreasing tyrosine phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediated by Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2008-10-24

    Previous studies indicate that cerebral ischemia breaks the dynamic balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The neural excitotoxicity induced by ionotropic glutamate receptors gain the upper hand during ischemia-reperfusion. In this paper, we investigate whether GluR5 (glutamate receptor 5)-containing kainate receptor activation could lead to a neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury and the related mechanism. The results showed that (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective GluR5 agonist, could suppress Src tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions among N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2A (NR2A), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and Src and then decrease NMDA receptor activation through attenuating tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A and NR2B. More importantly, ATPA had a neuroprotective effect against ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal cell death in vivo. However, four separate drugs were found to abolish the effects of ATPA. These were selective GluR5 antagonist NS3763; GluR5 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides; CdCl(2), a broad spectrum blocker of voltage-gated calcium channels; and bicuculline, an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor. GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol could attenuate Src activation and interactions among NR2A, PSD-95 and Src, resulting the suppression of NMDA receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, patch clamp recording proved that the activated GABA(A) receptor could inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated whole-cell currents. Taken together, the results suggest that during ischemia-reperfusion, activated GluR5 may facilitate Ca(2+)-dependent GABA release from interneurons. The released GABA can activate postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors, which then attenuates NMDA receptor tyrosine phosphorylation through inhibiting Src activation and disassembling the signaling module NR2A-PSD-95-Src. The final result of this process is that the pyramidal

  2. Neuroprotective effects of the allosteric agonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 AMN082 on oxygen-glucose deprivation- and kainate-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Helena; Jantas, Danuta; Śmiałowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Although numerous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective potency of unspecific group III mGluR agonists in in vitro and in vivo models of excitotoxicity, little is known about the protective role of group III mGlu receptor activation against neuronal cell injury evoked by ischemic conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess neuroprotective potential of the allosteric agonist of mGlu7 receptor, N,N'-Bis(diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride (AMN082) against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)- and kainate (KA)-evoked neuronal cell damage in primary neuronal cultures, with special focus on its efficacy after delayed application. We demonstrated that in cortical neuronal cultures exposed to a 180 min OGD, AMN082 (0.01-1 µM) in a concentration- and time-dependent way attenuated the OGD-induced changes in the LDH release and MTT reduction assays. AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) produced also neuroprotective effects against KA-evoked neurotoxicity both in cortical and hippocampal cultures. Of particular importance was the finding that AMN082 attenuated excitotoxic neuronal injury after delayed application (30 min after OGD, or 30 min-1 h after KA). In both models of neurotoxicity, namely OGD- and KA-induced injury, the neuroprotective effects of AMN082 (1 µM) were reversed by the selective mGlu7 antagonist, 6-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-(4-pyridinyl)-isoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one hydrochloride (MMPIP, 1 µM), suggesting the mGlu7-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective effects of AMN082. Next, we showed that AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) attenuated the OGD-induced increase in the number of necrotic nuclei as well inhibited the OGD-evoked calpain activation, suggesting the participation of these processes in the mechanism of AMN082-mediated protection. Additionally, we showed that protection evoked by AMN082 (1 µM) in KA model was connected with the inhibition of toxin-induced caspase-3 activity, and this effect was abolished by the mGlu7

  3. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator RAD140 Is Neuroprotective in Cultured Neurons and Kainate-Lesioned Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed “selective androgen receptor modulators” (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in sel...

  4. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator RAD140 Is Neuroprotective in Cultured Neurons and Kainate-Lesioned Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V. Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S.; Miller, Chris P.; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed “selective androgen receptor modulators” (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in sel...

  5. AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Hellgren, Charlotte; Korol, Sergiy V; Nowak, Krzysztof; Williamsson, Louise; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Birnir, Bryndis

    2017-04-15

    The amino acid glutamate opens cation permeable ion channels, the iGlu receptors. These ion channels are abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain where glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitters and their receptors are being increasingly detected in the cells of immune system. Here we examined the expression of the 18 known subunits of the iGlu receptors families; α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and delta in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We compared the expression of the subunits between four groups: men, non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women and depressed pregnant women. Out of 18 subunits of the iGlu receptors, mRNAs for 11 subunits were detected in PBMCs from men and non-pregnant women; AMPA: GluA3, GluA4, kainate: GluK2, GluK4, GluK5, NMDA: GluN1, GluN2C, GluN2D, GluN3A, GluN3B, and delta: GluD1. In the healthy and the depressed pregnant women, in addition, the delta GluD2 subunit was identified. The mRNAs for GluK4, GluK5, GluN2C and GluN2D were expressed at a higher level than other subunits. Gender, pregnancy or depression during pregnancy altered the expression of GluA3, GluK4, GluN2D, GluN3B and GluD1 iGlu subunit mRNAs. The greatest changes recorded were the lower GluA3 and GluK4 mRNA levels in pregnant women and the higher GluN2D mRNA level in healthy but not in depressed pregnant women as compared to non-pregnant individuals. Using subunit specific antibodies, the GluK4, GluK5, GluN1, GluN2C and GluN2D subunit proteins were identified in the PBMCs. The results show expression of specific iGlu receptor subunit in the PBMCs and support the idea of physiology-driven changes of iGlu receptors subtypes in the immune cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Topiramate via NMDA, AMPA/kainate, GABAA and Alpha2 receptors and by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathway exerts neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Fatima, Sulail; Beiranvand, Tabassom; Mozaffari, Shiva

    2017-08-09

    Chronic abuse of methylphenidate (MPH) often causes neuronal cell death. Topiramate (TPM) carries neuroprotective effects, but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, the role of various doses of TPM and its possible mechanisms, receptors and signaling pathways involved against MPH-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration were evaluated in vivo. Thus, domoic acid (DOM) was used as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist, bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, ketamine (KET) as NMDA receptor antagonist, yohimbine (YOH) as α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist and haloperidol (HAL) was used as dopamine D2 receptor antagonist. Open field test (OFT) was used to investigate the disturbances in motor activity. Hippocampal neurodegenerative parameters were evaluated. Protein expressions of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathways were also evaluated. Cresyl violet staining was performed to show and confirm the changes in the shape of the cells. TPM (70 and 100 mg/kg) reduced MPH-induced rise in lipid peroxidation, oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG), IL-1β and TNF-α levels, Bax expression and motor activity disturbances. In addition, TPM treatment increased Bcl-2 expression, the level of reduced form of glutathione (GSH) and the levels and activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase enzymes. TPM also inhibited MPH-induced hippocampal degeneration. Pretreatment of animals with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced neuroprotection and increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, neuroapoptosis and neurodegeneration while reducing CREB, BDNF and Akt protein expressions. Also pretreatment with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced decreases in GSK3. It can be concluded that the mentioned receptors by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 pathways, are involved in neuroprotection of TPM against MPH-induced neurodegeneration.

  7. AMPA/Kainate, NMDA, and Dopamine D1 Receptor Function in the Nucleus Accumbens Core: A Context-Limited Role in the Encoding and Consolidation of Instrumental Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Pepe J.; Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Sadeghian, Kenneth; Panksepp, Jules B.; Kelley, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    Neural integration of glutamate- and dopamine-coded signals within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a fundamental process governing cellular plasticity underlying reward-related learning. Intra-NAc core blockade of NMDA or D1 receptors in rats impairs instrumental learning (lever-pressing for sugar pellets), but it is not known during which phase of…

  8. Involvement of AMPA/Kainate Glutamate Receptor in the Extinction and Reinstatement of Morphine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference: A Behavioral and Molecular Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahposht-Khachaki, Ali; Fatahi, Zahra; Yans, Asal; Khodagholi, Fariba; Haghparast, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate receptors in mesolimbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus (HIP) are a component of the mechanisms of drug-induced reward and can modulate the firing pattern of dopaminergic neurons in the reward system. In addition, several lines of study have indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-fos have important role in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by drugs of abuse, such as morphine, cocaine, nicotine, and alcohol. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the changes in phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) and c-fos induction within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), HIP, and PFC after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of different doses of CNQX or vehicle during extinction period or reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. In all groups, the CPP procedure was done; afterward, the conditioning scores were recorded by Ethovision software. After behavioral test recording, we dissected out the NAc, HIP, and PFC regions and measured the p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that administration of CNQX significantly shortened the extinction of morphine CPP. Besides, ICV microinjection of CNQX following extinction period decreased the reinstatement of morphine CPP in extinguished rats. In molecular section, in treatment group, all mentioned factors were dose-dependently decreased in comparison with vehicle group (DMSO) after ICV microinjection of different doses of CNQX but not in pre-extinction microinjection. These findings suggested that antagonism of AMPA receptor decreased p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the PFC, NAc, and HIP. Modulation of the drug memory reconsolidation may be useful for faster extinction of drug-induced reward and attenuation of drug-seeking behavior.

  9. A Study of GluK1 Kainate Receptor Polymorphisms in Down Syndrome Reveals Allelic Non-Disjunction at 1173(C/T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying Down syndrome (DS-related mental retardation (MR remain poorly understood. In trisomic offspring, non-disjunction may result in the reduction to homozygosity of a susceptibility allele inherited from a heterozygous parent. Accordingly, we sought evidence for allelic non-disjunction in the GluK1 gene that encodes the critical kainite-binding glutamate receptor subunit-5, maps to chromosome 21q22.1 in the DS critical region and is expressed in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. Three polymorphisms of GluK1 [522(A/C rs363538; 1173(C/T rs363430 and 2705(T/C rs363504] were genotyped in 86 DS patient families by means of PCR-coupled RFLP assays and evaluated with respect to allele frequency, heterozygosity, linkage disequilibrium, stage and parental origin of allelic non-disjunction. We report that the distribution of allele frequencies is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Moderate heterozygosity (0.339 and a major allele frequency of 0.78 render the 1173(C/T marker informative. Pair-wise comparisons reveal that 522(A/C-1173(C/T [χ2 = 31.2, df = 1, p = 0.0001; D’ = 0.42] and 1173(C/T-2705(T/C [χ2 = 18.3, df = 1, p = 0.0001; D’ = 0.34] are in significant linkage disequilibrium of weak magnitude. The estimated ratio of meiosis-I to meiosis-II errors arising from allelic non-disjunction of 1173(C/T is 4:1 in maternal cases and 2:1 in paternal cases. Studies including additional markers and patient samples are warranted to further substantiate present findings.

  10. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full......-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered...

  11. Neuropeptide Y-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγs functional binding is reduced in the hippocampus after kainate-induced seizures in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd-Bek, Heidi; Olling, Janne Damm; Gøtzsche, Casper René;

    2014-01-01

    Kainate-induced seizures constitute a model of temporal lobe epilepsy where prominent changes are observed in the hippocampal neuropeptide Y (NPY) system. However, little is known about the functional state and signal transduction of the NPY receptor population resulting from kainate exposure. Thus......, in this study, we explored functional NPY receptor activity in the mouse hippocampus and neocortex after kainate-induced seizures using NPY-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγS binding. Moreover, we also studied levels of [(125) I]-peptide YY (PYY) binding and NPY, Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptor mRNA in these kainate-treated mice....... Functional NPY binding was unchanged up to 12 h post-kainate, but decreased significantly in all hippocampal regions after 24 h and 1 week. Similarly, a decrease in [(125) I]-PYY binding was found in the dentate gyrus (DG) 1 week post-kainate. However, at 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h, [(125) I]-PYY binding...

  12. Effect of curcumin on AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated calcium influx in cultured rat hippocampal neurons%姜黄素对AMPA/KA受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜鹏; 彭伟锋; 刘剑英; 林豪杰; 马昱; 汪昕; 范薇

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨姜黄素对α-氨基-3-羧基-5-甲基异恶唑-4-丙酸(AMPA)/海人酸(KA)受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流的影响.方法 选用胚胎17dSD鼠分离海马,离体培养海马神经元,借助活体钙荧光染色和激光共聚焦钙成像技术观察100μmol/LKA刺激海马神经元内钙的变化,不同浓度(5、10、15、30、50 μmol/L)姜黄素预孵育海马神经元30min对100μmol/L KA刺激下细胞内钙变化的影响,15 μmol/L姜黄素对不同浓度(10、30、50、100、200、300 μmol/L)KA刺激海马神经元内钙变化的影响.应用钴染色技术观察(30、100 μmol/L KA)刺激后海马神经元钴阳性染色细胞变化.姜黄素预孵育30min对KA刺激导致钴阳性染色细胞变化的影响.结果 不同浓度姜黄素预孵育30 min均可以明显缓解100 μmol/L或30 μmol/L KA导致的细胞内钙升高程度.差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),其中15 μmol/L姜黄素作用最为明显.30μmol/L或100 μmol/LKA刺激均可以引起海马神经元钴染色阳性细胞增加,15 μmol/L姜黄素预处理30 min后明显减少钴染色阳性细胞,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),而其他浓度(5 μmol/L或30 μmol/L)姜黄素未见明显影响.结论 一定浓度的姜黄素可以影响AMPA/KA受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流.这可能是姜黄素抗癫痫作用的一个机制.%Objective To investigate the effect of curcumin on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate (KA) receptor-mediated calcium influx in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Methods The hippocampal neurons from SD rat embryos (17 days old) were cultured for 9 days, and fluorescent calcium chelator and confocal microscopy calcium imaging were used to observe the changes in intracellular free calcium in the neurons following stimulation with 100 μmol/L KA. The effect of curcumin pretreatment at different concentrations (10, 30, 50, 100, 200 and 300 μmol/L) for 30 min on 100 μmol/L KA

  13. Temperature- and concentration-dependence of kainate-induced y oscillation in rat hippocampal slices under submerged condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-biao LU; Zhi-hua WANG; Yan-hong ZHOU; Martin VREUGDENHIL

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Fast neuronal network oscillation at the y frequency band (y oscillation:30-80 Hz) has been studied extensively in hippocampal slices under interface recording condition.The aim of this study is to establish a method for recording Y oscillation in submerged hippocampal slices that allows simultaneously monitoring Y oscillation and the oscillation-related intracellular events,such as intracellular Ca2+ concentration or mitochondrial membrane potentials.Methods:Horizontal hippocampal slices (thickness:300 pm) of adult rats were prepared and placed in a submerged or an interface chamber.Extracellular field recordings Were made in the CA3c pyramidal layer of the slices.Kainate,an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist,was applied via perfusion.Data analysis was performed off-line.Results:Addition of kainate (25-1000 nmol/L) induced Y oscillation in both the submerged and interface slices.Kainate increased the Y power in a concentration-dependent manner,but the duration of steady state oscillation was reduced at higher concentrations of kainate.Long-lasting Y oscillation was maintained at the concentrations of 100-300 nmol/L.Under submerged condition,Y oscillation was temperature-dependent,with the maximum power achieved at 29℃.The induction of Y oscillation under submerged condition also required a fast rate of perfusion (5-7 mL/min) and showed a fast dynamic during development and after the washout.Conclusion:The kainite-induced Y oscillation recorded in submerged rat hippocampal slices is useful for studying the intracellular events related to neuronal network activities and may represent a model to reveal the mechanisms underlying the normal neuronal synchronizations and diseased conditions.

  14. Comparison between spontaneous and kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Patel, Nisha; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma frequency, implicated in cognition, can be evoked in hippocampal slices by pharmacological activation. We characterized spontaneous small-amplitude gamma oscillations (SgammaO) recorded in area CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices and compared it with kainate-induced gamma oscillations (KgammaO). SgammaO had a lower peak frequency, a more sinusoidal waveform and was spatially less coherent than KgammaO, irrespective of oscillation amplitude. CA3a had the smallest oscillation power, phase-led CA3c by approximately 4 ms and had the highest SgammaO frequency in isolated subslices. During SgammaO CA3c neurons fired at the rebound of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that were associated with a current source in stratum lucidum, whereas CA3a neurons often fired from spikelets, 3-4 ms earlier in the cycle, and had smaller IPSPs. Kainate induced faster/larger IPSPs that were associated with an earlier current source in stratum pyramidale. SgammaO and KgammaO power were dependent on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, gap junctions and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. SgammaO was suppressed by elevating extracellular KCl, blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors or muscarinic receptors, or activating GluR5-containing kainate receptors. SgammaO was not affected by blocking metabotropic glutamate receptors or hyperpolarization-activated currents. The adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethoxyxanthine (8-CPT) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) increased SgammaO power, indicating that endogenous adenosine and/or endocannabinoids suppress or prevent SgammaO in vitro. SgammaO emerges from a similar basic network as KgammaO, but differs in involvement of somatically projecting interneurons and pharmacological modulation profile. These observations advocate

  15. Effects of AT1 receptor antagonism on kainate-induced seizures and concomitant changes in hippocampal extracellular noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Loyens, Ellen; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-05-01

    In the management of epilepsy, AT1 receptor antagonists have been suggested as an additional treatment strategy. A hyperactive brain angiotensin (Ang) II system and upregulated AT1 receptors are implicated in the cerebrovascular alterations in a genetic form of hypertension. Uncontrolled hypertension could also, in turn, be a risk factor for a seizure threshold decrease and development of epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the effects of the selective AT1 receptor antagonist ZD7155 on kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) development and accompanying changes in the hippocampal extracellular (EC) neurotransmitter levels of noradrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their parent strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, since monoamines are well-known neurotransmitters involved in mechanisms of both epilepsy and hypertension. Status epilepticus was evoked in freely moving rats by a repetitive intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of KA in subconvulsant doses. In the treatment group, ZD7155 (5mg/kg i.p.) was coadministered with the first KA injection. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibited higher susceptibility to SE than WKY rats, but the AT1 receptor antagonist did not alter the development of SE in SHRs or in WKY rats. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated significant KA-induced increases of the hippocampal NAD and DA levels in SHRs and of NAD, 5-HT, and DA in WKY rats. Although SHRs developed more severe seizures while receiving a lower dose of KA compared to WKY rats, AT1 receptor antagonism completely prevented all KA-induced increases of hippocampal monoamine levels in both rat strains without affecting seizure development per se. These results suggest a lack of direct relationship between KA-induced seizure susceptibility and adaptive changes of hippocampal NAD, 5-HT, and DA levels in the effects of ZD7155 in WKY rats and SHRs.

  16. Mitochondrial superoxide production and MnSOD activity following exposure to an agonist and antagonists of ionotropic receptors in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenović Lidija Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the induction of superoxide production in the rat brain was examined after intrahippocampal injection of kainate, a non-NMDA receptor agonist; kainate plus CNQX, a selective AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist; or kainate plus APV, a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The measurements took place at different times in the ipsi- and contralateral hippocampus, forebrain cortex, striatum, and cerebellum homogenates. The used glutamate antagonists both ensured sufficient neuroprotection in the sense of lowering superoxide production and raising MnSOD levels, but in the mechanisms and time dynamics of their effects were different. Our findings suggest that NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors are differentially involved in superoxide production. UDC 612.815 612.82.

  17. Atorvastatin enhances kainate-induced gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengzhang; Wang, Jiangang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Yali; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Fang Li; Wang, Xiao Fang; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Cheng Biao

    2016-09-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to affect cognitive functions in rodents and humans. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Because hippocampal gamma oscillations (γ, 20-80 Hz) are associated with cognitive functions, we studied the effect of atorvastatin on persistent kainate-induced γ oscillation in the CA3 area of rat hippocampal slices. The involvement of NMDA receptors and multiple kinases was tested before and after administration of atorvastatin. Whole-cell current-clamp and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons before and after atorvastatin application. Atorvastatin increased γ power by ~ 50% in a concentration-dependent manner, without affecting dominant frequency. Whereas atorvastatin did not affect intrinsic properties of both pyramidal neurons and interneurons, it increased the firing frequency of interneurons but not that of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whereas atorvastatin did not affect synaptic current amplitude, it increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents, but did not affect the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. The atorvastatin-induced enhancement of γ oscillations was prevented by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89, the ERK inhibitor U0126, or the PI3K inhibitor wortmanin, but not by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atorvastatin enhanced the kainate-induced γ oscillation by increasing interneuron excitability, with an involvement of multiple intracellular kinase pathways. Our study suggests that the classical cholesterol-lowering agent atorvastatin may improve cognitive functions compromised in disease, via the enhancement of hippocampal γ oscillations.

  18. New insights from the use of pilocarpine and kainate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, J P; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Cavalheiro, E A

    2002-06-01

    Local or systemic administration of pilocarpine and kainate in rodents leads to a pattern of repetitive limbic seizures and status epilepticus, which can last for several hours. A latent period follows status epilepticus and precedes a chronic phase, which is characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous limbic seizures. These distinct features, in a single animal preparation, of an acute damage induced by status epilepticus, a silent interval between injury and the onset of spontaneous seizures, and a chronic epileptic state have allowed antiepileptic drug (AED) studies with different purposes, (a) in the acute phase, identification of compounds with efficacy against refractory status epilepticus and/or neuroprotection against damage induced by sustained seizures; (b) in the latent period, identification of agents with a potential for preventing epileptogenesis and/or against seizure-induced long-term behavioral deficits and (c) in the chronic phase, testing drugs effective against partial and secondarily generalized seizures. Studies on pilocarpine and kainate models have pointed out that some AEDs or other compounds exert an antiepileptogenic effect. The analogy of the latent phase of pilocarpine and kainate models with the acquisition of amygdala kindling should encourage testing of drugs that have proved to suppress the evolution of amygdala kindling. Drug testing in the chronic phase should not address only the suppression of secondarily generalized motor seizures. Most of current tools used to quantify spontaneous seizure events need to be coupled to electrophysiology and more sophisticated systems for recording and analyzing behavior.

  19. Target-cell specificity of kainate autoreceptor and Ca2+-store-dependent short-term plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ricardo; Lalic, Tatjana; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Capogna, Marco; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2008-12-03

    Presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) modulate transmission between dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Whether presynaptic KARs affect other synapses made by granule cell axons [mossy fibers (MFs)], on hilar mossy cells or interneurons, is not known. Nor is it known whether glutamate release from a single MF is sufficient to activate these receptors. Here, we monitor Ca(2+) in identified MF boutons traced from granule cell bodies. We show that a single action potential in a single MF activates both presynaptic KARs and Ca(2+) stores, contributing to use-dependent facilitation at MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Rapid local application of kainate to the giant MF bouton has no detectable effect on the resting Ca(2+) but facilitates action-potential-evoked Ca(2+) entry through a Ca(2+) store-dependent mechanism. Localized two-photon uncaging of the Ca(2+) store receptor ligand IP(3) directly confirms the presence of functional Ca(2+) stores at these boutons. In contrast, presynaptic Ca(2+) kinetics at MF synapses on interneurons or mossy cells are insensitive to KAR blockade, to local kainate application or to photolytic release of IP(3). Consistent with this, postsynaptic responses evoked by activation of a single MF show KAR-dependent paired-pulse facilitation in CA3 pyramidal cells, but not in interneurons or mossy cells. Thus, KAR-Ca(2+) store coupling acts as a synapse-specific, short-range autoreceptor mechanism.

  20. Synthesis and enantiopharmacology of new AMPA-kainate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, P; De Amici, M; De Sarro, G

    1999-01-01

    . The convulsant properties of all the compounds were evaluated in vivo on DBA/2 mice after icv injection. CIP-A showed a convulsant activity, measured as tonus and clonus seizures, 18-65 times higher than that produced by AMPA. It was also quite active after ip administration, since it induced seizures in mice...

  1. Hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate and kainate binding in response to entorhinal cortex aspiration or 192 IgG-saporin lesions of the basal forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gill, T.M. [Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Shivers, A. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Nicolle, M.M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1997-02-03

    Lesion models in the rat were used to examine the effects of removing innervation of the hippocampal formation on glutamate receptor binding in that system. Bilateral aspiration of the entorhinal cortex was used to remove the cortical innervation of the hippocampal formation and the dentate gyrus. The subcortical input to the hippocampus from cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain was lesioned by microinjection of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin into the medial septum and vertical limb of diagonal band. After a 30-day postlesion survival, the effects of these lesions on N-methyl-d-aspartate-displaceable [{sup 3}H]glutamate and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in the hippocampus were quantified using in vitro autoradiography. The bilateral entorhinal lesion induced a sprouting response in the dentate gyrus, measured by an increase in the width of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding. It also induced an increase in the density of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in CA3 stratum lucidum and an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding throughout the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus. The selective lesion of cholinergic septal input did not have any effect on hippocampal [{sup 3}H]kainate binding and induced only a moderate decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding that was not statistically reliable.The entorhinal and cholinergic lesions were used as in vivo models of the degeneration of hippocampal input that occurs in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The results from the present lesion study suggest that some, but not all, of the effects on hippocampal [{sup 3}H]kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate binding induced by the lesions are consistent with the status of binding to these receptors in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Consistent with the effects of aging and Alzheimer's disease is an altered topography of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding after entorhinal cortex lesion and a modest decline in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding after lesions of the cholinergic septal input to

  2. Delayed cell death in the contralateral hippocampus following kainate injection into the CA3 subfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglóczky, Z; Freund, T F

    1995-06-01

    A model of epileptic cell death has been developed employing unilateral injections of kainic acid, a glutamate agonist, into the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. The contralateral hippocampus, where neuronal damage is induced by hyperactivity in afferent pathways, served as the model structure. The pattern of cell death in this model was shown earlier to correspond to the vulnerable regions in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present time-course study we demonstrated that the different subpopulations of vulnerable cells in the contralateral hippocampus of the rat degenerate at different times following kainate injection. Spiny calretinin-containing cells in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum disappear at 12-24 h, other types of hilar neurons and CA3c pyramidal cells show shrinkage and argyrophilia at two days, whereas CA1 pyramidal cells degenerate at three days postinjection. The majority of cells destined to die showed a transient expression of the heatshock protein 72, approximately one day (for hilar-CA3c) or two days (for CA1) before degeneration. Parvalbumin-immunoreactivity transiently disappeared from the soma and dendrites of interneurons between the first and the fourth day. The results suggest that seizure-induced cell death is delayed, therefore acute oedema, even if it occurs, is insufficient to kill neurons. The only exception is the population of calretinin-containing interneurons degenerating at 12-24 h. The further one day delay between hilar-CA3c and CA1 cell death is likely to be due to differences in the relative density of glutamate receptor types (kainate versus NMDA) and the source of afferent input of these subfields. Thus, simple pharmacotherapy targeting only one of the excitotoxic mechanisms (i.e. acute oedema of calretinin cells versus delayed death of hilar-CA3c and CA1 cells at different time points) is likely to fail.

  3. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is not required for kainate-induced motoneuron death in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, W; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W

    1998-08-24

    Spinal motoneurons are highly vulnerable to kainate both in vivo and in vitro. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin have recently been shown to mediate kainate-induced neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tPA also mediates the kainate-induced death of motoneurons in vitro. A motoneuron-enriched neuronal population was isolated from the ventral spinal cord of wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mouse embryos. WT and tPA-/- neurons were cultured on WT and tPA-/- spinal glial feeder layers, respectively. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were morphologically indistinguishable. Expression of tPA in WT co-cultures was demonstrated using RT-PCR. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were exposed to kainate for 24 h. The neurotoxic effect of kainate did not differ significantly between WT and tPA-/- cultures. The plasmin inhibitor alpha2-antiplasmin did not protect WT neurons against kainate-induced injury. These results indicate that the plasmin system is not a universal mediator of kainate-induced excitotoxicity.

  4. Switch in glutamate receptor subunit gene expression in CA1 subfield of hippocampus following global ischemia in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrini-Giampietro, D E; Zukin, R.S.; Bennett, M V; Cho, S; Pulsinelli, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Severe, transient global ischemia of the brain induces delayed damage to specific neuronal populations. Sustained Ca2+ influx through glutamate receptor channels is thought to play a critical role in postischemic cell death. Although most kainate-type glutamate receptors are Ca(2+)-impermeable, Ca(2+)-permeable kainate receptors have been reported in specific kinds of neurons and glia. Recombinant receptors assembled from GluR1 and/or GluR3 subunits in exogenous expression systems are permeab...

  5. Ontogeny of Kainate-Induced Gamma Oscillations in the Rat CA3 Hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Vera eTsintsadze; Marat eMinlebaev; Dimitry eSuchkov; Mark eCunningham; Rustem eKhazipov

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged by the end of the first p...

  6. Ontogeny of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the rat CA3 hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Vera; Minlebaev, Marat; Suchkov, Dimitry; Mark O. Cunningham; Khazipov, Roustem

    2015-01-01

    International audience; GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged b...

  7. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  8. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  9. Rapeseed oil and magnesium manipulations affect the seizure threshold to kainate in mice*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagès Nicole

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the drop in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced seizure threshold caused by nutritional magnesium deprivation responded well to the w-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA alpha-linolenate (ALA (5% rapeseed oil diet when compared to w-6 PUFA diet. In the present work, kainate-induced seizures are shown to be also exacerbated by magnesium deprivation. ALA diet better attenuates this seizure exacerbation when compared to the non-ALA diet. The reversion of the drop in kainate seizure threshold induced in these conditions by magnesium administration was, however, better under the non-ALA diet in comparison with the ALA diet. Taken as a whole, present data indicate that kainate like NMDA brain injury is attenuated by ALA diet. On the other hand, the relative failure of ALA diet to potentiate reversion induced by magnesium might suggest that magnesium and ALA protections are not additive.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin posttreatment against kainate-induced excitotoxicity in mixed spinal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong Yoon; Won, You Jin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jong Uk; Sung, In Young; Hwang, Seung Jun; Kim, Mi Jung; Hong, Hea Nam

    2009-01-01

    Although the neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) preconditioning are well known, the potential of postapplied EPO to protect neurons against excitotoxic injury has not been clearly established. Here we show that kainate (KA)-induced excitotoxicity, which plays a key role in secondary spinal cord injury, decreased neuron survival, inhibited neurite extension, and significantly reduced the expression of erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) in cultured spinal neurons. Posttreatment with EPO for 48 hr protected neurons against KA-induced injury, opposing KA-induced apoptosis and promoting regrowth of motoneuron neurites. These neuroprotective effects were paralleled by a restoration of EpoR expression. The importance of the EpoR signaling pathway was demonstrated using an EpoR blocking antibody, which neutralized the neuroprotective action of EPO posttreatment and prevented EPO-induced increases in EpoR expression. We also found that up-regulated EpoR stimulated the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) pathway, which is known to facilitate neuronal growth and neurite regeneration. Although EPO posttreatment modestly attenuated KA-induced reactive gliosis in mixed neuron-glial cultures, blocking EpoR activity did not alter glial fibrillary acidic protein expression or astrocyte proliferation. In conclusion, 48 hr treatment with EPO following KA exposure induced EpoR-dependent protection against excitotoxic injury, demonstrating that preconditioning is not a prerequisite for neuroprotection by EPO. The neuroprotective effects of EPO posttreatment were mediated by an EpoR-dependent signaling pathway that possibly involves JAK2. The neuroprotective effect of EPO posttreatment against KA excitotoxicity appears to reflect direct effects on neurons and not indirect effects mediated by astrocytes.

  11. A subconvulsive dose of kainate selectively compromises astrocytic metabolism in the mouse brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M; Schousboe, Arne

    2014-01-01

    on cerebral metabolism and particularly that associated with astrocytes. We investigated astrocytic and neuronal metabolism in the cerebral cortex of adult mice after treatment with saline (controls), a subconvulsive or a mildly convulsive dose of kainate. A combination of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [1-(13)C......]glutamine and an increase in the calculated astrocytic TCA cycle activity. In contrast, the convulsive dose led to decrements in the cortical content and (13)C labeling of glutamate, glutamine, GABA, and aspartate. Evidence is provided that astrocytic metabolism is affected by a subconvulsive dose of kainate, whereas...

  12. A new pyrrolyl-quinoxalinedione series of non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists: pharmacological characterization and comparison with NBQX and valproate in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W; Lehmann, H; Behl, B; Seemann, D; Teschendorf, H J; Hofmann, H P; Lubisch, W; Höger, T; Lemaire, H G; Gross, G

    1999-01-01

    Antagonists at the ionotropic non-NMDA [AMPA (amino-methyl proprionic acid)/kainate] type of glutamate receptors have been suggested to possess several advantages compared to NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonists, particularly in terms of risk/benefit ratio, but the non-NMDA receptor antagonists available so far have not fulfilled this promise. From a large series of pyrrolyl-quinoxalinedione derivatives, we selected six new competitive non-NMDA receptor antagonists. The basis of selection was high potency and selectivity for AMPA and/or kainate receptors, high in vivo potency after systemic administration, and an acceptable ratio between neuroprotective or anticonvulsant effects and adverse effects. Pharmacological characteristics of these novel compounds are described in this study with special emphasis on their effects in the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, the most common type of epilepsy in humans. In most experiments, NBQX and the major antiepileptic drug valproate were used for comparison with the novel compounds. The novel non-NMDA receptor antagonists markedly differed in their AMPA and kainate receptor affinities from NBQX. Thus, while NBQX essentially did not bind to kainate receptors at relevant concentrations, several of the novel compounds exhibited affinity to rat brain kainate receptors or recombinant kainate receptor subtypes in addition to AMPA receptors. One compound, LU 97175, bound to native high affinity kainate receptors and rat GluR5-GluR7 subunits, i.e. low affinity kainate binding sites, with much higher affinities than to AMPA receptors. All compounds potently blocked AMPA-induced cell death in vitro and, except LU 97175, AMPA-induced convulsions in vivo. In the kindling model, compounds with a high affinity for GluR7 (LU 97175) or compounds (LU 115455, LU 136541) which potently bind to AMPA receptors and low affinity kainate receptor subunits were potent anticonvulsants in the kindling model, whereas the AMPA

  13. Hyperexcitability and cell loss in kainate-treated hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Stelzer, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of hippocampal interneurons has been reported in patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy and in animals treated with kainate. We investigated the relationship between KA induced epileptiform discharge and loss of interneurons in hippocampal slice cultures. Application of KA (1 micro......M) produced reversible epileptiform discharge without neurotoxicity. KA (5 microM), in contrast, produced irreversible epileptiform discharge and neurotoxicity, suggesting that the irreversible epileptiform discharge was required for the neuronal loss. Loss of CA3 pyramidal cells and parvalbumin...

  14. Neuropeptide Y-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγs functional binding is reduced in the hippocampus after kainate-induced seizures in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd-Bek, Heidi; Olling, Janne Damm; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2014-01-01

    . Functional NPY binding was unchanged up to 12 h post-kainate, but decreased significantly in all hippocampal regions after 24 h and 1 week. Similarly, a decrease in [(125) I]-PYY binding was found in the dentate gyrus (DG) 1 week post-kainate. However, at 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h, [(125) I]-PYY binding...

  15. Glutamate Receptor Aptamers and ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    proposed, including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, etc., the cause(s) of the disease, including the pathogenesis of the...GluR6-Selective Aptamers for Potential Autism Therapy This project is to develop RNA aptamers against a GluR6 kainate receptor mutant thought to be...involved in autism . Role: PI Department of Defense (PI: Niu) 4/1/09-3/30/14 Advanced Tech./Therapeutic Develop. Grant Developing Biostable

  16. NMDA and non-NMDA receptor gene expression following global brain ischemia in rats: effect of NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini-Giampietro, D E; Pulsinelli, W A; Zukin, R S

    1994-03-01

    Transient forebrain or global ischemia in rats induces selective and delayed damage of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In a previous study, we have shown that expression of GluR2, the kainate/alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit that governs Ca2+ permeability, is preferentially reduced in CA1 at a time point preceding neuronal degeneration. Postischemic administration of the selective AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX), protects CA1 neurons against delayed death. In this study we examined the effects of NBQX (at a neuroprotective dose) and of MK-801 (a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, not protective in this model) on kainate/AMPA receptor gene expression changes after global ischemia. We also examined the effects of transient forebrain ischemia on expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NMDAR1. In ischemic rats treated with saline, GluR2 and GluR3 mRNAs were markedly reduced in CA1 but were unchanged in CA3 or dentate gyrus. GluR1 and NMDAR1 mRNAs were not significantly changed in any region examined. Administration of NBQX or MK-801 did not alter the ischemia-induced changes in kainate/AMPA receptor gene expression. These findings suggest that NBQX affords neuroprotection by a direct blockade of kainate/AMPA receptors, rather than by a modification of GluR2 expression changes.

  17. Combined gene overexpression of neuropeptide Y and its receptor Y5 in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Casper René; Nikitidou, Litsa; Sørensen, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    on kainate-induced motor seizures in rats. However, combined overexpression of Y5 receptors and neuropeptide Y exerted prominent suppression of seizures. This seizure-suppressant effect of combination gene therapy with Y5 receptors and neuropeptide Y was significantly stronger as compared to neuropeptide Y...

  18. Excitatory and inhibitory pathways modulate kainate excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Rai, R;

    1993-01-01

    In organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, kainate (KA) specifically induces cell loss in the CA3 region while N-methyl-D-aspartate induces cell loss in the CA1 region. The sensitivity of slice cultures to KA toxicity appears only after 2 weeks in vitro which parallels the appearance of mossy...... fibers. KA toxicity is potentiated by co-application with the GABA-A antagonist, picrotoxin. These data suggest that the excitotoxicity of KA in slice cultures is modulated by both excitatory and inhibitory synapses....

  19. Molecular Characteristics of Membrane Glutamate Receptor-Ionophore Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-29

    Neurochemical - Research , 1984, 9, 29-44. Chang, H.H., Michaelis, E.K. & Roy, S. Functional characteristics of . -Z L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate...receptors in isolated brain synaptic membranes. Neurochemical Research , 1984, 9, 901-913. Michaelis, E. K., Galton, N. and Early, S. L. Spider venous

  20. Pharmacological analysis of ionotropic glutamate receptor function in neuronal circuits of the zebrafish olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Tabor

    Full Text Available Although synaptic functions of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the olfactory bulb have been studied in vitro, their roles in pattern processing in the intact system remain controversial. We therefore examined the functions of ionotropic glutamate receptors during odor processing in the intact olfactory bulb of zebrafish using pharmacological manipulations. Odor responses of mitral cells and interneurons were recorded by electrophysiology and 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging. The combined blockade of AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors abolished odor-evoked excitation of mitral cells. The blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors alone, in contrast, increased the mean response of mitral cells and decreased the mean response of interneurons. The blockade of NMDA receptors caused little or no change in the mean responses of mitral cells and interneurons. However, antagonists of both receptor types had diverse effects on the magnitude and time course of individual mitral cell and interneuron responses and, thus, changed spatio-temporal activity patterns across neuronal populations. Oscillatory synchronization was abolished or reduced by AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively. These results indicate that (1 interneuron responses depend mainly on AMPA/kainate receptor input during an odor response, (2 interactions among mitral cells and interneurons regulate the total olfactory bulb output activity, (3 AMPA/kainate receptors participate in the synchronization of odor-dependent neuronal ensembles, and (4 ionotropic glutamate receptor-containing synaptic circuits shape odor-specific patterns of olfactory bulb output activity. These mechanisms are likely to be important for the processing of odor-encoding activity patterns in the olfactory bulb.

  1. Pharmacological and structural characterization of conformationally restricted (S)-glutamate analogues at ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juknaite, Lina; Venskutonyte, Raminta; Assaf, Zeinab

    2012-01-01

    A2 and the kainate receptor GluK3. These structures show that CBG-IV interacts with the binding pocket in the same way as (S)-glutamate. The binding affinities reveal that CBG-IV has high affinity at the AMPA and kainate receptor subtypes. Appreciable binding affinity of CBG-IV was not observed......Conformationally restricted glutamate analogues have been pharmacologically characterized at AMPA and kainate receptors and the crystal structures have been solved of the ligand (2S,1'R,2'S)-2-(2'-carboxycyclobutyl)glycine (CBG-IV) in complex with the ligand binding domains of the AMPA receptor Glu...... at NMDA receptors, where the introduction of the carbocyclic ring is expected to lead to a steric clash with binding site residues. CBG-IV was demonstrated to be an agonist at both GluA2 and the kainate receptor GluK1. CBG-IV showed high affinity binding to GluK1 compared to GluA2, GluK2 and GluK3, which...

  2. Effects of Chronic Alcohol Exposure on Kainate Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Mexico REPORT NUMBER Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-5041 E-Mail: fvalenzuela@ salud .unm. edu 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING 70. SPONSORING IMONITORING AGENCY...on a Separate Group of Rats (lights on from 0900 to 1700 hr). Rats received a Bioserv (Frenchtown, NJ) chocolate -flavored liquid diet that was based

  3. 海人藻酸受体的生理功能%Physiological function of kainate receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云海; 胡国渊

    2001-01-01

    由于缺乏选择性药物,中枢神经系统内海人藻酸受体的生理功能长期未被阐明。近年来发现,2,3-苯二氮类化合物GYKI 52466和GYKI 53655是AMPA受体的选择性拮抗剂。应用重组受体技术,筛选出海人藻酸受体GluR5亚基的高选择性激动剂ATPA及拮抗剂LY294486、 LY293558和LY382884等。应用上述药物开展的生理学研究,证明海人藻酸受体在某些脑区具有介导兴奋性突触传递、参与突触可塑性的诱导机制以及调节神经递质释放等重要功能。

  4. Perampanel inhibition of AMPA receptor currents in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yin Chen

    Full Text Available Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM, concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M-1 s-1 and 0.58 s-1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM was similar at all kainate concentrations (3-100 µM, demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics.

  5. Dose-Dependent Effect of Curcumin on Learning and Memory Deficit in Kainate-Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kiasalari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Epileptic seizures accompany disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills. With regard to antiepileptic potential of curcumin and its beneficial effect on memory, the effect of its administration on learning and memory in kainate-epileptic rats was investigated.   Methods: Forty male rats were divided into sham, positive control ( valproate-treated epileptic, epileptic, and two curcumin-treated epileptic groups. Rat model of epilepsy was induced by unilateral intrahippocampal administration of 4 μg of kainate per rat. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg daily for 1 week before surgery. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial (IL and step-through latencies (STL were determined using passive avoidance test and alternation behavior percentage was obtained according to Y maze test.   Results: Regarding IL, there was no significant difference between the groups. In contrast, STL significantly decreased in curcumin-50-treated epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 263.1 to 184.5 s. However, this parameter significantly increased in curcumin-100-treated epileptic group as compared to epileptic group (p<0.01 (a change from 263.1 to 220.3 s. In addition, STL was also significantly higher in valproic acid-treated epileptic group versus epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 145.7 to 210.3 s. Alternation percentage was also significantly higher in curcumin-50- and curcumin-100-treated epileptic groups relative to epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 60.5 to 77.6 and 80.3%.   Conclusion: Curcumin could dose-dependently enhance the consolidation and recall in epileptic animals and could improve spatial memory in such animals.

  6. Stereoselective effects of AMOA on non-NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, P; Nielsen, B; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1992-01-01

    a nearly parallel shift to the right of the dose-response curve for kainate-induced currents. AMOA was found to have two different effects on AMPA receptors: 1) currents elicited by low concentrations of AMPA (6 microM) were inhibited by AMOA with an IC50 value of 160 +/- 19 microM and 2) currents elicited...

  7. Electron spin resonance assay of ascorbyl radical generation in mouse hippocampal slices during and after kainate-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumizu, Toshiki; Noda, Yasuko; Mori, Akitane; Packer, Lester

    2005-12-01

    As an index of oxidative status, we analyzed ascorbyl radical generation during and after kainate-induced seizures in mouse hippocampus, using an ESR spectrometer equipped with a special tissue-type quartz cell. A specific doublet ESR spectrum was observed after seizures, and the g value and the hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) of the spectrum were identical with those of ascorbyl radical itself. Antiepileptic zonisamide inhibited the generation of ascorbyl radical accompanying the seizures.

  8. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R;

    2010-01-01

    studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by alpha-CGRP, capsaicin......During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical...

  9. Visualization of spatiotemporal energy dynamics of hippocampal neurons by mass spectrometry during a kainate-induced seizure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Sugiura

    Full Text Available We report the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI imaging mass spectrometry combined with capillary electrophoresis (CE mass spectrometry to visualize energy metabolism in the mouse hippocampus by imaging energy-related metabolites. We show the distribution patterns of ATP, ADP, and AMP in the hippocampus as well as changes in their amounts and distribution patterns in a murine model of limbic, kainate-induced seizure. As an acute response to kainate administration, we found massive and moderate reductions in ATP and ADP levels, respectively, but no significant changes in AMP levels--especially in cells of the CA3 layer. The results suggest the existence of CA3 neuron-selective energy metabolism at the anhydride bonds of ATP and ADP in the hippocampal neurons during seizure. In addition, metabolome analysis of energy synthesis pathways indicates accelerated glycolysis and possibly TCA cycle activity during seizure, presumably due to the depletion of ATP. Consistent with this result, the observed energy depletion significantly recovered up to 180 min after kainate administration. However, the recovery rate was remarkably low in part of the data-pixel population in the CA3 cell layer region, which likely reflects acute and CA3-selective neural death. Taken together, the present approach successfully revealed the spatiotemporal energy metabolism of the mouse hippocampus at a cellular resolution--both quantitatively and qualitatively. We aim to further elucidate various metabolic processes in the neural system.

  10. Distribution of neurotransmitter receptors and zinc in the pigeon (Columba livia) hippocampal formation: A basis for further comparison with the mammalian hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christina; Bingman, Verner P; Ströckens, Felix; Letzner, Sara; Sauvage, Magdalena; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Zilles, Karl; Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-08-01

    The avian hippocampal formation (HF) and mammalian hippocampus share a similar functional role in spatial cognition, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms allowing the functional similarity are incompletely understood. To understand better the organization of the avian HF and its transmitter receptors, we analyzed binding site densities for glutamatergic AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptors; GABAA receptors; muscarinic M1 , M2 and nicotinic (nACh) acetylcholine receptors; noradrenergic α1 and α2 receptors; serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors; dopaminergic D1/5 receptors by using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Additionally, we performed a modified Timm staining procedure to label zinc. The regionally different receptor densities mapped well onto seven HF subdivisions previously described. Several differences in receptor expression highlighted distinct HF subdivisions. Notable examples include 1) high GABAA and α1 receptor expression, which rendered distinctive ventral subdivisions; 2) high α2 receptor expression, which rendered distinctive a dorsomedial subdivision; 3) distinct kainate, α2 , and muscarinic receptor densities that rendered distinctive the two dorsolateral subdivisions; and 4) a dorsomedial region characterized by high kainate receptor density. We further observed similarities in receptor binding densities between subdivisions of the avian and mammalian HF. Despite the similarities, we propose that 300 hundred million years of independent evolution has led to a mosaic of similarities and differences in the organization of the avian HF and mammalian hippocampus and that thinking about the avian HF in terms of the strict organization of the mammalian hippocampus is likely insufficient to understand the HF of birds.

  11. Aryl- and heteroaryl-substituted phenylalanines as AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Chałupnik, Paulina; Johansen, Tommy Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    in radioligand binding assays at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors. The most interesting compound in this series, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3'-hydroxy-5-(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)propanoic acid 7e, showed the binding affinity of 4.6 µM for native AMPA receptors and almost 5-fold lower affinity...... with molecular modeling confirmed that aryl/heteroaryl-substituted phenylalanine analogues effectively bind to AMPA receptors with low micromolar affinity and high selectivity over native NMDA and kainate receptors. These properties make 7e a promising lead for the further development of new AMPA receptor...

  12. Prenatal Exposure to 1-Bromopropane Suppresses Kainate-Induced Wet Dog Shakes in Immature Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Kanemitsu, Masanari; Egawa, Sumie; Ishidao, Toru; Ueno, Susumu; Hori, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is used in degreasing solvents and spray adhesives. The adverse effects of 1-BP have been reported in human cases and adult animal models, and its developmental toxicity has also been reported, but its effects on developmental neurotoxicity have not been investigated in detail. We evaluated the effects in rat pups of prenatal exposure to 1-BP on behaviors such as scratching and wet dog shakes (WDS), which were induced by injection of kainate (KA). Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to vaporized 1-BP with 700 ppm from gestation day 1 to day 20 (6 h/day). KA at doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 2.0 mg/kg were intraperitoneally injected into a control group and a 1-BP-exposed group of pups on postnatal day 14. There was no significant difference in scratching between the control and the prenatally 1-BP-exposed groups, while suppression of the occurrence ratio of WDS was observed at the low dose of 0.1 mg/kg of KA in the prenatally 1-BP-exposed pups. Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to 1-BP affects neurobehavioral responses in the juvenile period.

  13. Effects of Swimming Exercise on Learning and Memory in the Kainate-Lesion Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorantla, Vasavi Rakesh; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Bond, Vernon; Meyers, Dewey G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An aerobic exercise (Ex) augments neurogenesis and may ameliorate learning and memory deficits in the rat Kainic Acid (KA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy in the short-term but whether it reverses learning and memory deficits after a substantial period of delay remains unclear. Aim This study tests the hypothesis that aerobic Ex attenuates the learning and memory deficits associated with kainate seizures in the long-term. Materials and Methods A total of 60 rats were subjected to chemical lesioning using KA and to an Ex intervention consisting of a 30 days period of daily swimming for 15 min, immediately after KA lesioning (immediate exposure) or after a 60 days period of normal activity (delayed exposure). We evaluated spatial learning on a T-maze test, expressed as percentage of correct responses. We evaluated memory on a passive-avoidance test, expressed as time spent in a compartment in which the rats were previously exposed to an aversive stimulus. Results Ex increases the percentage of correct responses, percentage bias, and number of alternations, associated with the T-maze testing for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Ex decreased the time exposed to the aversive stimulus in the smaller compartment of the two-compartment passive-avoidance test, also for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Conclusion These findings suggest that, after temporal lobe epileptic seizures in rats, swimming exercise may attenuate the learning and memory deficits, even if the exercise treatment is delayed. PMID:28050361

  14. mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated sodium channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex after monocular deafferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Matute, Carlos; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    It has been postulated that, in the adult visual cortex, visual inputs modulate levels of mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors in an activity-dependent manner. To investigate this possibility, we performed a monocular enucleation in adult rabbits and, 15 days later, collected their left and right visual cortices. Levels of mRNAs coding for voltage-activated sodium channels, and for receptors for kainate/α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine were semiquantitatively estimated in the visual cortices ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion by the Xenopus oocyte/voltage-clamp expression system. This technique also allowed us to study some of the pharmacological and physiological properties of the channels and receptors expressed in the oocytes. In cells injected with mRNA from left or right cortices of monocularly enucleated and control animals, the amplitudes of currents elicited by kainate or AMPA, which reflect the abundance of mRNAs coding for kainate and AMPA receptors, were similar. There was no difference in the sensitivity to kainate and in the voltage dependence of the kainate response. Responses mediated by NMDA, GABA, and glycine were unaffected by monocular enucleation. Sodium channel peak currents, activation, steady-state inactivation, and sensitivity to tetrodotoxin also remained unchanged after the enucleation. Our data show that mRNAs for major neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex are not obviously modified by monocular deafferentiation. Thus, our results do not support the idea of a widespread dynamic modulation of mRNAs coding for receptors and ion channels by visual activity in the rabbit visual system. PMID:9501250

  15. Differential patterns of synaptotagmin7 mRNA expression in rats with kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Glavan

    Full Text Available Previous studies in rat models of neurodegenerative disorders have shown disregulation of striatal synaptotagmin7 mRNA. Here we explored the expression of synaptotagmin7 mRNA in the brains of rats with seizures triggered by the glutamatergic agonist kainate (10 mg/kg or by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (30 mg/kg in LiCl (3 mEq/kg pre-treated (24 h rats, in a time-course experiment (30 min-1 day. After kainate-induced seizures, synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels were transiently and uniformly increased throughout the dorsal and ventral striatum (accumbens at 8 and 12 h, but not at 24 h, followed at 24 h by somewhat variable upregulation within different parts of the cerebral cortex, amigdala and thalamic nuclei, the hippocampus and the lateral septum. By contrast, after LiCl/pilocarpine-induced seizures, there was a more prolonged increase of striatal Synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels (at 8, 12 and 24 h, but only in the ventromedial striatum, while in some other of the aforementioned brain regions there was a decline to below the basal levels. After systemic post-treatment with muscarinic antagonist scopolamine in a dose of 2 mg/kg the seizures were either extinguished or attenuated. In scopolamine post-treated animals with extinguished seizures the striatal synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels (at 12 h after the onset of seizures were not different from the levels in control animals without seizures, while in rats with attenuated seizures, the upregulation closely resembled kainate seizures-like pattern of striatal upregulation. In the dose of 1 mg/kg, scopolamine did not significantly affect the progression of pilocarpine-induced seizures or pilocarpine seizures-like pattern of striatal upregulation of synaptotagmin7 mRNA. In control experiments, equivalent doses of scopolamine per se did not affect the expression of synaptotagmin7 mRNA. We conclude that here described differential time course and pattern of synaptotagmin7 mRNA expression imply regional

  16. Insights into the olfactory system of the ectoparasite Caligus rogercresseyi: molecular characterization and gene transcription analysis of novel ionotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Marambio, Jorge Pino; Wadsworth, Simon; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-10-01

    Although various elements of the olfactory system have been elucidated in insects, it remains practically unstudied in crustaceans at a molecular level. Among crustaceans, some species are classified as ectoparasites that impact the finfish aquaculture industry. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify and comprehend the signaling pathways used by these in host recognition. The present study, through RNA-seq and qPCR analyses, found novel transcripts involved in the olfactory system of Caligus rogercresseyi, in addition to the transcriptomic patterns expressed during different stages of salmon lice development. From a transcriptomic library generated by Illumina sequencing, contigs that annotated for ionotropic receptors and other genes implicated in the olfactory system were identified and extracted. Full length mRNA was obtained for the ionotropic glutamate receptor 25, which had 3923 bp, and for the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 2, which had 2737 bp. Furthermore, two other transcripts identified as glutamate receptor, ionotropic kainate 2-like were found. In silico analysis was performed for the transcription expression from different stages of development in C. rogercresseyi, and clusters according to RPKM values were constructed. Gene transcription data were validated through qPCR assays in ionotropic receptors, and showed an expression of glutamate receptor 25 associated with the copepodid stage whereas adults, especially male adults, were associated with the kainate 2 and kainate 2-like transcripts. Additionally, gene transcription analysis of the ionotropic receptors showed an overexpression in response to the presence of masking compounds and immunostimulant in salmon diets. This response correlated to a reduction in sea lice infection following in vivo challenge. Diets with masking compounds showed a decrease of lice infestation of up to 25%. This work contributes to the available knowledge on chemosensory systems in this ectoparasite, providing

  17. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K; Mayer, Mark L

    2015-11-03

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.

  18. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Lee, Chi-Hon; Mayer, Mark L.

    2016-12-01

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation by its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation.

  19. Distribution and functional properties of glutamate receptors in the leech central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierkes, P W; Hochstrate, P; Schlue, W R

    1996-06-01

    1. The effect of kainate and other glutamatergic agonists on the membrane potential (Em), the intracellular Na+ activity (aNai), and the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of identified leech neurons and neuropile glial cells was measured with conventional and ion-sensitive microelectrodes, as well as with the use of the iontophoretically injected fluorescent indicators sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate and Fura-2. 2. In Retzius neurons, AE, L, 8, and 101 motoneurons, and in the unclassified 50 neurons (Leydig cells) and AP neurons, as well as in neuropile glial cells, bath application of 100 microM kainate evoked a marked membrane depolarization and an increase in aNai and [Ca2+]i. The kainate-induced aNai increase persisted in solutions with high Mg2+ concentration in which synaptic transmission is blocked. 3. A membrane depolarization as well as an increase in aNai and [Ca2+]i was also evoked by L-glutamate, quisqualate, and L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA). The agonist-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX). 4. In Ca(2+)-free solution, the kainate-induced [Ca2+]i increase was abolished in the neurons and in neuropile glial cells, whereas membrane depolarization and aNai increase were unchanged. In Na(+)-free solution, kainate had no effect on Em, aNai, or [Ca2+]i in the neurons. 5. In the mechanosensory T, P, and N neurons, kainate induced considerably smaller membrane depolarizations than in the other neurons or in neuropile glial cells, and it had no significant effect on aNai or [Ca2+]i. 6. It is concluded that in leech segmental ganglia the majority of the neurons and the neuropile glial cells, but probably not the mechanosensory neurons, possess glutamate receptors of the AMPA-kainate type. In the neurons, the [Ca2+]i increase caused by glutamatergic agonists is due to Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels that are activated by the agonist

  20. Switch in glutamate receptor subunit gene expression in CA1 subfield of hippocampus following global ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini-Giampietro, D E; Zukin, R S; Bennett, M V; Cho, S; Pulsinelli, W A

    1992-11-01

    Severe, transient global ischemia of the brain induces delayed damage to specific neuronal populations. Sustained Ca2+ influx through glutamate receptor channels is thought to play a critical role in postischemic cell death. Although most kainate-type glutamate receptors are Ca(2+)-impermeable, Ca(2+)-permeable kainate receptors have been reported in specific kinds of neurons and glia. Recombinant receptors assembled from GluR1 and/or GluR3 subunits in exogenous expression systems are permeable to Ca2+; heteromeric channels containing GluR2 subunits are Ca(2+)-impermeable. Thus, altered expression of GluR2 in development or following a neurological insult or injury to the brain can act as a switch to modify Ca2+ permeability. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying delayed postischemic cell death, GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 gene expression was examined by in situ hybridization in postischemic rats. Following severe, transient forebrain ischemia GluR2 gene expression was preferentially reduced in CA1 hippocampal neurons at a time point that preceded their degeneration. The switch in expression of kainate/AMPA receptor subunits coincided with the previously reported increase in Ca2+ influx into CA1 cells. Timing of the switch indicates that it may play a causal role in postischemic cell death.

  1. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G; Barslund, Anne F; Bach, Tinna B; Kristensen, Anders S; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-11-26

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes reveals that two of these, Nephila polyamine toxins 1 (NPTX-1) and 8 (NPTX-8), comprise intriguing pharmacological activities by having subnanomolar IC(50) values at kainate receptors.

  2. Plasminogen mRNA induction in the mouse brain after kainate excitation: codistribution with plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Ronit; Abramovitz, Rene; Miskin, Ruth

    2002-08-15

    Plasminogen (Plg), which can be converted to the active protease plasmin by plasminogen activators, has been previously implicated in brain plasticity and in toxicity inflicted in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by kainate. Here we have localized Plg. mRNA through in situ hybridization in brain cryosections derived from normal adult mice or after kainate injection (i.p.). The results indicated that Plg mRNA was undetectable in the normal brain, but after kainate injection it was induced in neuronal cells in multiple, but specific areas, including layers II-III of the neocortex; the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and the piriform cortex; the caudate/putamen and accumbens nucleus shell; throughout the amygdaloid complex; and in the CAI/CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. Interestingly, this distribution pattern coincided with what we have recently described for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA, however differing from that of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA, as also shown here. These results suggest that enhanced Plg gene expression could be involved in events associated with olfactory, striatal, and limbic structures. Furthermore, because PAI-2 is thought to intracellularly counteract cytotoxic events, our results raise the possibility that PAI-2 can act in the brain as an intracellular neuroprotector against potential plasmin-mediated toxicity.

  3. receptores

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    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  4. Glutamate-containing dipeptides do not modulate ligand binding at excitatory amino acid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, J; Fagg, G E

    1986-10-08

    Dipeptides of the structure X-Glu (e.g. X = Phe, Leu) have been proposed as allosteric modulators of excitatory amino acid receptors in rat brain membranes. Here we report that these dipeptides reduce the binding of L-[3H]Glu (predominantly N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive sites) and of [3H]kainate to postsynaptic density preparations isolated from rat brain. However, several observations indicate that the effects of these dipeptides are mediated not by allosteric modulation, but by free L-Glu liberated by the actions of a membrane-associated aminopeptidase. The absolute and relative potencies of the dipeptides are similar at all acidic amino acid binding sites examined to date, suggesting the involvement of a factor with similar activity at each site (e.g. L-Glu). N-Acetyl-Met-Glu is a weak inhibitor of L-Glu and kainate binding, and N-blocked peptides are known to be poor substrates of aminopeptidases. Bestatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidases, decreases or abolishes the effects of substrate dipeptides on L-Glu and kainate receptor binding, while having no effect itself.

  5. Arctigenin reduces neuronal responses in the somatosensory cortex via the inhibition of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Sándor; Jócsák, Gergely; Moldován, Kinga; Sedlák, Éva; Preininger, Éva; Boldizsár, Imre; Tóth, Attila; Atlason, Palmi T; Molnár, Elek; Világi, Ildikó

    2016-07-01

    Lignans are biologically active phenolic compounds related to lignin, produced in different plants. Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, has been used as a neuroprotective agent for the treatment of encephalitis. Previous studies of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurones raised the possibility that arctigenin inhibits kainate-induced excitotoxicity. The aims of the present study were: 1) to analyse the effect of arctigenin on normal synaptic activity in ex vivo brain slices, 2) to determine its receptor binding properties and test the effect of arctigenin on AMPA/kainate receptor activation and 3) to establish its effects on neuronal activity in vivo. Arctigenin inhibited glutamatergic transmission and reduced the evoked field responses. The inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the evoked field responses proved to be substantially dose dependent. Our results indicate that arctigenin exerts its effects under physiological conditions and not only on hyper-excited neurons. Furthermore, arctigenin can cross the blood-brain barrier and in the brain it interacts with kainate sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. These results indicate that arctigenin is a potentially useful new pharmacological tool for the inhibition of glutamate-evoked responses in the central nervous system in vivo.

  6. Retraction: Radenović L. Effect of 7-nitroindazole on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in the rat brain following kainate-induced neurotoxicity. Arch biol sci, 2008, 60(1:25-32. DOI: 10.2298/ABS0801025R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a notice of retraction of the article: Effect of 7-nitroindazole on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in the rat brain following kainate-induced neurotoxicity, published in the Archives of Biological Sciences in 2008, Vol. 60, Issue 1. The Editor-in-Chief has been informed that this paper plagiarizes an earlier paper: Radenovic L, Selakovic V, Kartelija G, Todorovic N, Nedeljkovic M. Differential effects of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in rat brain following intrahippocampal injection. Brain Res Bull, 2004, 64(1:85-93. The results in the article being retracted were presented as findings obtained from novel research. Inspection of the results has revealed that they were part of research already presented in the original article without appropriate justification or cross-referencing. The Editor-in-Chief considered publishing a notice of redundancy specifying the elements published previously. However, since the original article had already been autoplagiarized by the same corresponding author in the same journal (retraction DOI:10.2298/ABS150318026E, the article is being retracted in accordance with the publishing ethics of the Archives of Biological Sciences in order to preserve the integrity of scientific research. We apologize to the journal's readers that it took so long to notice this error and instigate retraction of the paper. We request our readers to contact the editorial office and editors of the journal directly should similar cases occur in the future, so that the necessary action can be taken more promptly. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/ABS0801025R

  7. Development of calcium-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors in cultured neocortical neurons visualized by cobalt staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S

    1998-01-01

    The developmental expression of calcium (Ca2+)-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptors in cultured neocortical neurons was evaluated by using cobalt uptake, a histochemical method that identifies cells expressing Ca2+-permeable, non-N-methyl......The developmental expression of calcium (Ca2+)-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptors in cultured neocortical neurons was evaluated by using cobalt uptake, a histochemical method that identifies cells expressing Ca2+-permeable, non......-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) receptors. At a concentration of 500 microM, AMPA was found to stimulate cobalt uptake only late in development, resulting in staining of 2.7%+/-0.3% of the neurons maintained in culture for 12 days in vitro (DIV). When AMPA receptor desensitization was blocked with 50 microM cyclothiazide......, the developmental profile of cobalt uptake mediated by 25 microM AMPA changed dramatically. The cobalt staining now appeared in young cultures (5 DIV), and the percentage of stained cells increased from 3.4%+/-0.2% at 5 DIV to 21.7%+/-1.6% at 12 DIV. The effect of 200 microM kainate was similar to that seen with 25...

  8. Ablation of NMDA receptors enhances the excitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

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    Fumiaki Fukushima

    Full Text Available Synchronized discharges in the hippocampal CA3 recurrent network are supposed to underlie network oscillations, memory formation and seizure generation. In the hippocampal CA3 network, NMDA receptors are abundant at the recurrent synapses but scarce at the mossy fiber synapses. We generated mutant mice in which NMDA receptors were abolished in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons by postnatal day 14. The histological and cytological organizations of the hippocampal CA3 region were indistinguishable between control and mutant mice. We found that mutant mice lacking NMDA receptors selectively in CA3 pyramidal neurons became more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. Consistently, mutant mice showed characteristic large EEG spikes associated with multiple unit activities (MUA, suggesting enhanced synchronous firing of CA3 neurons. The electrophysiological balance between fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission was comparable between control and mutant pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region, while the NMDA receptor-slow AHP coupling was diminished in the mutant neurons. In the adult brain, inducible ablation of NMDA receptors in the hippocampal CA3 region by the viral expression vector for Cre recombinase also induced similar large EEG spikes. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of CA3 NMDA receptors enhanced the susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures. These results raise an intriguing possibility that hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors may suppress the excitability of the recurrent network as a whole in vivo by restricting synchronous firing of CA3 neurons.

  9. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  10. (R-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

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    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. Methods (R-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM. Results All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. Conclusions P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  11. Ionotropic glutamate receptors & CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-04-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although aetilogy is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual's susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking are important to fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate receptor (KAR) synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms.

  12. Kainate-enhanced release of D-(3H)aspartate from cerebral cortex and striatum: reversal by baclofen and pentobarbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potashner, S.J.; Gerard, D.

    1983-06-01

    A study was made of the actions of the excitant neurotoxin, kainic acid, on the uptake and the release of D-(2,3-3H)aspartate (D-ASP) in slices of guinea pig cerebral neocortex and striatum. The slices took up D-ASP, reaching concentrations of the amino acid in the tissue which were 14-23 times that in the medium. Subsequently, electrical stimulation of the slices evoked a Ca2+-dependent release of a portion of the D-ASP. Kainic acid (10(-5)-10(-3) M) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of D-ASP uptake. The electrically evoked release of D-ASP was increased 1.6-2.0 fold by 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid. The kainate-enlarged release was Ca2+-dependent. Dihydrokainic acid, an analogue of kainic acid with little excitatory or toxic action, did not increase D-ASP release but depressed D-ASP uptake. Attempts were made to block the action of kainic acid with baclofen and pentobarbital, compounds which depress the electrically evoked release of L-glutamate (L-GLU) and L-aspartate (L-ASP). Baclofen (4 X 10(-6)M), an antispastic drug, and pentobarbital (10(-4)M), an anesthetic agent, each inhibited the electrically evoked release of D-ASP and prevented the enhancement of the release above control levels usually produced by 10(-4)M kainic acid. It is proposed that 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid may enhance the synaptic release of L-GLU and L-ASP from neurons which use these amino acids as transmitters. This action is prevented by baclofen and pentobarbital. In view of the possibility that cell death in Huntington's disease could involve excessive depolarization of striatal and other cells by glutamate, baclofen might be effective in delaying the loss of neurons associated with this condition.

  13. OLM interneurons are transiently recruited into field gamma oscillations evoked by brief kainate pressure ejections onto area CA1 in mice hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiani, E

    2009-02-01

    Oscillations (30-100 Hz) are correlated with the cognitive functions of the brain. In the hippocampus interactions between perisomatic and trilaminar interneurons with pyramidal cells are thought to underlie generation of field gamma oscillations. In area CA3 OLM interneurons receive synaptic input in gamma range but generate action potential (AP) output in theta band and are involved in theta oscillations synchronized along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. In slice preparations of CA3 area the spike timing of OLM cells could be modulated by carbachole induced gamma oscillations, although their firing rates are limited to theta frequency. Normally, OLM interneurons are somatostatin positive cells. In this study we tested whether parvalbumin (PV) containing OLM interneurons in area CA1 limit AP output during kainate pressure ejection also to theta frequency. We used focal short applications of kainate in area CA1 to induce filed gamma oscillations with an average frequency of about 44.7+/-4.4 Hz. The duration of field gamma was on average 8.9+/-3.5 s. During such oscillations CA1 PV positive OLM interneurons of mice hippocampus received excitatory synaptic input at gamma frequency. Moreover, their AP output was in gamma range as well. Thus, we show that beside the somatostatin containing OLM interneurons, which generate theta rhythm there are PV containing OLM cells, which could synchronize the distal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells to the field gamma oscillations.

  14. The selective activation of the glutamate receptor GluR5 by ATPA is controlled by serine 741.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mai Marie; Liljefors, Tommy; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Egebjerg, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Only a few agonists exhibit selectivity between the AMPA and the kainate subtypes of the glutamate receptor. The most commonly used kainate receptor preferring agonist, (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-ATPA], is an (R,S)-2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) derivative in which the methyl group at the 5-position of the isoxazole ring has been replaced by a tert-butyl group. When characterized by the two-electrode voltage clamp method in Xenopus laevis oocytes, ATPA exhibits at least 50-fold higher potency on the kainate receptor subtype, GluR5, compared with the AMPA receptors. Through mutagenesis studies of GluR5 and the AMPA receptor subtype, GluR1, we demonstrate that this pronounced selectivity for ATPA can be ascribed to Ser741 in GluR5 and Met722 in GluR1. Examination of other aliphatic substitutions at the 5-position of the isoxazole ring revealed that (R,S)-2-amino-3-(5-isopropyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (isopropyl-AMPA) displayed a 6-fold higher potency for GluR5 than for GluR1, whereas the analogs, propyl-AMPA and isobutyl-AMPA, did not exhibit significantly different potencies. Our study suggests that the GluR5 selectivity was a result not only of steric interference between the bulky tert-butyl group in ATPA and the methionine (Met722) in GluR1 but also a serine-dependent stabilization of the active conformation of GluR5 induced by ATPA. The stabilization was agonist-dependent and observed only for ATPA and isopropyl-AMPA, not for other AMPA analogs with bulky substitutions at the 5-position of the isoxazole ring.

  15. Anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine on spontaneous seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy: comparison of intraperitoneal injections with drug-in-food protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstatter, Heidi L; Clark, Suzanne; Dudek, F Edward

    2007-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of intraperitoneal (IP) injections and oral administration of carbamazepine (CBZ) in food on the frequency of spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. The purpose was to develop a convenient drug-in-food approach for continuous, long-term administration of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Single IP injections of CBZ (10-100 mg/kg) were compared to vehicle injections via six AED-versus-vehicle tests using a repeated-measures, crossover protocol. Similar protocols were used with CBZ-containing or control food pellets. CBZ significantly reduced motor seizure frequency at 30 and 100 mg/kg after single IP injections, and these doses completely blocked motor seizures during a 6-h postdrug epoch in 25% and 70% of the animals, respectively. Single administrations of 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg CBZ in food also significantly reduced motor seizures, and blocked seizures in 33% and 89% of the rats, respectively. CBZ administered in food three times per day (100 mg/kg x3 CBZ in food) continuously blocked nearly all motor seizures over a 5-day period, and completely suppressed motor seizures in 50% of the animals tested. CBZ strongly suppresses spontaneous motor seizures, and single doses of CBZ in food are as effective as IP injections in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. CBZ administered regularly in food continuously blocks nearly all motor seizures, and may provide a relatively simple method to test AEDs in chronic models of epilepsy.

  16. Induction of c-fos mRNA expression in an in vitro hippocampal slice model of adult rats after kainate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid or bicuculline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massamiri, T; Khrestchatisky, M; Ben-Ari, Y

    1994-01-17

    Levels of gene expression following in vitro treatment of rat hippocampal slices with kainate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or bicuculline were measured by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method. Following a short-term exposure to kainate, c-fos gene expression was induced by 12-fold in the adult, but not the newborn, hippocampus. Under the same experimental conditions, zifl268 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression were unchanged. Our results also demonstrate a lack of induction of c-fos, zifl268 and BDNF after short-time treatment of either adult or newborn hippocampal slices with GABA or bicuculline. The relevance of the differential induction of gene expression in the adult and newborn in an in vitro hippocampal slice model as compared to previously described in vivo models is discussed.

  17. In vitro autoradiography of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampus and striatum of aged Long-Evans rats: relationship to spatial learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Bizon, J.L. [Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Nicolle, M.M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1996-08-02

    Using in vitro autoradiography, we investigated [{sup 3}H]{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate, [{sup 3}H]kainate and [{sup 3}H]N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in two forebrain regions, the hippocampus and striatum, of young (four months of age) and aged (24-25 months of age) Long-Evans rats that had previously been tested for spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze. Although there was substantial preservation of binding in the aged rats, reductions in binding were present in the aged rats that were specific to ligand and anatomical region. In the hippocampus of aged rats, [{sup 3}H]{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate binding in CA1 and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in CA3 were reduced. In contrast, N-methyl-d-aspartate binding was not significantly different between age groups. There was evidence of sprouting in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of aged rats, indicated by changes in the topography of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding. Binding density was analysed with respect to patch/matrix compartmentalization in the striatum. The most striking result was a large decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in aged rats that was not limited to any dorsal/ventral or patch/matrix area of the striatum. Additionally, [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in striatal matrix was modestly reduced in aged rats. Of these age effects, only N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in the striatum and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in the CA3 region of the hippocampus were correlated with spatial learning, with lower binding in the aged rats associated with better spatial learning ability.Age-related alterations in ionotropic glutamate receptors differ with respect to the receptor subtype and anatomical region examined. The age effects were not neccessarily indicative of cognitive decline, as only two age-related binding changes were correlated with spatial learning. Interestingly, in these instances, lower binding in the aged rats was associated with preserved spatial

  18. Antagonism of ionotropic glutamate receptors attenuates chemical ischemia-induced injury in rat primary cultured myenteric ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Carpanese

    Full Text Available Alterations of the enteric glutamatergic transmission may underlay changes in the function of myenteric neurons following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R contributing to impairment of gastrointestinal motility occurring in these pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether glutamate receptors of the NMDA and AMPA/kainate type are involved in myenteric neuron cell damage induced by I/R. Primary cultured rat myenteric ganglia were exposed to sodium azide and glucose deprivation (in vitro chemical ischemia. After 6 days of culture, immunoreactivity for NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors subunits, GluN(1 and GluA(1-3, GluK(1-3 respectively, was found in myenteric neurons. In myenteric cultured ganglia, in normal metabolic conditions, -AP5, an NMDA antagonist, decreased myenteric neuron number and viability, determined by calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 assay, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, measured with hydroxyphenyl fluorescein. CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist exerted an opposite action on the same parameters. The total number and viability of myenteric neurons significantly decreased after I/R. In these conditions, the number of neurons staining for GluN1 and GluA(1-3 subunits remained unchanged, while, the number of GluK(1-3-immunopositive neurons increased. After I/R, -AP5 and CNQX, concentration-dependently increased myenteric neuron number and significantly increased the number of living neurons. Both -AP5 and CNQX (100-500 µM decreased I/R-induced increase of ROS levels in myenteric ganglia. On the whole, the present data provide evidence that, under normal metabolic conditions, the enteric glutamatergic system exerts a dualistic effect on cultured myenteric ganglia, either by improving or reducing neuron survival via NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptor activation, respectively. However, blockade of both receptor pathways may exert a protective role on myenteric neurons following and I

  19. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of gluazo, a Photo-Switchable Ligand for the Glutamate Receptor GluK2.

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    Yanan Guo

    Full Text Available Photochromic ligands (PCLs, defined as photoswitchable molecules that are able to endow native receptors with a sensitivity towards light, have become a promising photopharmacological tool for various applications in biology. In general, PCLs consist of a ligand of the target receptor covalently linked to an azobenzene, which can be reversibly switched between two configurations upon light illumination. Gluazo, as a PCL that targets excitatory amino acid receptors, in its dark-adapted trans iso-form was characterized to be a partial agonist of the kainate glutamate receptor GluK2. Application of UV light leads to the formation of the cis form, with remarkedly reduced affinity towards GluK2. The mechanism of the change of ligand affinity induced by the photoisomerization was unresolved. The presented computational study explains how the isomerization of such a PCL affects the structural changes in the target receptor that lead to its activation.

  20. CP-465,022, a selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, blocks AMPA receptors but is not neuroprotective in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menniti, Frank S; Buchan, Alistair M; Chenard, Bertrand L; Critchett, Donald J; Ganong, Alan H; Guanowsky, Victor; Seymour, Patricia A; Welch, Willard M

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor inhibition has been hypothesized to provide neuroprotective efficacy after cerebral ischemia on the basis of the activity in experimental ischemia models of a variety of compounds with varying selectivity for AMPA over other glutamate receptor subtypes. CP-465,022 is a new, potent, and selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist. The present study investigated the ability of this compound to reduce neuronal loss after experimental cerebral ischemia to probe the neuroprotective potential of AMPA receptor inhibition. To demonstrate that CP-465,022 gains access to the brain, the effects of systemic administration of CP-465,022 were investigated on AMPA receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses in hippocampus and on chemically induced seizures in rats. The compound was then investigated for neuroprotective efficacy in rat global and focal ischemia models at doses demonstrated to be maximally effective in the electrophysiology and seizure models. CP-465,022 potently and efficaciously inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and the induction of seizures. However, at comparable doses, CP-465,022 failed to prevent CA1 neuron loss after brief global ischemia or to reduce infarct volume after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion. Given the high selectivity of CP-465,022 for AMPA over kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtypes of glutamate receptors, the lack of neuroprotective efficacy of the compound calls into question the neuroprotective efficacy of AMPA receptor inhibition after ischemia.

  1. Protection from neuronal damage induced by combined oxygen and glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal cultures by glutamate receptor antagonists.

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    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-07-31

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, mimicking transient ischemic conditions. The involvement of different glutamate receptors in individual hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) was studied using antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine) and AMPA/kainate receptors (CNQX and GYKI 52466). Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI) allowed detection of damaged cells. For quantitative determination of neuronal damage, fluorescence intensity was measured after a 22 h recovery period and was related to maximal fluorescence intensity measured after fixation and PI restaining of the cultures at the end of the experiment. Dizocilpine (10 microM), CNQX (100 microM) and GYKI 52466 (100 microM) provided complete protection in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus following the moderate ischemic insult, when the antagonists were present permanently. This indicates that none of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes dominated toxicity in the most sensitive subpopulation of neurons. When applied only during the recovery period protection with dizocilpine (10 microM) or CNQX (100 microM) was drastically reduced by about 60% in the most sensitive area (CA1), but only slightly by 15% in CA3. Therefore the onset of irreversible damage seems to occur earlier in CA1 than in CA3. Blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors by GYKI 52466 (100 microM) offered no neuroprotection if the compound was applied only during the recovery period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Cholesterol modulates open probability and desensitization of NMDA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinek, Miloslav; Vyklicky, Vojtech; Borovska, Jirina; Lichnerova, Katarina; Kaniakova, Martina; Krausova, Barbora; Krusek, Jan; Balik, Ales; Smejkalova, Tereza; Horak, Martin; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the CNS. Although these receptors are in direct contact with plasma membrane, lipid–NMDAR interactions are little understood. In the present study, we aimed at characterizing the effect of cholesterol on the ionotropic glutamate receptors. Whole-cell current responses induced by fast application of NMDA in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were almost abolished (reduced to 3%) and the relative degree of receptor desensitization was increased (by seven-fold) after acute cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Both of these effects were fully reversible by cholesterol repletion. By contrast, the responses mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors were not affected by cholesterol depletion. Similar results were obtained in CGCs after chronic inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis by simvastatin and acute enzymatic cholesterol degradation to 4-cholesten-3-one by cholesterol oxidase. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that membrane fluidity increased after methyl-β-cyclodextrin pretreatment. However, no change in fluidity was observed after cholesterol enzymatic degradation, suggesting that the effect of cholesterol on NMDARs is not mediated by changes in membrane fluidity. Our data show that diminution of NMDAR responses by cholesterol depletion is the result of a reduction of the open probability, whereas the increase in receptor desensitization is the result of an increase in the rate constant of entry into the desensitized state. Surface NMDAR population, agonist affinity, single-channel conductance and open time were not altered in cholesterol-depleted CGCs. The results of our experiments show that cholesterol is a strong endogenous modulator of NMDARs. Key points NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are tetrameric cation channels permeable to calcium; they mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS and their excessive activation can lead to

  3. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in preganglionic neurons of the rat inferior salivatory nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; Chiego, D J; Bradley, R M

    2008-02-29

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) subunit composition of inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN) neurons was studied by immunohistochemical staining of retrogradely labeled neurons. Preganglionic ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner or parotid salivary glands were labeled by application of a fluorescent tracer to the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve or the otic ganglion respectively. We used polyclonal antibodies to glutamate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, (NMDA receptor subunits) GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, GluR4 (AMPA receptor subunits), and GluR5-7, KA2 (kainate receptor subunits) to determine their expression in ISN neurons. The distribution of the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor subunits in retrogradely labeled ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands was qualitatively similar. The percentage of retrogradley labeled ISN neurons innervating the parotid gland expressing the GluR subunits was always greater than those innervating the von Ebner gland. For both von Ebner and parotid ISN neurons, NR2A subunit staining had the highest expression and the lowest expression of GluR subunit staining was NR2B for von Ebner ISN neurons and GluR1 for parotid ISN neurons. The percentage of NR2B and GluR4 expressing ISN neurons was significantly different between the two glands. The percentage of ISN neurons that expressed GluR receptor subunits ranged widely indicating that the distribution of GluR subunit expression differs amongst the ISN neurons. While ISN preganglionic neurons express all the GluR subunits, differences in the percentage of ISN neurons expression between neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands may relate to the different functional roles of these glands.

  4. An alternating GluN1-2-1-2 subunit arrangement in mature NMDA receptors.

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    Morgane Riou

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs form glutamate-gated ion channels that play a critical role in CNS physiology and pathology. Together with AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDARs are known to operate as tetrameric complexes with four membrane-embedded subunits associating to form a single central ion-conducting pore. While AMPA and some kainate receptors can function as homomers, NMDARs are obligatory heteromers composed of homologous but distinct subunits, most usually of the GluN1 and GluN2 types. A fundamental structural feature of NMDARs, that of the subunit arrangement around the ion pore, is still controversial. Thus, in a typical NMDAR associating two GluN1 and two GluN2 subunits, there is evidence for both alternating 1/2/1/2 and non-alternating 1/1/2/2 arrangements. Here, using a combination of electrophysiological and cross-linking experiments, we provide evidence that functional GluN1/GluN2A receptors adopt the 1/2/1/2 arrangement in which like subunits are diagonal to one another. Moreover, based on the recent crystal structure of an AMPA receptor, we show that in the agonist-binding and pore regions, the GluN1 subunits occupy a "proximal" position, closer to the central axis of the channel pore than that of GluN2 subunits. Finally, results obtained with reducing agents that differ in their membrane permeability indicate that immature (intracellular and functional (plasma-membrane inserted pools of NMDARs can adopt different subunit arrangements, thus stressing the importance of discriminating between the two receptor pools in assembly studies. Elucidating the quaternary arrangement of NMDARs helps to define the interface between the subunits and to understand the mechanism and pharmacology of these key signaling receptors.

  5. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  6. Kainate-induced epileptogenesis alters circular hole board learning strategy but not the performance of C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubens, Chantal J; Kaptein, Pascale S; ter Horst, Judith P; Voskuyl, Rob A; Schenk, Geert J

    2014-12-01

    Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) frequently show cognitive deficits. However, the relation between mTLE and cognitive impairment is poorly understood. To gain more insight into epilepsy-associated alterations in cognitive performance, we studied the spatial learning of C57BL/6J mice five weeks after kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE). Typically, structural hippocampal rearrangements take place within five weeks after SE. Mice were monitored by exposing them to four tasks with a focus on spatial memory and anxiety: the circular hole board, modified hole board, novel object-placement task, and elevated plus maze. On the circular hole board, animals showed a higher preference for hippocampus-independent strategies after SE. In contrast, no change in strategy was seen on the modified hole board, but animals with SE were able to finish the task more often. Animals did not have an increased preference for a relocated object in the novel object-placement task but showed an increased locomotion after SE. No indications for altered anxiety were found when tested on the elevated plus maze following SE. These data suggest that the circular hole board is a well-suited paradigm to detect subtle SE-induced hippocampal deficits.

  7. Acute alterations of somatodendritic action potential dynamics in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after kainate-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minge

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3-4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca(2+ imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2-5 mV. No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP, was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP-induced Ca(2+ signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na(+ and K(+ current components.

  8. Subregion-specific role of glutamate receptors in the nucleus accumbens on drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaohu; Lasseter, Heather C; Ramirez, Donna R; Ponds, KaiCee L; Wells, Audrey M; Fuchs, Rita A

    2012-03-01

    The functional integrity of the nucleus accumbens (NAC) core and shell is necessary for contextual cocaine-seeking behavior in the reinstatement animal model of drug relapse; however, the neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present study evaluated the contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor populations to drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to lever press for un-signaled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced active lever pressing) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts after JNJ16259685 (mGluR1 antagonist: 0.0, 0.6, or 30 pg/0.3 µl/hemisphere) or CNQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist: 0.0, 0.03, or 0.3 µg/0.3 µl /hemisphere) administration into the NAC core, medial or lateral NAC shell, or the ventral caudate-putamen (vCPu, anatomical control). JNJ16259685 or CNQX in the NAC core dose-dependently impaired contextual cocaine-seeking behavior relative to vehicle. Conversely, CNQX, but not JNJ16259685, in the lateral or medial NAC shell attenuated, whereas CNQX or JNJ16259685 in vCPu failed to inhibit, this behavior. The manipulations failed to alter instrumental behavior in the extinction context, general motor activity or food-reinforced instrumental behavior in control experiments. Thus, glutamate-mediated changes in drug context-induced motivation for cocaine involve distinct neuropharmacological mechanisms within the core and shell subregions of the NAC, with the stimulation of mGlu1 and AMPA/kainate receptors in the NAC core and the stimulation of AMPA/kainate, but not mGlu1, receptors in the NAC shell being necessary for this phenomenon.

  9. Estudio computacional de las relaciones evolutivas de los receptores ionotrópicos NMDA, AMPA y kainato en cuatro especies de primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francy Johanna Moreno-Pedraza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational study of the evolutionary relationships of the ionotropic receptors NMDA, AMPA and kainate in four species ofprimates. Objective. To identify the influence of changes on the secondary structure and evolutionary relationship of NMDA, AMPA andkainate receptors in Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus and Macaca mulatta. Materials and methods. We identified 91sequences for NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors and analyzed with software for predicting secondary structure, phosphorylation sites,multiple alignments, selection of protein evolution models and phylogenetic prediction. Results. We found that subunits GLUR5, NR2A,NR2C and NR3A showed structural changes in the C-terminal region and formation or loss of phosphorylation sites in this zone.Additionally the phylogenetic prediction suggests that the NMDA NR2 subunits are the closest to the ancestral node that gives rise to theother subunits. Conclusions. Changes in structure and phosphorylation sites in GLUR5, NR2A, NR2C and NR3A subunits suggestvariations in the interaction of the C-terminal region with kinase proteins and with proteins with PDZ domains, which could affect thetrafficking and anchoring of the subunits. On the other hand, the phylogenetic prediction suggests that the changes that occurred in the NR2subunits gave rise to the other subunits of glutamate ionotropic receptors, primarily because the NMDA and particularly the NR2D subunitsare the most closely related to the ancestral node that possibly gave rise to the iGluRs.

  10. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  11. Three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2 in complex with the agonist (S)-ATPA: implications for receptor subunit selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Marie-Louise; Hogner, Anders; Stensbøl, Tine B; Gouaux, Eric; Egebjerg, Jan; Kastrup, Jette S

    2003-02-27

    Two X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid ((S)-ATPA) have been determined with and without Zn(2+) ions. (S)-ATPA induces a domain closure of ca. 21 degrees compared to the apo form. The tert-butyl moiety of (S)-ATPA is buried in a partially hydrophobic pocket and forces the ligand into the glutamate-like binding mode. The structures provide new insight into the molecular basis of agonist selectivity between AMPA and kainate receptors.

  12. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Injection of Caenorhabditis elegans polyA RNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the expression of neurotransmitter receptors that generated some unique responses, including ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors as well as receptors that coupled to G proteins, such as those to octopamine, norepinephrine, and angiotensin, which activated the oocyte’s own phosphatidylinositol system and calcium-gated chloride channels. The oocytes also expressed chloride-conducting glutamate receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and voltage-operated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, GABA, and kainate did not generate ionic currents, suggesting that the corresponding receptors were not expressed or were not functional in the oocytes. The use of X. laevis oocytes for expressing worm RNA demonstrates that there are many molecular components whose role remains to be clarified in the nematode. Among them are the nature of the endogenous agonists for the octopamine and angiotensin receptors and the subunits that compose the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors and the norepinephrine receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide cascade. PMID:16549772

  13. Properties of GluR3 receptors tagged with GFP at the amino or carboxyl terminus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomical visualization of neurotransmitter receptor localization is facilitated by tagging receptors, but this process can alter their functional properties. We have evaluated the distribution and properties of WT glutamate receptor 3 (GluR3) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (WT GluR3) and two receptors in which GFP was tagged to the amino terminus (GFP-GluR3) or to the carboxyl terminus (GluR3-GFP). Although the fluorescence in Xenopus oocytes was stronger in the vegetal hemisphere because of localization of internal structures (probable sites of production, storage or recycling of receptors), the insertion of receptors into the plasma membrane was polarized to the animal hemisphere. The fluorescence intensity of oocytes injected with GluR3-GFP RNA was approximately double that of oocytes injected with GFP-GluR3 RNA. Accordingly, GluR3-GFP oocytes generated larger kainate-induced currents than GFP-GluR3 oocytes, with similar EC50 values. Currents elicited by glutamate, or AMPA coapplied with cyclothiazide, were also larger in GluR3-GFP oocytes. The glutamate- to kainate-current amplitude ratios differed, with GluR3-GFP being activated more efficiently by glutamate than the WT or GFP-GluR3 receptors. This pattern correlates with the slower decay of glutamate-induced currents generated by GluR3-GFP receptors. These changes were not observed when GFP was tagged to the amino terminus, and these receptors behaved like the WT. The antagonistic effects of 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) were not altered in any of the tagged receptors. We conclude that GFP is a useful and convenient tag for visualizing these proteins. However, the effects of different sites of tag insertion on receptor characteristics must be taken into account in assessing the roles played by these receptor proteins. PMID:17881566

  14. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  15. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  16. Optical control of endogenous receptors and cellular excitability using targeted covalent photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Bautista-Barrufet, Antoni; Trapero, Ana; Garrido-Charles, Aida; Díaz-Tahoces, Ariadna; Camarero, Nuria; Pittolo, Silvia; Valbuena, Sergio; Pérez-Jiménez, Ariadna; Gay, Marina; García-Moll, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Escrich, Carles; Lerma, Juan; de la Villa, Pedro; Fernández, Eduardo; Pericàs, Miquel À; Llebaria, Amadeu; Gorostiza, Pau

    2016-07-20

    Light-regulated drugs allow remotely photoswitching biological activity and enable plausible therapies based on small molecules. However, only freely diffusible photochromic ligands have been shown to work directly in endogenous receptors and methods for covalent attachment depend on genetic manipulation. Here we introduce a chemical strategy to covalently conjugate and photoswitch the activity of endogenous proteins and demonstrate its application to the kainate receptor channel GluK1. The approach is based on photoswitchable ligands containing a short-lived, highly reactive anchoring group that is targeted at the protein of interest by ligand affinity. These targeted covalent photoswitches (TCPs) constitute a new class of light-regulated drugs and act as prosthetic molecules that photocontrol the activity of GluK1-expressing neurons, and restore photoresponses in degenerated retina. The modularity of TCPs enables the application to different ligands and opens the way to new therapeutic opportunities.

  17. Y5 neuropeptide Y receptor overexpression in mice neither affects anxiety- and depression-like behaviours nor seizures but confers moderate hyperactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V; Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira; Gøtzsche, Casper René;

    2012-01-01

    , by testing effects of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) encoding Y5 (rAAV-Y5) in anxiety- and depression-like behaviour as well as in kainate-induced seizures in adult mice. The rAAV-Y5 vector injected into the hippocampus and amygdala induced a pronounced and sustained increase in Y5 receptor...... mRNA expression and functional Y5 receptor binding, but no significant effects were found with regard to anxiety- and depression-like behaviours or seizure susceptibility. Instead, rAAV-mediated Y5 receptor transgene overexpression resulted in moderate hyperactivity in the open field test....... These results do not support a potential role for single transgene overexpression of Y5 receptors for modulating anxiety-/depression-like behaviours or seizures in adult mice. Whether the induction of hyperactivity by rAAV-Y5 could be relevant for other conditions remains to be studied....

  18. Fosb gene products contribute to excitotoxic microglial activation by regulating the expression of complement C5a receptors in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Katogi, Atsuhisa; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Kajitani, Kosuke; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nestler, Eric J; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-08-01

    The Fosb gene encodes subunits of the activator protein-1 transcription factor complex. Two mature mRNAs, Fosb and ΔFosb, encoding full-length FOSB and ΔFOSB proteins respectively, are formed by alternative splicing of Fosb mRNA. Fosb products are expressed in several brain regions. Moreover, Fosb-null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and adult-onset spontaneous epilepsy, demonstrating important roles in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Study of Fosb products has focused almost exclusively on neurons; their function in glial cells remains to be explored. In this study, we found that microglia express equivalent levels of Fosb and ΔFosb mRNAs to hippocampal neurons and, using microarray analysis, we identified six microglial genes whose expression is dependent on Fosb products. Of these genes, we focused on C5ar1 and C5ar2, which encode receptors for complement C5a. In isolated Fosb-null microglia, chemotactic responsiveness toward the truncated form of C5a was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells. Fosb-null mice were significantly resistant to kainate-induced seizures compared with wild-type mice. C5ar1 mRNA levels and C5aR1 immunoreactivity were increased in wild-type hippocampus 24 hours after kainate administration; however, such induction was significantly reduced in Fosb-null hippocampus. Furthermore, microglial activation after kainate administration was significantly diminished in Fosb-null hippocampus, as shown by significant reductions in CD68 immunoreactivity, morphological change and reduced levels of Il6 and Tnf mRNAs, although no change in the number of Iba-1-positive cells was observed. These findings demonstrate that, under excitotoxicity, Fosb products contribute to a neuroinflammatory response in the hippocampus through regulation of microglial C5ar1 and C5ar2 expression.

  19. Molecular cloning, chromosomal mapping, and functional expression of human brain glutamate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W.; Ferrer-Montiel, A.V.; Schinder, A.F.; Montal, M. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States)); McPherson, J.P. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Evans, G.A. (Salk Inst. for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1992-02-15

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding a glutamate receptor was isolated from a human brain cDNA library, and the gene product was characterized after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Degenerate PCR primers to conserved regions of published rat brain glutamate receptor sequences amplified a 1-kilobase fragment from a human brain cDNA library. This fragment was used as a probe for subsequent hybridization screening. Two clones were isolated that, based on sequence information, code for different receptors: a 3-kilobase clone, HBGR1, contains a full-length glutamate receptor cDNA highly homologous to the rat brain clone GluR1, and a second clone, HBGR2, contains approximately two-thirds of the coding region of a receptor homologous to rat brain clone GluR2. Southern and PCr analysis of a somatic cell-hybrid panel mapped HBGR1 to human chromosome 5q31.3-33.3 and mapped HBGR2 to chromosome 4q25-34.3. Xenopus oocytes injected with in vitro-synthesized HBGR1 cRNA expressed currents activated by glutamate receptor agonists. These results indicate that clone HBGR1 codes for a glutamate receptor of the kainate subtype cognate to members of the glutamate receptor family from rodent brain.

  20. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  1. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases.

  2. Pharmacology of glutamate receptor antagonists in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W

    1998-04-01

    It is widely accepted that excitatory amino acid transmitters such as glutamate are involved in the initiation of seizures and their propagation. Most attention has been directed to synapses using NMDA receptors, but more recent evidence indicates potential roles for ionotropic non-NMDA (AMPA/kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors as well. Based on the role of glutamate in the development and expression of seizures, antagonism of glutamate receptors has long been thought to provide a rational strategy in the search for new, effective anticonvulsant drugs. Furthermore, because glutamate receptor antagonists, particularly those acting on NMDA receptors, protect effectively in the induction of kindling, it was suggested that they may have utility in epilepsy prophylaxis, for example, after head trauma. However, first clinical trials with competitive and uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists in patients with partial (focal) seizures, showed that these drugs lack convincing anticonvulsant activity but induce severe neurotoxic adverse effects in doses which were well tolerated in healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the only animal model which predicted the unfavorable clinical activity of competitive NMDA antagonists in patients with chronic epilepsy was the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, indicating that this model should be used in the search for more effective and less toxic glutamate receptor antagonists. In this review, results from a large series of experiments on different categories of glutamate receptor antagonists in fully kindled rats are summarized and discussed. NMDA antagonists, irrespective whether they are competitive, high- or low-affinity uncompetitive, glycine site or polyamine site antagonists, do not counteract focal seizure activity and only weakly, if at all, attenuate propagation to secondarily generalized seizures in this model, indicating that once kindling is established, NMDA receptors are not critical for the expression of

  3. Characterisation of the effects of ATPA, a GLU(K5) receptor selective agonist, on excitatory synaptic transmission in area CA1 of rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, V R J; Collingridge, G L

    2002-06-01

    Kainate receptors are involved in a variety of synaptic functions in the CNS including the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission. Previously we described the depressant action of the GLU(K5) selective agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA) on synaptic transmission in the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway of rat hippocampal slices. In the present study we report several new features of the actions of ATPA at this synapse. Firstly, the effectiveness of ATPA is developmentally regulated. Secondly, the effects of ATPA decline during prolonged or repeated applications. Thirdly, the effects of ATPA are not mediated indirectly via activation of GABA(A), GABA(B), muscarinic or adenosine A(1) receptors. Fourthly, elevating extracellular Ca(2+) from 2 to 4 mM antagonises the effects of ATPA. Some differences between the actions of ATPA and kainate on synaptic transmission in the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway are also noted.

  4. Role of glutamatergic receptors located in the nucleus raphe magnus on antinociceptive effect of morphine microinjected into the nucleus cuneiformis of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Soltani-Hekmat, Ava; Khani, Abbas; Komaki, Alireza

    2007-10-29

    Neurons in the nucleus cuneiformis (CnF), located just ventrolateral to the periaqueductal gray, project to medullary nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), which is a key medullary relay for descending pain modulation and is critically involved in opioid-induced analgesia. Previous studies have shown that antinociceptive response of CnF-microinjected morphine can be modulated by the specific subtypes of glutamatergic receptors within the CnF. In this study, we evaluated the role of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors that are widely distributed within the NRM on morphine-induced antinociception elicited from the CnF. Hundred and five male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were used. Morphine (10, 20 and 40 microg) and NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (10 microg) or kainate/AMPA receptor antagonist, DNQX (0.5 microg) in 0.5 microl saline were stereotaxically microinjected into the CnF and NRM, respectively. The latency of tail-flick response was measured at set intervals (2, 7, 12, 17, 22, 27 min after microinjection) by using an automated tail-flick analgesiometer. The results showed that morphine microinjection into the CnF dose-dependently causes increase in tail-flick latency (TFL). MK-801 microinjected into the NRM, just 1 min before morphine injection into the CnF, significantly attenuated antinociceptive effects of morphine. On the other hand, DNQX microinjected into the NRM, significantly increased TFL after local application of morphine into the CnF. We suggest that morphine related antinociceptive effect elicited from the CnF is mediated, in part, by NMDA receptor at the level of the NRM whereas kainite/AMPA receptor has a net inhibitory influence at the same pathway.

  5. Systemic administration of kainic acid induces selective time dependent decrease in [{sup 125}I]insulin-like growth factor I, [{sup 125}I]insulin-like growth factor II and [{sup 125}I]insulin receptor binding sites in adult rat hippocampal formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirion, R. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Chabot, J.-G.; Dore, S. [Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Seto, D. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Kar, S. [Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    1997-08-11

    Administration of kainic acid evokes acute seizure in hippocampal pathways that results in a complex sequence of functional and structural alterations resembling human temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural alterations induced by kainic acid include selective loss of neurones in CA1-CA3 subfields and the hilar region of the dentate gyrus followed by sprouting and permanent reorganization of the synaptic connections of the mossy fibre pathways. Although the neuronal degeneration and process of reactive synaptogenesis have been extensively studied, at present little is known about means to prevent pathological conditions leading to kainate-induced cell death. In the present study, to address the role of insulin-like growth factors I and II, and insulin in neuronal survival as well as synaptic reorganization following kainate-induced seizure, the time course alterations of the corresponding receptors were evaluated. Additionally, using histological preparations, the temporal profile of neuronal degeneration and hypertrophy of resident astroglial cells were also studied. [{sup 125}I]Insulin-like growth factor I binding was found to be decreased transiently in almost all regions of the hippocampal formation at 12 h following treatment with kainic acid. The dentate hilar region however, exhibited protracted decreases in [{sup 125}I]insulin-like growth factor I receptor sites throughout (i.e. 30 days) the study. [{sup 125}I]Insulin-like growth factor II receptor binding sites in the hippocampal formation were found to be differentially altered following systemic administration of kainic acid. A significant decrease in [{sup 125}I]insulin-like growth factor II receptor sites was observed in CA1 subfield and the pyramidal cell layer of the Ammon's horn at all time points studied whereas the hilar region and the stratum radiatum did not exhibit alteration at any time. A kainate-induced decrease in [{sup 125}I]insulin receptor binding was noted at all time points in the

  6. LTP requires a reserve pool of glutamate receptors independent of subunit type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Adam J; Shi, Yun; Lu, Wei; Cerpas, Manuel; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-01-24

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is thought to be an important cellular mechanism underlying memory formation. A widely accepted model posits that LTP requires the cytoplasmic carboxyl tail (C-tail) of the AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) receptor subunit GluA1. To find the minimum necessary requirement of the GluA1 C-tail for LTP in mouse CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, we used a single-cell molecular replacement strategy to replace all endogenous AMPA receptors with transfected subunits. In contrast to the prevailing model, we found no requirement of the GluA1 C-tail for LTP. In fact, replacement with the GluA2 subunit showed normal LTP, as did an artificially expressed kainate receptor not normally found at these synapses. The only conditions under which LTP was impaired were those with markedly decreased AMPA receptor surface expression, indicating a requirement for a reserve pool of receptors. These results demonstrate the synapse's remarkable flexibility to potentiate with a variety of glutamate receptor subtypes, requiring a fundamental change in our thinking with regard to the core molecular events underlying synaptic plasticity.

  7. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehek, E.A.; Hernan, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a “long-loop” feedback system from the PFC to the VTA and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA. Infusions of a combination of a NMDA (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5 mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  8. Undifferentiated embryonic stem cells express ionotropic glutamate receptor mRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja ePachernegg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs do not only mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the vertebrate CNS, but also modulate pre- and postnatal neurogenesis. Most of the studies on the developmental role of iGluRs are performed on neural progenitors and neural stem cells. We took a step back in our study by examining the role of iGluRs in the earliest possible cell type, embryonic stem cells (ESCs, by looking at the mRNA expression of the major iGluR subfamilies in undifferentiated mouse ESCs. For that, we used two distinct murine ES cell lines, 46C ESCs and J1 ESCs. Regarding 46C ESCs, we found transcripts of kainate receptors (GluK2 to GluK5, AMPA receptors (GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4, and NMDA receptors (GluN1, and GluN2A to GluN2D. Analysis of 46C-derived cells of later developmental stages, namely neuroepithelial precursor cells (NEPs and neural stem cells (NSCs, revealed that the mRNA expression of KARs is significantly upregulated in NEPs and, subsequently, downregulated in NSCs. However, we could not detect any protein expression of any of the KAR subunits present on the mRNA level either in ESCs, NEPs, or NSCs. Regarding AMPARs and NMDARs, GluN2A is weakly expressed at the protein level only in NSCs. Matching our findings for GluRs, all three cell types were found to weakly express pre- and postsynaptic markers of glutamatergic synapses only at the mRNA level. Finally, we performed patch-clamp recordings of 46C ESCs and could not detect any current upon iGluR agonist application. Similar to 46C ESCs, J1 ESCs express kainate receptors (GluK2 to GluK5, AMPA receptors (GluA3, and NMDA receptors (GluN1, and GluN2A to GluN2D at the mRNA level, but these transcripts are not translated into receptor proteins either. Thus, we conclude that ESCs do not contain functional iGluRs, although they do express an almost complete set of iGluR subunit mRNAs.

  9. A toolkit for orthogonal and in vivo optical manipulationof ionotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Todd Levitz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to optically manipulate specific neuronal signaling proteins with genetic precision paves the way for the dissection of their roles in brain function, behavior, and disease. Chemical optogenetic control with photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs enables rapid, reversible and reproducible activation or block of specific neurotransmitter-gated receptors and ion channels in specific cells. In this study, we further engineered and characterized the light-activated GluK2 kainate receptor, LiGluR, to develop a toolbox of LiGluR variants. Low-affinity LiGluRs allow for efficient optical control of GluK2 while removing activation by native glutamate, whereas variant RNA edited versions enable the synaptic role of receptors with high and low Ca2+ permeability to be assessed and spectral variant photoswitches provide flexibility in illumination. Importantly, we establish that LiGluR works efficiently in the cortex of awake, adult mice using standard optogenetic techniques, thus opening the door to probing the role of specific synaptic receptors and cellular signals in the neural circuit operations of the mammalian brain in normal conditions and in disease. The principals developed in this study are widely relevant to the engineering and in vivo use of optically controllable proteins, including other neurotransmitter receptors.

  10. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl− channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to γ-aminobutyric acid, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders. PMID:12237406

  11. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade is neuroprotective in experimental autoimmune optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Fairless, Richard; Williams, Sarah K; Heine, Katrin; Cavalié, Adolfo; Diem, Ricarda

    2014-06-01

    Optic neuritis is a common clinical manifestation of the chronic inflammatory CNS disease multiple sclerosis that can result in persistent visual impairment caused by degeneration of optic nerve axons and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with optic neuritis (Brown Norway rats), we show that administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists memantine or MK801 results in RGC protection, axon protection, and reduced demyelination of optic nerves. Calcium imaging revealed that RGC responses to glutamate stimulation predominantly occurred via NMDA receptors and were inhibited by memantine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, oligodendrocytes were mainly responsive through the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptor. This suggests that NMDA receptor blockade protected RGCs directly and that the protection was independent of effects on oligodendrocytes. Moreover, increased RGC survival was observed before the onset of optic nerve demyelination--when RGC degeneration had already started. These results indicate an important pathophysiologic role for NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate toxicity during the induction phase of this disease model and highlight a potential target for therapeutic neuroprotection in human optic neuritis.

  12. Two-photon brightness of azobenzene photoswitches designed for glutamate receptor optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Berlin, Shai; Levitz, Joshua; Kienzler, Michael A; Yuan, Zhe; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-02-17

    Mammalian neurotransmitter-gated receptors can be conjugated to photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) to enable photoactivation, or photoantagonism, while preserving normal function at neuronal synapses. "MAG" PTLs for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are based on an azobenzene photoswitch that is optimally switched into the liganding state by blue or near-UV light, wavelengths that penetrate poorly into the brain. To facilitate deep-tissue photoactivation with near-infrared light, we measured the efficacy of two-photon (2P) excitation for two MAG molecules using nonlinear spectroscopy. Based on quantitative characterization, we find a recently designed second generation PTL, L-MAG0460, to have a favorable 2P absorbance peak at 850 nm, enabling efficient 2P activation of the GluK2 kainate receptor, LiGluR. We also achieve 2P photoactivation of a metabotropic receptor, LimGluR3, with a new mGluR-specific PTL, D-MAG0460. 2P photoswitching is efficiently achieved using digital holography to shape illumination over single somata of cultured neurons. Simultaneous Ca(2+)-imaging reports on 2P photoswitching in multiple cells with high temporal resolution. The combination of electrophysiology or Ca(2+) imaging with 2P activation by optical wavefront shaping should make second generation PTL-controlled receptors suitable for studies of intact neural circuits.

  13. Role of glutamate receptors and nitric oxide on the effects of glufosinate ammonium, an organophosphate pesticide, on in vivo dopamine release in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Lilian R F; Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Alfonso, Miguel; Ferreira, Vania M; Durán, Rafael

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the possible role of glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production on effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an organophosphate pesticide structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo striatal dopamine release in awake and freely moving rats. For this, we used antagonists of NMDA (MK-801 and AP5) or AMPA/kainate (CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (l-NAME and 7-NI), to study the effects of GLA on release of dopamine from rat striatum. So, intrastriatal infusion of 10mM GLA significantly increased dopamine levels (1035±140%, compared with basal levels) and administration of GLA to MK-801 (250μM) or AP5 (650μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼40% and ∼90% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with MK-801 or AP5. Administration of GLA to CNQX (500μM) pretreated animals produced an effect that was not significantly different from the one produced in animals not pretreated with CNQX. On the other hand, administration of GLA to l-NAME (100μM) or 7-NI (100μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼80% and ∼75% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with these inhibitors. In summary, GLA appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA (and not AMPA/kainate) receptors with possible NO production to induce in vivo dopamine release. Administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors partially blocks the release of dopamine from rat striatum.

  14. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons

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    Manfred eOswald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarisation (AHP underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD of postsynaptic potentials (PSP in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg2+-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg2+-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission.

  15. Common variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 and GRIA3 receptor genes are associated with migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfrancesco Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system which acts by the activation of either ionotropic (AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptors or G-protein coupled metabotropic receptors. Glutamate is widely accepted to play a major role in the path physiology of migraine as implicated by data from animal and human studies. Genes involved in synthesis, metabolism and regulation of both glutamate and its receptors could be, therefore, considered as potential candidates for causing/predisposing to migraine when mutated. Methods The association of polymorphic variants of GRIA1-GRIA4 genes which encode for the four subunits (GluR1-GluR4 of the alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA receptor for glutamate was tested in migraineurs with and without aura (MA and MO and healthy controls. Results Two variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 (rs2195450 and GRIA3 (rs3761555 genes resulted strongly associated with MA (P = 0.00002 and P = 0.0001, respectively, but not associated with MO, suggesting their role in cortical spreading depression. Whereas the rs548294 variant in GRIA1 gene showed association primarily with MO phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that MA and MO phenotypes could be genetically related. These variants modify binding sites for transcription factors altering the expression of GRIA1 and GRIA3 genes in different conditions. Conclusions This study represents the first genetic evidence of a link between glutamate receptors and migraine.

  16. (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid, a potent and selective agonist at the GluR5 subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Synthesis, modeling, and molecular pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Lotte; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Hansen, Kasper B

    2003-01-01

    We have previously described (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (4-AHCP) as a highly effective agonist at non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (non-NMDA) glutamate (Glu) receptors in vivo, which is more potent than (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl......, activated cloned AMPA receptor subunits GluR1o, GluR3o, and GluR4o with EC(50) values in the range 4.5-15 microM and the coexpressed kainate-preferring subunits GluR6 + KA2 (EC(50) = 6.4 microM). Compound 6, but not 7, proved to be a very potent agonist (EC(50) = 0.13 microM) at the kainate-preferring GluR5...... subunit, equipotent with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisothiazol-4-yl)propionic acid [(S)-Thio-ATPA, 4] and almost 4 times more potent than (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid [(S)-ATPA, 3]. Compound 6 thus represents a new structural class of GluR5 agonists...

  17. Full domain closure of the ligand-binding core of the ionotropic glutamate receptor iGluR5 induced by the high affinity agonist dysiherbaine and the functional antagonist 8,9-dideoxyneodysiherbaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Lash, L Leanne; Naur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing structural model for ligand activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors posits that agonist efficacy arises from the stability and magnitude of induced domain closure in the ligand-binding core structure. Here we describe an exception to the correlation between ligand efficacy...... and domain closure. A weakly efficacious partial agonist of very low potency for homomeric iGluR5 kainate receptors, 8,9-dideoxy-neodysiherbaine (MSVIII-19), induced a fully closed iGluR5 ligand-binding core. The degree of relative domain closure, ~30 degrees , was similar to that we resolved...... to inter-domain hydrogen bonds residues Glu441 and Ser721 in the iGluR5-S1S2 structure. The weaker interactions of MSVIII-19 with iGluR5 compared to DH, together with altered stability of the inter-domain interaction, may be responsible for the apparent uncoupling of domain closure and channel opening...

  18. A Presynaptic Glutamate Receptor Subunit Confers Robustness to Neurotransmission and Homeostatic Potentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beril Kiragasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are thought to interface with other forms of plasticity to ensure flexible yet stable levels of neurotransmission. The role of neurotransmitter receptors in this process, beyond mediating neurotransmission itself, is not known. Through a forward genetic screen, we have identified the Drosophila kainate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit DKaiR1D to be required for the retrograde, homeostatic potentiation of synaptic strength. DKaiR1D is necessary in presynaptic motor neurons, localized near active zones, and confers robustness to the calcium sensitivity of baseline synaptic transmission. Acute pharmacological blockade of DKaiR1D disrupts homeostatic plasticity, indicating that this receptor is required for the expression of this process, distinct from developmental roles. Finally, we demonstrate that calcium permeability through DKaiR1D is necessary for baseline synaptic transmission, but not for homeostatic signaling. We propose that DKaiR1D is a glutamate autoreceptor that promotes robustness to synaptic strength and plasticity with active zone specificity.

  19. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  20. The chemokine growth-related gene product β protects rat cerebellar granule cells from apoptotic cell death through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limatola, Cristina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Vacca, Fabrizio; Ragozzino, Davide; Giovannelli, Aldo; Santoni, Angela; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule neurons are widely used as a cellular model to study mechanisms of neuronal cell death because they undergo programmed cell death when switched from a culture medium containing 25 mM to one containing 5 mM K+. We have found that the growth-related gene product β (GROβ) partially prevents the K+-depletion-induced cell death, and that the neuroprotective action of GROβ on granule cells is mediated through the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type of ionotropic glutamate receptors. GROβ-induced survival was suppressed by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, which is a specific antagonist of AMPA/kainate receptors; it was not affected by the inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was comparable to the survival of granule cells induced by AMPA (10 μM) treatment. Moreover, GROβ-induced neuroprotection was abolished when granule cells were treated with antisense oligonucleotides specific for the AMPA receptor subunits, which significantly reduced receptor expression, as verified by Western blot analysis with subunit-specific antibodies and by granule cell electrophysiological sensitivity to AMPA. Our data demonstrate that GROβ is neurotrophic for cerebellar granule cells, and that this activity depends on AMPA receptors. PMID:10811878

  1. Inhibition of calcium-permeable and calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors by perampanel in rat brain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barygin, Oleg I

    2016-10-28

    Perampanel is an antiepileptic drug that is used to treat partial-onset seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. It is a highly selective AMPA receptor allosteric antagonist. However, published data on perampanel activity vary in different studies. In the present work we studied the inhibition of native calcium-permeable and calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors in rat brain neurons by perampanel using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that inhibitory activity and kinetics of perampanel action do not differ between calcium-permeable AMPA receptors of rat giant striatum interneurons and calcium-impermeable receptors of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons (the IC50 value about 60nM). Also, perampanel caused the same inhibition of steady-state currents induced by kainate and glutamate. From the other side perampanel-induced inhibition was markedly reduced in the presence of cyclothiazide (IC50 value increased to 1.2±0.2μM). We demonstrated that perampanel competes with GYKI-52466 for binding site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular lock regulates binding of glycine to a primitive NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alvin; Alberstein, Robert; Thomas, Alecia; Zimmet, Austin; Grey, Richard; Mayer, Mark L; Lau, Albert Y

    2016-11-01

    The earliest metazoan ancestors of humans include the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi The genome of this comb jelly encodes homologs of vertebrate ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that are distantly related to glycine-activated NMDA receptors and that bind glycine with unusually high affinity. Using ligand-binding domain (LBD) mutants for electrophysiological analysis, we demonstrate that perturbing a ctenophore-specific interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge that is notably absent from vertebrate AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluRs greatly increases the rate of recovery from desensitization, while biochemical analysis reveals a large decrease in affinity for glycine. X-ray crystallographic analysis details rearrangements in the binding pocket stemming from the mutations, and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the interdomain salt bridge acts as a steric barrier regulating ligand binding and that the free energy required to access open conformations in the glycine-bound LBD is largely responsible for differences in ligand affinity among the LBD variants.

  3. Glutamate and GABA activate different receptors and Cl(-) conductances in crab peptide-secretory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Cooke, I M

    2000-01-01

    Responses to rapid application of glutamic acid (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 0.01-3 mM, were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp of cultured crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ neurons. Responses peaked within 200 ms. Both Glu and GABA currents had reversal potentials that followed the Nernst Cl(-) potential when [Cl(-)](i) was varied. A Boltzmann fit to the normalized, averaged dose-response curve for Glu indicated an EC(50) of 0.15 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.05. Rapid (t(1/2) approximately 1 s) desensitization occurred during Glu but not GABA application that required >2 min for recovery. Desensitization was unaffected by concanavalin A or cyclothiazide. N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, quisqualate, and kainate (to 1 mM) were ineffective, nor were Glu responses influenced by glycine (1 microM) or Mg(2+) (0-26 mM). Glu effects were imitated by ibotenic acid (0.1 mM). The following support the conclusion that Glu and GABA act on different receptors: 1) responses sum; 2) desensitization to Glu or ibotenic acid did not diminish GABA responses; 3) the Cl(-)-channel blockers picrotoxin and niflumic acid (0.5 mM) inhibited Glu responses by approximately 90 and 80% but GABA responses by approximately 50 and 20%; and 4) polyvinylpyrrolydone-25 (2 mM in normal crab saline) eliminated Glu responses but left GABA responses unaltered. Thus crab secretory neurons have separate receptors responsive to Glu and to GABA, both probably ionotropic, and mediating Cl(-) conductance increases. In its responses and pharmacology, this crustacean Glu receptor resembles Cl(-)-permeable Glu receptors previously described in invertebrates and differs from cation-permeable Glu receptors of vertebrates and invertebrates.

  4. Mechanisms of calcium influx into hippocampal spines: heterogeneity among spines, coincidence detection by NMDA receptors, and optical quantal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, R; Majewska, A; Cash, S S; Denk, W

    1999-03-15

    Dendritic spines receive most excitatory inputs in the vertebrate brain, but their function is still poorly understood. Using two-photon calcium imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the mechanisms by which calcium enters into individual spines in the stratum radiatum. We find three different pathways for calcium influx: high-threshold voltage-sensitive calcium channels, NMDA receptors, and an APV-resistant influx consistent with calcium-permeable AMPA or kainate receptors. These pathways vary among different populations of spines and are engaged under different stimulation conditions, with peak calcium concentrations reaching >10 microM. Furthermore, as a result of the biophysical properties of the NMDA receptor, the calcium dynamics of spines are exquisitely sensitive to the temporal coincidence of the input and output of the neuron. Our results confirm that individual spines are chemical compartments that can perform coincidence detection. Finally, we demonstrate that functional studies and optical quantal analysis of single, identified synapses is feasible in mammalian CNS neurons in brain slices.

  5. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  6. DCP-LA stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis through CaMKII activation due to PP-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). DCP-LA induced a transient huge facilitation of synaptic transmission monitored from the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, which was largely inhibited by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. DCP-LA potentiated kainate-evoked whole-cell membrane currents for Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors composed of the GluR1, GluR3, GluR1/GluR2, GluR1/GluR3, and GluR1/GluR2/GluR3 subunits, and the potentiation was significantly inhibited by KN-93. A similar potentiation was still found with mutant GluR1 (S831A) receptor lacking CaMKII phosphorylation site. The GluR1 and GluR2 subunits formed AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus, and DCP-LA increased expression of both the subunits on the plasma membrane. The DCP-LA action was blocked by KN-93 and the exocytosis inhibitor botulinum toxin type A, but not by the endocytosis inhibitor phenylarsine oxide. DCP-LA, thus, appears to activate CaMKII through PP-1 inhibition, that stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis to increase expression of the receptors on the plasma membrane, responsible for potentiate AMPA receptor responses and facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission.

  7. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  8. Presynaptic facilitation of glutamate release in the basolateral amygdala: a mechanism for the anxiogenic and seizurogenic function of GluK1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroniadou-Anderjaska, V; Pidoplichko, V I; Figueiredo, T H; Almeida-Suhett, C P; Prager, E M; Braga, M F M

    2012-09-27

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit (GluK1Rs; previously known as GluR5 kainate receptors) are concentrated in certain brain regions, where they play a prominent role in the regulation of neuronal excitability, by modulating GABAergic and/or glutamatergic synaptic transmission. In the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA), which plays a central role in anxiety as well as in seizure generation, GluK1Rs modulate GABAergic inhibition via postsynaptic and presynaptic mechanisms. However, the role of these receptors in the regulation of glutamate release, and the net effect of their activation on the excitability of the BLA network are not well understood. Here, we show that in amygdala slices from 35- to 50-day-old rats, the GluK1 agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) (300 nM) increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) recorded from BLA principal neurons, and decreased the rate of failures of evoked EPSCs. The GluK1 antagonist (S)-1-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-3-(2-carboxybenzyl) pyrimidine-2,4-dione (UBP302) (25 or 30 μM) decreased the frequency of mEPSCs, reduced evoked field potentials, and increased the "paired-pulse ratio" of the field potential amplitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that GluK1Rs in the rat BLA are present on presynaptic terminals of principal neurons, where they mediate facilitation of glutamate release. In vivo bilateral microinjections of ATPA (250 pmol) into the rat BLA increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field test, while 2 nmol ATPA induced seizures. Similar intra-BLA injections of UBP302 (20 nmol) had anxiolytic effects in the open field and the acoustic startle response tests, without affecting pre-pulse inhibition. These results suggest that although GluK1Rs in the rat BLA facilitate both GABA and glutamate release, the facilitation of glutamate release prevails, and these receptors can have an

  9. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  10. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs.

  11. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-10-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin(5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations.Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3.Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The negative effects of alcohol hangover on high-anxiety phenotype rats are influenced by the glutamate receptors of the dorsal midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezequiel Leite, L; Nobre, M J

    2012-06-28

    Alcoholism is a chronic disorder characterized by the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome following the abrupt cessation of alcohol intake that includes symptoms of physical and emotional disturbances, anxiety being the most prevalent symptom. In humans, it was shown that anxiety may increase the probability of relapse. In laboratory animals, however, the use of anxiety to predict alcohol preference has remained difficult. Excitatory amino acids as glutamate have been implicated in alcohol hangover and may be responsible for the seizures and anxiety observed during withdrawal. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) is a midbrain region critical for the modulation/expression of anxiety- and fear-related behaviors and the propagation of seizures induced by alcohol withdrawal, the glutamate neurotransmission being one of the most affected. The present study was designed to evaluate whether low- (LA) and high-anxiety rats (HA), tested during the alcohol hangover phase, in which anxiety is the most prevalent symptom, are more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of alcohol when tested in a voluntary alcohol drinking procedure. Additionally, we were interested in investigating the main effects of reducing the excitatory tonus of the dorsal midbrain, after the blockade of the ionotropic glutamate receptors into the DPAG, on the voluntary alcohol intake of HA and LA motivated rats that were made previously experienced with the free operant response of alcohol drinking. For this purpose, we used local infusions of the N-metil D-Aspartato (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-kainate receptors antagonist DL-2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid - DL-AP7 (10 nmol/0.2 μl) and l-glutamic acid diethyl ester - GDEE (160 nmol/0.2 μl), respectively. Alcohol intoxication was produced by 10 daily bolus intraperitonial (IP) injections of alcohol (2.0 g/kg). Peak-blood alcohol levels were determined by gas-chromatography analysis in order to assess blood

  13. Expression of human epileptic temporal lobe neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes: An innovative approach to study epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Esposito, Vincenzo; Mileo, Anna Maria; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pierpaolo; Giangaspero, Felice; Scoppetta, Ciriaco; Onorati, Paolo; Trettel, Flavia; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2002-01-01

    Poly(A+) RNA was extracted from the temporal lobe (TL) of medically intractable epileptic patients which underwent surgical TL resection. Injection of this mRNA into Xenopus oocytes led to the expression of ionotropic receptors for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), kainate (KAI) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA). Membrane currents elicited by GABA inverted polarity at −15 mV, close to the oocyte's chloride equilibrium potential, were inhibited by bicuculline, and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These basic characteristics were also displayed by GABA currents elicited in oocytes injected with mRNAs isolated from human TL glioma (TLG) or from mouse TL. However, the GABA receptors expressed by the epileptic TL mRNA exhibited some unusual properties, consisting in a rapid current run-down after repetitive GABA applications and a large EC50 (125 μM). AMPA alone evoked very small or nil currents, whereas KAI induced larger currents. Nevertheless, upon cyclothiazide treatment, AMPA elicited substantial currents that, like the KAI currents, were inhibited by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Furthermore, the glutamate receptor 5 (GluR5) agonist, ATPA, failed to evoke an obvious current although both RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed GluR5 expression in the epileptic TL. Oocytes injected with mouse TL or human TLG mRNAs generated KAI and AMPA currents similar to those evoked in oocytes injected with epileptic TL mRNA but, in contrast to these, the mouse TL and human TLG oocytes were also responsive to ATPA. Our findings are in accord with the concept that both a depression of GABA inhibition and a dysfunction of the KAI-receptor system maintain a high neuronal excitability that results in epileptic seizures. PMID:12409614

  14. Regulated release of BDNF by cortical oligodendrocytes is mediated through metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes), the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1)-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate), receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C) pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3) receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane) and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  15. Distribution of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Auditory Ganglion and Cochlear Nuclei of Pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M R; Atoji, Y

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate is a principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the auditory system. Our previous studies revealed localization of glutamate receptor mRNAs in the pigeon cochlear nuclei, suggesting the existence of glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. This study demonstrated localization of mRNAs for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate and NMDA) in the auditory ganglion (AG) and cochlear nuclei (magnocellular, angular and laminar nuclei). VGluT2 mRNA was intensely expressed in AG and intensely or moderately in the cochlear nuclei. The AG and cochlear nuclei showed intense-to-moderate mRNA signals for GluA2, GluA3, GluA4, GluK4 and GluN1. These results suggest that the pigeon AG neurons receives glutamatergic input from hair cells and in turn projects to the magnocellular and angular nuclei. Glutamate may play a pivotal role in the excitatory synapse transmission in the peripheral auditory pathway of birds.

  16. Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces apoptotic hair-cell death independent of afferent and efferent innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of excess glutamate plays a central role in eliciting the pathological events that follow intensely loud noise exposures and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been characterized in cochlear nerve terminals, but much less is known about whether excess glutamate signaling also contributes to pathological changes in sensory hair cells. I therefore examined whether glutamate excitotoxicity damages hair cells in zebrafish larvae exposed to drugs that mimic excitotoxic trauma. Exposure to ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) agonists, kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), contributed to significant, progressive hair cell loss in zebrafish lateral-line organs. To examine whether hair-cell loss was a secondary effect of excitotoxic damage to innervating neurons, I exposed neurog1a morphants—fish whose hair-cell organs are devoid of afferent and efferent innervation—to KA or NMDA. Significant, dose-dependent hair-cell loss occurred in neurog1a morphants exposed to either agonist, and the loss was comparable to wild-type siblings. A survey of iGluR gene expression revealed AMPA-, Kainate-, and NMDA-type subunits are expressed in zebrafish hair cells. Finally, hair cells exposed to KA or NMDA appear to undergo apoptotic cell death. Cumulatively, these data reveal that excess glutamate signaling through iGluRs induces hair-cell death independent of damage to postsynaptic terminals. PMID:28112265

  17. Inhibition of glutamate receptors reduces the homocysteine-induced whole blood platelet aggregation but does not affect superoxide anion generation or platelet membrane fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolczak, Kamil; Pieniazek, Anna; Watala, Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an excitotoxic amino acid. It is potentially possible to prevent Hcy-induced toxicity, including haemostatic impairments, by antagonizing glutaminergic receptors. Using impedance aggregometry with arachidonate and collagen as platelet agonists, we tested whether the blockade of platelet NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) and kainate receptors with their inhibitors: MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate, [5R,10S]-[+]-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine), CNQX (7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile) and UBP-302 (2-{[3-[(2S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin 1(2H)-yl]methyl}benzoic acid) may hamper Hcy-dependent platelet aggregation. All the tested compounds significantly inhibited Hcy-augmented aggregation of blood platelets stimulated either with arachidonate or collagen. Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion in whole blood samples in a concentration-dependent manner; however, this process appeared as independent on ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as on NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C, and was not apparently associated with the extent of either arachidonate- or collagen-dependent platelet aggregation. Moreover, Hcy acted as a significant fluidizer of surface (more hydrophilic) and inner (more hydrophobic) regions of platelet membrane lipid bilayer, when used at the concentration range from 10 to 50 µmol/l. However, this effect was independent on the Hcy action through glutamate ionotropic receptors, since there was no effects of MK-801, CNQX or UBP-302 on Hcy-mediated membrane fluidization. In conclusion, Hcy-induced changes in whole blood platelet aggregation are mediated through the ionotopic excitotoxic receptors, although the detailed mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated.

  18. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids,

  19. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Fact Sheet GLP-1 Receptor Agonists May, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Silvio ... are too high or too low. What are GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines? GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines, also called ...

  20. Protection from inorganic mercury effects on the in vivo dopamine release by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Lucía; Durán, Rafael; Faro, Lilian F; Campos, Francisco; Cervantes, Rosa C; Alfonso, Miguel

    2007-09-05

    The possible role of ionotropics glutamate receptors on the HgCl(2)-induced dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum was investigated by using in vivo brain microdialysis technique after administration of selective NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801), D (-)-2-amino-5-phoshonopentanoic acid (AP5), and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Moreover, we have also studied the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 7-nitro-indazol (7-NI) on HgCl(2)-induced DA release. Intraestriatal infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) increased striatal DA to 1717.2+/-375.4% respect to basal levels. Infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) in 400 microM MK-801 pre-treated animals produced an increase on striatal DA levels 61% smaller than that induced in non-pre-treated animals. In the case of AP5, this treatment reduced 92% the increase produced by HgCl(2) as compared to non-pre-treated rats. Nevertheless, the administration of CNQX did not produce any effect on HgCl(2)-induced dopamine release. Intrastriatal infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) in 100 microM L-NAME pre-treated animals produced an increase on extracellular DA levels 82% smaller than produced by HgCl(2) alone. In addition, the pre-treatment with 7-NI reduced 90% the increase produced by infusion of HgCl(2) alone in rats. Thus, HgCl(2)-induced DA release could be produced at last in part, by overstimulation of NMDA receptors with NO production, since administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors protected against HgCl(2) effects on DA release.

  1. Effects of the abused solvent toluene on recombinant N-methyl-D-aspartate and non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, S L; Mirshahi, T; Thomas, B; Balster, R L; Woodward, J J

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that toluene, which is commonly abused, depresses neuronal activity and causes behavioral effects in both animals and man similar to those observed for ethanol. In this study, the oocyte expression system was used to test the hypothesis that toluene, like ethanol, inhibits the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Oocytes were injected with mRNA for specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or non-NMDA subunits and currents were recorded using conventional two-electrode voltage clamp. To enhance the low water solubility of toluene, drug solutions were prepared by mixing toluene with alkamuls (ethoxylated castor oil) at a 1:1 ratio (v:v) and diluting this mixture to the appropriate concentration with barium-containing normal frog Ringer solution. Alkamuls, up to 0.1%, had no significant effects on membrane leak currents or on NMDA-induced currents. Toluene, up to approximately 9 mM, had only minor effects on membrane leak currents but dose-dependently inhibited NMDA-mediated currents in oocytes. The inhibition of NMDA receptor currents by toluene was rapid, reversible and the potency for toluene's effects was subunit dependent. The NR1/2B subunit combination was the most sensitive with an IC50 value for toluene-induced inhibition of 0.17 mM. The NR1/2A and NR1/2C receptors were 6- and 12-fold less sensitive with IC50 values of 1.4 and 2.1 mM, respectively. In contrast, toluene up to approximately 9 mM did not inhibit kainate-induced currents in oocytes expressing GluR1, GluR1(+)R2 or GluR6 subunits. These results suggest that some of the effects of toluene on neuronal activity and behavior may be mediated by inhibition of NMDA receptors.

  2. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases.

  3. Differential expression of glutamate receptors in avian neural pathways for learned vocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kazuhiro; Sakaguchi, Hironobu; Jarvis, Erich D; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2004-08-01

    Learned vocalization, the substrate for human language, is a rare trait. It is found in three distantly related groups of birds-parrots, hummingbirds, and songbirds. These three groups contain cerebral vocal nuclei for learned vocalization not found in their more closely related vocal nonlearning relatives. Here, we cloned 21 receptor subunits/subtypes of all four glutamate receptor families (AMPA, kainate, NMDA, and metabotropic) and examined their expression in vocal nuclei of songbirds. We also examined expression of a subset of these receptors in vocal nuclei of hummingbirds and parrots, as well as in the brains of dove species as examples of close vocal nonlearning relatives. Among the 21 subunits/subtypes, 19 showed higher and/or lower prominent differential expression in songbird vocal nuclei relative to the surrounding brain subdivisions in which the vocal nuclei are located. This included relatively lower levels of all four AMPA subunits in lMAN, strikingly higher levels of the kainite subunit GluR5 in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), higher and lower levels respectively of the NMDA subunits NR2A and NR2B in most vocal nuclei and lower levels of the metabotropic group I subtypes (mGluR1 and -5) in most vocal nuclei and the group II subtype (mGluR2), showing a unique expression pattern of very low levels in RA and very high levels in HVC. The splice variants of AMPA subunits showed further differential expression in vocal nuclei. Some of the receptor subunits/subtypes also showed differential expression in hummingbird and parrot vocal nuclei. The magnitude of differential expression in vocal nuclei of all three vocal learners was unique compared with the smaller magnitude of differences found for nonvocal areas of vocal learners and vocal nonlearners. Our results suggest that evolution of vocal learning was accompanied by differential expression of a conserved gene family for synaptic transmission and plasticity in vocal nuclei. They also suggest

  4. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of new 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues and structure-activity relationship studies at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Zeinab; Larsen, Anja P; Venskutonytė, Raminta; Han, Liwei; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Birgitte; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Jensen, Anders A; Pickering, Darryl S; Frydenvang, Karla; Gefflaut, Thierry; Bunch, Lennart

    2013-02-28

    In the mammalian central nervous system, (S)-glutamate (Glu) is released from the presynaptic neuron where it activates a plethora of pre- and postsynaptic Glu receptors. The fast acting ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) are ligand gated ion channels and are believed to be involved in a vast number of neurological functions such as memory and learning, synaptic plasticity, and motor function. The synthesis of 14 enantiopure 2,4-syn-Glu analogues 2b-p is accessed by a short and efficient chemoenzymatic approach starting from readily available cyclohexanone 3. Pharmacological characterization at the iGluRs and EAAT1-3 subtypes revealed analogue 2i as a selective GluK1 ligand with low nanomolar affinity. Two X-ray crystal structures of the key analogue 2i in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of GluA2 and GluK3 were determined. Partial domain closure was seen in the GluA2-LBD complex with 2i comparable to that induced by kainate. In contrast, full domain closure was observed in the GluK3-LBD complex with 2i, similar to that of GluK3-LBD with glutamate bound.

  5. Regulation of GABA(A and glutamate receptor expression, synaptic facilitation and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of prion mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rangel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prionopathies are characterized by spongiform brain degeneration, myoclonia, dementia, and periodic electroencephalographic (EEG disturbances. The hallmark of prioniopathies is the presence of an abnormal conformational isoform (PrP(sc of the natural cellular prion protein (PrP(c encoded by the Prnp gene. Although several roles have been attributed to PrP(c, its putative functions in neuronal excitability are unknown. Although early studies of the behavior of Prnp knockout mice described minor changes, later studies report altered behavior. To date, most functional PrP(c studies on synaptic plasticity have been performed in vitro. To our knowledge, only one electrophysiological study has been performed in vivo in anesthetized mice, by Curtis and coworkers. They reported no significant differences in paired-pulse facilitation or LTP in the CA1 region after Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we explore the role of PrP(c expression in neurotransmission and neural excitability using wild-type, Prnp -/- and PrP(c-overexpressing mice (Tg20 strain. By correlating histopathology with electrophysiology in living behaving mice, we demonstrate that both Prnp -/- mice but, more relevantly Tg20 mice show increased susceptibility to KA, leading to significant cell death in the hippocampus. This finding correlates with enhanced synaptic facilitation in paired-pulse experiments and hippocampal LTP in living behaving mutant mice. Gene expression profiling using Illumina microarrays and Ingenuity pathways analysis showed that 129 genes involved in canonical pathways such as Ubiquitination or Neurotransmission were co-regulated in Prnp -/- and Tg20 mice. Lastly, RT-qPCR of neurotransmission-related genes indicated that subunits of GABA(A and AMPA-kainate receptors are co-regulated in both Prnp -/- and Tg20 mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Present results demonstrate that PrP(c is necessary for the

  6. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  7. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Nunes-Correia, Isabel [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Flow Cytometry Unit, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Armanda E., E-mail: aesantos@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  8. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  9. Mammalian Sweet Taste Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Greg; Hoon, Mark A; Chandrashekar, Jayaram; Zhang, Yifeng; Ryba, Nicholas J.P; Zuker, Charles S

    2001-01-01

    ... and information coding, and have focused on the isolation and characterization of genes encoding sweet and bitter taste receptors. The identification of taste receptors generates powerful molecular tools to investigate not only the function of taste receptor cells, but also the logic of taste coding. For example, defining the size and diversity of the re...

  10. [Melatonin receptor agonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland and is involved in the regulation of human sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. The melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus play a pivotal role in the sleep-wake regulation. Based on the fact that MT1 receptors are involved in human sleep onset process, melatonin receptor agonists have been developed to treat insomnia. In this article, we first reviewed functions of melatonin receptors with special reference to MT1 and MT2, and properties and clinical application of melatonin receptor agonists as hypnotics.

  11. Dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine synthesis and dopamine receptor subtypes have been shown in the kidney. Dopamine acts via cell surface receptors coupled to G proteins; the receptors are classified via pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies into two families, D1-like and D2-like. Two D1-like receptors cloned in mammals, the D1 and D5 receptors (D1A and D1B in rodents), are linked to adenylyl cyclase stimulation. Three D2-like receptors (D2, D3, and D4) have been cloned and are linked mainly to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Activation of D1-like receptors on the proximal tubules inhibits tubular sodium reabsorption by inhibiting Na/H-exchanger and Na/K-adenosine triphosphatase activity. Reports exist of defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function in human primary hypertension and in genetic models of animal hypertension. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to hypertension. A primary defect in D1-like receptors and an altered signaling system in proximal tubules may reduce dopamine-mediated effects on renal sodium excretion. The molecular basis for dopamine receptor dysfunction in hypertension is being investigated, and may involve an abnormal posttranslational modification of the dopamine receptor.

  12. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  13. A new agonist of the erythropoietin receptor, Epobis, induces neurite outgrowth and promotes neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Gu, Bing; Kiryushko, Darya

    2012-01-01

    study shows that the Epobis peptide specifically binds to EPOR and induces neurite outgrowth from primary neurons in an EPOR-expression dependent manner. Furthermore, Epobis promoted the survival of hippocampal and cerebellar neuronal cultures after kainate treatment and KCl deprivation, respectively...

  14. Dopamine D4 receptor activation increases hippocampal gamma oscillations by enhancing synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gamma oscillations are electric activity patterns of the mammalian brain hypothesized to serve attention, sensory perception, working memory and memory encoding. They are disrupted or altered in schizophrenic patients with associated cognitive deficits, which persist in spite of treatment with antipsychotics. Because cognitive symptoms are a core feature of schizophrenia it is relevant to explore signaling pathways that potentially regulate gamma oscillations. Dopamine has been reported to decrease gamma oscillation power via D1-like receptors. Based on the expression pattern of D4 receptors (D4R in hippocampus, and pharmacological effects of D4R ligands in animals, we hypothesize that they are in a position to regulate gamma oscillations as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this hypothesis we use rat hippocampal slices and kainate-induced gamma oscillations. Local field potential recordings as well as intracellular recordings of pyramidal cells, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking interneurons were carried out. We show that D4R activation with the selective ligand PD168077 increases gamma oscillation power, which can be blocked by the D4R-specific antagonist L745,870 as well as by the antipsychotic drug Clozapine. Pyramidal cells did not exhibit changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic current amplitudes, but inhibitory currents became more coherent with the oscillations after application of PD168077. Fast-spiking, but not non-fast spiking, interneurons, increase their action potential phase-coupling and coherence with regard to ongoing gamma oscillations in response to D4R activation. Among several possible mechanisms we found that the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 also blocks the D4R mediated increase in gamma oscillation power. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that D4R activation affects fast-spiking interneuron synchronization and thereby increases gamma power by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. This

  15. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. LU 73068, a new non-NMDA and glycine/NMDA receptor antagonist: pharmacological characterization and comparison with NBQX and L-701,324 in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potschka, H; Löscher, W; Wlaź, P; Behl, B; Hofmann, H P; Treiber, H J; Szabo, L

    1998-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a drug which combines an antagonistic action at both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors offers advantages for treatment of epileptic seizures compared to drugs which antagonize only one of these ionotropic glutamate receptors. The novel glutamate receptor antagonist LU 73068 (4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-7-trifluoromethylimidazo[1,2a]quinoxal ine-2-carbonic acid) binds with high affinity to both the glycine site of the NMDA receptor (Ki 185 nM) and to the AMPA receptor (Ki 158 nM). Furthermore, binding experiments with recombinant kainate receptor subunits showed that LU 73068 binds to several of these subunits, particularly to rGluR7 (Ki 104 nM) and rGluR5 (Ki 271 nM). In comparison, the prototype non-NMDA receptor antagonist NBQX (2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline) binds with high affinity to AMPA receptors only. Both NBQX and LU 73068 were about equieffective after i.p. injection in mice to block lethal convulsions induced by AMPA or NMDA. In the rat amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, LU 73068 dose-dependently increased the focal seizure threshold (afterdischarge threshold, ADT). When rats were stimulated with a current 20% above the individual control ADT, LU 73068 completely blocked seizures with an ED50 of 4.9 mg kg(-1). Up to 20 mg kg(-1), only moderate adverse effects, e.g. slight ataxia, were observed. NBQX, 10 mg kg(-1), and the glycine/NMDA site antagonist L-701,324 (7-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-(3-phenoxy)phenyl-quinoline-2(1H)one), 2.5 or 5 mg kg(-1), exerted no anticonvulsant effects in kindled rats when administered alone, but combined treatment with both drugs resulted in a significant ADT increase. The data indicate that combination of glycine/NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonism in a single drug is an effective means of developing a potent and effective anticonvulsant agent.

  17. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  18. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs).

  19. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...

  20. Spreading depression induces expression of calcium-independent protein kinase C subspecies in ischaemia-sensitive cortical layers: regulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, S; Keinänen, R; Roivainen, R; Hirvonen, T; Närhi, M; Chan, P H; Koistinaho, J

    1999-01-01

    Spreading depression is a wave of sustained depolarization challenging the energy metabolism of the cells without causing irreversible damage. In the ischaemic brain, sreading depression-like depolarization contributes to the evolution of ischaemia to infarction. The depolarization is propagated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but changes in signal transduction downstream of the receptors are not known. Because protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism whereby most cellular processes are regulated, and inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors or protein kinase C is neuroprotective, the expression of protein kinase C subspecies in spreading depression was examined. Cortical treatment with KCl induced an upregulation of protein kinase Cdelta and zeta messenger RNA at 4 and 8 h, whereas protein kinase Calpha, beta, gamma and epsilon did not show significant changes. The gene induction was the strongest in layers 2 and 3, and was followed by an increased number of protein kinase Cdelta-immunoreactive neurons. Protein kinase Cdelta and zeta inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate, which also blocked spreading depression propagation, and with dexamethasone, which acted without blocking the propagation. Quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, reduced only protein kinase C5 induction. In addition, N(G)(-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not influence protein kinase Cdelta or zeta induction, whereas 6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione, an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate/kainate receptor antagonist, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and diclophenac tended to increase gene expression. The data show that cortical spreading depression induces Ca2(+)-independent protein kinase C subspecies delta and zeta, but not Ca(2+)-dependent subspecies, through activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and

  1. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors on parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferando, Isabella; Mody, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Gamma (γ) oscillations (30-120 Hz), an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs) and the principal (pyramidal) cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (δ-GABA(A)Rs) and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS), such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO), modulate the expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABA(A)Rs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs) express δ-GABA(A)Rs, expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 h postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy) may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABA(A)Rs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABA(A)R expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  2. Synapse organization and modulation via C1q family proteins and their receptors in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko

    2016-11-12

    Several C1q family members, related to the C1q complement component are extensively expressed in the central nervous system. Cbln1, which belongs to the Cbln subfamily of C1q proteins and released from cerebellar granule cells, plays an indispensable role in the synapse formation and function at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. This is achieved by formation of a trans-synaptic tripartite complex which is composed of one unit of the Cbln1 hexamer, monomeric neurexin (NRX) containing a splice site 4 insertion at presynaptic terminals and the postsynaptic GluD2 dimers. Recently an increasing number of soluble or transmembrane proteins have been identified to bind directly to the amino-terminal domains of iGluR and regulate the recruitment and function of iGluRs at synapses. Especially at mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in the hippocampus, postsynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) are involved in synaptic network activity through their characteristic channel kinetics. C1ql2 and C1ql3, which belong to the C1q-like subfamily of C1q proteins, are produced by MFs and serve as extracellular organizers to recruit functional postsynaptic KAR complexes at MF-CA3 synapses via binding to the amino-terminal domains of GluK2 and GluK4 KAR subunits. In addition, C1ql2 and C1ql3 directly bind to NRX3 containing sequences encoded by exon 25b insertion at splice site 5. In the present review, we highlighted the generality of the strategy by tripartite complex formation of the specific type of NRX and iGluR via C1q family members.

  3. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors on parvalbumin interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella eFerando

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma (γ oscillations (30-120 Hz, an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs and the principal (pyramidal cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABAARs (-GABAARs and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS, such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO, modulate the expression of δ-GABAARs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABAARs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs express δ-GABAARs, expression of δ-GABAARs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 hours postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABAARs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABAAR expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  4. GLYX-13, a NMDA Receptor Glycine-Site Functional Partial Agonist, Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects Without Ketamine-Like Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; David Leander, J; Stanton, Patric K; Gross, Amanda L; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    Recent human clinical studies with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine have revealed profound and long-lasting antidepressant effects with rapid onset in several clinical trials, but antidepressant effects were preceded by dissociative side effects. Here we show that GLYX-13, a novel NMDAR glycine-site functional partial agonist, produces an antidepressant-like effect in the Porsolt, novelty induced hypophagia, and learned helplessness tests in rats without exhibiting substance abuse-related, gating, and sedative side effects of ketamine in the drug discrimination, conditioned place preference, pre-pulse inhibition and open-field tests. Like ketamine, the GLYX-13-induced antidepressant-like effects required AMPA/kainate receptor activation, as evidenced by the ability of NBQX to abolish the antidepressant-like effect. Both GLYX-13 and ketamine persistently (24 h) enhanced the induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission and the magnitude of NMDAR-NR2B conductance at rat Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in vitro. Cell surface biotinylation studies showed that both GLYX-13 and ketamine led to increases in both NR2B and GluR1 protein levels, as measured by Western analysis, whereas no changes were seen in mRNA expression (microarray and qRT-PCR). GLYX-13, unlike ketamine, produced its antidepressant-like effect when injected directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). These results suggest that GLYX-13 produces an antidepressant-like effect without the side effects seen with ketamine at least in part by directly modulating NR2B-containing NMDARs in the MPFC. Furthermore, the enhancement of ‘metaplasticity' by both GLYX-13 and ketamine may help explain the long-lasting antidepressant effects of these NMDAR modulators. GLYX-13 is currently in a Phase II clinical development program for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23303054

  5. Retraction: Radenović L, Selaković V. Mitochondrial superoxide production and MnSOD activity following exposure to an agonist and antagonists of ionotropic receptors in rat brain, Arch Biol Sci. 2005; 57(1:1-10, DOI:10.2298/ABS0501001R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a notice of retraction of the article: Mitochondrial superoxide production and MnSOD activity following exposure to an agonist and antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors in rat brain, published in the Archives of Biological Sciences in 2005, Vol. 57, Issue 1. The Editor-in-Chief has been informed that this paper plagiarizes an earlier paper: Radenović L, Selaković V, Kartelija G, Todorović N, Nedeljković M. Differential effects of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in rat brain following intrahippocampal injection. Brain Res Bull, 2004, 64(1:85-93. This claim is correct and almost the entire paper is a verbatim copy of the earlier one. After confirmation of this fact, the Editor-in-Chief of the Archives of Biological Sciences has decided to retract the paper immediately. We apologize to the readers of the journal that it took so many years to notice this error and to retract the paper. We request readers of the journal to directly get in touch with the editorial office and the editors of the journal for similar cases in the future, so that they can be handled promptly. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/ABS0501001R

  6. [The LDL receptor family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  7. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart;

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  8. [Glutamate receptors genes polymorphism and the risk of paranoid schizophrenia in Russians and tatars from the Republic of Bashkortostan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareeva, A E; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that affects about 1% of the world population, leading to disability and social exclusion. Glutamatergic neurotransmission is a violation of one of the main hypotheses put forward to explain the neurobiological mechanisms of schizophrenia. Post mortem studies have found changes in the degree of affinity glutamate receptors, their transcription, and altered expression of their subunits in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus in patients with schizophrenia. As a result of genetic studies of gene family encoding ionotropic AMPA and kainate glutamate receptors in schizophrenia, ambiguous results were received. The association of polymorphic variants of genes GRIA2 and GRIK2 with paranoid schizophrenia and response to therapy with haloperidol in Russian and Tatar of the Republic of Bashkortostan was conducted in the present study. DNA samples of 257 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and of 349 healthy controls of Russian and Tatar ethnic group living in the Republic of Bashkortostan were involved into the present study. In the result of the present study: (1) high risk genetic markers of paranoid schizophrenia (PSZ) were obtained: in Russians-GR4IA2*CCC (OR = 9.60) and in Tatars-GRIK2*ATG (OR = 3.5), GRIK2*TGG (OR = 3.12) (2) The following low risk genetic markers of PSZ were revealed: in Tatars-GRIA2*T/T (rs43025506) of GRIA2 gene (OR = 0.34); in Russians.- GRIA2*CCT (OR = 0.481). (3) Genetic markers of low haloperido! treatment efficacy in respect of negative and positive symptoms GRIK2*T/T (rs2227281) of GRIK2 gene and GRAL42*C/C in Russians, GRIK2*A/A (rs995640) of GRIK2 gene in Tatars. (4) Genetic markers of low haloperidol treatment efficacy in respect of positive symptoms GRL42*C/C in Russians. The results of the present study support the hypothesis of the involvement of glutamate receptor genes in schizophrenia pathway. Considerable inter-ethnic'diversity of genetic risk factors for this disease was

  9. Glutamate Receptors in the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala Mediate Cisplatin-Induced Malaise and Energy Balance Dysregulation through Direct Hindbrain Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Holland, Ruby A; Nelson, Alexandra; Grill, Harvey J; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2015-08-05

    Cisplatin chemotherapy is used commonly to treat a variety of cancers despite severe side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and anorexia that compromise quality of life and limit treatment adherence. The neural mechanisms mediating these side effects remain elusive despite decades of clinical use. Recent data highlight the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN), and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) as potential sites of action in mediating the side effects of cisplatin. Here, results from immunohistochemical studies in rats identified a population of cisplatin-activated DVC neurons that project to the lPBN and a population of cisplatin-activated lPBN calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a marker for glutamatergic neurons in the lPBN) neurons that project to the CeA, outlining a neuroanatomical circuit that is activated by cisplatin. CeA gene expressions of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits were markedly increased after cisplatin treatment, suggesting that CeA glutamate receptor signaling plays a role in mediating cisplatin side effects. Consistent with gene expression results, behavioral/pharmacological data showed that CeA AMPA/kainate receptor blockade attenuates cisplatin-induced pica (a proxy for nausea/behavioral malaise in nonvomiting laboratory rodents) and that CeA NMDA receptor blockade attenuates cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss in addition to pica, demonstrating that glutamate receptor signaling in the CeA is critical for the energy balance dysregulation caused by cisplatin treatment. Together, these data highlight a novel circuit and CGRP/glutamatergic mechanism through which cisplatin-induced malaise and energy balance dysregulation are mediated. To treat cancer effectively, patients must follow prescribed chemotherapy treatments without interruption, yet most cancer treatments produce side effects that devastate quality of life (e.g., nausea, vomiting, anorexia, weight loss). Although hundreds of

  10. Opiate receptors: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, J J

    1987-02-01

    Current status of opiate receptors and their agonists is reviewed--basic aspects of receptor theory, the importance of stereospecificity in drug-receptor interactions and the role of 'second messengers' in drug action. The three classes of endogenous opioids, originating from three distinct genes, are discussed: pro-opiomelanocortin, giving rise to beta-endorphin, ACTH and various MSHs; pro-enkephalin, giving methionine enkephalin and leucine enkephalin; and prodynorphin; their anatomical distribution and the main classes of receptors with which they interact, the mu-receptor, with a high affinity for met-enkephalin and beta-endorphin (as well as morphine and dynorphin A); the delta-receptor for which the primary ligand is leu-enkephalin; and the kappa-receptor which is the main target for the dynorphins. Functional roles for endogenous opioids are considered. Essentially they are inhibitory to target neurones, depressing motor reflexes, baroreflexes and nociception. They also have roles in the response to physical and psychological stress.

  11. Serotonin receptors in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system.

  12. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cristina Berumen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system.

  13. Dopamine receptor and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chunyu; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport and reactive oxygen and by interacting with vasopressin, renin-angiotensin, and the sympathetic nervous system. Decreased renal dopamine production and/or impaired dopamine receptor function have been reported in hypertension. Disruption of any of the dopamine receptors (D(1), D(2), D(3), D(4), and D(5)) results in hypertension. In this paper, we review the mechanisms by which hypertension develops when dopamine receptor function is perturbed.

  14. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  15. Recognition receptors in biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Zourob, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a significant and up-to-date review of the various recognition receptors, their immobilization, and an overview of the used surface characterization techniques. It includes more than 150 illustrations that help explain the ideas presented.

  16. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects...

  17. Update on Melatonin Receptors. IUPHAR Review. : Melatonin Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jockers, Ralf; Delagrange, Philippe; Dubocovich, Margarita ,; Markus, Regina ,; Renault, Nicolas; Tosini, Gianluca; Cecon, Erika; Zlotos, Darius Paul

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Melatonin receptors are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor super-family. In mammals, two melatonin receptor subtypes exit MT1 and MT2 encoded by the MTNR1A and MTNR1B genes, respectively. The current review provides an update on melatonin receptors by the corresponding sub-committee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. We will highlight recent developments of melatonin receptor ligands, including ...

  18. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Cristina Berumen; Angelina Rodríguez; Ricardo Miledi; Guadalupe García-Alcocer

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a fu...

  19. Receptors for enterovirus 71

    OpenAIRE

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays crit...

  20. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

  1. Imidazoline receptors ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbaba Danica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive biochemical and pharmacological studies have determined three different subtypes of imidazoline receptors: I1-imidazoline receptors (I1-IR involved in central inhibition of sympathicus that produce hypotensive effect; I2-imidazoline receptors (I2-IR modulate monoamine oxidase B activity (MAO-B; I3-imidazoline receptors (I3-IR regulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, the I1/I2/I3 imidazoline receptors are selected as new, interesting targets for drug design and discovery. Novel selective I1/I2/I3 agonists and antagonists have been recently developed. In the present review, we provide a brief update to the field of imidazoline research, highlighting some of the chemical diversity and progress made in the 2D-QSAR, 3D-QSAR and quantitative pharmacophore development studies of I1-IR and I2-IR imidazoline receptor ligands. Theoretical studies of I3-IR ligands are not yet performed because of insufficient number of synthesized I3-IR ligands.

  2. D-aspartate and NMDA, but not L-aspartate, block AMPA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Xiang-Qun; Frandsen, Anne; Lu, Wei-Yang;

    2005-01-01

    -independent in the tested voltage range (-80 to +60 mV). 3 The estimated EC50 of the L-glutamate-induced AMPAR current was increased in the presence of D-aspartate, while the estimated maximum L-glutamate-induced AMPAR current was not changed. D-aspartate concentration-dependently shifted the dose-response curve of kainate...

  3. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  4. Presynaptic P2 receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T W; O'Kane, E M; Nikbakht, M R; Ross, F M

    2000-07-01

    Although the emphasis in ATP research has been on postjunctional receptors, there is also evidence for presynaptic receptors regulating transmitter release in the autonomic nervous system. Recent work has attempted to identify similar mechanisms in the central nervous system. Some of the existing results can be explained by the metabolism of nucleotides to adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP). However, studies of presynaptic effects using sensitive electrophysiological tests such as paired-pulse interactions indicate that nucleotides can act at presynaptic sites, but that their effects may be mediated by a release of adenosine. Results are also described which indicate that, under some conditions, nucleotides can mediate phenomena such as long-term potentiation, which probably involves a significant presynaptic element. In part these effects may involve a nucleotide-induced release of adenosine and the simultaneous activation of P1 and P2 receptors.

  5. Human presynaptic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Feuerstein, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Presynaptic receptors are sites at which transmitters, locally formed mediators or hormones inhibit or facilitate the release of a given transmitter from its axon terminals. The interest in the identification of presynaptic receptors has faded in recent years and it may therefore be justified to give an overview of their occurrence in the autonomic and central nervous system; this review will focus on presynaptic receptors in human tissues. Autoreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which a given transmitter restrains its further release, though in some instances may also increase its release. Inhibitory autoreceptors represent a typical example of a negative feedback; they are tonically activated by the respective endogenous transmitter and/or are constitutively active. Autoreceptors also play a role under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. by limiting the massive noradrenaline release occurring during congestive heart failure. They can be used for therapeutic purposes; e.g., the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist mirtazapine is used as an antidepressant and the inverse histamine H3 receptor agonist pitolisant has been marketed as a new drug for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2016. Heteroreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which transmitters from adjacent neurons, locally formed mediators (e.g. endocannabinoids) or hormones (e.g. adrenaline) can inhibit or facilitate transmitter release; they may be subject to an endogenous tone. The constipating effect of the sympathetic nervous system or of the antihypertensive drug clonidine is related to the activation of inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on postganglionic parasympathetic neurons. Part of the stimulating effect of adrenaline on the sympathetic nervous system during stress is related to its facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release via β2-adrenoceptors.

  6. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE, but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors.

  7. Beyond the Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell Jones

    2008-01-01

    @@ Had this Special Issue on plant hormones been published 5 years ago,it is likely that details about biosynthetic pathways would have taken center stage.As articles in this issue show,however,the field of plant hormone research has progressed rapidly and is now moving beyond the search for receptors.Progress in research on the mechanism of action of plant hormones has been rapid;receptors for the main classes of hormones have been identified;and the search is on for players downstream in signal-transduction chains.

  8. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  9. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  10. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striking...

  11. Characterization of melanocortin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Aaron S; Ignar, Diane M

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) for the measurement of ligand binding to melanocortin receptors (MCRs) using membranes prepared from cell lines stably expressing recombinant MCRs. It provides a facile method for determining the affinity of compounds at MC1R, MC3R, MC4R, or MC5R.

  12. P2-purinerge receptorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Marie; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    and by osteoclasts, and agonist binding affects cell proliferation, differentiation, activity and apoptosis. With increasing knowledge of the function and role of these receptors in bone biology, they will undoubtedly be a future target for the design of new drugs which can be used for treatment of metabolic bone...

  13. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  14. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea;

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA......-ray crystallographic analyses, chemical correlation, and CD spectral analyses. The effects of the individual stereoisomers at ionotropic and metabotropic (S)-Glu receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) were characterized. Compounds with S-configuration at the alpha-carbon generally showed mGluR2 agonist activity of similar...... limited effect on pharmacology. Structure-activity relationships at iGluRs in the rat cortical wedge preparation showed a complex pattern, some compounds being NMDA receptor agonists [e.g., EC(50) =110 microM for (2S,5RS)-5-methyl-AA (6a,b)] and some compounds showing NMDA receptor antagonist effects [e...

  15. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown...

  16. Androgen receptor mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated wit

  17. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  18. Increased glutamate receptor and transporter expression in the cerebral cortex and striatum of gcdh-/- mice: possible implications for the neuropathology of glutaric acidemia type I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska Lizzi Lagranha

    Full Text Available We determined mRNA expression of the ionotropic glutamate receptors NMDA (NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits, AMPA (GluR2 subunit and kainate (GluR6 subunit, as well as of the glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT1 in cerebral cortex and striatum of wild type (WT and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (Gchh-/- mice aged 7, 30 and 60 days. The protein expression levels of some of these membrane proteins were also measured. Overexpression of NR2A and NR2B in striatum and of GluR2 and GluR6 in cerebral cortex was observed in 7-day-old Gcdh-/-. There was also an increase of mRNA expression of all NMDA subunits in cerebral cortex and of NR2A and NR2B in striatum of 30-day-old Gcdh-/- mice. At 60 days of life, all ionotropic receptors were overexpressed in cerebral cortex and striatum of Gcdh-/- mice. Higher expression of GLAST and GLT1 transporters was also verified in cerebral cortex and striatum of Gcdh-/- mice aged 30 and 60 days, whereas at 7 days of life GLAST was overexpressed only in striatum from this mutant mice. Furthermore, high lysine intake induced mRNA overexpression of NR2A, NR2B and GLAST transcripts in striatum, as well as of GluR2 and GluR6 in both striatum and cerebral cortex of Gcdh-/- mice. Finally, we found that the protein expression of NR2A, NR2B, GLT1 and GLAST were significantly greater in cerebral cortex of Gcdh-/- mice, whereas NR2B and GLT1 was similarly enhanced in striatum, implying that these transcripts were translated into their products. These results provide evidence that glutamate receptor and transporter expression is higher in Gcdh-/- mice and that these alterations may be involved in the pathophysiology of GA I and possibly explain, at least in part, the vulnerability of striatum and cerebral cortex to injury in patients affected by GA I.

  19. Anti-nociceptive effect induced by intrathecal injection of ATPA, an effect enhanced and prolonged by concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Chuan; Zhou, Ning; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2003-01-10

    The present study investigated the effect of intrathecal injection of (RS)-2-alpha-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tbutylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective agonist to kainate receptor, on nociception in rats. Intrathecal administration of 1, 4 and 10 nmol of ATPA induced dose-dependent increases in the hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats. Pretreatment with intrathecal injection of 300 microg of concanavalin A (ConA) to block the desensitization of kainate receptors enhanced and prolonged the anti-nociceptive effect induced by intrathecal injection of ATPA. The results suggest that the pre-synaptic kainate receptor in the primary afferent terminals is involved in the transmission of nociceptive information in dorsal horn of the spinal cord in rats. Furthermore, blocking the desensitization of kainate receptor enhanced and prolonged the ATPA-induced anti-nociceptive effects.

  20. Levamisole receptors: a second awakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J.; Robertson, Alan P.; Buxton, Samuel K.; Beech, Robin N.; Charvet, Claude L.; Neveu, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    Levamisole and pyrantel are old (1965) but useful anthelmintics that selectively activate nematode acetylcholine ion-channel receptors; they are used to treat roundworm infections in humans and animals. Interest in their actions has surged, giving rise to new knowledge and technical advances, including an ability to reconstitute receptors that reveal more details of modes of action/resistance. We now know that the receptors are plastic and may form diverse species-dependent subtypes of receptor with different sensitivities to individual cholinergic anthelmintics. Understanding the biology of the levamisole receptors is expected to inform other studies on anthelmintics (ivermectin and emodepside) that act on ion-channels. PMID:22607692

  1. Histamine H3-receptor isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, R A

    2004-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for HA as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in various brain functions, including emotion, cognition, and feeding. The recent cloning of the histamine H3 receptor allowed for the subsequent cloning of a variety of H3 receptor isoforms from different species as well as the H4 receptor. As a result a wide variety of H3-receptor isoforms are now known that display differential brain expression patterns and signalling properties. These recent discoveries are discussed in view of the growing interest of the H3 receptor as a target for the development of potential therapeutics.

  2. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... in various parts of the viral life cyclus. Most of the receptors encoded by human pathogenic virus are still orphan receptors, i.e. the endogenous ligand is unknown. In the few cases where it has been possible to characterize these receptors pharmacologically, they have been found to bind a broad spectrum...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  4. TSH RECEPTOR AUTOANTIBODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Krzysztof; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHR-Abs) of the stimulating variety are the hallmark of Graves’ disease. The presence of immune defects leading to synthesis of TSHR-Abs causes hyperthyroidism and is associated with other extrathyroidal manifestations. Further characterization of these antibodies has now been made possible by the generation of monoclonal antibodies with this unique stimulating capacity as well as similar TSHR-Abs not associated with hyperthyroidism. Their present classification divides TSHR-Abs into stimulating, blocking (competing with TSH binding) and neutral (no signaling). Recent studies using monoclonal TSHR-Abs has revealed that stimulating and blocking antibodies bind to the receptor using mostly conformational epitopes, whilst neutral antibodies utilize exclusively linear peptides. Subtle differences in epitopes for stimulating and blocking antibodies account for the diversity of their biological actions. Recently non-classical signaling elicited by neutral antibodies has also been described, raising the need for a new classification of TSHR-Abs. PMID:19332151

  5. Ligand-Receptor Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The formation and dissociation of specific noncovalent interactions between a variety of macromolecules play a crucial role in the function of biological systems. During the last few years, three main lines of research led to a dramatic improvement of our understanding of these important phenomena. First, combination of genetic engineering and X ray cristallography made available a simultaneous knowledg of the precise structure and affinity of series or related ligand-receptor systems differing by a few well-defined atoms. Second, improvement of computer power and simulation techniques allowed extended exploration of the interaction of realistic macromolecules. Third, simultaneous development of a variety of techniques based on atomic force microscopy, hydrodynamic flow, biomembrane probes, optical tweezers, magnetic fields or flexible transducers yielded direct experimental information of the behavior of single ligand receptor bonds. At the same time, investigation of well defined cellular models raised the ...

  6. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  7. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  8. Similarity of Bovine Rotavirus Receptor and Human Rotavirus Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琦华; 訾自强; 潘菊芬; 徐燕

    2004-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody against bovine rotavirus (BRV) receptor (BRV-R-mAb) was used to explore the similarity between the receptors of BRV and human rotavirus (HRV). ELISA, dot immunobinding assay, cell protection assay, solid-phase assay and immunohistochemistry method were applied. BRV-R-mAb bound both anti-BRV IgG and anti-HRV IgG respectively and could protect MA 104 cells against BRV and HRV challenges. Immunohistochemistry test showed that there were rotavirus receptors on the surfaces of foetal intestinal, tracheal mucosa and MA 104 cells membrane. We purified the rotavirus receptors on MA 104 ceils, which could bind both BRV and HRV in vitro. It is concluded that BRV receptor and HRV receptor are homogenous proteins and can be recognized by both BRV and HRV.

  9. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  10. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  11. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  12. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik;

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...... polyamine toxins antagonize the AMPA receptor ion channel and provide the basis for rational development of uncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors....

  13. GABAρ1/GABAAα1 receptor chimeras to study receptor desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Demuro, Angelo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyrate type C (GABAC) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are expressed preponderantly in the vertebrate retina and are characterized, among other things, by a very low rate of desensitization and resistance to the specific GABAA antagonist bicuculline. To examine which structural elements determine the nondesensitizing character of the human homomeric ρ1 receptor, we used a combination of gene chimeras and electrophysiology of receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two chimeric genes were constructed, made up of portions of the ρ1-subunit and of the α1-subunit of the GABAA receptor. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, one chimeric gene (ρ1/α1) formed functional homooligomeric receptors that were fully resistant to bicuculline and were blocked by the specific GABAC antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid and by zinc. Moreover, these chimeric receptors had a fast-desensitizing component, even faster than that of heterooligomeric GABAA receptors, in striking contrast to the almost nil desensitization of wild-type ρ1 (wt ρ1) receptors. To see whether the fast-desensitizing characteristic of the chimera was determined by the amino acids forming the ion channels, we replaced the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of ρ1 by that of the α1-subunit of GABAA. Although the α1-subunit forms fast-desensitizing receptors when coexpressed with other GABAA subunits, the sole transfer of the α1TM2 segment to ρ1 was not sufficient to form desensitizing receptors. All this suggests that the slow-desensitizing trait of ρ1 receptors is determined by a combination of several interacting domains along the molecule. PMID:10725369

  14. Renal dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tahir; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2003-02-01

    Dopamine has been recognized as an important modulator of central as well as peripheral physiologic functions in both humans and animals. Dopamine receptors have been identified in a number of organs and tissues, which include several regions within the central nervous system, sympathetic ganglia and postganglionic nerve terminals, various vascular beds, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, and the kidney. The peripheral dopamine receptors influence cardiovascular and renal function by decreasing afterload and vascular resistance and promoting sodium excretion. Within the kidney, dopamine receptors are present along the nephron, with highest density on proximal tubule epithelial cells. It has been reported that there is a defective dopamine receptor, especially D(1) receptor function, in the proximal tubule of various animal models of hypertension as well as in humans with essential hypertension. Recent reports have revealed the site of and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the defect in D(1) receptors in hypertension. Moreover, recent studies have also demonstrated that the disruption of various dopamine receptor subtypes and their function produces hypertension in rodents. In this review, we present evidence that dopamine and dopamine receptors play an important role in regulating renal sodium excretion and that defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function may contribute to the development of various forms of hypertension.

  15. Leptin and its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms.

  16. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  17. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  18. Trace amine-associated receptors are olfactory receptors in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2009-07-01

    The mammalian nose is a powerful chemosensor, capable of detecting and distinguishing a myriad of chemicals. Sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium contain two types of chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): odorant receptors (ORs), which are encoded by the largest gene family in mammals, and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), a smaller family of receptors distantly related to biogenic amine receptors. Do TAARs play a specialized role in olfaction distinct from that of ORs? Genes encoding TAARs are found in diverse vertebrates, from fish to mice to humans. Like OR genes, each Taar gene defines a unique population of canonical sensory neurons dispersed in a single zone of the olfactory epithelium. Ligands for mouse TAARs include a number of volatile amines, several of which are natural constituents of mouse urine, a rich source of rodent social cues. One chemical, 2-phenylethylamine, is reported to be enriched in the urine of stressed animals, and two others, trimethylamine and isoamylamine, are enriched in male versus female urine. Furthermore, isoamylamine has been proposed to be a pheromone that induces puberty acceleration in young female mice. These data raise the possibility that some TAARs are pheromone receptors in the nose, a hypothesis consistent with recent data suggesting that the olfactory epithelium contains dedicated pheromone receptors, separate from pheromone receptors in the vomeronasal organ. Future experiments will clarify the roles of TAARs in olfaction.

  19. GABAB receptors modulate NMDA receptor calcium signals in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalifoux, Jason R; Carter, Adam G

    2010-04-15

    Metabotropic GABA(B) receptors play a fundamental role in modulating the excitability of neurons and circuits throughout the brain. These receptors influence synaptic transmission by inhibiting presynaptic release or activating postsynaptic potassium channels. However, their ability to directly influence different types of postsynaptic glutamate receptors remains unresolved. Here we examine GABA(B) receptor modulation in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from the mouse prefrontal cortex. We use two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to study synaptic modulation at individual dendritic spines. Using two-photon optical quantal analysis, we first demonstrate robust presynaptic modulation of multivesicular release at single synapses. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we then reveal that GABA(B) receptors strongly inhibit NMDA receptor calcium signals. This postsynaptic modulation occurs via the PKA pathway and does not affect synaptic currents mediated by AMPA or NMDA receptors. This form of GABA(B) receptor modulation has widespread implications for the control of calcium-dependent neuronal function.

  20. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  1. Sensory receptors in monotremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, U; Gregory, J E; Iggo, A

    1998-01-01

    This is a summary of the current knowledge of sensory receptors in skin of the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, and the snout of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus. Brief mention is also made of the third living member of the monotremes, the long-nosed echidna, Zaglossus bruijnii. The monotremes are the only group of mammals known to have evolved electroreception. The structures in the skin responsible for the electric sense have been identified as sensory mucous glands with an expanded epidermal portion that is innervated by large-diameter nerve fibres. Afferent recordings have shown that in both platypuses and echidnas the receptors excited by cathodal (negative) pulses and inhibited by anodal (positive) pulses. Estimates give a total of 40,000 mucous sensory glands in the upper and lower bill of the platypus, whereas there are only about 100 in the tip of the echidna snout. Recording of electroreceptor-evoked activity from the brain of the platypus have shown that the largest area dedicated to somatosensory input from the bill, S1, shows alternating rows of mechanosensory and bimodal neurons. The bimodal neurons respond to both electrosensory and mechanical inputs. In skin of the platypus bill and echidna snout, apart from the electroreceptors, there are structures called push rods, which consist of a column of compacted cells that is able to move relatively independently of adjacent regions of skin. At the base of the column are Merkel cell complexes, known to be type I slowly adapting mechanoreceptors, and lamellated corpuscles, probably vibration receptors. It has been speculated that the platypus uses its electric sense to detect the electromyographic activity from moving prey in the water and for obstacle avoidance. Mechanoreceptors signal contact with the prey. For the echidna, a role for the electrosensory system has not yet been established during normal foraging behaviour, although it has been shown that it is able to detect the presence

  2. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  3. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  4. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  5. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-01-01

    .... Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles...

  6. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  7. Opioids and their peripheral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Amato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The inflammation of peripheral tissues leads the primary afferent neurons, in particular at the cell bodies level located in the DRG (dorsal root ganglia, to an increased synthesis of opioid receptors: determining an “up-regulation”. After that opioid receptors are transported at the level of the nociceptive terminals, they are incorporated into the neuronal membrane becoming functional receptors. The above receptor proteins bind to opioid produced by immune cells or the exogenous ones. This leads to a direct or indirect suppression of the Ca2+ currents induced by TRPV1 or the currents of the Na+, resulting in neuronal reduced excitability and in transmitted signals decrease. The observation that the immune system is able to modulate the pain by ligands that interact with the opioid receptors located on sensory neurons, may have broad implications for the development of innovative and safer pain drugs.

  8. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  9. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2009-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor fami...

  10. High-resolution immunogold localization of AMPA type glutamate receptor subunits at synaptic and non-synaptic sites in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, A; Nusser, Z; Molnár, E; McIlhinney, R A; Somogyi, P

    1995-12-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of the GluRA, GluRB/C and GluRD subunits of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type glutamate receptor was determined in the rat hippocampus using polyclonal antipeptide antibodies in immunoperoxidase and immunogold procedures. For the localization of the GluRD subunit a new polyclonal antiserum was developed using the C-terminal sequence of the protein (residues 869-881), conjugated to carrier protein and absorbed to colloidal gold for immunization. The purified antibodies immunoprecipitated about 25% of 3[H]AMPA binding activity from the hippocampus, cerebellum or whole brain, but very little from neocortex. These antibodies did not precipitate a significant amount of 3[H]kainate binding activity. The antibodies also recognize the GluRD subunit, but not the other AMPA receptor subunits, when expressed in transfected COS-7 cells and only when permeabilized with detergent, indicating an intracellular epitope. All subunits were enriched in the neuropil of the dendritic layers of the hippocampus and in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. The cellular distribution of the GluRD subunit was studied more extensively. The strata radiatum, oriens and the dentate molecular layer were more strongly immunoreactive than the stratum lacunosum moleculare, the stratum lucidum and the hilus. However, in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 area and in the hilus the weakly reacting dendrites were surrounded by immunopositive rosettes, shown in subsequent electron microscopic studies to correspond to complex dendritic spines. In the stratum radiatum, the weakly reacting apical dendrites contrasted with the surrounding intensely stained neuropil. The cell bodies of pyramidal and granule cells were moderately reactive. Some non-principal cells and their dendrites in the pyramidal cell layer and in the alveus also reacted very strongly for the GluRD subunit. At the subcellular level, silver intensified immunogold

  11. Stimulus intensity, cell excitation and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor component of sensory responses in the rat spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, B A; Cumberbatch, M J; Herrero, J F; Stirk, G C; Headley, P M

    1997-09-01

    responses. When background activity of neurones was enhanced by continuous activation of C-fibres with cutaneous application of mustard oil, ketamine was less effective against superimposed noxious pinch responses. Ongoing background activity was affected in parallel with evoked responses. When background discharge of the cells was maintained at a stable level with continuous ejection of kainate, neither the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists nor thyrotrophin-relasing hormone affected the responses to noxious pinch or heat, although responses to exogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate were still blocked. The wind-up of the electrical responses was, however, reduced by ketamine irrespective of the level of background activity. The results indicate that under these conditions in vivo, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate ongoing low-frequency background activity rather than phasic high-frequency nociceptive responses. The effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists and positive modulators on nociceptive responses are evidently indirect, being secondary to changes in background synaptic excitation. These results cannot be explained simply in relation to the voltage-dependence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activity; other factors, such as modulation by neuropeptides, must be involved.

  12. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  13. Stargazin Modulation of AMPA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana A. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory synaptic signaling in the mammalian brain is mediated by AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In neurons, AMPA receptors co-assemble with auxiliary proteins, such as stargazin, which can markedly alter receptor trafficking and gating. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to map distances between the full-length, functional AMPA receptor and stargazin expressed in HEK293 cells and to determine the ensemble structural changes in the receptor due to stargazin. In addition, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the structural and conformational distribution of the receptor and how this distribution is affected by stargazin. Our nanopositioning data place stargazin below the AMPA receptor ligand-binding domain, where it is well poised to act as a scaffold to facilitate the long-range conformational selection observations seen in single-molecule experiments. These data support a model of stargazin acting to stabilize or select conformational states that favor activation.

  14. Cytokine receptors and hematopoietic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, L

    2007-10-15

    Colony-stimulating factors and other cytokines signal via their cognate receptors to regulate hematopoiesis. In many developmental systems, inductive signalling determines cell fate and, by analogy with this, it has been postulated that cytokines, signalling via their cognate receptors, may play an instructive role in lineage specification in hematopoiesis. An alternative to this instructive hypothesis is the stochastic or permissive hypothesis. The latter proposes that commitment to a particular hematopoietic lineage is an event that occurs independently of extrinsic signals. It predicts that the role of cytokines is to provide nonspecific survival and proliferation signals. In this review, we look at the role of cytokine receptor signalling in hematopoiesis and consider the evidence for both hypotheses. Data from experiments that genetically manipulate receptor gene expression in vitro or in vivo are reviewed. Experiments in which cytokine receptors were installed in multipotential cells showed that, in some cases, stimulation with the cognate ligand could lead to alterations in lineage output. The creation of genetically manipulated mouse strains demonstrated that cytokine receptors are required for expansion and survival of single lineages but did not reveal a role in lineage commitment. We conclude that hematopoietic differentiation involves mainly stochastic events, but that cytokine receptors also have some instructive role.

  15. Vascular dopamine-I receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Kano, H; Takeda, T

    1995-06-01

    The modulation of dopamine DA1 receptors of cultured rat renal arterial smooth muscle cells by phorbol ester, glucocorticoid and sodium chloride was studied. The extent of [3H]Sch-23390 binding to phorbol ester-treated cell was increased without any change in the dissociation constant (Kd). At a concentration of 10 nmol/l, the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased maximum receptor binding (Bmax) but had no effect on the Kd. 100 mmol/l sodium chloride did not change Bmax, but increased the Kd for DA1 receptor. The production of cAMP in response to DA1 receptor stimulation was enhanced without any change of the adenylate cyclase activity. The glucocorticoid effect on DA1 of arterial smooth muscle cells became apparent after hours of incubation in the presence of the steroid and was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) and by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-38486, indicating that the effect required protein synthesis through glucocorticoid receptors. Treatment of cells with 1 mumol/l dexamethasone for 24 h increased basal and DA1-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Basal adenylate cyclase was decreased by sodium chloride in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest differential control of DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells by protein kinase C, glucocorticoid or sodium chloride.

  16. Nuclear hormone receptors in podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurana Simran

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nuclear receptors are a family of ligand-activated, DNA sequence-specific transcription factors that regulate various aspects of animal development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. The physiological roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands have been intensively studied in cancer and metabolic syndrome. However, their role in kidney diseases is still evolving, despite their ligands being used clinically to treat renal diseases for decades. This review will discuss the progress of our understanding of the role of nuclear receptors and their ligands in kidney physiology with emphasis on their roles in treating glomerular disorders and podocyte injury repair responses.

  17. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  18. Autoimmune NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Tebo, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with prominent neurologic and psychiatric features at disease onset. The disease is associated with the production of autoantibodies to NMDAR, a protein involved in memory function and synaptic plasticity. Affected patients develop a multistage progressive illness with symptoms ranging from memory deficits, seizures and psychosis, to potentially lethal catatonia, and autonomic and breathing instability. The outcome can be much improved with accurate diagnosis and early treatment using adequate immunosuppressive therapy. However, since the neurological and psychiatric symptoms as well as the clinical examination results can be non-specific, the disease is probably under-recognized. Reliable and accurate clinical testing for the identification of NMDAR autoantibodies is crucial for diagnosis, timely treatment selection, and monitoring. Recently, a cell-based indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for the detection of IgG antibodies to NMDAR has become available for diagnostic use. This review highlights the progress and challenges of laboratory testing in the evaluation and management anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and perspectives for the future.

  19. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  20. Anthrax receptors position the spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minc, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Spindle orientation plays a pivotal role in tissue morphogenesis. An asymmetric anthrax receptor cap is revealed to promote activation of a formin to orient the spindle along the planar cell polarity (PCP) axis in zebrafish dorsal epiblast cells.

  1. [Nucleotide receptors and renal function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney plays a key role in homeostasis of human body. It has heterogenic structure and is characterized by complicated vascular beds and numbers of sympathetic nerves endings. Nucleotides receptors are involved in the regulation of blood flow, a fundamental process for renal function. Plasma is filtrated in renal glomerulus and activity of nucleotides receptors located on cells of glomerular filter modifies the physi- cochemical properties of filter and affects the filtration process. Electrolytes, water and low molecular weight molecules are reabsorbed from tubular fluid or secreted into fluid in proximal and distal tubules. Glomerular filtration rate and activity of tubular processes are regulated via nucleotides receptors by glomerulotubularbalance and tubuloglomerular feedback. Nucleotides receptors are involved in systemic regulation of blood pressure and carbohydrate metabolism.

  2. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja;

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes...... anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells....

  3. An Update on GABAρ Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Delgado, Gustavo; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2010-01-01

    The present review discusses the functional and molecular diversity of GABAρ receptors. These receptors were originally described in the mammalian retina, and their functional role in the visual pathway has been recently elucidated; however new studies on their distribution in the brain and spinal cord have revealed that they are more spread than originally thought, and thus it will be important to determine their physiological contribution to the GABAergic transmission in other areas of the ...

  4. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, p...

  5. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  6. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  7. Estrogen receptors in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, A

    1979-11-01

    On the basis of estrogen receptor assays, breast carcinomas are presently classified as estrogen-dependent tumors, which respond to endocrine therapy, and autonomous tumors, for which endocrine therapy is useless. This paper presents a short review of the biochemical principles of estrogen dependence, the procedures used to determine estrogen receptors, and the clinical applications of the findings of these assay procedures. Biobhemically, the estroogen dependence of normal breast cells is explained as a biochemical reaction occurring between the circulating estradiol and the breast cell, which occurs in 3 steps: 1) circulating estradiol penetrates the cellular membrane by passive diffusion, followed by 2) combining of estradiol with the estrogen-binding protein (estrophilin) and formation of an estrogen receptor complex which undergoes activation and translocation into the nucleus, to result in 3) the activated steroid receptor which combines with the nuclear charomatin and stimulates ribonucleic acid synthesis for the formation of estradiol binding proteins or estradiol receptors. The cytosol method of Wittliff et al. is described in brief and entails radioactive competitive analysis; the other available laboratory procedure is immunofluorescence of tumor sections. Quantification of estrogen receptor content can be used clinically to decide on ablative endocrine therapy, to determine the effectiveness of anti-estrogen administration, to determine the primary site of metastatic carcinoma, and as a screenng device.

  8. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism.

  9. Prognostic Value of Estrogen Receptor alpha and Progesterone Receptor Conversion in Distant Breast Cancer Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, Laurien D. C.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Meijer, S. L.; van Slooten, Henk-Jan; Wesseling, Pieter; Wesseling, Jelle; Westenend, Pieter J.; Bart, Joost; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Oudejans, Joost; van der Valk, Paul; van Gils, Carla H.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in the receptor profile of primary breast cancers to their metastases (receptor conversion) have been described for the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) and progesterone receptor (PR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of receptor conversion for ER alpha and

  10. Neurotrophins and their receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NellyFROSSARD; CharlesADVENIER

    2004-01-01

    The neurotrophin family has recently been in volved ininflammatory and remodelling processes occurring in chronic inflammatory diseases, in particular in asthma. Nerve growth fac-tor (NGF) is a high molecular weight peptide that belongs to the neurotrophin family. It is synthesized by various structural and inflammatory cells and activates two types of receptors, the TrkA (tropomyosin-receptor kinase A) receptor and the p75NTR receptor, in the death receptor family. NGF was first studied for

  11. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  12. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally.

  13. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  14. Brain CB₂ Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2010-08-10

    Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB₂ receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB₂ receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB₁ receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB₂ receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB₂ receptor expression in the brain is enhanced and CB2 receptor agonists exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. These findings have prompted research into the CB₂ receptor as a possible target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Neuroinflammatory alterations are also associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and polymorphisms in the CB₂ gene have been reported in depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. This review will examine the evidence to date for a role of brain CB₂ receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (UCR)

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  16. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  17. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions...... and odor-decoding processes. However, this type of explanation does not entirely justify the role olfactory receptors have played during evolution, since they are also expressed ectopically in different organs and/or tissues. Homologous olfactory genes have in fact been found in such diverse cells and....../or organs as spermatozoa, testis and kidney where they are assumed to act as chemotactic sensors or renin modulators. To justify their functional diversity, homologous olfactory receptors are assumed to share the same basic role: that of conferring a self-identity to cells or tissues under varying...

  18. An Update on GABAρ Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Delgado, Gustavo; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2010-01-01

    The present review discusses the functional and molecular diversity of GABAρ receptors. These receptors were originally described in the mammalian retina, and their functional role in the visual pathway has been recently elucidated; however new studies on their distribution in the brain and spinal cord have revealed that they are more spread than originally thought, and thus it will be important to determine their physiological contribution to the GABAergic transmission in other areas of the central nervous system. In addition, molecular modeling has revealed peculiar traits of these receptors that have impacted on the interpretations of the latest pharmacolgical and biophysical findings. Finally, sequencing of several vertebrate genomes has permitted a comparative analysis of the organization of the GABAρ genes. PMID:21629448

  19. Cytokine-Leukotriene Receptor Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rola-Pleszczynski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and pharmacological studies have identified the structure of leukotrienes, the pathways that lead to their synthesis, and the signaling events they trigger when they interact with their cognate receptors. A privileged interaction exists between these lipid mediators and another group of molecules essential for inflammation and immune modulation, namely, cytokines. Whereas leukotrienes can trigger the synthesis and release of selected cytokines in distinct cell populations, many cytokines can affect cellular responsiveness to leukotrienes by modulating leukotriene receptor expression. As we progressively begin to unravel these complex interactions, new areas of cell-cell communication and eventual therapeutic interventions will emerge.

  20. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  1. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  2. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  3. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  4. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions a...

  5. Hormone receptors in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, K. P M; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are critical for the growth and development of breast tissue as well as of breast cancer. The importance of the role estrogens in breast cancer has been delineated for more than 100 years. The analysis of its expression has been used not only to classify breast cancers but

  6. Dopamine Receptor Availability in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal dopamine (D2 receptor availability was determined by iodobenzamide brain SPECT, before and 3 months after methylphenidate (MPH therapy, in 9 children (mean age, 9.8 years with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD examined at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.

  7. Emerging GLP-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have become available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These agents exploit the physiological effects of GLP-1, which is able to address several of the pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1R agonists...

  8. Serotonin receptors as cardiovascular targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Villalón (Carlos); P.A.M. de Vries (Peter); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSerotonin exerts complex effects in the cardiovascular system, including hypotension or hypertension, vasodilatation or vasoconstriction, and/or bradycardia or tachycardia; the eventual response depends primarily on the nature of the 5-HT receptors involved. In the light of current 5-HT

  9. Estrogen Receptor Driven Inhibitor Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Engstrom O, Ohman L, Greene GL, Gustaffson JA, Carlquist M. Molecular basis of agonism and antagonism in the oestrogen receptor. Nature 389, 753-758...oxidatively modified proteins in Bacillus subtilis, Mol. Microbiol. 58 (2005) 409–425. [7] K. Tyagarajan, E. Pretzer, J.E. Wiktorowicz, Thiol-reactive dyes

  10. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  11. Forebrain NMDA receptors contribute to neuronal spike responses in adult mice%成年小鼠前脑NMDA受体参与神经元的动作电位发放

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王过渡; 卓敏

    2006-01-01

    谷氨酸是中枢神经系统主要的快速兴奋性递质.AMPA受体和海人藻酸受体主要参与突触传递,而NMDA受体主要参与突触可塑性.基因操作的方法增强NMDA受体的功能,可以增强动物在正常生理状态下的学习能力,及在组织损伤情况下的反应敏感性.NMDA受体参与生理功能的主要机制是长时程增强(long-term potentiation,LTP).我们的研究表明,NMDA受体不仅参与刺激前扣带皮层的第五层细胞或刺激白质诱导的突触反应,而且参与在胞体施加去极化跃阶电流诱导的动作电位的发放.钙-钙调蛋白敏感的腺苷酸环化酶1(adenylyl cyclase 1,AC1)和cAMP信号通路可能介导了这些反应.由于扣带皮层神经元在伤害性刺激和痛中发挥重要作用,我们的结果为前脑NMDA受体参与突触传递和动作电位发放,以及与前脑相关的行为,如感受伤害性刺激和痛,提供了一个新的机制.%Glutamate is the major fast excitatory transmitter in the central nervous system.While normal synaptic transmission is mediated byα-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid(AMPA)and kainate receptors,N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA) receptors are thought to selectively contribute to plasticity.Genetically enhancing NMDA receptor functions enhances animal behavior in normal physiological learning and enhances their sensitivity in the case of tissue injury.One major mechanism for NMDA receptors is synaptic long-term potentiation(LTP).Here we present evidence that NMDA receptors not only contribute to normal synaptic responses induced by stimulation of local layer V or white matters,but also contribute to generation of action potentials induced by a depolarizing step applied to the soma.Calcium-calmodulin sensitive adenylyl cyclase 1 and cAMP signal pathways likely mediate these effects.Considering the importance of cingulate neurons in nociception and pain,our results provide a new mechanism for NMDA receptor contributing to

  12. Amide-based Fluorescent Macrocyclic Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG, Zhen-Ya(曾振亚); XU, Kuo-Xi(徐括喜); HE, Yong-Bing(何永炳); LIU, Shun-Ying(刘顺英); WU, Jin-Long(吴进龙); WEI, Lan-Hua(隗兰华); MENG, Ling-Zhi(孟令芝)

    2004-01-01

    Two fluorescent anion receptors (1 and 2) based on amide macrocycle were synthesized and corresponding fluorescence quenching induced by anion complexation was observed in different degree. Receptors form 1: 1 complexes with anions by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptor 1 bound anions in the order of F->Cl->H2PO4->CH3COO->>Br-, I- and receptor 2 showed high selectivity to F- over other anions.

  13. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  14. Neuroexcitatory Drug Receptors in Mammals and Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-16

    several animal species investigated. We identified the codfish as having a single polypeptide/gene for CABA -A receptors, as compared to 10-15 different...through blocking of CABA receptor functions. The CABA receptor-chloride channel system is important in wide-spread regions of the mammalian nervous... CABA receptor distribution was quantitated and mapped (14). For this analysis, we employed an image analyzer purchased by Drs. Olsen and de Vellis under

  15. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  16. Mannose receptor-targeted vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keler, Tibor; Ramakrishna, Venky; Fanger, Michael W

    2004-12-01

    Targeting antigens to endocytic receptors on professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represents an attractive strategy to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Such APC-targeted vaccines have an exceptional ability to guide exogenous protein antigens into vesicles that efficiently process the antigen for major histocompatibility complex class I and class II presentation. Efficient targeting not only requires high specificity for the receptor that is abundantly expressed on the surface of APCs, but also the ability to be rapidly internalised and loaded into compartments that contain elements of the antigen-processing machinery. The mannose receptor (MR) and related C-type lectin receptors are particularly designed to sample antigens (self and non-self), much like pattern recognition receptors, to integrate the innate with adaptive immune responses. In fact, a variety of approaches involving delivery of antigens to the MR have demonstrated effective induction of potent cellular and humoral immune responses. Yet, although several lines of evidence in diverse experimental systems attest to the efficacy of targeted vaccine strategies, it is becoming increasingly clear that additional signals, such as those afforded by adjuvants, may be critical to elicit sustained immunity. Therefore, MR-targeted vaccines are likely to be most efficacious in vivo when combined with agents that elicit complementary activation signals. Certainly, a better understanding of the mechanism associated with the induction of immune responses as a result of targeting antigens to the MR, will be important in exploiting MR-targeted vaccines not only for mounting immune defenses against cancer and infectious disease, but also for specific induction of tolerance in the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  17. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  18. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B.R.; Korte, S.M.; Buwalda, B.; Fleur, la S.E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  19. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    2015-01-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has receive

  20. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has

  1. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand bin...

  2. Imaging of receptors in clinical neurosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J

    This article deals with the question why should one determine receptors in the brain with positron and single photon emission tomography (PET and SPECT, respectively). Radiopharmaceuticals for a wide variety of receptors are available now. Receptors studies with PET and SPECT have thus far focused

  3. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...

  4. Estrogen receptors in human vaginal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, M.A.H.M.; Poortman, J.; Agema, A.R.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of specific estrogen receptors could be demonstrated in vaginal tissue, obtained during operation from 38 women, age 27–75 yr. In 23 premenopausal women the receptor concentration in the vaginal tissue varied between 12 and 91 fmol/mg protein, no significant difference in the receptor

  5. The Human Laminin Receptor is a Member of the Integrin Family of Cell Adhesion Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlsen, Kurt R.; Dillner, Lena; Engvall, Eva; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1988-09-01

    A receptor for the adhesive basement membrane protein, laminin, was isolated from human glioblastoma cells by affinity chromatography on laminin. This receptor has a heterodimeric structure similar to that of receptors for other extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. Incorporation of the laminin receptor into liposomal membranes makes it possible for liposomes to attach to surfaces coated with laminin. The receptor liposomes also attached to some extent to surfaces coated with fibronectin, but not with other matrix proteins. These properties identify the laminin receptor as a member of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors.

  6. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  7. Venus Kinase Receptors: prospects in signalling and biological functions of these invertebrate receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Colette eDissous; Marion eMorel; Mathieu eVanderstraete

    2014-01-01

    Venus Kinase Receptors (VKRs) form a family of invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) initially discovered in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. VKRs are single transmembrane receptors which contain an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT) structure similar to the ligand binding domain of G Protein Coupled Receptors of class C, and an intracellular Tyrosine Kinase domain close to that of Insulin Receptors. VKRs are found in a large variety of invertebrates from cnidarians to ...

  8. Discoidin Domain Receptors Role in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker BADIOLA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 and Discodin Domain Receptor 2 are the two only members of the DDR family. The DDR family is a Tyrosine Kinase Receptor (TKR family with some peculiarities compared with other Tyrosine Kinase Receptors such as their natural ligand; which in this case is the fibrillar collagen; or the slow phosphorylation pattern. These peculiarities confer a special role to the receptors present in many diseases development processes as cancer, cirrhosis or lung fibrosis. In this review it is described the overview of the DDRs structure and their role in the different disease development and the possibility to consider them as therapeutic targets.

  9. Novel receptors for bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    While bacterial effectors are often directly introduced into eukaryotic target cells by various types of injection machines, toxins enter the cytosol of host cells from endosomal compartments or after retrograde transport via Golgi from the ER. A first crucial step of toxin-host interaction is receptor binding. Using optimized protocols and new methods novel toxin receptors have been identified, including metalloprotease ADAM 10 for Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, laminin receptor Lu/BCAM for Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor CNF1, lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) for Clostridium difficile transferase CDT and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin.

  10. Evolutionary vignettes of natural killer cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Beck, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of novel immune receptors has led to a recent renaissance of research into the innate immune system, following decades of intense research of the adaptive immune system. Of particular interest has been the discovery of the natural killer (NK) cell receptors which, depending on type, interact with classical or non-classical MHC class I antigens of the adaptive immune system, thus functioning at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review recent progress with respect to two such families of NK receptors, the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLRs), and attempt to trace their evolution across vertebrates.

  11. Sugars, Sweet Taste Receptors, and Brain Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allen A; Owyang, Chung

    2017-06-24

    Sweet taste receptors are composed of a heterodimer of taste 1 receptor member 2 (T1R2) and taste 1 receptor member 3 (T1R3). Accumulating evidence shows that sweet taste receptors are ubiquitous throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract as well as the hypothalamus. These sweet taste receptors are heavily involved in nutrient sensing, monitoring changes in energy stores, and triggering metabolic and behavioral responses to maintain energy balance. Not surprisingly, these pathways are heavily regulated by external and internal factors. Dysfunction in one or more of these pathways may be important in the pathogenesis of common diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Differences in the interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with receptor from normal, denervated and myasthenic human muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefvert, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with different kinds of human skeletal muscle receptor was investigated. The reaction of most receptor antibodies was strongest with receptor from a patient with myasthenia gravis and with receptor from denervated muscle. Results obtained with these receptors were well correlated. The binding of most receptor antibodies to receptor from functionally normal muscle was much weaker and also qualitatively different. In a few patients with moder...

  13. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-05-17

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) Each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction, and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor arrays.

  14. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  15. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    Nutrients, biological waste-products, toxins, pathogens, and other ligands for endocytosis are typically captured by multidomain receptors with multiligand specificity. Upon internalization, the receptor-ligand complex segregates, followed by lysosomal degradation of the ligand and recycling...... of the receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...

  16. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zwicker, David; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information-theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor...

  17. The vanilloid receptor and hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donna H WANG

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels consist of six related protein sub-families that are involved in a variety of pathophysiological function, and disease development. The TRPV1 channel, a member of the TRPV sub-family, is identified by expression cloning using the "hot" pepper-derived vanilloid compound capsaicin as a ligand. Therefore, TRPV1 is also referred as the vanilloid receptor (VR1) or the capsaicin receptor. VR1 is mainly expressed in a subpopulation of primary afferent neurons that project to cardiovascular and renal tissues.These capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons are not only involved in the perception of somatic and visceral pain, but also have a "sensory-effector" function.Regarding the latter, these neurons release stored neuropeptides through a calcium-dependent mechanism via the binding of capsaicin to VR1. The most studied sensory neuropeptides are calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), which are potent vasodilators and natriuretic/diuretic factors. Recent evidence using the model of neonatal degeneration of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves revealed novel mechanisms that underlie increased salt sensitivity and several experimental models of hypertension. These mechanisms include insufficient suppression of plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels subsequent to salt loading, enhancement of sympathoexcitatory response in the face of a salt challenge, activation of the endothelin- 1 receptor, and impaired natriuretic response to salt loading in capsaicin-pretreated rats. These data indicate that sensory nerves counterbalance the prohypertensive effects of several neurohormonal systems to maintain normal blood pressure when challenged with salt loading. The therapeutic utilities of vanilloid compounds, endogenous agonists,and sensory neuropeptides are also discussed.

  18. Endomorphins interact with tachykinin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosson, Piotr; Bonney, Iwona; Carr, Daniel B; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2005-09-01

    Soon after the discovery of endomorphins several studies indicated differences between pharmacological effects of endomorphins and other MOR selective ligands, as well as differences between the effects of endomorphin I and endomorphin II. We now propose that these differences are the result of an additional non-opioid property of endomorphins, namely, their weak antagonist properties with respect to tachykinin NK1 and NK1 receptors.

  19. The Laminins and their Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferletta, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Basement membranes are thin extracellular sheets that surround muscle, fat and peripheral nerve cells and underlay epithelial and endothelial cells. Laminins are one of the main protein families of these matrices. Integrins and dystroglycan are receptors for laminins, connecting cells to basement membranes. Each laminin consists of three different chains, (α, β, γ). Laminin-1 (α1β1γ1) was the first laminin to be found and is the most frequently studied. Despite this, it was unclear where its ...

  20. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensi...

  1. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  2. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  3. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition.

  4. Receptor response in Venus's fly-trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S L

    1965-09-01

    The insect-trapping movement of the plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus's fly-trap) is mediated by the stimulation of mechanosensory hairs located on the surface of the trap. It is known that stimulation of the hairs is followed by action potentials which are propagated over the surface of the trap. It has been reported that action potentials always precede trap closure. The occurrence of non-propagated receptor potentials is reported here. Receptor potentials always precede the action potentials. The receptor potential appears to couple the mechanical stimulation step to the action potential step of the preying sequence. Receptor potentials elicited by mechanical stimulation of a sensory hair were measured by using the hair as an integral part of the current-measuring path. The tip of the hair was cut off exposing the medullary tissue; this provided a natural extension of the measuring electrode into the receptor region at the base of the hair. A measuring pipette electrode was slipped over the cut tip of the hair. Positive and negative receptor potentials were measured. Evidence is presented which supports the hypothesis that the positive and negative receptor potentials originate from independent sources. An analysis is made of (a) the relation of the parameters of mechanical stimuli to the magnitude of the receptor potential, and (b) the relation of the receptor potentials to the action potential. The hypothesis that the positive receptor potential is the generator of the action potential is consistent with these data.

  5. Constitutive receptor systems for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G; Jayawickreme, C; Way, J; Armour, S; Queen, K; Watson, C; Ignar, D; Chen, W J; Kenakin, T

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of constitutively active G-protein-coupled receptor systems for drug discovery. Specifically, the ternary complex model is used to define the two major theoretical advantages of constitutive receptor screening-namely, the ability to detect antagonists as well as agonists directly and the fact that constitutive systems are more sensitive to agonists. In experimental studies, transient transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cyclic AMP response element (CRE) luciferase reporter cells with cDNA for human parathyroid hormone receptor, glucagon receptor, and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor showed cDNA concentration-dependent constitutive activity with parathyroid hormone (PTH-1) and glucagon. In contrast, no constitutive activity was observed for GLP-1 receptor, yet responses to GLP-1 indicated that receptor expression had taken place. In another functional system, Xenopus laevi melanophores transfected with cDNA for human calcitonin receptor showed constitutive activity. Nine ligands for the calcitonin receptor either increased or decreased constitutive activity in this assay. The sensitivity of the system to human calcitonin increased with increasing constitutive activity. These data indicate that, for those receptors which naturally produce constitutive activity, screening in this mode could be advantageous over other methods.

  6. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  7. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  8. Assembly of PRR-containing receptors on scaffolds: a model for imidazoline I(1)-receptor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, I F; Dehle, F C; Piletz, J

    2003-12-01

    IRAS, a putative clone of the I(1)-imidazoline receptor, possesses a proline-rich region (PRR) motif, which might interact with SH3 regions on tyrosine kinases, and an integrin-binding motif. Receptors with a PRR motif can generally assemble onto multi-element signaling complexes (eg., the beta(3)-receptor on the EGF receptor) and thereby modulate signal transduction. Integrins serve as scaffolds for multi-element signaling complexes, similar to that assembled with the EGF receptor. It is therefore possible that IRAS signals through a complex with other receptors.

  9. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors (m......GluRs). Within the iGluRs, five subtypes (KA1, KA2, iGluR5-7) show high affinity and express full agonist activity upon binding of the naturally occurring amino acid kainic acid (KA). Thus these receptors have been named the KA receptors. This review describes all-to our knowledge-published KA receptor agonists...

  10. Mast Cell and Immune Inhibitory Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LixinLi; ZhengbinYao

    2004-01-01

    Modulation by balancing activating and inhibitory receptors constitutes an important mechanism for regulating immune responses. Cells that are activated following ligation of receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) can be negatively regulated by other receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). Human mast cells (MCs) are the major effector cells of type I hypersensitivity and important participants in a number of disease processes. Antigen-mediated aggregation of IgE bound to its high-affinity receptor on MCs initiates a complex series of biochemical events leading to MC activation. With great detailed description and analysis of several inhibitory receptors on human MCs, a central paradigm of negative regulation of human MC activation by these receptors has emerged. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):408-415.

  11. The anatomy of mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéron, Jean-Baptiste; Golebiowski, Jérôme; Antonczak, Serge; Fiorucci, Sébastien

    2017-02-01

    All sweet-tasting compounds are detected by a single G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), the heterodimer T1R2-T1R3, for which no experimental structure is available. The sweet taste receptor is a class C GPCR, and the recently published crystallographic structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 and 5 provide a significant step forward for understanding structure-function relationships within this family. In this article, we recapitulate more than 600 single point site-directed mutations and available structural data to obtain a critical alignment of the sweet taste receptor sequences with respect to other class C GPCRs. Using this alignment, a homology 3D-model of the human sweet taste receptor is built and analyzed to dissect out the role of key residues involved in ligand binding and those responsible for receptor activation. Proteins 2017; 85:332-341. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. P2X receptors in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2015-01-01

    pathways that inhibit epithelial absorption are currently not well understood. Epithelial P2X7 receptors show pronounced up-regulation during varies diseased states highlighting a role of purinergic signaling in epithelial pathophysiology. Importantly, functional effects of epithelial P2X receptors cover......P2X receptors are ubiquitously expressed in all epithelial tissues but their functional roles are less well studied. Here we review the current state of knowledge by focusing on functional effects of P2X receptor in secretory and in absorptive tissues. In glandular tissue like the parotid gland...... basolateral P2X receptors stimulate ion secretion via an increase of [Ca2+]i. In absorptive epithelia like the renal tubule P2X receptor stimulation mediates the inhibition of NaCl, Mg2+ and water transport in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, respectively. The underlying signaling...

  13. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention.

  14. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  15. Complex pharmacology of free fatty acid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond; Hudson, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond simple competitive agonism or antagonism by ligands interacting with the orthosteric binding site of the receptor to incorporate concepts of allosteric agonism, allosteric modulation, signaling bias, c...

  16. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  17. Emerging GLP-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have become available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These agents exploit the physiological effects of GLP-1, which is able to address several of the pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1R agonists...... presently available are administered once or twice daily, but several once-weekly GLP-1R agonists are in late clinical development. Areas covered: The present review aims to give an overview of the clinical data on the currently available GLP-1R agonists used for treatment of type 2 diabetes, exenatide...

  18. New transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein isoform, gamma-7, differentially regulates AMPA receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kato, Akihiko S; Zhou, Wei; Milstein, Aaron D; Knierman, Mike D; Siuda, Edward R; Dotzlaf, Joe E; Yu, Hong; Hale, John E; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2007-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (GluRs) mediate most excitatory signaling in the brain and are composed of GluR principal subunits and transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) auxiliary subunits...

  19. The angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor and receptor-associated proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms of regulation, activation and signal transduction of the angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) type 1 (AT1) receptor have been studied extensively in the decade after its cloning. The AT1receptor is a major component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). It mediates the classical biological actions of Ang Ⅱ. Among the structures required for regulation and activation of the receptor, its carboxylterminal region plays crucial roles in receptor internalization, desensitization and phosphorylation. The mechanisms involved in heterotrimeric G-protein coupling to the receptor, activation of the downstreamsignaling pathway by G proteins and the Ang Ⅱ signal transduction pathways leading to specific cellularresponses are discussed. In addition, recent work on the identification and characterization of novel proteinsassociated with carboxyl-terminus of the AT1 receptor is presented. These novel proteins will advance ourunderstanding of how the receptor is internalized and recycled as they provide molecular mechanisms for the activation and regulation of G-protein-coupled receptors.

  20. ABA Receptors: Past, Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the key plant stress hormone. Consistent with the earlier studies in support of the presence of both membrane- and cytoplasm-localized ABA receptors, recent studies have identified multiple ABA receptors located in various subcellular locations. These include a chloroplast envelope-localized receptor (the H subunit of Chloroplast Mg2+-chelatase/ABA Receptor), two plasma membrane-localized receptors (G-protein Coupled Receptor 2 and GPCR-type G proteins), and one cytosol/nucleus-localized Pyrabactin Resistant (PYR)/PYR-Like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor 1 (RCAR). Although the downstream molecular events for most of the identified ABA receptors are currently unknown, one of them, PYR/PYL/RACR was found to directly bind and regulate the activity of a long-known central regulator of ABA signaling, the A-group protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Together with the Sucrose Non-fermentation Kinase Subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) protein kinases, a central signaling complex (ABA-PYR-PP2Cs-SnRK2s) that is responsible for ABA signal perception and transduction is supported by abundant genetic, physiological, biochemical and structural evidence. The identification of multiple ABA receptors has advanced our understanding of ABA signal perception and transduction while adding an extra layer of complexity.

  1. Challenges in imaging cell surface receptor clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, Rebecca; Giske, Arnold; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy offers unique tools for visualizing and resolving cellular structures at the molecular level. STED microscopy is a purely optical method where neither complex sample preparation nor mathematical post-processing is required. Here we present the use of STED microscopy for imaging receptor cluster composition. We use two-color STED to further determine the distribution of two different receptor subunits of the family of receptor serine/threonine kinases in the presence or absence of their ligands. The implications of receptor clustering on the downstream signaling are discussed, and future challenges are also presented.

  2. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcriptome Reveals Unidentified Neuroendocrine Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Žitňan, Dušan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  3. Neuropeptide receptor transcriptome reveals unidentified neuroendocrine pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT, remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA. Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC, an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research.

  4. Abscisic Acid Receptors: Past, Present and Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Guo; Xiaohan Yang; David J. Weston; Jin-Gui Chen

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the key plant stress hormone. Consistent with the earlier studies in support of the presence of both membrane- and cytoplasm-localized ABA receptors, recent studies have identified multiple ABA receptors located in various subcellular locations. These include a chloroplast envelope-localized receptor (the H subunit of Chloroplast Mg2+-chelatase/ABA Receptor), two plasma membrane-localized receptors (G-protein Coupled Receptor 2 and GPCR-type G proteins),and one cytosol/nucleus-localized Pyrabactin Resistant (PYR)/PYR-Like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor 1 (RCAR). Although the downstream molecular events for most of the identified ABA receptors are currently unknown, one of them, PYR/PYL/RCAR was found to directly bind and regulate the activity of a long-known central regulator of ABA signaling, the A-group protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Together with the Sucrose Non-fermentation Kinase Subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) protein kinases, a central signaling complex (ABA-PYR-PP2Cs-SnRK2s) that is responsible for ABA signal perception and transduction is supported by abundant genetic, physiological, biochemical and structural evidence. The identification of multiple ABA receptors has advanced our understanding of ABA signal perception and transduction while adding an extra layer of complexity.

  5. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  6. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Nuclear Export by Ligand-Induced and p38-Mediated Receptor Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heehyoung; Bai, Wenlong

    2002-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are phosphoproteins which can be activated by ligands, kinase activators, or phosphatase inhibitors. Our previous study showed that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was involved in estrogen receptor activation by estrogens and MEKK1. Here, we report estrogen receptor-dependent p38 activation by estrogens in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells and in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor α mediated through p38. The phosphorylation site was identified as...

  8. Studies on mu and delta opioid receptor selectivity utilizing chimeric and site-mutagenized receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Shahrestanifar, M; Jin, J; Howells, R D

    1995-01-01

    Opioid receptors are members of the guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor family. Three types of opioid receptors have been cloned and characterized and are referred to as the delta, kappa and mu types. Analysis of receptor chimeras and site-directed mutant receptors has provided a great deal of information about functionally important amino acid side chains that constitute the ligand-binding domains and G-protein-coupling domains of G-protein-coupled receptors. We have constructed delta/mu opioid receptor chimeras that were express in human embryonic kidney 293 cells in order to define receptor domains that are responsible for receptor type selectivity. All chimeric receptors and wild-type delta and mu opioid receptors displayed high-affinity binding of etorphine (an agonist), naloxone (an antagonist), and bremazocine (a mixed agonist/antagonist). In contrast, chimeras that lacked the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor did not bind the mu-selective peptide [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO). Chimeras that lacked the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor did not bind the delta-selective peptide, [D-Ser2,D-Leu5]enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Point mutations in the putative third extracellular loop of the wild-type delta receptor that converted vicinal arginine residues to glutamine abolished DSLET binding while not affecting bremazocine, etorphine, and naltrindole binding. We conclude that amino acids in the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor are critical for high-affinity DAMGO binding and that arginine residues in the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor are important for high-affinity DSLET binding. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618916

  9. Epac2: a sulfonylurea receptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmann, Holger

    2012-02-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely used oral drugs in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. They function by the inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in pancreatic β-cells, which are thus considered the 'classical' sulfonylurea receptor. Next to the ATP-sensitive K+ channels, additional sulfonylurea-interacting proteins were identified, which might contribute to the physiological effects of this drug family. Most recently, Epac2 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2) was added to the list of sulfonylurea receptors. However, this finding caused controversy in the literature. The critical discussion of the present paper comes to the conclusion that sulfonylureas are not able to activate Epac2 directly and are unlikely to bind to Epac2. Increased blood glucose levels after food intake result in the secretion of insulin from pancreatic β-cells. Glucose levels are detected 'indirectly' by β-cells: owing to increased glycolysis rates, the ratio of cellular ATP/ADP increases and causes the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ channels. In consequence, cells depolarize and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels open to cause an increase in the cellular Ca2+ concentration. Finally, Ca2+ induces the fusion of insulin-containing granules with the plasma membrane. Sulfonylureas, such as tolbutamide, glibenclamide or acetohexamide, form a class of orally applicable drugs used in the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  10. Prorenin receptor in kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2017-03-01

    Prorenin receptor (PRR), a receptor for renin and prorenin and an accessory subunit of the vacuolar proton pump H(+)-ATPase, is expressed in the developing kidney. Global loss of PRR is lethal in mice, and PRR mutations are associated with a high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and X-linked mental retardation in humans. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several recent studies have demonstrated critical roles for the PRR in several lineages of the developing kidney. PRR signaling has been shown to be essential for branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud (UB), nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis. PRR regulates these developmental events through interactions with other transcription and growth factors. Several targeted PRR knockout animal models have structural defects mimicking congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract observed in humans. The aim of this review, is to highlight new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which PRR may regulate UB branching, terminal differentiation and function of UB-derived collecting ducts, nephron progenitor maintenance, progression of nephrogenesis and normal structural kidney development and function.

  11. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  12. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  13. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this...

  14. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L...

  15. The role of the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) in adrenomedullin receptor signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2001-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are usually thought to act as monomer receptors that bind ligand and then interact with G proteins to initiate signal transduction. In this study we report an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) required for signal transduction at the G protein-coupled receptor for adrenomedullin. Cell lines were made that expressed an antisense construct of the RCP cDNA, and in these cells diminished RCP expression correlated with loss of adrenomedullin signal transduction. In contrast, loss of RCP did not diminish receptor density or affinity, therefore RCP does not appear to act as a chaperone protein. Instead, RCP represents a novel class of protein required to couple the adrenomedullin receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway. A candidate adrenomedullin receptor named the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been described, which forms high affinity adrenomedullin receptors when co-expressed with the accessory protein receptor-activity modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR and RAMP2, indicating that a functional adrenomedullin receptor is composed of at least three proteins: the ligand binding protein (CRLR), an accessory protein (RAMP2), and a coupling protein for signal transduction (RCP).

  16. A novel fluorescent receptor assay : Based upon receptors embedded in labeled liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, Gerhard Theodoor

    1999-01-01

    Receptor proteins play an essential role in life. All organisms, from bacteria to plants, animals and human beings use receptors for their response to (external) signals. By definition, a receptor is a (macro) molecule which is able to recognize a distinct chemical entity (e.g. a hormone or neurotra

  17. A novel fluorescent receptor assay : based upon receptors embedded in labeled liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, Gerhard Theodoor

    1999-01-01

    Receptor proteins play an essential role in life. All organisms, from bacteria to plants, animals and human beings use receptors for their response to (external) signals. By definition, a receptor is a (macro) molecule which is able to recognize a distinct chemical entity (e.g. a hormone or neurotra

  18. Microarray-based determination of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 receptor status in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Roepman; H.M. Horlings; O. Krijgsman; M. Kok; J.M. Bueno-de-Mesquita; R. Bender; S.C. Linn; A.M. Glas; M.J. van de Vijver

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The level of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 aids in the determination of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry is currently the predominant method for assessment, but differences in methods and interpretation can substantially affect th

  19. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions.

  20. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  1. Down regulation of epidermal growth factor receptors: direct demonstration of receptor degradation in human fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The metabolism of the receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been measured by labeling the receptor in vivo with radioactive amino acid precursors and then determining, by immunoprecipitation with specific anti-EGF receptor antisera, the rate of degradation of the receptor when the cells are placed in a nonradioactive medium. In human fibroblasts the rate of EGF receptor degradation (t1/2 = 10.1 h) was faster than the rate of degradation of total cell protein. When EGF was added to th...

  2. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    .05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  3. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    1994-01-01

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  4. Transient receptor potential channels in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Scholze, Alexandra; Zhu, Zhiming

    2006-01-01

    The role of nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) family in essential hypertension has not yet been investigated.......The role of nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) family in essential hypertension has not yet been investigated....

  5. [Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma: scintigraphic expression of somatostatin receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vicente, A; García Del Castillo, E; Soriano Castrejón, A; Alonso Farto, J

    1999-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor originating in the upper nasal cavity and constitutes 3% of all intranasal neoplasms. Few references exist about the expression of somatostatin receptors in these tumors. Our case demonstrates a good correlation between the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  7. Evidence of paired M2 muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, L.T.; Ballesteros, L.A.; Bichajian, L.H.; Ferrendelli, C.A.; Fisher, A.; Hanchett, H.E.; Zhang, R. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Binding assays involving various antagonists, including N-(3H) methylscopolamine, (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate, AFDX-116, pirenzepine, and propylbenzilylcholine mustard, disclosed only a single population of M2 muscarinic receptors in membranes from the rat brainstem (medulla, pons, and colliculi). However, competition curves between N-(3H)methylscopolamine and various agonists, including oxotremorine, cis-dioxolane, and acetylethylcholine mustard, showed approximately equal numbers of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity (H) sites and guanine nucleotide-insensitive low affinity (L) sites. This 50% H phenomenon persisted in different buffers, at different temperatures, after the number of receptors was halved (and, thus, the remaining receptor to guanine nucleotide-binding protein ratio was doubled), after membrane solubilization with digitonin, and when rabbit cardiac membranes were used instead of rat brainstem membranes. Preferential occupation of H sites with acetylethylcholine mustard, and of L sites with quinuclidinyl benzilate or either mustard, yielded residual free receptor populations showing predominantly L and H sites, respectively. Low concentrations of (3H)-oxotremorine-M labeled only H sites, and the Bmax for these sites was 49% of the Bmax found with (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate plus guanine nucleotide. These and other results are most consistent with the idea that H and L receptor sites exist on separate but dimeric receptor molecules and with the hypothesis that only the H receptors cycle between high and low affinity, depending upon interactions between this receptor molecule and a guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

  8. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs...

  9. Docking to flexible nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Bruun, Anne T; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and other members of the Cys-loop receptor family is complicated by the flexibility of the so-called C-loop. As observed in the large number of published crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a structural...

  10. Enantioselective Transport by a Steroidal Guanidinium Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Blackburn, Adrian G.; Breccia, Perla; Davis, Anthony P.; Mendoza, Javier de; Padrón-Carrillo, José M.; Prados, Pilar; Riedner, Jens; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2002-01-01

    The cationic steroidal receptors 9 and 11 have been synthesized from cholic acid 3. Receptor 9 extracts N-acetyl-α-amino acids from aqueous media into chloroform with enantioselectivities (L:D) of 7-10:1. The lipophilic variant 11 has been employed for the enantioselective transport of N-acetylpheny

  11. Characterization of the lymphocyte substance P receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillis, J.P.; Organist, M.L.; Payan, D.G.

    1986-03-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that tissues of the immune and reticuloendothelial systems are influenced by various hormones and neuropeptides. While the interrelationship between these peptides and the immune system, and the physiological relevance of their effects is not clear, a variety of highly specific, receptor-mediated effects has been demonstrated. One neuropeptide for which immunomodulatory effects have been identified is substance P (SP). SP acts as a potent T-cell mitogen, and enhances the mitogenic effects of PHA. Radioreceptor and FACS binding studies suggest that the SP receptor is present on a discrete population of T-cells and has a Kd of 0.87 nM and a density of 24,000. Studies have been initiated to biochemically characterize the lymphocyte SP receptor on IM-9 lymphoblasts. (/sup 125/I)-labeled SP was covalently crosslinked to the receptor using disuccinimidyl suberate and solubilized. Two radioactive bands of m.w. 55,000 and 33,000 were seen when the solubilized crosslinked receptor was electrophoresed on SDS gels. The authors are currently using a combination of HPLC immunoaffinity and reverse-phase chromatography to purify the receptor. The initial studies indicate that the receptor can be purified to homogeneity using this approach. The biochemical characterization of this receptor should provide a better understanding of its importance not only on lymphocytes, but in other tissues as well.

  12. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  13. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Cedrick D; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Hong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Vigues, Stephan; Ott, Sandra H; Elson, Amanda E T; Choi, Hyun Jin; Shaw, Hillary; Egan, Josephine M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Li, Xiaodong; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  14. Teaching Receptor Theory to Biochemistry Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Sufka, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Receptor:ligand interactions account for numerous reactions critical to biochemistry and molecular biology. While students are typically exposed to some examples, such as hemoglobin binding of oxygen and signal transduction pathways, the topic could easily be expanded. Theory and kinetic analysis, types of receptors, and the experimental assay…

  15. Nanobiosensors based on individual olfactory receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Pajot-Augy, E

    2008-01-01

    In the SPOT-NOSED European project, nanoscale sensing elements bearing olfactory receptors and grafted onto functionalized gold substrates are used as odorant detectors to develop a new concept of nanobioelectronic nose, through sensitive impedancemetric measurement of single receptor conformational change upon ligand binding, with a better specificity and lower detection threshold than traditional physical sensors.

  16. Primary Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    quantities of starting material (for reviews of receptor, see Popot and Changeux, 1984; Stroud and Finer-Moore, 1985). This work led to the...Cloning of the Acetylcholine Receptor. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. on Quant. Biol. XLVIH: 71-78. 15. Popot , J-L. and Changeux, J-P. (1984) The

  17. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined.

  18. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  19. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  20. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  1. The exportomer: the peroxisomal receptor export machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platta, Harald W; Hagen, Stefanie; Erdmann, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Peroxisomes constitute a dynamic compartment of almost all eukaryotic cells. Depending on environmental changes and cellular demands peroxisomes can acquire diverse metabolic roles. The compartmentalization of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is a prerequisite to carry out their physiologic function. The matrix proteins are synthesized on free ribosomes in the cytosol and are ferried to the peroxisomal membrane by specific soluble receptors. Subsequent to cargo release into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptors are exported back to the cytosol to facilitate further rounds of matrix protein import. This dislocation step is accomplished by a remarkable machinery, which comprises enzymes required for the ubiquitination as well as the ATP-dependent extraction of the receptor from the membrane. Interestingly, receptor ubiquitination and dislocation are the only known energy-dependent steps in the peroxisomal matrix protein import process. The current view is that the export machinery of the receptors might function as molecular motor not only in the dislocation of the receptors but also in the import step of peroxisomal matrix protein by coupling ATP-dependent removal of the peroxisomal import receptor with cargo translocation into the organelle. In this review we will focus on the architecture and function of the peroxisomal receptor export machinery, the peroxisomal exportomer.

  2. Regulation of gonadotropin receptor gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); R. Kraaij (Robert); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe receptors for the gonadotropins differ from the other G protein-coupled receptors by having a large extracellular hormone-binding domain, encoded by nine or ten exons. Alternative splicing of the large pre-mRNA of approximately 100 kb can result in mRNA species that encode truncated

  3. Engineering Hybrid Chemotaxis Receptors in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuangyu; Pollard, Abiola M; Yang, Yiling; Jin, Fan; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-09-16

    Most bacteria use transmembrane sensors to detect a wide range of environmental stimuli. A large class of such sensors are the chemotaxis receptors used by motile bacteria to follow environmental chemical gradients. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis receptors are known to mediate highly sensitive responses to ligands, making them potentially useful for biosensory applications. However, with only four ligand-binding chemotaxis receptors, the natural ligand spectrum of E. coli is limited. The design of novel chemoreceptors to extend the sensing capabilities of E. coli is therefore a critical aspect of chemotaxis-based biosensor development. One path for novel sensor design is to harvest the large natural diversity of chemosensory functions found in bacteria by creating hybrids that have the signaling domain from E. coli chemotaxis receptors and sensory domains from other species. In this work, we demonstrate that the E. coli receptor Tar can be successfully combined with most typical sensory domains found in chemotaxis receptors and in evolutionary-related two-component histidine kinases. We show that such functional hybrids can be generated using several different fusion points. Our work further illustrates how hybrid receptors could be used to quantitatively characterize ligand specificity of chemotaxis receptors and histidine kinases using standardized assays in E. coli.

  4. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedrick D Dotson

    Full Text Available TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+ and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  5. Molecular identification of the first SIFamide receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars M; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    . Database searches revealed SIFamide receptor orthologues in the genomes from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the silkworm Bombyx mori, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, and the honey bee Apis mellifera. An alignment of the five insect SIFamide or SIFamide-like receptors showed, again...

  6. Prostanoid Receptors in the Human Vascular Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Norel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms involved in vascular homeostasis and disease are mostly dependent on the interactions between blood, vascular smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. There is an accumulation of evidence for the involvement of prostanoids, the arachidonic acid metabolites derived from the cyclooxygenase enzymatic pathway, in physiological and/or pathophysiological conditions. In humans, the prostanoids activate different receptors. The classical prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1–4, FP, IP, and TP are localized at the cell plasma or nuclear membrane. In addition, CRTH2 and the nuclear PPAR receptors are two other targets for prostanoids, namely, prostacyclin (PGI2 or the natural derivatives of prostaglandin D2. While there is little information on the role of CRTH2, there are many reports on PPAR activation and the consecutive expression of genes involved in the human vascular system. The role of the classical prostanoid receptors stimulated by PGI2 and thromboxane in the control of the vascular tone has been largely documented, whereas the other receptor subtypes have been overlooked. There is now increasing evidence that suggests a role of PGE2 and the EP receptor subtypes in the control of the human vascular tone and remodeling of the vascular wall. These receptors are also present on leukocytes and platelets, and they are implicated in most of the inflammatory processes within the vascular wall. Consequently, the EP receptor subtypes or isoforms would provide a novel and specific cardiovascular therapeutic approach in the near future.

  7. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  8. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side......-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest...... that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human...

  9. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond...... pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets...... for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of the complex pharmacology of these receptors will be critical to unlocking their ultimate therapeutic potential....

  10. Insulin receptor what role in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A

    1997-10-01

    It is commonly believed that the insulin receptor mainly mediates the metabolic effects of insulin, whereas the closely related IGF-I receptor is considered a major factor for the regulation of cell proliferation. Experimental and epidemiological evidence indicates, however, that insulin and insulin receptors may play an important role in breast cancer. This article reviews evidence indicating that (a) insulin receptors are overexpressed in human breast cancer, (b) insulin stimulates growth in breast cancer cells, (c) cells transfected with human insulin receptor may acquire a ligand-dependent transformed phenotype, and (d) breast cancer is associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. These findings may open new possibilities in breast cancer prevention, prognosis assessment, and therapy. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:306-312). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  12. Chemokine Receptors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda G. Muralidhar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy with very poor rate of survival, and it is characterized by the presence of vast incurable peritoneal metastasis. Studies of the role of chemokine receptors, a family of proteins belonging to the group of G protein-coupled receptors, in ovarian carcinoma strongly placed this family of membrane receptors as major regulators of progression of this malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the roles that chemokine-receptor interactions play to support angiogenesis, cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, invasion, metastasis, and immune evasion in progression of ovarian carcinoma. Data regarding the role that the chemokine receptors play in the disease progression accumulated insofar strongly suggest that this family of proteins could be good therapeutic targets against ovarian carcinoma.

  13. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  14. GABAA receptor subtype involvement in addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D N; King, S L; Lambert, J J; Belelli, D; Duka, T

    2017-01-01

    GABAA receptors form the major class of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain. This review sets out to summarize the evidence that variations in genes encoding GABAA receptor isoforms are associated with aspects of addictive behaviour in humans, while animal models of addictive behaviour also implicate certain subtypes of GABAA receptor. In addition to outlining the evidence for the involvement of specific subtypes in addiction, we summarize the particular contributions of these isoforms in control over the functioning of brain circuits, especially the mesolimbic system, and make a first attempt to bring together evidence from several fields to understanding potential involvement of GABAA receptor subtypes in addictive behaviour. While the weight of the published literature is on alcohol dependency, the underlying principles outlined are relevant across a number of different aspects of addictive behaviour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  15. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  16. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  17. The ABA receptors -- we report you decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Peter; Creelman, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated in a variety of physiological responses ranging from seed dormancy to stomatal conductance. Recently, three groups have reported the molecular identification of three disparate ABA receptors. Unlike the identification of other hormone receptors, in these three cases high affinity binding to ABA rather than the isolation of ABA insensitive mutants led to these receptor genes. Interestingly, two of the receptors encode genes involved in floral timing and chlorophyll biosynthesis, which are not considered traditional ABA responses. And the third receptor has been clouded in issues of its molecular identity. To clearly determine the roles of these genes in ABA perception it will require placing of these ABA-binding proteins into the rich ABA physiological context that has built up over the years.

  18. Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors in Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Ronald N.; Moore, David D.; Willson, Timothy M.; Guy, R. Kip

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) sponsored a workshop, “Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors and Metabolism,” in April 2009 to explore how chemical and molecular biology and physiology can be exploited to further our understanding of nuclear receptor structure, function, and role in disease. Signaling cascades involving nuclear receptors are more complex and interrelated than once thought. Nuclear receptors continue to be attractive targets for drug discovery. The overall goal of this workshop was to identify gaps in our understanding of the complexity of ligand activities and begin to address them by (i) increasing the collaboration of investigators from different disciplines, (ii) developing a better understanding of chemical modulation of nuclear receptor action, and (iii) identifying opportunities and roadblocks in the path of translating basic research to discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:19654413

  19. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion.

  20. Real-Time G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Imaging to Understand and Quantify Receptor Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Aymerich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their regulation by agonists and antagonists is fundamental to develop more effective drugs. Optical methods using fluorescent-tagged receptors and spinning disk confocal microscopy are useful tools to investigate membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. The aim of this study was to develop a method to characterize receptor dynamics using this system which offers the advantage of very fast image acquisition with minimal cell perturbation. However, in short-term assays photobleaching was still a problem. Thus, we developed a procedure to perform a photobleaching-corrected image analysis. A study of short-term dynamics of the long isoform of the dopamine type 2 receptor revealed an agonist-induced increase in the mobile fraction of receptors with a rate of movement of 0.08 μm/s For long-term assays, the ratio between the relative fluorescence intensity at the cell surface versus that in the intracellular compartment indicated that receptor internalization only occurred in cells co-expressing G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. These results indicate that the lateral movement of receptors and receptor internalization are not directly coupled. Thus, we believe that live imaging of GPCRs using spinning disk confocal image analysis constitutes a powerful tool to study of receptor dynamics.

  1. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa;

    2009-01-01

    Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker...... of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...... an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...

  2. The use of receptor-specific antibodies to study G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Achla; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2006-07-01

    The identification of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) cDNAs has facilitated a number of studies characterizing the biochemical properties of the receptor protein. Most of these studies have used antibodies directed against the epitope-tagged receptor expressed in heterologous cells, because of the lack of sensitive and selective antibodies capable of recognizing endogenous receptors in their native state. In order to facilitate studies with endogenous receptors, efforts have been made to generate receptor-type selective, sensitive antibodies that are able to recognize endogenous receptors. In this review, we discuss the strategies as well as the details of the techniques used for the generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with a focus on family A GPCRs.

  3. Endocytosis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Lai Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator of signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The canonical model of RTK endocytosis involves rapid internalization of an RTK activated by ligand binding at the cell surface and subsequent sorting of internalized ligand-RTK complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Activation of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of RTKs results in autophosphorylation, which is mechanistically coupled to the recruitment of adaptor proteins and conjugation of ubiquitin to RTKs. Ubiquitination serves to mediate interactions of RTKs with sorting machineries both at the cell surface and on endosomes. The pathways and kinetics of RTK endocytic trafficking, molecular mechanisms underlying sorting processes, and examples of deviations from the standard trafficking itinerary in the RTK family are discussed in this work. PMID:23637288

  4. Modulation of fast synaptic transmission by presynaptic ligand-gated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakh, B S; Henderson, G

    2000-07-01

    There is now considerable evidence demonstrating that ligand-gated cation channels (i.e., P2X, nicotinic, kainate, NMDA, AMPA and 5-HT(3) receptors), in addition to mediating fast excitatory neurotransmission, may be located presynaptically on nerve terminals in the peripheral and central nervous systems where they function to modulate neurotransmitter release. This modulation can be facilitation, inhibition or both. In this article, we first outline the multiple mechanisms by which activation of presynaptic ligand-gated cation channels can modulate spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release, before reviewing in detail published electrophysiological studies of presynaptic P2X, nicotinic, kainate, NMDA, AMPA and 5-HT(3) receptors.

  5. THE NATURE OF ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. TASHAYOD

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work with consideratlon to the autoradiographic pictures, suggests that cholinergic receptors are located at the gate of a channel originating from synaptic cleft coming to lie within the muscle fibre. AChE molecules stand at the gate of this channel,controlling the entrance of different cholinergic agents. It was report- ••• ed previously that dtc molecules s t.abD ;:.2e the AChE rnolecules and will obstruct the gate. This blocks the acess of ionic flux within the channel thus producing a non-depolarizing neuromuscular paralysis.The presented experiments imply that depolarizing agent will bring a considerable change in conformation of AChE mole cule and this causes the opening of the gate allowing ioni flux and depolarization .In case of ACh this process is repeated in a fraction of milli second, due to rapid regeneration of AChE while in case of suxamethonium and neostigmine(given in high dose, the regeneration of AChE takes much longer time thus will produce a depolarizing blockade. In this hypothepis the main responsa~ility of AChE"nis confined to identification of cholinergic agents and Cooperation in their function so,it can be accepted as Cholinergic receptor. In regard to clinic, this work suggests that only the use of minimum effective dose of neostigmine is advisable, in reversing curarisation. In contrast to general belief , the dose of neostigmine should be s elec t ed in relation to r eceptor dtc occupation and not depending on pati ent 's weight . As it was demonstrated , the early use"nof high dose o f neostigmine may a lso potent i a te curar i s a tion

  6. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  7. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Johnson, K.W. [Chiron Corp., Emeryville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  8. Enhanced human receptor binding by H5 haemagglutinins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Xiao, Haixia; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Liu, Junfeng; Collins, Patrick J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Walker, Philip A.; Lin, Yi Pu; McCauley, John W.; Gamblin, Steven J.; John J Skehel

    2014-01-01

    Mutant H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from humans that have increased human receptor avidity. We have compared the receptor binding properties of these mutants with those of wild-type viruses, and determined the structures of their haemagglutinins in complex with receptor analogues. Mutants from Vietnam bind tighter to human receptor by acquiring basic residues near the receptor binding site. They bind more weakly to avian receptor because they lack specific interactions between As...

  9. Cocaine Inhibits Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling via Sigma-1-D2 Receptor Heteromers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefania; Bonaventura, Jordi; Brugarolas, Marc; Farré, Daniel; Aguinaga, David; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carmen; Ferre, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor) can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain. PMID:23637801

  10. Cocaine inhibits dopamine D2 receptor signaling via sigma-1-D2 receptor heteromers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Navarro

    Full Text Available Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain.

  11. Membrane topology of insulin receptors reconstituted into lipid vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen; Christiansen, K.; Carlsen, Jens;

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, insulin receptors, membrane reconstitution, electron microscopy, quaternary structure, immunogold labeling......Anatomy, insulin receptors, membrane reconstitution, electron microscopy, quaternary structure, immunogold labeling...

  12. Pattern-recognition receptors in human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnhammar, Anne Månsson; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-05-01

    The pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) family includes Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). They recognize various microbial signatures or host-derived danger signals and trigger an immune response. Eosinophils are multifunctional leucocytes involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory processes, including parasitic helminth infection, allergic diseases, tissue injury and tumour immunity. Human eosinophils express several PRRs, including TLR1-5, TLR7, TLR9, NOD1, NOD2, Dectin-1 and RAGE. Receptor stimulation induces survival, oxidative burst, activation of the adhesion system and release of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), chemokines (interleukin-8 and growth-related oncogene-α) and cytotoxic granule proteins (eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase and major basic protein). It is also evident that eosinophils play an immunomodulatory role by interacting with surrounding cells. The presence of a broad range of PRRs in eosinophils indicates that they are not only involved in defence against parasitic helminths, but also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. From a clinical perspective, eosinophilic PRRs seem to be involved in both allergic and malignant diseases by causing exacerbations and affecting tumour growth, respectively.

  13. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  14. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  15. GABA B receptor subunit expression in glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Deuchars, J; Davies, C H; Pangalos, M N

    2003-09-01

    GABA(B) receptor subunits are widely expressed on neurons throughout the CNS, at both pre- and postsynaptic sites, where they mediate the late, slow component of the inhibitory response to the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. The existence of functional GABA(B) receptors on nonneuronal cells has been reported previously, although the molecular composition of these receptors has not yet been described. Here we demonstrate for the first time, using immunohistochemistry the expression of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) on nonneuronal cells of the rat CNS. All three principle GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on these cells irrespective of whether they had been cultured or found within brain tissue sections. At the ultrastructural level GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on astrocytic processes surrounding both symmetrical and assymetrical synapses in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus. In addition, GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) receptor subunits were expressed on activated microglia in culture but were not found on myelin forming oligodendrocytes in the white matter of rat spinal cord. Together these data demonstrate that the obligate subunits of functional GABA(B) receptors are expressed in astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

  16. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Gustafsson, Jan-Åke, E-mail: jgustafs@central.uh.edu [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum S-141 86 (Sweden)

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors.

  17. Tachykinin receptors in the equine pelvic flexure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonea, I M; Wilson, D V; Bowker, R M; Robinson, N E

    1997-07-01

    Tachykinins, of which substance P (SP) is the prototype, are neuropeptides which are widely distributed in the nervous systems. In the equine gut, SP is present in enteric nerves and is a powerful constrictor of enteric muscle; in other species, SP is also known to have potent vasodilatory and pro-inflammatory effects. The specific effects of SP are determined by the subtype of receptor present in the target tissue. There are 3 known subtypes of tachykinin receptors, distinguished by their relative affinities for SP and other tachykinins. The distribution of SP binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure was determined using 125I-Bolton Hunter SP (I-BHSP) autoradiography. Most I-BHSP binding sites were determined to be saturable and specific, therefore presumably representing tachykinin receptors. The greatest degree of I-BHSP binding occurred over very small vessels, and over the muscularis mucosae; I-BHSP binding was also intense over the circular muscle of the muscularis externa and mucosa, and present, although less intense, over the longitudinal muscle of the muscularis externa. Competition of I-BHSP with specific receptor agonists for binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure were used to determine the subtypes of tachykinin receptors present. The neurokinin-1 receptor subtype predominated in the equine pelvic flexure, followed by the neurokinin-3 receptor subtype.

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  19. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  20. Role of Prolactin Receptors in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Alkharusi

    Full Text Available Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM is a rare lung disease caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor genes encoding Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC 1 and TSC2. The protein product of the TSC2 gene is a well-known suppressor of the mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence suggests that the pituitary hormone prolactin (Prl has both endocrine and paracrine modes of action. Here, we have investigated components of the Prl system in models for LAM. In a TSC2 (+/- mouse sarcoma cell line, down-regulation of TSC2 using siRNA resulted in increased levels of the Prl receptor. In human LAM cells, the Prl receptor is detectable by immunohistochemistry, and the expression of Prl in these cells stimulates STAT3 and Erk phosphorylation, as well as proliferation. A high affinity Prl receptor antagonist consisting of Prl with four amino acid substitutions reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and Erk. Antagonist treatment further reduced the proliferative and invasive properties of LAM cells. In histological sections from LAM patients, Prl receptor immuno reactivity was observed. We conclude that the Prl receptor is expressed in LAM, and that loss of TSC2 increases Prl receptor levels. It is proposed that Prl exerts growth-stimulatory effects on LAM cells, and that antagonizing the Prl receptor can block such effects.

  1. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation.

  2. Glucagon receptors: effect of exercise and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Carole

    2005-06-01

    One paradox of hormonal regulation during exercise is the maintenance of glucose homeostasis after endurance training despite a lower increase in plasma glucagon. One explanation could be that liver sensitivity to glucagon is increased by endurance training. Glucagon exerts its effect through a 62 KDa glycoprotein receptor, member of the G protein-coupled receptor. To determine whether changes with exercise in glucagon sensitivity occurred at the level of the glucagon receptor (GR), binding characteristics of hepatic glucagon receptors were ascertained in rat purified plasma membranes. Saturation kinetics indicated no difference in the dissociation constant or affinity of glucagon receptor, but a significantly higher glucagon receptor binding density in liver in endurance trained compared to untrained animals. Along with endurance training, it appears that fasting also changes GR binding characteristics. In animals fasting 24 hrs, a significant increase in glucagon receptor density was also reported. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, there is no doubt that the liver can adapt to physiological stress through modulation of GR binding characteristics to enhance the hepatic glucose production responsiveness to glucagon.

  3. Neuromedin B receptors regulate EGF receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W.; Berna, Marc J.; Mantey, Samuel; Sancho, Veronica; Ridnour, Lisa; Wink, David A.; Chan, Daniel; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromedin B (NMB), a member of the bombesin family of peptides, is an autocrine growth factor for many lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the ability of NMB to cause transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in lung cancer cells. By Western blot, addition of NMB or related peptides to NCI-H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, caused phosphorylation of Tyr1068 of the EGF receptor. The signal was amplified using NCI-H1299 cells stably transected with NMB receptors. The transactivation of the EGF receptor or the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by AG1478 or gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and NMB receptor antagonist PD168368 but not the GRP receptor antagonist, BW2258U89. The transactivation of the EGF receptor caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by GM6001 (matrix metalloprotease inhibitor), PP2 (Src inhibitor), or transforming growth factor (TGF)α antibody. The transactivation of the EGF receptor and the increase in reactive oxygen species caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Tiron. Gefitinib inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H1299 cells and its sensitivity was increased by the addition of PD168368. The results indicate that the NMB receptor regulates EGF receptor transactivation by a mechanism dependent on Src as well as metalloprotease activation and generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:20388507

  4. GABAA receptors: post-synaptic co-localization and cross-talk with other receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system (CNS, and importantly contribute to the functional regulation of the nervous system. Several studies in the last few decades have convincingly shown that GABA can be co-localized with other neurotransmitters in the same synapse, and can be co-released with these neurotransmitters either from the same vesicles or from different vesicle pools. The co-released transmitters may act on post-synaptically co-localized receptors resulting in a simultaneous activation of both receptors. Most of the studies investigating such co-activation observed a reduced efficacy of GABA for activating GABAARs and thus, a reduced inhibition of the postsynaptic neuron. Similarly, in several cases activation of GABAARs has been reported to suppress the response of the associated receptors. Such a receptor cross-talk is either mediated via a direct coupling between the two receptors or via the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and is used for fine tuning of inhibition in the nervous system. Recently, it was demonstrated that a direct interaction of different receptors might already occur in intracellular compartments and might also be used to specifically target the receptors to the cell membrane. In this article, we provide an overview on such cross-talks between GABAARs and several other neurotransmitter receptors and briefly discuss their possible physiological and clinical importance.

  5. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  6. N-glycosylation of the β2 adrenergic receptor regulates receptor function by modulating dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Zhou, Mang; Huang, Wei; Yang, Huaiyu

    2017-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, it remains unknown how N-glycosylation affects GPCR signaling. β2 adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) has three N-glycosylation sites: Asn6, Asn15 at the N-terminus, and Asn187 at the second extracellular loop (ECL2). Here, we show that deletion of the N-glycan did not affect receptor expression and ligand binding. Deletion of the N-glycan at the N-terminus rather than Asn187 showed decreased effects on isoproterenol-promoted G-protein-dependent signaling, β-arrestin2 recruitment, and receptor internalization. Both N6Q and N15Q showed decreased receptor dimerization, while N187Q did not influence receptor dimerization. As decreased β2 AR homodimer accompanied with reduced efficiency for receptor function, we proposed that the N-glycosylation of β2 AR regulated receptor function by influencing receptor dimerization. To verify this hypothesis, we further paid attention to the residues at the dimerization interface. Studies of Lys60 and Glu338, two residues at the receptor dimerization interface, exhibited that the K60A/E338A showed decreased β2 AR dimerization and its effects on receptor signaling were similar to N6Q and N15Q, which further supported the importance of receptor dimerization for receptor function. This work provides new insights into the relationship among glycosylation, dimerization, and function of GPCRs. Peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F, EC 3.2.2.11); endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase A (Endo-A, EC 3.2.1.96). © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Evolution of endothelin receptors in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Schartl, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Endothelin receptors are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the β-group of rhodopsin receptors that bind to endothelin ligands, which are 21 amino acid long peptides derived from longer prepro-endothelin precursors. The most basal Ednr-like GPCR is found outside vertebrates in the cephalochordate amphioxus, but endothelin ligands are only present among vertebrates, including the lineages of jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfishes), cartilaginous vertebrates (sharks, rays, and chimaeras), and bony vertebrates (ray-finned fishes and lobe-finned vertebrates including tetrapods). A bona fide endothelin system is thus a vertebrate-specific innovation with important roles for regulating the cardiovascular system, renal and pulmonary processes, as well as for the development of the vertebrate-specific neural crest cell population and its derivatives. Expectedly, dysregulation of endothelin receptors and the endothelin system leads to a multitude of human diseases. Despite the importance of different types of endothelin receptors for vertebrate development and physiology, current knowledge on endothelin ligand-receptor interactions, on the expression of endothelin receptors and their ligands, and on the functional roles of the endothelin system for embryonic development and in adult vertebrates is very much biased towards amniote vertebrates. Recent analyses from a variety of vertebrate lineages, however, have shown that the endothelin system in lineages such as teleost fish and lampreys is more diverse and is divergent from the mammalian endothelin system. This diversity is mainly based on differential evolution of numerous endothelin system components among vertebrate lineages generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication (three in teleosts) during vertebrate evolution. Here we review current understanding of the evolutionary history of the endothelin receptor family in vertebrates supplemented with surveys on the endothelin receptor gene complement of

  8. Regulation of blood pressure by dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Pedro A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A

    2003-01-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of blood pressure. Its actions on renal hemodynamics, epithelial transport and humoral agents such as aldosterone, catecholamines, endothelin, prolactin, pro-opiomelanocortin, renin and vasopressin place it in central homeostatic position for regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Dopamine also modulates fluid and sodium intake via actions in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract, and by regulation of cardiovascular centers that control the functions of the heart, arteries and veins. Abnormalities in dopamine production and receptor function accompany a high percentage of human essential hypertension and several forms of rodent genetic hypertension. Some dopamine receptor genes and their regulators are in loci linked to hypertension in humans and in rodents. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes that regulate dopamine receptors, alone or via the interaction with SNPs of genes that regulate the renin-angiotensin system, are associated with human essential hypertension. Each of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5) participates in the regulation of blood pressure by mechanisms specific for the subtype. Some receptors (D2 and D5) influence the central and/or peripheral nervous system; others influence epithelial transport and regulate the secretion and receptors of several humoral agents (e.g., the D1, D3 and D4 receptors interact with the renin-angiotensin system). Modifications of the usual actions of the receptor can produce blood pressure changes. In addition, abnormal functioning of these dopamine receptor subtypes impairs their antioxidant function.

  9. Chaperone receptors: guiding proteins to intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; von Löffelholz, Ottilie; Abell, Ben M

    2012-01-01

    Despite mitochondria and chloroplasts having their own genome, 99% of mitochondrial proteins (Rehling et al., Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 5:519-530, 2004) and more than 95% of chloroplast proteins (Soll, Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:529-535, 2002) are encoded by nuclear DNA, synthesised in the cytosol and imported post-translationally. Protein targeting to these organelles depends on cytosolic targeting factors, which bind to the precursor, and then interact with membrane receptors to deliver the precursor into a translocase. The molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 have been widely implicated in protein targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts, and receptors capable of recognising these chaperones have been identified at the surface of both these organelles (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007). The role of these chaperone receptors is not fully understood, but they have been shown to increase the efficiency of protein targeting (Young et al., Cell 112:41-50, 2003; Qbadou et al., EMBO J 25:1836-1847, 2006). Whether these receptors contribute to the specificity of targeting is less clear. A class of chaperone receptors bearing tetratricopeptide repeat domains is able to specifically bind the highly conserved C terminus of Hsp70 and/or Hsp90. Interestingly, at least of one these chaperone receptors can be found on each organelle (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007), which suggests a universal role in protein targeting for these chaperone receptors. This review will investigate the role that chaperone receptors play in targeting efficiency and specificity, as well as examining recent in silico approaches to find novel chaperone receptors.

  10. Chemical Sensing by Nonequilibrium Cooperative Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoge, Monica; Naqvi, Sahin; Meir, Yigal; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperativity arising from local interactions in equilibrium receptor systems provides gain, but does not increase sensory performance, as measured by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to a fundamental tradeoff between gain and intrinsic noise. Here we allow sensing to be a nonequilibrium process and show that energy dissipation cannot circumvent the fundamental tradeoff, so that the SNR is still optimal for independent receptors. For systems requiring high gain, nonequilibrium 2D-coupled receptors maximize the SNR, revealing a new design principle for biological sensors. PMID:25165963

  11. Receptores de radio monochip para FM

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel López, José María

    2005-01-01

    Este libro aborda de forma estructurada tanto los aspectos de diseño como los de realización de receptores de radio para la banda de FM. Tras unos primeros capítulos dedicados al estudio de las propiedades de la modulación de frecuencia y de los circuitos básicos que configuran un receptor de radio, se desarrolla un minucioso análisis de los circuitos integrados TDA7000/10/21. Paso a paso se muestra cómo diseñar con estos circuitos receptores de FM que, al requerir muy pocos ajustes, puede...

  12. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  13. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties...... to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...

  14. Advances in Variations of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Status in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and molecular targeted therapy are vital means in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), whose reasonable and standard applications are of great importance to prolong patients’ survival and improve the quality of life. The expressions of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) present signiifcant differences between primary and metastatic breast cancer. However, these differences may affect the selection of MBC patients for therapeutic strategies and judgment on the prognosis. Hence, the relevant researches on variations of hormone receptors and HER-2 in primary and metastatic breast cancer, discordant causes of ER, PR and HER-2 expression in primary and metastatic lesions and clinical value of biopsy to the metastases are reviewed in the study.

  15. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J. (UWA); (St. Vincent); (Queensland)

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  16. Nicotinic receptors, memory, and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) modulate the neurobiological processes underlying hippocampal learning and memory. In addition, nicotine's ability to desensitize and upregulate certain nAChRs may alter hippocampus-dependent memory processes. Numerous studies have examined the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning, as well as the roles of low- and high-affinity nAChRs in mediating nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. These studies suggested that while acute nicotine generally acts as a cognitive enhancer for hippocampus-dependent learning, withdrawal from chronic nicotine results in deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that low- and high-affinity nAChRs functionally differ in their involvement in nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning. In the present chapter, we reviewed studies using systemic or local injections of acute or chronic nicotine, nAChR subunit agonists or antagonists; genetically modified mice; and molecular biological techniques to characterize the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning.

  17. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  18. Palmitoylation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. K.; Govind, A. P.; Drisdel, R. C.; Blanton, M. P.; Vallejo, Y.; Lam, T. T.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) undergo a number of different post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and phosphorylation. Recently, our laboratory has developed more sensitive assays of protein palmitoylation that have allowed us and others to detect the palmitoylation of relatively low abundant proteins such as ligand-gated ion channels. Here, we present evidence that palmitoylation is prevalent on many subunits of different nAChR subtypes, both muscle-type nAChRs and the neuronal “α4β2” and “α7” subtypes most abundant in brain. The loss of ligand binding sites that occurs when palmitoylation is blocked with the inhibitor bromopalmitate suggests that palmitoylation of α4β2 and α7 subtypes occurs during subunit assembly and regulates the formation of ligand binding sites. However, additional experiments are needed to test whether nAChR subunit palmitoylation is involved in other aspects of nAChR trafficking or whether palmitoylation regulates nAChR function. Further investigation would be aided by identifying the sites of palmitoylation on the subunits, and here we propose a mass spectrometry strategy for identification of these sites. PMID:19693711

  19. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  20. Ubiquitylation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables efficient receptor recycling and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Karin; Hauser, Mark A.; Rippl, Alexandra; Bruderer, Roland; Otero, Carolina; Gröttrup, Marcus; Legler, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for lymphocyte and dendritic cell homing to secondary lymphoid organs. Owing to the ability to induce directional migration, CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are pivotal for the regulation of the immune system. Here, we identify a novel function for receptor ubiquitylation in the regulation of the trafficking process of this G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. We discovered that CCR7 is ubiquitylated in a constitutive, ligand-independen...

  1. GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators: Enhancement of GABAB Receptor Agonist Effects In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABAB receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-but...

  2. Activation of α7-containing nicotinic receptors on astrocytes triggers AMPA receptor recruitment to glutamatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xulong; Lippi, Giordano; Carlson, David M; Berg, Darwin K

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytes, an abundant form of glia, are known to promote and modulate synaptic signaling between neurons. They also express α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), but the functional relevance of these receptors is unknown. We show here that stimulation of α7-nAChRs on astrocytes releases components that induce hippocampal neurons to acquire more α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors post-synaptically at glutamatergic synapses. The increase is specific in that no change is seen in synaptic NMDA receptor clusters or other markers for glutamatergic synapses, or in markers for GABAergic synapses. Moreover, the increases in AMPA receptors on the neuron surface are accompanied by increases in the frequency of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents mediated by the receptors and increases in the ratio of evoked synaptic currents mediated by AMPA versus NMDA receptors. This suggests that stimulating α7-nAChRs on astrocytes can convert 'silent' glutamatergic synapses to functional status. Astrocyte-derived thrombospondin is necessary but not sufficient for the effect, while tumor necrosis factor-α is sufficient but not necessary. The results identify astrocyte α7-nAChRs as a novel pathway through which nicotinic cholinergic signaling can promote the development of glutamatergic networks, recruiting AMPA receptors to post-synaptic sites and rendering the synapses more functional. We find that activation of nicotinic receptors on astrocytes releases a component that specifically recruits AMPA receptors to glutamatergic synapses. The recruitment appears to occur preferentially at what may be 'silent synapses', that is, synapses that have all the components required for glutamatergic transmission (including NMDA receptors) but lack sufficient AMPA receptors to generate a response. The results are unexpected and open up new possibilities for mechanisms underlying network formation and synaptic plasticity.

  3. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  4. Functional characterization of protease-activated receptor -1 palmitoylation in receptor signaling and trafficking /

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of signaling receptors that respond to diverse stimuli and regulate many physiological responses. GPCRs elicit their cellular responses by coupling to distinct subtypes of heterotrimeric G-proteins composed of G[alpha] and G[beta][gamma] subunits. Activated GPCRs undergo conformational changes that allow the receptor to exchange GDP for GTP on the G[alpha] subunit, which induces dissociation from the [beta][gamma] subunits and subsequ...

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 upregulates surface NMDA receptor expression in striatal neurons via CaMKII

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are closely clustered in postsynaptic membranes and are believed to interact actively with each other to control excitatory synaptic transmission. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), for example, has been well documented to potentiate ionotropic NMDA receptor activity, although underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mGluR5 in regulating trafficking and subcellular distribution of NMDA rece...

  6. RNA editing of the GABAA receptor α3 subunit alters the functional properties of recombinant receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmich, Mitchell L.; Heidelberg, Laura S.; Fisher, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    RNA editing provides a post-transcriptional mechanism to increase structural heterogeneity of gene products. Recently, the α3 subunit of the GABAA receptors has been shown to undergo RNA editing. As a result, a highly conserved isoleucine residue in the third transmembrane domain is replaced with a methionine. To determine the effect of this structural change on receptor function, we compared the GABA sensitivity, pharmacological properties and macroscopic kinetics of recombinant receptors co...

  7. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshula eSamarajeewa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin (5-HT type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including cortical neurons. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins towards the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  8. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  9. G Protein - Coupled Receptors [Receptores Acoplados à Proteína G

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas V. B. Hoelz; Guilherme B. L. de Freitas; Pedro Henrique M. Torres; Tácio Vinício A. Fernandes; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Joaquim Fernando M. da Silva; Pedro G Pascutti; Ricardo B. de Alencastro

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins encoded by the human genome. These receptors are membrane proteins which share a common structure of seven transmembrane helices and are involved in the cellular signal transduction through activation of heterotrimeric protein (G protein) in intracellular environment. This activation signal, mediated by the agonist binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor, is transmitted into the cell and activat...

  10. ABP: a novel AMPA receptor binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Ziff, E B

    1999-04-30

    We review the cloning of a novel AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) that interacts with GluR2/3 and is homologous to GRIP. ABP is enriched in the PSD with GluR2 and is localized to the PSD by EM. ABP binds GluR2 via the C-terminal VXI motif through a Class I PDZ interaction. ABP and GRIP can also homo- and heteromultimerize. Thus, ABP and GRIP may be involved in AMPA receptor regulation and localization, by linking it to other cytoskeletal or signaling molecules. We suggest that the ABP/GRIP and PSD-95 families form distinct scaffolds that anchor, respectively, AMPA and NMDA receptors. We are currently investigating proteins that bind ABP and that may regulate the AMPA receptor.

  11. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  12. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  13. Receptor binding profile of Otilonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, S; Giachetti, A; Chapelain, B; Neliat, G; Maggi, C A

    1998-08-01

    The interaction of Otilonium bromide (OB) with binding sites for 63 different receptors and ion channels in appropriate preparations has been investigated. Experiments were also performed in rat colon, the preferred tissue for OB 'in vivo' uptake after oral administration. Among the receptors investigated OB binds with sub microM affinity to muscarinic M1, M2, M4, M5 and PAF receptors and with microM affinity to the diltiazem binding site on L type Ca2+ channels. In the rat colon OB shows competitive interaction with the verapamil binding site on L type Ca2+ channels and with muscarinic M2 receptors with IC50 of 1020 and 1220 nM, respectively. These findings provide a molecular rationale to explain the spasmolytic action exerted by OB on intestinal smooth muscle. In particular, a combination of antimuscarinic and Ca2+ channel blocker properties seems to best account for the action of this compound.

  14. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  15. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  16. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new...... insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...... shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B'29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR...

  17. NMDA receptor and schizophrenia: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-09-01

    Although glutamate was first hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the 1980s, it was the demonstration that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, the dissociative anesthetics, could replicate the full range of psychotic, negative, cognitive, and physiologic features of schizophrenia in normal subjects that placed the "NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis" on firm footing. Additional support came from the demonstration that a variety of agents that enhanced NMDA receptor function at the glycine modulatory site significantly reduced negative symptoms and variably improved cognition in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic drugs. Finally, persistent blockade of NMDA receptors recreates in experimental animals the critical pathologic features of schizophrenia including downregulation of parvalbumin-positive cortical GABAergic neurons, pyramidal neuron dendritic dysgenesis, and reduced spine density.

  18. Endocrine receptors as targets for new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly detailed knowledge of cellular signalling pathways is providing a sound basis for the development of specific drugs aimed at selected components of the pathways. Many of these targets are receptors and the multitude of hormone receptors makes endocrine functions a rich proving ground for this research. This article reviews a recent meeting (Insights into Receptor Function and New Drug Development Targets; 5th Endocrinology Colloquium of the Fondation Ipsen, Paris, December 5, 2005) where progress in defining suitable targets for drug therapies in the endocrine system and in designing drugs for some of these targets was discussed. Although the family of G-protein-coupled receptors, ubiquitous in the endocrine system, was the central focus, comparisons with other receptor families were made. Many mutations affecting genes coding for receptors or other components of signalling pathways have been found in a wide range of endocrine disorders including obesity, parathyroid malfunction, disorders involving thyroid-stimulating hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, and tumours in the anterior pituitary, as well as in many types of cancer. These are being used to dissect the normal control mechanisms as well as to provide information for the development of selective drugs. Recently identified mutations that affect the intracellular traffic in newly synthesised receptors open up possibilities of another dimension of cellular regulation of signalling. Both the discovery of hormones such as apelin and its pairing with an 'orphan' receptor, and the unexpected action of a drug against cannabinoid receptors point to further levels of complexity in cardiovascular regulation. Deeper understanding of the evolution of receptor families and of the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction is enabling the design of highly specific agonists and antagonists. Pharmacological intervention is not limited to the ligand-receptor interaction but can extend to inhibition of

  19. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  20. Parathyroid hormone receptor recycling: role of receptor dephosphorylation and beta-arrestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Stephanie; Bencsik, Margaret; Bambino, Tom; Nissenson, Robert A

    2002-12-01

    The recovery of PTH receptor (PTHR) function after acute homologous receptor desensitization and down-regulation in bone and kidney cells has been attributed to receptor recycling. To determine the role of receptor dephosphorylation in PTHR recycling, we performed morphological and functional assays on human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing wild-type (wt) or mutant PTHRs. Confocal microscopy and ligand binding assays revealed that the wt PTHR is rapidly recycled back to the plasma membrane after removal of the agonist. Receptors that were engineered to either lack the sites of phosphorylation or to resemble constitutively phosphorylated receptors were able to recycle back to the plasma membrane with the same kinetics as the wt PTHR. The PTHR was found to be dephosphorylated by an enzyme apparently distinct from protein phosphatases 1 or 2A. The PTHR and beta-arrestin-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) were found to stably colocalize during PTHR internalization, whereas after agonist removal and during receptor recycling, the colocalization slowly disappeared. Experiments using phosphorylation-deficient PTHRs and a dominant-negative form of beta-arrestin showed that beta-arrestin does not regulate the efficiency of PTHR recycling. These studies indicate that, unlike many G protein-coupled receptors, PTHR recycling does not require receptor dephosphorylation or its dissociation from beta-arrestin.