WorldWideScience

Sample records for kainate receptor-mediated neurotransmission

  1. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  2. Role of desensitization and subunit expression for kainate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in murine neocortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S

    1999-01-01

    ) toxicity mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors, and (3) toxicity that can be mediated by kainate receptors when desensitization of the receptors is blocked. The indirect action at NMDA receptors was discovered because (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H...... nedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine (GYKI 53655), a selective AMPA receptor antagonist, abolished the remaining toxicity. These results indicated that kainate- and domoate-mediated toxicity involves both the NMDA and the AMPA receptors. Pretreatment of the cultures with concanavalin A to prevent desensitization...

  3. Phenobarbital but not diazepam reduces AMPA/Kainate receptor mediated currents and exerts opposite actions on initial seizures in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eNardou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam (DZP and phenobarbital (PB are extensively used as first and second line drugs to treat acute seizures in neonates and their actions are thought to be mediated by increasing the actions of GABAergic signals. Yet, their efficacy is variable with occasional failure or even aggravation of recurrent seizures questioning whether other mechanisms are not involved in their actions. We have now compared the effects of DZP and PB on ictal-like events (ILEs in an in vitro model of mirror focus (MF. Using the three-compartment chamber with the two immature hippocampi and their commissural fibers placed in 3 different compartments, kainate was applied to one hippocampus and PB or DZP to the contralateral one, either after one ILE or after many recurrent ILEs that produce an epileptogenic MF. We report that in contrast to PB, DZP aggravated propagating ILEs from the start and did not prevent the formation of MF. PB reduced and DZP increased the network driven Giant Depolarising Potentials suggesting that PB may exert additional actions that are not mediated by GABA signalling. In keeping with this, PB but not DZP reduced field potentials recorded in the presence of GABA and NMDA receptor antagonists. These effects are mediated by a direct action on AMPA/Kainate receptors since PB: i reduced AMPA/Kainate receptor mediated currents induced by focal applications of glutamate ; ii reduced the amplitude and the frequency of AMPA but not NMDA receptor mediated miniature EPSCs; iii augmented the number of AMPA receptor mediated EPSCs failures evoked by minimal stimulation. These effects persisted in MF. Therefore, PB exerts its anticonvulsive actions partly by reducing AMPA/Kainate receptors mediated EPSCs in addition to the pro-GABA effects. We suggest that PB may have advantage over DZP in the treatment of initial neonatal seizures since the additional reduction of glutamate receptors mediated signals may reduce the severity of neonatal seizures.

  4. Effects of Chronic Alcohol Exposure on Kainate Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Mexico REPORT NUMBER Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-5041 E-Mail: fvalenzuela@ salud .unm. edu 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING 70. SPONSORING IMONITORING AGENCY...on a Separate Group of Rats (lights on from 0900 to 1700 hr). Rats received a Bioserv (Frenchtown, NJ) chocolate -flavored liquid diet that was based

  5. Adolescent chronic mild stress alters hippocampal CB1 receptor-mediated excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, C G; Mihalik, G R; Iskander, A N; Seckler, J C; Weiss, M S

    2013-12-03

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are involved in the stress response and alterations in eCB signaling may contribute to the etiology of mood disorders. Exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a model of depression, produces downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor in the hippocampus of male rats. However, it is unknown how this stress-induced change in CB1 levels affects eCB-mediated neurotransmission. In vitro, field potential recordings from CMS-exposed (21-days) rats were performed to assess the effects of stress on eCB-regulated glutamatergic neurotransmission in/on hippocampal area CA1. We observed that application of the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-5 (1 μM), in stress animals resulted in a ∼135% increase in excitatory neurotransmission, whereas CB1 activation in non-stress animals leads to a ∼30% decrease. However, during blockade of GABA(A) neurotransmission with picrotoxin, CB1 activation yielded a ∼35% decrease in stress animals. These findings indicate that CMS does not directly affect glutamatergic neurotransmission. Rather, CMS sensitizes CB1 function on GABAergic terminals, leading to less inhibition and an increase in excitatory neurotransmission. This finding is reinforced in that induction of weak long-term-potentiation (LTP) is enhanced in CMS-exposed animals compared to controls and this enhancement is CB1-dependent. Lastly, we observed that the LTP-blocking property of WIN 55,212-5 shifts from being glutamate-dependent in non-stress animals to being GABA-dependent in stress animals. These results effectively demonstrate that CMS significantly alters hippocampal eCB-mediated neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity.

  6. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated neurotransmission in major depression: Implications for anhedonia, anxiety and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Marta; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T; Heffernan, Joseph; Peciña, Susana; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2017-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the brain's reward circuit has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and in both, cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. Still, a direct relationship between measures of DA neurotransmission and reward-related deficits in patients with depression has not been demonstrated. To gain insight into the symptom-specific alterations in the DA system in patients with depression, we used positron emission tomography (PET) and the D2/3 receptor-selective radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride in twenty-three non-smoking un-medicated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients and sixteen healthy controls (HC). We investigated the relationship between D2/3 receptor availability and baseline measures of depression severity, anxiety, anhedonia, and cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. We found that, compared to controls, patients with depression showed greater D2/3 receptor availability in several striatal regions, including the bilateral ventral pallidum/nucleus accumbens (vPAL/NAc), and the right ventral caudate and putamen. In the depressed sample, D2/3 receptor availability in the caudal portion of the ventral striatum (NAc/vPAL) correlated with higher anxiety symptoms, whereas D2/3 receptor availability in the rostral area of the ventral striatum correlated negatively with the severity of motivational anhedonia. Finally, MDD non-remitters showed greater baseline anxiety, greater D2/3 availability in the NAc/vPAL, and greater placebo-induced DA release in the bilateral NAc. Our results demonstrate abnormally high D2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum of patients with MDD, which seem to be associated with comorbid anxiety symptoms and lack of response to antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuroprotection of GluR5-containing kainate receptor activation against ischemic brain injury through decreasing tyrosine phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediated by Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2008-10-24

    Previous studies indicate that cerebral ischemia breaks the dynamic balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The neural excitotoxicity induced by ionotropic glutamate receptors gain the upper hand during ischemia-reperfusion. In this paper, we investigate whether GluR5 (glutamate receptor 5)-containing kainate receptor activation could lead to a neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury and the related mechanism. The results showed that (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective GluR5 agonist, could suppress Src tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions among N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2A (NR2A), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and Src and then decrease NMDA receptor activation through attenuating tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A and NR2B. More importantly, ATPA had a neuroprotective effect against ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal cell death in vivo. However, four separate drugs were found to abolish the effects of ATPA. These were selective GluR5 antagonist NS3763; GluR5 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides; CdCl(2), a broad spectrum blocker of voltage-gated calcium channels; and bicuculline, an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor. GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol could attenuate Src activation and interactions among NR2A, PSD-95 and Src, resulting the suppression of NMDA receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, patch clamp recording proved that the activated GABA(A) receptor could inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated whole-cell currents. Taken together, the results suggest that during ischemia-reperfusion, activated GluR5 may facilitate Ca(2+)-dependent GABA release from interneurons. The released GABA can activate postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors, which then attenuates NMDA receptor tyrosine phosphorylation through inhibiting Src activation and disassembling the signaling module NR2A-PSD-95-Src. The final result of this process is that the pyramidal

  8. Optogenetic Evocation of Field Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials in Hippocampal Slices: A Simple and Reliable Approach for Studying Pharmacological Effects on GABAA and GABAB Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eDine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The GABAergic system is the main source of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Consequently, much effort is still made to develop new modulators of GABAergic synaptic transmission. In contrast to glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials (PSPs, accurate monitoring of GABA receptor-mediated PSPs (GABAR-PSPs and their pharmacological modulation in brain tissue invariably requires the use of intracellular recording techniques. However, these techniques are expensive, time- and labor-consuming, and, in case of the frequently employed whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, impact on intracellular ion concentrations, signaling cascades, and pH buffering systems. Here, we describe a novel approach to circumvent these drawbacks. In particular, we demonstrate in mouse hippocampal slices that selective optogenetic activation of interneurons leads to prominent field inhibitory GABAAR- and GABABR-PSPs in area CA1 which are easily and reliably detectable by a single extracellular recording electrode. The field PSPs exhibit typical temporal and pharmacological characteristics, display pronounced paired-pulse depression, and remain stable over many consecutive evocations. Additionally validating the methodological value of this approach, we further show that the neuroactive steroid 5-THDOC (5 µM shifts the inhibitory GABAAR-PSPs towards excitatory ones.

  9. Effect of curcumin on AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated calcium influx in cultured rat hippocampal neurons%姜黄素对AMPA/KA受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜鹏; 彭伟锋; 刘剑英; 林豪杰; 马昱; 汪昕; 范薇

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨姜黄素对α-氨基-3-羧基-5-甲基异恶唑-4-丙酸(AMPA)/海人酸(KA)受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流的影响.方法 选用胚胎17dSD鼠分离海马,离体培养海马神经元,借助活体钙荧光染色和激光共聚焦钙成像技术观察100μmol/LKA刺激海马神经元内钙的变化,不同浓度(5、10、15、30、50 μmol/L)姜黄素预孵育海马神经元30min对100μmol/L KA刺激下细胞内钙变化的影响,15 μmol/L姜黄素对不同浓度(10、30、50、100、200、300 μmol/L)KA刺激海马神经元内钙变化的影响.应用钴染色技术观察(30、100 μmol/L KA)刺激后海马神经元钴阳性染色细胞变化.姜黄素预孵育30min对KA刺激导致钴阳性染色细胞变化的影响.结果 不同浓度姜黄素预孵育30 min均可以明显缓解100 μmol/L或30 μmol/L KA导致的细胞内钙升高程度.差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),其中15 μmol/L姜黄素作用最为明显.30μmol/L或100 μmol/LKA刺激均可以引起海马神经元钴染色阳性细胞增加,15 μmol/L姜黄素预处理30 min后明显减少钴染色阳性细胞,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),而其他浓度(5 μmol/L或30 μmol/L)姜黄素未见明显影响.结论 一定浓度的姜黄素可以影响AMPA/KA受体介导大鼠海马神经元钙内流.这可能是姜黄素抗癫痫作用的一个机制.%Objective To investigate the effect of curcumin on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate (KA) receptor-mediated calcium influx in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Methods The hippocampal neurons from SD rat embryos (17 days old) were cultured for 9 days, and fluorescent calcium chelator and confocal microscopy calcium imaging were used to observe the changes in intracellular free calcium in the neurons following stimulation with 100 μmol/L KA. The effect of curcumin pretreatment at different concentrations (10, 30, 50, 100, 200 and 300 μmol/L) for 30 min on 100 μmol/L KA

  10. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  11. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  12. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  13. Kainate induces various domain closures in AMPA and kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Frydenvang, Karla; Hald, Helle

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are key players in fast excitatory synaptic transmission within the central nervous system. These receptors have been divided into three subfamilies: the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate...... receptors. Kainate has previously been crystallized with the ligand binding domain (LBD) of AMPA receptors (GluA2 and GluA4) and kainate receptors (GluK1 and GluK2). Here, we report the structures of the kainate receptor GluK3 LBD in complex with kainate and GluK1 LBD in complex with kainate in the absence...... in the three kainate receptors, which is in contrast to the AMPA receptors where similar contacts are seen. It was revealed by patch clamp electrophysiology studies that kainate is a partial agonist at GluK1 with 36% efficacy compared to glutamate, which is in between the published efficacies of kainate at Glu...

  14. Role of GluK1 kainate receptors in seizures, epileptic discharges, and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine; Gasior, Maciej; Kaminski, Rafal M; Rogawski, Michael A

    2014-04-23

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit have an impact on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain regions, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are relevant to seizures and epilepsy. Here we used 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a potent and selective agonist of kainate receptors that include the GluK1 subunit, in conjunction with mice deficient in GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits to assess the role of GluK1 kainate receptors in provoking seizures and in kindling epileptogenesis. We found that systemic ATPA, acting specifically via GluK1 kainate receptors, causes locomotor arrest and forelimb extension (a unique behavioral characteristic of GluK1 activation) and induces myoclonic behavioral seizures and electrographic seizure discharges in the BLA and hippocampus. In contrast, the proconvulsant activity of systemic AMPA, kainate, and pentylenetetrazol is not mediated by GluK1 kainate receptors, and deletion of these receptors does not elevate the threshold for seizures in the 6 Hz model. ATPA also specifically activates epileptiform discharges in BLA slices in vitro via GluK1 kainate receptors. Olfactory bulb kindling developed similarly in wild-type, GluK1, and GluK2 knock-out mice, demonstrating that GluK1 kainate receptors are not required for epileptogenesis or seizure expression in this model. We conclude that selective activation of kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit can trigger seizures, but these receptors are not necessary for seizure generation in models commonly used to identify therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy.

  15. Synaptic kainate receptors in interplay with INaP shift the sparse firing of dentate granule cells to a sustained rhythmic mode in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artinian, Julien; Peret, Angélique; Marti, Geoffrey; Epsztein, Jérôme; Crépel, Valérie

    2011-07-27

    Dentate granule cells, at the gate of the hippocampus, use coincidence detection of synaptic inputs to code afferent information under a sparse firing regime. In both human patients and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, mossy fibers sprout to form an aberrant glutamatergic network between dentate granule cells. These new synapses operate via long-lasting kainate receptor-mediated events, which are not present in the naive condition. Here, we report that in chronic epileptic rat, aberrant kainate receptors in interplay with the persistent sodium current dramatically expand the temporal window for synaptic integration. This introduces a multiplicative gain change in the input-output operation of dentate granule cells. As a result, their sparse firing is switched to an abnormal sustained and rhythmic mode. We conclude that synaptic kainate receptors dramatically alter the fundamental coding properties of dentate granule cells in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  16. [Neurotransmission in developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2008-11-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) is a heterogeneous developmental disorder with an etiology that is not fully understood. AD/HD has been considered to occur due to a disturbance in cathecholaminergic neurotransmission, with particular emphasis on dopamine. The neurotransmission of dopamine in subcortical regions such as the basal ganglia and limbic areas is synaptic; on the other hand, dopamine neurotransmission in the frontal cortex is quite different, because there are very few dopamine transporters (DAT) in the frontal cortex that allow dopamine to diffuse away from the dopamine synapse ("volume transmission"). It is now clear that noradrenergic neurons play a key regulatory role in dopaminergic function in the frontal cortex. Furthermore, serotonergic neurons exert an inhibitory effect on midbrain dopamine cell bodies, and they have an influence on dopamine release in terminal regions. There is accumulating neurobiological evidence pointing toward a role of the serotonin system in AD/HD. The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is still unclear, but information from genetics, neuropathology, brain imaging, and basic neuroscience has provided insights into the understanding of this developmental disorder. In addition to abnormal circuitry in specific limbic and neocortical areas of the cerebral cortex, impairments in brainstem, cerebellar, thalamic, and basal ganglia connections have been reported. Numerous studies have pointed to abnormalities in serotonin and glutamate neurotransmission. Three important aspects involved in the pathophysiology of ASD have been proposed. The first is cell migration, the second is unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory networks, and the third is synapse formation and pruning, the key factors being reelin, neurexin, and neuroligin. Serotonin is considered to play an important role in all of these aspects of the pathophysiology of ASD. Finally, I would like to emphasize that it is crucial in the field of child

  17. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2017-01-01

    synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor...... structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full...

  18. Receptor-Mediated Signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M Grice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the most pathogenic species among the Aspergilli, and the major fungal agent of human pulmonary infection. To prosper in diverse ecological niches, Aspergilli have evolved numerous mechanisms for adaptive gene regulation, some of which are also crucial for mammalian infection. Among the molecules which govern such responses, integral membrane receptors are thought to be the most amenable to therapeutic modulation. This is due to the localisation of these molecular sensors at the periphery of the fungal cell, and to the prevalence of small molecules and licensed drugs which target receptor-mediated signalling in higher eukaryotic cells. In this review we highlight the progress made in characterising receptor-mediated environmental adaptation in A. fumigatus and its relevance for pathogenicity in mammals. By presenting a first genomic survey of integral membrane proteins in this organism, we highlight an abundance of putative 7TMD receptors, the majority of which remain uncharacterised. Given the dependency of A. fumigatus upon stress adaptation for colonisation and infection of mammalian hosts, and the merits of targeting receptor-mediated signalling as an antifungal strategy, a closer scrutiny of sensory perception and signal transduction in this organism is warranted.

  19. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  20. Topiramate reduces excitability in the basolateral amygdala by selectively inhibiting GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptors on interneurons and positively modulating GABAA receptors on principal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Maria F M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Li, He; Rogawski, Michael A

    2009-08-01

    Topiramate [2,3:4,5-bis-O-(1-methylethylidene)-beta-D-fructopyranose sulfamate] is a structurally novel antiepileptic drug that has broad efficacy in epilepsy, but the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic activity are not fully understood. We have found that topiramate selectively inhibits GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic responses in rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) principal neurons and protects against seizures induced by the GluK1 kainate receptor agonist (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA). Here, we demonstrate that topiramate also modulates inhibitory function in the BLA. Using whole-cell recordings in rat amygdala slices, we found that 0.3 to 10 microM topiramate 1) inhibited ATPA-evoked postsynaptic currents recorded from BLA interneurons; 2) suppressed ATPA-induced enhancement of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from BLA pyramidal cells; and 3) blocked ATPA-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs, which is mediated by presynaptic GluK1 kainate receptors present on BLA interneurons. Topiramate (10 microM) had no effect on the AMPA [(R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid]-induced enhancement of spontaneous activity of BLA neurons. Thus, although topiramate inhibits GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated enhancement of interneuron firing, it promotes evoked GABA release, leading to a net inhibition of circuit excitability. In addition, we found that topiramate (0.3-10 microM) increased the amplitude of evoked, spontaneous, and miniature IPSCs in BLA pyramidal neurons, indicating an enhancement of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor responses. Taken together with our previous findings, we conclude that topiramate protects against hyperexcitability in the BLA by suppressing the GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated excitation of principal neurons by glutamatergic afferents, blocking the suppression of GABA release from interneurons mediated by presynaptic GluK1

  1. Kainate receptor modulation by sodium and chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plested, Andrew J R

    2011-01-01

    The kainate-type glutamate receptor displays strong modulation by monovalent anions and cations. This modulation is independent of permeation of the ion channel. Instead, structural, computational and biophysical evidence shows that receptor activity is controlled by binding of sodium and chloride ions at sites that stabilize active dimers of glutamate binding domains. Modulation by monovalent ions is a surprisingly general property across ion channel families. However, evidence of a physiological role for ion-dependent effects on glutamate receptors is lacking, perhaps reflecting the adventitious use of ions as structural components of the kainate receptor. "ergo, Hercules, vita humanior sine sale non quit degree […]" "Heaven known, a civilized life is impossible without salt" -Pliny the Elder, Natural History XXXI 88.

  2. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  3. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred eOswald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarisation (AHP underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD of postsynaptic potentials (PSP in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg2+-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg2+-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission.

  4. Le DHA dans la neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavialle Monique

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, particularly arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are integral components of neural membrane phospholipids. DHA deficiency is associated with behavioural and neurophysiological disorders. A deficiency of DHA markedly affects neurotransmission, membrane-bound proteins, ion channel activities and synaptic plasticity, and the supplementation restores neurotransmission. Although the molecular mechanism of DHA involvement remains unknown, more and more data demonstrate its implication in various cellular activities contributing to regulation of neurotransmission. Since recent studies have provided evidence that n-3 deficiency altered neurogenesis in embryonic brain, the question of lasting effects on neural function can be addressed.

  5. Functional diversity and developmental changes in rat neuronal kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, T J; Huettner, J E

    2001-04-15

    1. Whole-cell currents evoked by kainate and the GluR5-selective agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tertbutylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA) were used to compare the physiological properties of kainate receptors expressed by neurons from rat hippocampus, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. 2. In contrast to kainate, which evoked desensitizing currents with similar decay rates and steady-state components in all three cell types, responses to ATPA were distinctly different in the three cell populations. Currents evoked by ATPA displayed a significant steady-state component in hippocampal neurons, but decayed rapidly to baseline in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. ATPA failed to evoke current in many of the spinal neurons. 3. ATPA caused steady-state desensitization in DRG cells with an IC50 of 41 nM. Recovery from desensitization of DRG cell receptors by ATPA was significantly slower than for any previously described agonist. In contrast, hippocampal kainate receptors recovered from desensitization by ATPA within a few seconds. 4. Half-maximal activation of kainate receptors in hippocampal neurons required 938 nM ATPA. In DRG cells treated with concanavalin A the EC50 for ATPA was 341 nM. ATPA evoked current in embryonic hippocampal neurons but with lower amplitude relative to kainate than in cultured postnatal neurons. 5. Collectively, these results highlight functional differences between neuronal kainate receptors that may reflect their distinct subunit composition and their diverse roles in synaptic transmission.

  6. Kainate receptors: multiple roles in neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihra, Talvinder S; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)- and AMPA-type, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors have been extensively invoked in plasticity. Until relatively recently, however, kainate-type receptors (KARs) had been the most elusive to study because of the lack of appropriate pharmacological tools to specifically address their roles. With the development of selective glutamate receptor antagonists, and knockout mice with specific KAR subunits deleted, the functions of KARs in neuromodulation and synaptic transmission, together with their involvement in some types of plasticity, have been extensively probed in the central nervous system. In this review, we summarize the findings related to the roles of KARs in short- and long-term forms of plasticity, primarily in the hippocampus, where KAR function and synaptic plasticity have received avid attention.

  7. Serotonergic neurotransmission in emotional processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Ruff; Henningsson, Susanne; Macoveanu, Julian;

    2016-01-01

    ,4-methylene-dioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) induces alterations in serotonergic neurotransmission that are comparable to those observed in a depleted state. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated the responsiveness of the amygdala to emotional face stimuli in recreational...

  8. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS. The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  9. The GluR5 subtype of kainate receptor regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in areas CA1 and CA3 of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignes, M; Clarke, V R; Parry, M J; Bleakman, D; Lodge, D; Ornstein, P L; Collingridge, G L

    1998-01-01

    Activation of kainate receptors depresses excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. In the present study, we have utilised a GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA [(RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid], and a GluR5 selective antagonist, LY294486 [(3SR,4aRS,6SR,8aRS)-6-([[(1H-tetrazol-5-y l)methyl]oxy]methyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-decahydroisoquinoline-3 -carboxylic acid], to determine whether GluR5 subunits are involved in this effect. ATPA mimicked the presynaptic depressant effects of kainate in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. It depressed reversibly AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (field EPSPs) with an IC50 value of approximately 0.60 microM. The dual-component excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) and the pharmacologically isolated NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor-mediated EPSC were depressed to a similar extent by 2 microM ATPA (61 +/- 7% and 58 +/- 6%, respectively). Depressions were associated with an increase in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio suggesting a presynaptic locus of action. LY294486 (20 microM) blocked the effects of 2 microM ATPA on NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a reversible manner. In area CA3, 1 microM ATPA depressed reversibly mossy fibre-evoked synaptic transmission (by 82 +/- 10%). The effects of ATPA were not accompanied by any changes in the passive properties of CA1 or CA3 neurones. However, in experiments where K+, rather than Cs+, containing electrodes were used, a small outward current was observed. These results show that GluR5 subunits comprise or contribute to a kainate receptor that regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in both the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus.

  10. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  11. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  12. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  13. Neto2 influences on kainate receptor pharmacology and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Liwei; Howe, James; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Neuropilin tolloid-like protein 2 (Neto2) is an auxiliary subunit of kainate receptors (KARs). It specifically regulates KARs, e.g., slows desensitization and deactivation, increases the rate of recovery from desensitization, promotes modal gating and increases agonist sensitivity. Although...

  14. DHA involvement in neurotransmission process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vancassel Sylvie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The very high enrichment of the nervous system in the polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic (AA, 20: 4n-6 and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA, 22: 6n-3, is dependant of the dietary availability of their respective precursors, linoleic (18: 2n-6 and_-linolenic acids (18: 3n-3. Inadequate amounts of DHA in brain membranes have been linked to a wide variety of abnormalities ranging from visual acuity and learning irregularities, to psychopathologies. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Several years ago, we hypothesized that a modification of DHA contents of neuronal membranes by dietary modulation could change the neurotransmission function and then underlie inappropriate behavioural response. We showed that, in parallel to a severe loss of brain DHA concomitant to a compensatory substitution by 22:5n-6, the dietary lack of α-linolenic acid during development induced important changes in the release of neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine in cerebral areas specifically involved in learning, memory and reward processes. Data suggested alteration of presynaptic storage process and dysregulations of reciprocal functional interactions between monoaminergic and cholinergic pathways. Moreover, we showed that recovery of these neurochemical changes was possible when the deficient diet was switched to a diet balanced in n-3 and n-6 PUFA before weaning. The next step is to understand the mechanism involved. Particularly, we focus on the study of the metabolic cooperation between the endothelial cell, the astrocyte and the neuron which regulate synaptic transmission.These works could contribute to the understanding of the link between some neuropsychiatric disorders and the metabolism of n-3 PUFA, through their action on neurotransmission.

  15. A Presynaptic Glutamate Receptor Subunit Confers Robustness to Neurotransmission and Homeostatic Potentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beril Kiragasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are thought to interface with other forms of plasticity to ensure flexible yet stable levels of neurotransmission. The role of neurotransmitter receptors in this process, beyond mediating neurotransmission itself, is not known. Through a forward genetic screen, we have identified the Drosophila kainate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit DKaiR1D to be required for the retrograde, homeostatic potentiation of synaptic strength. DKaiR1D is necessary in presynaptic motor neurons, localized near active zones, and confers robustness to the calcium sensitivity of baseline synaptic transmission. Acute pharmacological blockade of DKaiR1D disrupts homeostatic plasticity, indicating that this receptor is required for the expression of this process, distinct from developmental roles. Finally, we demonstrate that calcium permeability through DKaiR1D is necessary for baseline synaptic transmission, but not for homeostatic signaling. We propose that DKaiR1D is a glutamate autoreceptor that promotes robustness to synaptic strength and plasticity with active zone specificity.

  16. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  17. 3-Substituted phenylalanines as selective AMPA- and kainate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymanska, Ewa; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of X-ray structures of ionotropic glutamate receptor constructs in complex with amino acid-based AMPA and kainate receptor antagonists, a series of rigid as well as flexible biaromatic alanine derivatives carrying selected hydrogen bond acceptors and donors have been synthesized...... in order to investigate the structural determinants for receptor selectivity between AMPA and the GluR5 subtype of kainate receptors. Compounds selective for either GluR5 or AMPA receptors were identified. One particular substituent position appeared to be of special importance for control of ligand...... selectivity. Using molecular modeling the observed structure-activity relationships at AMPA and GluR5 receptors were deduced....

  18. P2X receptor-mediated ATP purinergic signaling in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Hua JiangSchool of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United KingdomAbstract: Purinergic P2X receptors are plasma membrane proteins present in a wide range of mammalian cells where they act as a cellular sensor, enabling cells to detect and respond to extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP, an important signaling molecule. P2X receptors function as ligand-gated Ca2+-permeable cationic channels that open upon ATP binding to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and cause membrane depolarization. In response to sustained activation, P2X receptors induce formation of a pore permeable to large molecules. P2X receptors also interact with distinct functional proteins and membrane lipids to form specialized signaling complexes. Studies have provided compelling evidence to show that such P2X receptor-mediated ATP-signaling mechanisms determine and regulate a growing number and diversity of important physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and cytokine release. There is accumulating evidence to support strong causative relationships of altered receptor expression and function with chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, cancers, and other pathologies or diseases. Numerous high throughput screening drug discovery programs and preclinical studies have thus far demonstrated the proof of concepts that the P2X receptors are druggable targets and selective receptor antagonism is a promising therapeutics approach. This review will discuss the recent progress in understanding the mammalian P2X receptors with respect to the ATP-signaling mechanisms, physiological and pathophysiological roles, and development and preclinical studies of receptor antagonists.Keywords: extracellular ATP, ion channel, large pore, signaling complex, chronic pain, inflammatory diseases

  19. New insights from the use of pilocarpine and kainate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, J P; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Cavalheiro, E A

    2002-06-01

    Local or systemic administration of pilocarpine and kainate in rodents leads to a pattern of repetitive limbic seizures and status epilepticus, which can last for several hours. A latent period follows status epilepticus and precedes a chronic phase, which is characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous limbic seizures. These distinct features, in a single animal preparation, of an acute damage induced by status epilepticus, a silent interval between injury and the onset of spontaneous seizures, and a chronic epileptic state have allowed antiepileptic drug (AED) studies with different purposes, (a) in the acute phase, identification of compounds with efficacy against refractory status epilepticus and/or neuroprotection against damage induced by sustained seizures; (b) in the latent period, identification of agents with a potential for preventing epileptogenesis and/or against seizure-induced long-term behavioral deficits and (c) in the chronic phase, testing drugs effective against partial and secondarily generalized seizures. Studies on pilocarpine and kainate models have pointed out that some AEDs or other compounds exert an antiepileptogenic effect. The analogy of the latent phase of pilocarpine and kainate models with the acquisition of amygdala kindling should encourage testing of drugs that have proved to suppress the evolution of amygdala kindling. Drug testing in the chronic phase should not address only the suppression of secondarily generalized motor seizures. Most of current tools used to quantify spontaneous seizure events need to be coupled to electrophysiology and more sophisticated systems for recording and analyzing behavior.

  20. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward

    OpenAIRE

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J

    2011-01-01

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward, by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05–0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and ...

  1. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors.

  2. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  3. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  4. Haloperidol impairs auditory filial imprinting and modulates monoaminergic neurotransmission in an imprinting-relevant forebrain area of the domestic chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, M; Bock, J; Braun, K

    2003-11-01

    In vivo microdialysis and behavioural studies in the domestic chick have shown that glutamatergic as well as monoaminergic neurotransmission in the medio-rostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale (MNH) is altered after auditory filial imprinting. In the present study, using pharmaco-behavioural and in vivo microdialysis approaches, the role of dopaminergic neurotransmission in this juvenile learning event was further evaluated. The results revealed that: (i) the systemic application of the potent dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol (7.5 mg/kg) strongly impairs auditory filial imprinting; (ii) systemic haloperidol induces a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase of extracellular levels of the dopamine metabolite, homovanillic acid, in the MNH, whereas the levels of glutamate, taurine and the serotonin metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, remain unchanged; (iii) haloperidol (0.01, 0.1, 1 mm) infused locally into the MNH increases glutamate, taurine and 5- hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid levels in a dose-dependent manner, whereas homovanillic acid levels remain unchanged; (iv) systemic haloperidol infusion reinforces the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated inhibitory modulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmission within the MNH. These results indicate that the modulation of dopaminergic function and its interaction with other neurotransmitter systems in a higher associative forebrain region of the juvenile avian brain displays similar neurochemical characteristics as the adult mammalian prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, we were able to show that the pharmacological manipulation of monoaminergic regulatory mechanisms interferes with learning and memory formation, events which in a similar fashion might occur in young or adult mammals.

  5. Neuron-glia interactions in glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sickmann, H M; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2011-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission accounts for a considerable part of energy consumption related to signaling in the brain. Chemical energy is provided by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formed in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle combined with oxidative phosphorylation. It is not clear wh...

  6. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is not required for kainate-induced motoneuron death in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, W; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W

    1998-08-24

    Spinal motoneurons are highly vulnerable to kainate both in vivo and in vitro. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin have recently been shown to mediate kainate-induced neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tPA also mediates the kainate-induced death of motoneurons in vitro. A motoneuron-enriched neuronal population was isolated from the ventral spinal cord of wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mouse embryos. WT and tPA-/- neurons were cultured on WT and tPA-/- spinal glial feeder layers, respectively. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were morphologically indistinguishable. Expression of tPA in WT co-cultures was demonstrated using RT-PCR. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were exposed to kainate for 24 h. The neurotoxic effect of kainate did not differ significantly between WT and tPA-/- cultures. The plasmin inhibitor alpha2-antiplasmin did not protect WT neurons against kainate-induced injury. These results indicate that the plasmin system is not a universal mediator of kainate-induced excitotoxicity.

  7. Modulation of excitatory neurotransmission by neuronal/glial signalling molecules: interplay between purinergic and glutamatergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köles, László; Kató, Erzsébet; Hanuska, Adrienn; Zádori, Zoltán S; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Zelles, Tibor; Rubini, Patrizia; Illes, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS), released both from neurons and glial cells. Acting via ionotropic (NMDA, AMPA, kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors, it is critically involved in essential regulatory functions. Disturbances of glutamatergic neurotransmission can be detected in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. This paper summarizes the present knowledge on the modulation of glutamate-mediated responses in the CNS. Emphasis will be put on NMDA receptor channels, which are essential executive and integrative elements of the glutamatergic system. This receptor is crucial for proper functioning of neuronal circuits; its hypofunction or overactivation can result in neuronal disturbances and neurotoxicity. Somewhat surprisingly, NMDA receptors are not widely targeted by pharmacotherapy in clinics; their robust activation or inhibition seems to be desirable only in exceptional cases. However, their fine-tuning might provide a promising manipulation to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system and to restore proper CNS function. This orchestration utilizes several neuromodulators. Besides the classical ones such as dopamine, novel candidates emerged in the last two decades. The purinergic system is a promising possibility to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system. It exerts not only direct and indirect influences on NMDA receptors but, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, also plays an important role in glia-neuron communication. These purinergic functions will be illustrated mostly by depicting the modulatory role of the purinergic system on glutamatergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex, a CNS area important for attention, memory and learning.

  8. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  9. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  10. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins resulting from receptor mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Kuester, Katharina; Kloft, Charlotte; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2009-06-01

    Receptor mediated endocytosis (RME) plays a major role in the disposition of therapeutic protein drugs in the body. It is suspected to be a major source of nonlinear pharmacokinetic behavior observed in clinical pharmacokinetic data. So far, mostly empirical or semi-mechanistic approaches have been used to represent RME. A thorough understanding of the impact of the properties of the drug and of the receptor system on the resulting nonlinear disposition is still missing, as is how to best represent RME in pharmacokinetic models. In this article, we present a detailed mechanistic model of RME that explicitly takes into account receptor binding and trafficking inside the cell and that is used to derive reduced models of RME which retain a mechanistic interpretation. We find that RME can be described by an extended Michaelis-Menten model that accounts for both the distribution and the elimination aspect of RME. If the amount of drug in the receptor system is negligible a standard Michaelis-Menten model is capable of describing the elimination by RME. Notably, a receptor system can efficiently eliminate drug from the extracellular space even if the total number of receptors is small. We find that drug elimination by RME can result in substantial nonlinear pharmacokinetics. The extent of nonlinearity is higher for drug/receptor systems with higher receptor availability at the membrane, or faster internalization and degradation of extracellular drug. Our approach is exemplified for the epidermal growth factor receptor system.

  11. Ontogeny of Kainate-Induced Gamma Oscillations in the Rat CA3 Hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Vera eTsintsadze; Marat eMinlebaev; Dimitry eSuchkov; Mark eCunningham; Rustem eKhazipov

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged by the end of the first p...

  12. Ontogeny of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the rat CA3 hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Vera; Minlebaev, Marat; Suchkov, Dimitry; Mark O. Cunningham; Khazipov, Roustem

    2015-01-01

    International audience; GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged b...

  13. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  14. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  15. Presynaptic inhibition by kainate receptors converges mechanistically with presynaptic inhibition by adenosine and GABAB receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi, Dara; Frerking, Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Kainate receptors are widely reported to regulate the release of neurotransmitter in the CNS, but the mechanisms involved remain controversial. Previous studies have found that the kainate receptor agonist ATPA, which selectively activates Glu(K5)-containing kainate receptors, depresses glutamate release at Schaffer-collateral synapses in the hippocampus. In the present study, we provide pharmacological evidence that this depressant effect is mediated by Glu(K5)-containing heteromers, but is distinct from a similar depressant effect engaged by the kainate receptor agonist domoate. The depressant effect of ATPA is insensitive to antagonists for GABA(A), GABA(B), and adenosine receptors, and is also unaffected by lowering the release probability by reducing extracellular calcium. However, the effect of ATPA is partly occluded by prior activation of GABA(B) receptors and completely occluded by prior activation of adenosine receptors, suggesting a mechanistic convergence of heteromeric Glu(K5) kainate receptor signaling with GABA(B) receptors and adenosine receptors. The effects of domoate are partially occluded by both adenosine and GABA(B) receptor agonists, indicating at least a partial convergence of Glu(K5)-lacking kainate receptor signaling with these other pathways. The depressant effect of ATPA is not blocked by inhibition of serine/threonine protein kinases. These results suggest that ATPA and domoate inhibit glutamate release through mechanisms that converge with those of classical metabotropic receptor agonists, although they do so through different receptors.

  16. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0314 TITLE: Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis ...19 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro- Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... arthritis (RA) patients rely on glucocorticoids (GCs) at some point during the disease. GCs signal through the GC receptor (GR), a transcription factor that

  17. Induction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogen receptor-mediated activities, and modulation of cell proliferation by dinaphthofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrácek, Jan; Chramostová, Katerina; Plísková, Martina; Bláha, Ludek; Brack, Werner; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-09-01

    A group of heterocyclic aromatic compounds, dinaphthofurans (DNFs), recently have been identified as potentially significant contaminants in freshwater sediments. In the present study, a battery of in vitro assays was used for detection of toxic effects of DNFs that are potentially associated with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion. Dinaphthofurans were found to act as relatively potent inducers of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity in the chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene expression DR-CALUX assay. The relative AhR-inducing potencies of DNFs were similar or even higher than relative potencies of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with dinaphtho[1,2-b;2'3'-d]furan being the most potent AhR agonist. Two compounds, dinaphtho[2,1-b;2'3'-d]furan and dinaphtho[1,2-b;1'2'-d]furan, induced estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated activity in the estrogen receptor-mediated CALUX (the ER-CALUX) assay. Two types of potential tumor-promoting effects of DNFs were investigated, using in vitro bioassays for detection of inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and detection of a release from contact inhibition. Although the acute inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication was not observed, all six tested DNFs were able to release rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells from contact inhibition at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In summary, the present study indicated that DNFs can exert multiple biological effects in vitro, including induction of the AhR-mediated activity, release of cells from contact inhibition, and induction of ER-mediated activity.

  18. Dopamine-galanin receptor heteromers modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in the rat ventral hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Vaz, Sandra H.; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Ferrada, Carla; Quiroz, César; Barodia, Sandeep; Kabbani, Nadine; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine and galanin modulate cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus, but little is known about the mechanisms involved and their possible interactions. By using resonance energy transfer techniques in transfected mammalian cells we demonstrated the existence of heteromers between the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) and galanin Gal1, but not Gal2 receptors. Within the D1-Gal1 and D5-Gal1 receptor heteromers, dopamine receptor activation potentiated and dopamine receptor blockade counteracted MAPK activation induced by stimulation of Gal1 receptors, while Gal1 receptor activation or blockade did not modify D1-like receptor-mediated MAPK activation. Ability of a D1-like receptor antagonist to block galanin-induced MAPK activation (cross-antagonism) was used as a “biochemical fingerprint” of D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers, allowing their identification in the rat ventral hippocampus. The functional role of D1-like-Gal receptor heteromers was demonstrated in synaptosomes from rat ventral hippocampus, where galanin facilitated acetylcholine release, but only with co-stimulation of D1-like receptors. Electrophysiological experiments in rat ventral hippocampal slices showed that these receptor interactions modulate hippocampal synaptic transmission. Thus, a D1-like receptor agonist, that was ineffective when administered alone, turned an inhibitory effect of galanin into an excitatory effect, an interaction that required cholinergic neurotransmission. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers act as processors that integrate signals of two different neurotransmitters, dopamine and acetylcholine, to modulate hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:21593325

  19. Topiramate selectively protects against seizures induced by ATPA, a GluR5 kainate receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Rafal M; Banerjee, Madhumita; Rogawski, Michael A

    2004-06-01

    Although the mechanism of action of topiramate is not fully understood, its anticonvulsant properties may result, at least in part, from an interaction with AMPA/kainate receptors. We have recently shown that topiramate selectively inhibits postsynaptic responses mediated by GluR5 kainate receptors. To determine if this action of topiramate is relevant to the anticonvulsant effects of the drug in vivo, we determined the protective activity of topiramate against seizures induced by intravenous infusion of various ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists in mice. Topiramate (25-100 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent elevation in the threshold for clonic seizures induced by infusion of ATPA, a selective agonist of GluR5 kainate receptors. Topiramate was less effective in protecting against clonic seizures induced by kainate, a mixed agonist of AMPA and kainate receptors. Topiramate did not affect clonic seizures induced by AMPA or NMDA. In contrast, the thresholds for tonic seizures induced by higher doses of these various glutamate receptor agonists were all elevated by topiramate. Unlike topiramate, carbamazepine elevated the threshold for AMPA- but not ATPA-induced clonic seizures. Our results are consistent with the possibility that the effects of topiramate on clonic seizure activity are due to functional blockade of GluR5 kainate receptors. Protection from tonic seizures may be mediated by other actions of the drug. Together with our in vitro cellular electrophysiological results, the present observations strongly support a unique mechanism of action of topiramate, which involves GluR5 kainate receptors.

  20. Key role of the dopamine D4 receptor in the modulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Quiroz, César; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Tanda, Gianluigi; Ferré, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) have been repeatedly associated with numerous neuropsychiatric disorders. Yet, the functional role of the D4 receptor and the functional differences of the products of DRD4 polymorphic variants remained enigmatic. Immunohistochemical and optogenetic-microdialysis experiments were performed in knock-in mice expressing a D4 receptor with the long intracellular domain of a human DRD4 polymorphic variant associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). When compared with the wild-type mouse D4 receptor, the expanded intracellular domain of the humanized D4 receptor conferred a gain of function, blunting methamphetamine-induced cortical activation and optogenetic and methamphetamine-induced corticostriatal glutamate release. The results demonstrate a key role of the D4 receptor in the modulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, these data imply that enhanced D4 receptor-mediated dopaminergic control of corticostriatal transmission constitutes a vulnerability factor of ADHD and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. The GluK4 kainate receptor subunit regulates memory, mood, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, E R; Kruyer, A; Norris, E H; Cederroth, C R; Strickland, S

    2013-04-01

    Though the GluK4 kainate receptor subunit shows limited homology and a restricted expression pattern relative to other kainate receptor subunits, its ablation results in distinct behavioral and molecular phenotypes. GluK4 knockout mice demonstrated impairments in memory acquisition and recall in a Morris water maze test, suggesting a previously unreported role for kainate receptors in spatial memory. GluK4 knockout mice also showed marked hyperactivity and impaired pre-pulse inhibition, thereby mirroring two of the hallmark endophenotypes of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Furthermore, we found that GluK4 is a key mediator of excitotoxic neurodegeneration: GluK4 knockout mice showed robust neuroprotection in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following intrahippocampal injection of kainate and widespread neuroprotection throughout the hippocampus following hypoxia-ischemia. Biochemical analysis of kainate- or sham-treated wild-type and GluK4 knockout hippocampal tissue suggests that GluK4 may act through the JNK pathway to regulate the molecular cascades that lead to excitotoxicity. Together, our findings suggest that GluK4 may be relevant to the understanding and treatment of human neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. [3H]ATPA: a high affinity ligand for GluR5 kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, K; Legutko, B; Rizkalla, G; Deverill, M; Hawes, C R; Ellis, G J; Stensbol, T B; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Skolnick, P; Bleakman, D

    1999-12-01

    The pharmacological properties of [3H]ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid) are described. ATPA is a tert-butyl analogue of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid) that has been shown to possess high affinity for the GluR5 subunit of kainate receptors. [3H]ATPA exhibits saturable, high affinity binding to membranes expressing human GluR5 (GluR5) kainate receptors (Kd approximately 13 nM). No specific binding was observed in membranes expressing GluR2 and GluR6 receptors. Several compounds known to interact with the GluR5 kainate receptor inhibited [3H]ATPA binding with potencies similar to those obtained for competition of [3H]kainate binding to GluR5. Saturable, high affinity [3H]ATPA binding (Kd approximately 4 nM) was also observed in DRG neuron (DRG) membranes isolated from neonatal rats. The rank order potency of compounds to inhibit [3H]ATPA binding in rat DRG and GluR5 membranes were in agreement. These finding demonstrate that [3H]ATPA can be used as a radioligand to examine the pharmacological properties of GluR5 containing kainate receptors.

  3. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  4. Treatment of dementia with neurotransmission modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggrell, Sheila A; Evans, Suzanne

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of dementia is growing in developed countries where elderly patients are increasing in numbers. Neurotransmission modulation is one approach to the treatment of dementia. Cholinergic precursors, anticholinesterases, nicotine receptor agonists and muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonists are agents that enhance cholinergic neurotransmission and that depend on having some intact cholinergic innervation to be effective in the treatment of dementia. The cholinergic precursor choline alfoscerate may be emerging as a potential useful drug in the treatment of dementia, with few adverse effects. Of the anticholinesterases, donepezil, in addition to having a similar efficacy to tacrine in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), appears to have major advantages; its use is associated with lower drop-out rates in clinical trials, a lower incidence of cholinergic-like side effects and no liver toxicity. Rivastigmine is efficacious in the treatment in dementia with Lewy bodies, a condition in which the other anticholinesterases have not been tested extensively to date. Galantamine is an anticholinesterase and also acts as an allosteric potentiating modulator at nicotinic receptors to increase the release of acetylcholine. Pooled data from clinical trials of patients with mild-to-moderate AD suggest that the benefits and safety profile of galantamine are similar to those of the anticholinesterases. Selective nicotine receptor agonists are being developed that enhance cognitive performance without influencing autonomic and skeletal muscle function, but these have not yet entered clinical trial for dementia. Unlike the cholinergic enhancers, the M(1) receptor agonists do not depend upon intact cholinergic nerves but on intact M(1) receptors for their action, which are mainly preserved in AD and dementia with Lewy bodies. The M(1) receptor-selective agonists developed to date have shown limited efficacy in clinical trials and have a high incidence of side effects. A

  5. Activity-dependent endogenous taurine release facilitates excitatory neurotransmission in the neocortical marginal zone of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Taizhe; Chen, Rongqing; Nakamura, Masato; Furukawa, Tomonori; Kumada, Tatsuro; Akita, Tenpei; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Nakahara, Daiichiro; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    In the developing cerebral cortex, the marginal zone (MZ), consisting of early-generated neurons such as Cajal-Retzius cells, plays an important role in cell migration and lamination. There is accumulating evidence of widespread excitatory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the MZ. Cajal-Retzius cells express not only GABAA receptors but also α2/β subunits of glycine receptors, and exhibit glycine receptor-mediated depolarization due to high [Cl(-)]i. However, the physiological roles of glycine receptors and their endogenous agonists during neurotransmission in the MZ are yet to be elucidated. To address this question, we performed optical imaging from the MZ using the voltage-sensitive dye JPW1114 on tangential neocortical slices of neonatal rats. A single electrical stimulus evoked an action-potential-dependent optical signal that spread radially over the MZ. The amplitude of the signal was not affected by glutamate receptor blockers, but was suppressed by either GABAA or glycine receptor antagonists. Combined application of both antagonists nearly abolished the signal. Inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter by 20 µM bumetanide reduced the signal, indicating that this transporter contributes to excitation. Analysis of the interstitial fluid obtained by microdialysis from tangential neocortical slices with high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that GABA and taurine, but not glycine or glutamate, were released in the MZ in response to the electrical stimulation. The ambient release of taurine was reduced by the addition of a voltage-sensitive Na(+) channel blocker. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy indicated that taurine was stored both in Cajal-Retzius and non-Cajal-Retzius cells in the MZ, but was not localized in presynaptic structures. Our results suggest that activity-dependent non-synaptic release of endogenous taurine facilitates excitatory neurotransmission through activation of glycine

  6. Activity-dependent endogenous taurine release facilitates excitatory neurotransmission in the neocortical marginal zone of neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizhe eQian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the developing cerebral cortex, the marginal zone (MZ, consisting of early-generated neurons such as Cajal-Retzius cells, plays an important role in cell migration and lamination. There is accumulating evidence of widespread excitatory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in the MZ. Cajal-Retzius cells express not only GABAA receptors but also α2/β subunits of glycine receptors, and exhibit glycine receptor-mediated depolarization due to high [Cl−]i. However, the physiological roles of glycine receptors and their endogenous agonists during neurotransmission in the MZ are yet to be elucidated. To address this question, we performed optical imaging from the MZ using the voltage-sensitive dye JPW1114 on tangential neocortical slices of neonatal rats. A single electrical stimulus evoked an action-potential-dependent optical signal that spread radially over the MZ. The amplitude of the signal was not affected by glutamate receptor blockers, but was suppressed by either GABAA or glycine receptor antagonists. Combined application of both antagonists nearly abolished the signal. Inhibition of Na+, K+-2Cl− cotransporter by 20 µM bumetanide reduced the signal, indicating that this transporter contributes to excitation. Analysis of the interstitial fluid obtained by microdialysis from tangential neocortical slices with high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that GABA and taurine, but not glycine or glutamate, were released in the MZ in response to the electrical stimulation. The ambient release of taurine was reduced by the addition of a voltage-sensitive Na+ channel blocker. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy indicated that taurine was stored both in Cajal-Retzius and non-Cajal-Retzius cells in the MZ, but was not localized in presynaptic structures. Our results suggest that activity-dependent non-synaptic release of endogenous taurine facilitates excitatory neurotransmission through activation of

  7. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-08-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations.

  8. Rapeseed oil and magnesium manipulations affect the seizure threshold to kainate in mice*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagès Nicole

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the drop in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced seizure threshold caused by nutritional magnesium deprivation responded well to the w-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA alpha-linolenate (ALA (5% rapeseed oil diet when compared to w-6 PUFA diet. In the present work, kainate-induced seizures are shown to be also exacerbated by magnesium deprivation. ALA diet better attenuates this seizure exacerbation when compared to the non-ALA diet. The reversion of the drop in kainate seizure threshold induced in these conditions by magnesium administration was, however, better under the non-ALA diet in comparison with the ALA diet. Taken as a whole, present data indicate that kainate like NMDA brain injury is attenuated by ALA diet. On the other hand, the relative failure of ALA diet to potentiate reversion induced by magnesium might suggest that magnesium and ALA protections are not additive.

  9. Stereostructure-activity studies on agonists at the AMPA and kainate subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tommy N; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2003-01-01

    -methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subtype of ionotropic Glu receptors in the presence or absence of an agonist has provided important information about ligand-receptor interaction mechanisms. The availability of these binding domain crystal structures has formed the basis for rational...... design of ligands, especially for the AMPA and kainate subtypes of ionotropic Glu receptors. This mini-review will focus on structure-activity relationships on AMPA and kainate receptor agonists with special emphasis on stereochemical and three-dimensional aspects....

  10. A subconvulsive dose of kainate selectively compromises astrocytic metabolism in the mouse brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M; Schousboe, Arne

    2014-01-01

    on cerebral metabolism and particularly that associated with astrocytes. We investigated astrocytic and neuronal metabolism in the cerebral cortex of adult mice after treatment with saline (controls), a subconvulsive or a mildly convulsive dose of kainate. A combination of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [1-(13)C......]glutamine and an increase in the calculated astrocytic TCA cycle activity. In contrast, the convulsive dose led to decrements in the cortical content and (13)C labeling of glutamate, glutamine, GABA, and aspartate. Evidence is provided that astrocytic metabolism is affected by a subconvulsive dose of kainate, whereas...

  11. DMPD: Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15662540 Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. Li X, Qin J....iated signaling. PubmedID 15662540 Title Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor media... J Mol Med. 2005 Apr;83(4):258-66. Epub 2005 Jan 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor med

  12. A kinetic model for chemical neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Fernandez de Miguel, Francisco

    Recent experimental observations in presynaptic terminals at the neuromuscular junction indicate that there are stereotyped patterns of cooperativeness in the fusion of adjacent vesicles. That is, a vesicle in hemifusion process appears on the side of a fused vesicle and which is followed by another vesicle in a priming state while the next one is in a docking state. In this talk we present a kinetic model for this morphological pattern in which each vesicle state previous to the exocytosis is represented by a kinetic state. This chain states kinetic model can be analyzed by means of a Master equation whose solution is simulated with the stochastic Gillespie algorithm. With this approach we have reproduced the responses to the basal release in the absence of stimulation evoked by the electrical activity and the phenomena of facilitation and depression of neuromuscular synapses. This model offers new perspectives to understand the underlying phenomena in chemical neurotransmission based on molecular interactions that result in the cooperativity between vesicles during neurotransmitter release. DGAPA Grants IN118410 and IN200914 and Conacyt Grant 130031.

  13. Isolated NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses express both LTP and LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Berger, T W; Barrionuevo, G

    1992-04-01

    1. The possibility of use-dependent, long-lasting modifications of pharmacologically isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was examined by intracellular recordings from granule cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in vitro. In the presence of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinaxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) robust, long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials was induced by brief, high (50 Hz) and lower (10 Hz) frequency tetanic stimuli of glutamatergic afferents (60 +/- 6%, n = 8, P less than 0.001 and 43 +/- 12%, n = 3, P less than 0.05, respectively). 2. Hyperpolarization of granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 50-Hz tetanic stimuli reversibly blocked the induction of LTP (-6 +/- 2%, n = 6, P greater than 0.05) indicating that simultaneous activation of pre- and postsynaptic elements is a prerequisite for potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. In contrast, hyperpolarization of the granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 10-Hz tetanic stimuli resulted in long-term depression (LTD) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials (-34 +/- 8%, n = 8, P less than 0.01). 3. We also studied the role of [Ca2+]i in the induction of LTP and LTD of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. Before tetanization, [Ca2+]i was buffered by iontophoretic injections of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). BAPTA completely blocked the induction of LTP (3 +/- 5%, n = 13) and partially blocked LTD (-14.8 +/- 6%, n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Pharmacology and crystal structure of novel 2,3-quinoxalinediones at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Pasini, Diletta

    2017-01-01

    with the patho-physiology of CNS diseases such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Selective tool compounds are therefore needed to address the functional roles of different types of iGluRs. A few selective compounds that can discriminate between AMPA and kainate (KA) receptors are available. However...

  15. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity GluK5 kainate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Mouse GluK5 was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and radiolabelled with [3H]-kainate in receptor binding assays (Kd = 6.9 nM). Western immunoblotting indicated an Sf9 GluK5 band doublet corresponding to the glycosylated (128 kDa) and deglycosylated (111 kDa) protein, which was identical to the band...

  16. Mixed neurotransmission in the hippocampal mossy fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eMuenster-Wandowski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs, the axons of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, innervate mossy cells and interneurons in the hilus on its way to CA3 where they innervate interneurons and pyramidal cells. Synapses on each target cell have distinct anatomical and functional characteristics. In recent years, the paradigmatic view of the MF synapses being only glutamatergic and, thus, excitatory has been questioned. Several laboratories have provided data supporting the hypothesis that the MFs can transiently release GABA during development and, in the adult, after periods of enhanced excitability. This transient glutamate-GABA co-transmission coincides with the transient expression of the machinery for the synthesis and release of GABA in the glutamatergic granule cells. Although some investigators have deemed this evidence controversial, new data has appeared with direct evidence of co-release of glutamate and GABA from single, identified MF boutons. However, this must still be confirmed by other groups and with other methodologies. A second, intriguing observation is that MF activation produced fast spikelets followed by excitatory postsynaptic potentials in a number of pyramidal cells, which, unlike the spikelets, underwent frequency potentiation and were strongly depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The spikelets persisted during blockade of chemical transmission and were suppressed by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. These data is consistent with the hypothesis of mixed electrical-chemical synapses between MFs and some pyramidal cells. Dye coupling between these types of principal cells and ultrastructural studies showing the co-existence of AMPA receptors and connexin 36 in this synapse corroborate their presence. A deeper consideration of mixed neurotransmission taking place in this synapse may expand our search and understanding of communication channels between different regions of the mammalian CNS.

  17. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44.).

  18. Vascular endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction requires phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guogang; Jamali, Roya; Cao, Yong-Xiao;

    2006-01-01

    RNA and protein expressions. The endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction was associated with increase in phosphorylation of extracellular regulation kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) proteins and elevated levels of intracellular calcium. The elevation curve of intracellular calcium consisted of two phases: one rapid...... and one sustained. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by SB386023 or blockage of calcium channels by nifedipine significantly reduced the endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction (P..., phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins and elevation of intracellular calcium level are required for endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction in rat mesenteric artery....

  19. Orexinergic neurotransmission in temperature responses to methamphetamine and stress: mathematical modeling as a data assimilation approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Behrouzvaziri

    Full Text Available Orexinergic neurotransmission is involved in mediating temperature responses to methamphetamine (Meth. In experiments in rats, SB-334867 (SB, an antagonist of orexin receptors (OX1R, at a dose of 10 mg/kg decreases late temperature responses (t > 60 min to an intermediate dose of Meth (5 mg/kg. A higher dose of SB (30 mg/kg attenuates temperature responses to low dose (1 mg/kg of Meth and to stress. In contrast, it significantly exaggerates early responses (t < 60 min to intermediate and high doses (5 and 10 mg/kg of Meth. As pretreatment with SB also inhibits temperature response to the stress of injection, traditional statistical analysis of temperature responses is difficult.We have developed a mathematical model that explains the complexity of temperature responses to Meth as the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory nodes. We have extended the developed model to include the stress of manipulations and the effects of SB. Stress is synergistic with Meth on the action on excitatory node. Orexin receptors mediate an activation of on both excitatory and inhibitory nodes by low doses of Meth, but not on the node activated by high doses (HD. Exaggeration of early responses to high doses of Meth involves disinhibition: low dose of SB decreases tonic inhibition of HD and lowers the activation threshold, while the higher dose suppresses the inhibitory component. Using a modeling approach to data assimilation appears efficient in separating individual components of complex response with statistical analysis unachievable by traditional data processing methods.

  20. Orexinergic Neurotransmission in Temperature Responses to Methamphetamine and Stress: Mathematical Modeling as a Data Assimilation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Fu, Daniel; Tan, Patrick; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Zaretskaia, Maria V.; Rusyniak, Daniel E.; Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Zaretsky, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental Data Orexinergic neurotransmission is involved in mediating temperature responses to methamphetamine (Meth). In experiments in rats, SB-334867 (SB), an antagonist of orexin receptors (OX1R), at a dose of 10 mg/kg decreases late temperature responses (t>60 min) to an intermediate dose of Meth (5 mg/kg). A higher dose of SB (30 mg/kg) attenuates temperature responses to low dose (1 mg/kg) of Meth and to stress. In contrast, it significantly exaggerates early responses (t<60 min) to intermediate and high doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) of Meth. As pretreatment with SB also inhibits temperature response to the stress of injection, traditional statistical analysis of temperature responses is difficult. Mathematical Modeling We have developed a mathematical model that explains the complexity of temperature responses to Meth as the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory nodes. We have extended the developed model to include the stress of manipulations and the effects of SB. Stress is synergistic with Meth on the action on excitatory node. Orexin receptors mediate an activation of on both excitatory and inhibitory nodes by low doses of Meth, but not on the node activated by high doses (HD). Exaggeration of early responses to high doses of Meth involves disinhibition: low dose of SB decreases tonic inhibition of HD and lowers the activation threshold, while the higher dose suppresses the inhibitory component. Using a modeling approach to data assimilation appears efficient in separating individual components of complex response with statistical analysis unachievable by traditional data processing methods. PMID:25993564

  1. Computational study of the evolutionary relationships of the ionotropic receptors NMDA, AMPA and kainate in four species of primates.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Pedraza, Francy Johanna; Grupo de Bioquímica Molecular Computacional y Bioinformática, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 No. 43-82 Ed. 52, Bogotá,; Lareo, Leonardo René; Grupo de Bioquímica Molecular Computacional y Bioinformática, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 No. 43-82 Ed. 52, Bogotá,; Reyes-Montaño, Edgar Antonio; Grupo de Investigación en Proteínas (GRIP) Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Edificio 451, Bogotá

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To identify the influence of changes on the secondary structure and evolutionary relationship of NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors in Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus and Macaca mulatta. Materials and methods. We identified 91 sequences for NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors and analyzed with software for predicting secondary structure, phosphorylation sites, multiple alignments, selection of protein evolution models and phylogenetic prediction. Results. We found that s...

  2. Upregulation of endothelin ETB receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in rat coronary artery after organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Karen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction occurred in isolated segments of rat coronary arteries during organ culture. Presence of contractile endothelin ET(B) receptors was studied by measuring the change in isometric tension in rings of left anterior...... descending coronary arteries isolated from hearts of rats as response to application of the selective endothelin ET(B) receptor agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c and endothelin-1. In segments cultured 1 day in serum free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, Sarafotoxin 6c induced a concentration dependent contraction......(+)-solution was not modified after 1 day in culture medium. The experiments indicate that organ culture of rat coronary arteries upregulate endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction by inducing synthesis of new protein....

  3. THIP, a hypnotic and antinociceptive drug, enhances a tonic GABAA receptor mediated conductance in mouse neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun; Jensen, Kimmo

    2006-01-01

    its cellular actions in the neocortex are uncertain, we studied the effects of THIP on neurons in slices of frontoparietal neocortex of 13- to 19-day-old (P13-19) mice. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that the clinically relevant THIP concentration of 1 μM induced a robust tonic GABA...... suggest that THIP activates an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated conductance in the neocortex, which may alter the cortical network activity....

  4. Kainate-type glutamate receptors modulating network activity in developing hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Juuri, Juuso

    2015-01-01

    Kainate-type of ionotropic glutamate (KA) receptors are associated with the modulation of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, and activity of neuronal networks. They are believed to have an important role in the development of neuronal connections. In this thesis, the role of KA receptors in the early brain development was assessed by conducting in vitro electrophysiological recordings from individual neurons at CA3 region in acute slices of neonatal rodent hippocampi. It was f...

  5. Tonically Active Kainate Receptors (tKARs) : A Novel Mechanism Regulating Neuronal Function in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Segerstråle, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Fast excitatory transmission between neurons in the central nervous system is mainly mediated by L-glutamate acting on ligand gated (ionotropic) receptors. These are further categorized according to their pharmacological properties to AMPA (2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2- oxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid), NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid) and kainate (KAR) subclasses. In the rat and the mouse hippocampus, development of glutamatergic transmission is most dynamic during the first postnatal weeks. This...

  6. Hyperexcitability and cell loss in kainate-treated hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Stelzer, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of hippocampal interneurons has been reported in patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy and in animals treated with kainate. We investigated the relationship between KA induced epileptiform discharge and loss of interneurons in hippocampal slice cultures. Application of KA (1 micro......M) produced reversible epileptiform discharge without neurotoxicity. KA (5 microM), in contrast, produced irreversible epileptiform discharge and neurotoxicity, suggesting that the irreversible epileptiform discharge was required for the neuronal loss. Loss of CA3 pyramidal cells and parvalbumin...

  7. Kainate Receptors in the Striatum: Implications for Excitotoxicity in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    finding regarding the anatomical organization of caudal intralaminar Pf, which provides a massive feed - the basal ganglia is the demonstration of multiple...Trends Neurosci. 12, 366- Bonanno et a!., 1998). Future behavioural studies of 375. baclofen in animal models should help ascertain the Ainhardekar...Glutamand inhibitoryn raptor mese dephc pncipal Charara, A., Blankstein, E., Smith, Y., 1999. Presynaptic kainate tory and inhibitory transmission on rat

  8. MicroRNA-219 modulates NMDA receptor-mediated neurobehavioral dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Lopez-Toledano, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors are regulators of fast neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in the brain. Disruption of NMDA-mediated glutamate signaling has been linked to behavioral deficits displayed in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Recently, noncoding RNA m...

  9. Neuropeptide Y-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγs functional binding is reduced in the hippocampus after kainate-induced seizures in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd-Bek, Heidi; Olling, Janne Damm; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2014-01-01

    . Functional NPY binding was unchanged up to 12 h post-kainate, but decreased significantly in all hippocampal regions after 24 h and 1 week. Similarly, a decrease in [(125) I]-PYY binding was found in the dentate gyrus (DG) 1 week post-kainate. However, at 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h, [(125) I]-PYY binding...

  10. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  11. Melanocortin MC(4) receptor-mediated feeding and grooming in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, Joram D; Spruijt, Berry M; Brakkee, Jan H; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-11-01

    Decades ago it was recognized that the pharmacological profile of melanocortin ligands that stimulated grooming behavior in rats was strikingly similar to that of Xenopus laevis melanophore pigment dispersion. After cloning of the melanocortin MC1 receptor, expressed in melanocytes, and the melanocortin MC4 receptor, expressed mainly in brain, the pharmacological profiles of these receptors appeared to be very similar and it was demonstrated that these receptors mediate melanocortin-induced pigmentation and grooming respectively. Grooming is a low priority behavior that is concerned with care of body surface. Activation of central melanocortin MC4 receptors is also associated with meal termination, and continued postprandial stimulation of melanocortin MC4 receptors may stimulate natural postprandial grooming behavior as part of the behavioral satiety sequence. Indeed, melanocortins fail to suppress food intake or induce grooming behavior in melanocortin MC4 receptor-deficient rats. This review will focus on how melanocortins affect grooming behavior through the melanocortin MC4 receptor, and how melanocortin MC4 receptors mediate feeding behavior. This review also illustrates how melanocortins were the most likely candidates to mediate grooming and feeding based on the natural behaviors they induced.

  12. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  13. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  14. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David M; Endres, Robert G

    2016-05-31

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery.

  15. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  16. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  17. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive...ed byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. Authors Parker LC, Prince LR, Sabroe I. Publi...d byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. Parker LC, Prince LR, Sabroe I. Clin Exp Immun...17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate

  18. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity GluK5 kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-10-05

    Mouse GluK5 was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and radiolabelled with [(3)H]-kainate in receptor binding assays (Kd=6.9nM). Western immunoblotting indicated an Sf9 GluK5 band doublet corresponding to the glycosylated (128kDa) and deglycosylated (111kDa) protein, which was identical to the band pattern of native rat brain GluK5. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity kainate receptor GluK5 is described which is distinct from the profiles of other kainate receptors (GluK1-3). The 27 tested ligands generally show a preferential affinity to GluK1 over GluK5, the exceptions being: dihydrokainate, (S)-5-fluorowillardiine, (S)-glutamate and quisqualate, where the affinity is similar at GluK1 and GluK5. In contrast, quisqualate shows 40-fold higher affinity at GluK5 over GluK3 whereas (S)-1-(2'-amino-2'-caboxyethyl)thienol[3,4-d]pyrimidin-2,4-dione (NF1231), (RS)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)propionate (ATPA), dihydrokainate and (2S,4R)-4-methyl-glutamate (SYM2081) have higher affinity at GluK3 compared to GluK5. Since some studies have indicated that GluK5 is associated with various diseases in the central nervous system (e.g. schizophrenia, temporal lobe epilepsy, bipolar disorder), selective GluK5 ligands could have therapeutic potential. The distinct pharmacological profile of GluK5 suggests that it would be possible to design ligands with selectivity towards GluK5.

  19. Excitatory and inhibitory pathways modulate kainate excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Rai, R;

    1993-01-01

    In organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, kainate (KA) specifically induces cell loss in the CA3 region while N-methyl-D-aspartate induces cell loss in the CA1 region. The sensitivity of slice cultures to KA toxicity appears only after 2 weeks in vitro which parallels the appearance of mossy...... fibers. KA toxicity is potentiated by co-application with the GABA-A antagonist, picrotoxin. These data suggest that the excitotoxicity of KA in slice cultures is modulated by both excitatory and inhibitory synapses....

  20. Role of astrocytic transport processes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sarup, A; Bak, L K

    2004-01-01

    The fine tuning of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission is to a large extent dependent upon optimal function of astrocytic transport processes. Thus, glutamate transport in astrocytes is mandatory to maintain extrasynaptic glutamate levels sufficiently low to prevent excitotoxic...... neuronal damage. In GABA synapses hyperactivity of astroglial GABA uptake may lead to diminished GABAergic inhibitory activity resulting in seizures. As a consequence of this the expression and functional activity of astrocytic glutamate and GABA transport is regulated in a number of ways...

  1. AB318. SPR-45 Decentralization reduces nicotinic receptor-mediated canine bladder contractions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadeo, Danielle M.; Frara, Nagat; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    had no significant inhibitory effect on DMPP, epibatidine or nicotine-induced contraction in any group. Conclusions Nicotinic receptors mediate contraction in sham, reinnervated and decentralized bladders. This nicotinic receptor-mediated contraction is decreased after decentralization. TTX does not block nicotinic receptor-mediated contractions, indicating that action potentials are not required to induce contraction. In sham-operated dog bladders, the nicotine-induced contraction is blocked by ATR, suggesting that these nicotinic receptors are located on cholinergic nerve terminals and induce the release of acetylcholine, which activates muscarinic receptors on the smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) NIH-NINDS NS070267

  2. An intracellular traffic jam: Fc receptor-mediated transport of immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Devin B; Björkman, Pamela J

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques along with more powerful in vitro and in vivo models of receptor-mediated ligand transport are facilitating advances in our understanding of how cells efficiently direct receptors and their cargo to target destinations within the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. Specifically, light and 3D electron microscopy studies examining the trafficking behavior of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a transport receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG), have given us new insights into the dynamic interplay between the structural components of the cytosolic trafficking machinery, its protein regulators, and the receptors it directs to various locations within the cell. These studies build upon previous biochemical characterizations of FcRn transport and are allowing us to begin formulation of a more complete model for the intracellular trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes.

  3. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor-mediated pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2013-01-01

    of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies......Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent...... advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase-dependent manner and was subsequently...

  4. Neto Auxiliary Subunits Regulate Interneuron Somatodendritic and Presynaptic Kainate Receptors to Control Network Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S. Wyeth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Netos are considered auxiliary subunits critical for kainate receptor (KAR function, direct evidence for their regulation of native KARs is limited. Because Neto KAR regulation is GluK subunit/Neto isoform specific, such regulation must be determined in cell-type-specific contexts. We demonstrate Neto1/2 expression in somatostatin (SOM-, cholecystokinin/cannabinoid receptor 1 (CCK/CB1-, and parvalbumin (PV-containing interneurons. KAR-mediated excitation of these interneurons is contingent upon Neto1 because kainate yields comparable effects in Neto2 knockouts and wild-types but fails to excite interneurons or recruit inhibition in Neto1 knockouts. In contrast, presynaptic KARs in CCK/CB1 interneurons are dually regulated by both Neto1 and Neto2. Neto association promotes tonic presynaptic KAR activation, dampening CCK/CB1 interneuron output, and loss of this brake in Neto mutants profoundly increases CCK/CB1 interneuron-mediated inhibition. Our results confirm that Neto1 regulates endogenous somatodendritic KARs in diverse interneurons and demonstrate Neto regulation of presynaptic KARs in mature inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

  5. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs.

  6. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel phenylalanine-based amino acids as kainate receptors ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Chałupnik, Paulina; Szczepańska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    A new series of carboxyaryl-substituted phenylalanines was designed, synthesized and pharmacologically characterized in vitro at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors as well as at cloned homomeric kainate receptors GluK1-GluK3. Among them, six compounds bound to GluK1 receptor subtypes with ...

  8. Effects of pilocarpine and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przewlocka, B.; Labuz, D.; Machelska, H.; Przewlocki, R.; Turchan, J.; Lason, W. [Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 12 Smetna Street, 31-343 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-04-14

    The effects of pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding were studied in the rat hippocampal formation. Pilocarpine- but not kainate-induced seizures decreased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in dentate gyrus at 24 and 72 h after drug injection. Both convulsants decreased the messenger RNA level in CA1 pyramidal cells at 24 and 72 h, the effects of kainate being more profound. Kainate also decreased the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in CA3 region after 24 and 72 h, whereas pilocarpine decreased the messenger RNA level at 72 h only. At 3 h after kainate, but not pilocarpine, an increased binding of [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate in several apical dendritic fields of pyramidal cells was found. Pilocarpine reduced the [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in stratum lucidum only at 3 and 24 h after the drug injection. Pilocarpine but not kainate induced prolonged decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 gene expression in dentate gyrus. However, at the latest time measured, kainate had the stronger effect in decreasing both messenger RNA N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. The latter changes corresponded, however, to neuronal loss and may reflect higher neurotoxic potency of kainate.These data point to some differences in hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor regulation in pilocarpine and kainate models of limbic seizures. Moreover, our results suggest that the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level is more susceptible to limbic seizures than is [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in the rat hippocampal formation. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal acidification is impaired in proximal tubule epithelial cells of Dent disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorvin, C.M.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Piret, S.E.; Harding, B.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Wrong, O.; Jat, P.S.; Lippiat, J.D.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Thakker, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis, involving megalin and cubilin, mediates renal proximal-tubular reabsorption and is decreased in Dent disease because of mutations of the chloride/proton antiporter, chloride channel-5 (CLC-5), resulting in low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithias

  10. Temperature- and concentration-dependence of kainate-induced y oscillation in rat hippocampal slices under submerged condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-biao LU; Zhi-hua WANG; Yan-hong ZHOU; Martin VREUGDENHIL

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Fast neuronal network oscillation at the y frequency band (y oscillation:30-80 Hz) has been studied extensively in hippocampal slices under interface recording condition.The aim of this study is to establish a method for recording Y oscillation in submerged hippocampal slices that allows simultaneously monitoring Y oscillation and the oscillation-related intracellular events,such as intracellular Ca2+ concentration or mitochondrial membrane potentials.Methods:Horizontal hippocampal slices (thickness:300 pm) of adult rats were prepared and placed in a submerged or an interface chamber.Extracellular field recordings Were made in the CA3c pyramidal layer of the slices.Kainate,an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist,was applied via perfusion.Data analysis was performed off-line.Results:Addition of kainate (25-1000 nmol/L) induced Y oscillation in both the submerged and interface slices.Kainate increased the Y power in a concentration-dependent manner,but the duration of steady state oscillation was reduced at higher concentrations of kainate.Long-lasting Y oscillation was maintained at the concentrations of 100-300 nmol/L.Under submerged condition,Y oscillation was temperature-dependent,with the maximum power achieved at 29℃.The induction of Y oscillation under submerged condition also required a fast rate of perfusion (5-7 mL/min) and showed a fast dynamic during development and after the washout.Conclusion:The kainite-induced Y oscillation recorded in submerged rat hippocampal slices is useful for studying the intracellular events related to neuronal network activities and may represent a model to reveal the mechanisms underlying the normal neuronal synchronizations and diseased conditions.

  11. Comparison between spontaneous and kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Patel, Nisha; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma frequency, implicated in cognition, can be evoked in hippocampal slices by pharmacological activation. We characterized spontaneous small-amplitude gamma oscillations (SgammaO) recorded in area CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices and compared it with kainate-induced gamma oscillations (KgammaO). SgammaO had a lower peak frequency, a more sinusoidal waveform and was spatially less coherent than KgammaO, irrespective of oscillation amplitude. CA3a had the smallest oscillation power, phase-led CA3c by approximately 4 ms and had the highest SgammaO frequency in isolated subslices. During SgammaO CA3c neurons fired at the rebound of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that were associated with a current source in stratum lucidum, whereas CA3a neurons often fired from spikelets, 3-4 ms earlier in the cycle, and had smaller IPSPs. Kainate induced faster/larger IPSPs that were associated with an earlier current source in stratum pyramidale. SgammaO and KgammaO power were dependent on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, gap junctions and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. SgammaO was suppressed by elevating extracellular KCl, blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors or muscarinic receptors, or activating GluR5-containing kainate receptors. SgammaO was not affected by blocking metabotropic glutamate receptors or hyperpolarization-activated currents. The adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethoxyxanthine (8-CPT) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) increased SgammaO power, indicating that endogenous adenosine and/or endocannabinoids suppress or prevent SgammaO in vitro. SgammaO emerges from a similar basic network as KgammaO, but differs in involvement of somatically projecting interneurons and pharmacological modulation profile. These observations advocate

  12. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan, E-mail: yuan.xu@ki.se; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  13. Structure and affinity of two bicyclic glutamate analogues at AMPA and kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pinto, Andrea; Marconi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    and depression. In order to understand the function of different types of iGluRs, selective agonists are invaluable as pharmacological tool compounds. Here, we report binding affinities of two bicyclic, conformationally restricted analogues of glutamate (CIP-AS and LM-12b) at AMPA (GluA2 and GluA3) and kainate...... receptor subunits (GluK1-3 and GluK5). Both CIP-AS and LM-12b were found to be GluK3-preferring agonists, with Ki of 6 and 22 nM, respectively, at recombinant GluK3 receptors. The detailed binding mode of CIP-AS and LM-12b in the ligand-binding domains of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (GluA2-LBD...

  14. Structural and pharmacological characterization of phenylalanine-based AMPA receptor antagonists at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Frydenvang, Karla; Valadés, Elena Antón

    2012-01-01

    . A new series of phenylalanine derivatives that target iGluRs was reported to bind AMPA receptors. Herein we report our studies of these compounds at the kainate receptors GluK1-3. Several compounds bind with micromolar affinity at GluK1 and GluK3, but do not bind GluK2. The crystal structure of the most...... potent compound in the ligand binding domain of GluK1 revealed different modes of binding to GluK1 and GluA2, due primarily to residues Ser741 (GluK1) and Met729 (GluA2). The compound was shown to be slightly more potent at GluK1 than at AMPA receptors and to induce a domain closure similar...

  15. Atorvastatin enhances kainate-induced gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengzhang; Wang, Jiangang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Yali; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Fang Li; Wang, Xiao Fang; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Cheng Biao

    2016-09-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to affect cognitive functions in rodents and humans. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Because hippocampal gamma oscillations (γ, 20-80 Hz) are associated with cognitive functions, we studied the effect of atorvastatin on persistent kainate-induced γ oscillation in the CA3 area of rat hippocampal slices. The involvement of NMDA receptors and multiple kinases was tested before and after administration of atorvastatin. Whole-cell current-clamp and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons before and after atorvastatin application. Atorvastatin increased γ power by ~ 50% in a concentration-dependent manner, without affecting dominant frequency. Whereas atorvastatin did not affect intrinsic properties of both pyramidal neurons and interneurons, it increased the firing frequency of interneurons but not that of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whereas atorvastatin did not affect synaptic current amplitude, it increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents, but did not affect the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. The atorvastatin-induced enhancement of γ oscillations was prevented by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89, the ERK inhibitor U0126, or the PI3K inhibitor wortmanin, but not by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atorvastatin enhanced the kainate-induced γ oscillation by increasing interneuron excitability, with an involvement of multiple intracellular kinase pathways. Our study suggests that the classical cholesterol-lowering agent atorvastatin may improve cognitive functions compromised in disease, via the enhancement of hippocampal γ oscillations.

  16. Delayed cell death in the contralateral hippocampus following kainate injection into the CA3 subfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglóczky, Z; Freund, T F

    1995-06-01

    A model of epileptic cell death has been developed employing unilateral injections of kainic acid, a glutamate agonist, into the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. The contralateral hippocampus, where neuronal damage is induced by hyperactivity in afferent pathways, served as the model structure. The pattern of cell death in this model was shown earlier to correspond to the vulnerable regions in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present time-course study we demonstrated that the different subpopulations of vulnerable cells in the contralateral hippocampus of the rat degenerate at different times following kainate injection. Spiny calretinin-containing cells in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum disappear at 12-24 h, other types of hilar neurons and CA3c pyramidal cells show shrinkage and argyrophilia at two days, whereas CA1 pyramidal cells degenerate at three days postinjection. The majority of cells destined to die showed a transient expression of the heatshock protein 72, approximately one day (for hilar-CA3c) or two days (for CA1) before degeneration. Parvalbumin-immunoreactivity transiently disappeared from the soma and dendrites of interneurons between the first and the fourth day. The results suggest that seizure-induced cell death is delayed, therefore acute oedema, even if it occurs, is insufficient to kill neurons. The only exception is the population of calretinin-containing interneurons degenerating at 12-24 h. The further one day delay between hilar-CA3c and CA1 cell death is likely to be due to differences in the relative density of glutamate receptor types (kainate versus NMDA) and the source of afferent input of these subfields. Thus, simple pharmacotherapy targeting only one of the excitotoxic mechanisms (i.e. acute oedema of calretinin cells versus delayed death of hilar-CA3c and CA1 cells at different time points) is likely to fail.

  17. Dose-Dependent Effect of Curcumin on Learning and Memory Deficit in Kainate-Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kiasalari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Epileptic seizures accompany disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills. With regard to antiepileptic potential of curcumin and its beneficial effect on memory, the effect of its administration on learning and memory in kainate-epileptic rats was investigated.   Methods: Forty male rats were divided into sham, positive control ( valproate-treated epileptic, epileptic, and two curcumin-treated epileptic groups. Rat model of epilepsy was induced by unilateral intrahippocampal administration of 4 μg of kainate per rat. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg daily for 1 week before surgery. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial (IL and step-through latencies (STL were determined using passive avoidance test and alternation behavior percentage was obtained according to Y maze test.   Results: Regarding IL, there was no significant difference between the groups. In contrast, STL significantly decreased in curcumin-50-treated epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 263.1 to 184.5 s. However, this parameter significantly increased in curcumin-100-treated epileptic group as compared to epileptic group (p<0.01 (a change from 263.1 to 220.3 s. In addition, STL was also significantly higher in valproic acid-treated epileptic group versus epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 145.7 to 210.3 s. Alternation percentage was also significantly higher in curcumin-50- and curcumin-100-treated epileptic groups relative to epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 60.5 to 77.6 and 80.3%.   Conclusion: Curcumin could dose-dependently enhance the consolidation and recall in epileptic animals and could improve spatial memory in such animals.

  18. Elevating student potential: creating digital video to teach neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvinen, Michael K; Jarvinen, Lamis Z

    2012-01-01

    Students today have unprecedented access to technology, the Internet, and social media. Their nearly ubiquitous use of these platforms is well documented. Given that today's students may be primed to learn using a different medium, incorporating various technological elements into the classroom in a manner compatible with traditional approaches to teaching becomes a challenge. We recently designed and implemented a strategy that capitalized on this knowledge. Students in their first neuroscience course were required to create a 3-5 minute digital video using video-making freeware available on any Mac or PC. They used images, text, animation, as well as downloaded music to describe the fundamental process of neurotransmission as it applies to a topic of their choice. In comparison to students taught using other more traditional approaches to demonstrate the process of neurotransmission, we observed that students who took part in the video-making project exhibited better understanding of the neurological process at multiple levels, as defined by Bloom's revised taxonomy. This was true even of students who had no aspirations of pursuing a Neuroscience career, thus suggesting that there was an overall increased level of student engagement regardless of personal career interests. The utility of our approach was validated by both direct and indirect assessments. Importantly, this particular strategy to teaching difficult concepts offers a high degree of flexibility allowing it to potentially be incorporated into any upper-level Neuroscience course.

  19. Polymorphisms in genes involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinami, T; Ishiguro, H; Onaivi, E S

    2000-12-27

    Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic contribution to smoking behavior is at least as great as its contribution to alcoholism. Much progress has been achieved in genomic research related to cigarette-smoking within recent years. Linkage studies indicate that there are several loci linked to smoking, and candidate genes that are related to neurotransmission have been examined. Possible associated genes include cytochrome P450 subfamily polypeptide 6 (CYP2A6), dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(4) receptors, dopamine transporter, and serotonin transporter genes. There are other important candidate genes but studies evaluating the link with smoking have not been reported. These include genes encoding the dopamine D(3) and D(5) receptors, serotonin receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase, trytophan 2,3-dioxygenase, opioid receptors, and cannabinoid receptors. Since smoking-related factors are extremely complex, studies of diverse populations and of many aspects of smoking behavior including initiation, maintenance, cessation, relapse, and influence of environmental factors are needed to identify smoking-associated genes. We now review genetic polymorphisms reported to be involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

  20. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  1. Cholinergic impact on neuroplasticity drives muscarinic M1 receptor mediated differentiation into neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninghoff, Jens; Rauh, Werner; Brantl, Victor; Schloesser, Robert J; Moessner, Rainald; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Rujescu, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that canonical neurotransmitters act as regulatory signals during neuroplasticity. Here, we report that muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmission stimulates differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro. Adult neural stem cells (ANSC) dissociated from the adult mouse hippocampus were expanded in culture with basic fibroblast growth factor (BFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Carbachol (CCh), an analog of acetylcholine (ACh) significantly enhanced de novo differentiation into neurons on bFGF- and EGF-deprived stem cells as shown by the percentage of TUJ1 positive cells. By contrast, pirenzepine (PIR), a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, reduced the generation of neurons. Activation of cholinergic signaling drives the de novo differentiation of uncommitted stem cells into neurons. These effects appear to be predominantly mediated via the muscarinic M1 receptor subtype.

  2. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  3. Multivalent ligand-receptor-mediated interaction of small filled vesicles with a cellular membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2017-07-01

    The ligand-receptor-mediated contacts of small sub-100-nm-sized lipid vesicles (or nanoparticles) with the cellular membrane are of interest in the contexts of cell-to-cell communication, endocytosis of membrane-coated virions, and drug (RNA) delivery. In all these cases, the interior of vesicles is filled by biologically relevant content. Despite the diversity of such systems, the corresponding ligand-receptor interaction possesses universal features. One of them is that the vesicle-membrane contacts can be accompanied by the redistribution of ligands and receptors between the contact and contact-free regions. In particular, the concentrations of ligands and receptors may become appreciably higher in the contact regions and their composition may there be different compared to that in the suspended state in the solution. A statistical model presented herein describes the corresponding distribution of various ligands and receptors and allows one to calculate the related change of the free energy with variation of the vesicle-engulfment extent. The results obtained are used to clarify the necessary conditions for the vesicle-assisted pathway of drug delivery.

  4. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Bozzo

    Full Text Available Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM. To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM. None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  5. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  6. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  7. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Seliverstova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes, and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals.

  8. Sucrose-induced analgesia in mice: Role of nitric oxide and opioid receptor-mediated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtin Shahlaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanism of action of sweet substance-induced analgesia is thought to involve activation of the endogenous opioid system. The nitric oxide (NO pathway has a pivotal role in pain modulation of analgesic compounds such as opioids. Objectives: We investigated the role of NO and the opioid receptor-mediated system in the analgesic effect of sucrose ingestion in mice. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg of NO synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and 20 mg/kg of opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone on the tail flick response in sucrose ingesting mice. Results: Sucrose ingestion for 12 days induced a statistically significant increase in the latency of tail flick response which was unmodified by L-NAME, but partially inhibited by naltrexone administration. Conclusions: Sucrose-induced nociception may be explained by facilitating the release of endogenous opioid peptides. Contrary to some previously studied pain models, the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway had no role in thermal hyperalgesia in our study. We recommend further studies on the involvement of NO in other animals and pain models.

  9. PGE2 Modulates GABAA Receptors via an EP1 Receptor-Mediated Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: PGE2 is one of the most abundant prostanoids in mammalian tissues, but its effect on neuronal receptors has not been well investigated. This study examines the effect of PGE2 on GABAA receptor currents in rat cerebellar granule neurons. Methods: GABAA currents were recorded using a patch-clamp technique. Cell surface and total protein of GABAA β1/2/3 subunits was carried out by Western blot analysis. Results: Upon incubation of neurons with PGE2 (1 µM for 60 minutes, GABAA currents were significantly potentiated. This PGE2-driven effect could be blocked by PKC or CaMKII inhibitors as well as EP1 receptor antagonist, and mimicked by PMA or EP1 receptor agonist. Furthermore, Western blot data showed that PGE2 did not increase the total expression level of GABAA receptors, but significantly increased surface levels of GABAA β1/2/3 subunits after 1 h of treatment. Consistently, both PKC and CaMKII inhibitors were able to reduce PGE2-induced increases in cell surface expression of GABAA receptors. Conclusion: Activation of either the PKC or CaMKII pathways by EP1 receptors mediates the PGE2-induced increase in GABAA currents. This suggests that upregulation of postsynaptic GABAA receptors by PGE2 may have profound effects on cerebellar functioning under physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eGuseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  11. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  12. Receptor-Mediated and Fluid-Phase Transcytosis of Horseradish Peroxidase across Rat Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Ellinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish peroxidase (HRP is often used as a fluid-phase marker to characterize endocytic and transcytotic processes. Likewise, it has been applied to investigate the mechanisms of biliary secretion of fluid in rat liver hepatocytes. However, HRP contains mannose residues and thus binds to mannose receptors (MRs on liver cells, including hepatocytes. To study the role of MR-mediated endocytosis of HRP transport in hepatocytes, we determined the influence of the oligosaccharid mannan on HRP biliary secretion in the isolated perfused rat liver. A 1-minute pulse of HRP was applied followed by marker-free perfusion. HRP appeared in bile with biphasic kinetics: a first peak at 7 minutes and a second peak at 15 minutes after labeling. Perfusion with 0.8 mg/mL HRP in the presence of a twofold excess of mannan reduced the first peak by 41% without effect on the second one. Together with recently published data on MR expression in rat hepatocytes this demonstrates two different mechanisms for HRP transcytosis: a rapid, receptor-mediated transport and a slower fluid-phase transport.

  13. Neuropeptide Y-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγs functional binding is reduced in the hippocampus after kainate-induced seizures in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd-Bek, Heidi; Olling, Janne Damm; Gøtzsche, Casper René;

    2014-01-01

    Kainate-induced seizures constitute a model of temporal lobe epilepsy where prominent changes are observed in the hippocampal neuropeptide Y (NPY) system. However, little is known about the functional state and signal transduction of the NPY receptor population resulting from kainate exposure. Thus......, in this study, we explored functional NPY receptor activity in the mouse hippocampus and neocortex after kainate-induced seizures using NPY-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγS binding. Moreover, we also studied levels of [(125) I]-peptide YY (PYY) binding and NPY, Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptor mRNA in these kainate-treated mice....... Functional NPY binding was unchanged up to 12 h post-kainate, but decreased significantly in all hippocampal regions after 24 h and 1 week. Similarly, a decrease in [(125) I]-PYY binding was found in the dentate gyrus (DG) 1 week post-kainate. However, at 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h, [(125) I]-PYY binding...

  14. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membr...... the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.......Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic...... membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition...

  15. Functional significance of brain glycogen in sustaining glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of brain glycogen in sustaining neuronal activity has previously been demonstrated. However, to what extent energy derived from glycogen is consumed by astrocytes themselves or is transferred to the neurons in the form of lactate for oxidative metabolism to proceed is at present...... in co-cultures of cerebellar neurons and astrocytes. In the astrocytes it was shown that uptake of the glutamate analogue D-[3H]aspartate was impaired when glycogen degradation was inhibited irrespective of the presence of glucose, signifying that energy derived from glycogen degradation is important...... for the astrocytic compartment. By inhibiting glycogen degradation in co-cultures it was evident that glycogen provides energy to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission, i.e. release and uptake of glutamate. The relocation of glycogen derived lactate to the neuronal compartment was investigated by employing d...

  16. Perspective food addiction, caloric restriction, and dopaminergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankowska, Arwen Urrsula Malgorzata; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    eating behaviour, with particular emphasis on the role of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Severely obese individuals have specific neurobiological characteristics in common with drug abusers, including low availability of dopamine receptors in the striatum, impaired neuronal responses to dopamine......, and reduced activity in prefrontal regions of the cerebral cortex. The neurobiological characteristics suggest that obese people also have a pathological dependence in common with addicts, in the form of food addiction. Malnutrition and dieting both relate to binge eating, possibly as a compensation...... of uncontrolled eating increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. This and other evidence suggests that abuse of food is a habit learned by means of mechanisms centred in the basal ganglia, with an increased risk of relapse in the presence of associative amplifiers. This risk is predicted...

  17. Electron spin resonance assay of ascorbyl radical generation in mouse hippocampal slices during and after kainate-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumizu, Toshiki; Noda, Yasuko; Mori, Akitane; Packer, Lester

    2005-12-01

    As an index of oxidative status, we analyzed ascorbyl radical generation during and after kainate-induced seizures in mouse hippocampus, using an ESR spectrometer equipped with a special tissue-type quartz cell. A specific doublet ESR spectrum was observed after seizures, and the g value and the hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) of the spectrum were identical with those of ascorbyl radical itself. Antiepileptic zonisamide inhibited the generation of ascorbyl radical accompanying the seizures.

  18. Implications of Neuroinvasive Bacterial Peptides on Rodents Behaviour and Neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneela Taj

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinvasive microbes are capable of applying their influences on the autonomic nervous system (ANS of the host followed by the involvement of central nervous system (CNS by releasing extracellular metabolites that may cause alterations in the biochemical and neurophysiological environment. Consequently synaptic, neuroendocrine, peripheral immune, neuro-immune, and behavioural responses of the host facilitate the progression of infection. The present study was designed to extrapolate the effects of crude and purified extracellular peptides of neuropathogenic bacteria on behavioural responses and neurotransmission of Sprague Dawley (SD models. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm and Neisseria meningitides (Nm were isolated from the 92 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples collected from mentally compromised patients. Bacillus cereus (Bc and Clostridium tetani (Ct were also included in the study. All bacterial strains were identified by the standard biochemical procedures. Filter sterilized cell free cultural broths (SCFBs were prepared of different culture media. Behavioural study and neurotransmitter analysis were performed by giving an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of each bacterial SCFB to four groups (Test; n = 7 of SD rats, whereas two groups each (Control; n = 7 received a nutrient broth (NB control and sterile physiological saline control, respectively. Extracellular bioactive peptides of these bacteria were screened and purified. All experiments were repeated using purified bacterial peptides on SD rat cohorts. Our study indicated promising behavioural changes, including fever, swelling, and hind paw paralysis, in SD rat cohorts. Purified bacterial peptides of all bacteria used in the present study elicited marked changes in behaviour through the involvement of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, these peptides of meningitis bacteria were found to potently affect the dopaminergic neurotransmission in CNS.

  19. Visualization of spatiotemporal energy dynamics of hippocampal neurons by mass spectrometry during a kainate-induced seizure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Sugiura

    Full Text Available We report the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI imaging mass spectrometry combined with capillary electrophoresis (CE mass spectrometry to visualize energy metabolism in the mouse hippocampus by imaging energy-related metabolites. We show the distribution patterns of ATP, ADP, and AMP in the hippocampus as well as changes in their amounts and distribution patterns in a murine model of limbic, kainate-induced seizure. As an acute response to kainate administration, we found massive and moderate reductions in ATP and ADP levels, respectively, but no significant changes in AMP levels--especially in cells of the CA3 layer. The results suggest the existence of CA3 neuron-selective energy metabolism at the anhydride bonds of ATP and ADP in the hippocampal neurons during seizure. In addition, metabolome analysis of energy synthesis pathways indicates accelerated glycolysis and possibly TCA cycle activity during seizure, presumably due to the depletion of ATP. Consistent with this result, the observed energy depletion significantly recovered up to 180 min after kainate administration. However, the recovery rate was remarkably low in part of the data-pixel population in the CA3 cell layer region, which likely reflects acute and CA3-selective neural death. Taken together, the present approach successfully revealed the spatiotemporal energy metabolism of the mouse hippocampus at a cellular resolution--both quantitatively and qualitatively. We aim to further elucidate various metabolic processes in the neural system.

  20. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which basal ganglia neurons express acquired activities during and after behavioral learning, selective dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists were applied while recording the activity of striatal neurons in monkeys performing behavioral tasks. In experiment 1, a monkey was trained to associate a click sound with a drop of reward water. DA receptor antagonists were administered by micropressure using a stainless steel injection cannula (300 microm ID) through which a Teflon-coated tungsten wire for recording neuronal activity had been threaded. Responses to sound by tonically active neurons (TANs), a class of neurons in the primate striatum, were recorded through a tungsten wire electrode during the application of either D1- or D2-class DA receptor antagonists (total volume one of the surrounding barrels. SCH23390 (10 mM, pH 4.5) and (-)-sulpiride (10 mM, pH 4.5) were used. The effects of iontophoresis of both D1- and D2-class antagonists were examined in 40 TANs. Of 40 TANs from which recordings were made, responses were suppressed exclusively by the D2-class antagonist in 19 TANs, exclusively by the D1-class antagonist in 3 TANs, and by both D1- and D2-class antagonists in 7 TANs. When 0.9% NaCl, saline, was applied by pressure (<1 microl) or by iontophoresis (<30 nA) as a control, neither the background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  1. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-08

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  2. α1A-adrenergic receptor mediated pressor response to phenylephrine in anesthetized rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qi; ZHU Weizhong; L(U) Zhizhen; ZHANG Youyi; HAN Qide

    2004-01-01

    To determine which subtype of α1A-adrenergic receptors plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure, with α1A-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in perfused hindlimb as a control, we compared the inhibitory effects of various α1A-adrenergic receptor selective antagonists on the vasopressure responses to phenylephrine between the mean arterial pressure and hindlimb perfusion pressure in anesthetized rats. In Normotensive Wistar rats, the results showed that the inhibitory effects (dose ratios of ED50, Dr) of α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonist (prazosin, Dr 13.5 ± 3.6 vs.15.1 ± 4.3, n = 11), α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonist (5- methyl-urapidil, Dr 2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 3.7 ± 2.3, n = 12; RS-17053, Dr 3.2 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 3.3, n =12) and α1D- adrenoceptor selective antagonist (BMY7378, Dr 1.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.8, n = 8) on phenylephrine- induced increases of perfusion pressure in the autoperfused femoral beds were the same as that in the mean arterial blood pressure in normotensive Wistar rats. The inhibitory effects of antagonists (RS-17053, Dr 3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9, n = 5; BMY7378, Dr 1.7±0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5, n = 8) in spontaneous hypertensive rats were similar with the Wistar rats. These results suggest that the mean arterial pressure induced by phenylephrine was mainly mediated by α1A-adrenergic receptor in both the anesthetized Wistar rats and spontaneous hypertensive rats.

  3. EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced cystogenesis of human renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberg, Gerard; Elberg, Dorit; Lewis, Teresa V; Guruswamy, Suresh; Chen, Lijuan; Logan, Charlotte J; Chan, Michael D; Turman, Martin A

    2007-11-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of cysts from tubular epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into cyst fluid and production of cAMP underlie cyst expansion. However, the mechanism by which PGE2 directly stimulates cAMP formation and modulates cystogenesis is still unclear, because the particular E-prostanoid (EP) receptor mediating the PGE2 effect has not been characterized. Our goal is to define the PGE2 receptor subtype involved in ADPKD. We used a three-dimensional cell-culture system of human epithelial cells from normal and ADPKD kidneys in primary cultures to demonstrate that PGE2 induces cyst formation. Biochemical evidence gathered by using real-time RT-PCR mRNA analysis and immunodetection indicate the presence of EP2 receptor in cystic epithelial cells in ADPKD kidney. Pharmacological evidence obtained by using PGE2-selective analogs further demonstrates that EP2 mediates cAMP formation and cystogenesis. Functional evidence for a role of EP2 receptor in mediating cAMP signaling was also provided by inhibiting EP2 receptor expression with transfection of small interfering RNA in cystic epithelial cells. Our results indicate that PGE2 produced in cyst fluid binds to adjacent EP2 receptors located on the apical side of cysts and stimulates EP2 receptor expression. PGE2 binding to EP2 receptor leads to cAMP signaling and cystogenesis by a mechanism that involves protection of cystic epithelial cells from apoptosis. The role of EP2 receptor in mediating the PGE2 effect on stimulating cyst formation may have direct pharmacological implications for the treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  4. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  5. Scavenger receptors mediate the role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila steroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Talamillo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval-pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor, the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues.

  6. Brain delta2 opioid receptors mediate SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott Manning; Hewson, Jennifer Marie; Inan, Saadet; Cowan, Alan

    2005-07-05

    Despite insights into an increasingly significant role for delta opioid receptors in thermoregulation, it is unclear whether delta receptors located in the brain or periphery play the more critical role in body temperature regulation. Moreover, it is not entirely clear which delta receptor phenotype, delta1 or delta2, mediates the hypothermic actions of delta agonists. Because SNC-80 distributes into central and peripheral compartments and produces rapid hypothermia following systemic injection, the nonpeptide delta agonist is particularly useful in discriminating the site of action of delta receptor-mediated hypothermia. To determine the locus and phenotype of delta receptor which mediates SNC-80-induced hypothermia, we injected SNC-80 and phenotype selective delta antagonists to male Sprague-Dawley rats. SNC-80 (10-50 mg/kg, im) evoked hypothermia that peaked 30 min post-injection. Naltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), an opioid antagonist, or naltrindole (5 mg/kg, sc), a delta antagonist, blocked the hypothermic response to SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im). The hypothermia caused by SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) was blocked by a delta2 antagonist, naltriben (2.5 mg/kg, sc), but was not affected by BNTX (5 and 10 mg/kg, sc), a delta1 antagonist. The administration of naltriben (10 microg/rat, icv) 30 min before SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) prevented SNC-80-evoked hypothermia. In contrast, methylnaltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), a peripherally restricted opioid antagonist, did not affect the hypothermia caused by SNC-80. The present data demonstrate that selective activation of brain delta2 receptors is a major mechanism of SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  8. Prenatal Exposure to 1-Bromopropane Suppresses Kainate-Induced Wet Dog Shakes in Immature Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Kanemitsu, Masanari; Egawa, Sumie; Ishidao, Toru; Ueno, Susumu; Hori, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is used in degreasing solvents and spray adhesives. The adverse effects of 1-BP have been reported in human cases and adult animal models, and its developmental toxicity has also been reported, but its effects on developmental neurotoxicity have not been investigated in detail. We evaluated the effects in rat pups of prenatal exposure to 1-BP on behaviors such as scratching and wet dog shakes (WDS), which were induced by injection of kainate (KA). Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to vaporized 1-BP with 700 ppm from gestation day 1 to day 20 (6 h/day). KA at doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 2.0 mg/kg were intraperitoneally injected into a control group and a 1-BP-exposed group of pups on postnatal day 14. There was no significant difference in scratching between the control and the prenatally 1-BP-exposed groups, while suppression of the occurrence ratio of WDS was observed at the low dose of 0.1 mg/kg of KA in the prenatally 1-BP-exposed pups. Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to 1-BP affects neurobehavioral responses in the juvenile period.

  9. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry.

  10. PSD-95 regulates synaptic kainate receptors at mouse hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuko; Kamiya, Haruyuki

    2016-06-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) are the third class of ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the unique roles in regulating synaptic transmission and circuit functions. In contrast to AMPA receptors (AMPARs), little is known about the mechanism of synaptic localization of KARs. PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density, is a candidate molecule that regulates the synaptic KARs. Although PSD-95 was shown to bind directly to KARs subunits, it has not been tested whether PSD-95 regulates synaptic KARs in intact synapses. Using PSD-95 knockout mice, we directly investigated the role of PSD-95 in the KARs-mediated components of synaptic transmission at hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse, one of the synapses with the highest density of KARs. Mossy fiber EPSCs consist of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated fast component and KAR-mediated slower component, and the ratio was significantly reduced in PSD-95 knockout mice. The size of KARs-mediated field EPSP reduced in comparison with the size of the fiber volley. Analysis of KARs-mediated miniature EPSCs also suggested reduced synaptic KARs. All the evidence supports critical roles of PSD-95 in regulating synaptic KARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Assembly Stoichiometry of the GluK2/GluK5 Kainate Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors assemble as homo- or heterotetramers. One well-studied heteromeric complex is formed by the kainate receptor subunits GluK2 and GluK5. Retention motifs prevent trafficking of GluK5 homomers to the plasma membrane, but coassembly with GluK2 yields functional heteromeric receptors. Additional control over GluK2/GluK5 assembly seems to be exerted by the amino-terminal domains, which preferentially assemble into heterodimers as isolated domains. However, the stoichiometry of the full-length GluK2/GluK5 receptor complex has yet to be determined, as is the case for all non-NMDA glutamate receptors. Here, we address this question, using a single-molecule imaging technique that enables direct counting of the number of each GluK subunit type in homomeric and heteromeric receptors in the plasma membranes of live cells. We show that GluK2 and GluK5 assemble with 2:2 stoichiometry. This is an important step toward understanding the assembly mechanism, architecture, and functional consequences of heteromer formation in ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  12. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Miyakawa

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH, which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms

  13. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Masanao; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH), which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the recognition

  14. Synaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents in anterior piriform cortex are reduced in the adult fragile X mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocel, James; Larson, John

    2012-09-27

    Fragile X syndrome is a neurodevelopmental condition caused by the transcriptional silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse exhibits age-dependent deficits in long term potentiation (LTP) at association (ASSN) synapses in anterior piriform cortex (APC). To investigate the mechanisms for this, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of ASSN stimulation-evoked synaptic currents were made in APC of slices from adult Fmr1-KO and wild-type (WT) mice, using the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, CPP, to distinguish currents mediated by NMDA and AMPA receptors. NMDA/AMPA current ratios were lower in Fmr1-KO mice than in WT mice, at ages ranging from 3-18months. Since amplitude and frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) mediated by AMPA receptors were no different in Fmr1-KO and WT mice at these ages, the results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated currents are selectively reduced in Fmr1-KO mice. Analyses of voltage-dependence and decay kinetics of NMDA receptor-mediated currents did not reveal differences between Fmr1-KO and WT mice, suggesting that reduced NMDA currents in Fmr1-KO mice are due to fewer synaptic receptors rather than differences in receptor subunit composition. Reduced NMDA receptor signaling may help to explain the LTP deficit seen at APC ASSN synapses in Fmr1-KO mice at 6-18months of age, but does not explain normal LTP at these synapses in mice 3-6months old. Evoked currents and mEPSCs were also examined in senescent Fmr1-KO and WT mice at 24-28months of age. NMDA/AMPA ratios were similar in senescent WT and Fmr1-KO mice, due to a decrease in the ratio in the WT mice, without significant change in AMPA receptor-mediated mEPSCs.

  15. Applications of SPECT imaging of dopaminergic neurotransmission in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugaya, Akira; Fujita, Masahiro; Innis, R.B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers selective for pre- and post-synaptic targets have allowed measurements of several aspects of dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission. In this article, we will first review our DA transporter imaging in Parkinson's disease. We have developed the in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT ((1R)-2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane). This method showed that patients with Parkinson's disease have markedly reduced DAT levels in striatum, which correlated with disease severity and disease progression. Second, we applied DA imaging techniques in patients with schizophrenia. Using amphetamine as a releaser of DA, we observed the enhanced DA release, which was measured by imaging D2 receptors with [{sup 123}I]IBZM (iodobenzamide), in schizophrenics. Further we developed the measurement of basal synaptic DA levels by AMPT (alpha-methyl-paratyrosine)-induced unmasking of D2 receptors. Finally, we expanded our techniques to the measurement of extrastriatal DA receptors using [{sup 123}I]epidepride. The findings suggest that SPECT is a useful technique to measure DA transmission in human brain and may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. (author)

  16. Methylaplysinopsin and other marine natural products affecting neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K M; Baird-Lambert, J A; Davis, P A; Spence, I

    1981-01-01

    Methylaplysinopsin is a novel marine natural product that, after oral administration, prevented the effects of tetrabenazine in mice and rats. Methylaplysinopsin was a short-acting inhibitor of monoamine oxidase activity with greatest potency when serotonin was the substrate studied. The brain concentration of serotonin in the mouse was increased by methylaplysinopsin over the same time course as monoamine oxidase inhibition ex vivo. Methylaplysinopsin was also a weak inhibitor of the neuronal uptake of [3H]serotonin and a potentiator of the K+-induced release of [3H]serotonin from prelabeled synaptosomes. The predicted potentiation of serotonergic neurotransmission was supported by initial neurophysiological studies in an identified serotonergic pathway in the central nervous system of Aplysia. Two other studies on the pharmacology of marine natural products are reviewed. The majority of polyhalogenated monoterpenes isolated from red algae had central nervous system depressant properties. The exception is plocamadiene A, which caused, in mice, a reversible spastic paresis lasting up to 72 hours after oral administration. The severe muscle spasm was antagonized by diazepam. The final study discussed is the effect of a variety of marine natural products on the synthesis, neuronal uptake, and metabolism of GABA. Their selectivity is discussed with regard to the effects on metabolic respiration, and the correlation of neurochemical and neurophysiological effects on these marine substances.

  17. Copper at synapse: Release, binding and modulation of neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosi, Nadia; Rossi, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, a piece of the research studying copper role in biological systems was devoted to unravelling a still elusive, but extremely intriguing, aspect that is the involvement of copper in synaptic function. These studies were prompted to provide a rationale to the finding that copper is released in the synaptic cleft upon depolarization. The copper pump ATP7A, which mutations are responsible for diseases with a prominent neurodegenerative component, seems to play a pivotal role in the release of copper at synapses. Furthermore, it was found that, when in the synaptic cleft, copper can control, directly or indirectly, the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA, AMPA, GABA, P2X receptors), thus affecting excitability. In turn, neurotransmission can affect copper trafficking and delivery in neuronal cells. Furthermore, it was reported that copper can also modulate synaptic vesicles trafficking and the interaction between proteins of the secretory pathways. Interestingly, proteins with a still unclear role in neuronal system though associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (the amyloid precursor protein, APP, the prion protein, PrP, α-synuclein, α-syn) show copper-binding domains. They may act as copper buffer at synapses and participate in the interplay between copper and the neurotransmitters receptors. Given that copper dysmetabolism occurs in several diseases affecting central and peripheral nervous system, the findings on the contribution of copper in synaptic transmission, beside its more consolidate role as a neuronal enzymes cofactor, may open new insights for therapy interventions.

  18. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  19. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  20. Dopaminergic neurotransmission in ventral and dorsal striatum differentially modulates alcohol Reinforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelder, Marcia; Hesseling, Peter; Styles, Matthew; Baars, Annemarie M; Lozeman-van 't Klooster, José G; Lesscher, Heidi M B; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum has been widely implicated in the reinforcing properties of substances of abuse. However, the striatum is functionally heterogeneous, and previous work has mostly focused on psychostimulant drugs. Therefore, we investigated how dopamine within striatal

  1. Effects of Swimming Exercise on Learning and Memory in the Kainate-Lesion Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorantla, Vasavi Rakesh; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Bond, Vernon; Meyers, Dewey G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An aerobic exercise (Ex) augments neurogenesis and may ameliorate learning and memory deficits in the rat Kainic Acid (KA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy in the short-term but whether it reverses learning and memory deficits after a substantial period of delay remains unclear. Aim This study tests the hypothesis that aerobic Ex attenuates the learning and memory deficits associated with kainate seizures in the long-term. Materials and Methods A total of 60 rats were subjected to chemical lesioning using KA and to an Ex intervention consisting of a 30 days period of daily swimming for 15 min, immediately after KA lesioning (immediate exposure) or after a 60 days period of normal activity (delayed exposure). We evaluated spatial learning on a T-maze test, expressed as percentage of correct responses. We evaluated memory on a passive-avoidance test, expressed as time spent in a compartment in which the rats were previously exposed to an aversive stimulus. Results Ex increases the percentage of correct responses, percentage bias, and number of alternations, associated with the T-maze testing for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Ex decreased the time exposed to the aversive stimulus in the smaller compartment of the two-compartment passive-avoidance test, also for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Conclusion These findings suggest that, after temporal lobe epileptic seizures in rats, swimming exercise may attenuate the learning and memory deficits, even if the exercise treatment is delayed. PMID:28050361

  2. Interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Agusti, Ana; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gomez-Gimenez, Belen; Malaguarnera, Michele; Dadsetan, Sherry; Belghiti, Majedeline; Garcia-Garcia, Raquel; Balzano, Tiziano; Taoro, Lucas; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    The cognitive and motor alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are the final result of altered neurotransmission and communication between neurons in neuronal networks and circuits. Different neurotransmitter systems cooperate to modulate cognitive and motor function, with a main role for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in different brain areas and neuronal circuits. There is an interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in HE. This interplay may occur: (a) in different brain areas involved in specific neuronal circuits; (b) in the same brain area through cross-modulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We will summarize some examples of the (1) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in different areas in the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuit in the motor alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE); (2) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cerebellum in the impairment of cognitive function in MHE through altered function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. We will also comment the therapeutic implications of the above studies and the utility of modulators of glutamate and GABA receptors to restore cognitive and motor function in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellon, Steven M; Dobyns, Abigail E; Beck, Hailey L; Kurtzman, James T; Garfield, Robert E; Kirby, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  4. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning and possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuji, Minoru; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-18

    Fear conditioning is a valuable behavioral paradigm for studying the neural basis of emotional learning and memory. The present study examined the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) signaling on the serotonin (5-HT)7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning. Conditioning was performed in a trial in which a tone was followed by an electrical foot-shock. Context- and tone-dependent fear were examined in tests conducted 24 and 48h after conditioning, respectively. The selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist 2a-[4-(4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridyl)butyl]-2a,3,4,-tetrahydrobenzo(c,d)indol-2-(1H)-one (DR4004) (5mg/kg), when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) immediately after conditioning, caused a significant decrease in both context- and tone-dependent fear responses (freezing behavior). A significant increase in ERK activity was observed in the amygdala of mice that displayed context- or tone-dependent fear responses, and these changes were also inhibited by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.) immediately after conditioning. In contrast, the increase in hippocampal ERK activity in mice that displayed context-dependent fear responses was further enhanced by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor-mediated ERK signaling may play a significant role in the processes of emotional learning and memory.

  5. Folate-receptor-mediated delivery of InP quantum dots for bioimaging using confocal and two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharali, Dhruba J; Lucey, Derrick W; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Pudavar, Haridas E; Prasad, Paras N

    2005-08-17

    A novel method for the synthesis of highly monodispersed hydrophillic InP-ZnS nanocrystals and their use as luminescence probes for live cell imaging is reported. Hydrophobic InP-ZnS nanocrystals are prepared by a new method that yields high-quality, luminescent core-shell nanocrystals within 6-8 h of total reaction time. Then by carefully manipulating the surface of these passivated nanocrystals, aqueous dispersions of folate-conjugated nanocrystals (folate-QDs) with high photostability are prepared. By use of confocal microscopy, we demonstrate the receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid conjugated quantum dots into folate-receptor-positive cell lines such as KB cells. These folate-QDs tend to accumulate in multi-vescicular bodies of KB cells after 6 h of incubation. Receptor-mediated delivery was confirmed by comparison with the uptake of these particles in folate-receptor-negative cell lines such as A549. Efficient two-photon excitation of these particles and two-photon imaging using these particles are also demonstrated. The use of these InP-ZnS nanoparticles and their efficient two-photon excitation can be potentially useful for deep tissue imaging for future in vivo studies.

  6. Receptor-Mediated Surface Charge Inversion Platform Based on Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Cell Recognition and Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Correia, Alexandra; Mäkilä, Ermei; Li, Wei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni J; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-03-22

    Negatively charged surface-modified drug delivery systems are promising for in vivo applications as they have more tendency to accumulate in tumor tissues. However, the inefficient cell uptake of these systems restricts their final therapeutic performance. Here, we have fabricated a receptor-mediated surface charge inversion nanoparticle made of undecylenic acid modified, thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles core and sequentially modified with polyethylenimine (PEI), methotrexate (MTX), and DNA aptamer AS1411 (herein termed as UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411) for enhancing the cell uptake of nucleolin-positive cells. The efficient interaction of AS1411 and the relevant receptor nucleolin caused the disintegration of the negative-charged AS1411 surface. The subsequent surface charge inversion and exposure of the active targeting ligand, MTX, enhanced the cell uptake of the nanoparticles. On the basis of this synergistic effect, the UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411 (hydrodynamic diameter is 242 nm) were efficiently internalized by nucleolin-positive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, with an efficiency around 5.8 times higher than that of nucleolin-negative cells (NIH 3T3 fibroblasts). The receptor competition assay demonstrated that the major mechanism (more than one-half) of the internalized nanoparticles in MDA-MB-231 cells was due to the receptor-mediated surface charge inversion process. Finally, after loading of sorafenib, the nanosystem showed efficient performance for combination therapy with an inhibition ratio of 35.6%.

  7. Nicotine alpha 4 beta 2 receptor-mediated free calcium in an animal model of facial nucleus injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Sun; Wenhai Sun; Yanqing Wang; Fugao Zhu; Rui Zhou; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu; Xiuming Wan; Huamin Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the cholinergic system,via nicotinic receptors,regulates intracellular free calcium levels in the facial nucleus under normal physiological conditions.However,the regulation of nicotinic receptors on free calcium levels following facial nerve injury remains unclear.In the present study,an animal model of facial nerve injury was established,and changes in nicotinic receptor expression following facial nerve injury in rats were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.Nicotinic receptor-mediated changes of free calcium levels following facial nucleus injury were determined by laser confocal microscopy.Results showed no significant difference in nicotinic receptor expression between the normal group and the affected facial nerve nucleus.The nicotinic receptor α4β2 subtype increased free calcium levels following facial nerve injury by promoting calcium transmembrane influx,and L-type voltage-gated calcium channel-mediated influx of calcium ions played an important role in promoting calcium transmembrane influx.The nicotinic receptor-mediated increase of free calcium levels following facial nerve injury provides an important mechanism for the repair of facial nerve injury.

  8. H1 and H2 receptors mediate postexercise hyperemia in sedentary and endurance exercise-trained men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Jennifer L; Halliwill, John R

    2006-12-01

    In sedentary individuals, H(1) receptors mediate the early portion of postexercise skeletal muscle hyperemia, whereas H(2) receptors mediate the later portion. It is not known whether postexercise hyperemia also presents in endurance-trained individuals. We hypothesized that the postexercise skeletal muscle hyperemia would also exist in endurance-trained individuals and that combined blockade of H(1) and H(2) receptors would abolish the long-lasting postexercise hyperemia in trained and sedentary individuals. We studied 28 sedentary and endurance trained men and women before and through 90 min after a 60-min bout of cycling at 60% peak O(2) uptake on control and combined H(1)- and H(2)-receptor antagonist days (fexofenadine and ranitidine). We measured arterial pressure (brachial auscultation) and femoral blood flow (Doppler ultrasound). On the control day, femoral vascular conductance (calculated as flow/pressure) was elevated in all groups 60 min after exercise (sedentary men: Delta86 +/- 35%, trained men, Delta65 +/- 18%; sedentary women, Delta61 +/- 19%, trained women: Delta59 +/- 23%, where Delta is change; all P men: Delta21 +/- 17%, trained men: Delta9 +/- 5%, sedentary women: Delta19 +/- 4%, trained women: Delta11 +/- 11%; all P > 0.16 vs. preexercise; all P men and women. Furthermore, histaminergic mechanisms produce the long-lasting hyperemia in sedentary and endurance-trained individuals.

  9. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin posttreatment against kainate-induced excitotoxicity in mixed spinal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong Yoon; Won, You Jin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jong Uk; Sung, In Young; Hwang, Seung Jun; Kim, Mi Jung; Hong, Hea Nam

    2009-01-01

    Although the neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) preconditioning are well known, the potential of postapplied EPO to protect neurons against excitotoxic injury has not been clearly established. Here we show that kainate (KA)-induced excitotoxicity, which plays a key role in secondary spinal cord injury, decreased neuron survival, inhibited neurite extension, and significantly reduced the expression of erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) in cultured spinal neurons. Posttreatment with EPO for 48 hr protected neurons against KA-induced injury, opposing KA-induced apoptosis and promoting regrowth of motoneuron neurites. These neuroprotective effects were paralleled by a restoration of EpoR expression. The importance of the EpoR signaling pathway was demonstrated using an EpoR blocking antibody, which neutralized the neuroprotective action of EPO posttreatment and prevented EPO-induced increases in EpoR expression. We also found that up-regulated EpoR stimulated the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) pathway, which is known to facilitate neuronal growth and neurite regeneration. Although EPO posttreatment modestly attenuated KA-induced reactive gliosis in mixed neuron-glial cultures, blocking EpoR activity did not alter glial fibrillary acidic protein expression or astrocyte proliferation. In conclusion, 48 hr treatment with EPO following KA exposure induced EpoR-dependent protection against excitotoxic injury, demonstrating that preconditioning is not a prerequisite for neuroprotection by EPO. The neuroprotective effects of EPO posttreatment were mediated by an EpoR-dependent signaling pathway that possibly involves JAK2. The neuroprotective effect of EPO posttreatment against KA excitotoxicity appears to reflect direct effects on neurons and not indirect effects mediated by astrocytes.

  11. Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission: A behavioral and biochemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission are varied and complex. However, there has been little investigation into the behavioral relevance of steroid effects on GABA. GABA had been implicated in the control of lordosis, a steroid dependent posture exhibited by sexually receptive female rats, but with conflicting results. This data demonstrated that GABA plays a dual role in the regulation of lordosis; stimulation of GABAergic transmission in the medial hypothalamus enhances lordosis whereas stimulation of GABA in the preoptic area inhibits lordosis. In separate experiments it was determined that progesterone enhances binding of the GABA{sub A} agonist, muscimol, in an in vitro exchange assay utilizing synaptic membranes prepared from the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats. Scatchard analysis revealed a difference in affinity of the GABA{sub A} receptor between ovariectomized, receptive and post receptive females. In the preoptic area there was a significant decrease in the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol in receptive females versus post-receptive and ovariectomized rats. In other behavioral experiments, the influence of estrogen and progesterone on GABA-induced analgesia was assessed. Intrathecal infusion of a low dose of muscimol at the lumbar level of the spinal cord did not alter nociceptive thresholds in ovariectomized rats. However, when intact females were administered the same dose of muscimol, they exhibited differential responses over the estrous cycle. Females in estrus were analgesic after muscimol, whereas diestrus females did not differ from ovariectomized controls. Ovariectomized rats injected s.c. with progesterone (2mg) exhibited a pronounced analgesia after intrathecal muscimol beginning 15 minutes after steroid treatment, whereas similar treatment with estrogen (10ug) was without effect.

  12. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands.

  13. Activin tunes GABAergic neurotransmission and modulates anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, F; Adelsberger, H; Müller, M R; Fritschy, J-M; Werner, S; Alzheimer, C

    2009-03-01

    Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, affords neuroprotection in acute brain injury, but its physiological functions in normal adult brain are largely unknown. Using transgenic (tg) mice expressing a dominant-negative activin receptor mutant under the control of the CaMKIIalpha promoter in forebrain neurons, we identified activin as a key regulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synapses and anxiety-like behavior. In the open field, wild-type (wt) and tg mice did not differ in spontaneous locomotion and exploration behavior. However, tg mice visited inner fields significantly more often than wt mice. In the light-dark exploration test, tg mice made more exits, spent significantly more time on a well-lit elevated bar and went farther away from the dark box as compared to wt mice. In addition, the anxiolytic effect of diazepam was abrogated in tg mice. Thus the disruption of activin receptor signaling produced a low-anxiety phenotype that failed to respond to benzodiazepines. In whole-cell recordings from hippocampal pyramidal cells, enhanced spontaneous GABA release, increased GABA tonus, reduced benzodiazepine sensitivity and augmented GABA(B) receptor function emerged as likely substrates of the low-anxiety phenotype. These data provide strong evidence that activin influences pre- and postsynaptic components of GABAergic synapses in a highly synergistic fashion. Given the crucial role of GABAergic neurotransmission in emotional states, anxiety and depression, dysfunctions of activin receptor signaling could be involved in affective disorders: and drugs affecting this pathway might show promise for psychopharmacological treatment.

  14. Neuroprotection of GluK1 kainate receptor agonist ATPA against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting GluK2 kainate receptor-JNK3 pathway via GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qian; Liu, Yong; Han, Dong; Xu, Jing; Zong, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2012-05-25

    It is well known that GluK2-containing kainate receptors play essential roles in seizure and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal death, while GluK1-containing kainate receptors could increase tonic inhibition of post-synaptic pyramidal neurons. This research investigated whether GluK1 could inhibit activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) signaling pathway mediated by the GluK2 in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. The results show that GluK1 activation by (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) at 1nmol per rat could inhibit the assembly of GluK2·Postsynaptic density 95·mixed lineage kinase 3 signaling module, activation of JNK3 and its downstream signal molecules. However, the inhibition of ATPA could be prevented by GluK1 antagonist NS3763, GluK1 antisense, and GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, ATPA played a neuroprotective role against cerebral ischemia. In sum, the findings indicate that activation of GluK1 by ATPA at specific dosages may promote GABA release, which then suppresses post-synaptic GluK2-JNK3 signaling-mediated cerebral ischemic injury via GABA(A)R.

  15. CB1 receptor activation in the rat paraventricular nucleus induces bi-directional cardiovascular effects via modification of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzęda, Emilia; Schlicker, Eberhard; Toczek, Marek; Zalewska, Iwona; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Malinowska, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    We have shown previously that the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 microinjected into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of urethane-anaesthetized rats induces depressor and pressor cardiovascular effects in the absence and presence of the CB1 antagonist AM251, respectively. The aim of our study was to examine whether the hypotension and/or hypertension induced by CP55940 given into the PVN results from its influence on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. CP55940 was microinjected into the PVN of urethane-anaesthetized rats twice (S1 and S2, 20 min apart). Antagonists of the following receptors, NMDA (MK801), β2-adrenergic (ICI118551), thromboxane A2-TP (SQ29548), angiotensin II-AT1 (losartan) or GABAA (bicuculline), or the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME were administered intravenously 5 min before S2 alone or together with AM251. The CP55940-induced hypotension was reversed into a pressor response by AM251, bicuculline and L-NAME, but not by the other antagonists. The CP55940-induced pressor effect examined in the presence of AM251 was completely reversed by losartan, reduced by about 50-60 % by MK801, ICI118551 and SQ29548, prevented by bilateral adrenalectomy but not modified by bicuculline and L-NAME. Parallel, but smaller, changes in heart rate accompanied the changes in blood pressure. The bi-directional CB1 receptor-mediated cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids microinjected into the PVN of anaesthetized rats depend on stimulatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic inputs to the sympathetic tone; the glutamatergic input is related to AT1, TP and β2-adrenergic receptors and catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla whereas the GABAergic input is reinforced by NO.

  16. Permanent Distal Occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery in Rat Causes Local Increased ETB, 5-HT1B and AT1 Receptor-Mediated Contractility Downstream of Occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Hornbak, Malene; Larsen, Stine S;

    2013-01-01

    a model of permanent distal occlusion of rat middle cerebral arteries, we investigated whether there was a regional difference in receptor-mediated contractility of segments located upstream and downstream of the occlusion site. The contractile response to endothelin, angiotensin and 5-hydroxytryptamine...... occlusion without significant visible infarct resulted in locally increased ETB, angiotensin type 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor-mediated contractile responses only in segments located downstream of the occlusion site. This suggests lack of wall stress as an initiating trigger leading to regulation...

  17. Imaging of nitric oxide in nitrergic neuromuscular neurotransmission in the gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant S Thatte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous functional studies have shown that nitrergic neurotransmission plays a central role in peristalsis and sphincter relaxation throughout the gut and impaired nitrergic neurotransmission has been implicated in clinical disorders of all parts of the gut. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO as a neurotransmitter continues to be controversial because: 1 the cellular site of production during neurotransmission is not well established; 2 NO may interacts with other inhibitory neurotransmitter candidates, making it difficult to understand its precise role. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Imaging NO can help resolve many of the controversies regarding the role of NO in nitrergic neurotransmission. Imaging of NO and its cellular site of production is now possible. NO forms quantifiable fluorescent compound with diaminofluorescein (DAF and allows imaging of NO with good specificity and sensitivity in living cells. In this report we describe visualization and regulation of NO and calcium (Ca(2+ in the myenteric nerve varicosities during neurotransmission using multiphoton microscopy. Our results in mice gastric muscle strips provide visual proof that NO is produced de novo in the nitrergic nerve varicosities upon nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC nerve stimulation. These studies show that NO is a neurotransmitter rather than a mediator. Changes in NO production in response to various pharmacological treatments correlated well with changes in slow inhibitory junction potential of smooth muscles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dual imaging and electrophysiologic studies provide visual proof that during nitrergic neurotransmission NO is produced in the nerve terminals. Such studies may help define whether NO production or its signaling pathway is responsible for impaired nitrergic neurotransmission in pathological states.

  18. Contribution of Aberrant GluK2-Containing Kainate Receptors to Chronic Seizures in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Peret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kainate is a potent neurotoxin known to induce acute seizures. However, whether kainate receptors (KARs play any role in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is not known. In TLE, recurrent mossy fiber (rMF axons form abnormal excitatory synapses onto other dentate granule cells that operate via KARs. The present study explores the pathophysiological implications of KARs in generating recurrent seizures in chronic epilepsy. In an in vitro model of TLE, seizure-like activity was minimized in mice lacking the GluK2 subunit, which is a main component of aberrant synaptic KARs at rMF synapses. In vivo, the frequency of interictal spikes and ictal discharges was strongly reduced in GluK2−/− mice or in the presence of a GluK2/GluK5 receptor antagonist. Our data show that aberrant GluK2-containing KARs play a major role in the chronic seizures that characterize TLE and thus constitute a promising antiepileptic target.

  19. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  20. Soman Induces Ictogenesis in the Amygdala and Interictal Activity in the Hippocampus That Are Blocked by a GluR5 Kainate Receptor Antagonist In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    damage, with long-term neu- ological and behavioral consequences (McDonough et al., 986; Brown and Brix , 1998; Bajgar et al., 2004). Nerve gent–induced...raga MF, Aroniadou-Anderjaska V, Li H (2004) The physiological role of kainate receptors in the amygdala. Mol Neurobiol 30:127–141. rown MA, Brix KA

  1. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Stefan; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Spada, Fabio; Engelke, Hanna; Vrabel, Milan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranos...

  2. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  3. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yellon

    Full Text Available A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone, or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 potentiation of P2X3 receptor mediated currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Li-Yen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is a well-known inflammatory mediator that enhances the excitability of DRG neurons. Homomeric P2X3 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors are abundantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons and participate in the transmission of nociceptive signals. The interaction between PGE2 and P2X3 receptors has not been well delineated. We studied the actions of PGE2 on ATP-activated currents in dissociated DRG neurons under voltage-clamp conditions. PGE2 had no effects on P2X2/3 receptor-mediated responses, but significantly potentiated fast-inactivating ATP currents mediated by homomeric P2X3 receptors. PGE2 exerted its action by activating EP3 receptors. To study the mechanism underlying the action of PGE2, we found that the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin and the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, 8-Br-cAMP increased ATP currents, mimicking the effect of PGE2. In addition, forskolin occluded the enhancement produced by PGE2. The protein kinase A (PKA inhibitors, H89 and PKA-I blocked the PGE2 effect. In contrast, the PKC inhibitor, bisindolymaleimide (Bis did not change the potentiating action of PGE2. We further showed that PGE2 enhanced α,β-meATP-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia and the enhancement was blocked by H89. These observations suggest that PGE2 binds to EP3 receptors, resulting in the activation of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and leading to an enhancement of P2X3 homomeric receptor-mediated ATP responses in DRG neurons.

  5. Receptor-mediated Ca2+ and PKC signaling triggers the loss of cortical PKA compartmentalization through the redistribution of gravin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Micah B; Grove, Bryon

    2013-11-01

    A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs) direct the flow of cellular information by positioning multiprotein signaling complexes into proximity with effector proteins. However, certain AKAPs are not stationary but can undergo spatiotemporal redistribution in response to stimuli. Gravin, a 300kD AKAP that intersects with a diverse signaling array, is localized to the plasma membrane but has been shown to translocate to the cytosol following the elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). Despite the potential for gravin redistribution to impact multiple signaling pathways, the dynamics of this event remain poorly understood. In this study, quantitative microscopy of cells expressing gravin-EGFP revealed that Ca(2+) elevation caused the complete translocation of gravin from the cell cortex to the cytosol in as little as 60s of treatment with ionomycin or thapsigargin. In addition, receptor mediated signaling was also shown to cause gravin redistribution following ATP treatment, and this event required both [Ca(2+)]i elevation and PKC activation. To understand the mechanism for Ca(2+) mediated gravin dynamics, deletion of calmodulin-binding domains revealed that a fourth putative calmodulin binding domain called CB4 (a.a. 670-694) is critical for targeting gravin to the cell cortex despite its location downstream of gravin's membrane-targeting domains, which include an N-terminal myristoylation site and three polybasic domains. Finally, confocal microscopy of cells co-transfected with gravin-EYFP and PKA RII-ECFP revealed that gravin redistribution mediated by ionomycin, thapsigargin, and ATP each triggered the gravin-dependent loss of PKA localized at the cell cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that gravin redistribution regulates cross-talk between PKA-dependent signaling and receptor-mediated events involving Ca(2+) and PKC. © 2013.

  6. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  8. Probes for Narcotic Receptor Mediated Phenomena. 39. Enantiomeric N-Substituted Benzofuro[2,3-c]pyridin-6-ols: Synthesis and Topological Relationship to Oxide-Bridged Phenylmorphans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    1989, 32, 2221–2226. (4) Burke, T. R. Jr.; Jacobson, A. E.; Rice, K. C.; Silverton , J. V. Probes for Narcotic Receptor Mediated Phenomena. 4...Chem. 1984, 49, 1051–1056. (5) Burke, T. R.Jr.; Jacobson, A. E.; Rice, K. C.; Silverton , J. V. Probes for Narcotic Receptor Mediated Phenomena. 6

  9. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  10. Differential patterns of synaptotagmin7 mRNA expression in rats with kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Glavan

    Full Text Available Previous studies in rat models of neurodegenerative disorders have shown disregulation of striatal synaptotagmin7 mRNA. Here we explored the expression of synaptotagmin7 mRNA in the brains of rats with seizures triggered by the glutamatergic agonist kainate (10 mg/kg or by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (30 mg/kg in LiCl (3 mEq/kg pre-treated (24 h rats, in a time-course experiment (30 min-1 day. After kainate-induced seizures, synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels were transiently and uniformly increased throughout the dorsal and ventral striatum (accumbens at 8 and 12 h, but not at 24 h, followed at 24 h by somewhat variable upregulation within different parts of the cerebral cortex, amigdala and thalamic nuclei, the hippocampus and the lateral septum. By contrast, after LiCl/pilocarpine-induced seizures, there was a more prolonged increase of striatal Synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels (at 8, 12 and 24 h, but only in the ventromedial striatum, while in some other of the aforementioned brain regions there was a decline to below the basal levels. After systemic post-treatment with muscarinic antagonist scopolamine in a dose of 2 mg/kg the seizures were either extinguished or attenuated. In scopolamine post-treated animals with extinguished seizures the striatal synaptotagmin7 mRNA levels (at 12 h after the onset of seizures were not different from the levels in control animals without seizures, while in rats with attenuated seizures, the upregulation closely resembled kainate seizures-like pattern of striatal upregulation. In the dose of 1 mg/kg, scopolamine did not significantly affect the progression of pilocarpine-induced seizures or pilocarpine seizures-like pattern of striatal upregulation of synaptotagmin7 mRNA. In control experiments, equivalent doses of scopolamine per se did not affect the expression of synaptotagmin7 mRNA. We conclude that here described differential time course and pattern of synaptotagmin7 mRNA expression imply regional

  11. Pharmacological and biochemical aspects of GABAergic neurotransmission: pathological and neuropsychobiological relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleboni, Renê Oliveira; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Pizzo, Andrea Baldocchi; Castellan-Baldan, Lissandra; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2004-12-01

    1. The GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the modulation of many neural networks in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, as well as, in several neurological disorders. 2. The complete comprehension of GABA system neurochemical properties and the search for approaches in identifying new targets for the treatment of neural diseases related to GABAergic pathway are of the extreme relevance. 3. The present review will be focused on the pharmacology and biochemistry of the GABA metabolism, GABA receptors and transporters. In addition, the pathological and psychobiological implications related to GABAergic neurotransmission will be considered.

  12. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  13. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  15. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  16. Hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate and kainate binding in response to entorhinal cortex aspiration or 192 IgG-saporin lesions of the basal forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gill, T.M. [Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Shivers, A. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Nicolle, M.M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1997-02-03

    Lesion models in the rat were used to examine the effects of removing innervation of the hippocampal formation on glutamate receptor binding in that system. Bilateral aspiration of the entorhinal cortex was used to remove the cortical innervation of the hippocampal formation and the dentate gyrus. The subcortical input to the hippocampus from cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain was lesioned by microinjection of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin into the medial septum and vertical limb of diagonal band. After a 30-day postlesion survival, the effects of these lesions on N-methyl-d-aspartate-displaceable [{sup 3}H]glutamate and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in the hippocampus were quantified using in vitro autoradiography. The bilateral entorhinal lesion induced a sprouting response in the dentate gyrus, measured by an increase in the width of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding. It also induced an increase in the density of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in CA3 stratum lucidum and an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding throughout the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus. The selective lesion of cholinergic septal input did not have any effect on hippocampal [{sup 3}H]kainate binding and induced only a moderate decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding that was not statistically reliable.The entorhinal and cholinergic lesions were used as in vivo models of the degeneration of hippocampal input that occurs in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The results from the present lesion study suggest that some, but not all, of the effects on hippocampal [{sup 3}H]kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate binding induced by the lesions are consistent with the status of binding to these receptors in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Consistent with the effects of aging and Alzheimer's disease is an altered topography of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding after entorhinal cortex lesion and a modest decline in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding after lesions of the cholinergic septal input to

  17. Opposing functions of two sub-domains of the SNARE-complex in neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Jens P; Reim, Kerstin; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2010-01-01

    The SNARE-complex consisting of synaptobrevin-2/VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1 is essential for evoked neurotransmission and also involved in spontaneous release. Here, we used cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from Snap-25 null mice rescued with mutants challenging the C-terminal, N-terminal...

  18. Modeling socially anhedonic syndromes: genetic and pharmacological manipulation of opioid neurotransmission in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, C; Pondiki, S; Oddi, D; Di Certo, M G; Marinelli, S; Troisi, A; Moles, A; D'Amato, F R

    2012-08-28

    Social anhedonia, or the diminished capacity to experience pleasure and reward from social affiliation, is a major symptom of different psychiatric disorders, including some forms of infantile autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The brain opioid hypothesis of social attachment is a promising model for achieving insights into how neurobiological and developmental factors contribute to the regulation of social reward. In this study, genetic knocking-out and naltrexone (NTRX) treatment during the first 4 days of life were used to disrupt opioid neurotransmission in mouse pups and their attachment relationships with the mother. Both permanent (genetic) and transient (pharmacological) manipulations of opioid neurotransmission exerted long-term effects on social affiliation. When juveniles, both μ-opioid receptor knockout mice and NTRX-treated pups showed reduced interest in peers and no preference for socially rewarding environment. These results demonstrate that sociability in juvenile mice is highly dependent on the establishment during infancy of a positive affective relationship with their mothers and that opioid neurotransmission has a major role in the regulation of social hedonic capacity. If the validity of this animal model will be confirmed by future research, translational studies focusing on the interaction between early experience and opioid neurotransmission could provide useful insights for identifying endophenotypes of human psychiatric disorders associated with social anhedonia.

  19. Nortriptyline induces mitochondria and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in bladder cancer cells and inhibits bladder tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheau-Yun; Cheng, Chen-Li; Ho, Hao-Chung; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Su, Chung-Kuang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-08-15

    Nortriptyline (NTP), an antidepressant, has antitumor effects on some human cancer cells, but its effect on human bladder cancer cells is not known. In this study, we used a cell viability assay to demonstrate that NTP is cytotoxic to human TCCSUP and mouse MBT-2 bladder cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. We also performed cell cycle analysis, annexin V and mitochondrial membrane potential assays, and Western blot analysis to show that NTP inhibits cell growth in these cells by inducing both mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Specifically, NTP increases the expression of Fas, FasL, FADD, Bax, Bak, and cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, NTP decreases the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BH3 interacting domain death agonist, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and survivin. Furthermore, NTP-induced apoptosis is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which can be reduced by antioxidants, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Finally, we showed that NTP suppresses tumor growth in mice inoculated with MBT-2 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that NTP induces both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis in human and mouse bladder cancer cells and that it may be a clinically useful chemotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  1. Histaminergic H1 receptors mediate L-histidine-induced anxiety in elevated plus-maze test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kuchibhotla Vijaya; Krishna, Devarakonda Rama; Palit, Gautam

    2007-05-01

    The central histaminergic system is reported to mediate behavioural, hormonal and physiological homeostasis of living organisms. Recent reports indicate its prominent role in various neurobehavioural disorders such as depression and psychosis. This study evaluated the effect of activation of the central histaminergic system in anxiety-like conditions, using the elevated plus-maze test in mice, and elucidated the role of different histaminergic receptors mediating such effects. Peripheral administration of L-histidine (L-His), in a dose-dependent manner, significantly decreased the exploration time in open arms and number of entries into open arms without modifying the number of entries into closed arms of the elevated plus-maze, indicating anxiogenesis. Further, such effects of central histamine were significantly attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, by pretreatment with pyrilamine (H1 receptor antagonist). Pretreatment with either zolantidine (H2 receptor antagonist) or thioperamide (H3 receptor antagonist), however, failed to attenuate the L-His-induced anxiogenesis. Our results indicate that anxiogenic effects of central histaminergic system appear to be mediated prominently by activation of H1 receptors.

  2. An special epithelial staining agents: folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng-Han; Hu, Ling-Yun; Du, Xin-Xin; Yang, Min; Zhang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Ke; Li, Li-An; Jiang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    High-quality screening with cytology has markedly reduced mortality from cervical cancer. However, it needs experienced pathologists to review and make the final decisions. We have developed folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) kits to effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer. We conduct present study aim to assess clinical significances of FRD in screening cervical cancer. A total of 169 patients were enrolled at Chinese People's liberation Army (PLA) general hospital. We compared diagnostic significances of FRD with thinprep cytology test (TCT). Meanwhile, colposcopy was also performed to confirm any lesion suspicious for cervical cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of FRD were 71.93% and 66.07% in diagnosis cervical cancer, respectively. Meanwhile, the positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV), Youden index were 51.90%, 82.22%, 0.38, respectively. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of TCT in diagnosis cervical cancer were 73.68% and 61.61% respectively. PPV, NPV and Youden index for TCT were 49.41%, 82.14% and 0.35 respectively. Overall, FRD have high values of sensitivity, specificity and Youden index. However, this difference failed to statistical significance. FRD have comparable diagnostic significance with TCT. Therefore, FRD might serve as one effective method to screen cervical cancer. Especially for those patients living in remote regions of China, where cytology was unavailable.

  3. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  4. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-01-14

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  6. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  7. The plasma concentration of HDL-associated apoM is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Benn, Marianne; Christensen, Pernille Møller;

    2012-01-01

    are affected by the rate of LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles. We measured apoM in humans each carrying one of three different LDL receptor mutations (n = 9) or the apoB3500 mutation (n = 12). These carriers had increased plasma apoM (1.34 ± 0.13 µM, P = 0.003, and 1.23 ± 0.10 µM, P...... catabolic rate of LDL (r = -0.38, P = 0.009). These data suggest that the plasma clearance of apoM, despite apoM primarily being associated with HDL, is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles....

  8. Preparation and characterization of folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan for intracellular transport of protein through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiangrong; Darby, Michael; Liang, Yufeng; He, Ling; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiuhong; Bi, Yueqi; Yang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jiapeng; Li, Yuanbo; Sun, Yiyi; Lee, Robert J; Hou, Shixiang

    2010-01-01

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins to specific tumor cells, folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan (folate-PEG-g-TMC) was synthesized. Nano-scaled spherical polyelectrolyte complexes between the folate-PEG-g-TMC and fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) were prepared under suitable weight ratio of copolymer to FITC-BSA by ionic interaction between the positively charged copolymers and the negatively charged FITC-BSA. Intracellular uptake of FITC-BSA was specifically enhanced in SKOV3 cells (folate receptor over-expressing cell line) through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with A549 cells (folate receptor deficient cell line). Folate-PEG-g-TMC shows promise for intracellular transport of negatively charged therapeutic proteins into folate receptor over-expressing tumor cells.

  9. Monoacylglycerol lipase promotes Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in microglia but does not regulate LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Zen

    2015-08-21

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is important for neuroinflammation. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying its expression and function remain unknown. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment post-translationally upregulated MAGL expression, whereas it downregulated MAGL transcription through a Stat6-mediated mechanism in microglia. Neither MAGL knockdown nor JZL-184, a selective MAGL inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in microglia. Moreover, exogenous expression of MAGL in BV-2 microglial cell line, which lacks endogenous MAGL, did not promote the induction of inflammatory cytokines by LPS treatment. Interestingly, MAGL knockdown reduced Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in primary microglia, and introduction of MAGL into the BV-2 cells increased Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Collectively, these results suggest that MAGL regulates phagocytosis, but not LPS-mediated cytokine induction in microglia.

  10. Plasminogen mRNA induction in the mouse brain after kainate excitation: codistribution with plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Ronit; Abramovitz, Rene; Miskin, Ruth

    2002-08-15

    Plasminogen (Plg), which can be converted to the active protease plasmin by plasminogen activators, has been previously implicated in brain plasticity and in toxicity inflicted in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by kainate. Here we have localized Plg. mRNA through in situ hybridization in brain cryosections derived from normal adult mice or after kainate injection (i.p.). The results indicated that Plg mRNA was undetectable in the normal brain, but after kainate injection it was induced in neuronal cells in multiple, but specific areas, including layers II-III of the neocortex; the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and the piriform cortex; the caudate/putamen and accumbens nucleus shell; throughout the amygdaloid complex; and in the CAI/CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. Interestingly, this distribution pattern coincided with what we have recently described for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA, however differing from that of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA, as also shown here. These results suggest that enhanced Plg gene expression could be involved in events associated with olfactory, striatal, and limbic structures. Furthermore, because PAI-2 is thought to intracellularly counteract cytotoxic events, our results raise the possibility that PAI-2 can act in the brain as an intracellular neuroprotector against potential plasmin-mediated toxicity.

  11. Characterisation of the effects of ATPA, a GLU(K5) kainate receptor agonist, on GABAergic synaptic transmission in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, V R J; Collingridge, G L

    2004-09-01

    Kainate receptors are implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in the CNS. Previously we demonstrated that (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective agonist for the GLU(K5) subtype of kainate receptor, depresses monosynaptically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. In the current study, we provide a more detailed characterisation of this effect. Firstly, our data demonstrate a rank order of potency of domoate>kainate>ATPA>alpha-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxalolyl)propionic acid Secondly, we confirm that the effects of ATPA are not mediated indirectly via the activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (i.e. either GABA(A) or GABA(B)). Thirdly, we show that the small increase in conductance induced by ATPA is insufficient to account for the depression of monosynaptic inhibition. Fourthly, we show that the effects of ATPA on IPSPs are antagonised by the GLU(K5)-selective antagonist (3S, 4aR, 6S, 8aR)-6-(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-decahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY382884). However, LY382884 is less potent as an antagonist of the effects of ATPA on IPSPs compared to its depressant effect on EPSPs.

  12. Target-cell specificity of kainate autoreceptor and Ca2+-store-dependent short-term plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ricardo; Lalic, Tatjana; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Capogna, Marco; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2008-12-03

    Presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) modulate transmission between dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Whether presynaptic KARs affect other synapses made by granule cell axons [mossy fibers (MFs)], on hilar mossy cells or interneurons, is not known. Nor is it known whether glutamate release from a single MF is sufficient to activate these receptors. Here, we monitor Ca(2+) in identified MF boutons traced from granule cell bodies. We show that a single action potential in a single MF activates both presynaptic KARs and Ca(2+) stores, contributing to use-dependent facilitation at MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Rapid local application of kainate to the giant MF bouton has no detectable effect on the resting Ca(2+) but facilitates action-potential-evoked Ca(2+) entry through a Ca(2+) store-dependent mechanism. Localized two-photon uncaging of the Ca(2+) store receptor ligand IP(3) directly confirms the presence of functional Ca(2+) stores at these boutons. In contrast, presynaptic Ca(2+) kinetics at MF synapses on interneurons or mossy cells are insensitive to KAR blockade, to local kainate application or to photolytic release of IP(3). Consistent with this, postsynaptic responses evoked by activation of a single MF show KAR-dependent paired-pulse facilitation in CA3 pyramidal cells, but not in interneurons or mossy cells. Thus, KAR-Ca(2+) store coupling acts as a synapse-specific, short-range autoreceptor mechanism.

  13. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  14. Melatonin receptor-mediated protection against myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury: role of its anti-adrenergic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genade, Sonia; Genis, Amanda; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Huisamen, Barbara; Lochner, Amanda

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin has potent cardioprotective properties. These actions have been attributed to its free radical scavenging and anti-oxidant actions, but may also be receptor mediated. Melatonin also exerts powerful anti-adrenergic actions based on its effects on contractility of isolated papillary muscles. The aims of this study were to determine whether melatonin also has anti-adrenergic effects on the isolated perfused rat heart, to determine the mechanism thereof and to establish whether these actions contribute to protection of the heart during ischaemia/reperfusion. The results showed that melatonin (50 microM) caused a significant reduction in both isoproterenol (10(-7) M) and forskolin (10(-6) M) induced cAMP production and that both these responses were melatonin receptor dependent, since the blocker, luzindole (5 x 10(-6) M) abolished this effect. Nitric oxide (NO), as well as guanylyl cyclase are involved, as L-NAME (50 microM), an NO synthase inhibitor and ODQ (20 microM), a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, significantly counteracted the effects of melatonin. Protein kinase C (PKC), as indicated by the use of the inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (50 microM), also play a role in melatonin's anti-adrenergic actions. These actions of melatonin are involved in its cardioprotection: simultaneous administration of L-NAME or ODQ with melatonin, before and after 35 min regional ischaemia, completely abolished its cardioprotection. PKC, on the other hand, had no effect on the melatonin-induced reduction in infarct size. Cardioprotection by melatonin was associated with a significant activation of PKB/Akt and attenuated activation of the pro-apoptotic kinase, p38MAPK during early reperfusion. In summary, the results show that melatonin-induced cardioprotection may be receptor dependent, and that its anti-adrenergic actions, mediated by NOS and guanylyl cyclase activation, are important contributors.

  15. NK3 receptors mediate an increase in firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons of the rat and the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkman, Taco R; McCreary, Andrew C; Kruse, Chris G; Wadman, Wytse J

    2011-08-01

    This in vitro study investigates and compares the effects of NK3 receptor ligands on the firing rate of rat and guinea pig midbrain dopamine neurons. The findings are discussed in the light of choosing suitable animal models for investigating pharmacological properties of NK3 receptor antagonists, which have been proposed to possess therapeutic activity in neuropsychiatric diseases like e.g. schizophrenia. In vitro midbrain slice preparations of both species were used to record (extracellularly) the firing rates of dopamine neurons located in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Furthermore, the effect of the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole on guinea pig SN and VTA dopamine neurons was investigated. The efficacy of quinpirole in inhibiting guinea pig dopamine neuron firing activity was much less as compared to that of rat dopamine neurons, suggesting a lower dopamine D2 autoreceptor density on the guinea pig neurons. The NK3 receptor agonist senktide induced in subpopulations of rat SN (55%) and VTA (79%) and guinea pig SN (50%) and VTA (21%) dopamine neurons an increase in firing rate. In responsive neurons this effect was concentration-dependent with EC₅₀ values of 3-5 nM (for both species). The selective NK3 receptor antagonist osanetant (100 nM) was able to partly block the senktide-induced increase in firing rates of dopamine neurons and shifted the concentration-response relation curves for senktide to the right (pA₂ values were ~7.5). The fractional block of the senktide responses by osanetant appeared to be larger in guinea pig dopamine neurons, indicating that osanetant is a more potent blocker of NK3 receptor-mediated responses with noncompetitive properties in the guinea pig.

  16. Exploring the contextual sensitivity of factors that determine cell-to-cell variability in receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Gaudet

    Full Text Available Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein levels which can potentially cause variability in cellular phenotype. For TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand variability manifests itself as dramatic differences in the time between ligand exposure and the sudden activation of the effector caspases that kill cells. However, the contribution of individual proteins to phenotypic variability has not been explored in detail. In this paper we use feature-based sensitivity analysis as a means to estimate the impact of variation in key apoptosis regulators on variability in the dynamics of cell death. We use Monte Carlo sampling from measured protein concentration distributions in combination with a previously validated ordinary differential equation model of apoptosis to simulate the dynamics of receptor-mediated apoptosis. We find that variation in the concentrations of some proteins matters much more than variation in others and that precisely which proteins matter depends both on the concentrations of other proteins and on whether correlations in protein levels are taken into account. A prediction from simulation that we confirm experimentally is that variability in fate is sensitive to even small increases in the levels of Bcl-2. We also show that sensitivity to Bcl-2 levels is itself sensitive to the levels of interacting proteins. The contextual dependency is implicit in the mathematical formulation of sensitivity, but our data show that it is also important for biologically relevant parameter values. Our work provides a conceptual and practical means to study and understand the impact of cell-to-cell variability in protein expression levels on cell fate using deterministic models and sampling from parameter distributions.

  17. Receptor-mediated hepatic uptake of M6P-BSA-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Cheng, Kun; Guntaka, Ramareddy V; Mahato, Ram I

    2006-01-01

    Excessive production of extracellular matrix, predominantly type I collagen, results in liver fibrosis. Earlier we synthesized mannose 6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) and conjugated to the type I collagen specific triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) for its enhanced delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is the principal liver fibrogenic cell. In this report, we demonstrate a time-dependent cellular uptake of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSC-T6 cells. Both cellular uptake and nuclear deposition of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO were significantly higher than those of 33P-TFO, leading to enhanced inhibition of type I collagen transcription. Following systemic administration into rats, hepatic accumulation of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO increased from 55% to 68% with the number of M6P per BSA from 14 to 27. Unlike 33P-TFO, there was no significant decrease in the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO in fibrotic rats. Prior administration of excess M6P-BSA decreased the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO from 66% to 40% in normal rats, and from 60% to 15% in fibrotic rats, suggesting M6P/insulin-like growth factor II (M6P/IGF II) receptor-mediated endocytosis of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSCs. Almost 82% of the total liver uptake in fibrotic rats was contributed by HSCs. In conclusion, by conjugation with M6P-BSA, the TFO could be potentially used for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  18. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magno, Aaron L. [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ingley, Evan [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Brown, Suzanne J. [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Conigrave, Arthur D. [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia); Ratajczak, Thomas [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ward, Bryan K., E-mail: bryanw@cyllene.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  19. Amyloid β-protein differentially affects NMDA receptor- and GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfang Zhang; Lei Hou; Xiuping Gao; Fen Guo; Wei Jing; Jinshun Qi; Jiantian Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Although the aggregated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in senile plaques is one of the key neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), soluble forms of Aβ also interfere with synaptic plasticity at the early stage of AD. The suppressive action of acute application of Aβ on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) has been reported widely, whereas the mechanism underlying the effects of Aβ is still mostly unknown. The present study, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, investigated the effects of Aβ fragments (Aβ25-35 and Aβ31-35) on the LTP induction-related postsynaptic ligand-gated channel currents in isolated hippocampal CA1 neurons. The results showed a rapid but opposite action of both peptides on excitatory and inhibitory receptor currents. Glutamate application-induced currents were suppressed by A β25-35 in a dose-dependent manner, and further N-methyl-I>aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated currents were selec-tively inhibited. In contrast, pretreatment with Aβ fragments potentiated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced whole-cell currents. As a control, Aβ35-31 the reversed sequence of Aβ35-31 showed no effect on the currents induced by glutamate, NMDA or GABA. These results may partly explain the impaired effects of Aβ on hippocampal LTP, and suggest that the functional down-regulation of N M DA receptors and up-regulation of GABAA receptors may play an important role in remodeling the hippocampal synaptic plasticity in early AD.

  20. Interferon-α/β receptor-mediated selective induction of a gene cluster by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakiguchi Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG ODN are known to exert a strong adjuvant effect on Th1 immune responses. Although several genes have been reported, no comprehensive study of the gene expression profiles in human cells after stimulation with CpG ODN has been reported. Results This study was designed to identify a CpG-inducible gene cluster that potentially predicts for the molecular mechanisms of clinical efficacy of CpG ODN, by determining mRNA expression in human PBMC after stimulation with CpG ODN. PBMCs were obtained from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured in the presence or absence of CpG ODN 2006 for up to 24 hours. The mRNA expression profile was evaluated using a high-density oligonucleotide probe array, GeneChip®. Using hierarchical clustering-analysis, out of a total of 10,000 genes we identified a cluster containing 77 genes as having been up-regulated by CpG ODN. This cluster was further divided into two sub-clusters by means of time-kinetics. (1 Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and GM-CSF were up-regulated predominantly 3 to 6 hours after stimulation with CpG ODN, presumably through activation of a transcription factor, NF-κB. (2 Interferon (IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, including IFIT1, OAS1 and Mx1, and Th1 chemoattractant IP-10, were up-regulated predominantly 6 to 24 hours after stimulation. Blocking with mAb against IFN-α/β receptor strongly inhibited the induction of these IFN-inducible genes by CpG ODN. Conclusion This study provides new information regarding the possible immunomodulatory effects of CpG ODN in vivo via an IFN-α/β receptor-mediated paracrine pathway.

  1. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  2. Modulation of the input-output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-11-15

    The neuronal input-output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency-current (f-I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input-output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f-I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f-I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation.

  3. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  4. Central 5-HT Neurotransmission Modulates Weight Loss following Gastric Bypass Surgery in Obese Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, M. E.; Hansen, D. L.; Fisher, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    , it was confirmed that obese individuals have higher cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding than lean individuals. Importantly, we found that higher presurgical 5-HT2A receptor binding predicted greater weight loss after RYGB and that the change in 5-HT2A receptor and 5-HT transporter binding correlated with weight loss......The cerebral serotonin (5-HT) system shows distinct differences in obesity compared with the lean state. Here, it was investigated whether serotonergic neurotransmission in obesity is a stable trait or changes in association with weight loss induced by Roux-in-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery...... after RYGB. The changes in the 5-HT neurotransmission before and after RYGB are in accordance with a model wherein the cerebral extracellular 5-HT level modulates the regulation of body weight. Our findings support that the cerebral 5-HT system contributes both to establish the obese condition...

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia blunts heart rate responses and alters neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Jameson, Heather; Dergacheva, Olga; Jain, Vivek; Alhusayyen, Mona; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-07-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea experience chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) during sleep that elicit sympathetic overactivity and diminished parasympathetic activity to the heart, leading to hypertension and depressed baroreflex sensitivity. The parasympathetic control of heart rate arises from pre-motor cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) located in nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNX). The mechanisms underlying diminished vagal control of heart rate were investigated by studying the changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and neurotransmission to CVNs evoked by acute hypoxia-hypercapnia (H-H) and CIHH. In vivo telemetry recordings of blood pressure and heart rate were obtained in adult rats during 4 weeks of CIHH exposure. Retrogradely labelled CVNs were identified in an in vitro brainstem slice preparation obtained from adult rats exposed either to air or CIHH for 4 weeks. Postsynaptic inhibitory or excitatory currents were recorded using whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Rats exposed to CIHH had increases in blood pressure, leading to hypertension, and blunted heart rate responses to acute H-H. CIHH induced an increase in GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA and DMNX, respectively; and a reduction in glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs in both nuclei. CIHH blunted the bradycardia evoked by acute H-H and abolished the acute H-H evoked inhibition of GABAergic transmission while enhancing glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA. These changes with CIHH inhibit CVNs and vagal outflow to the heart, both in acute and chronic exposures to H-H, resulting in diminished levels of cardioprotective parasympathetic activity to the heart as seen in OSA patients. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Drugs of abuse modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission : effects on exocytosis and neurotransmitter receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    Hondebrink, L.

    2011-01-01

    An extensive amount of literature is available on drugs of abuse. However, current knowledge on cellular and molecular mechanisms of actions is insufficient and hampers treatment of intoxicated patients. Drugs of abuse cause 100.000 hospital admissions yearly only in the US. Therefore, we investigated theeffects commonly used illicit drugs have on dopaminergic neurotransmission. Most tested drugs induced opposite effects, e.g., decreasing cholinergic input (possibly decreasing dopaminergic ou...

  7. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Disturbed Serotonergic Neurotransmission and Oxidative Stress in Elderly Patients with Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Egberts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress and disturbances in serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission may play a role in the pathophysiology of delirium. Aims: In this study, we investigated levels of amino acids, amino acid ratios and levels of homovanillic acid (HVA as indicators for oxidative stress and disturbances in neurotransmission. Methods: Plasma levels of amino acids, amino acid ratios and HVA were determined in acutely ill patients aged ≥65 years admitted to the wards of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics of the Erasmus University Medical Center and the ward of Geriatrics of the Havenziekenhuis, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Differences in the biochemical parameters between patients with and without delirium were investigated by analysis of variance in models adjusted for age, gender and comorbidities. Results: Of the 86 patients included, 23 had delirium. In adjusted models, higher mean phenylalanine/tyrosine ratios (1.34 vs. 1.14, p = 0.028, lower mean tryptophan/large neutral amino acids ratios (4.90 vs. 6.12, p = 0.021 and lower mean arginine levels (34.8 vs. 45.2 µmol/l, p = 0.022 were found in patients with delirium when compared to those without. No differences were found in HVA levels between patients with and without delirium. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest disturbed serotonergic neurotransmission and an increased status of oxidative stress in patients with delirium.

  9. Pesticides Drive Stochastic Changes in the Chemoreception and Neurotransmission System of Marine Ectoparasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Núñez-Acuña

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific efforts to elucidate the mechanisms of chemical communication between organisms in marine environments are increasing. This study applied novel molecular technology to outline the effects of two xenobiotic drugs, deltamethrin (DM and azamethiphos (AZA, on the neurotransmission system of the copepod ectoparasite Caligus rogercresseyi. Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses were conducted to evaluate treatment effects on the glutamatergic synaptic pathway of the parasite, which is closely related to chemoreception and neurotransmission. After drug treatment with DM or AZA, stochastic mRNA expression patterns of glutamatergic synapse pathway components were observed. Both DM and AZA promoted a down-regulation of the glutamate-ammonia ligase, and DM activated a metabotropic glutamate receptor that is a suggested inhibitor of neurotransmission. Furthermore, the delousing drugs drove complex rearrangements in the distribution of mapped reads for specific metabotropic glutamate receptor domains. This study introduces a novel methodological approach that produces high-quality results from transcriptomic data. Using this approach, DM and AZA were found to alter the expression of numerous mRNAs tightly linked to the glutamatergic signaling pathway. These data suggest possible new targets for xenobiotic drugs that play key roles in the delousing effects of antiparasitics in sea lice.

  10. Proteolytic fragments of laminin promote excitotoxic neurodegeneration by up-regulation of the KA1 subunit of the kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Yu, Huaxu; Yu, Wei-Ming; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2008-12-29

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein laminin contributes to excitotoxic cell death in the hippocampus, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. To study this process, we disrupted laminin gamma1 (lamgamma1) expression in the hippocampus. Lamgamma1 knockout (KO) and control mice had similar basal expression of kainate (KA) receptors, but the lamgamma1 KO mice were resistant to KA-induced neuronal death. After KA injection, KA1 subunit levels increased in control mice but were unchanged in lamgamma1 KO mice. KA1 levels in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-KO mice were also unchanged after KA, indicating that both tPA and laminin were necessary for KA1 up-regulation after KA injection. Infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 into the hippocampus of lamgamma1 or tPA KO mice restored KA1 up-regulation and KA-induced neuronal degeneration. Interfering with KA1 function with a specific anti-KA1 antibody protected against KA-induced neuronal death both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel pathway for neurodegeneration involving proteolysis of the ECM and KA1 KA receptor subunit up-regulation.

  11. Effects of the kainate receptor agonist ATPA on glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallert, Marko; Malkki, Hemi; Segerstråle, Mikael; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2007-05-01

    Kainate type of glutamate receptors (KARs) modulate synaptic transmission in a developmentally regulated manner at several synapses in the brain. Previous studies have shown that KARs depress glutamatergic transmission at CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus and these receptors are tonically active during early postnatal development. Here we use the GluR5 subunit specific agonist ATPA to further characterize the role of KARs in the modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in area CA1 during the first two weeks of life. We find that the depressant effect of ATPA on evoked fEPSPs/EPSCs is smaller in the neonate (P3-P6) than in the juvenile (P14-P18) rat CA1, due to endogenous activity of KAR in the neonate. Further, in the neonate but not juvenile CA1, ATPA downregulates action-potential independent transmission (mEPSCs) and its effects are dependent on protein kinase C activity. ATPA-induced depression of fEPSPs in the neonate occludes the presynaptic component of long-term depression (LTD). In contrast, at P14-P18, ATPA prevents LTD indirectly via GABAergic mechanisms. These data show that GluR5 signaling mechanisms are developmentally regulated and suggest distinct functional role for KARs in the modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity at different stages of development.

  12. Differences in AMPA and Kainate Receptor Interactomes Facilitate Identification of AMPA Receptor Auxiliary Subunit GSG1L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie F. Shanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AMPA receptor (AMPA-R complexes consist of channel-forming subunits, GluA1-4, and auxiliary proteins, including TARPs, CNIHs, synDIG1, and CKAMP44, which can modulate AMPA-R function in specific ways. The combinatorial effects of four GluA subunits binding to various auxiliary subunits amplify the functional diversity of AMPA-Rs. The significance and magnitude of molecular diversity, however, remain elusive. To gain insight into the molecular complexity of AMPA and kainate receptors, we compared the proteins that copurify with each receptor type in the rat brain. This interactome study identified the majority of known interacting proteins and, more importantly, provides candidates for additional studies. We validate the claudin homolog GSG1L as a newly identified binding protein and unique modulator of AMPA-R gating, as determined by detailed molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and biochemical experiments. GSG1L extends the functional variety of AMPA-R complexes, and further investigation of other candidates may reveal additional complexity of ionotropic glutamate receptor function.

  13. High firing rate of neonatal hippocampal interneurons is caused by attenuation of afterhyperpolarizing potassium currents by tonically active kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstråle, Mikael; Juuri, Juuso; Lanore, Frédéric; Piepponen, Petteri; Lauri, Sari E; Mulle, Christophe; Taira, Tomi

    2010-05-12

    In the neonatal hippocampus, the activity of interneurons shapes early network bursts that are important for the establishment of neuronal connectivity. However, mechanisms controlling the firing of immature interneurons remain elusive. We now show that the spontaneous firing rate of CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons markedly decreases during early postnatal development because of changes in the properties of GluK1 (formerly known as GluR5) subunit-containing kainate receptors (KARs). In the neonate, activation of KARs by ambient glutamate exerts a tonic inhibition of the medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) by a G-protein-dependent mechanism, permitting a high interneuronal firing rate. During development, the amplitude of the apamine-sensitive K+ currents responsible for the mAHP increases dramatically because of decoupling between KAR activation and mAHP modulation, leading to decreased interneuronal firing. The developmental shift in the KAR function and its consequences on interneuronal activity are likely to have a fundamental role in the maturation of the synchronous neuronal oscillations typical for adult hippocampal circuitry.

  14. Modeling Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data from Electrically Stimulated Dopamine Neurotransmission Data Using QNsim1.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Rashed; Grassi, Christine M; Munoz, Miranda J; Wagner, Amy K

    2017-06-05

    Central dopaminergic (DAergic) pathways have an important role in a wide range of functions, such as attention, motivation, and movement. Dopamine (DA) is implicated in diseases and disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Parkinson's disease, and traumatic brain injury. Thus, DA neurotransmission and the methods to study it are of intense scientific interest. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is a method that allows for selectively monitoring DA concentration changes with fine temporal and spatial resolution. This technique is commonly used in conjunction with electrical stimulations of ascending DAergic pathways to control the impulse flow of dopamine neurotransmission. Although the stimulated DA neurotransmission paradigm can produce robust DA responses with clear morphologies, making them amenable for kinetic analysis, there is still much debate on how to interpret the responses in terms of their DA release and clearance components. To address this concern, a quantitative neurobiological (QN) framework of stimulated DA neurotransmission was recently developed to realistically model the dynamics of DA release and reuptake over the course of a stimulated DA response. The foundations of this model are based on experimental data from stimulated DA neurotransmission and on principles of neurotransmission adopted from various lines of research. The QN model implements 12 parameters related to stimulated DA release and reuptake dynamics to model DA responses. This work describes how to simulate DA responses using QNsim1.0 and also details principles that have been implemented to systematically discern alterations in the stimulated dopamine release and reuptake dynamics.

  15. Hypersensitivity to thromboxane receptor mediated cerebral vasomotion and CBF oscillations during acute NO-deficiency in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Horváth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low frequency (4-12 cpm spontaneous fluctuations of the cerebrovascular tone (vasomotion and oscillations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF have been reported in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. Since endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO suppresses constitutively the release and vascular effects of thromboxane A(2 (TXA(2, NO-deficiency is often associated with activation of thromboxane receptors (TP. In the present study we hypothesized that in the absence of NO, overactivation of the TP-receptor mediated cerebrovascular signaling pathway contributes to the development of vasomotion and CBF oscillations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Effects of pharmacological modulation of TP-receptor activation and its downstream signaling pathway have been investigated on CBF oscillations (measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized rats and vasomotion (measured by isometric tension recording in isolated rat middle cerebral arteries, MCAs both under physiological conditions and after acute inhibition of NO synthesis. Administration of the TP-receptor agonist U-46619 (1 µg/kg i.v. to control animals failed to induce any changes of the systemic or cerebral circulatory parameters. Inhibition of the NO synthesis by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 mg/kg i.v. resulted in increased mean arterial blood pressure and a decreased CBF accompanied by appearance of CBF-oscillations with a dominant frequency of 148±2 mHz. U-46619 significantly augmented the CBF-oscillations induced by L-NAME while inhibition of endogenous TXA(2 synthesis by ozagrel (10 mg/kg i.v. attenuated it. In isolated MCAs U-46619 in a concentration of 100 nM, which induced weak and stable contraction under physiological conditions, evoked sustained vasomotion in the absence of NO, which effect could be completely reversed by inhibition of Rho-kinase by 10 µM Y-27632. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that hypersensitivity of the TP

  16. 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors differently modulate AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Trovato, C; Musumeci, S A; Catania, M V; Ciranna, L

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the effects of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) serotonin receptor activation in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission using patch clamp on mouse brain slices. Application of either 5-HT or 8-OH DPAT, a mixed 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(7) receptor agonist, inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs); this effect was mimicked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH PIPAT and blocked by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist NAN-190. 8-OH DPAT increased paired-pulse facilitation and reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, indicating a presynaptic reduction of glutamate release probability. In another group of neurons, 8-OH DPAT enhanced EPSC amplitude but did not alter paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a postsynaptic action; this effect persisted in the presence of NAN-190 and was blocked by the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB-269970. To confirm that EPSC enhancement was mediated by 5-HT(7) receptors, we used the compound LP-44, which is considered a selective 5-HT(7) agonist. However, LP-44 reduced EPSC amplitude in most cells and instead increased EPSC amplitude in a subset of neurons, similarly to 8-OH DPAT. These effects were respectively antagonized by NAN-190 and by SB-269970, indicating that under our experimental condition LP-44 behaved as a mixed agonist. 8-OH DPAT also modulated the current evoked by exogenously applied AMPA, inducing either a reduction or an increase of amplitude in distinct neurons; these effects were respectively blocked by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, indicating that both receptors exert a postsynaptic action. Our results show that 5-HT(1A) receptors inhibit CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting both pre- and postsynaptically, whereas 5-HT(7) receptors enhance CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting exclusively at a postsynaptic site. We suggest that a selective pharmacological targeting of either subtype may be envisaged in pathological loss of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. In this respect, we underline the

  17. Cerebral neurotransmission in huntington's disease and wilson's disease; Zerebrale Neurotransmission bei Chorea Huntington und Morbus Wilson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Huntington's disease and Wilson's disease are hereditary disorders with different neuropsychiatric symptoms. In both cases, these symptoms are mainly attributed to functional alterations of neurons, which are located in the basal ganglia. According deficits have been found by investigating the dopaminergic neurotransmission with different PET and SPECT tracers. For both diseases, these deficits revealed to concordantly involve the pre- and postsynaptic compartment. Apart from the dopaminergic system, more recent studies showed alterations of other neurotransmitter systems, like the serotonergic, GABA-ergic and opioide system. Except for scientific studies, nuclear medicine imaging is not regularly required for primary diagnosis of both disorders. In the case of Huntington's disease, however, imaging can be helpful for differential diagnosis to other diseases with similar initial symptoms and to determine the organic manifestation of the gene defect. In addition, neurotransmitter imaging with radiortracers could gain more relevance in the future in supporting decisions on specific treatments or for therapy monitoring in both diseases. (orig.) [German] Bei der Chorea Huntington und dem Morbus Wilson handelt es sich um erbliche Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlicher neuropsychiatrischer Symptomatik, welche im Wesentlichen auf Funktionsstoerungen von im Basalganglienbereich lokalisierten Neuronen zurueckgefuehrt werden. Untersuchungen der dopaminergen Neurotransmission mit verschiedenen PET- und SPECT-Radiopharmaka ergaben dementsprechende Defizite, welche fuer beide Erkrankungen konkordant das prae- und postsynaptische Kompartment betrafen. Juengere Studien deuten darueber hinaus auf Stoerungen anderer Neurotransmitter-Systeme, wie z.B. des serotonergen, GABAergen und Opioid-Systems, hin. Ausserhalb von wissenschaftlichen Fragestellungen ist die nuklearmedizinische Bildgebung bei beiden Erkrankungen in der Primaerdiagnostik eher selten erforderlich. Im

  18. Clinical results of neurotransmission SPECT in extra-pyramidal diseases; Resultats cliniques de la TEMP de la neurotransmission en pathologie extra-pyramidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier, C.; Tranquart, F.; Guilloteau, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bretonneau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire in vitro, INSERM U316, 37 - Tours (France)

    1999-12-01

    We present some methodological aspects and clinical applications of dopamine D2 receptor and transporter SPECT using new radiotracers radiolabeled with iodine 123. The gamma camera quality control and standardisation has to be adapted to the small volume and deep location of striata, where receptors and transporters are present. Phantom containing hollow spheres of different diameters which can be filled with different amounts of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 123}I. The semi quantitation of receptor and transporter molecular concentration is based on an equilibrium binding model. According to this model, the binding potential (Bmax. Ka) is equal to the ratio between specific binding in the striatum and circulating activity in a reference region of interest in the occipital cortex. By comparing ECD and ILIS SPECT, it has been shown that striatal ILIS binding does not depend on the local perfusion. The clinical applications mainly concern the extra-pyramidal pathology: ILIS and IBZM SPECT are able to differentiate pre- and post-synaptic lesions. In Parkinson disease the nigrostriatal pathway is damaged and D2 receptors are normal or increased, as shown by normal or elevated IBZM or ILIS uptake. In other extra pyramidal degenerative diseases as progressive supra nuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy striatal D2 receptors are damaged as shown by decreased IBZM or ILIS uptake. In our experience, 88 per cent of patients are correctly classified by ILIS SPECT and 86 per cent with IBZM SPECT. Dopamine transporter SPECT with {beta}CIT and PE2I provides an evaluation of the presynaptic neuronal density in the striatum. One can expect an help for the early diagnosis and the evaluation of Parkinson disease. Another potential application of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT is the evaluation of neuronal loss after hypoxo-ischemia. We conclude that dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT using specific ligands should become a useful diagnosis tool to study a large number of brain

  19. Ventral midbrain NTS1 receptors mediate conditioned reward induced by the neurotensin analogue, D-Tyr[11]neurotensin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eRouibi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at characterizing the mechanisms by which neurotensin (NT is acting within the ventral midbrain to induce a psychostimulant-like effect. In a first experiment, we determine which subtype(s of NT receptors is involved in the reward-inducing effect of ventral midbrain microinjection of NT using the conditioned place-preference (CPP paradigm. In a second study, we used in vitro patch clamp recording technique to characterize the NT receptor subtype(s involved in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission (excitatory post-synaptic current, EPSC in ventral tegmental neurons that expressed (Ih+, or do not express (Ih-, a hyperpolarization-activated cationic current. Behavioral studies were performed with adult male Long-Evans rats while electrophysiological recordings were obtained from brain slices of rat pups aged between 14 and 21 days. Results show that bilateral ventral midbrain microinjections of 1.5 and 3 nmol of D-Tyr[11]NT induced a CPP that was respectively attenuated or blocked by co-injection with 1.2 nmol of the NTS1/NTS2 antagonist, SR142948, and the preferred NTS1 antagonist, SR48692. In electrophysiological experiments, D-Tyr[11]NT (0.01-0.5 M attenuated glutamatergic EPSC in Ih+ but enhanced it in Ih- neurons. The attenuation effect (Ih+ neurons was blocked by SR142948 (0.1 M while the enhancement effect (Ih- neurons was blocked by both antagonists (0.1 M. These findings suggest that i NT is acting on ventral midbrain NTS1 receptors to induce a rewarding effect and ii that this psychostimulant-like effect could be due to a direct action of NT on dopamine neurons and/or an enhancement of glutamatergic inputs to non-dopamine (Ih- neurons.

  20. Increase in neurokinin-1 receptor-mediated colonic motor response in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Ho La; Tae-Wan Kim; Tae-Sik Sung; Hyn-Ju Kim; Jeom-Yong Kim; Il-Suk Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder. Its major symptom is bowel dysmotility, yet the mechanism of the symptom is poorly understood. Since the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-mediated signaling in the gut is important in the control of normal bowel motor function,we aimed to investigate whether the NK1R-mediated bowel motor function was altered in IBS, using a rat IBS model that was previously reported to show colonic dysmotility in response to restraint stress.METHODS: IBS symptoms were produced in male SpragueDawley rats by inducing colitis with acetic acid. Rats were left to recover from colitis for 6 d, and used for experiments 7 d post-induction of colitis. Motor activities of distal colon were recorded in vitro.RESULTS: The contractile sensitivity of isolated colon to a NK1R agonist [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-substance P (1-30 nmol/L)was higher in IBS rats than that in normal rats. After the enteric neurotransmission was blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μmol/L), the contractile sensitivity to the NK1R agonist was increased in normal colon but not in IBS rat colon. The NK1R agonist-induced contraction was not different between the two groups when the agonist was challenged to the TTX-treated colon or the isolated colonic myocytes. A nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μmol/L) augmented the NK1R agonist-induced contraction only in normal rat colon.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the NK1R-meidated colonic motor response is increased in IBS rats, due to the decrease in the nitrergic inhibitory neural component.

  1. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 2: Enhancement of tumor penetration through receptor mediated transcytosis in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor models, presumably through tandem cycles of CD44 mediated endocytosis and exocytosis. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the NPs, better penetration of multilayered tumor cells was observed with much improved cytotoxicities against both drug sensitive and drug resistant cancer spheroids compared to the free drug. Thus, targeting receptors such as CD44 that can readily undergo recycling between the cell surface and interior of the cells can become a useful strategy to enhance the tumor penetration potential of NPs and the efficiency of drug delivery through receptor mediated transcytosis.We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor

  2. Antagonism of GABAB-receptor-mediated responses in the guinea-pig isolated ileum and vas deferens by phosphono-analogues of GABA.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, D. I.; Ong, J; Prager, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    1. The phosphono-analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 4-amino-butylphosphonic acid (4-ABPA), 3-amino-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-propylphosphonic acid (phaclofen) and 3-amino-2-cyclohexylpropyl-phosphonic acid, each antagonized the GABA- and baclofen-induced GABAB-receptor-mediated depression of twitch responses to transmural stimulation in the guinea-pig isolated ileum, in a concentration-dependent, reversible and surmountable manner (apparent pA2 = 4.0 +/- 0.1, 4 +/- 0.2 and 3.7 +/- 0.2 resp...

  3. Role of AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors in the development and expression of amygdala kindling in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawski, M A; Kurzman, P S; Yamaguchi, S I; Li, H

    2001-01-01

    The role of AMPA and GluR5-containing kainate receptors in the development and expression of amygdala kindling was examined using the selective 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 [(1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-7,8-methylenedioxy-5H-2, 3-benzodiazepine] and the decahydroisoquinoline mixed AMPA receptor and GluR5 kainate receptor antagonist LY293558 {(3S,4aR,6R, 8aR)-6-[2-(1(2)H-tetrazole-5-yl)ethyl]decahydroisoquinoline- 3-carboxy lic acid)}. Administration of GYKI 52466 (5-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and LY293558 (10-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) prior to daily kindling stimulation in mice produced a dose-dependent suppression of the rate of development of behavioral kindled seizure activity and reduced the duration of the stimulation-induced electrographic afterdischarge. In drug-free stimulation sessions after the initial drug-treatment sessions, there was an acceleration in the rate of kindling development compared with the rate during the preceding drug-administration period; the "rebound" rate was also greater than the kindling rate in saline-treated control animals. In fully kindled animals, both GYKI 52466 and LY293558 produced a dose-dependent suppression of evoked seizures (ED(50), 19.3 and 16.7 mg/kg, respectively). Although AMPA receptors appear to be critical to the expression of kindled seizures, since kindling development progressed despite the suppression of behavioral seizure activity, AMPA receptors are less important to the kindling process. LY293558 was modestly less effective at suppressing behavioral seizures during kindling and was not superior to GYKI 52466 in retarding the overall extent of kindling development, indicating that GluR5 kainate receptors do not contribute to epileptogenesis in this model.

  4. (R-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. Methods (R-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM. Results All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. Conclusions P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  5. Kainate-enhanced release of D-(3H)aspartate from cerebral cortex and striatum: reversal by baclofen and pentobarbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potashner, S.J.; Gerard, D.

    1983-06-01

    A study was made of the actions of the excitant neurotoxin, kainic acid, on the uptake and the release of D-(2,3-3H)aspartate (D-ASP) in slices of guinea pig cerebral neocortex and striatum. The slices took up D-ASP, reaching concentrations of the amino acid in the tissue which were 14-23 times that in the medium. Subsequently, electrical stimulation of the slices evoked a Ca2+-dependent release of a portion of the D-ASP. Kainic acid (10(-5)-10(-3) M) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of D-ASP uptake. The electrically evoked release of D-ASP was increased 1.6-2.0 fold by 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid. The kainate-enlarged release was Ca2+-dependent. Dihydrokainic acid, an analogue of kainic acid with little excitatory or toxic action, did not increase D-ASP release but depressed D-ASP uptake. Attempts were made to block the action of kainic acid with baclofen and pentobarbital, compounds which depress the electrically evoked release of L-glutamate (L-GLU) and L-aspartate (L-ASP). Baclofen (4 X 10(-6)M), an antispastic drug, and pentobarbital (10(-4)M), an anesthetic agent, each inhibited the electrically evoked release of D-ASP and prevented the enhancement of the release above control levels usually produced by 10(-4)M kainic acid. It is proposed that 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid may enhance the synaptic release of L-GLU and L-ASP from neurons which use these amino acids as transmitters. This action is prevented by baclofen and pentobarbital. In view of the possibility that cell death in Huntington's disease could involve excessive depolarization of striatal and other cells by glutamate, baclofen might be effective in delaying the loss of neurons associated with this condition.

  6. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Jia, Yongheng; Pinaud, Raphael; Zhuo, Min

    2006-09-01

    GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs) are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  7. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaud Raphael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  8. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate excitatory sympathetic neurotransmission in guinea pig prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-ping; Ding, Guo-fu; Wang, Qin-zhang

    2013-06-01

    Morphological and functional studies have confirmed that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are involved in many enteric motor neurotransmission pathways. Recent investigations have demonstrated that human and guinea pig prostate glands possess a distinct cell type with morphological and immunological similarities to ICCs. These prostate ICCs have a close relationship with nerve bundles and smooth muscle cells. Prostate smooth muscle tone is largely induced by stimulation from the sympathetic nervous system, which releases excitatory norepinephrine (NE) to act on the α1-adrenoceptor. We have performed morphological and functional experiments to determine the role of ICCs in sympathetic neurotransmission in the guinea pig prostate based on the hypothesis that prostate ICCs act as mediators of sympathetic neurotransmission. Immunohistochemistry revealed many close points of contact between ICCs and sympathetic nerve bundles and smooth muscle cells. Double-labeled sections revealed that α1-adrenoceptor and the gap junction protein connexin 43 were expressed in prostate ICCs. Surprisingly, prostate ICCs co-expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, two markers of sympathetic neurons. Functionally, the application of NE evoked a large single inward current in isolated prostate ICCs in a dose-dependent manner. The inward current evoked by NE was mediated via the activation of α1-adrenoceptors, because it was abolished by the non-specific α-adrenoceptor antagonist, phentolamine and the specific α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin. Thus, ICCs in the guinea pig prostate are target cells for prostate sympathetic nerves and possess the morphological and functional characteristics required to mediate sympathetic signals.

  9. Effects of pharmacological manipulation of GABAergic neurotransmission in a new mutant hamster model of paroxysmal dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredow, G; Löscher, W

    1991-01-10

    Attacks of sustained dystonic postures of limbs and trunk can be initiated by handling or mild environmental stimuli (e.g. new cage) in an inbred line of Syrian hamsters. The severity of the dystonic syndrome in these mutant hamsters (gene symbol dtsz) is age-dependent, with a peak at about 30-40 days of age. A scoring system for grading type and severity of the dystonic attacks can be used to study the activity of drugs against dystonic movements with individual pre- and post-drug vehicle trials as control. In the present experiments, the effects of drugs which alter GABAergic functions in the brain were studied in dystonic hamsters. Anticonvulsants, i.e. valproate, diazepam and phenobarbital, which augment GABAergic neurotransmission, decreased the severity of dystonic attacks in the mutant hamsters, while administration of subconvulsive doses of pentylenetetrazol or the inverse benzodiazepine receptor agonist FG 7142 increased the severity of the syndrome. Anticonvulsants, i.e. phenytoin and carbamazepine, which are not thought to act via effects on GABAergic neurotransmission, exerted no antidystonic effects, but even worsened the attack in several animals. In contrast, the GABA-elevating drug, aminooxyacetic acid, produced a marked antidystonic effect in the hamsters. Similarly, the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, significant decreased the severity of the dystonic attack. The data indicate that dystonic movements in dtsz mutant hamsters can be attenuated by drugs which facilitate GABAergic functions, but worsened by drugs which impair GABAergic neurotransmission. These data thus seem to suggest that the dystonic syndrome in dtsz mutant hamsters is under GABAergic influence. The data show furthermore that dystonic hamsters are a suitable model to detect antidystonic effects of drugs.

  10. Oméga 3 et neurotransmission cérébrale

    OpenAIRE

    Vancassel Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Les acides gras polyinsaturés (AGPI) sont des constituants structuraux fondamentaux du système nerveux central (SNC) dont la teneur conditionne le fonctionnement des cellules neuronales. Ils sont des acteurs de la communication intercellulaire, notamment à travers les processus de neurotransmission. De nombreuses études ont montré chez l’animal que le déficit des membranes cérébrales en oméga 3, et plus particulièrement en acide docosahexaénoïque (22 : 6ω-3 ou DHA) induit par une carence alim...

  11. Quantitation of the Contractile Response Mediated by Two Receptors: M2 and M3 Muscarinic Receptor-Mediated Contractions of Human Gastroesophageal Smooth MuscleS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M2 receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M3 density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M2 and M3 receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M2 and M3 receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M2 muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M3 receptor predominantly mediates contraction. PMID:19126780

  12. Quantitation of the contractile response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions of human gastroesophageal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Vegesna, Anil K; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M(2) receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M(3) density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M(2) and M(3) receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M(2) muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M(3) receptor predominantly mediates contraction.

  13. Mu-Opioid (MOP) receptor mediated G-protein signaling is impaired in specific brain regions in a rat model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, Edina; Büki, Alexandra; Kékesi, Gabriella; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Benyhe, Sándor

    2016-04-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder. Clinical reports suggest that many patients with schizophrenia are less sensitive to pain than other individuals. Animal models do not interpret schizophrenia completely, but they can model a number of symptoms of the disease, including decreased pain sensitivities and increased pain thresholds of various modalities. Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides have a substantial role in analgesia. In this biochemical study we investigated changes in the signaling properties of the mu-opioid (MOP) receptor in different brain regions, which are involved in the pain transmission, i.e., thalamus, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our goal was to compare the transmembrane signaling mediated by MOP receptors in control rats and in a recently developed rat model of schizophrenia. Regulatory G-protein activation via MOP receptors were measured in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays in the presence of a highly selective MOP receptor peptide agonist, DAMGO. It was found that the MOP receptor mediated activation of G-proteins was substantially lower in membranes prepared from the 'schizophrenic' model rats than in control animals. The potency of DAMGO to activate MOP receptor was also decreased in all brain regions studied. Taken together in our rat model of schizophrenia, MOP receptor mediated G-proteins have a reduced stimulatory activity compared to membrane preparations taken from control animals. The observed distinct changes of opioid receptor functions in different areas of the brain do not explain the augmented nociceptive threshold described in these animals.

  14. Changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents at early-stage epileptogenesis in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juegang Ju; Sheng-tian Li

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are extensively involved in epilepsy genesis and recurrence.Recent studies have shown that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play different, or even opposing, roles in various signaling pathways, including synaptic plasticity and neuronal death.The present study analyzed changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents during epilepsy onset.Mouse models of lithium chloride pilocarpine-induced epilepsy were established, and hippocampal slices were prepared at 24 hours after the onset of status epilepticus.Synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) were recorded in CA1 pyramidal neurons by whole-cell patch clamp technique.Results demonstrated no significant difference in rise and delay time of synaptic NMDA-EPSCs compared with normal neurons.Peak amplitude, area-to-peak ratio,and rising time of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs remained unchanged, but decay of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs was faster than that of normal neurons.These results suggest that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play a role in epileptogenesis.

  15. Nicotine effects on muscarinic receptor-mediated free Ca[Formula: see text] level changes in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dawei; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Anbing; Sun, Wenhai; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Limin

    2016-06-01

    It was suggested that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca[Formula: see text] levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. It is assumed that, following facial nerve injury, the interactions of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in facial nerve nucleus may negatively regulate free Ca[Formula: see text] concentrations in the facial nerve nucleus, which provide important information for the repair and regeneration of the facial nerve. The present study investigated the regulatory effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury at 7, 30, and 90 days following facial nerve injury using laser confocal microscopy. The dose-dependent regulation of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus may decrease the range of free Ca[Formula: see text] increases following facial nerve injury, which is important for nerve cell regeneration. It is concluded that the negative effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptors are related to the [Formula: see text] subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  16. Fast neurotransmission related genes are expressed in non nervous endoderm in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matan Oren

    Full Text Available Cnidarian nervous systems utilize chemical transmission to transfer signals through synapses and neurons. To date, ample evidence has been accumulated for the participation of neuropeptides, primarily RFamides, in neurotransmission. Yet, it is still not clear if this is the case for the classical fast neurotransmitters such as GABA, Glutamate, Acetylcholine and Monoamines. A large repertoire of cnidarian Fast Neurotransmitter related Genes (FNGs has been recently identified in the genome of the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. In order to test whether FNGs are localized in cnidarian neurons, we characterized the expression patterns of eight Nematostella genes that are closely or distantly related to human central and peripheral nervous systems genes, in adult Nematostella and compared them to the RFamide localization. Our results show common expression patterns for all tested genes, in a single endodermal cell layer. These expressions did not correspond with the RFamide expressing nerve cell network. Following these results we suggest that the tested Nematostella genes may not be directly involved in vertebrate-like fast neurotransmission.

  17. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  18. Neonatal DSP-4 treatment modifies GABAergic neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortel, Aleksandra; Nowak, Przemyslaw; Brus, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) is a noradrenergic neurotoxin which selectively damages noradrenergic projections originating from the locus coeruleus (LC). DSP-4 treatment of rats on the first and third days after birth produces a long-lasting lesion of noradrenergic neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In DSP-4-lesioned rats, studied as adults, we observed a decrease in norepinephrine content, with no significant change in the levels of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). There is now a well established interaction between noradrenergic and GABAergic systems, whereby the noradrenergic system is involved in the regulation of basal GABA release, while GABAergic neurons simultaneously exert tonic inhibitory regulation of LC norepinephrine neurons. We examined GABAergic neurotransmission in the norepinephrine-denervated PFC for a better appreciation of the interaction between these two systems. Treatment with the GABA transaminase inhibitor vigabatrine (VGB) increased the GABA level of PFC (tissue content) in both intact and lesioned groups. Additionally, VGB increased extracellular GABA concentration in the PFC in both control and DSP-4-lesioned animals, but the elevation of GABA was 2-fold higher in DSP-4 lesioned rats. These findings indicate that neonatal DSP-4 treatment increases GABAergic neurotransmission in the PFC of rats in adulthood, perhaps by decreasing reactivity of central GABA(A) receptors.

  19. Pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertí, Elena; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Wang, Xuanyu

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats, which harbor a mutation in the c-kit gene that affects development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). In Ws/Ws rats, the density of KIT-positive cells was marked...... as indirect innervation via ICC. In summary, loss of ICC markedly affects pacemaker and motor activities of the rat colon. Inhibitory innervation is largely maintained but nitrergic innervation is reduced possibly related to the loss of ICC-mediated relaxation.......The aim of this study was to characterize the pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats, which harbor a mutation in the c-kit gene that affects development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). In Ws/Ws rats, the density of KIT-positive cells was markedly...... of 10-20 cycles/min. Spontaneous activity of nitrergic nerves caused sustained inhibition of muscle activity in both wild-type (+/+) and Ws/Ws rats. Electrical field stimulation of enteric nerves, after blockade of cholinergic and adrenergic activity, elicited inhibition of mechanical activity...

  20. Effect of amyloids on the vesicular machinery: implications for somatic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anand Kant; Pandit, Rucha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2015-07-01

    Certain neurodegenerative diseases are thought to be initiated by the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. However, the mechanism underlying toxicity remains obscure. Most of the suggested mechanisms are generic in nature and do not directly explain the neuron-type specific lesions observed in many of these diseases. Some recent reports suggest that the toxic aggregates impair the synaptic vesicular machinery. This may lead to an understanding of the neuron-type specificity observed in these diseases. A disruption of the vesicular machinery can also be deleterious for extra-synaptic, especially somatic, neurotransmission (common in serotonergic and dopaminergic systems which are specifically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), respectively), though this relationship has remained unexplored. In this review, we discuss amyloid-induced damage to the neurotransmitter vesicular machinery, with an eye on the possible implications for somatic exocytosis. We argue that the larger size of the system, and the availability of multi-photon microscopy techniques for directly visualizing monoamines, make the somatic exocytosis machinery a more tractable model for understanding the effect of amyloids on all types of vesicular neurotransmission. Indeed, exploring this neglected connection may not just be important, it may be a more fruitful route for understanding AD and PD.

  1. OLM interneurons are transiently recruited into field gamma oscillations evoked by brief kainate pressure ejections onto area CA1 in mice hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiani, E

    2009-02-01

    Oscillations (30-100 Hz) are correlated with the cognitive functions of the brain. In the hippocampus interactions between perisomatic and trilaminar interneurons with pyramidal cells are thought to underlie generation of field gamma oscillations. In area CA3 OLM interneurons receive synaptic input in gamma range but generate action potential (AP) output in theta band and are involved in theta oscillations synchronized along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. In slice preparations of CA3 area the spike timing of OLM cells could be modulated by carbachole induced gamma oscillations, although their firing rates are limited to theta frequency. Normally, OLM interneurons are somatostatin positive cells. In this study we tested whether parvalbumin (PV) containing OLM interneurons in area CA1 limit AP output during kainate pressure ejection also to theta frequency. We used focal short applications of kainate in area CA1 to induce filed gamma oscillations with an average frequency of about 44.7+/-4.4 Hz. The duration of field gamma was on average 8.9+/-3.5 s. During such oscillations CA1 PV positive OLM interneurons of mice hippocampus received excitatory synaptic input at gamma frequency. Moreover, their AP output was in gamma range as well. Thus, we show that beside the somatostatin containing OLM interneurons, which generate theta rhythm there are PV containing OLM cells, which could synchronize the distal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells to the field gamma oscillations.

  2. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zhiyuan_nju@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Yu, Yijun, E-mail: yjun.yu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Tang, Song [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Liu, Hongling, E-mail: hlliu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Hecker, Markus [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Yu, Hongxia [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of TBOEP on expression of genes of several nuclear hormone receptors and their relationship with adverse effect pathways in zebrafish. • TBOEP was neither an agonist nor antagonist of AR or AhR as determined by use of in vitro mammalian cell-based receptor transactivation assays. • Modulation of ER- and MR-dependent pathways allowed for development of feasible receptor-mediated, critical mechanisms of toxic action. - Abstract: As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5 μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane × receptor (P × R)) pathways at 120 hpf. Exposure to 0.5 μM TBOEP significantly (p < 0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were

  3. Blocking GABA(A) inhibition reveals AMPA- and NMDA-receptor-mediated polysynaptic responses in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépel, V; Khazipov, R; Ben-Ari, Y

    1997-04-01

    We have investigated the conditions required to evoke polysynaptic responses in the isolated CA1 region of hippocampal slices from Wistar adult rats. Experiments were performed with extracellular and whole cell recording techniques. In the presence of bicuculline (10 microM), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2-3-dione (10 microM), glycine (10 microM), and a low external concentration of Mg2+ (0.3 mM), electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals/commissural pathway evoked graded N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor-mediated late field potentials in the stratum radiatum of the CA1 region. These responses were generated via polysynaptic connections because their latency varied strongly and inversely with the stimulation intensity and they were abolished by a high concentration of divalent cations (7 mM Ca2+). These responses likely were driven by local collateral branches of CA1 pyramidal cell axons because focal application of tetrodotoxin (30 microM) in the stratum oriens strongly reduced the late synaptic component and antidromic stimulation of CA1 pyramidal cells could evoke the polysynaptic response. Current-source density analysis suggested that the polysynaptic response was generated along the proximal part of the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells (50-150 microm below the pyramidal cell layer in the stratum radiatum). In physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1.3 mM), the pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated polysynaptic response was abolished. In control artificial cerebrospinal fluid (with physiological concentration of Mg2+), bicuculline ( 10 microM) generated a graded polysynaptic response. Under these conditions, this response was mediated both by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/NMDA receptors. In the presence of D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 microM), the polysynaptic response could be mediated by AMPA receptors, although less efficiently. In conclusion, suppression of gamma-aminobutyric acid

  4. Dopaminergic enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal neurons is dependent on D₁-like receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovaci, I; Caruana, D A; Chapman, C A

    2014-01-31

    The modulatory neurotransmitter dopamine induces concentration-dependent changes in synaptic transmission in the entorhinal cortex, in which high concentrations of dopamine suppress evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and lower concentrations induce an acute synaptic facilitation. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings were used to investigate the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II neurons of the rat lateral entorhinal cortex. A constant bath application of 1 μM dopamine resulted in a consistent facilitation of EPSPs evoked in layer II fan cells by layer I stimulation; the size of the facilitation was more variable in pyramidal neurons, and synaptic responses in a small group of multiform neurons were not modulated by dopamine. Isolated inhibitory synaptic responses were not affected by dopamine, and the facilitation of EPSPs was not associated with a change in paired-pulse facilitation ratio. Voltage-clamp recordings of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were facilitated by dopamine, but N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents were not. Bath application of the dopamine D₁-like receptor blocker SCH23390 (50 μM), but not the D₂-like receptor blocker sulpiride (50 μM), prevented the facilitation, indicating that it is dependent upon D₁-like receptor activation. Dopamine D₁ receptors lead to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and including the PKA inhibitor H-89 or KT 5720 in the recording pipette solution prevented the facilitation of EPSCs. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor 1 or the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated protein phosphatase (DARPP-32) can lead to a facilitation of AMPA receptor responses by inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) that reduces dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors, and we found here that inhibition of PP1 occluded the facilitatory effect of dopamine. The dopamine

  5. Oméga 3 et neurotransmission cérébrale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vancassel Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Les acides gras polyinsaturés (AGPI sont des constituants structuraux fondamentaux du système nerveux central (SNC dont la teneur conditionne le fonctionnement des cellules neuronales. Ils sont des acteurs de la communication intercellulaire, notamment à travers les processus de neurotransmission. De nombreuses études ont montré chez l’animal que le déficit des membranes cérébrales en oméga 3, et plus particulièrement en acide docosahexaénoïque (22 : 6ω-3 ou DHA induit par une carence alimentaire spécifique en cette famille d’AGPI, s’accompagne de troubles de l’apprentissage. Un support neurochimique a été avancé, impliquant les processus de libération de neurotransmetteurs, notamment les monoamines et l’acétylcholine. Cette relation entre AGPI ω3 et neurotransmission est d’autant plus intéressante qu’elle pourrait être également impliquée chez l’Homme dans l’apparition et\\\\ou la sévérité de certains troubles neuropsychiatriques dans lesquels des dysfonctionnements de la neurotransmission sont constatés (schizophrénie, dépression, hyperactivité chez l’enfant. En effet, de nombreuses études révèlent un déficit du statut corporel en AGPI oméga 3 (20 : 5 et 22 : 6 mais aussi en oméga 6, qui peut être corrigé par voie nutritionnelle, permettant alors de réduire significativement certains des symptômes pathologiques. Dans ce contexte, nous développons au laboratoire des recherches visant à comprendre les mécanismes d’action des oméga 3, et en particulier du DHA, dans les membranes nerveuses et l’incidence sur le fonctionnement de ces cellules.

  6. Long-term exposure to IL-1beta enhances Toll-IL-1 receptor-mediated inflammatory signaling in murine airway hyperresponsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Cang-Bao; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-interleukin-1 (Toll-IL-1) receptor signaling may play a key role in the development of airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Previously, we have demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin......-time PCR-based cDNA array. The key gene expressions that were altered were verified by immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. Tracheal ring segment contractile responsiveness to the inflammatory mediator bradykinin was monitored using a sensitive myograph system. The results showed that after......-1beta (IL-1beta), induce AHR. However, the underlying intracellular signaling mechanisms that lead to AHR remain elusive. In order to see if the Toll-IL-1 receptor-mediated inflammatory signal pathways are involved in the development of AHR, the present study was designed to use a real-time PCR...

  7. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  8. Long-term exposure to IL-1beta enhances Toll-IL-1 receptor-mediated inflammatory signaling in murine airway hyperresponsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Cang-Bao; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-interleukin-1 (Toll-IL-1) receptor signaling may play a key role in the development of airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Previously, we have demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin......RNA expression following IL-1beta treatment. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that protein expression for CD14, RP105, MCP-1 and phosphorylated IkappaB-alpha were increased in both the airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. In order to link the activation of Toll-IL-1 receptor-mediated inflammatory signal...... airway to IL-1beta induces up- and down-regulation of mRNA expression for Toll-IL-1 receptor signal molecules, with a significant increase in the expression of 16 genes that contribute to the development of airway inflammation and AHR. Understanding cytokine-induced activation of the Toll-IL-1 receptor...

  9. Optical modulation of neurotransmission using calcium photocurrents through the ion channel LiGluR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè eIzquierdo-Serra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of light-activated molecules (photoswitches and phototriggers have been used to the study of computational properties of an isolated neuron by acting pre and postsynaptically. However, new tools are being pursued to elicit a presynaptic calcium influx that triggers the release of neurotransmitters, most of them based in calcium-permeable Channelrhodopsin-2 mutants. Here we describe a method to control exocytosis of synaptic vesicles through the use of a light-gated glutamate receptor (LiGluR, which has recently been demonstrated that supports secretion by means of calcium influx in chromaffin cells. Expression of LiGluR in hippocampal neurons enables reversible control of neurotransmission with light, and allows modulating the firing rate of the postsynaptic neuron with the wavelength of illumination. This method may be useful for the determination of the complex transfer function of individual synapses.

  10. Optical modulation of neurotransmission using calcium photocurrents through the ion channel LiGluR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Trauner, Dirk; Llobet, Artur; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of light-activated molecules (photoswitches and phototriggers) have been used to the study of computational properties of an isolated neuron by acting pre and postsynaptically. However, new tools are being pursued to elicit a presynaptic calcium influx that triggers the release of neurotransmitters, most of them based in calcium-permeable Channelrhodopsin-2 mutants. Here we describe a method to control exocytosis of synaptic vesicles through the use of a light-gated glutamate receptor (LiGluR), which has recently been demonstrated that supports secretion by means of calcium influx in chromaffin cells. Expression of LiGluR in hippocampal neurons enables reversible control of neurotransmission with light, and allows modulating the firing rate of the postsynaptic neuron with the wavelength of illumination. This method may be useful for the determination of the complex transfer function of individual synapses.

  11. Perspectives on kiss-and-run: role in exocytosis, endocytosis, and neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, AbdulRasheed A; Tsien, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis and endocytosis are critical to the function of many intercellular networks, particularly the complex neural circuits underlying mammalian behavior. Kiss-and-run (KR) is an unconventional fusion between secretory vesicles and a target membrane that releases intravesicular content through a transient, nanometer-sized fusion pore. The fusing vesicle retains its gross shape, precluding full integration into the planar membrane, and enough molecular components for rapid retrieval, reacidification, and reuse. KR makes judicious use of finite presynaptic resources, and mounting evidence suggests that it influences synaptic information transfer. Here we detail emerging perspectives on KR and its role in neurotransmission. We additionally formulate a restraining force hypothesis as a plausible mechanistic basis for KR and its physiological modulation in small nerve terminals. Clarification of the mechanism and function of KR has bearing on understanding the kinetic transitions underlying SNARE-mediated fusion, interactions between vesicles and their local environment, and the influence of release dynamics on neural information processing.

  12. Cholinergic facilitation of neurotransmission to the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig prostate gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W A; Pennefather, J N; Mitchelson, F J

    2000-07-01

    1. Functional experiments have been conducted to assess the effects of acetylcholine and carbachol, and the receptors on which they act to facilitate neurotransmission to the stromal smooth muscle of the prostate gland of the guinea-pig. 2. Acetylcholine and carbachol (0.1 microM - 0.1 mM) enhanced contractions evoked by trains of electrical field stimulation (20 pulses of 0.5 ms at 10 Hz every 50 s with a dial setting of 60 V) of nerve terminals within the guinea-pig isolated prostate. In these concentrations they had negligible effects on prostatic smooth muscle tone. 3. The facilitatory effects of acetylcholine, but not those of carbachol, were further enhanced in the presence of physostigmine (10 microM). 3. The facilitatory effects of carbachol were unaffected by the neuropeptide Y Y(1) receptor antagonist BIBP 3226 ((R)-N(2)-(diphenylacetyl)-N-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-arginina mide) (0.3 microM, n=3) or suramin (100 microM, n=5). Prazosin (0.1 microM, n=5) and guanethidine (10 microM, n=5) alone and in combination (n=4), reduced responses to field stimulation and produced rightward shifts of the log concentration-response curves to carbachol. 4. The rank orders of potency of subtype-preferring muscarinic receptor antagonists in inhibiting the facilitatory actions of acetylcholine and carbachol were: pirenzepine > HHSiD (hexahydrosiladifenidol) > pF-HHSiD (para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol)>/= 5 himbacine, and pirenzepine > HHSiD > himbacine>/= 5 pF-HHSiD, respectively. These profiles suggest that muscarinic receptors of the M(1)-subtype mediate the facilitatory effects of acetylcholine and carbachol on neurotransmission to the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig prostate.

  13. Effect of intranasal manganese administration on neurotransmission and spatial learning in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Piechal, Agnieszka; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa, E-mail: etyszkiewicz@wum.edu.pl

    2012-11-15

    The effect of intranasal manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O) exposure on spatial learning, memory and motor activity was estimated in Morris water maze task in adult rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats received for 2 weeks MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O at two doses the following: 0.2 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.2) or 0.8 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.8) per day. Control (Con) and manganese-exposed groups were observed for behavioral performance and learning in water maze. ANOVA for repeated measurements did not show any significant differences in acquisition in the water maze between the groups. However, the results of the probe trial on day 5, exhibited spatial memory deficits following manganese treatment. After completion of the behavioral experiment, the regional brain concentrations of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined via HPLC in selected brain regions, i.e. prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. ANOVA demonstrated significant differences in the content of monoamines and metabolites between the treatment groups compared to the controls. Negative correlations between platform crossings on the previous platform position in Southeast (SE) quadrant during the probe trial and neurotransmitter turnover suggest that impairment of spatial memory and cognitive performance after manganese (Mn) treatment is associated with modulation of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. These findings show that intranasally applied Mn can impair spatial memory with significant changes in the tissue level and metabolism of monoamines in several brain regions. -- Highlights: ► Intranasal exposure to manganese in rats impairs spatial memory in the water maze. ► Regional changes in levels of neurotransmitters in the brain have been identified. ► Cognitive disorder correlates with modulation of 5-HT, NA and DA neurotransmission.

  14. Ceftriaxone attenuates acute cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, B A; Tallarida, C S; Scholl, J L; Forster, G L; Unterwald, E M; Rawls, S M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ceftriaxone is a β‐lactam antibiotic and glutamate transporter activator that reduces the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants. Ceftriaxone also reduces locomotor activation following acute psychostimulant exposure, suggesting that alterations in dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens contribute to its mechanism of action. In the present studies we tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with ceftriaxone disrupts acute cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Experimental Approach Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or ceftriaxone (200 mg kg−1, i.p. × 10 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15 mg kg−1, i.p.). Motor activity, dopamine efflux (via in vivo microdialysis) and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the dopamine transporter and organic cation transporter as well as α‐synuclein, Akt and GSK3β were analysed in the nucleus accumbens. Key Results Ceftriaxone‐pretreated rats challenged with cocaine displayed reduced locomotor activity and accumbal dopamine efflux compared with saline‐pretreated controls challenged with cocaine. The reduction in cocaine‐evoked dopamine levels was not counteracted by excitatory amino acid transporter 2 blockade in the nucleus accumbens. Pretreatment with ceftriaxone increased Akt/GSK3β signalling in the nucleus accumbens and reduced levels of dopamine transporter, TH and phosphorylated α‐synuclein, indicating that ceftriaxone affects numerous proteins involved in dopaminergic transmission. Conclusions and Implications These results are the first evidence that ceftriaxone affects cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic transmission, in addition to its well‐described effects on glutamate, and suggest that its ability to attenuate cocaine‐induced behaviours, such as psychomotor activity, is due in part to reduced dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:26375494

  15. Cannabinoids Occlude the HIV-1 Tat-Induced Decrease in GABAergic Neurotransmission in Prefrontal Cortex Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Hermes, Douglas J; Mackie, Ken; Lichtman, Aron H; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-06-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is now considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids exhibit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND are poorly understood. To address this issue, whole-cell recordings were performed on young (14-24 day old) C57BL/6J mice. We investigated the actions of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (1 μM) and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA, 1 μM) in the presence of HIV-1 Tat on GABAergic neurotransmission in mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) slices. We found a Tat concentration-dependent (5-50 nM) decrease in the frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) and zero extracellular calcium prevented the significant Tat-induced decrease in mIPSCs. Further, bath-applied WIN55,212-2 or AEA by itself, significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of mIPSCs and/or spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs), and occluded a further downregulation of IPSCs by Tat. Pretreatment with rimonabant but not the CB2R antagonist AM630 (1 μM) prevented the WIN55,212-2- and AEA-induced decrease in IPSCs frequency without any further Tat effect. Results indicated a Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission, which was occluded by cannabinoids via a CB1R-related mechanism. Understanding the relationship between Tat toxicity and endocannabinoid signaling has the potential to identify novel therapeutic interventions to benefit individuals suffering from HAND and other cognitive impairments.

  16. Inositol hexakisphosphate suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain in the hippocampal neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Nian; Shi, Yue; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuxin; Yu, Lina; Shin, Ok-Ho; Bacaj, Taulant; Südhof, Thomas C.; Yu, Jia; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) levels rise and fall with neuronal excitation and silence, respectively, in the hippocampus, suggesting potential signaling functions of this inositol polyphosphate in hippocampal neurons. We now demonstrate that intracellular application of InsP6 caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in cultured hippocampal neurons. The treatment did not alter the size and replenishment rate of the readily releasable pool in autaptic neurons. Intracellular exposure to InsP6 did not affect spontaneous EPSCs or excitatory amino acid-activated currents in neurons lacking autapses. The InsP6-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs was effectively abolished by coapplication of an antibody to synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain. Importantly, preabsorption of the antibody with a GST-WT synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment but not with a GST-mutant synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment that poorly reacted with the antibody impaired the activity of the antibody on the InsP6-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs. Furthermore, K+ depolarization significantly elevated endogenous levels of InsP6 and occluded the inhibition of autaptic EPSCs by exogenous InsP6. These data reveal that InsP6 suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via inhibition of the presynaptic synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain-mediated fusion via an interaction with the synaptotagmin Ca2+-binding sites rather than via interference with presynaptic Ca2+ levels, synaptic vesicle trafficking, or inactivation of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors. Therefore, elevated InsP6 in activated neurons serves as a unique negative feedback signal to control hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:22778403

  17. A neural population model incorporating dopaminergic neurotransmission during complex voluntary behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fürtinger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Assessing brain activity during complex voluntary motor behaviors that require the recruitment of multiple neural sites is a field of active research. Our current knowledge is primarily based on human brain imaging studies that have clear limitations in terms of temporal and spatial resolution. We developed a physiologically informed non-linear multi-compartment stochastic neural model to simulate functional brain activity coupled with neurotransmitter release during complex voluntary behavior, such as speech production. Due to its state-dependent modulation of neural firing, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a key role in the organization of functional brain circuits controlling speech and language and thus has been incorporated in our neural population model. A rigorous mathematical proof establishing existence and uniqueness of solutions to the proposed model as well as a computationally efficient strategy to numerically approximate these solutions are presented. Simulated brain activity during the resting state and sentence production was analyzed using functional network connectivity, and graph theoretical techniques were employed to highlight differences between the two conditions. We demonstrate that our model successfully reproduces characteristic changes seen in empirical data between the resting state and speech production, and dopaminergic neurotransmission evokes pronounced changes in modeled functional connectivity by acting on the underlying biological stochastic neural model. Specifically, model and data networks in both speech and rest conditions share task-specific network features: both the simulated and empirical functional connectivity networks show an increase in nodal influence and segregation in speech over the resting state. These commonalities confirm that dopamine is a key neuromodulator of the functional connectome of speech control. Based on reproducible characteristic aspects of empirical data, we suggest a number

  18. Neurobiological model of stimulated dopamine neurotransmission to interpret fast-scan cyclic voltammetry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Rashed; Grassi, Christine M; Munoz, Miranda J; Torres, Gonzalo E; Wagner, Amy K

    2015-03-02

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical method that can assess real-time in vivo dopamine (DA) concentration changes to study the kinetics of DA neurotransmission. Electrical stimulation of dopaminergic (DAergic) pathways can elicit FSCV DA responses that largely reflect a balance of DA release and reuptake. Interpretation of these evoked DA responses requires a framework to discern the contribution of DA release and reuptake. The current, widely implemented interpretive framework for doing so is the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model, which is grounded on two assumptions- (1) DA release rate is constant during stimulation, and (2) DA reuptake occurs through dopamine transporters (DAT) in a manner consistent with M-M enzyme kinetics. Though the M-M model can simulate evoked DA responses that rise convexly, response types that predominate in the ventral striatum, the M-M model cannot simulate dorsal striatal responses that rise concavely. Based on current neurotransmission principles and experimental FSCV data, we developed a novel, quantitative, neurobiological framework to interpret DA responses that assumes DA release decreases exponentially during stimulation and continues post-stimulation at a diminishing rate. Our model also incorporates dynamic M-M kinetics to describe DA reuptake as a process of decreasing reuptake efficiency. We demonstrate that this quantitative, neurobiological model is an extension of the traditional M-M model that can simulate heterogeneous regional DA responses following manipulation of stimulation duration, frequency, and DA pharmacology. The proposed model can advance our interpretive framework for future in vivo FSCV studies examining regional DA kinetics and their alteration by disease and DA pharmacology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. TMS-EEG signatures of GABAergic neurotransmission in the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premoli, Isabella; Castellanos, Nazareth; Rivolta, Davide; Belardinelli, Paolo; Bajo, Ricardo; Zipser, Carl; Espenhahn, Svenja; Heidegger, Tonio; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2014-04-16

    Combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) constitutes a powerful tool to directly assess human cortical excitability and connectivity. TMS of the primary motor cortex elicits a sequence of TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs). It is thought that inhibitory neurotransmission through GABA-A receptors (GABAAR) modulates early TEPs (TMS), whereas GABA-B receptors (GABABR) play a role for later TEPs (at ∼100 ms after TMS). However, the physiological underpinnings of TEPs have not been clearly elucidated yet. Here, we studied the role of GABAA/B-ergic neurotransmission for TEPs in healthy subjects using a pharmaco-TMS-EEG approach. In Experiment 1, we tested the effects of a single oral dose of alprazolam (a classical benzodiazepine acting as allosteric-positive modulator at α1, α2, α3, and α5 subunit-containing GABAARs) and zolpidem (a positive modulator mainly at the α1 GABAAR) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. In Experiment 2, we tested the influence of baclofen (a GABABR agonist) and diazepam (a classical benzodiazepine) versus placebo on TEPs. Alprazolam and diazepam increased the amplitude of the negative potential at 45 ms after stimulation (N45) and decreased the negative component at 100 ms (N100), whereas zolpidem increased the N45 only. In contrast, baclofen specifically increased the N100 amplitude. These results provide strong evidence that the N45 represents activity of α1-subunit-containing GABAARs, whereas the N100 represents activity of GABABRs. Findings open a novel window of opportunity to study alteration of GABAA-/GABAB-related inhibition in disorders, such as epilepsy or schizophrenia.

  20. Ontogeny of catecholamine and adenosine receptor-mediated cAMP signaling of embryonic red blood cells: role of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R; Blass, C; Götz, R; Dragon, S

    1999-12-15

    We have previously shown that the cAMP signaling pathway controls major aspects of embryonic red blood cell (RBC) function in avian embryos (Glombitza et al, Am J Physiol 271:R973, 1996; and Dragon et al, Am J Physiol 271:R982, 1996) that are important for adaptation of the RBC gas transport properties to the progressive hypercapnia and hypoxia of later stages of avian embryonic development. Data about the ontogeny of receptor-mediated cAMP signaling are lacking. We have analyzed the response of primitive and definitive chick embryo RBC harvested from day 3 to 18 of development towards forskolin, beta-adrenergic, and A2 receptor agonists. The results show a strong response of immature definitive and primitive RBC to adenosine A2 and beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, which is drastically reduced in the last stage of development, coincident with the appearance of mature, transcriptionally inactive RBC. Modulation of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) has a controlling influence on cAMP accumulation in definitive RBC. Under physiological conditions, PDE3 is inhibited due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Inhibition of sGC with the specific inhibitor ODQ decreases receptor-mediated stimulation of cAMP production; this effect is reversed by the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. sGC is acitivated by nitric oxide (NO), but we found no evidence for production of NO by erythrocyte NO-synthase. However, embryonic hemoglobin releases NO in an oxygen-linked manner that may activate guanylyl cyclase.

  1. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  2. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated meningeal dilatation induced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine in rats is not altered by 5-HT depletion and chronic corticosterone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, E; Sánchez-Maldonado, C; Terrón, J A

    2011-01-01

    Low brain serotonin levels and high circulating levels of corticosterone are features of migraine. The 5-HT7 receptor was shown to mediate dilator responses to the 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, 5-carboxamidotryptamine in the middle meningeal artery of rats. Here we analyzed the effect of serotonin depletion and chronic corticosterone treatment on 5-HT7 receptor-mediated dilatation induced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine in the middle meningeal artery of anesthetized rats. Two weeks before experiments, male Wistar rats received i.c.v. injections of vehicle or the neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine; upon recovery, animals received a chronic s.c. treatment (2 weeks) with vehicle (1 ml/kg/day) or corticosterone (20 mg/kg/day). At the end of treatments, animals were anesthetized and prepared for recording of blood pressure and blood flow in the middle meningeal artery, and i.v. drug administration. All animals received the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR-127935 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) alone or combined with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-269970 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). Topical 5-carboxamidotryptamine (0.01-1000 microM) to the exposed dura mater encephala produced decreases in diastolic blood pressure, variable changes in meningeal blood flow and increases in conductance (i.e. dilatation) in the middle meningeal artery. Meningeal dilator responses to 5-carboxamidotryptamine did not differ among treatment groups. In all cases, the combined treatment with GR-127935 + SB-269970 inhibited hypotensive and meningeal dilator responses to 5- carboxamidotryptamine. Together, these data do not support the notion that 5-HT7 receptors mediating dilatation in the middle meningeal artery are regulated by low brain serotonin levels and/or chronically high circulating levels of corticosterone. Further studies are required to elucidate the potential impact of these conditions and the role of 5-HT7 receptors in migraine.

  3. Prenatal nicotine is associated with reduced AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated rises in calcium within the laterodorsal tegmentum: a pontine nucleus involved in addiction processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, L F; Kohlmeier, K A

    2015-06-01

    Despite huge efforts from public sectors to educate society as to the deleterious physiological consequences of smoking while pregnant, 12-25% of all babies worldwide are born to mothers who smoked during their pregnancies. Chief among the negative legacies bestowed to the exposed individual is an enhanced proclivity postnatally to addict to drugs of abuse, which suggests that the drug exposure during gestation changed the developing brain in such a way that biased it towards addiction. Glutamate signalling has been shown to be altered by prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) and glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter within the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), which is a brainstem region importantly involved in responding to motivational stimuli and critical in development of drug addiction-associated behaviours, however, it is unknown whether PNE alters glutamate signalling within this nucleus. Accordingly, we used calcium imaging, to evaluate AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated calcium responses in LDT brain slices from control and PNE mice. We also investigated whether the positive AMPA receptor modulator cyclothiazide (CYZ) had differential actions on calcium in the LDT following PNE. Our data indicated that PNE significantly decreased AMPA receptor-mediated calcium responses, and altered the neuronal calcium response to consecutive NMDA applications within the LDT. Furthermore, CYZ strongly potentiated AMPA-induced responses, however, this action was significantly reduced in the LDT of PNE mice when compared with enhancements in responses in control LDT cells. Immunohistochemical processing confirmed that calcium imaging recordings were obtained from the LDT nucleus as determined by presence of cholinergic neurons. Our results contribute to the body of evidence suggesting that neurobiological changes are induced if gestation is accompanied by nicotine exposure. We conclude that in light of the role played by the LDT in motivated behaviour, the

  4. The plasma concentration of HDL-associated apoM is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Benn, Marianne; Christensen, Pernille M; Gordts, Philip L S M; Roebroek, Anton J M; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Dahlbäck, Björn; Nielsen, Lars B

    2012-10-01

    ApoM is mainly associated with HDL. Nevertheless, we have consistently observed positive correlations of apoM with plasma LDL cholesterol in humans. Moreover, LDL receptor deficiency is associated with increased plasma apoM in mice. Here, we tested the idea that plasma apoM concentrations are affected by the rate of LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles. We measured apoM in humans each carrying one of three different LDL receptor mutations (n = 9) or the apoB3500 mutation (n = 12). These carriers had increased plasma apoM (1.34 ± 0.13 µM, P = 0.003, and 1.23 ± 0.10 µM, P = 0.02, respectively) as compared with noncarriers (0.93 ± 0.04 µM). When we injected human apoM-containing HDL into Wt (n = 6) or LDL receptor-deficient mice (n = 6), the removal of HDL-associated human apoM was delayed in the LDL receptor-deficient mice. After 2 h, 54 ± 5% versus 90 ± 8% (P LDL receptor-deficient mice, respectively. Finally, we compared the turnover of radio-iodinated LDL and plasma apoM concentrations in 45 normocholesterolemic humans. There was a negative correlation between plasma apoM and the fractional catabolic rate of LDL (r = -0.38, P = 0.009). These data suggest that the plasma clearance of apoM, despite apoM primarily being associated with HDL, is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

  5. Endomorphins 1 and 2 reduce relaxant non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission in rat gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storr, M; Gaffal, E; Schusdziarra, V; Allescher, H-D

    2002-06-14

    It is now well established that opioids modulate cholinergic excitatory neurotransmission in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to characterize a possible effect of endomorphins on nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxant neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus in vitro. The drugs used in the experiments were the endogenous mu-opioid receptors (MORs) endomorphin 1 and 2 and the mu-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2). CTAP left the basal tonus and the spontaneous activity of the preparation unchanged. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) under NANC conditions at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 16 Hz caused a frequency-dependent relaxant response on the 5-hydoxytryptamine (5-HT) (10(-7) M) precontracted smooth-muscle strip. Both endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2 significantly reduced this relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. Endomorphin 1 proved to be more potent in reducing the relaxant responses. The endomorphin effects were significantly reversed by the MOR antagonist CTAP. CTAP itself did not influence the EFS-induced relaxation. In summary, these data provide evidence that the endogenous MOR agonists endomorphin 1 and 2 can reduce nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus smooth muscle via a pathway involving MORs. The physiological relevance of these findings remains to be established, since the data presented suggest that the endomorphins act as neuromodulators within NANC relaxant neurotransmission.

  6. Channel-opening kinetic mechanism for human wild-type GluK2 and the M867I mutant kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Wang, Congzhou; Park, Jae Seon; Niu, Li

    2010-11-02

    GluK2 is a kainate receptor subunit that is alternatively spliced at the C-terminus. Previous studies implicated GluK2 in autism. In particular, the methionine-to-isoleucine replacement at amino acid residue 867 (M867I) that can only occur in the longest isoform of the human GluK2 (hGluK2), as the disease (autism) mutation, is thought to cause gain-of-function. However, the kinetic properties of the wild-type hGluK2 and the functional consequence of this gain-of-function mutation at the molecular level are not well understood. To investigate whether the M867I mutation affects the channel properties of the human GluK2 kainate receptor, we have systematically characterized the rate and the equilibrium constants pertinent to channel opening and channel desensitization for this mutant and the wild-type hGluK2 receptor, along with the wild-type rat GluK2 kainate receptor (rGluK2) as the control. Our results show that the M867I mutation does not affect either the rate or the equilibrium constants of the channel opening but does slow down the channel desensitization rate by ~1.6-fold at saturating glutamate concentrations. It is possible that a consequence of this mutation on the desensitization rate is linked to facilitating the receptor trafficking and membrane expression, given the close proximity of M867 to the forward trafficking motif in the C-terminal sequence. By comparing the kinetic data of the wild-type human and rat GluK2 receptors, we also find that the human GluK2 has a ~3-fold smaller channel-opening rate constant but an identical channel-closing rate constant and thus a channel-opening probability of 0.85 vs 0.96 for rGluK2. Furthermore, the intrinsic equilibrium dissociation constant K(1) for hGluK2, like the EC(50) value, is ~2-fold lower than rGluK2. Our results therefore suggest that the human GluK2 is relatively a slowly activating channel but more sensitive to glutamate, as compared to the rat ortholog, despite the fact that the human and rat forms

  7. A homolog of FHM2 is involved in modulation of excitatory neurotransmission by serotonin in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena G Govorunova

    Full Text Available The C. elegans eat-6 gene encodes a Na(+, K(+-ATPase alpha subunit and is a homolog of the familial hemiplegic migraine candidate gene FHM2. Migraine is the most common neurological disorder linked to serotonergic dysfunction. We sought to study the pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine and their relation to serotonin (5-HT signaling using C. elegans as a genetic model. In C. elegans, exogenous 5-HT inhibits paralysis induced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that the eat-6(ad467 mutation or RNAi of eat-6 increases aldicarb sensitivity and causes complete resistance to 5-HT treatment, indicating that EAT-6 is a component of the pathway that couples 5-HT signaling and ACh neurotransmission. While a postsynaptic role of EAT-6 at the bodywall NMJs has been well established, we found that EAT-6 may in addition regulate presynaptic ACh neurotransmission. We show that eat-6 is expressed in ventral cord ACh motor neurons, and that cell-specific RNAi of eat-6 in the ACh neurons leads to hypersensitivity to aldicarb. Electron microscopy showed an increased number of synaptic vesicles in the ACh neurons in the eat-6(ad467 mutant. Genetic analyses suggest that EAT-6 interacts with EGL-30 Galphaq, EGL-8 phospholipase C and SLO-1 BK channel signaling to modulate ACh neurotransmission and that either reduced or excessive EAT-6 function may lead to increased ACh neurotransmission. Study of the interaction between eat-6 and 5-HT receptors revealed both stimulatory and inhibitory 5-HT inputs to the NMJs. We show that the inhibitory and stimulatory 5-HT signals arise from distinct 5-HT neurons. The role of eat-6 in modulation of excitatory neurotransmission by 5-HT may provide a genetic explanation for the therapeutic effects of the drugs targeting 5-HT receptors in the treatment of migraine patients.

  8. Anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine on spontaneous seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy: comparison of intraperitoneal injections with drug-in-food protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstatter, Heidi L; Clark, Suzanne; Dudek, F Edward

    2007-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of intraperitoneal (IP) injections and oral administration of carbamazepine (CBZ) in food on the frequency of spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. The purpose was to develop a convenient drug-in-food approach for continuous, long-term administration of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Single IP injections of CBZ (10-100 mg/kg) were compared to vehicle injections via six AED-versus-vehicle tests using a repeated-measures, crossover protocol. Similar protocols were used with CBZ-containing or control food pellets. CBZ significantly reduced motor seizure frequency at 30 and 100 mg/kg after single IP injections, and these doses completely blocked motor seizures during a 6-h postdrug epoch in 25% and 70% of the animals, respectively. Single administrations of 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg CBZ in food also significantly reduced motor seizures, and blocked seizures in 33% and 89% of the rats, respectively. CBZ administered in food three times per day (100 mg/kg x3 CBZ in food) continuously blocked nearly all motor seizures over a 5-day period, and completely suppressed motor seizures in 50% of the animals tested. CBZ strongly suppresses spontaneous motor seizures, and single doses of CBZ in food are as effective as IP injections in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. CBZ administered regularly in food continuously blocks nearly all motor seizures, and may provide a relatively simple method to test AEDs in chronic models of epilepsy.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide plays a key role in the inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig intravesical ureter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor S Fernandes

    Full Text Available According to previous observations nitric oxide (NO, as well as an unknown nature mediator are involved in the inhibitory neurotransmission to the intravesical ureter. This study investigates the hydrogen sulfide (H2S role in the neurogenic relaxation of the pig intravesical ureter. We have performed western blot and immunohistochemistry to study the expression of the H2S synthesis enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, measurement of enzymatic production of H2S and myographic studies for isometric force recording. Immunohistochemical assays showed a high CSE expression in the intravesical ureter muscular layer, as well as a strong CSE-immunoreactivity within nerve fibres distributed along smooth muscle bundles. CBS expression, however, was not consistently observed. On ureteral strips precontracted with thromboxane A2 analogue U46619, electrical field stimulation (EFS and the H2S donor P-(4-methoxyphenyl-P-4-morpholinylphosphinodithioic acid (GYY4137 evoked frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations. CSE inhibition with DL-propargylglycine (PPG reduced EFS-elicited responses and a combined blockade of both CSE and NO synthase (NOS with, respectively, PPG and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, greatly reduced such relaxations. Endogenous H2S production rate was reduced by PPG, rescued by addition of GYY4137 and was not changed by L-NOARG. EFS and GYY4137 relaxations were also reduced by capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA desensitization with capsaicin and blockade of ATP-dependent K+ (KATP channels, transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1, vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (VIP/PACAP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors with glibenclamide, HC030031, AMG9810, PACAP6-38 and CGRP8-37, respectively. These results suggest that H2S, synthesized by CSE, is involved in the inhibitory neurotransmission

  10. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  11. Key role of the dopamine D4 receptor in the modulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Quiroz, César; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Tanda, Gianluigi; Ferré, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) have been repeatedly associated with numerous neuropsychiatric disorders. Yet, the functional role of the D4 receptor and the functional differences of the products of DRD4 polymorphic variants remained enigmatic. Immunohistochemical and optogenetic-microdialysis experiments were performed in knock-in mice expressing a D4 receptor with the long intracellular domain of a human DRD4 polymorphic variant associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). When compared with the wild-type mouse D4 receptor, the expanded intracellular domain of the humanized D4 receptor conferred a gain of function, blunting methamphetamine-induced cortical activation and optogenetic and methamphetamine-induced corticostriatal glutamate release. The results demonstrate a key role of the D4 receptor in the modulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, these data imply that enhanced D4 receptor–mediated dopaminergic control of corticostriatal transmission constitutes a vulnerability factor of ADHD and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28097219

  12. Changes in aminoacidergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats after ayahuasca ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Neto, Eduardo Ferreira; da Cunha, Rafael Henrique; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier; Yonamine, Mauricio; Gouveia, Telma Luciana Furtado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Amado, Débora; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2013-11-26

    To evaluate changes in neurotransmission induced by a psychoactive beverage ayahuasca in the hippocampus and amygdala of naive rats. The level of monoamines, their main metabolites and amino acid neurotransmitters concentrations were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Four groups of rats were employed: saline-treated and rats receiving 250, 500 and 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca infusion (gavage). Animals were killed 40 min after drug ingestion and the structures stored at -80 °C until HPLC assay. The data from all groups were compared using Analysis of variance and Scheffé as post test and P ayahuasca. Animals that ingested 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca also showed a reduction of GLY level (0.11 ± 0.01 vs 0.29 ± 0.07, P ayahuasca doses: 250 mg/kg (1.29 ± 0.19 vs 0.84 ± 0.21, P ayahuasca administration in doses: 250 mg/kg (noradrenaline: 0.16 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P ayahuasca ingestion.

  13. The potential role of myostatin and neurotransmission genes in elite sport performances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Filonzi; N Franchini; M Vaghi; S Chiesa; F Nonnis Marzano

    2015-09-01

    Elite athletes are those who represent their sport at such major competition as the Olympic Games or World contests. The most outstanding athletes appear to emerge as a result of endogenous biologic characteristics interacting with exogenous influences of the environment, often described as a `Nature and Nurture’ struggle. In this work, we assessed the contribution given by 4 genes involved in muscles development (MSTN) and behavioural insights (5HTT, DAT and MAOA) to athletic performances. As for neurotransmission, 5HTT, DAT and MAOA genes have been considered as directly involved in the management of aggressiveness and anxiety. Genotypes and allelic frequencies of 5HTTLPR, MAOA-u VNTR, DAT VNTR and MSTN K153R were determined in 50 elite athletes and compared with 100 control athletes. In this work we found a significant correlation between the dopamine transporter genotype 9/9 and allele 9 and elite sport performances. On the contrary, no association was found between muscle development regulation or serotonin pathway and elite performances. Our data, for the first time, suggest a strong role of dopamine neurotransmitter in determining sport success, highlighting the role of emotional control and psycological management to reach high-level performances.

  14. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire N J Meunier

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors.

  15. Effects of emerging contaminants on neurotransmission and biotransformation in marine organisms - An in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Luis G; Barreto, Ângela; Trindade, Tito; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Oliveira, Miguel

    2016-05-15

    The effects of gold (ionic form and nanoparticles - AuNPs) and pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and fluoxetine) on enzymes involved in neurotransmission (acetylcholinesterase - AChE) and biotransformation (glutathione S-transferases - GST) were assessed by their incubation with Mytilus galloprovincialis' hemolymph and subcellular fraction of gills, respectively. AuNPs did not alter enzymatic activities unlike ionic gold that inhibited AChE and GST activities at 2.5 and 0.42mg·L(-1), respectively. Carbamazepine inhibited AChE activity at 500mg·L(-1) and fluoxetine at 1000mg·L(-1). GST was inhibited by carbamazepine at 250mg·L(-1) and by fluoxetine at 125mg·L(-1). Increased AChE activity was found in simultaneous exposures to fluoxetine and bovine serum albumin coated AuNPs (BSA-AuNPs). Concerning GST, in the simultaneous exposures, AuNPs revealed protective effects against carbamazepine (citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone coated) and fluoxetine (citrate and BSA coated) induced inhibition. However, BSA-AuNPs increased the inhibition caused by carbamazepine. AuNPs demonstrated ability to interfere with other chemicals toxicity justifying further studies.

  16. Abnormal γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in a Kcnq2 model of early onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Taku; Lossin, Christoph; Ihara, Yukiko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Koyama, Susumu; Hirose, Shinichi

    2017-08-01

    Mutations of the KCNQ2 gene, which encodes the Kv 7.2 subunit of voltage-gated M-type potassium channels, have been associated with epilepsy in the neonatal period. This developmental stage is unique in that the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is inhibitory in adults, triggers excitatory action due to a reversed chloride gradient. To examine whether KCNQ2-related neuronal hyperexcitability involves neonatally excitatory GABA, we examined 1-week-old knockin mice expressing the Kv 7.2 variant p.Tyr284Cys (Y284C). Brain slice electrophysiology revealed elevated CA1 hippocampal GABAergic interneuron activity with respect to presynaptic firing and postsynaptic current frequency. Blockade with the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline decreased ictal-like bursting in brain slices with lowered divalent ion concentration, which is consistent with GABA mediating an excitatory function that contributes to the hyperexcitability observed in mutant animals. We conclude that excitatory GABA contributes to the phenotype in these animals, which raises the question of whether this special type of neurotransmission has broader importance in neonatal epilepsy than is currently recognized. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and chronic stress-induced modulations of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Marie; Champeil-Potokar, Gaëlle; Lavialle, Monique; Vancassel, Sylvie; Denis, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Chronic stress causes the release of glucocorticoids, which greatly influence cerebral function, especially glutamatergic transmission. These stress-induced changes in neurotransmission could be counteracted by increasing the dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs). Numerous studies have described the capacity of n-3 PUFAs to help protect glutamatergic neurotransmission from damage induced by stress and glucocorticoids, possibly preventing the development of stress-related disorders such as depression or anxiety. The hippocampus contains glucocorticoid receptors and is involved in learning and memory. This makes it particularly sensitive to stress, which alters certain aspects of hippocampal function. In this review, the various ways in which n-3 PUFAs may prevent the harmful effects of chronic stress, particularly the alteration of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, are summarized.

  18. Induction of c-fos mRNA expression in an in vitro hippocampal slice model of adult rats after kainate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid or bicuculline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massamiri, T; Khrestchatisky, M; Ben-Ari, Y

    1994-01-17

    Levels of gene expression following in vitro treatment of rat hippocampal slices with kainate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or bicuculline were measured by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method. Following a short-term exposure to kainate, c-fos gene expression was induced by 12-fold in the adult, but not the newborn, hippocampus. Under the same experimental conditions, zifl268 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression were unchanged. Our results also demonstrate a lack of induction of c-fos, zifl268 and BDNF after short-time treatment of either adult or newborn hippocampal slices with GABA or bicuculline. The relevance of the differential induction of gene expression in the adult and newborn in an in vitro hippocampal slice model as compared to previously described in vivo models is discussed.

  19. Activity-dependent regulation of release probability at excitatory hippocampal synapses: a crucial role of FMRP in neurotransmission

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. FMRP has been suggested to play important roles in regulating neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory hippocampal and cortical synapses. However, the origins and the mechanisms of these FMRP actions remain incompletely understood, and the rol...

  20. Insights into the mechanisms of ifosfamide encephalopathy: drug metabolites have agonistic effects on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification in mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, J Y; Idle, J R; Vågbø, C B; Magistretti, P J

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic value of the alkylating agent ifosfamide has been limited by major side effects including encephalopathy. Although the underlying biochemical processes of the neurotoxic side effects are still unclear, they could be attributed to metabolites rather than to ifosfamide itself. In the present study, the effects of selected ifosfamide metabolites on indices of neuronal activity have been investigated, in particular for S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) and thiodiglycolic acid (TDGA). Because of structural similarities of SCMC with glutamate, the Ca(2+)(i) response of single mouse cortical neurons to SCMC and TDGA was investigated. SCMC, but not TDGA, evoked a robust increase in Ca(2+)(i) concentration that could be abolished by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), but only partly diminished by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK=801). Cyclothiazide (CYZ), used to prevent AMPA/kainate receptor desensitization, potentiated the response to SCMC. Because activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is known to induce proton influx, the intracellular pH (pH(i)) response to SCMC was investigated. SCMC caused a concentration-dependent acidification that was amplified by CYZ. Since H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) activity leads to similar cellular acidification, we tested its potential involvement in the pH(i) response. Application of the lactate transport inhibitor quercetin diminished the pH(i) response to SCMC and TDGA by 43 and 51%, respectively, indicating that these compounds may be substrates of MCTs. Taken together, this study indicates that hitherto apparently inert ifosfamide metabolites, in particular SCMC, activate AMPA/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification. Both processes could provide the biochemical basis of the observed ifosfamide-associated encephalopathy.

  1. THE 10,000 FOLD EFFECT OF RETROGRADE NEUROTRANSMISSION, A NEW CONCEPT FOR STROKE REVIVAL: USE OF INTRACAROTID SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA showed a level 1 benefit in acute stroke (within 3-6 hrs. Intracarotid sodium nitroprusside (ICSNP has been studied in this context with a wide treatment window, fast recovery and affordability. This work proposes two mechanisms for acute cases and one mechanism for chronic cases, which are interrelated, for physiological recovery. RETROGRADE NEUROTRANSMISSION (acute cases: Normal excitatory impulse: at the synaptic level, glutamate activates NMDA receptors, with nitric oxide synthetase (NOS on the postsynaptic membrane, for further propagation by the calcium-calmodulin complex. Nitric oxide (NO, produced by NOS travels backward across the chemical synapse and binds the axon-terminal NO receptor/sGC of a presynaptic neuron, regulating anterograde neurotransmission (ANT via retrograde neurotransmission (RNT. Heme is the ligand-binding site of the NO receptor/sGC. Heme exhibits >10, 000-fold higher affinity for NO than for oxygen (the 10, 000-fold effect and is completed in 20 msec

  2. The role of G protein-coupled receptors in the early evolution of neurotransmission and the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-02-15

    The origin and evolution of the nervous system is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic events in biology. The recent sequencing of complete genomes from early metazoan organisms provides a new platform to study the origins of neuronal gene families. This review explores the early metazoan expansion of the largest integral transmembrane protein family, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which serve as molecular targets for a large subset of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in higher animals. GPCR repertories from four pre-bilaterian metazoan genomes were compared. This includes the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, which have primitive nervous systems (nerve nets), the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, which lack nerve and muscle cells. Comparative genomics demonstrate that the rhodopsin and glutamate receptor families, known to be involved in neurotransmission in higher animals are also widely found in pre-bilaterian metazoans and possess substantial expansions of rhodopsin-family-like GPCRs. Furthermore, the emerging knowledge on the functions of adhesion GPCRs in the vertebrate nervous system provides a platform to examine possible analogous roles of their closest homologues in pre-bilaterians. Intriguingly, the presence of molecular components required for GPCR-mediated neurotransmission in pre-bilaterians reveals that they exist in both primitive nervous systems and nerve-cell-free environments, providing essential comparative models to better understand the origins of the nervous system and neurotransmission. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Cell Type-Specific Delivery of RNAi by Ligand-Functionalized Curdlan Nanoparticles: Balancing the Receptor Mediation and the Charge Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinga; Cai, Jia; Han, Jingfen; Baigude, Huricha

    2015-09-30

    Tissue-specific delivery of therapeutic RNAi has great potential for clinical applications. Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in targeted delivery of biotherapeutics including short interfering RNA (siRNA). Previously we reported a novel Curdlan-based nanoparticle for intracellular delivery of siRNA. Here we designed a nanoparticle based on ligand-functionalized Curdlan. Disaccharides were site-specifically conjugated to 6-deoxy-6-amino Curdlan, and the cell line specificity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and siRNA delivery efficiency of the corresponding disaccharide-modified 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan were investigated. Observation by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry showed that galactose-containing Curdlan derivatives delivered fluorescently labeled short nucleic acid to HepG2 cells expressing ASGPR receptor but not in other cells lacking surface ASGPR protein. Moreover, highly galactose-substituted Curdlan derivatives delivered siRNA specifically to ASGPR-expressing cells and induced RNAi activities, silencing endogenous GAPDH gene expression. Our data demonstrated that galactose-functionalized 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan is a promising carrier for short therapeutic nucleic acids for clinical applications.

  4. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  5. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Contribution of priority PAHs and POPs to Ah receptor-mediated activities in sediment samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported.

  7. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  8. The role of G protein coupled receptor-mediated signaling in the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Manan, Zainab; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care, the prognosis of Acanthamoeba infections remains poor, suggesting that new targets are needed that can affect parasite survival and host-pathogen interactions. G proteins and their coupled receptors are well known regulators of a variety of cellular functions. The overall aim of the present study was to study the role of G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor on the biology and pathogenesis of keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype. Inhibition of β adrenergic receptor using antagonist, propranolol had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities A. castellanii as determined using zymographic assays. Conversely, β adrenergic receptor agonist, isoprenaline showed increased proteases. Interestingly, β adrenergic receptor inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), viability (using amoebicidal assays by measuring uptake of Trypan blue) and encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form. Pre-treatment of parasites with propranolol hampered A. castellanii-mediated human brain microvascular endothelial cell cytotoxicity, as measured by the lacatate dehydrogenase release. The aforementioned findings suggest that G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling in A. castellanii biology and pathogenesis may offer new pharmacological targets.

  9. Mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated p38MAP kinase independently of angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor is known to mediate a variety of physiological actions of Ang II including autophagy. However, the role of AT1 receptor in cardiomyocyte autophagy triggered by mechanical stress still remains elusive. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether and how AT1 receptor participates in cardiomyocyte autophagy induced by mechanical stresses. A 48-hour mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aorta constriction (TAC were imposed to cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats and adult male C57B/L6 mice, respectively, to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy prior to the assessment of cardiomyocyte autophagy using LC3b-II. Losartan, an AT1 receptor blocker, but not PD123319, the AT2 inhibitor, was found to significantly reduce mechanical stretch-induced LC3b-II upregulation. Moreover, inhibition of p38MAP kinase attenuated not only mechanical stretch-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but also autophagy. To the contrary, inhibition of ERK and JNK suppressed cardiac hypertrophy but not autophagy. Intriguingly, mechanical stretch-induced autophagy was significantly inhibited by Losartan in the absence of Ang II. Taken together, our results indicate that mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through AT1 receptor-mediated activation of p38MAP kinase independently of Ang II.

  10. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  11. Luteolin Reduces BACE1 Expression through NF-κB and through Estrogen Receptor Mediated Pathways in HEK293 and SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Peng; Li, Changhao; Wu, Jun; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Beta-secretase (BACE1) controls an essential step for the generation of amyloid- peptide (Aβ). As Aβ forms the principle pathologies in Alzheimer’s disease, lowering A production by inhibiting BACE1 is a plausible therapeutic approach. In the present study, we identified a natural polyphenol, luteolin, as a potent inhibitor of BACE1 transcription inhuman embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines. Luteolin is capable of suppressing the activation of BACE1 promoter by NF-κB signaling. We further characterized that luteolin interferes with NF-κB signaling by with both directly and indirectly disrupting p65 complex formation. In addition, we discovered that estrogen receptor mediates luteolin’s effect in inhibiting NF-κB signaling inhibiting and BACE1 transcription. Interestingly, the beneficial effects of luteolin may be attributed to selective activation profiles of luteolin to different estrogen receptor subtypes. Our study reports luteolin as a potent BACE1-inhibiting compound, providing useful information in understanding estrogen receptor- and NF-κB-mediated signaling and in regulating BACE1 expression.

  12. Heterogenous GABA(B) receptor-mediated pathways are involved in the local GABAergic system of the rat trigeminal ganglion: possible involvement of KCTD proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, H; Sohma, Y; Kanbara, K; Otsuki, Y

    2012-08-30

    It is well known that Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays an important role in signal transduction in the central nervous system. However, the function of GABA in the peripheral nervous system, including sensory ganglions, is still unclear. In this study we have characterized the expression, cellular distribution, and function of GABA(B) receptor subunits, and the recently discovered GABA(B) auxiliary subunits, K(+) channel tetramerization domain-containing (KCTD) proteins, in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuronal cells, which are devoid of synapses. We found heterogeneous expression of both GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, and a near-plasma membrane localization of KCTD12. In addition, we found that GABA(B2) subunits correlated with KCTD16. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that responses to the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, were variable and both increases and decreases in excitability were observed. This correlated with observed differences in voltage-dependent K(+) current responses to baclofen in voltage-clamped TG neuronal cells. The functional diversity of the GABA(B)ergic regulation on the excitability of the TG neuronal cell bodies could be due to the heterogenous expression of KCTD proteins, and subsequent regulation of plasma membrane K(+) channels. Taken together with our previous demonstration of a local GABA(A) receptor-mediated system in rat TG, we provide an updated GABAergic model in the rat TG that incorporates both GABA(A)- and GABA(B)-receptor systems.

  13. A ketolide antibiotic, telithromycin, inhibits vascular adrenergic neurotransmission in the rat mesenteric vascular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Y; Zamami, Y; Koyama, T; Hobara, N; Jin, X; Kitamura, Y; Kawasaki, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A ketolide antibiotic, telithromycin, has side effects including temporary loss of consciousness in clinical use, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the effects of telithromycin on perivascular nerve function in rat mesenteric arteries, in comparison with those of macrolide (erythromycin and clarithromycin) and new quinolone antibiotics (levofloxacin and gatifloxacin). Experimental approach: In vitro, vascular responses and release of noradrenaline induced by periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) of rat perfused mesenteric vascular beds were measured in the presence of each antibiotic. In vivo blood pressure measurement was performed in Wistar rats. Key results: In mesenteric preparations with resting tone, telithromycin (10 nM–10 μM) markedly inhibited PNS (4–12 Hz)-induced adrenergic nerve- and exogenous noradrenaline-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas the other antibiotics slightly inhibited PNS-induced responses without affecting noradrenaline-induced responses. Telithromycin significantly reduced PNS (12 Hz)-evoked noradrenaline release in the perfusate. In pre-constricted preparations with or without endothelium, telithromycin (0.1 nM–10 μM) caused a concentration-dependent vasodilation. Telithromycin (10 nM) inhibited calcium-induced vasoconstriction in high KCl and calcium-free medium. None of the antibiotics used affected PNS (0.5–2 Hz)-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) nerve- and exogenous CGRP-mediated vasodilation. Intravenous injection of telithromycin significantly lowered blood pressure in anaesthetized rats. Conclusions and implications: These results suggest that telithromycin causes not only strong inhibition of perivascular adrenergic neurotransmission but also a vasodilator action in mesenteric vascular beds and hypotension. It is thus possible that telithromycin increases visceral blood flow, consequently reducing cerebral blood flow and resulting

  14. Alterations to melanocortinergic, GABAergic and cannabinoid neurotransmission associated with olanzapine-induced weight gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Weston-Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs are used to treat schizophrenia but can cause serious metabolic side-effects, such as obesity and diabetes. This study examined the effects of low to high doses of olanzapine on appetite/metabolic regulatory signals in the hypothalamus and brainstem to elucidate the mechanisms underlying olanzapine-induced obesity. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Levels of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, neuropeptide Y (NPY and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(65, enzyme for GABA synthesis mRNA expression, and cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R binding density (using [(3H]SR-141716A were examined in the arcuate nucleus (Arc and dorsal vagal complex (DVC of female Sprague Dawley rats following 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg olanzapine or vehicle (3×/day, 14-days. Consistent with its weight gain liability, olanzapine significantly decreased anorexigenic POMC and increased orexigenic NPY mRNA expression in a dose-sensitive manner in the Arc. GAD(65 mRNA expression increased and CB1R binding density decreased in the Arc and DVC. Alterations to neurotransmission signals in the brain significantly correlated with body weight and adiposity. The minimum dosage threshold required to induce weight gain in the rat was 0.5 mg/kg olanzapine. CONCLUSIONS: Olanzapine-induced weight gain is associated with reduced appetite-inhibiting POMC and increased NPY. This study also supports a role for the CB1R and GABA in the mechanisms underlying weight gain side-effects, possibly by altering POMC transmission. Metabolic dysfunction can be modelled in the female rat using low, clinically-comparable olanzapine doses when administered in-line with the half-life of the drug.

  15. Regulation of the genes involved in neurotransmission in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuch Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is the full name of the disease commonly deemed ADHD. This disease is most frequently diagnosed in childhood, and it affects up to 12 % of all children world-wide. The current clinical criteria (the base for diagnosis can be found in DSM -V. The core symptoms are divided in three groups: hyperactivity, impulsivity and impaired attention. The aetiology of the disorder is combined, including a wide range of factors, and the genetic, environmental, toxic, perinatal background is taken into account. Because, currently, more and more studies are seeking to explore the heritability of the disorder, the aim of this study is to review the information provided by different research centres which discuss the genetic background of the disease. Herein, we present the results of different studies gathered from the online database. Our findings indicate that the participation of genetic factors within this disorder is supported by family, twin and adoption studies. Indeed, in current literature, researchers estimate that there is a higher risk of developing ADHD among children from families with an ADHD history. Of particular note is that there are some studies indicating particular genes that determine the susceptibility to ADHD. Such studies make mention that most of these genes encode components of the dompaminergic and serotoninergic neurotransmission systems. Researchers in the field, thus, are attempting to link the presence of certain alleles in affected children with their response to treatment. Yet, while ADHD is now considered as being a disorder of genetic background, we cannot indicate a single gene or its mutation that would be crucial in the aetiology and diagnosis. Still, a number of candidate genes have been reported so far.

  16. Chronic nandrolone decanoate exposure during adolescence affects emotional behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Quentin; Speziali, Simona; Rubino, Tiziana; Dominguez-Lopez, Sergio; Bambico, Francis Rodriguez; Gobbi, Gabriella; Parolaro, Daniela

    2014-08-01

    Nandrolone decanoate, an anabolic androgen steroid (AAS) illicitly used by adult and adolescent athletes to enhance physical performance and body image, induces psychiatric side effects, such as aggression, depression as well as a spectrum of adverse physiological impairments. Since adolescence represents a neurodevelopmental window that is extremely sensitive to the detrimental effects of drug abuse, we investigated the long-term behavioral and neurophysiological consequences of nandrolone abuse during adolescence. Adolescent rats received daily injections of nandrolone decanoate (15 mg/kg, i.m.) for 14 days (PND 40-53). At early adulthood (PND 68), forced swim, sucrose preference, open field and elevated plus maze tests were performed to assess behavioral changes. In vivo electrophysiological recordings were carried out to monitor changes in electrical activity of serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC). Our results show that after early exposure to nandrolone, rats display depression-related behavior, characterized by increased immobility in the forced swim test and reduced sucrose intake in the sucrose preference test. In addition, adult rats presented anxiety-like behavior characterized by decreased time and number of entries in the central zone of the open field and decreased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Nandrolone decreased the firing rate of spontaneously active serotonergic neurons in the DRN while increasing the firing rate of noradrenergic neurons in the LC. These results provide evidence that nandrolone decanoate exposure during adolescence alters the emotional profile of animals in adulthood and significantly modifies both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission.

  17. Impaired Excitatory Neurotransmission in the Urinary Bladder from the Obese Zucker Rat: Role of Cannabinoid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Igor; Recio, Paz; Martínez, María Pilar; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Ribeiro, Ana S. F.; Agis-Torres, Ángel; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Fernandes, Vítor S.; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms. This study investigates whether functional and expression changes of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors are involved in the bladder dysfunction in an obese rat model with insulin resistance. Bladder samples from obese Zucker rat (OZR) and their respective controls lean Zucker rat (LZR) were processed for immunohistochemistry and western blot for studying the cannabinoid receptors expression. Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips from LZR and OZR were also mounted in myographs for isometric force recordings. Neuronal and smooth muscle CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and the nerve fiber density was diminished in the OZR bladder. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh) induced frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions of LZR and OZR DSM. ACh contractile responses were similar in LZR and OZR. EFS-elicited contractions, however, were reduced in OZR bladder. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists failed to modify the DSM basal tension in LZR and OZR In LZR bladder, EFS responses were inhibited by ACEA and SER-601, CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, these effects being reversed by ACEA plus the CB1 antagonist, AM-251 or SER-601 plus the CB2 antagonist, AM-630. In OZR bladder, the inhibitory action of ACEA on nerve-evoked contractions was diminished, whereas that SER-601 did not change EFS responses. These results suggest that a diminished function and expression of neuronal cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, as well as a lower nerve fiber density is involved in the impaired excitatory neurotransmission of the urinary bladder from the OZR. PMID:27285468

  18. Enhancement of inhibitory neurotransmission and inhibition of excitatory mechanisms underlie the anticonvulsant effects of Mallotus oppositifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Kwami Edem Kukuia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mallotus oppositifolius is a shrub that is used traditionally to treat epilepsy, but its potential has not been scientifically validated. Aims: This study investigated the anticonvulsant properties and possible mechanism of action of the 70% v/v hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of M. oppositifolius.Materials and Methods: Inprinting control region (ICR mice (25–30 g were pretreated with the M. oppositifolius leaf extract (10–100 mg/kg before administering the respective convulsants (pentylenetetrazole [PTZ], picrotoxin [PTX], strychnine [STR], 4-aminopyridine [4-AP], and pilocarpine. The effect of the extract in maximal electroshock seizure (MES model was investigated also. Statistical Analysis: Data were presented as mean ± standard error of the mean and were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA or two-way ANOVA where appropriate with Newman–Keuls or Bonferroni post hoc test respectively. P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In both PTX and PTZ test, extract delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. In the STR-induced seizure test, the extract significantly delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the duration of seizures. The extract also delayed the onset of clonic and tonic seizures as well as increasing the survival of mice in the 4-AP-induced seizure test. It further reduced the duration of tonic limb extensions in the MES test. In the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the extract significantly delayed the onset of clonic convulsions and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. Moreover, the anticonvulsant effect of the extract was attenuated by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These findings show that the extract has anticonvulsant effect possible mediated by GABAergic, glycinergic neurotransmission, and potassium channel conductions. It may also be acting by antagonizing muscarinic

  19. Synaptic Neurotransmission Depression in Ventral Tegmental Dopamine Neurons and Cannabinoid-Associated Addictive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Han, Jing; Jia, Lintao; Maillet, Jean-Christian; Bai, Guang; Xu, Lin; Jia, Zhengping; Zheng, Qiaohua; Zhang, Wandong; Monette, Robert; Merali, Zul; Zhu, Zhou; Wang, Wei; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is an association of compulsive drug use with long-term associative learning/memory. Multiple forms of learning/memory are primarily subserved by activity- or experience-dependent synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Recent studies suggest LTP expression in locally activated glutamate synapses onto dopamine neurons (local Glu-DA synapses) of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) following a single or chronic exposure to many drugs of abuse, whereas a single exposure to cannabinoid did not significantly affect synaptic plasticity at these synapses. It is unknown whether chronic exposure of cannabis (marijuana or cannabinoids), the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, induce LTP or LTD at these synapses. More importantly, whether such alterations in VTA synaptic plasticity causatively contribute to drug addictive behavior has not previously been addressed. Here we show in rats that chronic cannabinoid exposure activates VTA cannabinoid CB1 receptors to induce transient neurotransmission depression at VTA local Glu-DA synapses through activation of NMDA receptors and subsequent endocytosis of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunits. A GluR2-derived peptide blocks cannabinoid-induced VTA synaptic depression and conditioned place preference, i.e., learning to associate drug exposure with environmental cues. These data not only provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic depression at VTA dopamine circuitry requires GluR2 endocytosis, but also suggest an essential contribution of such synaptic depression to cannabinoid-associated addictive learning, in addition to pointing to novel pharmacological strategies for the treatment of cannabis addiction. PMID:21187978

  20. Abnormal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission during rest and task production in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Kristina; Berman, Brian D; Herscovitch, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2013-09-11

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is thought to involve structural and functional abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry; however, neurochemical correlates underpinning these abnormalities as well as their relations to spasmodic dysphonia symptoms remain unknown. We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [(11)C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. We found that patients, compared to healthy controls, had bilaterally decreased RAC binding potential (BP) to striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors on average by 29.2%, which was associated with decreased RAC displacement (RAC ΔBP) in the left striatum during symptomatic speaking (group average difference 10.2%), but increased RAC ΔBP in the bilateral striatum during asymptomatic tapping (group average difference 10.1%). Patients with more severe voice symptoms and subclinically longer reaction time to initiate the tapping sequence had greater RAC ΔBP measures, while longer duration of spasmodic dysphonia was associated with a decrease in task-induced RAC ΔBP. Decreased dopaminergic transmission during symptomatic speech production may represent a disorder-specific pathophysiological trait involved in symptom generation, whereas increased dopaminergic function during unaffected task performance may be explained by a compensatory adaptation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system possibly due to decreased striatal D2/D3 receptor availability. These changes can be linked to the clinical and subclinical features of spasmodic dysphonia and may represent the neurochemical basis of basal ganglia alterations in this disorder.

  1. Sleep pattern and learning in knockdown mice with reduced cholinergic neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cholinergic neurotransmission can affect memory formation and influence sleep-wake cycles (SWC. In the present study, we describe the SWC in mice with a deficient vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT system, previously characterized as presenting reduced acetylcholine release and cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions. Continuous, chronic ECoG and EMG recordings were used to evaluate the SWC pattern during light and dark phases in VAChT knockdown heterozygous (VAChT-KDHET, n=7 and wild-type (WT, n=7 mice. SWC were evaluated for sleep efficiency, total amount and mean duration of slow-wave, intermediate and paradoxical sleep, as well as the number of awakenings from sleep. After recording SWC, contextual fear-conditioning tests were used as an acetylcholine-dependent learning paradigm. The results showed that sleep efficiency in VAChT-KDHET animals was similar to that of WT mice, but that the SWC was more fragmented. Fragmentation was characterized by an increase in the number of awakenings, mainly during intermediate sleep. VAChT-KDHET animals performed poorly in the contextual fear-conditioning paradigm (mean freezing time: 34.4±3.1 and 44.5±3.3 s for WT and VAChT-KDHET animals, respectively, which was followed by a 45% reduction in the number of paradoxical sleep episodes after the training session. Taken together, the results show that reduced cholinergic transmission led to sleep fragmentation and learning impairment. We discuss the results on the basis of cholinergic plasticity and its relevance to sleep homeostasis. We suggest that VAChT-KDHET mice could be a useful model to test cholinergic drugs used to treat sleep dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  3. Neurophysiology of space travel: energetic solar particles cause cell type-specific plasticity of neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Dudok, Barna; Parihar, Vipan K; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Zöldi, Miklós; Kang, Young-Jin; Maroso, Mattia; Alexander, Allyson L; Nelson, Gregory A; Piomelli, Daniele; Katona, István; Limoli, Charles L; Soltesz, Ivan

    2016-11-30

    In the not too distant future, humankind will embark on one of its greatest adventures, the travel to distant planets. However, deep space travel is associated with an inevitable exposure to radiation fields. Space-relevant doses of protons elicit persistent disruptions in cognition and neuronal structure. However, whether space-relevant irradiation alters neurotransmission is unknown. Within the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for cognition, perisomatic inhibitory control of pyramidal cells (PCs) is supplied by two distinct cell types, the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells (CB1BCs) and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons (PVINs). Mice subjected to low-dose proton irradiation were analyzed using electrophysiological, biochemical and imaging techniques months after exposure. In irradiated mice, GABA release from CB1BCs onto PCs was dramatically increased. This effect was abolished by CB1 blockade, indicating that irradiation decreased CB1-dependent tonic inhibition of GABA release. These alterations in GABA release were accompanied by decreased levels of the major CB1 ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol. In contrast, GABA release from PVINs was unchanged, and the excitatory connectivity from PCs to the interneurons also underwent cell type-specific alterations. These results demonstrate that energetic charged particles at space-relevant low doses elicit surprisingly selective long-term plasticity of synaptic microcircuits in the hippocampus. The magnitude and persistent nature of these alterations in synaptic function are consistent with the observed perturbations in cognitive performance after irradiation, while the high specificity of these changes indicates that it may be possible to develop targeted therapeutic interventions to decrease the risk of adverse events during interplanetary travel.

  4. Synaptic neurotransmission depression in ventral tegmental dopamine neurons and cannabinoid-associated addictive learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Liu

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is an association of compulsive drug use with long-term associative learning/memory. Multiple forms of learning/memory are primarily subserved by activity- or experience-dependent synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. Recent studies suggest LTP expression in locally activated glutamate synapses onto dopamine neurons (local Glu-DA synapses of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA following a single or chronic exposure to many drugs of abuse, whereas a single exposure to cannabinoid did not significantly affect synaptic plasticity at these synapses. It is unknown whether chronic exposure of cannabis (marijuana or cannabinoids, the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, induce LTP or LTD at these synapses. More importantly, whether such alterations in VTA synaptic plasticity causatively contribute to drug addictive behavior has not previously been addressed. Here we show in rats that chronic cannabinoid exposure activates VTA cannabinoid CB1 receptors to induce transient neurotransmission depression at VTA local Glu-DA synapses through activation of NMDA receptors and subsequent endocytosis of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunits. A GluR2-derived peptide blocks cannabinoid-induced VTA synaptic depression and conditioned place preference, i.e., learning to associate drug exposure with environmental cues. These data not only provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic depression at VTA dopamine circuitry requires GluR2 endocytosis, but also suggest an essential contribution of such synaptic depression to cannabinoid-associated addictive learning, in addition to pointing to novel pharmacological strategies for the treatment of cannabis addiction.

  5. Acides gras polyinsaturés n-3, neurotransmission et fonctions cognitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalon Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Les acides gras polyinsaturés (AGPI incorporés dans les phospholipides membranaires représentent une proportion importante (environ 20 % de la matière sèche cérébrale. Ils sont apportés par l’alimentation sous forme de précurseurs (acide a-linolénique pour la série n-3, acide linoléique pour la série n-6 ou de dérivés à longues chaînes (notamment l’acide docosahexaénoïque, ou 22 :6n-3 et l’acide arachidonique, ou 20 :4n-6. Des données récentes indiquent que le statut en AGPI constitue l’un des facteurs environnementaux capables d’affecter le fonctionnement du système nerveux central (SNC. Les résultats principaux sont, d’une part, la mise en évidence d’anomalies comportementales chez des animaux recevant des régimes déséquilibrés en AGPI et, d’autre part, la détection de taux anormaux d’AGPI chez des humains souffrant de maladies du SNC. Au cours de ces dernières années, nous avons apporté des arguments établissant que ces dysfonctionnements peuvent être reliés à des altérations des processus de neurotransmission induites par le déséquilibre en AGPI.

  6. Angiotensin receptor-mediated oxidative stress is associated with impaired cardiac redox signaling and mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Popovich, Irina; Thorwald, Max A; Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Sonanez-Organis, Jose G; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-15

    Activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) contributes to NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived oxidative stress during metabolic syndrome. However, the specific role of AT1 in modulating redox signaling, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in the heart remains more elusive. To test the hypothesis that AT1 activation increases oxidative stress while impairing redox signaling and mitochondrial function in the heart during diet-induced insulin resistance in obese animals, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats (n = 8/group) were treated with the AT1 blocker (ARB) olmesartan for 6 wk. Cardiac Nox2 protein expression increased 40% in OLETF compared with age-matched, lean, strain-control Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats, while mRNA and protein expression of the H₂O₂-producing Nox4 increased 40-100%. ARB treatment prevented the increase in Nox2 without altering Nox4. ARB treatment also normalized the increased levels of protein and lipid oxidation (nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal) and increased the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 by 30% and the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx) by 50-70%. Citrate synthase (CS) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities decreased 60-70%, whereas cardiac succinate levels decreased 35% in OLETF compared with LETO, suggesting that mitochondrial function in the heart is impaired during obesity-induced insulin resistance. ARB treatment normalized CS and SDH activities, as well as succinate levels, while increasing AMPK and normalizing Akt, suggesting that AT1 activation also impairs cellular metabolism in the diabetic heart. These data suggest that the cardiovascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome may result from AT1 receptor-mediated Nox2 activation leading to impaired redox signaling, mitochondrial activity, and dysregulation of cellular metabolism in the heart.

  7. Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the onset and development of cardiac remodelling associated with changes of autophagy. Angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] is a newly established bioactive peptide of renin-angiotensin system, which has been shown to counteract the deleterious effects of Ang II. However, the precise impact of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy remained essentially elusive. The aim of the present study was to examine if Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced autophagy and the underlying mechanism involved. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to Ang II for 48 hrs while mice were infused with Ang II for 4 weeks to induce models of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. LC3b-II and p62, markers of autophagy, expression were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the presence of autophagy accompanying cardiac hypertrophy in response to Ang II treatment. Besides, Ang II induced oxidative stress, manifesting as an increase in malondialdehyde production and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Ang-(1-7) significantly retarded hypertrophy, autophagy and oxidative stress in the heart. Furthermore, a role of Mas receptor in Ang-(1-7)-mediated action was assessed using A779 peptide, a selective Mas receptor antagonist. The beneficial responses of Ang-(1-7) on cardiac remodelling, autophagy and oxidative stress were mitigated by A779. Taken together, these result indicated that Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. ADP stimulates human endothelial cell migration via P2Y1 nucleotide receptor-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianzhong; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2008-02-29

    Extensive research on the role of ADP in platelet activation led to the design of new anti-thrombotic drugs, such as clopidogrel (Plavix; sanofi-aventis); however, very little is known about the ADP-preferring nucleotide receptors (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13) in endothelium. Here, we show that ADP stimulates migration of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in both Boyden chamber and in vitro wound repair assays. This promigratory effect was mimicked by 2-MeSADP, but not by AMP, and was inhibited by MRS2179 (P2Y1 receptor antagonist) but not by AR-C69931MX (P2Y12/13 receptor antagonist). RT-PCR revealed abundant P2Y1, barely detectable P2Y12, and absent P2Y13 receptor message in these cells. In addition, both ADP and 2-MeSADP, but not AMP, activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase. ADP also stimulated phosphorylation of p90RSK, a downstream substrate of phosphorylated ERK1/2, and induced phosphorylation of such transcription factors downstream of the JNK and p38 pathways as c-Jun and activating transcription factor-2. These signaling events were inhibited by MRS2179 but not by AR-C69931MX. Furthermore, blockade of the ERK or JNK pathways by U0126 and SP600125, respectively, abolished ADP- and 2-MeSADP-stimulated HUVEC migration. However, inhibition of the p38 pathway by SB203580 partially suppressed ADP- and 2-MeSADP-induced HUVEC migration. We conclude that ADP promotes human endothelial cell migration by activating P2Y1 receptor-mediated MAPK pathways, possibly contributing to reendothelialization and angiogenesis after vascular injury.

  9. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release: an investigation into the involvement of Ca2+ and K+ ions, G protein and adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Detzner, M; Exner, H J; Göthert, M

    1994-07-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of mechanisms following the activation of histamine H3 receptors. Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused and the (H3 receptor-mediated) effect of histamine on the electrically evoked tritium overflow was studied under a variety of conditions. The extent of inhibition produced by histamine was inversely related to the frequency of stimulation used to evoke tritium overflow and to the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium. An activator (levcromakalim) and blocker (glibenclamide) of ATP-dependent K+ channels did not affect the electrically evoked tritium overflow and its inhibition by histamine. A blocker of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (TEA), increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine. TEA also reduced the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. When the facilitatory effect of TEA on the evoked overflow was compensated for by reducing the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium, TEA did no longer attenuate the effect of histamine. Exposure of the slices to the SH group-alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine; both effects were counteracted by the SH group-protecting agent dithiothreitol, which, by itself, did not affect the evoked overflow and its inhibition by histamine. Mouse brain cortex membranes were used to study the effect of the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the basal cAMP accumulation and on the accumulation stimulated by forskolin or noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. The Bcl-2 gene polymorphism rs956572AA increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated endoplasmic reticulum calcium release in subjects with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Yuan, Peixiong; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Rulun; Zarate, Carlos A; Drevets, Wayne C; Brantner, Christine A; Baum, Amber; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J; Chen, Guang; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K; Andrews, S Brian

    2011-02-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is characterized by altered intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis. Underlying mechanisms involve dysfunctions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, potentially mediated by B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), a key protein that regulates Ca(2+) signaling by interacting directly with these organelles, and which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of BPD. Here, we examined the effects of the Bcl-2 gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs956572 on intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in patients with BPD. Live cell fluorescence imaging and electron probe microanalysis were used to measure intracellular and intra-organelle free and total calcium in lymphoblasts from 18 subjects with BPD carrying the AA, AG, or GG variants of the rs956572 SNP. Analyses were carried out under basal conditions and in the presence of agents that affect Ca(2+) dynamics. Compared with GG homozygotes, variant AA-which expresses significantly reduced Bcl-2 messenger RNA and protein-exhibited elevated basal cytosolic Ca(2+) and larger increases in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, the latter in parallel with enhanced depletion of the ER Ca(2+) pool. The aberrant behavior of AA cells was reversed by chronic lithium treatment and mimicked in variant GG by a Bcl-2 inhibitor. In contrast, no differences between SNP variants were found in ER or mitochondrial total Ca(2+) content or in basal store-operated Ca(2+) entry. These results demonstrate that, in patients with BPD, abnormal Bcl-2 gene expression in the AA variant contributes to dysfunctional Ca(2+) homeostasis through a specific ER inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated positron emission tomographic imaging in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats using [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Lang Lixin; Jacobson, Orit [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shinkre, Bidhan [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Ma Ying [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu Gang [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Trenkle, William C. [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jacobson, Kenneth A. [Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kiesewetter, Dale O., E-mail: dk7k@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: A{sub 2A} receptors are expressed in the basal ganglia, specifically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons in the striatum (caudate-putamen). This brain region undergoes degeneration of presynaptic dopamine projections and depletion of dopamine in Parkinson's disease. We developed an {sup 18}F-labeled A{sub 2A} analog radiotracer ([{sup 18}F]-MRS5425) for A{sub 2A} receptor imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that this tracer could image A{sub 2A} receptor changes in the rat model for Parkinson's disease, which is created following unilateral injection of the monoaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. Methods: [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425 was injected intravenously in anesthetized rats, and PET imaging data were collected. Image-derived percentage injected doses per gram (%ID/g) in regions of interest was measured in the striatum of normal rats and in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA after intravenous administration of saline (baseline), D{sub 2} agonist quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) or D{sub 2} antagonist raclopride (6.0 mg/kg). Results: Baseline %ID/g reached a maximum at 90 s and maintained plateau for 3.5 min, and then declined slowly thereafter. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, %ID/g was significantly higher in the lesioned side compared to the intact side, and the baseline total %ID/g (data from both hemispheres were combined) was significantly higher compared to quinpirole stimulation starting from 4.5 min until the end of acquisition at 30 min. Raclopride did not produce any change in uptake compared to baseline or between the hemispheres. Conclusion: Thus, increase of A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated uptake of radioactive MRS5425 could be a superior molecular target for Parkinson's imaging.

  12. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  13. Activation of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor mediates the anticonvulsant properties of cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture models of acquired epilepsy and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Sombati, Sompong; Falenski, Katherine W; Martin, Billy R; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2006-06-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to have anticonvulsant properties, but no studies have evaluated the effects of cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture models of acquired epilepsy (AE) and status epilepticus (SE). This study investigated the anticonvulsant properties of the cannabinoid receptor agonist R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolol[1,2,3 de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone (WIN 55,212-2) in primary hippocampal neuronal culture models of both AE and SE. WIN 55,212-2 produced dose-dependent anticonvulsant effects against both spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SRED) (EC50 = 0.85 microM) and SE (EC50 = 1.51 microM), with total suppression of seizure activity at 3 microM and of SE activity at 5 microM. The anticonvulsant properties of WIN 55,212-2 in these preparations were both stereospecific and blocked by the cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamidehydrochloride (SR141716A; 1 microM), showing a CB1 receptor-dependent pathway. The inhibitory effect of WIN 55,212-2 against low Mg2+-induced SE is the first observation in this model of total suppression of SE by a selective pharmacological agent. The clinically used anticonvulsants phenytoin and phenobarbital were not able to abolish low Mg2+-induced SE at concentrations up to 150 microM. The results from this study show CB1 receptor-mediated anticonvulsant effects of the cannabimimetic WIN 55,212-2 against both SRED and low Mg2+-induced SE in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures and show that these in vitro models of AE and SE may represent powerful tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms mediating the effects of cannabinoids on neuronal excitability.

  14. ERK/Egr-1 signaling pathway is involved in CysLT2 receptor-mediated IL-8 production in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kana; Fang, Sanhua; Cai, Beilei; Huang, Xueqin; Zhang, Xiayan; Lu, Yunbi; Zhang, Weiping; Wei, Erqing

    2014-07-01

    The CysLT2 receptor is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, differentiation of colorectal cancers, bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. However, the signal transduction of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CysLT2) in inflammatory responses remains to be clarified. In HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT1, hCysLT2 and rGPR17, we determined the signaling pathways for interleukin-8 (IL-8) production after CysLT2 receptor activation. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with the recombinant plasmids of pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT1, pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT2 and pcDNA3.1-rGPR17. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and LTD4 were used as the agonists to induce IL-8 production and the related changes in signal molecules. We found that LTC4 and LTD4 significantly induced IL-8 promoter activation in the HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT2, but not in those expressing hCysLT1 and rGPR17. In hCysLT2-HEK293 cells, LTC4 induced elevation of intracellular calcium, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and Egr-1 expression, and stimulated IL-8 expression and release. These responses were blocked by the selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist HAMI3379. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 inhibited Egr-1 and IL-8 expression as well as IL-8 release, but the JNK and p38 inhibitors did not have the inhibitory effects. Down-regulation of Egr-1 by RNA interference with its siRNA inhibited the LTC4-induced IL-8 expression and release. In conclusion, these findings indicate the ERK-Egr-1 pathway of CysLT2 receptors mediates IL-8 production induced by the pro-inflammatory mediators LTC4 and LTD4.

  15. Prostaglandin (PG) FP and EP1 receptors mediate PGF2alpha and PGE2 regulation of interleukin-1beta expression in Leydig cell progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Laurence; Clavarino, Emanuela; Morris, Patricia L

    2003-04-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) mediate IL-1beta regulation of several interleukin mRNAs in progenitor Leydig cells. PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) potently reverse indomethacin (INDO; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) inhibition of IL-1beta autoinduction. IL-1beta increases PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) production. To determine the PG receptors involved in this regulation, this study established by RT-PCR and Western analyses which specific receptors for PGE(2) (EP receptors) and PGF(2alpha) (FP receptors) are expressed in progenitors. Pharmacological characterization of receptors involved in PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) regulation of IL-1beta mRNA levels was ascertained using real-time PCR analyses. FP, EP(1), EP(2), and EP(4) receptor mRNAs and proteins, and an EP(3) receptor subtype were detected. IL-1beta treatment (24-h) significantly decreased EP(1) receptor levels; INDO abrogated this down-regulation. FP, EP(2), and EP(4) receptor levels increased after IL-1beta and IL-1beta + INDO. A selective FP agonist, cloprostenol (0.1 micro M), and PGF(2alpha) (10 micro M) had similar effects on IL-1beta mRNA levels in progenitors treated with IL-1beta + INDO. None of the EP(2)/EP(4) agonists [butaprost, misoprostol, or 11-deoxy PGE(1) (10 micro M)] affected IL-1beta mRNA levels. In contrast, EP(1)/EP(3) agonists (17-phenyl trinor PGE(2) and sulprostone) increased IL-1beta mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner. EP(1) receptor subtype-selective antagonist, SC-51322, blocked IL-1beta-induced and [IL-1beta + INDO + 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2)]-induced increases in IL-1beta mRNAs. Taken together, our data demonstrate that FP and EP(1) receptors mediate PGF(2alpha) and PGE(2) induction of progenitor IL-1beta expression.

  16. Enhancing the receptor-mediated cell uptake of PLGA nanoparticle for targeted drug delivery by incorporation chitosan onto the particle surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqiang; Tang, Shifu; Chen, Xuelan; Ding, Fuxin

    2014-06-01

    Cationic polymer chitosan (CS) and target ligand were both incorporated onto nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the cell uptake by integration of electrostatic interaction and receptor-mediated internalization. CS and biotin-contained amphipathic polymer biotin-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) (biotin-PEG-PLA) were simultaneously decorated on the poly(lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs surface in one step during the o/w solvent evaporation procedure. The incorporation of CS increased the zeta potential of the NPs to positive value and showed little impacts on particle size and biotin density. Cell uptake was investigated in vitro using human hepatic carcinoma cell lines SMMC-7721. The CS and biotin co-decorated NPs (CS-B-NPs) presented significantly higher cell uptake than that of the mono biotin-decorated NPs (B-NPs). In acid environment, as CS-B-NPs are more positive charged, cell uptake of CS-B-NPs is further increased, which is 3.8-fold as much as that of the undecorated NPs (U-NPs) and 1.9-fold higher than that of B-NPs at pH 6.6. When either the ligand density was reduced within limited or the particle size was slightly increased, cell uptake of CS-B-NPs remained almost the same. The cell uptake mechanism study demonstrated that the internalization due to the electrostatic interaction would contribute more to the cell uptake when the internalization based on clathrin-mediated endocytosis and other ATP-dependent pathways were blocked. The co-decoration of CS and target ligand is an effective approach for improving the specific cell uptake of NPs.

  17. Does ligand-receptor mediated competitive effect or penetrating effect of iRGD peptide when co-administration with iRGD-modified SSL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhong, Ting; Luo, Li-Min; Du, Ruo; Ren, Wei; Huang, Dan; Song, Ping; Li, Dan; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-mediated targeting of anticancer therapeutic agents is a useful strategy for improving anti-tumor efficacy. It has been reported that co-administration of a tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) enhances the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here, we designed an experiment involving co-administration of iRGD-SSL-DOX with free iRGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing mice to examine the action of free iRGD. We also designed an experiment to investigate the location of iRGD-modified SSL when co-administered with free iRGD or free RGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing nude mice. Considering the sequence of iRGD, we selected the GPDC, RGD and CRGDK as targeting ligands to investigate the targeting effect of these peptides compared with iRGD on B16-F10 and MCF-7 cells, with or without enzymatic degradation. Finally, we selected free RGD, free CRGDK and free iRGD as ligand to investigate the inhibitory effect on RGD-, CRGDK- or iRGD-modified SSL on B16-F10 or MCF-7 cells. Our results indicated that iRGD targeting to tumor cells was ligand-receptor mediated involving RGD to αv-integrin receptor and CRGDK to NRP-1 receptor. Being competitive effect, the administration of free iRGD would not be able to further enhance the anti-tumor activity of iRGD-modified SSL. There is no need to co-administrate of free iRGD with the iRGD-modified nanoparticles for further therapeutic benefit.

  18. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  19. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  20. Elevated potassium elicits recurrent surges of large GABAA-receptor-mediated post-synaptic currents in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Sutton, Alex; Calos, Megan; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found that rat hippocampal CA3 interneurons become hyperactive with increasing concentrations of extracellular K(+) up to 10 mM. However, it is unclear how this enhanced interneuronal activity affects pyramidal neurons. Here we voltage-clamped rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in vitro at 0 mV to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) and measured these in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) and with 10 mM K(+) bath perfusion. In aCSF, small IPSCs were present with amplitudes of 0.053 ± 0.007 nA and a frequency of 0.27 ± 0.14 Hz. With 10 mM K(+) perfusion, IPSCs increased greatly in frequency and amplitude, culminating in surge events with peak amplitudes of 0.56 ± 0.08 nA, that appeared and disappeared cyclically with durations lasting 2.02 ± 0.37 min repeatedly, up to 10 times over a 30-min bath perfusion of elevated K(+). These large IPSCs were GABA(A)-receptor mediated and did not involve significant desensitization of this receptor. Perfusion of a GABA transporter inhibitor (NO-711), glutamate receptor inhibitors CNQX and APV, or a gap junctional blocker (carbenoxolone) prevented the resurgence of large IPSCs. Pressure ejected sucrose resulted in the abolishment of subsequent surges. No elevated K(+)-mediated surges were observed in CA3 interneurons from the stratum oriens layer. In conclusion, these cyclic large IPSC events observable in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 10 mM KCl may be due to transient GABA depletion from continuously active interneuronal afferents.

  1. Brain tumor-targeted therapy by systemic delivery of siRNA with Transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Guo, Xi-Ying; Yang, Ting; Yu, Min-Zhi; Chen, Da-Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng

    2016-08-20

    Treatment of brain tumor remains a great challenge worldwide. Development of a stable, safe, and effective siRNA delivery system which is able to cross the impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target glioma cells is necessary. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous administration of T7 peptide modified core-shell nanoparticles (named T7-LPC/siRNA NPs) on brain tumors. Layer-by-layer assembling of protamine/chondroitin sulfate/siRNA/cationic liposomes followed by T7 peptide modification has been carried out in order to obtain a targeted siRNA delivery system. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated a higher intracellular fluorescence intensity of siRNA in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) and U87 glioma cells when treated with T7-LPC/siRNA NPs compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In the co-culture model of BMVECs and U87 cells, a significant down-regulation of EGFR protein expression occurred in the U87 glioma cells after treatment with the T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs. Moreover, the T7-LPC/siRNA NPs had an advantage in penetrating into a deep region of the tumor spheroid compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In vivo imaging revealed that T7-LPC/siRNA NPs accumulated more specifically in brain tumor tissues than the non-targeted NPs. Also, in vivo tumor therapy experiments demonstrated that the longest survival period along with the greatest downregulation of EGFR expression in tumor tissues was observed in mice with an intracranial U87 glioma treated with T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs compared with mice receiving other formulations. Therefore, we believe that these transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles are an important potential siRNA delivery system for brain tumor-targeted therapy.

  2. Development of a stably transfected estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assay in the human T47D breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, J; van den Brink, C E; Brouwer, A; Murk, A J; van der Saag, P T; Vethaak, A D; van der Burg, B

    1999-03-01

    Development of an estrogen receptor-mediated, chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene-expression (ER-CALUX) assay was attempted by stable transfection of luciferase reporter genes in a number of cell lines. Stable transfection of the chimeric Gal4 estrogen receptor and luciferase gene constructs in MCF-7 breast cancer and Hepa.1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines, as well as transfection of a newly constructed luciferase reporter gene pEREtata-Luc in the ECC-1 human endometrial cell line, resulted in constitutive, non-estradiol-inducible clones. Stable transfection of pEREtata-Luc in the T47D breast cancer cell line, however, resulted in an extremely sensitive, highly responsive cell line. Following a 24-h exposure to estradiol (E2), stably transfected T47D.Luc cells demonstrated a detection limit of 0.5 pM, an EC50 of 6 pM, and a maximum induction of 100-fold relative to solvent controls. No clear reduction in responsiveness has been found over extended culture periods (50 passages). Anti-estrogens ICI 182,780, TCDD, and tamoxifen inhibited the estradiol-mediated luciferase induction. Genistein, nonylphenol, and o,p'DDT were the most potent (pseudo-)estrogens tested in this system (EC50 100, 260, and 660 nM, respectively). Determination of interactive effects of the (pseudo-)estrogens nonylphenol, o,p'DDT, chlordane, endosulfan, dieldrin, and methoxychlor revealed that, in combination with 3 pM E2, (pseudo-)estrogens were additive. Slightly more than additive effects (less than 2-fold) were found for combinations of dieldrin and endosulfan tested in the range of 3 to 6 microM. At these concentrations, the combination of endosulfan and chlordane demonstrated additive interaction. The ER-CALUX assay with T47D cells can provide a sensitive, responsive, and rapid in vitro system to detect and measure substances with potential (anti-)estrogenic activity.

  3. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogenic activities of oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and azaarenes originally identified in extracts of river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, M; Ciganek, M; Bláha, L; Minksová, K; Vondráck, J

    2001-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction in wildlife populations can be a result of environmental contaminants binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or estrogenic receptors. Signaling by both types of receptors can be affected by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are potential endocrine disruptors. However, our knowledge regarding the effects of oxygenated (oxy)-PAHs and azaarenes on AhR-mediated and estrogenic activities is incomplete. In the present study, we have identified 9-fluorenone, anthrone, anthraquinone, benzanthrone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, benz[c]acridine, and dibenz[a,h]acridine as prevalent oxy-PAHs and azaarenes found in river sediments. Their concentrations in sediment samples ranged from 2.1 to 165.2 ng g(-1) for oxy-PAHs and up to 27.3 ng g(-1) for azaarenes. Their relative AhR-inducing and estrogenic potencies were quantified in vitro using two cell lines that were stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene system and expressed as induction equivalency factors (IEFs). The only oxy-PAHs with detectable levels of in vitro AhR-mediated activity were benzanthrone and benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione. However, their IEFs were approximately three to four orders of magnitude lower than those of benzo[a]pyrene. On the other hand, azaarenes showed a strong AhR-mediated activity, with dibenzo[a,h]acridine being a far more potent inducer of activity than benzo[a]pyrene. Benzanthrone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, anthraquinone, and benz[a]acridine were weak inducers of in vitro estrogenic activity, with IEFs similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Based on concentrations and relative potencies, our results suggest that dibenzo[a,h]acridine can significantly contribute to the overall AhR-mediated activity in river sediments, whereas the remaining compounds do not. No studied compound was found to contribute significantly to estrogen receptor-mediated activity in vitro.

  5. Polysialic acid is required for dopamine D2 receptor-mediated plasticity involving inhibitory circuits of the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Castillo-Gómez

    Full Text Available Decreased expression of dopamine D2 receptors (D2R, dysfunction of inhibitory neurotransmission and impairments in the structure and connectivity of neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and major depression, but the relationship between these changes remains unclear. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule, may serve as a link. This molecule is expressed in cortical interneurons and dopamine, via D2R, modulates its expression in parallel to that of proteins related to synapses and inhibitory neurotransmission, suggesting that D2R-targeted antipsychotics/antidepressants may act by affecting the plasticity of mPFC inhibitory circuits. To understand the role of PSA-NCAM in this plasticity, rats were chronically treated with a D2R agonist (PPHT after cortical PSA depletion. PPHT-induced increases in GAD67 and synaptophysin (SYN neuropil expression were blocked when PSA was previously removed, indicating a role for PSA-NCAM in this plasticity. The number of PSA-NCAM expressing interneuron somata also increased after PPHT treatment, but the percentages of these cells belonging to different interneuronal subpopulations did not change. Cortical pyramidal neurons did not express PSA-NCAM, but puncta co-expressing this molecule and parvalbumin could be found surrounding their somata. PPHT treatment increased the number of PSA-NCAM and parvalbumin expressing perisomatic puncta, but decreased the percentage of parvalbumin puncta that co-expressed SYN. PSA depletion did not block these effects on the perisomatic region, but increased further the number of parvalbumin expressing puncta and increased the percentage of puncta co-expressing SYN and parvalbumin, suggesting that the polysialylation of NCAM may regulate perisomatic inhibition of mPFC principal neurons. Summarizing, the present results indicate that dopamine acting on D2R

  6. Kainate-induced epileptogenesis alters circular hole board learning strategy but not the performance of C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubens, Chantal J; Kaptein, Pascale S; ter Horst, Judith P; Voskuyl, Rob A; Schenk, Geert J

    2014-12-01

    Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) frequently show cognitive deficits. However, the relation between mTLE and cognitive impairment is poorly understood. To gain more insight into epilepsy-associated alterations in cognitive performance, we studied the spatial learning of C57BL/6J mice five weeks after kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE). Typically, structural hippocampal rearrangements take place within five weeks after SE. Mice were monitored by exposing them to four tasks with a focus on spatial memory and anxiety: the circular hole board, modified hole board, novel object-placement task, and elevated plus maze. On the circular hole board, animals showed a higher preference for hippocampus-independent strategies after SE. In contrast, no change in strategy was seen on the modified hole board, but animals with SE were able to finish the task more often. Animals did not have an increased preference for a relocated object in the novel object-placement task but showed an increased locomotion after SE. No indications for altered anxiety were found when tested on the elevated plus maze following SE. These data suggest that the circular hole board is a well-suited paradigm to detect subtle SE-induced hippocampal deficits.

  7. Acute alterations of somatodendritic action potential dynamics in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after kainate-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minge

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3-4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca(2+ imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2-5 mV. No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP, was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP-induced Ca(2+ signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na(+ and K(+ current components.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls activity-dependent maturation of CA1 synapses by downregulating tonic activation of presynaptic kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallert, Marko; Rantamäki, Tomi; Vesikansa, Aino; Anthoni, Heidi; Harju, Kirsi; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Taira, Tomi; Castren, Eero; Lauri, Sari E

    2009-09-09

    Immature hippocampal synapses express presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs), which tonically inhibit glutamate release. Presynaptic maturation involves activity-dependent downregulation of the tonic KAR activity and consequent increase in release probability; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this developmental process are unknown. Here, we have investigated whether brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a secreted protein implicated in developmental plasticity in several areas of the brain, controls presynaptic maturation by regulating KARs. Application of BDNF in neonate hippocampal slices resulted in increase in synaptic transmission that fully occluded the immature-type KAR activity in area CA1. Conversely, genetic ablation of BDNF was associated with delayed synaptic maturation and persistent presynaptic KAR activity, suggesting a role for endogenous BDNF in the developmental regulation of KAR function. In addition, our data suggests a critical role for BDNF TrkB signaling in fast activity-dependent regulation of KARs. Selective acute inhibition of TrkB receptors using a chemical-genetic approach prevented rapid change in synapse dynamics and loss of tonic KAR activity that is typically seen in response to induction of LTP at immature synapses. Together, these data show that BDNF-TrkB-dependent maturation of glutamatergic synapses is tightly associated with a loss of endogenous KAR activity. The coordinated action of these two receptor mechanisms has immediate physiological relevance in controlling presynaptic efficacy and transmission dynamics at CA3-CA1 synapses at a stage of development when functional contact already exists but transmission is weak.

  9. Involvement of AMPA/kainate and GABAA receptors in topiramate neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate abuse sequels involving oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Abuses of methylphenidate (MPH) as psychostimulant cause neural damage of brain cells. Neuroprotective properties of topiramate (TPM) have been indicated in several studies but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. The current study evaluates protective role of various doses of TPM and its mechanism of action in MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. The neuroprotective effects of various doses of TPM against MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated and then the action of TPM was studied in presence of domoic acid (DOM), as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist and bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, in isolated rat hippocampus. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity changes. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. TPM (70 and 100mg/kg) decreased MPH induced motor activity disturbances and inhibit MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. On the other hand pretreatment of animals with DOM or BIC, inhibit this effect of TPM and potentiate MPH induced motor activity disturbances and increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) level, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampal cells and decreased reduced form of glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity. It seems that TPM can protect cells of hippocampus from oxidative stress and neuroinflammation and it could be partly by activation of GABAA receptor and inhibition of AMPA/kainite receptor.

  10. Metabolic fingerprints of altered brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a Rett syndrome model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Viola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is the leading cause of profound mental retardation of genetic origin in girls. Since RS is mostly caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, transgenic animal models such as the Mecp2-deleted ("Mecp2-null" mouse have been employed to study neurological symptoms and brain function. However, an interdisciplinary approach drawing from chemistry, biology and neuroscience is needed to elucidate the mechanistic links between the genotype and phenotype of this genetic disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed, for the first time, a metabolomic study of brain extracts from Mecp2-null mice by using high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of individual water-soluble metabolites and phospholipids were quantified without prior selection for specific metabolic pathways. Results were interpreted in terms of Mecp2 gene deletion, brain cell function and brain morphology. This approach provided a "metabolic window" to brain characteristics in Mecp2-null mice (n = 4, revealing (i the first metabolic evidence of astrocyte involvement in RS (decreased levels of the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, vs. wild-type mice; p = 0.034; (ii reduced choline phospholipid turnover in Mecp2-null vs. wild-type mice, implying a diminished potential of cells to grow, paralleled by globally reduced brain size and perturbed osmoregulation; (iii alterations of the platelet activating factor (PAF cycle in Mecp2-null mouse brains, where PAF is a bioactive lipid acting on neuronal growth, glutamate exocytosis and other processes; and (iv changes in glutamine/glutamate ratios (p = 0.034 in Mecp2-null mouse brains potentially indicating altered neurotransmitter recycling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes, for the first time, detailed metabolic fingerprints of perturbed brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Combined with morphological and neurological findings

  11. Releasing the Cortical Brake by Non-Invasive Electromagnetic Stimulation? rTMS Induces LTD of GABAergic Neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique which modulates cortical excitability beyond the stimulation period. However, despite its clinical use rTMS-based therapies which prevent or reduce disabilities in a functionally significant and sustained manner are scarce. It remains unclear how rTMS-mediated changes in cortical excitability, which are not task- or input-specific, exert beneficial effects in some healthy subjects and patients. While experimental evidence exists that repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) is linked to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory neurotransmission, less attention has been dedicated to rTMS-induced structural, functional and molecular adaptations at inhibitory synapses. In this review article we provide a concise overview on basic neuroscience research, which reveals an important role of local disinhibitory networks in promoting associative learning and memory. These studies suggest that a reduction in inhibitory neurotransmission facilitates the expression of associative plasticity in cortical networks under physiological conditions. Hence, it is interesting to speculate that rTMS may act by decreasing GABAergic neurotransmission onto cortical principal neurons. Indeed, evidence has been provided that rTMS is capable of modulating inhibitory networks. Consistent with this suggestion recent basic science work discloses that a 10 Hz rTMS protocol reduces GABAergic synaptic strength on principal neurons. These findings support a model in which rTMS-induced long-term depression (LTD) of GABAergic synaptic strength mediates changes in excitation/inhibition-balance of cortical networks, which may in turn facilitate (or restore) the ability of stimulated networks to express input- and task-specific associative synaptic plasticity.

  12. Layer-specific endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto principal neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Laijian; Li, Shuo; Tie, Xiaoxiu; Jiang, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Visually induced endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission (iLTD) mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in layer 2/3 of visual cortex. Here we examined whether the maturation of GABAergic transmission in other layers of visual cortex also requires endocannabinoids. The developmental plasticity of GABAergic neurotransmission onto the principal neurons in different layers of mouse visual cortex was examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked by presynaptic inhibitory inputs. Theta burst stimulation of GABAergic inputs induced an endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 from postnatal day (P)10 to 30 and in layer 5 from P10 to 40, whereas that of GABAergic inputs did not induce iLTD onto star pyramidal neurons in layer 4 at any time postnatally, indicating that this plasticity is laminar-specific. The developmental loss of iLTD paralleled the maturation of GABAergic inhibition in both layer 2/3 and layer 5. Visual deprivation delayed the developmental loss of iLTD in layers 3 and 5 during a critical period, while 2 days of light exposure eliminated iLTD in both layers. Furthermore, the GABAergic synapses in layers 2/3 and 5 did not normally mature in the type 1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas those in layer 4 did not require endocannabinoid receptor for maturation. These results suggest that visually induced endocannabinoid-dependent iLTD mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in extragranular layer rather than in granular layer of mouse visual cortex.

  13. Mice lacking the serotonin transporter exhibit 5-HT(1A) receptor-mediated abnormalities in tests for anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew; Yang, Rebecca J; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Murphy, Dennis L

    2003-12-01

    The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulates serotonergic neurotransmission via clearance of extracellular serotonin. Abnormalities in 5-HTT expression or function are found in mood and anxiety disorders, and the 5-HTT is a major target for antidepressants and anxiolytics. The 5-HTT is further implicated in the pathophysiology of these disorders by evidence that genetic variation in the promoter region of the HTT (SLC6A4) is associated with individual differences in anxiety and neural responses to fear. To further evaluate the role of the 5-HTT in anxiety, we employed a mouse model in which the 5-HTT gene (htt) was constitutively inactivated. 5-HTT -/- mice were characterized for anxiety-related behaviors using a battery of tests (elevated plus maze, lightdark exploration test, emergence test, and open field test). Male and female 5-HTT -/- mice showed robust phenotypic abnormalities as compared to +/+ littermates, suggestive of increased anxiety-like behavior and inhibited exploratory locomotion. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.05-0.3 mg/kg), produced a significant anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus maze in 5-HTT -/- mice, but not +/+ controls. The present findings demonstrate abnormal behavioral phenotypes in 5-HTT null mutant mice in tests for anxiety-like and exploratory behavior, and suggest a role for the 5-HT(1A) receptor in mediating these abnormalities. 5-HTT null mutant mice provide a model to investigate the role of the 5-HTT in mood and anxiety disorders.

  14. Pharmacological characterisation of the adenosine receptor mediating increased ion transport in the mouse isolated trachea and the effect of allergen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, Kristin N; Page, Clive P; Moffatt, James D

    2005-04-01

    The effect of adenosine on transepithelial ion transport was investigated in isolated preparations of murine trachea mounted in Ussing chambers. The possible regulation of adenosine receptors in an established model of allergic airway inflammation was also investigated. Mucosally applied adenosine caused increases in short-circuit current (I(SC)) that corresponded to approximately 50% of the response to the most efficacious secretogogue, ATP (delta I(SC) 69.5 +/- 6.7 microA cm2). In contrast, submucosally applied adenosine caused only small (<20%) increases in I(SC), which were not investigated further. The A1-selective (N6-cyclopentyladenosine, CPA, 1 nM-10 microM), A2A-selective (2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxoamido adenosine; CGS 21680; 0.1-100 microM) and A3-selective (1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)-methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide; IB-MECA; 30 nM-100 microM) adenosine receptor agonists were either equipotent or less potent than adenosine, suggesting that these receptors do not mediate the response to adenosine. The A1 receptor selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 10 nM-1 microM) caused a rightward shift of the adenosine concentration-effect curve only at 1 microM. The mixed A2A/A2B receptor antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) also caused rightward shift of the adenosine concentration-effect curve, again only at micromolar concentrations, suggestive of the involvement of A2B receptors. In preparations from animals sensitised to ovalbumin and challenged over 3 days with aerosol ovalbumin, a decrease in baseline I(SC) was observed and responses to ATP were diminished. Similarly, the amplitude of responses to adenosine were attenuated although there was no change in potency. These results suggest that the A2B receptor mediates the I(SC) response to adenosine in the mouse trachea. This receptor does not appear to be

  15. The differential effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation on dopamine receptor-mediated abnormal involuntary movements and rotations in the primed hemiparkinsonian rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Kristin B; Eskow, Karen L; Negron, Giselle; Bishop, Christopher

    2007-07-16

    Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT(1A)R) agonists have emerged as valuable supplements to l-DOPA therapy, demonstrating that they can decrease side effects and enhance motor function in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and human PD patients. The precise mechanism by which these receptors act remains unknown and there is limited information on how 5-HT(1A)R stimulation impacts striatal dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) and D2 receptor (D2R) function. The current study examined the effects of 5-HT(1A)R stimulation on DA receptor-mediated behaviors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were rendered hemiparkinsonian by unilateral 6-OHDA lesions and primed with the D1R agonist SKF81297 (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.) in order to sensitize DA receptors. Using a randomized within subjects design, rats received a first injection of: Vehicle (dH(2)O) or the 5-HT(1A)R agonist +/-8-OH-DPAT (0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by a second injection of: Vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide), the D1R agonist SKF81297 (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.), the D2R agonist quinpirole (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-DOPA (12 mg/kg+benserazide, 15 mg/kg, i.p.). On test days, rats were monitored over a 2-h period immediately following the second injection for abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), analogous to dyskinesia observed in PD patients, and contralateral rotations. The present findings indicate that 5-HT(1A)R stimulation reduces AIMs induced by D1R, D2R and l-DOPA administration while its effects on DA agonist-induced rotations were receptor-dependent, suggesting that direct 5-HT(1A)R and DA receptor interactions may contribute to the unique profile of 5-HT(1A)R agonists for the improvement of PD treatment.

  16. Contribution of priority PAHs and POPs to Ah receptor-mediated activities in sediment samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens C Otte

    Full Text Available The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM. One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02-0.906 µg/g dw. Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported.

  17. Contribution of Priority PAHs and POPs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities in Sediment Samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C.; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B.; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A.; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02–0.906 µg/g dw). Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ) with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported. PMID:24146763

  18. Pharmacological blockade of serotonin 5-HT₇ receptor reverses working memory deficits in rats by normalizing cortical glutamate neurotransmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Bonaventure

    Full Text Available The role of 5-HT₇ receptor has been demonstrated in various animal models of mood disorders; however its function in cognition remains largely speculative. This study evaluates the effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT₇ antagonist, in a translational model of working memory deficit and investigates whether it modulates cortical glutamate and/or dopamine neurotransmission in rats. The effect of SB-269970 was evaluated in the delayed non-matching to position task alone or in combination with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and, in separate experiments, with scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist. SB-269970 (10 mg/kg significantly reversed the deficits induced by MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg but augmented the deficit induced by scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg. The ability of SB-269970 to modulate MK-801-induced glutamate and dopamine extracellular levels was separately evaluated using biosensor technology and microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. SB-269970 normalized MK-801 -induced glutamate but not dopamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of MK-801 were not affected by co-administration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. These results indicate that 5-HT₇ receptor antagonists might reverse cognitive deficits associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by selectively normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  19. Brain-specific overexpression of trace amine-associated receptor 1 alters monoaminergic neurotransmission and decreases sensitivity to amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Florent G; Meyer, Claas A; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Jeanneau, Karine; Calcagno, Eleonora; André, Cédric B; Haenggi, Markus; Miss, Marie-Thérèse; Galley, Guido; Norcross, Roger D; Invernizzi, Roberto W; Wettstein, Joseph G; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Hoener, Marius C

    2012-11-01

    Trace amines (TAs) such as β-phenylethylamine, p-tyramine, or tryptamine are biogenic amines found in the brain at low concentrations that have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, depression, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. TAs are ligands for the recently identified trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), an important modulator of monoamine neurotransmission. Here, we sought to investigate the consequences of TAAR1 hypersignaling by generating a transgenic mouse line overexpressing Taar1 specifically in neurons. Taar1 transgenic mice did not show overt behavioral abnormalities under baseline conditions, despite augmented extracellular levels of dopamine and noradrenaline in the accumbens nucleus (Acb) and of serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex. In vitro, this was correlated with an elevated spontaneous firing rate of monoaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, dorsal raphe nucleus, and locus coeruleus as the result of ectopic TAAR1 expression. Furthermore, Taar1 transgenic mice were hyposensitive to the psychostimulant effects of amphetamine, as it produced only a weak locomotor activation and failed to alter catecholamine release in the Acb. Attenuating TAAR1 activity with the selective partial agonist RO5073012 restored the stimulating effects of amphetamine on locomotion. Overall, these data show that Taar1 brain overexpression causes hyposensitivity to amphetamine and alterations of monoaminergic neurotransmission. These observations confirm the modulatory role of TAAR1 on monoamine activity and suggest that in vivo the receptor is either constitutively active and/or tonically activated by ambient levels of endogenous agonist(s).

  20. The effects of cyclophosphamide on neurotransmission in the urinary bladder of Suncus murinus, the house musk shrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M H; Knight, G E; Andrews, P L; Hoyle, C H; Burnstock, G

    2000-05-12

    This study has shown that cyclophosphamide treatment of the insectivore Suncus murinus, causes a down regulation in both muscarinic and P2X receptors, together with a reduced responsiveness to exogenous histamine (0.3 mM) in the urinary bladder. Electrical field stimulation (70 V, 0.3 ms, 0.5-16 Hz, 10 s every 5 min) of bladders from both control and cyclophosphamide-treated animals showed identical responses. Since post-junctional alterations have been revealed by the reduced responsiveness to exogenous carbachol (0.1 microM-3 mM) and beta,gamma-methylene ATP (0.3-300 microM), it would appear that in the bladders of cyclophosphamide-treated animals there is also a pre-junctional effect, increased transmitter release compensating for the down regulation of the receptors. As the pattern of neurotransmission of the bladder of suncus more closely resembles that of human detrusor than other commonly studied laboratory animals, this insectivore appears to be a useful animal model for the study of bladder neurotransmission in pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation modulates hypnosis, immobility, and breathing during isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2008-12-01

    Many general anesthetics are thought to produce a loss of wakefulness, in part, by enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission. However, GABAergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation promotes wakefulness. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) relative to wakefulness, isoflurane decreases GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation; and (2) pontine reticular formation administration of drugs that increase or decrease GABA levels increases or decreases, respectively, isoflurane induction time. To test hypothesis 1, cats (n = 5) received a craniotomy and permanent electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram. Dialysis samples were collected from the pontine reticular formation during isoflurane anesthesia and wakefulness. GABA levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. For hypothesis 2, rats (n = 10) were implanted with a guide cannula aimed for the pontine reticular formation. Each rat received microinjections of Ringer's (vehicle control), the GABA uptake inhibitor nipecotic acid, and the GABA synthesis inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Rats were then anesthetized with isoflurane, and induction time was quantified as loss of righting reflex. Breathing rate was also measured. Relative to wakefulness, GABA levels were significantly decreased by isoflurane. Increased power in the electroencephalogram and decreased activity in the electromyogram caused by isoflurane covaried with pontine reticular formation GABA levels. Nipecotic acid and 3-mercaptopropionic acid significantly increased and decreased, respectively, isoflurane induction time. Nipecotic acid also increased breathing rate. Decreasing pontine reticular formation GABA levels comprises one mechanism by which isoflurane causes loss of consciousness, altered cortical excitability, muscular hypotonia, and decreased respiratory rate.

  2. Changes in aminoacidergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats after ayahuasca ingestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo; Ferreira; de; Castro-Neto; Rafael; Henrique; da; Cunha; Dartiu; Xavier; da; Silveira; Mauricio; Yonamine; Telma; Luciana; Furtado; Gouveia; Esper; Abro; Cavalheiro; Débora; Amado; Maria; da; Graa; Naffah-Mazzacoratti

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate changes in neurotransmission induced by a psychoactive beverage ayahuasca in the hippocampus and amygdala of naive rats. METHODS: The level of monoamines, their main metabolites and amino acid neurotransmitters concentrations were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). Four groups of rats were employed: saline-treated and rats receiving 250, 500 and 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca infusion(gavage). Animals were killed 40 min after drug ingestion and the structures stored at-80 ℃ until HPLC assay. The data from all groups were compared using Analysis of variance and Scheffé as post test and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. RESULTS: The results showed decreased concentrations of glycine(GLY)(0.13 ± 0.03 vs 0.29 ± 0.07, P < 0.001) and γ-aminobutyric acid(GABA)(1.07 ± 0.14 vs 1.73 ± 0.25, P < 0.001) in the amygdala of rats that received 500 of ayahuasca. Animals that ingested 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca also showed a reduction of GLY level(0.11 ± 0.01 vs 0.29 ± 0.07, P < 0.001) and GABA(0.98 ± 0.06 vs 1.73 ± 0.25, P < 0.001). In the hippocampus, increased GABA levels were found in rats that received all ayahuasca doses: 250 mg/kg(1.29 ± 0.19 vs 0.84 ± 0.21, P < 0.05); 500 mg/kg(2.23 ± 038 vs 084 ± 0.21, P < 0.05) and 800 mg/kg(1.98 ± 0.92 vs 0.84 ± 0.21, P < 0.05). In addition, an increased utilization rate of all monoamines was found in the amygdala after ayahuasca administration in doses: 250 mg/kg(noradrenaline: 0.16 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.01; dopamine: 0.39 ± 0.012 vs 2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.001; serotonin: 1.02 ± 0.22 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001), 500 mg/kg(noradrenaline: 0.08 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.001; dopamine: 0.33 ± 0.19 vs 2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.001; serotonin: 0.59 ± 0.08 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001) and 800 mg/kg(noradrenaline: 0.16 ± 0.04 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.001; dopamine: 0.84 ± 0.65 vs2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.05; serotonin: 0.36 ± 0.02 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest

  3. The Glt1 glutamate receptor mediates the establishment and perpetuation of chronic visceral pain in an animal model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A Lenore; Jellison, Forrest C; Lee, Una J; Bradesi, Sylvie; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2016-04-01

    Psychological stress exacerbates interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a lower urinary tract pain disorder characterized by increased urinary frequency and bladder pain. Glutamate (Glu) is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter modulating nociceptive networks. Glt1, an astrocytic transporter responsible for Glu clearance, is critical in pain signaling termination. We sought to examine the role of Glt1 in stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia and urinary frequency. In a model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia with high construct validity to human IC/BPS, female Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to 10-day water avoidance stress (WAS). Referred hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia were assessed after WAS with von Frey filaments. After behavioral testing, we assessed Glt1 expression in the spinal cord by immunoblotting. We also examined the influence of dihydrokainate (DHK) and ceftriaxone (CTX), which downregulate and upregulate Glt1, respectively, on pain development. Rats exposed to WAS demonstrated increased voiding frequency, increased colonic motility, anxiety-like behaviors, and enhanced visceral hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. This behavioral phenotype correlated with decreases in spinal Glt1 expression. Exogenous Glt1 downregulation by DHK resulted in hyperalgesia similar to that following WAS. Exogenous Glt1 upregulation via intraperitoneal CTX injection inhibited the development of and reversed preexisting pain and voiding dysfunction induced by WAS. Repeated psychological stress results in voiding dysfunction and hyperalgesia that correlate with altered central nervous system glutamate processing. Manipulation of Glu handling altered the allodynia developing after psychological stress, implicating Glu neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of bladder hyperalgesia in the WAS model of IC/BPS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eJin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the main excitatory transmitter in the human brain. Drugs that affect the glutamatergic signaling will alter neuronal excitability. Ethanol inhibits glutamate receptors. We examined the expression level of glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in human post-mortem samples from alcoholics and compared the results to brain samples from control subjects. RNA from hippocampal dentate gyrus (HP-DG, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC samples from 21 controls and 19 individuals with chronic alcohol dependence were included in the study. Total RNA was assayed using quantitative RT-PCR. Out of the 16 glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA (2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-ylpropanoic acid receptor subunits GluA2 and GluA3; three kainate receptor subunits GluK2, GluK3 and GluK5 and five NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2C, GluN2D and GluN3A were significantly increased in the HP-DG region in alcoholics. In the OFC, mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A was increased, whereas in the DL-PFC, no differences in mRNA levels were observed. Our laboratory has previously shown that the expression of genes encoding inhibitory GABA-A receptors is altered in the HP-DG and OFC of alcoholics (Jin et al., 2011. Whether the changes in one neurotransmitter system drives changes in the other or if they change independently is currently not known. The results demonstrate that excessive long-term alcohol consumption is associated with altered expression of genes encoding glutamate receptors in a brain region-specific manner. It is an intriguing possibility that genetic predisposition to alcoholism may contribute to these gene expression changes.

  5. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  6. Reduced Mechanical Stretch Induces Enhanced Endothelin B Receptor-mediated Contractility via Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Extra Cellular-regulated Kinase 1/2 in Cerebral Arteries from Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Skovsted, Gry F

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia results in enhanced endothelin B (ETB ) receptor-mediated contraction and receptor protein expression in the affected cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Organ culture of cerebral arteries is a method to induce similar alterations in ETB receptor expression. We hypothesize...... expression to SMC expression and 2) an increased calcium sensitivity of the SMCs due to an increased expression of the calcium channel transient receptor potential canonical 1. Collectively, our results present a possible mechanism linking lack of vessel wall stretch/tension to changes in ETB receptor...

  7. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. Neurotransmission to parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons in the brain stem is altered with left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Edmund; Wang, Xin; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Sun, Ke; Garrott, Kara; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF) are widespread and debilitating cardiovascular diseases that affect nearly 23 million people worldwide. A distinctive hallmark of these cardiovascular diseases is autonomic imbalance, with increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic vagal tone. Recent device-based approaches, such as implantable vagal stimulators that stimulate a multitude of visceral sensory and motor fibers in the vagus nerve, are being evaluated as new therapeutic approaches for these and other diseases. However, little is known about how parasympathetic activity to the heart is altered with these diseases, and this lack of knowledge is an obstacle in the goal of devising selective interventions that can target and selectively restore parasympathetic activity to the heart. To identify the changes that occur within the brain stem to diminish the parasympathetic cardiac activity, left ventricular hypertrophy was elicited in rats by aortic pressure overload using a transaortic constriction approach. Cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brain stem that generate parasympathetic activity to the heart were identified with a retrograde tracer and studied using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in vitro. Animals with left cardiac hypertrophy had diminished excitation of CVNs, which was mediated both by an augmented frequency of spontaneous inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission (with no alteration of inhibitory glycinergic activity) as well as a diminished amplitude and frequency of excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. Opportunities to alter these network pathways and neurotransmitter receptors provide future targets of intervention in the goal to restore parasympathetic activity and autonomic balance to the heart in cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Pentobarbital enhances GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, which is prevented by expression of GABA(A) epsilon subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnaten, Mustapha; Walwyn, Wendy M; Wang, Jijiang; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Chang, Kyoung S K; Andresen, Michael C; Hales, Tim G; Mendelowitz, David

    2002-09-01

    Pentobarbital decreases the gain of the baroreceptor reflex on the order of 50%, and this blunting is caused nearly entirely by decreasing cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity. The most likely site of action of pentobarbital is the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor. The authors tested whether pentobarbital augments the inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, and whether expression of the GABA(A) epsilon subunit prevents this facilitation. The authors used a novel approach to study the effect of pentobarbital on identified cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in rat brainstem slices. The cardiac parasympathetic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus were retrogradely prelabeled with a fluorescent tracer and were visually identified for patch clamp recording. The effects of pentobarbital on spontaneous GABAergic synaptic events were tested. An adenovirus was used to express the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in cardiac parasympathetic neurons to examine whether this transfection alters pentobarbital-mediated changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. Pentobarbital increased the duration but not the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous GABAergic currents in cardiac parasympathetic neurons. Transfection of cardiac parasympathetic neurons with the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor prevented the pentobarbital-evoked facilitation of GABAergic currents. Pentobarbital, at clinically relevant concentrations, prolongs the duration of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents that impinge on cardiac parasympathetic neurons. This action would augment the inhibition of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, reduce parasympathetic cardioinhibitory activity, and increase heart rate. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor epsilon subunit in cardiac parasympathetic neurons renders the GABA receptors insensitive to pentobarbital.

  10. Chronic intermittent hypoxia depresses afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons by a reduction in the number of active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almado, Carlos Eduardo L; Machado, Benedito H; Leão, Ricardo M

    2012-11-21

    Long-term synaptic plasticity has been recently described in brainstem areas associated to visceral afferent sensory integration. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an animal model for studying obstructive sleep apnea in humans, depresses the afferent neurotransmission in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons, which affect respiratory and autonomic regulation. Here we identified the synaptic mechanisms of CIH-induced depression of the afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons in juvenile rats. We verified that CIH reduced the amplitude of both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamatergic excitatory currents (eEPSCs) evoked by tractus solitarii stimulation (TS-eEPSC) of second-order neurons in the NTS. No changes were observed in release probability, evidenced by absence of any CIH-elicited effects on short-term depression and failures in EPSCs evoked in low calcium. CIH also produced no changes in TS-eEPSC quantal size, since the amplitudes of both low calcium-evoked EPSCs and asynchronous TS-eEPSCs (evoked in the presence of Sr(2+)) were unchanged. Using single TS afferent fiber stimulation in slices from control and CIH rats we clearly show that CIH reduced the quantal content of the TS-eEPSCs without affecting the quantal size or release probability, suggesting a reduction in the number of active synapses as the mechanism of CIH induced TS-eEPSC depression. In accordance with this concept, the input-output relationship of stimulus intensity and TS-eEPSC amplitude shows an early saturation in CIH animals. These findings open new perspectives for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the synaptic plasticity in the brainstem sensory neurons under challenges such as those produced by CIH in experimental and pathological conditions.

  11. Regionally Selective Requirement for D[subscript 1]/D[subscript 5] Dopaminergic Neurotransmission in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Object-in-Place Associative Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Giorgia; Bashir, Zafar I.; Warburton, E. Clea

    2015-01-01

    Object-in-place (OiP) memory is critical for remembering the location in which an object was last encountered and depends conjointly on the medial prefrontal cortex, perirhinal cortex, and hippocampus. Here we examined the role of dopamine D[subscript 1]/D[subscript 5] receptor neurotransmission within these brain regions for OiP memory. Bilateral…

  12. Neuroprotective effects of the allosteric agonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 AMN082 on oxygen-glucose deprivation- and kainate-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Helena; Jantas, Danuta; Śmiałowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Although numerous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective potency of unspecific group III mGluR agonists in in vitro and in vivo models of excitotoxicity, little is known about the protective role of group III mGlu receptor activation against neuronal cell injury evoked by ischemic conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess neuroprotective potential of the allosteric agonist of mGlu7 receptor, N,N'-Bis(diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride (AMN082) against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)- and kainate (KA)-evoked neuronal cell damage in primary neuronal cultures, with special focus on its efficacy after delayed application. We demonstrated that in cortical neuronal cultures exposed to a 180 min OGD, AMN082 (0.01-1 µM) in a concentration- and time-dependent way attenuated the OGD-induced changes in the LDH release and MTT reduction assays. AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) produced also neuroprotective effects against KA-evoked neurotoxicity both in cortical and hippocampal cultures. Of particular importance was the finding that AMN082 attenuated excitotoxic neuronal injury after delayed application (30 min after OGD, or 30 min-1 h after KA). In both models of neurotoxicity, namely OGD- and KA-induced injury, the neuroprotective effects of AMN082 (1 µM) were reversed by the selective mGlu7 antagonist, 6-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-(4-pyridinyl)-isoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one hydrochloride (MMPIP, 1 µM), suggesting the mGlu7-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective effects of AMN082. Next, we showed that AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) attenuated the OGD-induced increase in the number of necrotic nuclei as well inhibited the OGD-evoked calpain activation, suggesting the participation of these processes in the mechanism of AMN082-mediated protection. Additionally, we showed that protection evoked by AMN082 (1 µM) in KA model was connected with the inhibition of toxin-induced caspase-3 activity, and this effect was abolished by the mGlu7

  13. Transmissão pelo glutamato como alvo molecular na ansiedade Glutamatergic neurotransmission as molecular target in anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio de Pádua Carobrez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O glutamato (GLU é o principal neurotransmissor excitatório do cérebro de mamíferos. Os receptores do GLU são classificados em ionotrópicos ou metabotrópicos. A interferência do GLU no desenvolvimento neural, na plasticidade sináptica, no aprendizado e na memória, na epilepsia, na isquemia neural, na tolerância e na dependência a drogas, na dor neuropática, na ansiedade e na depressão tem limitado o uso de compostos que agem nos receptores de GLU, quando existe a necessidade de ações mais seletivas dessas drogas. Dados pré-clínicos em roedores e humanos têm mostrado que compostos que reduzem a ativação do GLU, pelo bloqueio dos seus receptores ou através da redução da sua liberação dos terminais, produzem um perfil ansiolítico em modelos de ansiedade. A aplicação desses compostos em áreas específicas do cérebro, envolvidas na mediação do comportamento defensivo, tal como a substância cinzenta periaquedutal dorsal, também reproduzem o mesmo perfil ansiolítico de ação. O conhecimento crescente acerca da neurotransmissão pelo GLU e o desenvolvimento de compostos mais seletivos atuantes nesta neurotransmissão, renovaram a atenção para esse sistema neurotransmissor como alvo molecular possível para uma nova classe de drogas no tratamento de condições neuropsiquiátricas. Embora incompleta, esta revisão tenta atrair a atenção para a importância de estudos colaborativos entre clínicos e pesquisadores de ciências básicas na geração de idéias para alvos potenciais no desenvolvimento de novos compostos ansiolíticos. e desta maneira contribuir para a compreensão das bases biológicas da ansiedade.Glutamate (GLU is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. GLU receptors are classified as ionotropic (iGLUR or metabotropic (mGLUR. The GLU interference with neural development, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, epilepsy, neural ischemia, drug addiction, tolerance, neuropathic

  14. Suppressing SNAP-25 and reversing glial glutamate transporters relieves neuropathic pain in rats by ameliorating imbalanced neurotransmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang; GUO Qu-lian; HUANG Chang-sheng; ZOU Wang-yuan; SONG Zong-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain results from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system at either the peripheral or central level.The transmission of nociception within the central nervous system is subject to modulation by release and reuptake of neurotransmitters,which maintain a dynamic balance through the assembly and disassembly of the SNARE complex as well as a series of neurotransmitter transporters (inhibitory GABA transporters GAT and excitatory glutamate transporters GT).Neuronal hyper-excitability or defected inhibition involved in neuropathic pain is one of the outcomes caused by imbalanced neurotransmission.SNAP-25,which is one of the SNARE complexes,can modulate the release of neurotransmitters.Glia glutamate transporter (GLT) is one of the two glutamate transporters which account for most synaptic glutamate uptake in the CNS.The role of SNAP-25 and GLT as well as GAT is not clearly understood.Methods We used the rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model for research,and degraded SNAP-25 by a single intrathecal administration of BoNT/A.The mechanical (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) were tested.The level of SNAP-25,GLT,and GAT-1 were assayed using RT-PCR and Western blotting.Results SNAP-25 was suppressed by a single intrathecal administration of 0.01U BoNT/A and the reduction of SNAP-25 was correlated with the relief of nociceptive responses in CCI rats.MWT and TWL returned to normal from the 5th to 14th day (P <0.05) after the administration.On the 14th day after surgery,compared to the sham group,the upregulation of SNAP-25 in CCI rats was reversed after BoNT/A treatment (P <0.05).The decreased GLT was reversed after BoNT/A treatment but increased GAT-1 was not influenced by BoNT/A treatment.Conclusions SNAP-25 and GLT play important roles in the development of neuropathic pain,and the mechanism may involve the imbalance of neurotransmission after peripheral nerve injury.Intrathecal administration of BoNT/A reversed the

  15. Involvement of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission in mouse gastric preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Serio, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    While most of the studies concerning the role of cannabinoids on gastric motility have focused the attention on the gastric emptying in in vivo animal models, there is little information about the cannabinoid peripheral influence in the stomach. In addition, the functional features of CB2 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract have been poorly characterized. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the excitatory cholinergic and inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmission in mouse isolated gastric preparations. Intraluminal pressure from isolated whole stomach was recorded and mechanical responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analyzed in different experimental conditions. EFS (0.5ms duration, supramaximal voltage, in trains of 5s, 2-16Hz) caused a cholinergic contraction, which was abolished by atropine or tetrodotoxin (TTX). The cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2, the endogenous ligand, anandamide, the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, and the selective CB2 receptor agonists, JWH015 and JWH133, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the EFS-evoked cholinergic contractions. SR141716A, CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide or ACEA, without affecting those caused by JWH133. AM630, CB2 receptor antagonist, reduced the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide, JWH015 or JWH133, without affecting those caused by ACEA. The joint application of SR141716A and AM630 was able of fully preventing the WIN 55,212-2 and anandamide actions. The cannabinoid antagonists failed per se to affect the neurally evoked responses. Cannabinoids did not modify the contractions produced by exogenous carbachol. In the presence of atropine and guanethidine (NANC conditions) EFS-induced TTX-sensitive relaxation consisting in an early and rapid component followed by a second slow phase, which were

  16. Imaging plasma docosahexaenoic acid (dha incorporation into the brain in vivo, as a biomarker of brain DHA: Metabolism and neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport Stanley I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is critical for normal brain structure and function, and its brain concentration depends on dietary DHA content and hepatic conversion from its dietary derived n-3 precursor, a-linolenic acid (α-LNA. We developed an in vivo method in rats using quantitative autoradiography to image incorporation into brain of unesterified plasma DHA, and showed that the incorporation rate equals the rate of brain metabolic DHA consumption. Thus, quantitative imaging of DHA incorporation from plasma into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain DHA metabolism and neurotransmission. The method has been extended to humans with the use of positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, imaging in unanesthetized rats using DHA incorporation as a biomarker in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA administration confirms that regional DHA signaling is independent of extracellular calcium, and likely mediated by a calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2. Studies in mice in which iPLA2-VIA (β was knocked out confirmed that this enzyme is critical for baseline and muscarinic cholinergic signaling involving DHA.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide functions as a neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Zhu, Jun; Pan, Yang; Dong, Jingde; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter, has been considered a neuromodulator to enhance hippocampal long-term potentiation and exerts neuroprotective effects against neurotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether H2S can function as a neuromodulator to regulate the levels of nigrostriatal neurotransmitters and then impact the vulnerability of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in response to neurotoxins remains unknown. For this study, we prepared a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine plus probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced mouse subacute model of PD to explore the modulatory effect of H2S on monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice. This study shows that NaHS (an H2S donor, 5.6 mg/kg/day, i.p.) administration improves the survival rate and significantly ameliorates the weight loss of MPTP-treated mice. NaHS treatment attenuated MPTP-induced neuronal damage, restored the diminution of DA neurons, and suppressed the overactivation of astrocytes in the mouse striatum. Additionally, NaHS upregulated striatal serotonin levels and modulated the balance of excitatory glutamate and the inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid system in response to MPTP challenge. The current study indicates that H2S may function as an effective neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission and provides insight into the potential of H2S for PD therapy.

  18. Role of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of intestinal blood flow and sympathetic neurotransmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvannapura, A.

    1988-01-01

    The aims of the present studies were (1) to determine if endogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a role in the local control of mesenteric blood flow (MBF) following volume depletion in anesthetized dogs, and (2) to investigate the mechanism(s) of actions of Ang II on the facilitation of sympathetic neurotransmission in the rate jejunum. To investigate the role of endogenous Ang II in the control of MBF, a dose of an antagonist of Ang II, saralasin, that has effects mainly localized to the mesenteric circulation was determined. The data demonstrated that blockage of actions of Ang II in the mesenteric circulation resulted in a decrease in intestinal vasoconstriction which occurred following acute hypotensive hemorrhage. The effect of Ang II on the uptake and release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings in the rat jejunum was investigated. The uptake of norepinephrine in rat jejunum was determined by incubating jejunal slices in Krebs buffer containing 0.01 {mu}M {sup 3}H-norepinephrine. The accumulation of label in the tissue after 10 min incubation was determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Intracellular uptake of {sup 3}H-norepinephrine was calculated and shown to be an active process.

  19. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Y; Buzgariu, W; Galliot, B

    2016-01-05

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory-motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution.

  20. Sensory Input-Dependent Changes in Glutamatergic Neurotransmission- Related Genes and Proteins in the Adult Rat Trigeminal Ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Buendia, Izaskun; Martin, Yasmina B.; Egea, Javier; Negredo, Pilar; Avendaño, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity induces lasting changes in the structure of synapses, dendrites, and axons at both molecular and anatomical levels. Whilst relatively well studied in the cortex, little is known about the molecular changes underlying experience-dependent plasticity at peripheral levels of the sensory pathways. Given the importance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the somatosensory system and its involvement in plasticity, in the present study, we investigated gene and protein expression of glutamate receptor subunits and associated molecules in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of young adult rats. Microarray analysis of naïve rat TG revealed significant differences in the expression of genes, coding for various glutamate receptor subunits and proteins involved in clustering and stabilization of AMPA receptors, between left and right ganglion. Long-term exposure to sensory-enriched environment increased this left–right asymmetry in gene expression. Conversely, unilateral whisker trimming on the right side almost eliminated the mentioned asymmetries. The above manipulations also induced side-specific changes in the protein levels of glutamate receptor subunits. Our results show that sustained changes in sensory input induce modifications in glutamatergic transmission-related gene expression in the TG, thus supporting a role for this early sensory-processing node in experience-dependent plasticity. PMID:27965535

  1. Synaptic plasticity in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission following chronic memantine treatment in an in vitro model of limbic epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuijin; Bausch, Suzanne B

    2014-02-01

    Chronic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade with high affinity competitive and uncompetitive antagonists can lead to seizure exacerbation, presumably due to an imbalance in glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission. Acute administration of the moderate affinity NMDAR antagonist memantine in vivo has been associated with pro- and anticonvulsive properties. Chronic treatment with memantine can exacerbate seizures. Therefore, we hypothesized that chronic memantine treatment would increase glutamatergic and decrease GABAergic transmission, similar to high affinity competitive and uncompetitive antagonists. To test this hypothesis, organotypic hippocampal slice culture were treated for 17-21 days with memantine and then subjected to electrophysiological recordings. Whole-cell recordings from dentate granule cells revealed that chronic memantine treatment slightly, but significantly increased sEPSC frequency, mEPSC amplitude and mEPSC charge transfer, consistent with minimally increased glutamatergic transmission. Chronic memantine treatment also increased both sIPSC and mIPSC frequency and amplitude, suggestive of increased GABAergic transmission. Results suggest that a simple imbalance between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission may not underlie memantine's ictogenic properties. That said, glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission were assayed independently of one another in the current study. More complex interactions between glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission may prevail under conditions of intact circuitry.

  2. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  3. Pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits GABAergic neurotransmission by activating endocytosis and repression of GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffault, Baptiste; Medina, Igor; Dumon, Camille; Thalman, Carine; Ferrand, Nadine; Friedel, Perrine; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    GABA is the canonical inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. This inhibitory action is largely mediated by GABA type A receptors (GABAARs). Among the many factors controlling GABAergic transmission, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to play a major role in regulating synaptic inhibition. Recent findings have demonstrated that BDNF can be released as a precursor (proBDNF). Although the role of mature BDNF on GABAergic synaptogenesis and maintenance has been well studied, an important question still unanswered is whether secreted proBDNF might affect GABAergic neurotransmission. Here, we have used 14 d in vitro primary culture of hippocampal neurons and ex vivo preparations from rats to study the function of proBDNF in regulation of GABAAR trafficking and activity. We demonstrate that proBDNF impairs GABAergic transmission by the activation of two distinct pathways: (1) a RhoA-Rock-PTEN pathway that decreases the phosphorylation levels of GABAAR, thus affecting receptor function and triggering endocytosis and degradation of internalized receptors, and (2) a JAK-STAT-ICER pathway leading to the repression of GABAARs synthesis. These effects lead to the diminution of GABAergic synapses and are correlated with a decrease in GABAergic synaptic currents. These results revealed new functions for proBDNF-p75 neurotrophin receptor signaling pathway in the control of the efficacy of GABAergic synaptic activity by regulating the trafficking and synthesis of GABAARs at inhibitory synapses.

  4. Effects of subchronic treatment with valproate on L-5-HTP-induced cortisol responses in mania: evidence for increased central serotonergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Calabrese, J; Jayathilake, K; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-07-04

    The mechanisms underlying the acute and prophylactic antimanic properties of valproate have remained elusive. There are some reports that treatment with valproic acid may increase brain serotonergic neurotransmission in the rodent. This study was carried out in order to investigate the effects of subchronic therapy with valproate on central serotonin metabolism in manic patients. Toward this end, the authors examined plasma cortisol responses to 200 mg (orally) L-5-hydroxy-tryptophan (L-5-HTP) in 10 manic patients both before and after subchronic treatment with valproate. Administration of L-5-HTP resulted in significantly increased cortisol responses both before and after treatment with valproate. The L-5-HTP-induced cortisol responses were significantly higher after treatment with valproate than before treatment. It is suggested that valproate may increase central serotonergic neurotransmission and that this stimulation may play a role in the antimanic effects of valproate.

  5. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Ploug, K.B.; Iversen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown...... an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β...... to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release....

  6. Gene expression related to serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in the flinders sensitive line rat model of depression: Effect of ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers; Elfving, Betina

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with dysfunctional serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and the genetic animal model of depression Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats display alterations in these systems relatively to their control strain Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). However, changes on transcript level related to serotonergic and glutamatergic signaling have only been sparsely studied in this model. The non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has fast-onset antidepressant properties, and recent data implicate serotonergic neurotransmission in ketamine's antidepressant-like activities in rodents. Here, we investigated the transcript levels of 40 genes involved in serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in FSL and FRL rats in response to a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg; 90 min prior to euthanization). Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we studied the effect of ketamine in the hippocampus, whereas strain differences were investigated in both hippocampus and frontal cortex. The expression of genes involved in serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission were unaffected by a single dose of ketamine in the hippocampus. Relative to FRL rats, FSL rats displayed enhanced hippocampal transcript levels of 5-ht2c , and P11, whereas the expression was reduced for 5-ht2a , Nr2a, and Mglur2. In the frontal cortex, we found higher transcript levels of 5-ht2c and Mglur2, whereas the expression of 5-ht2a was reduced in FSL rats. Thus, ketamine is not associated with hippocampal alterations in serotonergic or glutamatergic genes at 90 min after an antidepressant dose. Furthermore, FSL rats display serotonergic and glutamatergic abnormalities on gene expression level that partly may resemble findings in MDD patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nitric oxide facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission in the cat oculomotor system: a physiological mechanism in eye movement control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-López, Bernardo; Escudero, Miguel; Estrada, Carmen

    2002-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by prepositus hypoglossi (PH) neurons is necessary for the normal performance of horizontal eye movements. We have previously shown that unilateral injections of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors into the PH nucleus of alert cats produce velocity imbalance without alteration of the eye position control, both during spontaneous eye movements and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). This NO effect is exerted on the dorsal PH neuropil, whose fibres increase their cGMP content when stimulated by NO. In an attempt to determine whether NO acts by modulation of a specific neurotransmission system, we have now compared the oculomotor effects of NOS inhibition with those produced by local blockade of glutamatergic, GABAergic or glycinergic receptors in the PH nucleus of alert cats. Both glutamatergic antagonists used, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 2,3-dihydro-6-nitro-7-sulphamoyl-benzo quinoxaline (NBQX), induced a nystagmus contralateral to that observed upon NOS inhibition, and caused exponential eye position drift. In contrast, bicuculline and strychnine induced eye velocity alterations similar to those produced by NOS inhibitors, suggesting that NO oculomotor effects were due to facilitation of some inhibitory input to the PH nucleus. To investigate the anatomical location of the putative NO target neurons, the retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected in one PH nucleus, and the brainstem sections containing Fast Blue-positive neurons were stained with double immunohistochemistry for NO-sensitive cGMP and glutamic acid decarboxylase. GABAergic neurons projecting to the PH nucleus and containing NO-sensitive cGMP were found almost exclusively in the ipsilateral medial vestibular nucleus and marginal zone. The results suggest that the nitrergic PH neurons control their own firing rate by a NO-mediated facilitation of GABAergic afferents from the ipsilateral medial vestibular nucleus. This self-control mechanism could play an important role

  8. Enhancement of inorganic Martian dust simulant with carbon component and its effects on key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Evidence on the past existence of subsurface organic-bearing fluids on Mars was recently achieved basing on the investigation of organic carbon from the Tissint Martian meteorite (Lin et al., 2014). Tremendous amount of meteorites containing abundant carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily (Pizzarello and Shock 2010). National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institute of Health panel of research scientists revealed recently that accumulating evidences suggest that nano-sized air pollution may have a significant impact on central nervous system in health and disease (Block et al., Neurotoxicology, 2012). During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Based on above facts, the aims of this study were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust stimulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission and to compare its effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in Na+-dependent uptake of L-[14C]glutamate that is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of isolated rat brain nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon-contained Martian dust analogue. This fact indicated that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamatergic neurtransmission.

  9. NAD+ Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Hyperexcitation in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus by Inhibiting Excitatory Neurotransmission and Neuronal Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Min; Yin, Xin-Lu; Wang, Lu-Yang; Yin, Wei-Hai; Song, Ning-Ying; Shi, Hai-Bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an important molecule with extensive biological functions in various cellular processes, including protection against cell injuries. However, little is known regarding the roles of NAD+ in neuronal excitation and excitotoxicity associated with many neurodegenerative disorders and diseases. Using patch-clamp recordings, we studied its potential effects on principal neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), which is particularly vulnerable to bilirubin excitotoxicity. We found that NAD+ effectively decreased the size of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and reversed the effect of bilirubin on eEPSCs, implicating its inhibitory effects on the presynaptic release probability (Pr). Moreover, NAD+ not only decreased the basal frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs), but also reversed bilirubin-induced increases in the frequency of mEPSCs without affecting their amplitude under either condition. Furthermore, we found that NAD+ decreased the frequency of spontaneous firing of VCN neurons as well as bilirubin-induced increases in firing frequency. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that NAD+ could directly decrease the intrinsic excitability of VCN neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting NAD+ exerts its actions in both presynaptic and postsynaptic loci. Consistent with these observations, we found that the latency of the first postsynaptic spike triggered by high-frequency train stimulation of presynaptic afferents (i.e., the auditory nerve) was prolonged by NAD+. These results collectively indicate that NAD+ suppresses presynaptic transmitter release and postsynaptic excitability, jointly weakening excitatory neurotransmission. Our findings provide a basis for the exploration of NAD+ for the prevention and treatment of bilirubin encephalopathy and excitotoxicity associated with other neurological disorders. PMID:28217084

  10. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Hideo; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Mikako; Kitamura, Youji; Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko; Shimazu, Seiichiro; Yoneda, Fumiro [Fujimoto Pharmaceutical Corporation, Matsubara, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [{sup 123}I]2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  11. GABA, Selank, and Olanzapine Affect the Expression of Genes Involved in GABAergic Neurotransmission in IMR-32 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Elena; Kasian, Anastasiya; Kolomin, Timur; Rybalkina, Ekaterina; Alieva, Anelya; Andreeva, Lyudmila; Limborska, Svetlana; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Pavlova, Galina; Slominsky, Petr; Shadrina, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that Selank had an anxiolytic effect comparable to that of classical benzodiazepine drugs, which can enhance the inhibitory effect of GABA by allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. These data suggest that the molecular mechanism of the effect of Selank may also be related to its ability to affect the performance of the GABAergic system. To test this hypothesis, we studied the changes in expression of 84 genes involved in the functioning of the GABAergic system and in the processes of neurotransmission in the culture of neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells using qPCR method. As test substances, in addition to Selank, we selected the major GABAA receptor ligand, GABA, the atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, and combinations of these compounds (Selank and GABA; Selank and olanzapine). We found no changes in the mRNA levels of the genes studied under the effect of Selank. The combined effect of GABA and Selank led to nearly complete suppression of changes in expression of genes in which mRNA levels changed under the effect of GABA. When Selank was used in conjunction with olanzapine, the expression alterations of more genes were observed compared with olanzapine alone. The data obtained indicate that Selank has no direct effect on the mRNA levels of the GABAergic system genes in neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. At the same time, our results partially confirm the hypothesis that the peptide may affect the interaction of GABA with GABAA receptors. Our data also suggest that Selank may enhance the effect of olanzapine on the expression of the genes studied. PMID:28293190

  12. Role of opioidergic and GABAergic neurotransmission of the nucleus raphe magnus in the modulation of tonic immobility in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luis Felipe Souza; Menescal-de-Oliveira, Leda

    2007-04-02

    Tonic immobility (TI) is an inborn defensive behavior characterized by a temporary state of profound and reversible motor inhibition elicited by some forms of physical restraint. Previous results from our laboratory have demonstrated that nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) is also a structure involved in the modulation of TI behavior, as chemical stimulation through carbachol decreases the duration of TI in guinea pigs. In view of the fact that GABAergic and opioidergic circuits participate in the regulation of neuronal activity in the NRM and since these neurotransmitters are also involved in the modulation of TI, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of these circuits of the NRM in the modulation of the behavioral TI response. Microinjection of morphine (4.4 nmol/0.2 microl) or bicuculline (0.4 nmol/0.2 microl) into the NRM increased the duration of TI episodes while muscimol (0.5 nmol/0.2 microl) decreased it. The effect of morphine injection into the NRM was blocked by previous microinjection of naloxone (2.7 nmol/0.2 microl). Muscimol at 0.25 nmol did not produce any change in TI duration; however, it blocked the increased response induced by morphine. Our results indicate a facilitatory role of opioidergic neurotransmission in the modulation of the TI response within the NRM, whereas GABAergic activity plays an inhibitory role. In addition, in the present study the modulation of TI in the NRM possibly occurred via an interaction between opioidergic and GABAergic systems, where the opioidergic effect might be due to inhibition of tonically active GABAergic interneurons.

  13. Melatonin affects the immobility time of rats in the forced swim test: the role of serotonin neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Vincenzo; Arezzi, Anna; Rampello, Liborio; Drago, Filippo

    2006-10-01

    The efficacy of melatonin or its derivatives in depressive patients has been recently considered for clinical application. However, the evidence for its effect on experimental models of depression is not consolidated. Here, the effects of melatonin on the model of forced swim test (FST) paradigm were studied in male rats of the Wistar strain after acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 0.1, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg of the hormone. Melatonin at doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, but not of 0.1 mg/kg, decreased the immobility of rats in the FST paradigm suggesting a possible antidepressant-like activity. The dose of 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be as potent as clomipramine 50 mg/kg in reducing the immobility time of rats in the FST paradigm. The effect of melatonin on immobility time of rats in the FST paradigm was abolished by the simultaneous injection of the non-selective melatonin antagonist, luzindole (0.25 mg/kg, subcutaneously). Similarly, administration of small quantities of serotonin (5-HT, 5 ng/1 microl) or of the 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (2 ng/1 microl) injected into the amygdale totally suppressed the reduction of immobility time in the FST paradigm induced by melatonin 0.5 mg/kg. These results may suggest that effects of melatonin on the behavioral reaction of rats in the FST paradigm are due to an interaction of the hormone with central 5-HT neurotransmission.

  14. Evidence for a modulatory role of orexin A on the nitrergic neurotransmission in the mouse gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccari, Maria Caterina; Bani, Daniele; Calamai, Franco

    2009-04-10

    The presence of orexins and their receptors in the gastrointestinal tract supports a local action of these peptides. Aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of orexin A (OXA) on the relaxant responses of the mouse gastric fundus. Mechanical responses of gastric strips were recorded via force-displacement transducers. The presence of orexin receptors (OX-1R) was also evaluated by immunocytochemistry. In carbachol precontracted strips and in the presence of guanethidine, electrical field stimulation (EFS) elicited a fast inhibitory response that may be followed, at the highest stimulation frequencies employed, by a sustained relaxation. All relaxant responses were abolished by TTX. The fast response was abolished by the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibitor l-NNA (2x10(-4) M) as well as by the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1x10(-6) M). OXA (3x10(-7) M) greatly increased the amplitude of the EFS-induced fast relaxation without affecting the sustained one. OXA also potentiated the amplitude of the relaxant responses elicited by the ganglionic stimulating agent DMPP (1x10(-5) M), but had no effects on the direct smooth muscle relaxant responses elicited by papaverine (1x10(-5) M) or VIP (1x10(-7) M). In the presence of l-NNA, the response to DMPP was reduced in amplitude and no longer influenced by OXA. The OX1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 (1x10(-5) M) reduced the amplitude of the EFS-induced fast relaxation without influencing neither the sustained responses nor those to papaverine and VIP. Immunocytochemistry showed the presence of neurons that co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase and OX-1R. These results indicate that, in mouse gastric fundus, OXA exerts a modulatory action at the postganglionic level on the nitrergic neurotransmission.

  15. Improving effects of long-term growth hormone treatment on monoaminergic neurotransmission and related behavioral tests in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Susana; Garau, Celia; Aparicio, Sara; Moranta, David; Barceló, Pere; Ramis, Margarita; Tresguerres, Jesús A F; Rial, Rubén

    2010-12-01

    An age-related decline in cognitive functions and physical performance has been associated with reductions in growth hormone (GH) secretion and brain neurotransmitter function. In vivo experiments were performed to study the long-term effects of exogenously administered GH on the central monoaminergic neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline and behavioral tests in old Wistar rats. The accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) after decarboxylase inhibition was used as a measure of the rate of tryptophan and tyrosine hydroxylation in vivo. Also, the content of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline and some metabolites was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the hippocampus and striatum, brain regions involved in adult memory processing and motor coordination. The age-related decline observed in all the neurochemical parameters in control rats was significantly reversed after repeated subcutaneous administration of GH (2 mg/kg per day, 4 weeks). Thus, GH treatment exerted a long-term effect on serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline neurotransmission by enhancing neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism in aged rats. The results obtained after examining working memory tasks in the eight-radial maze and motor ability in the Rotarod treadmill in aged rats were consistent with these neurochemical data; both tests were significantly improved after chronic GH treatment. Overall, these in vivo findings suggest that the positive effects induced by GH on serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline neurotransmitters might explain, at least in part, the effects of chronic GH treatment in improving cognitive and motor ability in aged rats, and could aid in preventing or delaying deficits in monoamines associated with learning or motor disabilities.

  16. Main path and byways: non-vesicular glutamate release by system xc(-) as an important modifier of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Ann; Boillée, Séverine; Hewett, Sandra; Knackstedt, Lori; Lewerenz, Jan

    2015-12-01

    System xc(-) is a cystine/glutamate antiporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. Cystine is intracellularly reduced to cysteine, a building block of GSH. As such, system xc(-) can regulate the antioxidant capacity of cells. Moreover, in several brain regions, system xc(-) is the major source of extracellular glutamate. As such this antiporter is able to fulfill key physiological functions in the CNS, while evidence indicates it also plays a role in certain brain pathologies. Since the transcription of xCT, the specific subunit of system xc(-), is enhanced by the presence of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines, system xc(-) could be involved in toxic extracellular glutamate release in neurological disorders that are associated with increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. System xc(-) has also been reported to contribute to the invasiveness of brain tumors and, as a source of extracellular glutamate, could participate in the induction of peritumoral seizures. Two independent reviews (Pharmacol. Rev. 64, 2012, 780; Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2013, 522), approached from a different perspective, have recently been published on the functions of system xc(-) in the CNS. In this review, we highlight novel achievements and insights covering the regulation of system xc(-) as well as its involvement in emotional behavior, cognition, addiction, neurological disorders and glioblastomas, acquired in the past few years. System xc(-) constitutes an important source of extrasynaptic glutamate in the brain. By modulating the tone of extrasynaptic metabotropic or ionotropic glutamate receptors, it affects excitatory neurotransmission, the threshold for overexcitation and excitotoxicity and, as a consequence, behavior. This review describes the current knowledge of how system xc(-) is regulated and involved in physiological as well as pathophysiological brain functioning.

  17. Reduction of glutamatergic neurotransmission by prolonged exposure to dieldrin involves NMDA receptor internalization and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz, Victor; Galofré, Mireia; Suñol, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Dieldrin was previously used as a pesticide. Although its use has been discontinued, humans are still exposed to it due to its high environmental persistence and because it accumulates in the adipose tissue of animals. Acute exposure to dieldrin provokes convulsions due to its antagonism on the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA(A)) receptor. However, little is known about the effects of low chronic exposure to this pollutant. In the present work, we use primary cultures of cortical neurons to study the mechanisms involved in the toxic action of dieldrin. We found that 2 and 6 days in vitro (DIV) exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration (60nM) of dieldrin reduced the increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and the excitotoxicity caused by glutamate. Exposure to dieldrin for 6 DIV induced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) internalization and reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGLUR5) levels. Double immunostaining for NMDAR and mGLUR5 showed that these receptors lose colocalization on the cell membrane in neurons treated with dieldrin. No changes were observed in receptor functionalities or receptor levels after 2 DIV of exposure to dieldrin. However, the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by coactivation of NMDAR and mGLUR5 was significantly reduced. Thus, a functional interaction between the two receptors seems to play an important role in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We confirm that permanent blockade of the GABA(A) receptor by this persistent pesticide triggers adaptive neuronal changes consisting of a reduction of glutamatergic neurotransmission. This might explain the cognitive and learning deficits observed in animals after chronic treatment with dieldrin.

  18. Oxytocin receptor neurotransmission in the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis facilitates the acquisition of cued fear in the fear-potentiated startle paradigm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddab, Mahsa; Dabrowska, Joanna

    2017-07-15

    Oxytocin (OT) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that modulates fear and anxiety-like behaviors. Dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTdl) plays a critical role in the regulation of fear and anxiety, and expresses high levels of OT receptor (OTR). However, the role of OTR neurotransmission within the BNSTdl in mediating these behaviors is unknown. Here, we used adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the role of OTR neurotransmission in the BNSTdl in the modulation of the acoustic startle response, as well as in the acquisition and consolidation of conditioned fear using fear potentiated startle (FPS) paradigm. Bilateral intra-BNSTdl administration of OT (100 ng) did not affect the acquisition of conditioned fear response. However, intra-BNSTdl administration of specific OTR antagonist (OTA), (d(CH2)5(1), Tyr(Me)(2), Thr(4), Orn(8), des-Gly-NH2(9))-vasotocin, (200 ng), prior to the fear conditioning session, impaired the acquisition of cued fear, without affecting a non-cued fear component of FPS. Neither OTA, nor OT affected baseline startle or shock reactivity during fear conditioning. Therefore, the observed impairment of cued fear after OTA infusion resulted from the specific effect on the formation of cued fear. In contrast to the acquisition, neither OTA nor OT affected the consolidation of FPS, when administered after the completion of fear conditioning session. Taken together, these results reveal the important role of OTR neurotransmission in the BNSTdl in the formation of conditioned fear to a discrete cue. This study also highlights the role of the BNSTdl in learning to discriminate between threatening and safe stimuli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A2A receptors with iron deficiency in rats. Effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A2A receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A2A receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A2A receptors was found in rats fed during three weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A2A receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. PMID:20385128

  1. AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Hellgren, Charlotte; Korol, Sergiy V; Nowak, Krzysztof; Williamsson, Louise; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Birnir, Bryndis

    2017-04-15

    The amino acid glutamate opens cation permeable ion channels, the iGlu receptors. These ion channels are abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain where glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitters and their receptors are being increasingly detected in the cells of immune system. Here we examined the expression of the 18 known subunits of the iGlu receptors families; α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and delta in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We compared the expression of the subunits between four groups: men, non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women and depressed pregnant women. Out of 18 subunits of the iGlu receptors, mRNAs for 11 subunits were detected in PBMCs from men and non-pregnant women; AMPA: GluA3, GluA4, kainate: GluK2, GluK4, GluK5, NMDA: GluN1, GluN2C, GluN2D, GluN3A, GluN3B, and delta: GluD1. In the healthy and the depressed pregnant women, in addition, the delta GluD2 subunit was identified. The mRNAs for GluK4, GluK5, GluN2C and GluN2D were expressed at a higher level than other subunits. Gender, pregnancy or depression during pregnancy altered the expression of GluA3, GluK4, GluN2D, GluN3B and GluD1 iGlu subunit mRNAs. The greatest changes recorded were the lower GluA3 and GluK4 mRNA levels in pregnant women and the higher GluN2D mRNA level in healthy but not in depressed pregnant women as compared to non-pregnant individuals. Using subunit specific antibodies, the GluK4, GluK5, GluN1, GluN2C and GluN2D subunit proteins were identified in the PBMCs. The results show expression of specific iGlu receptor subunit in the PBMCs and support the idea of physiology-driven changes of iGlu receptors subtypes in the immune cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Streptozotocin diabetic mice display depressive-like behavior and alterations in the structure, neurotransmission and plasticity of medial prefrontal cortex interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Coviello, Simona; Perez-Rando, Marta; Curto, Yasmina; Carceller, Héctor; Salvador, Alicia; Nacher, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus patients are at increased risk of developing depression, although the neurobiological bases of this comorbidity are not yet fully understood. These patients show CNS alterations, similar to those found in major depression, including changes in the structure and neurotransmission of excitatory neurons. However, although depressive patients and animal models also display alterations in inhibitory networks, little is known about the effects of diabetes on interneurons. Our main objective was to study the impact of diabetes on interneurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), one of the regions most affected by major depression. For this purpose we have induced diabetes with high-dose streptozotozin in transgenic mice displaying fluorescent interneurons. These animals showed a depressive-like behavior (increased immobility time in tail suspension test) in parallel with reductions in interneuronal dendritic arborization and in the expression of GAD67, the enzyme that synthetizes the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. However, the levels of PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule exclusively expressed by interneurons in the mPFC, were unaltered in the different regions and layers of this cortical area. Interestingly, diabetic mice also showed increased levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein. These results indicate that the structure and neurotransmission of interneurons is altered in the mPFC of diabetic mice and suggest that these changes may play a key role in the depressive symptoms associated to diabetes.

  3. Serotonergic neurotransmission and lapses of attention in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: availability of tryptophan influences attentional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Florian D; Gaber, Tilman J; Baurmann, David; Bubenzer, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Stadler, Christina; Poustka, Fritz; Wöckel, Lars

    2010-08-01

    Deficiencies in serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission have frequently been linked to altered attention and memory processes. With attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) being associated with impaired attention and working memory, this study investigated the effects of a diminished 5-HT turnover achieved by rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) on attentional performance in children and adolescents with ADHD. Twenty-two male patients with ADHD (aged 9-15 yr) received the RTD procedure Moja-De and a tryptophan (Trp)-balanced placebo (Pla) in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject crossover design on two separate study days. Lapses of attention (LA) and phasic alertness (PA) were assessed within the test battery for attentional performance under depleted and sham-depleted conditions 120 (T1), 220 (T2) and 300 (T3) min after intake of RTD/Pla. At T1 there was a significant main effect for RTD, indicating more LA under intake of a Trp-balanced Pla compared to diminished 5-HT neurotransmission. For T2/T3 there were no such effects. PA was not affected by the factors RTD/Pla and time. Interactions of 5-HT with other neurotransmitters as possible underlying neurochemical processes could be subject to further investigations involving healthy controls as regards altered attentional performance in children and adolescents.

  4. Effects of Chronic Dopamine D2R Agonist Treatment and Polysialic Acid Depletion on Dendritic Spine Density and Excitatory Neurotransmission in the mPFC of Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Castillo-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D2 receptors (D2R in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are key players in the etiology and therapeutics of schizophrenia. The overactivation of these receptors contributes to mPFC dysfunction. Chronic treatment with D2R agonists modifies the expression of molecules implicated in neuronal structural plasticity, synaptic function, and inhibitory neurotransmission, which are also altered in schizophrenia. These changes are dependent on the expression of the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule, but nothing is known about the effects of D2R and PSA-NCAM on excitatory neurotransmission and the structure of mPFC pyramidal neurons, two additional features affected in schizophrenia. To evaluate these parameters, we have chronically treated adult rats with PPHT (a D2R agonist after enzymatic removal of PSA with Endo-N. Both treatments decreased spine density in apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons without affecting their inhibitory innervation. Endo-N also reduced the expression of vesicular glutamate transporter-1. These results indicate that D2R and PSA-NCAM are important players in the regulation of the structural plasticity of mPFC excitatory neurons. This is relevant to our understanding of the neurobiological basis of schizophrenia, in which structural alterations of pyramidal neurons and altered expression of D2R and PSA-NCAM have been found.

  5. Dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction induced by amyloid-β transforms cortical long-term potentiation into long-term depression and produces memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Rodriguez-Duran, Luis F; Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Barcenas-Femat, Alejandro; Escobar, Martha L; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition manifested by synaptic dysfunction and memory loss, but the mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are not entirely understood. Although dopamine is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction in AD has mostly been associated to noncognitive symptoms. Thus, we aimed to study the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in AD models. We used a transgenic model of AD (triple-transgenic mouse model of AD) and the administration of exogenous amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers into wild type mice. We found that Aβ decreased cortical dopamine levels and converted in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-term depression (LTD) after high-frequency stimulation delivered at basolateral amygdaloid nucleus-insular cortex projection, which led to impaired recognition memory. Remarkably, increasing cortical dopamine and norepinephrine levels rescued both high-frequency stimulation -induced LTP and memory, whereas depletion of catecholaminergic levels mimicked the Aβ-induced shift from LTP to LTD. Our results suggest that Aβ-induced dopamine depletion is a core mechanism underlying the early synaptopathy and memory alterations observed in AD models and acts by modifying the threshold for the induction of cortical LTP and/or LTD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. KCa1.1 is potential marker for distinguishing Ah-type baroreceptor neurons in NTS and contributes to sex-specific presynaptic neurotransmission in baroreflex afferent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qu, Mei-Yu; Guo, Xin-Jing; Li, Guo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yang; Ban, Tao; Sun, Hong-Li; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-09-14

    Sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of circulation has been described in baroreflex due largely to the function of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs, 1st-order) in nodose. However, it remains unclear if sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmission could also be observed in the central synapses within nucleus of solitary track (NTS, 2nd-order). According to the principle of no mixed neurotransmission among afferents and differentiation of Ah- and A-types to iberiotoxin (IbTX) observed in nodose, the 2nd-order Ah-type BRNs are highly expected. To test this hypothesis, the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in identified 2nd-order BRNs before and after IbTX using brain slice and whole-cell patch. These results showed that, in male rats, the dynamics of EPSCs in capsaicin-sensitive C-types were dramatically altered by IbTX, but not in capsaicin-insensitive A-types. Interestingly, near 50% capsaicin-insensitive neurons in females showed similar effects to C-types, suggesting the existence of Ah-types in NTS, which may be the likely reason why the females had lower blood pressure and higher sensitivity to aortic depressor nerve stimulation via KCa1.1-mediated presynaptic glutamate release from Ah-type afferent terminals.

  7. Receptor-mediated delivery of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) to hepatocytes from ATRA-loaded poly(N-p-vinylbenzyl-4-o-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seog-Jin [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of) ; Moon, Hyun-Seuk [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of) ; Guo, Ding-Ding [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of) ; Kim, Sang-Heon [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) ; Akaike, Toshihiro [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Cho, Chong-Su [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of) ]. E-mail: chocs@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2006-01-15

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) plays a role in regulating CYP26 gene expression in hepatocytes. Poly(N-p-vinylbenzyl-4-o-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide) (PVLA) nanoparticles have been used as hepatocyte-specific targeting candidates. The objective of this study was to investigate receptor-mediated delivery of ATRA using PVLA nanoparticles. ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticles were confirmed by {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the {sup 1}H-NMR study, the proton signals of ATRA disappeared in the spectrum of ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticles in D{sub 2}O, whereas in dimethylsulfoxide-d{sub 6}, the spectrum seemed like an addition of the respective spectrum of each of the pure components. The crystalline peaks of ATRA disappeared in the XRD pattern of ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticles after ATRA was loaded into PVLA nanoparticles. In the measurement of size distribution, diameter of PVLA and ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticles in aqueous solution was 6.9 and 61.2 nm in number average, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the internalization of FITC-PVLA nanoparticles by hepatocytes in the absence of a competitive inhibitor was larger than preincubated with galactose. In reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticles induced CYP26A1 gene in hepatocytes in the absence of a competitive inhibitor but not preincubated with galactose. The results indicate that the ATRA-loaded PVLA nanoparticle can induce CYP26A1 gene in aqueous phase by an asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-mediated delivery system.

  8. Chemical kinetic measurements of the effect of trans- and cis-3,3'-Bis[(trimethylammonio)methyl]azobenzene bromide on acetylcholine receptor mediated ion translocation in Electrophorus electricus and Torpedo californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, A H; Hess, G P

    1986-04-08

    A quench-flow technique was used to study the effect of trans- and cis-3,3'-bis[(trimethylammonio)methyl]azobenzene bromide (trans- and cis-Bis-Q), photoisomerizable ligands, on the acetylcholine receptor in vesicles prepared from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and of Torpedo californica. In E. electricus, two rate coefficients of the receptor-mediated translocation of 86Rb+ induced with trans-Bis-Q were measured: JA, the rate coefficient for ion flux, and alpha, the rate coefficient for receptor inactivation (desensitization). Both rate coefficients increase with increasing concentrations of Bis-Q up to 50 microM. At higher concentrations JA decreases in a concentration-dependent manner while alpha remains unchanged. This effect was previously observed with suberyldicholine [Pasquale, E. B., Takeyasu, K., Udgaonkar, J., Cash, D.J., Severski, M.C., & Hess, G. P. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 5967-5973] and with acetylcholine [Takeyasu, K., Udgaonkar, J., & Hess, G. P. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 5973-5978] and was analyzed in terms of a minimum mechanism that accounts for the properties of activation, desensitization, and inhibition of the receptor. Two molecules of trans-Bis-Q must be bound for the channel to open, but at concentrations greater than 50 microM the population of open channels decreases because of the additional binding of one molecule of trans-Bis-Q to a regulatory inhibitory site, independent of the activating sites. cis-Bis-Q does not induce transmembrane ion flux, but it does inhibit the response of the receptor to acetylcholine and induces inactivation (desensitization) in the micromolar range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Laminar distribution of GABAA- and glycine-receptor mediated tonic inhibition in the dorsal horn of the rat lumbar spinal cord: effects of picrotoxin and strychnine on expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John N; Bradbury, Elizabeth J; Lidierth, Malcolm

    2004-11-01

    Inhibitory mechanisms are essential in suppressing the development of allodynia and hyperalgesia in the normal animal and there is evidence that loss of inhibition can lead to the development of neuropathic pain. We used Fos expression to map the distribution of tonically inhibited cells in the healthy rat lumbar spinal cord. In a control group, Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI) cells were rare, averaging 7.5+/-2.2 cells (mean+/-SEM; N=13 sections) per 20 microm thick section of dorsal horn. This rose to 103+/-11 (mean+/-SEM; N=20) in picrotoxin-treated rats and to 88+/-11 (mean+/-SEM; N=18) in strychnine-treated rats. These changes were significant (ANOVA; Pstrychnine-treated animals. Picrotoxin induced a significant increase in the number of Fos-LI cells throughout the dorsal horn (lamina I-VI) while strychnine significantly elevated Fos-like immunoreactivity only in deep laminae (III-VI). For both picrotoxin and strychnine, the increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity peaked in lamina V (at 3579+/-319 and 3649+/-375% of control, respectively; mean+/-SEM) but for picrotoxin an additional peak was observed in the outer part of lamina II (1959+/-196%). Intrathecal administration of both GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists has been shown elsewhere to induce tactile allodynia. The present data suggest that this allodynia could arise due to blockade of tonic GABAA and glycine-receptor mediated inhibition in the deep dorsal horn. GABAA antagonists also induce hypersensitivity to noxious inputs. The blockade of tonic inhibition in the superficial dorsal horn shown here may underlie this hyperalgesia.

  10. Prostanoid EP1 receptors mediate up-regulation of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 by cAMP-independent activation of protein kinase A, CREB and NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, R; Sanchez, CM; Chou, CL; Chen, XB; Woodward, DF; Regan, JW

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulation of the G protein-coupled prostanoid EP1 receptor was found to up-regulate the expression of Nur-related factor 1 (Nurr1) (NR4A2), a transcription factor in the NR4A subfamily of nuclear receptors. The present studies characterize the molecular mechanism of this up-regulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The expression of Nurr1 was examined by immunoblot analysis, the polymerase chain reaction and reporter gene assays in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells stably expressing the recombinant EP1 receptor and in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing endogenous EP1 receptors. Signalling pathway inhibitors were used to examine the roles of Rho, PKA, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and NF-κB on the PGE2 stimulated up-regulation of Nurr1. CREB and NF-κB signalling were also examined by immunoblot analysis and reporter gene assays. KEY RESULTS The EP1 receptor mediated up-regulation of Nurr1 was blocked with inhibitors of Rho, PKA, NF-κB and CREB; but PGE2 failed to significantly stimulate intracellular cAMP formation. PGE2 stimulation of the EP1 receptor induced the phosphorylation and activation of CREB and NF-κB, which could be blocked by inhibition of PKA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS PGE2 stimulation of the human EP1 receptor up-regulates the expression of Nurr1 by a mechanism involving the sequential activation of the Rho, PKA, CREB and NF-κB signalling pathways. EP1 receptors are implicated in tumorigenesis and the up-regulation of Nurr1 may underlie the anti-apoptotic effects of PGE2. PMID:22188298

  11. RDX binds to the GABA(A) receptor-convulsant site and blocks GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in the amygdala: a mechanism for RDX-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Larry R; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Qashu, Felicia; Finne, Huckelberry; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Bannon, Desmond I; Braga, Maria F M

    2011-03-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a high-energy, trinitrated cyclic compound that has been used worldwide since World War II as an explosive in both military and civilian applications. RDX can be released in the environment by way of waste streams generated during the manufacture, use, and disposal of RDX-containing munitions and can leach into groundwater from unexploded munitions found on training ranges. For > 60 years, it has been known that exposure to high doses of RDX causes generalized seizures, but the mechanism has remained unknown. We investigated the mechanism by which RDX induces seizures. By screening the affinity of RDX for a number of neurotransmitter receptors, we found that RDX binds exclusively to the picrotoxin convulsant site of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) ionophore. Whole-cell in vitro recordings in the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) showed that RDX reduces the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA-evoked postsynaptic currents. In extracellular field recordings from the BLA, RDX induced prolonged, seizure-like neuronal discharges. These results suggest that binding to the GABA(A) receptor convulsant site is the primary mechanism of seizure induction by RDX and that reduction of GABAergic inhibitory transmission in the amygdala is involved in the generation of RDX-induced seizures. Knowledge of the molecular site and the mechanism of RDX action with respect to seizure induction can guide therapeutic strategies, allow more accurate development of safe thresholds for exposures, and help prevent the development of new explosives or other munitions that could pose similar health risks.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated downregulation of spinal astrocytic connexin43 leads to increased glutamatergic neurotransmission and neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Zhang, Fang Fang; Nakamura, Yoki; Kitamura, Tomoya; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Spinal cord astrocytes are critical in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Connexin 43 (Cx43) expressed on spinal dorsal horn astrocytes modulates synaptic neurotransmission, but its role in nociceptive transduction has yet to be fully elaborated. In mice, Cx43 is mainly expressed in astrocytes, not neurons or microglia, in the spinal dorsal horn. Hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity was observed beginning 3days after partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL), but a persistent downregulation of astrocytic Cx43 in ipsilateral lumbar spinal dorsal horn was not observed until 7days post-PSNL, suggesting that Cx43 downregulation mediates the maintenance and not the initiation of nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity. Downregulation of Cx43 expression by intrathecal treatment with Cx43 siRNA also induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Conversely, restoring Cx43 by an adenovirus vector expressing Cx43 (Ad-Cx43) ameliorated PSNL-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. The sensitized state following PSNL is likely maintained by dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission, as Cx43 siRNA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity was attenuated with intrathecal treatment of glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and CNQX, but not neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist CP96345 or the Ca(2+) channel subunit α2δ1 blocker gabapentin. The source of this dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission is likely decreased clearance of glutamate from the synapse rather than increased glutamate release into the synapse. Astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter GLT-1, but not GLAST, and activity of glutamate transport were markedly decreased in mice intrathecally injected with Cx43-targeting siRNA but not non-targeting siRNA. Glutamate release from spinal synaptosomes prepared from mice treated with either Cx43-targeting siRNA or non-targeting siRNA was unchanged. Intrathecal injection of Ad-Cx43 in PSNL mice restored astrocytic GLT-1 expression. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been

  13. Effects of age and acute ethanol on glutamatergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats using enzyme-based microelectrode amperometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Devesh; Harrison, Nicholas R; Gonzales, Carolina B; Schilström, Björn; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse during adolescence may significantly alter development of the prefrontal cortex which continues to undergo structural remodeling into adulthood. Glutamatergic neurotransmission plays an important role during these brain maturation processes and is modulated by ethanol. In this study, we investigated glutamate dynamics in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats, using enzyme-based microelectrode amperometry. We analyzed the effects of an intraperitoneal ethanol injection (1 g/kg) on cortical glutamate levels in adolescent and adult rats. Notably, basal glutamate levels decreased with age and these levels were found to be significantly different between postnatal day (PND) 28-38 vs PND 44-55 (pprefrontal cortex and suggest that acute ethanol injections have both inhibitory and excitatory effects in adolescent rats. These effects of ethanol on the prefrontal cortex may disturb its maturation and possibly limiting individuals´ control over addictive behaviors.

  14. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D.; Chaudoin, Tammy R.; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Evan H.; Hoke, Traci A.; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D.; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A. Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H.; Volden, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits. PMID:27689748

  15. Reduced dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of quinpirole-sensitized rats hints at inhibitory D2 autoreceptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Angélica P; Cornejo, Francisca A; Olivares-Costa, Montserrat; González, Marcela; Fuentealba, José A; Gysling, Katia; España, Rodrigo A; Andrés, María E

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine from the ventral tegmental area and glutamate from several brain nuclei converge in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to drive motivated behaviors. Repeated activation of D2 receptors with quinpirole (QNP) induces locomotor sensitization and compulsive behaviors, but the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, in vivo microdialysis and fast scan cyclic voltammetry in adult anesthetized rats were used to investigate the effect of repeated QNP on dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission within the NAc. Following eight injections of QNP, a significant decrease in phasic and tonic dopamine release was observed in rats that displayed locomotor sensitization. Either a systemic injection or the infusion of QNP into the NAc decreased dopamine release, and the extent of this effect was similar in QNP-sensitized and control rats, indicating that inhibitory D2 autoreceptor function is maintained despite repeated activation of D2 receptors and decreased dopamine extracellular levels. Basal extracellular levels of glutamate in the NAc were also significantly lower in QNP-treated rats than in controls. Moreover, the increase in NAc glutamate release induced by direct stimulation of medial prefrontal cortex was significantly lower in QNP-sensitized rats. Together, these results indicate that repeated activation of D2 receptors disconnects NAc from medial prefrontal cortex and ventral tegmental area. Repeated administration of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (QNP) induces locomotor sensitization. We found that the NAc of QNP-sensitized rats has reduced glutamate levels coming from prefrontal cortex together with a decreased phasic and tonic dopamine neurotransmission but a conserved presynaptic D2 receptor function. We suggest that locomotor sensitization is because of increased affinity state of D2 post-synaptic receptors. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, but not androsterone, enhances the antidepressant effect of cocaine examined in the forced swim test--Possible role of serotonergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzascik, Pawel; Zajda, Malgorzata Elzbieta; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2015-04-01

    One of the mechanisms of cocaine's actions in the central nervous system is its antidepressant action. This effect might be responsible for increased usage of the drug by individuals with mood disorders. Higher endogenous levels of the excitatory neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were reported to correlate with successful abstinence from cocaine use in addicts, but a clinical trial showed that supplementation with a high dose of DHEA increased cocaine usage instead. Such ambiguous effects of DHEA(S) could potentially be linked to its influence on the antidepressant effect of cocaine. In this study we tested DHEAS and its metabolite, androsterone, for interactions with cocaine in animal model of depression (forced swim test) and examined the effects of both steroids and cocaine on serotoninergic neurotransmission. All substances were also tested for influence on locomotor activity. A cocaine dose of 5mg/kg, which had no significant effect on locomotor activity, was chosen for the forced swim test. Neither DHEAS nor androsterone showed any antidepressant action in this test, while cocaine manifested a clear antidepressant effect. Androsterone slightly reduced the antidepressant influence of cocaine while DHEAS markedly, dose-dependently enhanced it. Such an effect might be caused by the influence of DHEAS on serotonin neurotransmission, as this steroid decreased serotonin concentration and turnover in the striatum. When DHEAS and cocaine were administered together, the levels of serotonin in the striatum and hippocampus remained unchanged. This phenomenon may explain the additive antidepressant action of DHEAS and cocaine and why co-administration of DHEAS and cocaine increases drug use.

  17. Topiramate via NMDA, AMPA/kainate, GABAA and Alpha2 receptors and by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathway exerts neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Fatima, Sulail; Beiranvand, Tabassom; Mozaffari, Shiva

    2017-08-09

    Chronic abuse of methylphenidate (MPH) often causes neuronal cell death. Topiramate (TPM) carries neuroprotective effects, but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, the role of various doses of TPM and its possible mechanisms, receptors and signaling pathways involved against MPH-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration were evaluated in vivo. Thus, domoic acid (DOM) was used as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist, bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, ketamine (KET) as NMDA receptor antagonist, yohimbine (YOH) as α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist and haloperidol (HAL) was used as dopamine D2 receptor antagonist. Open field test (OFT) was used to investigate the disturbances in motor activity. Hippocampal neurodegenerative parameters were evaluated. Protein expressions of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathways were also evaluated. Cresyl violet staining was performed to show and confirm the changes in the shape of the cells. TPM (70 and 100 mg/kg) reduced MPH-induced rise in lipid peroxidation, oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG), IL-1β and TNF-α levels, Bax expression and motor activity disturbances. In addition, TPM treatment increased Bcl-2 expression, the level of reduced form of glutathione (GSH) and the levels and activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase enzymes. TPM also inhibited MPH-induced hippocampal degeneration. Pretreatment of animals with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced neuroprotection and increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, neuroapoptosis and neurodegeneration while reducing CREB, BDNF and Akt protein expressions. Also pretreatment with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced decreases in GSK3. It can be concluded that the mentioned receptors by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 pathways, are involved in neuroprotection of TPM against MPH-induced neurodegeneration.

  18. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eCosta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD in wild-type (wt and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices.Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions.The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of

  19. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome.

  20. THE 10,000-FOLD-EFFECT-RETROGRADE NEUROTRANSMISSION-A NEWER CONCEPT FOR PARAPLEGIAS PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIVAL-USE OF INTRATHECAL SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methylprednisolone-level-1-benefit (20% in paraplegia (8hrs. Patient’s wait-long-duration for physiological-recovery. Intrathecal-Sodium-Nitroprusside (ITSNP has been used-in vasospasm-due-to-subarachnoid-hemorrhage. ITSNP-has been studied-here for wide-window-period-range for-treatment, fast-recovery/affordability. 2-mechanisms for acute-cases-and 1-mechanism-for chronic-cases, which-are-interrelated, are being-proposed-for-physiological-recovery. A RETROGRADE-NEUROTRANSMISSION: (acute-cases. 1 Normal-excitatory-impulse: At synaptic-level, glutamate-activates NMDA-receptors, having-Nitric-Oxide-Synthetase (NOS on-postsynaptic-membrane, for-further propagation-by-calcium-calmodulin-complex. NITRIC-OXIDE (NO-produced-by-NOS travels-backward-across-chemical-synapse, binding-to-axon-terminal (NO-receptor/sGC of-a-presynaptic-neuron, regulating-Anterograde-Neurotransmission (ANT called-Retrograde-Neurotransmission (RNT. The-haem-is-the-ligand-binding-site-of-NO-receptor/sGC. The-affinity-of-haem-exhibits 10, 000-fold-excess-for-NO-than-Oxygen (THE=10, 000-FOLD-EFFECT completes-in-20msec. 2 Pathological-conditions: Normal-ANT, synaptic-activity including-RNT is-absent. NO-donor (SNP release NO from NOS at postsynaptic-region.NO-travels-backward across a chemical-synapse to bind to the haem of NO-receptor at axon-terminal of a presynaptic-neuron, generates-impulse, as in normal-condition. B VASOSPASM: (acute-cases c Perforators-show vasospastic-activity. NO-vasodilates the-perforators by NO-Camp-pathway. D LONG-TERM-POTENTIATION-(LTP: (chronic-cases NO–cGMP-pathway-plays-a-role-in-LTP-at-many-synapses-throughout-the-CNS, and-at-neuromuscular-junction. The-LTP-has-been-reviewed both-generally and with-respect to specific-brain regions for memory/learning. AIMS/STUDY-DESIGN: Principle-of “generation-of-impulses from presynaptic-region to postsynaptic-region by-RNT, vasodilatation of arteriolar-perforators and LTP is the basis

  1. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions.

  2. Effects of oxytocin on methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and the possible role of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice in reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jia; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2009-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown the neuroactive properties of oxytocin (OT), a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, and its ability to reduce the abuse potential of drugs. The present study investigated the effects of OT on the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by methamphetamine (MAP, 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice and the possible role of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the reinstatement of CPP. The results showed that OT (0.1, 0.5, 2.5 microg, i.c.v.) significantly inhibited the acquisition and facilitated the extinction of MAP-induced CPP and abolished the reinstatement of CPP induced by restraint stress. This effect of OT could be attenuated by atosiban (Ato, 2.0 microg, i.c.v.), a selective OT-receptor antagonist. OT failed to block the expression and the reinstatement of CPP induced by MAP challenge. Extracellular glutamate (Glu) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were determined using microdialysis coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detection system. The results indicated that OT markedly inhibited extracellular Glu levels induced by restraint stress in CPP mice, but not those induced by MAP priming. Ato also attenuated the effects of OT on the changes in Glu levels. Therefore, these findings suggest that OT inhibits drug reward-related behaviors induced by MAP via the OT receptor, and OT blocks the reinstatement of CPP, at least partially, by interfering with the glutamatergic system in the mPFC.

  3. Dietary Supplementation of Hericium erinaceus Increases Mossy Fiber-CA3 Hippocampal Neurotransmission and Recognition Memory in Wild-Type Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Brandalise

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hericium erinaceus (Bull. Pers. is a medicinal mushroom capable of inducing a large number of modulatory effects on human physiology ranging from the strengthening of the immune system to the improvement of cognitive functions. In mice, dietary supplementation with H. erinaceus prevents the impairment of spatial short-term and visual recognition memory in an Alzheimer model. Intriguingly other neurobiological effects have recently been reported like the effect on neurite outgrowth and differentiation in PC12 cells. Until now no investigations have been conducted to assess the impact of this dietary supplementation on brain function in healthy subjects. Therefore, we have faced the problem by considering the effect on cognitive skills and on hippocampal neurotransmission in wild-type mice. In wild-type mice the oral supplementation with H. erinaceus induces, in behaviour test, a significant improvement in the recognition memory and, in hippocampal slices, an increase in spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic current in mossy fiber-CA3 synapse. In conclusion, we have produced a series of findings in support of the concept that H. erinaceus induces a boost effect onto neuronal functions also in nonpathological conditions.

  4. Dietary Supplementation of Hericium erinaceus Increases Mossy Fiber-CA3 Hippocampal Neurotransmission and Recognition Memory in Wild-Type Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Valentina; Gregori, Andrej; Repetti, Margherita; Romano, Chiara; Orrù, Germano; Botta, Laura; Girometta, Carolina; Guglielminetti, Maria Lidia; Savino, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Pers. is a medicinal mushroom capable of inducing a large number of modulatory effects on human physiology ranging from the strengthening of the immune system to the improvement of cognitive functions. In mice, dietary supplementation with H. erinaceus prevents the impairment of spatial short-term and visual recognition memory in an Alzheimer model. Intriguingly other neurobiological effects have recently been reported like the effect on neurite outgrowth and differentiation in PC12 cells. Until now no investigations have been conducted to assess the impact of this dietary supplementation on brain function in healthy subjects. Therefore, we have faced the problem by considering the effect on cognitive skills and on hippocampal neurotransmission in wild-type mice. In wild-type mice the oral supplementation with H. erinaceus induces, in behaviour test, a significant improvement in the recognition memory and, in hippocampal slices, an increase in spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic current in mossy fiber-CA3 synapse. In conclusion, we have produced a series of findings in support of the concept that H. erinaceus induces a boost effect onto neuronal functions also in nonpathological conditions.

  5. Cocultures of GFP(+) -granule cells with GFP(-) -pyramidal cells and interneurons for the study of mossy fiber neurotransmission with paired recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Beatriz; León, Uriel; Galván, Emilio J; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Synaptic transmission of the granule cells (GCs) via their axons, the mossy fibers (MFs), is traditionally studied on acutely prepared or cultured slices. Usually, extracellular, bulk or minimal stimulation is used to evoke transmitter release from MF terminals, while recording from their postsynaptic target cells, the pyramidal cells and interneurons of CA3. However, the ideal method to assess MF neurotransmission, the simultaneous recording of a presynaptic GC and one of its target cells, is extremely difficult to achieve using slices. Alternatively, cultures of GCs establishing autapses have been developed, but in these, GCs do not contact their natural targets. We developed cocultures of GCs, dissociated from transgenic GFP(+) rats, with pyramidal cells and interneurons of CA3, dissociated from wild-type rats, and confirmed the expression of cell-specific markers by immunofluorescence. We conducted recordings of GFP(+) -GCs synaptically connected with their GFP(-) -target cells, and demonstrate that synaptic transmission and its plasticity have the signature of transmission of MF. Besides being strongly depressed by activation of mGluRs, high frequency activation of GC-to-pyramidal cells synapses undergo LTP, while GC-to-interneuron synapses undergo LTD. This coculture method allows a high reproducibility of recording connected pairs of identified cells, constituting a valuable tool to study MF transmission, as well as different combinations of identifiable pre- and postsynaptic cells.

  6. Dietary Supplementation of Hericium erinaceus Increases Mossy Fiber-CA3 Hippocampal Neurotransmission and Recognition Memory in Wild-Type Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandalise, Federico; Cesaroni, Valentina; Gregori, Andrej; Repetti, Margherita; Romano, Chiara; Orrù, Germano; Botta, Laura; Girometta, Carolina; Guglielminetti, Maria Lidia; Savino, Elena; Rossi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Pers. is a medicinal mushroom capable of inducing a large number of modulatory effects on human physiology ranging from the strengthening of the immune system to the improvement of cognitive functions. In mice, dietary supplementation with H. erinaceus prevents the impairment of spatial short-term and visual recognition memory in an Alzheimer model. Intriguingly other neurobiological effects have recently been reported like the effect on neurite outgrowth and differentiation in PC12 cells. Until now no investigations have been conducted to assess the impact of this dietary supplementation on brain function in healthy subjects. Therefore, we have faced the problem by considering the effect on cognitive skills and on hippocampal neurotransmission in wild-type mice. In wild-type mice the oral supplementation with H. erinaceus induces, in behaviour test, a significant improvement in the recognition memory and, in hippocampal slices, an increase in spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic current in mossy fiber-CA3 synapse. In conclusion, we have produced a series of findings in support of the concept that H. erinaceus induces a boost effect onto neuronal functions also in nonpathological conditions.

  7. Noradrenergic neurotransmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates the retention of immobility in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Michelly M; Gomes, Felipe V; Crestani, Carlos C; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2013-06-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a limbic structure that has a direct influence on the autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral responses to stress. It was recently reported that reversible inactivation of synaptic transmission within this structure causes antidepressant-like effects, indicating that activation of the BNST during stressful situations would facilitate the development of behavioral changes related to the neurobiology of depression. Moreover, noradrenergic neurotransmission is abundant in the BNST and has an important role in the regulation of emotional processes related to the stress response. Thus, this study aimed to test the hypothesis that activation of adrenoceptors within the BNST facilitates the development of behavioral consequences of stress. To investigate this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were stressed (forced swimming, 15 min) and 24 h later received intra-BNST injections of vehicle, WB4101, RX821002, CGP20712, or ICI118,551, which are selective α(1), α(2), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively, 10 min before a 5-min forced swimming test. It was observed that administration of WB4101 (10 and 15 nmol), CGP20712 (5 and 10 nmol), or ICI118,551 (5 nmol) into the BNST reduced the immobility time of rats subjected to forced swimming test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. These findings suggest that activation of α(1), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptors in the BNST could be involved in the development of the behavioral consequences of stress.

  8. Integrated analysis of genetic, behavioral, and biochemical data implicates neural stem cell-induced changes in immunity, neurotransmission and mitochondrial function in Dementia with Lewy Body mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Anita; Goldberg, Natalie R S; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2017-03-10

    We previously demonstrated that transplantation of murine neural stem cells (NSCs) can improve motor and cognitive function in a transgenic model of Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). These benefits occurred without changes in human α-synuclein pathology and were mediated in part by stem cell-induced elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, instrastriatal NSC transplantation likely alters the brain microenvironment via multiple mechanisms that may synergize to promote cognitive and motor recovery. The underlying neurobiology that mediates such restoration no doubt involves numerous genes acting in concert to modulate signaling within and between host brain cells and transplanted NSCs. In order to identify functionally connected gene networks and additional mechanisms that may contribute to stem cell-induced benefits, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on striatal tissue isolated from NSC- and vehicle-injected wild-type and DLB mice. Combining continuous behavioral and biochemical data with genome wide expression via network analysis proved to be a powerful approach; revealing significant alterations in immune response, neurotransmission, and mitochondria function. Taken together, these data shed further light on the gene network and biological processes that underlie the therapeutic effects of NSC transplantation on α-synuclein induced cognitive and motor impairments, thereby highlighting additional therapeutic targets for synucleinopathies.

  9. Object-in-place associative recognition memory depends on glutamate receptor neurotransmission within two defined hippocampal-cortical circuits: a critical role for AMPA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, perirhinal, and prefrontal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gareth Robert Issac; Warburton, Elizabeth Clea

    2015-02-01

    Object-in-place associative recognition memory depends on an interaction between the hippocampus (HPC), perirhinal (PRH), and medial prefrontal (mPFC) cortices, yet the contribution of glutamate receptor neurotransmission to these interactions is unknown. NMDA receptors (NMDAR) in the HPC were critical for encoding of object-in-place memory but not for single-item object recognition. Next, a disconnection procedure was used to examine the importance of "concurrent" glutamate neurotransmission in the HPC-mPFC and HPC-PRH. Contralateral unilateral infusions of NBQX (AMPAR antagonist), into the HPC-mPFC, or HPC-PRH, either before acquisition or test, impaired object-in-place performance. Thus, both circuits are necessary for encoding and retrieval. Crossed unilateral AP5 (NMDAR antagonist) infusions into the HPC-mPFC or HPC-PRH impaired encoding, but not retrieval. Specifically crossed HPC-mPFC infusions impaired both short-term (5 min) and longer term (1 h) memory while HPC-PRH infusions impaired longer term memory only. This delay-dependent effect of AP5 in the HPC-PRH on object-in-place memory, accords with its effects in the PRH, on single item object recognition memory, thereby suggesting that a single PRH synaptic plasticity mechanism underpins different recognition memory processes. Further, blocking excitatory neurotransmission in any pair of structures within the networks impaired "both" encoding and retrieval, thus object-in-place memory clearly requires network interdependency across multiple structures.

  10. Effects of acute and long-term administration of escitalopram and citalopram on serotonin neurotransmission: an in vivo electrophysiological study in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mansari, Mostafa; Sánchez, Connie; Chouvet, Guy; Renaud, Bernard; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2005-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the acute and long-term effects of escitalopram and citalopram on rat brain 5-HT neurotransmission, using electrophysiological techniques. In hippocampus, after 2 weeks of treatment with escitalopram (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or citalopram (20 mg/kg/day, s.c.), the administration of the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY-100,635 (20-100 microg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently induced a similar increase in the firing activity of dorsal hippocampus CA(3) pyramidal neurons, thus revealing direct functional evidence of an enhanced tonic activation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. In dorsal raphe nucleus, escitalopram was four times more potent than citalopram in suppressing the firing activity of presumed 5-HT neurons (ED(50)=58 and 254 mug/kg, i.v., respectively). Interestingly, the suppressant effect of escitalopram (100 microg/kg, i.v.) was significantly prevented, but not reversed by R-citalopram (250 microg/kg, i.v.). Sustained administration of escitalopram and citalopram significantly decreased the spontaneous firing activity of presumed 5-HT neurons. This firing activity returned to control rate after 2 weeks in rats treated with escitalopram, but only after 3 weeks using citalopram, and was associated with a desensitization of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors. These results suggest that the time course of the gradual return of presumed 5-HT neuronal firing activity, which was reported to account for the delayed effect of SSRI on 5-HT transmission, is congruent with the earlier onset of action of escitalopram vs citalopram in validated animal models of depression and anxiety.

  11. Ambient CO2, fish behaviour and altered GABAergic neurotransmission: exploring the mechanism of CO2-altered behaviour by taking a hypercapnia dweller down to low CO2 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Matthew D; Turko, Andy J; Heras, Joseph; Andersen, Mads Kuhlmann; Lefevre, Sjannie; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark; Brauner, Colin J; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Nilsson, Göran E

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that projected rises of aquatic CO2 levels cause acid-base regulatory responses in fishes that lead to altered GABAergic neurotransmission and disrupted behaviour, threatening fitness and population survival. It is thought that changes in Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) gradients across neural membranes interfere with the function of GABA-gated anion channels (GABAA receptors). So far, such alterations have been revealed experimentally by exposing species living in low-CO2 environments, like many oceanic habitats, to high levels of CO2 (hypercapnia). To examine the generality of this phenomenon, we set out to study the opposite situation, hypothesizing that fishes living in typically hypercapnic environments also display behavioural alterations if exposed to low CO2 levels. This would indicate that ion regulation in the fish brain is fine-tuned to the prevailing CO2 conditions. We quantified pH regulatory variables and behavioural responses of Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, a fish native to the hypercapnic Mekong River, acclimated to high-CO2 (3.1 kPa) or low-CO2 (0.04 kPa) water. We found that brain and blood pH was actively regulated and that the low-CO2 fish displayed significantly higher activity levels, which were reduced after treatment with gabazine, a GABAA receptor blocker. This indicates an involvement of the GABAA receptor and altered Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) ion gradients. Indeed, Goldman calculations suggest that low levels of environmental CO2 may cause significant changes in neural ion gradients in P. hypophthalmus. Taken together, the results suggest that brain ion regulation in fishes is fine-tuned to the prevailing ambient CO2 conditions and is prone to disruption if these conditions change.

  12. Novel mechanism of hydrogen sulfide-induced guinea pig urinary bladder smooth muscle contraction: role of BK channels and cholinergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Vítor S; Xin, Wenkuan; Petkov, Georgi V

    2015-07-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a key signaling molecule regulating important physiological processes, including smooth muscle function. However, the mechanisms underlying H2S-induced detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractions are not well understood. This study investigates the cellular and tissue mechanisms by which H2S regulates DSM contractility, excitatory neurotransmission, and large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels in freshly isolated guinea pig DSM. We used a multidisciplinary experimental approach including isometric DSM tension recordings, colorimetric ACh measurement, Ca(2+) imaging, and patch-clamp electrophysiology. In isolated DSM strips, the novel slow release H2S donor, P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-p-4-morpholinylphosphinodithioic acid morpholine salt (GYY4137), significantly increased the spontaneous phasic and nerve-evoked DSM contractions. The blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) channels or muscarinic ACh receptors with tetrodotoxin or atropine, respectively, reduced the stimulatory effect of GYY4137 on DSM contractility. GYY4137 increased ACh release from bladder nerves, which was inhibited upon blockade of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels with nifedipine. Furthermore, GYY4137 increased the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transients and basal Ca(2+) levels in isolated DSM strips. GYY4137 reduced the DSM relaxation induced by the BK channel opener, NS11021. In freshly isolated DSM cells, GYY4137 decreased the amplitude and frequency of transient BK currents recorded in a perforated whole cell configuration and reduced the single BK channel open probability measured in excised inside-out patches. GYY4137 inhibited spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations and depolarized the DSM cell membrane potential. Our results reveal the novel findings that H2S increases spontaneous phasic and nerve-evoked DSM contractions by activating ACh release from bladder nerves in combination with a direct inhibition of DSM BK channels.

  13. Cannabidiol induces rapid-acting antidepressant-like effects and enhances cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission: role of 5-HT1A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Raquel; Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Campa, Leticia; Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Pazos, Angel; Adell, Albert; Díaz, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotomimetic component of marihuana, exhibits anxiolytic-like properties in many behavioural tests, although its potential for treating major depression has been poorly explored. Moreover, the mechanism of action of CBD remains unclear. Herein, we have evaluated the effects of CBD following acute and chronic administration in the olfactory bulbectomy mouse model of depression (OBX), and investigated the underlying mechanism. For this purpose, we conducted behavioural (open field and sucrose preference tests) and neurochemical (microdialysis and autoradiography of 5-HT1A receptor functionality) studies following treatment with CBD. We also assayed the pharmacological antagonism of the effects of CBD to dissect out the mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that CBD exerts fast and maintained antidepressant-like effects as evidenced by the reversal of the OBX-induced hyperactivity and anhedonia. In vivo microdialysis revealed that the administration of CBD significantly enhanced serotonin and glutamate levels in vmPFCx in a different manner depending on the emotional state and the duration of the treatment. The potentiating effect upon neurotransmitters levels occurring immediately after the first injection of CBD might underlie the fast antidepressant-like actions in OBX mice. Both antidepressant-like effect and enhanced cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission induced by CBD were prevented by 5-HT1A receptor blockade. Moreover, adaptive changes in pre- and post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor functionality were also found after chronic CBD. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CBD could represent a novel fast antidepressant drug, via enhancing both serotonergic and glutamate cortical signalling through a 5-HT1A receptor-dependent mechanism.

  14. Activation of the HPA axis and depression of feeding behavior induced by restraint stress are separately regulated by PACAPergic neurotransmission in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sunny Zhihong; Eiden, Lee E

    2016-07-01

    We measured serum CORT elevation in wild-type and PACAP-deficient C57BL/6N male mice after acute (1 h) or prolonged (2-3 h) daily restraint stress for 7 d. The PACAP dependence of CORT elevation was compared to that of stress-induced hypophagia. Daily restraint induced unhabituated peak CORT elevation, and hypophagia/weight loss, of similar magnitude for 1, 2, and 3 h of daily restraint, in wild-type mice. Peak CORT elevation, and hypophagia, were both attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice for 2 and 3 h daily restraint. Hypophagia induced by 1-h daily restraint was also greatly reduced in PACAP-deficient mice, however CORT elevation, both peak and during recovery from stress, was unaffected. Thus, hypothalamic PACAPergic neurotransmission appears to affect CRH gene transcription and peptide production, but not CRH release, in response to psychogenic stress. A single exposure to restraint sufficed to trigger hypophagia over the following 24 h. PACAP deficiency attenuated HPA axis response (CORT elevation) to prolonged (3 h) but not acute (1 h) single-exposure restraint stress, while hypophagia induced by either a single 1 h or a single 3 h restraint were both abolished in PACAP-deficient mice. These results suggest that PACAP's actions to promote suppression of food intake following an episode of psychogenic stress is unrelated to the release of CRH into the portal circulation to activate the pituitary-adrenal axis. Furthermore, demonstration of suppressed food intake after a single 1-h restraint stress provides a convenient assay for investigating the location of the synapses and circuits mediating the effects of PACAP on the behavioral sequelae of psychogenic stress.

  15. Severe depression is associated with increased microglial quinolinic acid in subregions of the anterior cingulate gyrus: Evidence for an immune-modulated glutamatergic neurotransmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawrin Christian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune dysfunction, including monocytosis and increased blood levels of interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor α has been observed during acute episodes of major depression. These peripheral immune processes may be accompanied by microglial activation in subregions of the anterior cingulate cortex where depression-associated alterations of glutamatergic neurotransmission have been described. Methods Microglial immunoreactivity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA glutamate receptor agonist quinolinic acid (QUIN in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC, anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC of 12 acutely depressed suicidal patients (major depressive disorder/MDD, n = 7; bipolar disorder/BD, n = 5 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and compared with its expression in 10 healthy control subjects. Results Depressed patients had a significantly increased density of QUIN-positive cells in the sACC (P = 0.003 and the aMCC (P = 0.015 compared to controls. In contrast, counts of QUIN-positive cells in the pACC did not differ between the groups (P = 0.558. Post-hoc tests showed that significant findings were attributed to MDD and were absent in BD. Conclusions These results add a novel link to the immune hypothesis of depression by providing evidence for an upregulation of microglial QUIN in brain regions known to be responsive to infusion of NMDA antagonists such as ketamine. Further work in this area could lead to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and pave the way for novel NMDA receptor therapies or immune-modulating strategies.

  16. Impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with traumatic brain injury: a SPET study using {sup 123}I-{beta}-CIT and {sup 123}I-IBZM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnemiller, E.; Riccabona, G. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Brenneis, C.; Wissel, J.; Scherfler, C.; Poewe, W.; Wenning, G.K. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria)

    2000-09-01

    Structural imaging suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be associated with disruption of neuronal networks, including the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. However, to date deficits in pre- and/or postsynaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission have not been demonstrated in TBI using functional imaging. We therefore assessed dopaminergic function in ten TBI patients using [{sup 123}I]2-{beta}-carbomethoxy-3-{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Average Glasgow Coma Scale score ({+-}SD) at the time of head trauma was 5.8{+-}4.2. SPET was performed on average 141 days (SD {+-}92) after TBI. The SPET images were compared with structural images using cranial computerised tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPET was performed with an ADAC Vertex dual-head camera. The activity ratios of striatal to cerebellar uptake were used as a semiquantitative parameter of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor (D2R) binding. Compared with age-matched controls, patients with TBI had significantly lower striatal/cerebellar {beta}-CIT and IBZM binding ratios (P{<=}0.01). Overall, the DAT deficit was more marked than the D2R loss. CCT and MRI studies revealed varying cortical and subcortical lesions, with the frontal lobe being most frequently affected whereas the striatum appeared structurally normal in all but one patient. Our findings suggest that nigrostriatal dysfunction may be detected using SPET following TBI despite relative structural preservation of the striatum. Further investigations of possible clinical correlates and efficacy of dopaminergic therapy in patients with TBI seem justified. (orig.)

  17. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full......-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered...

  18. Retraction: Radenović L. Effect of 7-nitroindazole on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in the rat brain following kainate-induced neurotoxicity. Arch biol sci, 2008, 60(1:25-32. DOI: 10.2298/ABS0801025R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a notice of retraction of the article: Effect of 7-nitroindazole on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in the rat brain following kainate-induced neurotoxicity, published in the Archives of Biological Sciences in 2008, Vol. 60, Issue 1. The Editor-in-Chief has been informed that this paper plagiarizes an earlier paper: Radenovic L, Selakovic V, Kartelija G, Todorovic N, Nedeljkovic M. Differential effects of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists on superoxide production and MnSOD activity in rat brain following intrahippocampal injection. Brain Res Bull, 2004, 64(1:85-93. The results in the article being retracted were presented as findings obtained from novel research. Inspection of the results has revealed that they were part of research already presented in the original article without appropriate justification or cross-referencing. The Editor-in-Chief considered publishing a notice of redundancy specifying the elements published previously. However, since the original article had already been autoplagiarized by the same corresponding author in the same journal (retraction DOI:10.2298/ABS150318026E, the article is being retracted in accordance with the publishing ethics of the Archives of Biological Sciences in order to preserve the integrity of scientific research. We apologize to the journal's readers that it took so long to notice this error and instigate retraction of the paper. We request our readers to contact the editorial office and editors of the journal directly should similar cases occur in the future, so that the necessary action can be taken more promptly. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/ABS0801025R

  19. Plasticity in glutamatergic NTS neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, David D

    2008-12-10

    Changes in the physiological state of an animal or human can result in alterations in the cardiovascular and respiratory system in order to maintain homeostasis. Accordingly, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are not static but readily adapt under a variety of circumstances. The same can be said for the brainstem circuits that control these systems. The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration site of baroreceptor and chemoreceptor sensory afferent fibers. This central nucleus, and in particular the synapse between the sensory afferent and second-order NTS cell, possesses a remarkable degree of plasticity in response to a variety of stimuli, both acute and chronic. This brief review is intended to describe the plasticity observed in the NTS as well as the locus and mechanisms as they are currently understood. The functional consequence of NTS plasticity is also discussed.

  20. Chemical and radiological effects of chronic ingestion of uranium in the rat brain: biochemical impairment of dopaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic neuro-transmissions; Effets chimique et radiologique d'une ingestion chronique d'uranium sur le cerveau du rat. Effets sur les neurotransmissions dopaminergique, serotoninergique et cholinergique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussy, C

    2005-09-15

    Uranium is an environmental ubiquitous metal-trace element. It has both chemical and radiological toxicity. After chronic ingestion, uranium can distribute in any part of the body and accumulate in the brain. The aims of this study was 1) to determine and estimate the effects of uranium on dopaminergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems and 2) to measure the uranium amount in the brain, after chronic exposure by ingestion of depleted (D.U.) or enriched (E.U.) uranium during 1.5 to 18 months at 40 mg.L{sup -1} (40 ppm) in different rat brain areas. At any time of exposure, the results show that both the neurotransmission alterations and the uranium brain accumulation were moderate, area specific, time-evolutive and depended on uranium specific activity. After D.U. exposure, monoamine perturbations are chronic and progressive. On the contrary, monoamine alterations occurred only after long term of E.U. exposure. These mono-aminergic modifications are not always dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas. Moreover, although the cholinergic system was not affected at both 1.5 and 9 months of D.U. exposure, the alteration of ChE activity after E.U. exposure are both dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas and on uranium specific activity. After E.U. exposure, cholinergic modification and uranium accumulation in hippocampus could partially explain the short-term memory disturbances which have been previously reported. (author)

  1. Inhibition of spontaneous neurotransmission in the nucleus of solitary tract of the rat by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 is not via CB1 or CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Almado, Carlos E L; Dagostin, André L A; Machado, Benedito H; Leão, Ricardo M

    2008-03-20

    Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate central autonomic regulation and baroreflex control of blood pressure. Both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors have been described in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), which receives direct afferent projections of cardiovascular reflexes. In the present study we evaluated the effects of WIN 55212-2 (WIN), a cannabinoid agonist, on fast neurotransmission in the NTS. We recorded spontaneous post-synaptic currents using the whole-cell configuration in NTS cells in brainstem slices from young rats (25-30 days old). Application of 5 microM WIN inhibited the frequency of both glutamatergic and GABAergic sPSCs, without affecting their amplitudes. Effects of WIN were not blocked by application of the CB1 antagonist AM251, the CB2 antagonist AM630 or the vanniloid receptor TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, suggesting that the effect of WIN is via a non-CB1 non-CB2 receptor. Neither the CB1/CB2 agonist HU210 nor the CB1 agonist ACPA affected the frequency of sPSCs. We conclude WIN inhibits the neurotransmission in the NTS of young rats via a receptor distinct from CB1 or CB2.

  2. 苯丙酸诺龙对烫伤模型大鼠雄激素受体介导靶基因转录调控的影响%Effect of nandrolone phenylpropionate on androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional regulation of target genes in rat scald models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凯; 岑瑛

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Moderate to severe burn and trauma, treatment of which has been paid equal attention to wound surface, is always a difficulty of clinical systemic treatment and has a poor prognosis. Anabolic hormones have acquired secure and good results in the treatment of burns in both animals and clinical patients. Although use of anabolic hormones is restricted by the doping management, but its androgen receptor and nuclear receptor coregulators are the newly emerging areas of interests in the field of gene regulation mechanism in recent years. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of nandrolone phenylpropionate on androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional regulation of target gene in rat scald models. METHODS: Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into nandrolone phenylpropionate, model and control groups. In the nandrolone phenylpropionate and model groups, rats were subjected to a 20% total body surface area second-degree scald injury by hot water. Two days after model preparation, rats in these two groups were intramuscularly injected with nandrolone phenylpropionate and saline, once every other day, for a total of 21 days. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The gene expression levels of steroid receptor coactivator-1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 in the rat livers and gonads (testes, ovaries) were significantly different between the nandrolone phenylpropionate and model groups (P 0.05)。说明在不同组织不同生理病理条件下苯丙酸诺龙对类固醇受体辅助活化因子1、c-myc、胰岛素样生长因子1基因表达的作用是不同的。

  3. Receptor versus non-receptor mediated clearance of liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherphof, GL; Kamps, JAAM

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies have appeared over the years dealing with liposome-cell interaction mechanisms, most of them performed under in vitro conditions with isolated cell populations or cell lines. It is remarkable that, nonetheless, there hardly seem to exist established and generally accepted views on h

  4. Glucocorticoid hormone resistance during primate evolution: receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrousos, G P; Renquist, D; Brandon, D; Eil, C; Pugeat, M; Vigersky, R; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L; Lipsett, M B

    1982-03-01

    The concentrations of total and protein-unbound plasma cortisol of New World monkeys are higher than those of Old World primates and prosimians. The urinary free-cortisol excretion also is increased markedly. However, there is no physiologic evidence of increased cortisol effect. These findings suggest end-organ resistance to glucocorticoids. This was confirmed by showing that the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis is resistant to suppression by dexamethasone. To study this phenomenon, glucocorticoid receptors were examined in circulating mononuclear leukocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts from both New and Old World species. The receptor content is the same in all species, but the New World monkeys have a markedly decreased binding affinity for dexamethasone. Thus, the resistance of these species to the action of cortisol is due to the decreased binding affinity of the glucocorticoid receptor. This presumed mutation must have occurred after the bifurcation of Old and New World primates (approximately 60 x 10(6) yr ago) and before the diversion of the New World primates from each other (approximately 15 x 10(6) yr ago).

  5. Legume LysM receptors mediate symbiotic and pathogenic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Simon; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    2017-10-01

    Legume-rhizobia symbiosis is coordinated through the production and perception of signal molecules by both partners with legume LysM receptor kinases performing a central role in this process. Receptor complex formation and signalling outputs derived from these are regulated through ligand binding and further modulated by a diverse variety of interactors. The challenge now is to understand the molecular mechanisms of these reported interactors. Recently attributed roles of LysM receptors in the perception of rhizobial exopolysaccharide, distinguishing between pathogens and symbionts, and assembly of root and rhizosphere communities expand on the importance of these receptors. These studies also highlight challenges, such as identification of cognate ligands, formation of responsive receptor complexes and separation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Kodama, Yukio; Kaneko, Toyozo; Kanno, Jun; Kim, Dae-Yong; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    Benzene can induce hematotoxicity and leukemia in humans and mice. Since a review of the literature shows that the CYP2E1 knockout mouse is not known to possess any benzene toxicity, the metabolism of benzene by CYP2E1 in the liver is regarded to be prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, although the mechanism is not fully understood yet. Because it was found some years ago that benzene was also a substrate for CYP1A1, we investigated the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in benzene hematotoxicity using AhR wild-type (AhR(+/+)), heterozygous (AhR(+/-)), and homozygous (AhR(-/-)) male mice. Interestingly, following a 2-week inhalation of 300 ppm benzene (a potent dose for leukemogenicity), no hematotoxicity was induced in AhR(-/-) mice. Further, there were no changes in cellularity of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM), nor in levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units in BM. This lack of hematotoxicity was associated with the lack of p21 overexpression, which was regularly seen in the wild-type mice following benzene inhalation. Combined treatment with two major benzene metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, induced hemopoietic toxicity, although it was not known whether this happened due to a surprising lack of expression of CYP2E1 by AhR knockout, or due to a lack of other AhR-mediated CYP enzymes, including 1A1 (i.e., a possible alternative pathway of benzene metabolism). The former possibility, evaluated in the present study, failed to show a significant relationship between AhR and the expression of CYP2E1. Furthermore, a subsequent evaluation of AhR expression after benzene inhalation tended to show higher but less significant expression in the liver, and none in the BM, compared with sham control. Although this study failed to identify the more likely of the above-mentioned two possibilities, the study using AhR knockout mice on benzene inhalation presents the unique possibility that the benzene toxicity may be regulated by AhR signaling.

  7. Receptor-mediated choreography of life and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anjana; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2003-09-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor was originally identified as a protein that kills tumor cells. So far, 18 distinct members of this family have been identified. All of them regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death, also called apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by TNF, and other members of the family, for example, FasL, VEGI, and TRAIL is mediated through death receptors. The apoptotic signals by these cytokines are transduced by eight different death domain- (DD) containing receptors (TNFR1, also called DR1; Fas, also called DR2; DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR, and EDAR). The intracellular portion of all these receptors contains a region approximately 80 amino acids long referred to as the "death domain." Upon activation by its ligand, the DD recruits various proteins that mediate both death and proliferation of the cells. These proteins in turn recruit other proteins via their DDs or death effector domains. The actual destruction of the cell, however, is accomplished by serial activation of a family of proteases referred to as caspases. Cell death is negatively regulated by a family of proteins that includes decoy receptors, silencer of DD, sentrin, cellular FLICE inhibitory protein, cellular inhibitors of apoptosis, and survivin. This review is an attempt to describe how these negative and positive players of cell death perform a harmonious dance with each other.

  8. Experimental Cannabinoid 2 Receptor-Mediated Immune Modulation in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sardinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a complex condition that results from a dysregulated immune system in response to a systemic infection. Current treatments lack effectiveness in reducing the incidence and mortality associated with this disease. The endocannabinoid system offers great promise in managing sepsis pathogenesis due to its unique characteristics. The present study explored the effect of modulating the CB2 receptor pathway in an acute sepsis mouse model. Endotoxemia was induced by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in mice and intestinal microcirculation was assessed through intravital microscopy. We found that HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore muscular and mucosal villi FCD in endotoxemic mice. AM630 (CB2 receptor antagonist maintained the level of adherent leukocytes induced by LPS but further reduced muscular and mucosal villi FCD. URB597 (FAAH inhibitor and JZL184 (MAGL inhibitor both reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore the mucosal villi FCD. Using various compounds we have shown different mechanisms of activating CB2 receptors to reduce leukocyte endothelial interactions in order to prevent further inflammatory damage during sepsis.

  9. Of pheromones and kairomones: what receptors mediate innate emotional responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes-Marco, Lluis; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Some chemicals elicit innate emotionally laden behavioral responses. Pheromones mediate sexual attraction, parental care or agonistic confrontation, whereas predators' kairomones elicit defensive behaviors in their preys. This essay explores the hypothesis that the detection of these semiochemicals relies on highly specific olfactory and/or vomeronasal receptors. The V1R, V2R, and formyl-peptide vomeronasal receptors bind their ligands in highly specific and sensitive way, thus being good candidates for pheromone- or kairomone-detectors (e.g., secreted and excreted proteins, peptides and lipophilic volatiles). The olfactory epithelium also expresses specific receptors, for example trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) and guanylyl cyclase receptors (GC-D and other types), some of which bind kairomones and putative pheromones. However, most of the olfactory neurons express canonical olfactory receptors (ORs) that bind many ligands with different affinity, being not suitable for mediating responses to pheromones and kairomones. In this respect, trimethylthiazoline (TMT) is considered a fox-derived kairomone for mice and rats, but it seems to be detected by canonical ORs. Therefore, we have reassessed the kairomonal nature of TMT by analyzing the behavioral responses of outbred (CD1) and inbred mice (C57BL/J6) to TMT. Our results confirm that both mouse strains avoid TMT, which increases immobility in C57BL/J6, but not CD1 mice. However, mice of both strains sniff at TMT throughout the test and show no trace of TMT-induced contextual conditioning (immobility or avoidance). This suggests that TMT is not a kairomone but, similar to a loud noise, in high concentrations it induces aversion and stress as unspecific responses to a strong olfactory stimulation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nuclear receptors : mediators and modifiers of inflammation-induced cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Jaap; Karpen, Saul J.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation-induced cholestasis (IIC) is a frequently occurring phenomenon. A central role in its pathogenesis is played by nuclear receptors (NRs). These ligand-activated transcription factors not only regulate basal expression of hepatobiliary transport systems, but also mediate adaptive response

  11. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  12. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP wh