WorldWideScience

Sample records for ka-band radiometric mapping

  1. REAL-TIME FADE MITIGATION USING RADIOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS FOR FUTURE KA-BAND SERVICES AT DLR.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Due to the congestion of popular C- and Ku-band frequencies, the satellite communication systems are rapidly moving toward the higher frequencies. Most of the commercial communication satellites in the near future will operate Ka-band transponders. One of the inevitable part of such systems are ground stations which support In-Orbit-testing and the traffic routine for the satellites. The main problem at Ka-band link planning is the link availability reduction due to rain fade and scintillatio...

  2. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  3. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  4. Modulation transfer functions at Ka band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesany, Vahid; Sistani, Bita; Salam, Asif; Haimov, Samuel; Gogineni, Prasad; Moore, Richard K.

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is often used to describe the modulation of the radar signal by the long waves. MTFs were measured at 35 GHz (Ka band) with a switched-beam vector slope gauge/scatterometer on the research platform NORDSEE as part of the SAXON-FPN experiment. Three independent measurements of the scattering were available for each height measurement. This provided the opportunity to average the time series to reduce the effects of fading noise and sea spikes, or, alternatively, to append the time series to achieve more degrees of freedom in the spectral estimates. For upwind measurements, the phase of the VV-polarized Ka-band MTF was always positive, which implies that the maximum of the radar return originates from the forward face of the long-scale waves. This phase increases with increasing wind speed. The magnitude of the MTF decreases with increasing wind speed.

  5. Ka-band waveguide rotary joint

    KAUST Repository

    Yevdokymov, Anatoliy

    2013-04-11

    The authors present a design of a waveguide rotary joint operating in Ka-band with central frequency of 33 GHz, which also acts as an antenna mount. The main unit consists of two flanges with a clearance between them; one of the flanges has three circular choke grooves. Utilisation of three choke grooves allows larger operating clearance. Two prototypes of the rotary joint have been manufactured and experimentally studied. The observed loss is from 0.4 to 0.8 dB in 1.5 GHz band.

  6. Verification of the radiometric map of the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolín, Milan

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric map of the Czech Republic is based on uniform regional airborne radiometric total count measurements (1957-1959) which covered 100% of the country. The airborne radiometric instrument was calibrated to a (226)Ra point source. The calibration facility for field gamma-ray spectrometers, established in the Czech Republic in 1975, significantly contributed to the subsequent radiometric data standardization. In the 1990's, the original analogue airborne radiometric data were digitized and using the method of back-calibration (IAEA, 2003) converted to dose rate. The map of terrestrial gamma radiation expressed in dose rate (nGy/h) was published on the scale 1:500,000 in 1995. Terrestrial radiation in the Czech Republic, formed by magmatic, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks of Proterozoic to Quaternary age, ranges mostly from 6 to 245 nGy/h, with a mean of 65.6 ± 19.0 nGy/h. The elevated terrestrial radiation in the Czech Republic, in comparison to the global dose rate average of 54 nGy/h, reflects an enhanced content of natural radioactive elements in the rocks. The 1995 published radiometric map of the Czech Republic was successively studied and verified by additional ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements and by comparison to radiometric maps of Germany, Poland and Slovakia in border zones. A ground dose rate intercomparison measurement under participation of foreign and domestic professional institutions revealed mutual dose rate deviations about 20 nGy/h and more due to differing technical parameters of applied radiometric instruments. Studies and verification of the radiometric map of the Czech Republic illustrate the magnitude of current deviations in dose rate data. This gained experience can assist in harmonization of dose rate data on the European scale.

  7. High Efficiency Ka-Band Spatial Combiner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Passi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Ka-Band, High Efficiency, Small Size Spatial Combiner (SPC is proposed in this paper, which uses an innovatively matched quadruple Fin Lines to microstrip (FLuS transitions. At the date of this paper and at the Author's best knowledge no such FLuS innovative transitions have been reported in literature before. These transitions are inserted into a WR28 waveguide T-junction, in order to allow the integration of 16 Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPA's. A computational electromagnetic model using the finite elements method has been implemented. A mean insertion loss of 2 dB is achieved with a return loss better the 10 dB in the 31-37 GHz bandwidth.

  8. Aeronautical applications of steerable K/Ka-band antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmken, Henry; Prather, Horton

    1995-01-01

    The expected growth of wideband data and video transmission via satellite will press existing satellite Ku-band services and push development of the Ka-band region. Isolated ground based K/Ka-band terminals can experience severe fading due to rain and weather phenomena. However, since aircraft generally fly above the severe weather, they are attractive platforms for developing commercial K/Ka-band communication links.

  9. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  10. Ka-Band MMIC T/R Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is specifically written to address the need for improved Ka-band T/R modules. The solicitation calls for investigation and development of core...

  11. Ka-Band MMIC T/R Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II proposal is presented as the follow on to the Phase I SBIR contract number NNC06CB21C entitled "Ka-band MMIC T/R Module" For active microwave...

  12. A comparative study of RADAR Ka-band backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, D.; Pierdicca, N.; Guerriero, L.; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Calleja, Eduardo; Rommen, B.; Giudici, D.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Ka-band RADAR frequency range has not yet been used for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from space so far, although this technology may lead to important applications for the next generation of SAR space sensors. Therefore, feasibility studies regarding a Ka-band SAR instrument have been started [1][2], for the next generation of SAR space sensors. In spite of this, the lack of trusted references on backscatter at Ka-band revealed to be the main limitation for the investigation of the potentialities of this technology. In the framework of the ESA project "Ka-band SAR backscatter analysis in support of future applications", this paper is aimed at the study of wave interaction at Ka-band for a wide range of targets in order to define a set of well calibrated and reliable Ka-band backscatter coefficients for different kinds of targets. We propose several examples of backscatter data resulting from a critical survey of available datasets at Ka-band, focusing on the most interesting cases and addressing both correspondences and differences. The reliability of the results will be assessed via a preliminary comparison with ElectroMagnetic (EM) theoretical models. Furthermore, in support of future technological applications, we have designed a prototypal software acting as a "library" of earth surface radar response. In our intention, the output of the study shall contribute to answer to the need of a trustworthy Ka-Band backscatter reference. It will be of great value for future technological applications, such as support to instrument analysis, design and requirements' definition (e.g.: Signal to Noise Ratio, Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero).

  13. Results from Three Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne

    2015-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the Svalbard site. Svalbard was chosen as the appropriate site for two primary reasons: (1) Svalbard will be the first site to be upgraded to Ka-band operations within the NEN Polar Network enhancement plan, and (2) there exists a complete lack of Ka-band propagation data at this site (as opposed to the Fairbanks, AK NEN site, which has 5 years of characterization collected during the Advanced Communications Technology becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system Satellite (ACTS) campaign). processing and provide the Herein, we discuss the data three-year measurement results performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) from the ongoing Ka-band propagation characterization where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 4 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at a fixed 10 deg elevation angle. Three-year data collection results indicate good campaign at Svalbard, Norway. Comparison of these results with the ITU models and existing ERA profile data indicates very good agreement when the 2010 rain maps and cloud statistics are used. Finally, the Svalbard data is used to derive the expected

  14. Ka-band MMIC microstrip array for high rate communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. Q.; Raquet, C. A.; Tolleson, J. B.; Sanzgiri, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    In a recent technology assessment of alternative communication systems for the space exploration initiative (SEI), Ka-band (18 to 40 GHz) communication technology was identified to meet the mission requirements of telecommunication, navigation, and information management. Compared to the lower frequency bands, Ka-band antennas offer higher gain and broader bandwidths; thus, they are more suitable for high data rate communications. Over the years, NASA has played an important role in monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array technology development, and currently, has an ongoing contract with Texas Instrument (TI) to develop a modular Ka-band MMIC microstrip subarray (NAS3-25718). The TI contract emphasizes MMIC integration technology development and stipulates using existing MMIC devices to minimize the array development cost. The objective of this paper is to present array component technologies and integration techniques used to construct the subarray modules.

  15. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-11-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  16. Peat Mapping Associations of Airborne Radiometric Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beamish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers recent airborne radiometric (gamma ray survey data, obtained at high-resolution, across various regions of the UK. The datasets all display a very evident attenuation of signal in association with peat, and intra-peat variations are observed. The geophysical response variations are examined in detail using example data sets across lowland areas (raised bogs, meres, fens and afforested peat and upland areas of blanket bog, together with associated wetland zones. The radiometric data do not map soils per se. The bedrock (the radiogenic parent provides a specific amplitude level. Attenuation of this signal level is then controlled by moisture content in conjunction with the density and porosity of the soil cover. Both soil and bedrock variations need to be jointly assessed. The attenuation theory, reviewed here, predicts that the behaviour of wet peat is distinct from most other soil types. Theory also predicts that the attenuation levels observed across wet peatlands cannot be generally used to map variations in peat thickness. Four survey areas at various scales, across England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland are used to demonstrate the ability of the airborne data to map peat zones. A 1:50 k national mapping of deep peat is used to provide control although variability in the definition of peat zones across existing databases is also demonstrated.

  17. Additive manufacturing of Ka-band antennas for wireless communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5 GHz and 40 GHz through 3D printing. Three different antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter...

  18. Experimental radio frequency link for Ka-band communications applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Conray, Martin J.; Saunders, Alan L.; Pope, Dale E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental radio frequency link has been demonstrated to provide two-way communication between a remote user ground terminal and a ground-based Ka-band transponder. Bit-error-rate performance and radio frequency characteristics of the communication link were investigated.

  19. Rain Fade Compensation Alternatives for Ka Band Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1997-01-01

    Future satellite communications systems operating in Ka-band frequency band are subject to degradation produced by the troposphere which is much more severe than those found at lower frequency bands. These impairments include signal absorption by rain, clouds and gases, and amplitude scintillation's arising from refractive index irregularities. For example, rain attenuation at 20 GHz is almost three times that at 11 GHz. Although some of these impairments can be overcome by oversizing the ground station antennas and high power amplifiers, the current trend is using small (less than 20 inches apertures), low-cost ground stations (less than $1000) that can be easily deployed at user premises. As a consequence, most Ka-band systems are expected to employ different forms of fade mitigation that can be implemented relatively easily and at modest cost. The rain fade mitigation approaches are defined by three types of Ka-band communications systems - a low service rate (less than 1.5 Mb/s), a moderate service rate (1.5 to 6 Mb/s) system and a high service rate (greater than 43 Mb/s) system. The ACTS VSAT network, which includes an adaptive rain fade technique, is an example of a moderate service rate.

  20. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (fx-fka)/3.8 data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable environment

  1. Optimized mapping of radiometric quantities into OpenGL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Maximo; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moulton, J. R., Jr.; Liu, Jesse

    1999-07-01

    Physically realistic synthesis of FLIR imagery requires intensive phenomenology calculations of the spectral band thermal emission and reflection from scene elements in the database. These calculations predict the heat conduction, convection, and radiation exchange between scene elements and the environment. Balancing this requirement is the need for imagery to be presented to a display in a timely fashion, often in real time. In order to support these conflicting requirements, some means of overcoming the gap between real time and high fidelity must be achieved. Over the past several years, the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been developing a real-time forward looking infrared sensor simulation known as Paint the Night (PTN). As part of this development, NVESD has explored schemes for optimizing signature models and for mapping model radiometric output into parameters compatible with OpenGL, real-time rendering architectures. Relevant signature and mapping optimization issues are discussed, and a current NVESD PTN real-time implementation scheme is presented.

  2. Design of High Power Density Amplifiers: Application to Ka Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Davide; Leggieri, Alberto; Di Paolo, Franco; Bartocci, Marco; Tafuto, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Recent developments in the design of high-power-high-frequency amplifiers are assessed in this paper by the analysis and measurements of a high power density amplifier operating in the Ka Band. Design procedure is presented and a technical investigation is reported. The proposed device has shown over 23% of useful frequency bandwidth. It is an ensemble of 16 monolithic solid state power amplifiers that employees mixed technologies as spatial and planar combiners. Test performed have given maximum delivered power of 47.2 dBm.

  3. NASA SCaN Overview and Ka-Band Actvities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, James D.; Midon, Marco Mario; Davarian, Faramaz; Geldzahler, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The Ka- and Broadband Communications Conference is an international forum attended by worldwide experts in the area of Ka-Band Propagation and satellite communications. Since its inception, NASA has taken the initiative of organizing and leading technical sections on RF Propagation and satellite communications, solidifying its worldwide leadership in the aforementioned areas. Consequently, participation in this conference through the contributions described below will maintain NASA leadership in Ka- and above RF Propagation as it relates to enhancing current and future satellite communication systems supporting space exploration.

  4. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  5. Rain Fade Compensation for Ka-Band Communications Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, W. Carl; Nguyen, Lan; Dissanayake, Asoka; Markey, Brian; Le, Anh

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a review and evaluation of rain fade measurement and compensation techniques for Ka-band satellite systems. This report includes a description of and cost estimates for performing three rain fade measurement and compensation experiments. The first experiment deals with rain fade measurement techniques while the second one covers the rain fade compensation techniques. The third experiment addresses a feedback flow control technique for the ABR service (for ATM-based traffic). The following conclusions were observed in this report; a sufficient system signal margin should be allocated for all carriers in a network, that is a fixed clear-sky margin should be typically in the range of 4-5 dB and should be more like 15 dB in the up link for moderate and heavy rain zones; to obtain a higher system margin it is desirable to combine the uplink power control technique with the technique that implements the source information rate and FEC code rate changes resulting in a 4-5 dB increase in the dynamic part of the system margin. The experiments would assess the feasibility of the fade measurements and compensation techniques, and ABR feedback control technique.

  6. Ka-Band Transponder for Deep-Space Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Matthew S.; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Folkner, William M.; Mendoza, Ricardo; Venkatesan, Jaikrishna

    2008-01-01

    A one-page document describes a Ka-band transponder being developed for use in deep-space radio science. The transponder receives in the Deep Space Network (DSN) uplink frequency band of 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, transmits in the 31.8- to 32.3 GHz DSN downlink band, and performs regenerative ranging on a DSN standard 4-MHz ranging tone subcarrier phase-modulated onto the uplink carrier signal. A primary consideration in this development is reduction in size, relative to other such transponders. The transponder design is all-analog, chosen to minimize not only the size but also the number of parts and the design time and, thus, the cost. The receiver features two stages of frequency down-conversion. The receiver locks onto the uplink carrier signal. The exciter signal for the transmitter is derived from the same source as that used to generate the first-stage local-oscillator signal. The ranging-tone subcarrier is down-converted along with the carrier to the second intermediate frequency, where the 4-MHz tone is demodulated from the composite signal and fed into a ranging-tone-tracking loop, which regenerates the tone. The regenerated tone is linearly phase-modulated onto the downlink carrier.

  7. Design of Ka-band antipodal finline mixer and detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Changfei; Xu Jinping; Chen Mo

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the analysis and design of a finline single-ended mixer and detector. In the circuit, for the purpose of eliminating high-order resonant modes and improving transition loss, metallic via holes are implemented along the mounting edge of the substrate embedded in the split-block of the WG-finline-microstrip transition. Meanwhile, a Ka band slow-wave and bandstop filter, which represents a reactive termination, is designed for the utilization of idle frequencies and operation frequencies energy. Full-wave analysis is carried out to optimize the input matching network of the mixer and the detector circuit using lumped elements to model the nonlinear diode. The exported S-matrix of the optimized circuit is used for conversion loss and voltage sensitivity analysis.The lowest measured conversion loss is 3.52 dB at 32.2 GHz; the conversion loss is flat and less than 5.68 dB in the frequency band of 29-34 GHz. The highest measured zero-bias voltage sensitivity is 1450 mV/mW at 38.6 GHz,and the sensitivity is better than 1000 mV/mW in the frequency band of 38-40 GHz.

  8. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-09-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  9. First Airswot Ka-Band Radar Backscatter Returns over a Complex California Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baney, O. N.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Gleason, C. J.; Chu, V. W.; Bennett, M. M.; Pavelsky, T.; Sadowy, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    In anticipation of the launch of the NASA Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, this project was conducted around the Piute Ponds of Edwards Air Force Base within the Mojave Desert, California to characterize ground conditions simultaneously with two AirSWOT flights collected May 14th, 2014. Both SWOT and AirSWOT employ a Ka-band interferometer to map water surface elevations and extent, but the ability of Ka-band radar to discriminate shorelines and flooded vegetation is not well known. Presumed bright returns from moist soils surrounding surface water bodies have also been speculated to confound interpretation of SWOT/AirSWOT data. The Piute Ponds are a dynamic area of constantly changing water conditions, providing a convenient test site for field studies to assess open water, dry shorelines, vegetation edges, islands, flooded vegetation and soil moisture in conjunction with AirSWOT backscatter and visible/near-infrared camera imagery. Islands were characterized into dry islands and flooded vegetation stands including species such as bulrush (Scripus acutus) and tamarisk (Tammarix ramosissima). Results demonstrate that full water extent can be determined by near-range backscatter returns which are strong for both open water and flooded vegetation. Far-range backscatter returns over open water were unreliable for flooded extent. Comparing near-range and far-range backscatter results to the soil moisture transect shows correlation, however as soil moisture increases, discriminating between wet sediment and water becomes difficult. In sum, first results suggest near-return backscatter results prove most useful in distinguishing open water from non-water, with a strong correlation between soil moisture and backscatter returns.

  10. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  11. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  12. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-02-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  13. Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka-Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The Design and Validation of High Date Rate Ka- Band Software Defined Radio for Small Satellite project will develop a novel Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) that is capable of establishing high data rate inter-satellite links with a throughput of 500 megabits per second (Mb/s) and providing millimeter ranging precision. The system will be designed to operate with high performance and reliability that is robust against various interference effects and network anomalies. The Ka-band radio resulting from this work will improve upon state of the art Ka-band radios in terms of dimensional size, mass and power dissipation, which limit their use in small satellites.

  14. High Performance Ka-band Phase Shifters for Space Telecommunications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel MEMS-based digital phase shifter targeted for Ka-band operation, but scalable down to X-band and up to W-band. This novel phase shifter will...

  15. MMIC for High-Efficiency Ka-BAnd GaN Power Amplifiers (2007043) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the need for high-efficiency, high-output power amplifiers operating in the Ka-band frequencies. For space communications, the power...

  16. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  17. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  18. High Performance Ka Band Power Amplifiers for Future EVA Radio Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, AlphaSense, Inc. and the University of Washington detail the development of a novel, high performance Ka band power amplifier for EVA radio...

  19. High-power X- and Ka-band Gallium Nitride Amplifiers with Exceptional Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achieving very high-power amplification with maximum efficiency at X- and Ka-band is challenging using solid-state technology. Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) has been the...

  20. Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications allowing moving up from UHF, S or X to get higher gain for a given diameter.

  1. NASA's Evolution to Ka-Band Space Communications for Near-Earth Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kevin; Stocklin, Frank; Geldzahler, Barry; Friedman, Daniel; Celeste, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the exploration of NASA using a Ka-band system for spacecraft communications in Near-Earth orbits. The reasons for changing to Ka-band are the higher data rates, and the current (X-band spectrum) is becoming crowded. This will require some modification to the current ground station antennas systems. The results of a Request for Information (RFI) are discussed, and the recommended solution is reviewed.

  2. The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide VLBI Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, J. A.; Lovell, J.; Majid, W.; Natusch, T.; Neidhardt, A.; Phillips, C.; Porcas, R.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Saldana, L.; Schreiber, U.; Sotuela, I.; Takeuchi, H.; Trinh, J.; Tzioumis, A.; deVincente, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band VLBI astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!

  3. A Ka-band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Sotuela, I.

    2011-10-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of ~200 micro-arcsec (μas) in α cos δ and ~300 μas in δ. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  4. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  5. The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide VLBI Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band VLBI astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!

  6. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Millett National Topographic Map, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Millett National Topographic Map NJ11-2 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  7. Ka-band Technologies for Small Spacecraft Communications via Relays and Direct Data Downlink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.; Niederhaus, Charles; Reinhart, Richard; Downey, Joe; Roberts, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    As the scientific capabilities and number of small spacecraft missions in the near Earth region increase, standard yet configurable user spacecraft terminals operating in Ka-band are needed to lower mission cost and risk and enable significantly higher data return than current UHF or S-band terminals. These compact Ka-band terminals are intended to operate with both the current and next generation of Ka-band relay satellites and via direct data communications with near Earth tracking terminals. This presentation provides an overview of emerging NASA-sponsored and commercially provided technologies in software defined radios (SDRs), transceivers, and electronically steered antennas that will enable data rates from hundreds of kbps to over 1 Gbps and operate in multiple frequency bands (such as S- and X-bands) and expand the use of NASA's common Ka-bands frequencies: 22.55-23.15 GHz for forward data or uplink; and 25.5-27.0 GHz for return data or downlink. Reductions in mass, power and volume come from integration of multiple radio functions, operations in Ka-band, high efficiency amplifiers and receivers, and compact, flat and vibration free electronically steered narrow beam antennas for up to + 60 degrees field of regard. The software defined near Earth space transceiver (SD-NEST) described in the presentation is intended to be compliant with NASA's space telecommunications radio system (STRS) standard for communications waveforms and hardware interoperability.

  8. Overview of Ka-band communications technology requirements for the space exploration initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward F.

    1991-12-01

    In the Space Exploration Initiative, Ka-band frequencies are likely to carry the bulk of the communications traffic both in the vicinity of and on the return links from the moon and Mars. The four exploration architectures identified by the Synthesis Group are examined and Ka-band technology requirements to meet the data traffic needs and schedule are identified. Specific Ka-band technology requirements identified are: transmitters - 0.5 to 200 W with high efficiency; antennas - 5m and 9m diameter, with multiple beams and/or scanning beams; and spacecraft receivers - noise figure of 2 dB. For each component, the current state of technology is assessed and needed technology development programs are identified. It is concluded that to meet the schedules of lunar and Mars precursor missions beginning in approximately the year 2000, aggressive technology development and advanced development programs are required immediately for Ka-band communications systems components. Additionally, the greater data transmission rates for the cargo and piloted phases of the exploration program require further Ka-band communications technology developments targeted for operations beginning in about 2010.

  9. Fabrication of band-pass filter using YBCO film at Ka-band frequency; YBCO hakumaku wo mochiita Ka-band taiiki tsuka fuiruta no sakusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshitake, T.; Hattori, W.; Murakami, S.; Suzuki, S. [NEC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    In this report, Ka band microstrip band pass filter was produced experimentally using an YBCO system high temperature superconductivity thin film as examination initial stage high temperature superconductivity a thin film superscription communication element. With it, the following were examined: Evaluation method and frequency characteristics of the filter. Especially, the examination on structure of the package and system of measurement using refrigerating machine becomes important in order to evaluate the filter with the high frequency. (NEDO)

  10. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Green, B M R; Larmour, R

    2008-10-01

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas.

  11. Design of a Ka-Band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer [2] located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation [3] receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  12. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  13. The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4-GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-m-diameter parabolic antenna on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) research and development (R&D) 34-meter a ntenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. This Ka-band link experiment (KaBLE-II) allows the performances of the Ka-band and X-band signals to be compared under nearly identical conditions. The two signals have been regularly tracked during the past 2 years. This article presents carrier-signal-level data (P_c/N_o) for both X-band and Ka-band acquired over a wide range of station elevation angles, weather conditions, and solar elongation angles. The cruise phase of the mission covered the period from launch (November 7, 1996) to Mars orbit capture (September 12, 1997). Since September 12, 1997, MGS has been in orbit around Mars. The measurements confirm that Ka-band could increase data capacity by at least a factor of three (5 dB) as compared with X-band. During May 1998, the solar corona experiment, in which the effects of solar plasma on the X-band and Ka-band links were studied, was conducted. In addition, frequency and difference frequency (f_x - f_(Ka)/3.8), ranging, and telemetry data results are presented. MGS/KaBLE-II measured signal strengths (for 54 percent of the experiments conducted) that were in reasonable agreement with predicted values based on preflight knowledge, and frequency residuals that agreed between bands and whose statistics were consistent with expected noise sources. For passes in which measured signal strengths disagreed with predicted values, the problems were traced to known deficiencies, for example, equipment operating under certain conditions, such as a cold Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA

  14. Design of a Ka-band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  15. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  16. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  17. Results from Two Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Zemba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Over the several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) Polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 6 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at multiple elevation angles: 45 deg, 20 deg, and 10 deg. Two year data collection results indicate comparable performance to previously characterized northern latitude sites in the United States, i.e., Fairbanks, Alaska. It is observed that cloud cover at the Svalbard site remains the dominant loss mechanism for Ka-band links, resulting in a margin requirement of 4.1 dB to maintain link availability of 99% at 10 deg elevation.

  18. Steerable K/Ka-Band Antenna For Land-Mobile Satellite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Arthur; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Woo, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Prototype steerable microwave antenna tracks and communicates with geostationary satellite. Designed to mount on roof of vehicle and only 10 cm tall. K/Ka-band antenna rugged and compact to suit rooftop mobile operating environment. More-delicate signal-processing and control equipment located inside vehicle.

  19. Evaluation and Performance Analysis of 3D Printing Technique for Ka-Band Antenna Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of 3D printed WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5GHz and 40GHz. Three antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter is covered...

  20. SYSTEM MODELLING OF DTH BROADCASTING AT KA BAND MULTIBEAM SATELLITE SYSTEM OVER INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swastik Sahoo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A major application of satellite is broadcasting and in India this is done at Ku band. But with the increase of demand of number of channels Ku band is getting saturated. So, to satisfy this requirement an approach is to go to higher frequency band, i.e. Ka band. As India is allocated with seven fixed GEO locations, so the purpose is to calculate what is the suitable satellite position for India at Ka band, what is the best EIRP available at that position and what will be the smallest ground antenna diameter and satellite antenna diameter at Ka band. Broadcasting is done at 20GHz Ka band downlink frequency. At this frequency, as the signal will face lots of impairments during propagation, so the attenuation caused by variety of factors are discussed here. To overcome the attenuation maximum EIRP is given. The link equation is taken as a reference to calculate quality of the signal, G/T ratio and EIRP of the satellite. The extreme west region of India is being taken as earth station and after some brief calculations all the results are discussed. Out of seven allocated GEO locations, 74⁰E gives best output in terms of minimum loss & small antenna diameters.

  1. Design of a Ka-band gyro-TWT amplifier for broadband operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K. [Microwave Tubes Area, CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani 333031 (India); Choyal, Y. [Department of Physics, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (India)

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, the design of a Ka-band periodically ceramic loaded gyro-TWT amplifier has been carried out. The design predict that the interaction structure can produce more than 80 kW output power, 50 dB saturated gain, and 3 dB bandwidth for 65 kV and 5 A electron beam with velocity ratio (α) of 1.2. This paper describes the design and simulation of a high performance 35 GHz TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWT that applies the same technique of employing a periodic dielectric loaded interaction structure to achieve stability and wide bandwidth. The design of input coupler with loaded interaction structure for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using Ansoft hfss. The return loss (S{sub 11}) and transmission loss (S{sub 21}) of the Ka-band gyro-TWT input coupler have been found to be −27.3 dB and −0.05 dB, respectively. The design of output window for Ka-band Gyro-TWT has been carried out using cst microwave studio.

  2. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  3. Performance of a Ka-band transponder breadboard for deep-space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Lane, J. P.; Kayalar, S.; Kermode, A. W.

    1995-08-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts applied in the development of and advanced Ka-band (34.4 GHz/32 GHz) transponder breadboard for the next generation of space communications systems applications. The selected architecture upgrades the X-band (7.2 GHz/8.4 GHz) deep-space transponder (DST) to provide Da-band up/Ka- and X-band down capability. The Ka-band transponder breadboard incorporates several state-of-the-art components, including sampling mixers, a Ka-band dielectric resonator oscillator, and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). The MMICs that were tested in the breadboard include upconverters, downconverters, automatic gain control circuits, mixers, phase modulators, and amplifiers. The measured receiver dynamic range, tracking range, acquisition rate, static phase error, and phase jitter characteristics of the Ka-band breadboard interfaced to the advanced engineering model X-band DST are in good agreement with the expected performance. The results show a receiver tracking threshold of -149 dBm with a dynamic range of 80 dB and a downlink phase jitter of 7 deg rms. The analytical results of phase noise and Allan standard deviation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Ka-Band PAA for Satellite Telemetry System for RLVs & Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed antenna is a Radial-Waveguide Array (RWA) that will operate at Ka band, 25.5-27.5 GHz in transmit and receive for left-hand, right-hand. This Phase I...

  5. Radiometric Mapping for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM Assessment in Mamuju, West Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Syaeful

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mamuju has been known to have high radiation dose rate which comes from NORM in rock and soil. Major concern is due to its location which is near inhabitant settlement area. Preliminary research has been done by environmental team which is limited to main access road only, while some remote area has left untouched. The purpose of the research is to delineate the location and distribution of thorium and uranium anomaly in Mamuju, and also to provide adequate information regarding the anomaly and high dose rate area to decision makers and stakeholders in neither local nor central government. Method applied is radiometric mapping using spectrometer RS-125 with NaI(Tl detector in the area of interest Geological Formation of Adang Volcanic, which is more than 800 square km in size. The radiometric mapping method is widely used in uranium/thorium exploration, and now has been added with the measurement of radiation dose rate which is appropriate to environmental surveys. The mapping has been successfully delineated the area of NORM or the area with thorium and uranium anomaly. Thorium and uranium anomaly are related with multi-geological-process resulting the increase of grade into several fold from its original state

  6. Dichroic Filter for Separating W-Band and Ka-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Larry W.; Durden, Stephen L.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Long, Ezra M.; Sosnowski, John B.; Higuera, Raymond J.; Chen, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACEs) mission development would advance cloud profiling radar from that used in CloudSat by adding a 35-GHz (Ka-band) channel to the 94-GHz (W-band) channel used in CloudSat. In order to illuminate a single antenna, and use CloudSat-like quasi-optical transmission lines, a spatial diplexer is needed to add the Ka-band channel. A dichroic filter separates Ka-band from W-band by employing advances in electrical discharge machining (EDM) and mode-matching analysis techniques developed and validated for designing dichroics for the Deep Space Network (DSN), to develop a preliminary design that both met the requirements of frequency separation and mechanical strength. First, a mechanical prototype was built using an approximately 102-micron-diameter EDM process, and tolerances of the hole dimensions, wall thickness, radius, and dichroic filter thickness measured. The prototype validated the manufacturing needed to design a dichroic filter for a higher-frequency usage than previously used in the DSN. The initial design was based on a Ka-band design, but thicker walls are required for mechanical rigidity than one obtains by simply scaling the Ka-band dichroic filter. The resulting trade of hole dimensions for mechanical rigidity (wall thickness) required electrical redesign of the hole dimensions. Updates to existing codes in the linear solver decreased the analysis time using mode-matching, enabling the electrical design to be realized quickly. This work is applicable to missions and instruments that seek to extend W-band cloud profiling measurements to other frequencies. By demonstrating a dichroic filter that passes W-band, but reflects a lower frequency, this opens up the development of instruments that both compare to and enhance CloudSat.

  7. Experimental characterization of negative refractive index material NRM at Ka band

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sougata

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental characterization of a negative refractive material NRM at Ka band using LR labyrinth Ring and wire array WA. We describe in detail the the LR and wire array characterization separately, and after that the combined experimental results, for NRM are reported. The LRs analytical and simulation study is not new but design in Ka band and different experimental procedure for the characterization of the negative refractive index is the novelty of this paper. For performing a negative refractive index experiment we made prism of 150 Prism angle . We get enhanced transmittance of more than 20 dB from background, at a negative angle of refraction. The values of the negative refractive index in a band of about 1 G Hz around 31 GHz are retrieved from the experimental data.

  8. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND RF CHARACTERIZATION OF KA-BAND SILICON IMPATT DIODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAPAS KUMAR PAL,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A silicon (p+nn+ SDR IMPATT diode for Ka-band operation has been designed by using a double iterative DC and Small signal simulation which involves simultaneous solution of Poisson’s equation and Carrier continuity equation, satisfying appropriate boundary conditions in the depletion layer edges. Using the design parameters,silicon epitaxial n/n+ wafers of appropriate thickness and resistivity of the epitaxial layer have been selected for fabrication of (p+nn+ SDR IMPATT diode for Ka-band operation. The (p+nn+ SDR IMPATT diode has been fabricated through diffusion technique. The optimized process steps of fabrication, starting from wafer cleaningto packaging have been described in details. The DC V-I and RF characteristics of fabricated IMPATT diode have been measured by using an integrated heat sink cum resonant cap waveguide cavity.

  9. Ka-band InSAR Imaging and Analysis Based on IMU Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with other bands, the millimeter wave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR has high accuracy and small size, which is a hot topic in InSAR research. On the other hand, shorter wavelength causes difficulties in 2D imaging and interferometric phase extraction. In this study, the imaging and phase performance of the streaming Back Projection (BP method combined with IMU data are analyzed and discussed on the basis of actual Ka-band InSAR data. It is found that because the wavelength of the Ka-band is short, it is more sensitive to the antenna phase-center history. To ensure the phase-preserving capacity, the IMU data must be used with accurate motion error compensation. Furthermore, during data processing, we verify the flat-earth-removing capacity of the BP algorithm that calculates and compensates the master and slave antenna phase centers individually.

  10. Reconfigurable phased antenna array for extending cubesat operations to Ka-band: Design and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttazzoni, G.; Comisso, M.; Cuttin, A.; Fragiacomo, M.; Vescovo, R.; Vincenti Gatti, R.

    2017-08-01

    Started as educational tools, CubeSats have immediately encountered the favor of the scientific community, subsequently becoming viable platforms for research and commercial applications. To ensure competitive data rates, some pioneers have started to explore the usage of the Ka-band beside the conventional amateur radio frequencies. In this context, this study proposes a phased antenna array design for Ka-band downlink operations consisting of 8×8 circularly polarized subarrays of microstrip patches filling one face of a single CubeSat unit. The conceived structure is developed to support 1.5 GHz bandwidth and dual-task missions, whose feasibility is verified by proper link budgets. The dual-task operations are enabled by a low-complexity phase-only control algorithm that provides pattern reconfigurability in order to satisfy both orbiting and intersatellite missions, while remaining adherent to the cost-effective CubeSat paradigm.

  11. A satellite system for multimedia personal communications at Ka-band and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatalaro, F.; Losquadro, G.

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristics of the satellite extremely high frequency (EHF) communication of multimedia mobile services (SECOMS) system are given and the results of the preliminary analysis are included. The SECOMS provides a first generation Ka band system with coverage over Western Europe, in order to satisfy business user needs of very large bandwidths and terminal mobility. The satellite system also provides a second generation EHF enhanced system with increased capacity and enlarged coverage, to serve all of Europe and the nearby countries.

  12. A K/Ka band radiating element for Tx/Rx phased array

    KAUST Repository

    Sandhu, Ali Imran

    2017-01-20

    The paper presents a K/Ka band radiating element for TX/RX phased arrays. Dual band operations is obtained using a single radiating surface: a novel radiator is adopted and placed in a configuration in which dual band and single band elements are interleaved. The array elements are optimized to scan the beam in excess of 50° in both bands. A subarray with 49 Rx elements and 105 Tx elements was built and measured confirming the results obtained in simulations.

  13. Calibration of the KA Band Tracking of the Bepi-Colombo Spacecraft (more Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriot, J.; Serafini, J.; Sichoix, L.

    2013-12-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  14. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; Koenig, Kristina; Groom, Geoff; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about the magnitude of localised flooding of riverine areas is crucial for appropriate land management and administration at regional and local levels. However, detection and delineation of localised flooding with remote sensing techniques are often hampered on floodplains by the presence of herbaceous vegetation. To address this problem, this study presents the application of full-waveform airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for detection of floodwater extent. In general, water surfaces are characterised by low values of backscattered energy due to water absorption of the infrared laser shots, but the exact strength of the recorded laser pulse depends on the area covered by the targets located within a laser pulse footprint area. To account for this we analysed the physical quantity of radiometrically calibrated ALS data, the backscattering coefficient, in relation to water and vegetation coverage within a single laser footprint. The results showed that the backscatter was negatively correlated to water coverage, and that of the three distinguished classes of water coverage (low, medium, and high) only the class with the largest extent of water cover (>70%) had relatively distinct characteristics that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent. The performance of the classifiers is highly dependent on the set of laser points features used. Best performance was achieved by combining radiometric and geometric laser point features. The accuracy of flooding maps based solely on radiometric features resulted in overall accuracies of up to 70% and was limited due to the overlap of the backscattering coefficient values between water and other land cover classes. Our point-based classification methods assure a high

  15. Miniaturized UHF, S-, and Ka-band RF MEMS Filters for Small Form Factor, High Performance EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II of this SBIR, Harmonic Devices (HDI) proposes to develop miniaturized MEMS filters at UHF, S-band and Ka-band to address the requirements of NASA's...

  16. High-Efficiency, Ka-band Solid-State Power Amplifier Utilizing GaN Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop an efficient, solid-state power amplifier (SSPA), operating at Ka-band frequencies, for high data rate, long range space...

  17. Ka-Band Site Characterization of the NASA Near Earth Network in Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, R.; Morse, J.; Nessel, J.; Zemba, M.; Tuttle, K.; Caroglanian, A.; Younes, B.; Pedersen, Sten-Chirstian

    2011-01-01

    Critical to NASA s rapid migration toward Ka-Band is the comprehensive characterization of the communication channels at NASA's ground sites to determine the effects of the atmosphere on signal propagation and the network's ability to support various classes of users in different orbits. Accordingly, NASA has initiated a number of studies involving the ground sites of its Near Earth and Deep Space Networks. Recently, NASA concluded a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Norwegian Space Centre of the Kingdom of Norway and began a joint site characterization study to determine the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links at the Svalbard Satellite Station in Norway, which remains a critical component of NASA s Near Earth Communication Network (NEN). System planning and design for Ka-band links at the Svalbard site cannot be optimally achieved unless measured attenuation statistics (e.g. cumulative distribution functions (CDF)) are obtained. In general, the CDF will determine the necessary system margin and overall system availability due to the atmospheric effects. To statistically characterize the attenuation statistics at the Svalbard site, NASA has constructed a ground-based monitoring station consisting of a multi-channel total power radiometer (25.5 - 26.5 GHz) and a weather monitoring station to continuously measure (at 1 second intervals) attenuation and excess noise (brightness temperature). These instruments have been tested in a laboratory environment as well as in an analogous outdoor climate (i.e. winter in Northeast Ohio), and the station was deployed in Svalbard, Norway in May 2011. The measurement campaign is planned to last a minimum of 3 years but not exceeding a maximum of 5 years.

  18. Proposal for a Joint NASA/KSAT Ka-band RF Propagation Terminal at Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosin, Jeffrey; Acosta, Roberto; Nessel, James; McCarthy, Kevin; Caroglanian, Armen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the placement of a Ka-band RF Propagation Terminal at Svalbard, Norway. The Near Earth Network (NEN) station would be managed by Kongsberg Satellite Services (KSAT) and would benefit NASA and KSAT. There are details of the proposed NASA/KSAT campaign, and the responsibilities each would agree to. There are several reasons for the placement, a primary reason is comparison with the Alaska site, Based on climatological similarities/differences with Alaska, Svalbard site expected to have good radiometer/beacon agreement approximately 99% of time.

  19. Ka-band Dielectric Waveguide Antenna Array for Millimeter Wave Active Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weihai; Fei, Peng; Nian, Feng; Yang, Yujie; Feng, Keming

    2014-11-01

    Ka-band compact dielectric waveguide antenna array for active imaging system is given. Antenna array with WR28 metal waveguide direct feeding is specially designed with small size, high gain, good radiation pattern, easy realization, low insertion loss and low mutual coupling. One practical antenna array for 3-D active imaging system is shown with theoretic analysis and experimental results. The mutual coupling of transmitting and receiving units is less than -30dB, the gain from 26.5GHz to 40GHz is (12-16) dB. The results in this paper provide guidelines for the designing of millimeter wave dielectric waveguide antenna array.

  20. Particle simulation of a ka-band gyrotron traveling wave amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shouxi; Liu Pukun; Zhang Shichang; Du Chaohai; Xue Qianzhong; Geng Zhihui; Su Yinong [Key Laboratory of High Power Microwave Sources and Technologies, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2652, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The design of a ka-band gyrotron traveling wave (gyro-TWT) amplifier is presented. The gyro-TWT amplifier with a severed structure operates in the fundamental harmonic TE{sub 01} circular electric mode. The beam-wave interaction is studied by using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The simulations predict that the amplifier can produce an output peak power of over 155 kW, 22% efficiency, 23 dB gain, and a 3 dB bandwidth of 2 GHz for a 70 kV, 10 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread {Delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=5%.

  1. Ka Band Phase Locked Loop Oscillator Dielectric Resonator Oscillator for Satellite EHF Band Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Ka Band PLL DRO having a fundamental oscillation frequency of 19.250 GHz, used as local oscillator in the low-noise block of a down converter (LNB for an EHF band receiver. Apposite circuital models have been created to describe the behaviour of the dielectric resonator and of the active component used in the oscillator core. The DRO characterization and measurements have shown very good agreement with simulation results. A good phase noise performance is obtained by using a very high Q dielectric resonator.

  2. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles 60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on upwind (windward) face of the tilting wave. Retrieval of Bragg roughness properties shows that omni-directional saturation spectra at ~1000 rad/m are 2-3 times higher (0.01 at 10 m/s wind speed) than the spectra obtained from optical measurements of regular sea surface without wave breaking. This suggests that observed difference can arise

  3. A CDMA architecture for a Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedi, Masoud; Sue, Miles K.

    1990-01-01

    A Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) architecture is currently being studied for use in a Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). The complete architecture consisting of block diagrams of the user terminal, the supplier station, the network management center, and the satellite is described along with the access methods and frequency/time plans. The complexity of developing this system using the CDMA architecture is compared to that of a Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) architecture. The inherent advantages and disadvantages of the two architectures are compared and their respective capacities are discussed.

  4. Deep-Space Ka-Band Link Priority Data Protection: Pre-Emptive Retransmission vs. Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two preemptive retransmission schemes for protection of priority data over deep-space Ka-band links is evaluated. The first scheme merges the correctly received bit from each transmission to create the most complete set of priority data for each pass (bit merge). The second scheme (symbol combining) combines the soft symbols received from each transmission of the priority data to increase the priority data's signal to noise ratio (SNR), thus increasing the liklihood of the correct reception.

  5. Analysis of Standards Efficiency in Digital Television Via Satellite at Ku and Ka Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landeros-Ayala Salvador

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis on the main technical features of digital television standards for satellite transmission is carried out. Based on simulations and link budgets, the standard with the best operational performance is defined, based on simulations and link budget analysis, as well as a comparative efficiency analysis is conducted for the Ku and Ka bands for both transparent and regenerative transponders in terms of power, bandwidth, information rate and link margin, including clear sky, uplink rain, downlink rain and rain in both.

  6. Simulation and measurement of a Ka-band HTS MMIC Josephson junction mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Pegrum, Colin; Du, Jia; Guo, Yingjie Jay

    2017-01-01

    We report modeling and simulation results for a Ka band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) Josephson junction mixer. A Verilog-A model of a Josephson junction is established and imported into the system simulator to realize a full HTS MMIC circuit simulation containing the HTS passive circuit models. Impedance matching optimization between the junction and passive devices is investigated. Junction DC I-V characteristics, current and local oscillator bias conditions and mixing performance are simulated and compared with the experimental results. Good agreement is obtained between the simulation and measurement results.

  7. Ka Band Phase Locked Loop Oscillator Dielectric Resonator Oscillator for Satellite EHF Band Receiver

    OpenAIRE

    Coco, S; Di Maggio, F.; A. Laudani; I. Pomona

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Ka Band PLL DRO having a fundamental oscillation frequency of 19.250 GHz, used as local oscillator in the low-noise block of a down converter (LNB) for an EHF band receiver. Apposite circuital models have been created to describe the behaviour of the dielectric resonator and of the active component used in the oscillator core. The DRO characterization and measurements have shown very good agreement with simulation results. A good phase nois...

  8. Modeling and Measurement of Phase Noise in GaAs HBT Ka-Band Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Friedrich; Schott, Matthias; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Accurate oscillator phase-noise simulation is a key problem in MMIC design, which is not solved satisfactory so far and needs further investigation. In this paper, a Ka-band MMIC oscillator with GaInP/GaAs HBT and on-chip resonator is treated as an example. Measured phase noise reaches -90 dBc/Hz and below at 100 kHz offset. To evaluate phase-noise predic-tion, the circuit is simulated using different commercial simulation tools and HBT models. Con-siderable differences in simulation results ...

  9. Evaluation of Deep Space Ka-Band Data Transfer using Radiometeorological Forecasts and Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Biscarini, Marianna; Milani, Luca; Cimini, Domenico; De Sanctis, Klaide; Di Fabio, Saverio

    2016-04-01

    Deep space exploration is aimed at acquiring information about the solar system. In this scenario, telecommunications links between Earth ground receiving stations and extra-terrestrial satellite platforms have to be designed in order to ensure the optimal transfer of the acquired scientific data back to the Earth. A significant communication capacity has to be planned when very large distances, as those characterising deep space links, are involved thus fostering more ambitious scientific mission requirements. At the current state of the art, two microwave channel frequencies are used to perform the deep space data transfer: X band (~ 8.4 GHz) and Ka band (~ 32 GHz) channel. Ka-band transmission can offer an advantage over X-band in terms of antenna performance with the same antenna effective area and an available data transfer bandwidth (50 times higher at Ka band than X band). However, Earth troposphere-related impairments can affects the space-to-Earth carrier signals at frequencies higher than 10 GHz by degrading its integrity and thus reducing the deep space channel temporal availability. Such atmospheric impairments, especially in terms of path attenuation, their statistic and the possibility to forecast them in the next 24H at the Earth's receiving station would allow a more accurate design of the deep space link, promoting the mitigation of the detrimental effects on the link availability. To pursue this aim, meteorological forecast models and in situ measurements need to be considered in order to characterise the troposphere in terms of signal path attenuation at current and future time. In this work, we want to show how the synergistic use of meteorological forecasts, radiative transfer simulations and in situ measurements such as microwave radiometry observations, rain gauges and radiosoundings, can aid the optimisation of a deep space link at Ka band and improve its performance with respect to usual practices. The outcomes of the study are in the

  10. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  11. A Ka-band 22 dBm GaN amplifier MMIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Dongfang; Chen Xiaojuan; Yuan Tingting; Wei Ke; Liu Xinyu

    2011-01-01

    A Ka-band GaN amplifier MMIC has been designed in CPW technology,and fabricated with a domestic GaN epitaxial wafer and process.This is,to the best of our knowledge,the first demonstration of domestic Kaband GaN amplifier MMICs.The single stage CPW MMIC utilizes an AIGaN/GaN HEMT with a gate-length of 0.25 μm and a gate-width of 2 × 75 μm.Under Vds =10 V,continuous-wave operating conditions,the amplifier has a 1.5 GHz operating bandwidth.It exhibits a linear gain of 6.3 dB,a maximum output power of 22 dBm and a peak PAE of 9.5% at 26.5 GHz.The output power density of the AIGaN/GaN HEMT in the MMIC reaches 1 W/mm at Ka-band under the condition of Vds =10 V.

  12. A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator with a four-gap buncher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator (TTO) with a four-gap buncher is proposed and investigated. Simulation results show that an output power of 1.27 GW and a frequency of 26.18 GHz can be achieved with a diode voltage of 447 kV and a beam current of 7.4 kA. The corresponding power efficiency is 38.5%, and the guiding magnetic field is 0.6 T. Studies and analysis indicate that a buncher with four gaps can modulate the electron beam better than the three-gap buncher in such a Ka-band TTO. Moreover, power efficiency increases with the coupling coefficient between the buncher and the extractor. Further simulation demonstrates that power efficiency can reach higher than 30% with a guiding magnetic field of above 0.5 T. Besides, the power efficiency exceeds 30% in a relatively large range of diode voltage from 375 kV to 495 kV.

  13. Electromagnetic Properties of Graphene-like Films in Ka-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Voronovich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied electromagnetic properties of pyrolytic carbon (PyC films with thicknesses from 9 nm to 110 nm. The PyC films consisted of randomly oriented and intertwined graphene flakes with a typical size of a few nanometers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD at 1100 °C on a quartz substrate. The reflectance and transmittance of these films in Ka-band, 26–37 GHz, were studied both experimentally and theoretically. The discovered remarkably high absorption loss of up to 50% of incident power, along with chemical stability, makes PyC films attractive for electromagnetic (EM interference shielding in space and airspace communication systems, as well as in portable electronic devices occupying this frequency slot. Since, in practical applications, the PyC film should be employed for coating of dielectric surfaces, two important issues to be addressed are: (i which side (front or back of the substrate should be covered to ensure maximum absorption losses; and (ii the frequency dependence of absorbance/transmittance/reflectance of binary PyC/quartz structures in the Ka-band.

  14. Ferroelectric switch for a high-power Ka-band active pulse compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  15. Ka-Band Atmospheric Phase Stability Measurements in Goldstone, CA; White Sands, NM; and Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As spacecraft communication links are driven to higher frequencies (e.g. Ka-band) both by spectrum congestion and the appeal of higher data rates, the propagation phenomena at these frequencies must be well characterized for effective system design. In particular, the phase stability of a site at a given frequency will govern whether or not the site is a practical location for an antenna array, particularly if uplink capabilities are desired. Propagation studies to characterize such phenomena must be done on a site-by-site basis due to the wide variety of climates and weather conditions at each ground terminal. Accordingly, in order to statistically characterize the atmospheric effects on Ka-Band links, site test interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at three of NASA's operational sites to directly measure each site's tropospheric phase stability. Using three years of results from these experiments, this paper will statistically characterize the simultaneous atmospheric phase noise measurements recorded by the STIs deployed at the following ground station sites: the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, CA; the White Sands Ground Terminal near Las Cruces, NM; and the Guam Remote Ground Terminal on the island of Guam.

  16. On the Design of Laser Structured Ka Band Multi-Chip Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid prototyping of millimeter wave (MMW multi-chip module (MCM on low-cost ceramic-polymer composite substrate using laser ablation process is presented. A Ka band MCM front-end receiver is designed, fabricated and tested. The complete front-end receiver module except the IF and power distribution sections is realized on the single prescribed substrate. The measured receiver gain, noise figure and image rejection is 37 dB, 4.25 dB and 40 dB respectively. However, it deduced from the experimental results of the two front-end modules that the complex permittivity characteristics of the substrate are altered after the laser ablation process. The effective permittivity alteration phenomenon is further validated through the characterization and comparison of various laser ablated and chemically etched Ka band parallel-coupled band-pass filters. A simple and experimentally verified method is worked out to utilize the laser ablation structuring process on the prescribed substrate. It is anticipated that the proposed method can be applied to other laminated substrates as well with the prescribed manufacturing process.

  17. Deep Space Ka-band Link Management and the MRO Demonstration: Long-term Weather Statistics Versus Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Shambayati, Shervin; Slobin, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    During the last 40 years, deep space radio communication systems have experienced a move toward shorter wavelengths. In the 1960s a transition from L- to S-band occurred which was followed by a transition from S- to X-band in the 1970s. Both these transitions provided deep space links with wider bandwidths and improved radio metrics capability. Now, in the 2000s, a new change is taking place, namely a move to the Ka-band region of the radio frequency spectrum. Ka-band will soon replace X-band as the frequency of choice for deep space communications providing ample spectrum for the high data rate requirements of future missions. The low-noise receivers of deep space networks have a great need for link management techniques that can mitigate weather effects. In this paper, three approaches for managing Ka-band Earth-space links are investigated. The first approach uses aggregate annual statistics, the second one uses monthly statistics, and the third is based on the short-term forecasting of the local weather. An example of weather forecasting for Ka-band link performance prediction is presented. Furthermore, spacecraft commanding schemes suitable for Ka-band link management are investigated. Theses schemes will be demonstrated using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft in the 2007 to 2008 time period, and the demonstration findings will be reported in a future publication.

  18. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  19. Dual Ka-band radar field campaign for GPM/DPR algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Komachi, K.; Hanado, H.; Kawamura, S.; Sugitani, S.; Minda, H.; Shimizu, S.; Oki, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and a GPM core satellite will carry dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a GPM Microwave Imager on board. The DPR, which is being developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), consists of two radars; Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The DPR is expected to advance precipitation science by expanding the coverage of observations to higher latitudes than those of the TRMM/PR, measuring snow and light rain by the KaPR, and providing drop size distribution information based on the differential attenuation of echoes at two frequencies. In order to secure the quality of precipitation estimates, ground validation (GV) of satellite data and retrieval algorithms is essential. Since end-to-end comparisons between instantaneous precipitation data observed by satellite and ground-based instruments is not enough to improve the algorithms. The error of various physical parameters in the precipitation retrieval algorithms (e.g. attenuation factor, drop size distribution, terminal velocity, density of the snow particles, etc.) will be estimated by the comparison with the ground-based observation data. A dual Ka-band radar system is developed by the JAXA for the GPM/DPR algorithm development. The dual Ka-radar system which consists of two identical Ka-band radars can measure both the specific attenuation and the equivalent radar reflectivity at Ka-band. Those parameters are important particularly for snow measurement. Using the dual Ka-radar system along with other instruments, such as a polarimetric precipitation radar, a wind-profiler radar, ground-based precipitation measurement systems, the uncertainties of the parameters in the DPR algorithm can be reduced. The verification of improvement of rain retrieval with the DPR algorithm is

  20. Analysis of a Novel Ka-band Folded Waveguide Amplifier for Traveling-Wave Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Ming-Liang; WEI Yan-Yu; HE Jun; GONG Yu-Bin; WANG Wen-Xiang; Gun-Sik Park

    2009-01-01

    A novel Ka-band folded waveguide (FW) amplifier for traveling wave tubes (TWT) is investigated. The dispersion curve and interaction impedance are obtained and compared to the normal FW circuit by numerical simulation. The interaction impedance is higher than a normal circuit through the whole band. We also study the beam-wave interaction in this novel circuit, and the nonlinear large-signal performance is analyzed by a 3-D particle-in-cell code MACIC3D. A much higher continuous-wave (CW) output power with a considerably shorter circuit compared to a normal circuit is predicted by our simulation. Moreover, the novel FW even has a broader 3-dB bandwidth. It therefore will be useful in designing a miniature but high-power and broadband millimeter-wave TWT.

  1. A new low-cost 10 ns pulsed Ka-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ylinen, Juhana

    2011-07-01

    Two Gunn oscillators, conventional intermediate frequency building blocks, and a modified GaAs diode detector are combined to form a portable monostatic 10 ns instrumentation radar for outdoor Ka-band radar cross section measurements. At 37.8 GHz the radar gives +20 dBm output power and its tangential sensitivity is -76 dBm. Processing bandwidth is 125 MHz, which also allows for some frequency drift in the Gunn devices. Intra-pulse frequency chirp is less than 15 MHz. All functions are steered by a microcontroller. First measurements convince that the construction has a reasonable ability to reduce close-to-ground surface clutter and gives an effective way of resolving target detail. This is beneficial especially when amplitude fluctuations disturb measurements with longer pulses. The new unit operates on 12 V dc, draws a current of less than 3 A, and weighs 5 kg.

  2. Performance Analyses of the Radio Orbital Angular Momentum Steering Technique Based on Ka-Band Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingtuan Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The misalignment in the orbital angular momentum- (OAM- based system would distort the radiation patterns of twisted beams carrying OAM, consequently making the OAM-based communication infeasible. To tackle the misalignment problem, a radio OAM steering technique based on a uniform circular array (UCA is illustrated. Subsequently, simulations are conducted to explore the influence of the OAM steering on the OAM mode quality and transmission performance. Furthermore, UCAs working at Ka-band with formulated feeding networks are designed and fabricated to analyze the performance of the OAM steering. The influences of OAM steering on mode quality and orthogonality are then evaluated in the experiment. Overall, the analyses of OAM steering technique are beneficial for the development of radio OAM study.

  3. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  4. Enhancing End-to-End Performance of Information Services Over Ka-Band Global Satellite Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Glover, Daniel R.; Ivancic, William D.; vonDeak, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The Internet has been growing at a rapid rate as the key medium to provide information services such as e-mail, WWW and multimedia etc., however its global reach is limited. Ka-band communication satellite networks are being developed to increase the accessibility of information services via the Internet at global scale. There is need to assess satellite networks in their ability to provide these services and interconnect seamlessly with existing and proposed terrestrial telecommunication networks. In this paper the significant issues and requirements in providing end-to-end high performance for the delivery of information services over satellite networks based on various layers in the OSI reference model are identified. Key experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of digital video and Internet over satellite-like testbeds. The results of the early developments in ATM and TCP protocols over satellite networks are summarized.

  5. Ka-Band SiGe Receiver Front-End MMIC for Transponder Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Jaikrishna; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Hashemi, Hassein; Aflatouni, Firooz

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated, front-end Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) was developed that houses an LNA (low noise amplifier) stage, a down-conversion stage, and output buffer amplifiers. The MMIC design employs a two-step quadrature down-conversion architecture, illustrated in the figure, which results in improved quality of the down-converted IF quadrature signals. This is due to the improved sensitivity of this architecture to amplitude and phase mismatches in the quadrature down-conversion process. Current sharing results in reduced power consumption, while 3D-coupled inductors reduce the chip area. Improved noise figure is expected over previous SiGe-based, frontend designs

  6. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  7. Low phase noise GaAs HBT VCO in Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yan; Yuming, Zhang; Hongliang, Lü; Yimen, Zhang; Yue, Wu; Yifeng, Liu

    2015-02-01

    Design and fabrication of a Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) using commercially available 1-μm GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor technology is presented. A fully differential common-emitter configuration with a symmetric capacitance with a symmetric inductance tank structure is employed to reduce the phase noise of the VCO, and a novel π-feedback network is applied to compensate for the 180° phase shift. The on-wafer test shows that the VCO exhibits a phase noise of -96.47 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset and presents a tuning range from 28.312 to 28.695 GHz. The overall dc current consumption of the VCO is 18 mA with a supply voltage of -6 V The chip area of the VCO is 0.7 × 0.7 mm2.

  8. Design of a Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1998-04-01

    We present design aspects of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that is being developed for ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise in support of the Cassini Ka-band (32-GHz) radio science experiment. With cooling provided by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid helium, this standard is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3 x 10^(-15) (1 second ≤ τ ≤ 100 seconds) and a phase noise of -73 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz measured at 34 GHz. Test results are reported for several subsystems, including the cryocooler, vibration isolation system, and ruby compensating element.

  9. Radiating Elements for Shared Aperture Tx/Rx Phased Arrays at K/Ka Band

    KAUST Repository

    Sandhu, A.I.

    2016-04-11

    A dual band, Tx/Rx, self-diplexing phased array is presented. The antenna has been designed to cover Tx/Rx satellite communications at K/Ka band with a frequency ratio 1.5:1. To obtain dual band operations with a single radiating surface, a novel dual band radiator is adopted and placed in a configuration in which dual band and single band elements are interleaved. The proposed configuration reduces the number of radiating elements required by other solutions while avoiding the insurgence of grating lobes. The tightly packed arrangement of the elements poses many integration issues, which are solved with a novel integration technique. The array elements are optimized to scan the beam in excess of ° in both bands. A subarray with 49 Rx elements and 105 Tx elements was built and measured confirming the results obtained in simulations.

  10. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  11. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  12. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  13. Simultaneous Ka-Band Site Characterization: Goldstone, CA, White Sands, NM, and Guam, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Roberto; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Morabito, David; Caroglanian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    To statistically characterize atmospheric effects on Ka-band links at NASA operational sites, NASA has constructed site test interferometers (STI s) which directly measure the tropospheric phase stability and rain attenuation. These instruments observe an unmodulated beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (e.g., Anik F2) and measure the phase difference between the signals received by the two antennas and its signal attenuation. Three STI s have been deployed so far: the first one at the NASA Deep Space Network Tracking Complex in Goldstone, California (May 2007); the second at the NASA White Sands Complex, in Las Cruses, New Mexico (February 2009); and the third at the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Remote Ground Terminal (GRGT) complex in Guam (May 2010). Two station-years of simultaneous atmospheric phase fluctuation data have been collected at Goldstone and White Sands, while one year of data has been collected in Guam. With identical instruments operating simultaneously, we can directly compare the phase stability and rain attenuation at the three sites. Phase stability is analyzed statistically in terms of the root-mean-square (rms) of the tropospheric induced time delay fluctuations over 10 minute blocks. For two years, the time delay fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, CA, have been better than 2.5 picoseconds (ps) for 90% of the time (with reference to zenith), meanwhile at the White Sands, New Mexico site, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 2.2 ps with reference to zenith) for 90% of time. For Guam, the time delay fluctuations have been better than 12 ps (reference to zenith) at 90% of the time, the higher fluctuations are as expected from a high humidity tropical rain zone. This type of data analysis, as well as many other site quality characteristics (e.g., rain attenuation, infrastructure, etc.) will be used to determine the suitability of all the sites for NASA s future communication services at Ka-band.

  14. Improvement of Ka-band satellite link availability for real-time IP-based video contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Berretta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New High Throughput Satellite (HTS systems allow high throughput IP uplinks/contribution at Ka-band frequencies for relatively lower costs when compared to broadcasting satellite uplinks at Ku band. This technology offers an advantage for live video contribution from remote areas, where the terrestrial infrastructure may not be adequate. On the other hand, the Ka-band is more subject to impairments due to rain or bad weather. This paper addresses the target system specification and provides an optimized approach for the transmission of IP-based video flows through HTS commercial services operating at Ka-band frequencies. In particular, the focus of this study is on the service requirements and the propagation analysis that provide a reference architecture to improve the overall link availability. The approach proposed herein leads to the introduction of a new concept of live service contribution using pairs of small satellite antennas and cheap satellite terminals.

  15. A Ka-Band Backscatter Model Function and an Algorithm for Measurement of the Wind Vector Over the Sea Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nekrasov, A.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band backscatter model and an algorithm for measurement of the wind speed and direction over the sea surface by a frequency-modulated continous-wave radar demonstrator system operated in scatterometer mode have been developed. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a simulation of the wind vector

  16. A New Blind Pointing Model Improves Large Reflector Antennas Precision Pointing at Ka-Band (32 GHz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-Deep Space Network (DSN) subnet of 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) Antennas was recently upgraded with Ka-Band (32-GHz) frequency feeds for space research and communication. For normal telemetry tracking a Ka-Band monopulse system is used, which typically yields 1.6-mdeg mean radial error (MRE) pointing accuracy on the 34-m diameter antennas. However, for the monopulse to be able to acquire and lock, for special radio science applications where monopulse cannot be used, or as a back-up for the monopulse, high-precision open-loop blind pointing is required. This paper describes a new 4th order pointing model and calibration technique, which was developed and applied to the DSN 34-m BWG antennas yielding 1.8 to 3.0-mdeg MRE pointing accuracy and amplitude stability of 0.2 dB, at Ka-Band, and successfully used for the CASSINI spacecraft occultation experiment at Saturn and Titan. In addition, the new 4th order pointing model was used during a telemetry experiment at Ka-Band (32 GHz) utilizing the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft while at a distance of 0.225 astronomical units (AU) from Earth and communicating with a DSN 34-m BWG antenna at a record high rate of 6-megabits per second (Mb/s).

  17. Design and Analysis of a 34 dBm Ka-Band GaN High Power Amplifier MMIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijningen, M. van; Vliet, F.E. van; Quay, R.; Raay, F. van; Seelmann-Eggebert, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design and analysis issues related to the use of recent GaN technologies for realizing high power millimeter wave MMICs. Two GaN Ka-band amplifier MMICs have been designed, fabricated and characterized. The small-signal and power measurement results are presented for both amp

  18. Robust AlGaN/GaN low noise amplifier MMICs for C-, Ku- and Ka-band space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, E.M.; Rodenburg, M.; Hoogland, J.A.; Heijningen, M. van; Seelmann-Eggebert, M.; Quay, R.; Brückner, P.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    The high power capabilities in combination with the low noise performance of Gallium Nitride (GaN) makes this technology an excellent choice for robust receivers. This paper presents the design and measured results of three different LNAs, which operate in C-, Ku-, and Ka-band. The designs are reali

  19. Ka-Band Slot-Microstrip-Covered and Waveguide-Cavity-Backed Monopulse Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ming Si

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A slot-microstrip-covered and waveguide-cavity-backed monopulse antenna array is proposed for high-resolution tracking applications at Ka-band. The monopulse antenna array is designed with a microstrip with 2×32 slots, a waveguide cavity, and a waveguide monopulse comparator, to make the structure simple, reduce the feeding network loss, and increase the frequency bandwidth. The 2×32 slot-microstrip elements are formed by a metal clad dielectric substrate and slots etched in the metal using the standard printed circuit board (PCB process with dimensions of 230 mm  ×  10 mm. The proposed monopulse antenna array not only maintains the advantages of the traditional waveguide slot antenna array, but also has the characteristics of wide bandwidth, high consistence, easy of fabrication, and low cost. From the measured results, it exhibits good monopulse characteristics, including the following: the maximum gains of sum pattern are greater than 24 dB, the 3 dB beamwidth of sum pattern is about 2.2 degrees, the sidelobe levels of the sum pattern are less than −18 dB, and the null depths of the difference pattern are less than −25 dB within the operating bandwidth between 33.65 GHz and 34.35 GHz for VSWR ≤ 2.

  20. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  1. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chandra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from profiling Ka-band (35-GHz ARM zenith radars (KAZR. A 1-D simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate the impact of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of the radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for saturation and wet radome effects. The proposed algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while lower rain rates by the Ze–R (reflectivity-rain rate relation is implemented. Observations collected by the KAZR, disdrometer and scanning weather radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be used to derive robust statistics of rain rates in the tropics from KAZR observations.

  2. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong signal attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from the profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-dimensional, simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate impacts of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying situations when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for signal saturation and wet radome effects. The algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while low rain rates are retrieved from the reflectivity-rain rate (Ze-R) relation. Observations collected by the KAZR, rain gauge, disdrometer and scanning precipitating radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at the Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The differences in the rain accumulation from the proposed algorithm are quantified. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a potential for deriving continuous rain rate statistics in the tropics.

  3. User RF requirements for a Ka-band data relay satellite link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, David J.; Aleman, Roberto M.

    1989-01-01

    The user G/T and EIRP requirements were determined for a data relay satellite link consisting of a forward link to 360 Mbps at 23 GHz and a return link to 2 Gbps at 26.5 GHz. Hardware for this data link would be a modular expansion to the NASA Data Link Module. Calculations were based on a data relay satellite model of predetermined characteristics patterned after the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). The desired data rates could be achieved with a G/T of 21.7 dB/deg K (forward link) and an EIRP of 68.2 dBW (return link) for the user satellite. Hardware configurations meeting these requirements are discussed in terms of RF performance, efficiency, reliability, and modular flexibility. A planar array configuration emerges as the logical candidate for most NASA missions. Pertinent Ka-band technology and certain ongoing research efforts are reviewed. Areas of particular interest include new power device families, 0.25-micron low-noise HEMT technology, and fiber optic distribution and control of RF arrays.

  4. AltiKa: a Ka-band Altimetry Payload and System for Operational Altimetry during the GMES Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Patrick; Steunou, Nathalie; Caubet, Eric; Phalippou, Laurent; Rey, Laurent; Thouvenot, Eric; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the Ka-band altimetry payload and system that has been studied for several years by CNES, ALCATEL SPACE and some science laboratories. Altimetry is one of the major elements of the ocean observing system to be made sustainable through the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) and GMES (Global Monitoring of the Environment and Security) programs. A short review of some mission objectives to be fulfilled in terms of mesoscale oceanography in the frame of the GEOSS and GMES programs is performed. To answer the corresponding requirements, the approach consisting in a constellation of nadir altimeter is discussed. A coupled Ka-band altimeter-radiometer payload is then described; technical items are detailed to explain how this payload shall meet the science and operational requirements, and expected performances are displayed. The current status of the payload development and flight perspectives are given.

  5. Frequency Tracking Performance Using a Hyperbolic Digital-Phase Locked Loop for Ka-Band Communication in Rain Fading Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparanathan, Kandeepan; Piesiewicz, Radoslaw

    In this paper we study and present some results on the performances of frequency tracking for Ka-band satellite communications in rain fading channels. The carrier frequency is tracked using a 2nd order hyperbolic phase detector based digital-phase locked loop (D-PLL). The hyperbolic D-PLL has the capability of extending the tracking range compared to the other D-PLL and hence can be designed such that to achieve low phase jitter performance for improved carrier tracking. We present the design and analysis of the D-PLL and show some simulation results on the frequency tracking performance for Ka-band rain fading channel. The results are compared with the non-fading noise only case and comparative analyses are made.

  6. DVB-RCS return link radio resource management for broadband satellite systems using fade mitigation techniques at ka band

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Current Broadband Satellite systems supporting DVB-RCS at Ku band have static physical layer in order not to complicate their implementation. However at Ka band frequencies and above an adaptive physical layer wherein the physical layer parameters are dynamically modified on a per user basis is necessary to counteract atmospheric attenuation. Satellite Radio Resource Management (RRM) at the Medium Access Control (MAC) layer has become an important issue given the emphasis placed on Quality...

  7. Study of rain attenuation in Ka band for satellite communication in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-10-01

    The important factor to be considered in the link budget estimation for satellite communication systems, operating at frequencies above 10 GHz is the rain attenuation. Scattering and absorption are the main concern for system designers at these frequency bands. This has resulted in the need for suitable prediction models that can best provide estimates of attenuation due to rain with available information of rain attenuation data. Researchers have developed models that can be used to estimate 1-min rainfall attenuation distribution for earth space link but there is still some confusion with regard to choosing the right model to predict attenuation for the location of interest. In this context, the existing prediction models need to be tested against the measured results. This paper presents studies on rain attenuation at 19.8 GHz, which specifies the performance parameters for Ka-Band under earth space communication system. It presents the experimental result of rain rates and rain-induced attenuation in 19.8 and 20.73 GHz for vertical and circular polarization respectively. The received signal data for rain attenuation and rain rate were collected at 10 s intervals over a three year periods from 2013 to 2015. The data highlights the impact of clear air variation and rain fade loss. Rain rate data was measured through OTT Parsivel. During the observation period, rain rates of about 50 mm/h and attenuation values of 11.6 dB for 0.01% of the time were noted. The experimental link was set up at Korea Radio Promotion Association, Mokdong, Seoul. Out of several models, this paper present discussion and comparison of ITU-R P.618-12, Unified Method, Dissanayake Allnutt and Haidara (DAH), Simple Attenuation (SAM), Crane Global and Ramachandran and Kumar models. The relative error margin of 27.51, 89.84,72.46% and 67.24, 130.84, 166.48% are obtained for 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001% of the time for 19.8 and 20.73 GHz under vertical and circular polarization respectively from ITU

  8. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  9. A Novel Low-cost, Ka-band, High Altitude, Multi-Baseline Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Sensor for Surface Water Ocean Topography Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal presents the Ka-band SWOT Phenomenology Airborne Radar (KaSPAR) to support the surface water ocean topography (SWOT) mission for science and algorithm...

  10. Analysis and Mitigation of Tropospheric Effects on Ka Band Satellite Signals and Estimation of Ergodic Capacity and Outage Probability for Terrestrial Links

    OpenAIRE

    Enserink, Scott Warren

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this work covers the effect of the troposphere onKa band (20-30 GHz) satellite signals. The second part deals withthe estimation of the capacity and outage probability forterrestrial links when constrained to quadrature amplitudemodulations.The desire for higher data rates and the need for availablebandwidth has pushed satellite communications into the Ka band(20-30 GHz). At these higher carrier frequencies the effects ofscintillation and rain attenuation are increased. In...

  11. Coherent summation of Ka-band microwave beams produced by sub-gigawatt superradiance backward wave oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharypov, K. A.; El'chaninov, A. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pedos, M. S.; Romancheko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Rukin, S. N.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    Coherent summation of microwave beams has been demonstrated for two superradiance Ka-band backward wave oscillators producing over 700 MW of power. The explosive emission cathodes of the e-beam injectors were powered by stable splitted voltage pulses produced by an all-solid-state modulator. The voltage fronts were shortened to 300 ps in controlled delay shock-excited ferrite lines. The standard deviation of the phase difference between the microwave pulses was less than 2% of the oscillations period. The power flux density of the summarized radiation was the same as that of a single generator producing an output power of ˜3 GW.

  12. Low cost low phase noise PLL controlled push-push VCOs in k- and ka- bands, stabilized by cavity resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Tsvelykh, I. S.; B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates push-push VCOs in K-band (with second harmonic output at 24 GHz) and in Ka-band (with third harmonic output at 36 GHz), and PLL synthesizers on their basis. Oscillators are stabilized by a rectangular resonant metallic cavity. Output signal power within the frequency tuning range changes in the limits of -11,5 -7,6 dBm and -11,8 -10,9 dBm for 24 GHz and 36 GHz oscillators respectively. Single sideband (SSB) phase noise spectral densities of -91 dBc/Hz for 24 GHz oscilla...

  13. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  14. Installing the earth station of Ka-band satellite frequency in Malaysia: conceptual framework for site decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M. R.; Reba, M. N. M.; Jaw, S. W.; Arsyad, A.; Ibrahim, M. A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper developed a conceptual framework in determining the suitable location in installing the earth station for Ka-band satellite communication in Malaysia. This current evolution of high throughput satellites experienced major challenge due to Malaysian climate. Because Ka-band frequency is highly attenuated by the rainfall; it is an enormous challenge to define the most appropriate site for the static communication. Site diversity, a measure to anticipate this conflict by choosing less attenuated region and geographically change the transmission strategy on season basis require accurate spatio-temporal information on the geographical, environmental and hydro-climatology at local scale. Prior to that request, this study developed a conceptual framework to cater the needs. By using the digital spatial data, acquired from site measurement and remote sensing, the proposed framework applied a multiple criteria analysis to perform the tasks of site selection. With the advancement of high resolution remotely sensed data, site determination can be conducted as in Malaysia; accommodating a new, fast, and effective satellite communication. The output of this study is one of the pioneer contributions to create a high tech-society.

  15. Ka-Band Link Study and Analysis for a Mars Hybrid RF/Optical Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznikar, Daniel J.; Nappier, Jennifer M.; Downey, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated radio and optical communications (iROC) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating the feasibility of a hybrid RF and optical communication subsystem for future deep space missions. The hybrid communications subsystem enables the advancement of optical communications while simultaneously mitigating the risk of infusion by combining an experimental optical transmitter and telescope with a reliable Ka-band RF transmitter and antenna. The iROC communications subsystem seeks to maximize the total data return over the course of a potential 2-year mission in Mars orbit beginning in 2021. Although optical communication by itself offers potential for greater data return over RF, the reliable Ka-band link is also being designed for high data return capability in this hybrid system. A daily analysis of the RF link budget over the 2-year span is performed to optimize and provide detailed estimates of the RF data return. In particular, the bandwidth dependence of these data return estimates is analyzed for candidate waveforms. In this effort, a data return modeling tool was created to analyze candidate RF modulation and coding schemes with respect to their spectral efficiency, amplifier output power back-off, required digital to analog conversion (DAC) sampling rates, and support by ground receivers. A set of RF waveforms is recommended for use on the iROC platform.

  16. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Radoslaw; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent...

  18. Results of radiometric and geochemical measurement for the natural radioactivity map of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišo Andjelov

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, a program was initiated to cover Slovenia with portable gamma-ray spectrometer measurements on a 5 x 5 km grid. The measurements were performed with a four channel Scintrex GAD-6 spectrometer. Five gamma-ray measurements were taken at each of 816 locations. Samples of the upper 10 cm of soil profile were collected for laboratory analysis. Uranium in samples was determinedby delayed neutron method (DNC. Other 35 elements: Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be,Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Ti,U, V, W, Y, Zn and Zr were analyzed by plasma-coupled emission spectrometry (ICP. The field gamma-ray measurements were converted to ground concentrationsof potassium, uranium and thorium. These show good correlation with the laboratory analyses of soil samples. Regardless of the wide spaced sampling, the produced maps show relatively good correlation with main geological units. They demonstrated that the methodology can be successfully implemented for environmental monitoring, geological mapping and mineral exploration. The product ofthis project is the frist natural background radioactivity map of Slovenia covering the entire country.

  19. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Death Valley National Topographic Map, Nevada, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-17

    The results of analysis of the airborne gamma radiation survey flown for the region identified as the Death Valley National Topographic Map NJ11-11 is presented in the bound Volume of this report. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  20. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Socorro National Topographic Map, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-28

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Socorro National Topographic Map NI13-4 is presented in this report. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  1. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey, San Angelo National Topographic Map: Texas, West Texas Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the San Angelo National Topographic Map NH14-1 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium, and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  2. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Perryton National Topographic Map, Texas/Oklahoma/Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Perryton National Topographic Map NJ14-10 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  3. Synchronization of radiation in an oversized coaxial Ka-band backward wave oscillator using two-dimensional Bragg structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ginzburg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A coaxial Ka-band backward wave oscillator with a two-dimensional Bragg structure located at the output of the interaction space has been studied. This structure has a double-period corrugation and provides azimuthal electromagnetic energy fluxes, which act on the synchronized radiation of an oversized tubular electron beam. Proof-of-principle experiments were conducted based on the Saturn thermionic accelerator (300  keV/200  A/2  μs. In accordance with simulations, narrow-band generation was obtained at a frequency of 30 GHz and a power level of 1.5–2 MW. As a result, the possibility of using a two-dimensional distributed feedback mechanism in oscillators of the Cherenkov type has been demonstrated.

  4. Performance Analysis of Ultra-Wideband Channel for Short-Range Monopulse Radar at Ka-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiko Iwakiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-range resolution is inherently provided with Ka-band ultra-wideband (UWB vehicular radars. The authors have developed a prototype UWB monopulse radar equipped with a two-element receiving antenna array and reported its measurement results. In this paper, a more detailed verification using these measurements is presented. The measurements were analyzed employing matched filtering and eigendecomposition, and then multipath components were extracted to examine the behavior of received UWB monopulse signals. Next, conventional direction finding algorithms based on narrowband assumption were evaluated using the extracted multipath components, resulting in acceptable angle-of-arrival (AOA from the UWB monopulse signal regardless of wideband signals. Performance degradation due to a number of averaging the received monopulses was also examined to design suitable radar's waveforms.

  5. Current status of Dual Ka-band radar field campaign in Japan for GPM/DPR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Nakamura, Kenji; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi; Hanado, Hiroshi; Minda, Haruya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Oki, Riko; Furukawa, Kinji

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and a GPM core satellite will carry dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a GPM Microwave Imager on board. The DPR, which is being developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), consists of two radars; Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The DPR is expected to advance precipitation science by expanding the coverage of observations to higher latitudes than those of the TRMM/PR, measuring snow and light rain by the KaPR, and providing drop size distribution information based on the differential attenuation of echoes at two frequencies. In order to secure the quality of precipitation estimates, ground validation (GV) of satellite data and retrieval algorithms is essential. Since end-to-end comparisons between instantaneous precipitation data observed by satellite and ground-based instruments is not enough to improve the algorithms. The error of various physical parameters in the precipitation retrieval algorithms (e.g. attenuation factor, drop size distribution, terminal velocity, density of the snow particles, etc.) will be estimated by the comparison with the ground-based observation data. A dual Ka-band radar system is developed by the JAXA for the GPM/DPR algorithm development. The dual Ka-radar system which consists of two identical Ka-band radars can measure both the specific attenuation and the equivalent radar reflectivity at Ka-band. Those parameters are important particularly for snow measurement. Using the dual Ka-radar system along with other instruments, such as a polarimetric precipitation radar, a wind-profiler radar, ground-based precipitation measurement systems, the uncertainties of the parameters in the DPR algorithm can be reduced. The verification of improvement of rain retrieval with the DPR algorithm is

  6. A comparison of MESFET and HEMT MMIC technologies using a compact Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirhun, S.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Bosch, D.; Gawronski, M.; Anholt, R.

    1991-07-01

    To compare the capability of MESFET and HEMT technologies for monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) implementation we have fabricated and tested discrete field-effect transistors (FETs) and a novel Ka-band monolithic voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). We implemented the circuit with three different active devices: moderate- and high-doped ion-implanted MESFETs (metal-semiconductor FETs) and AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs (high electron mobility transistors). A comparison of the measured oscillator phase-noise and an independent comparison of the temperature dependence of MESFET and HEMT RF equivalent circuits yields two general guidelines: MESFETs are preferred over HEMTs for applications requiring low phase-noise and temperature insensitive operation.

  7. A Ka-band monolithic low phase noise coplanar waveguide oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Delong; Hsu, Shawn; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A Ka-band oscillator has been designed, fabricated and tested using InAlAs/InGaAs HBTs. Coplanar waveguide technology has been employed to improve the Q-factor of the circuit. An output power of 2.6 dBm with DC to RF conversion efficiency of 7.8% was measured at 31.7 GHz. Low phase noise of -87 and -112 dBc/Hz were achieved at an offset frequency of 100 kHz and 1 MHz respectively. These low phase noise values can be attributed to the low 1/ f noise of the InAlAs/InGaAs HBT devices and the coplanar design used for the circuit.

  8. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  9. AltiKa: a Ka-band Altimetry Payload and System for Operational Altimetry during the GMES Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Verron

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Ka-band altimetry payload and system that has beenstudied for several years by CNES, ALCATEL SPACE and some science laboratories.Altimetry is one of the major elements of the ocean observing system to be madesustainable through the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems and GMES(Global Monitoring of the Environment and Security programs. A short review of somemission objectives to be fulfilled in terms of mesoscale oceanography in the frame of theGEOSS and GMES programs is performed. To answer the corresponding requirements, theapproach consisting in a constellation of nadir altimeter is discussed. A coupled Ka-bandaltimeter-radiometer payload is then described; technical items are detailed to explain howthis payload shall meet the science and operational requirements, and expectedperformances are displayed. The current status of the payload development and flightperspectives are given.

  10. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  11. Sensitivity of S- and Ka-band matched dual-wavelength radar system for detecting nonprecipitating cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Politovich, Marcia; Rilling, Robert; Ellis, Scott; Pratte, Frank

    2004-12-01

    Remote detection of cloud phase in either liquid, ice or mixed form a key microphysical observation. Evolution of a cloud system and associated radiative properties depend on microphysical characteristics. Polarization radars rely on the shape of the particle to delineate the regions of liquid and ice. For specified transmitter and receiver characteristics, it is easier to detect a high concentrations of larger atmospheric particles than a low concentration of small particles. However, the radar cross-section of a given hydrometeor increases as the transmit frequency of the radar increases. Thus, in spite of a low transmit power, the sensitivity of a millimeter-wave radar might be better than high powered centimeter-wave radars. Also, ground clutter echoes and receiver system noise powers are sensitive functions of radar transmit frequency. For example, ground clutter in centimeter-wave radar sample volumes might mask non-precipitating or lightly precipitating clouds. An optimal clutter filter or signal processing technique can be used to suppress clutter masking its effects and/or enhanced weak cloud echoes that have significantly different Doppler characteristics than stationary ground targets. In practice, it is imperative to investigate the actual performance of S and Ka-band radar systems to detect small-scale, weak cloud reflectivity. This paper describes radar characteristics and the sensitivity of the new system in non-precipitating conditions. Recently, a dual-wavelength S and Ka-band radar system with matched resolution volume and sensitivity was built to remotely detect supercooled liquid droplets. The detection of liquid water content was based on the fact that the shorter of the two wavelengths is more strongly attenuated by liquid water. The radar system was deployed during the Winter Icing Storms Project 2004 (WISP04) near Boulder, Colorado to detect and estimate liquid water content. Observations by dual-wavelength radar were collected in both non

  12. Radiometric mapping of Goiania urban area: natural and artificial radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Nivaldo C.; Dias, Danila C.S.; Guerrero, Eder T. Z.; Alberti, Heber L.C., E-mail: ncsilva@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: danilacdias@gmail.com, E-mail: edertzg@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heber@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Santos, Eliane E.; Pimenta, Lucinei R.; Costa, Heliana F., E-mail: esantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lucinei@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heliana@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the city of Goiania it is common to observe in some social groups, such as medical society, academy and communication (media), the association between cancer incidence and the 1987's Goiania radiological accident. Moreover, data of Population-Base Cancer Register published in 2010 by INCA (Instituto Nacional do Cancer), reveals that Goiania figures among the three cities where the major increases in cancer incidence were observed. Therefore, this project aims to provide a dose rate database over Goiania's road network aiming to: 1) assess the level radiation dose to which the population is exposed and 1) provide technical support for social communication of Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy. The monitoring was accomplished by using a mobile system (EBERLINE FHT 1376) which includes a 5-liter plastic scintillator detector coupled with a GPS (Global Positioning System) and a portable computer. This system allowed the recording of both the geographical coordinates and the dose rate of each single point. Using a NBR (Natural Background Rejection) the system is able to discriminate between natural and artificial radiation. After the field campaign, the raw data were then treated in a Geographical Information System (GIS) using the ArcGis software in order to produce dose maps. Therefore, this paper will present the results of the current stage of this research encompassing the monitoring of streets located on seven regions Goiania - divided in for administrative purposes. It is important to point out that more than 175175 individual data were collected with results ranging from 13 to 490 nSv/h. (author)

  13. Ka-Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) Enabling High Speed Data Communication for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Chahat, Nacer; Hodges, Richard; Thomson, Mark W.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats are at a very exciting point as their mission capabilities and launch opportunities are increasing. But as instruments become more advanced and operational distances between CubeSats and earth increase communication data rate becomes a mission-limiting factor. Improving data rate has become critical enough for NASA to sponsor the Cube Quest Centennial Challenge when: one of the key metrics is transmitting as much data as possible from the moon and beyond Currently, many CubeSats communicate on UHF bands and those that have high data rate abilities use S-band or X-band patch antennas. The CubeSat Aneas, which was launched in September 2012, pushed the envelope with a half-meter S-band dish which could achieve 100x the data rate of patch antennas. A half-meter parabolic antenna operating at Ka-band would increase data rates by over 100x that of the AMOS antenM and 10,000 that of X-band patch antennas.

  14. A low-noise K-Ka band oscillator using AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madihian, Mohammad; Takahashi, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    The design considerations, fabrication process, and performance of the first K-Ka-band oscillator implemented using a self-aligned AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) are described. A large-signal time-domain-based design approach has been used which applies a SPICE-F simulator for optimization of the oscillator circuit parameters for maximum output power. The oscillator employs a 2 x 10 sq mm emitter AlGaAs/GaAs HBT that was fabricated using a pattern inversion technology. The HBT has a base current 1/f noise power density lower than 1 x 10 to the -20th sq A/Hz at 1 kHz and lower than 1 x 10 to the -22nd sq A/Hz at 100 kHz for a collector current of 1 mA. The oscillator, which is composed of only low-Q microstrip transmission lines, has a phase noise of -80 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz off carrier when operated at 26.6 GHz. These results indicate the applicability of the HBTs to low-phase-noise monolithic oscillators at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, where both Si bipolar transistors and GaAs FETs are absent.

  15. Design on a Ka-band Up-converter Module%Ka频段上变频模块设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈焕东

    2011-01-01

    A new Ka-band Up-converter module is described in this paper.How to achieve low spurious and low phase noise performance is studied,and then the feasible scheme is designed.The filter is co-simulated by Ansoft Designer and HFSS software and is realized with thin film technique.High spurious suppression is obtained by the filter.A 27 GHz local oscillator with very low phase noise is realized by sampling phase-locked technique.The waveguide to micro-strip transition is simulated.Finally the module is tested,and the design objective is satisfied.%论述一种Ka频段上变频模块设计,对模块的杂散和相位噪声性能做了分析,根据分析结果,设计出合理的变频方案。滤波器采用Ansoft Designer和HFSS软件协同仿真,薄膜工艺制作,获得足够的杂散抑制度从而实现低杂散。应用取样锁相技术合成了相位噪声极低的27 GHz本振。对波导—微带过渡结构进行仿真,并给出仿真结果。从测试结果表明,模块设计实现了低杂散和低相位噪声。

  16. Design of Ka band MMIC VCO%Ka波段单片压控振荡器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏亮; 马伟

    2014-01-01

    基于0.25μm GaAs pHEMT工艺设计了Ka波段单片压控振荡器,该压控振荡器采用源极正反馈结构,变容管采用源极和漏极接地的pHEMT管。通过优化输出匹配网络和谐振网络以改善输出功率和相位噪声性能,使用蒙特卡洛成品率分析对本设计的成品率进行分析和改进。版图仿真结果显示:芯片输出频率为24.6~26.3 GHz,输出功率为(10±1)dBm,谐波抑制大于19 dB,芯片尺寸为1.5 mm×1 mm。%A Ka-band MMIC VCO was designed with 0.25 μm GaAs pHEMT process. The source electrode positive feed-back structure is adopted for VCO. The pHEMT whose source electrode and drain electrode are connected to the ground is used for the varactor. The resonance network and the matching network are optimized to improve the output power and the phase noise performance. The yield of the VCO is analyzed and improved by the Monte-Carlo method. The simulation data shows the typical output power of VCO is 10±1 dBm,the output frequency of VCO is 24.6~26.3 GHz,the harmonic suppression is better than 19 dB. The chip size of the MMIC VCO is 1.5 mm×1 mm.

  17. An FSS-Backed 20/30 GHz Circularly Polarized Reflectarray for a Shared Aperture L- and Ka-Band Satellite Communication Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Thomas Gunst; Gothelf, Ulrich; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2014-01-01

    A shared aperture antenna for simultaneous operation at L- (1525 to 1661 MHz) and Ka-band (19.7 to 20.2 GHz and 29.5 to 30.0 GHz) is demonstrated. This stacked antenna consists of a Ka-band reflectarray antenna with a frequency selective surface (FSS) ground-plane above an L-band patch array...... antenna. The reflectarray is based on the concentric dual split-loop element backed by a concentric dual-loop FSS element. The reflectarray comprises 80 × 80 elements and it is printed on a 40 ×40 cm2 Rogers 5880 substrate, while the L-band antenna is a 2 × 2 patch array. The reflectarray antenna has been...

  18. Feasibility Study on Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing Using Earth Thermal Images for Deep-Space Ka-Band and Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ortiz, G. G.; Roberts, W. T.; Alexander, J. W.

    2003-11-01

    The feasibility of using long-wavelength Earth thermal (infrared) images for antenna/ telescope tracking/pointing applications for both deep-space Ka-band (18 to 35 GHz) and free-space optical communications has been investigated and is reported on here. The advantage of this technology rests on using full Earth images in this band that yield more accurate estimates of geometric centroids than those of Earth images in the visible band. Furthermore, these images are nearly independent of Earth phase angle. The results of the study show that, at a Mars range with currently available sensors, a noise equivalent angle of 10 to 150 nrad and a bias error of better than 80 nrad can be obtained. This would enable precise pointing of both the optical and Ka-band communications beams.

  19. Analysis of Dual-Frequency Ocean Backscatter Measurements at Ku- and Ka-Bands Using Near-Nadir Incidence GPM Radar Data

    OpenAIRE

    NOUGUIER, Frederic; Mouche, Alexis; Rascle, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Vandemark, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Global colocalized ocean surface measurements using the Global Precipitation Measurement near-nadir dual-frequency Ku- and Ka-band microwave measurements are analyzed and compared. Focusing on the Ka and Ku cross-sections fall-off with incidence angles, the contemporaneous measurements enable to more precisely document differing ocean scattering characteristics for both microwave frequencies. Sensitivity with wind speed and significant wave height is further reported using global comparisons ...

  20. Investigation of Ka-Band CW 250 W TWT%Ka波段250W连续波行波管的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晨; 杨明华; 黄拓朴

    2011-01-01

    本文介绍了一种Ka波段连续波250 W螺旋线行波管研制的主要技术方案.介绍了这种行波管的研究现状和研制成果.%This paper presents the main technology scheme of a CW 250 W Ka-band helix TWT. The current situation of this TWT and the research achievements are introduced.

  1. Fan tomography of the tropospheric water vapor for the calibration of the Ka band tracking of the Bepi-Colombo spacecraft (MORE experiment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Serafini, Jonathan; Sichoix, Lydie

    2012-07-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapour Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  2. Analysis of Fade Detection and Compensation Experimental Results in a Ka-Band Satellite System. Degree awarded by Akron Univ., May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequency bands being used for new satellite communication systems are constantly increasing to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band, the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), launched in September 1993, is the first US communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including onboard baseband processing, multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this thesis is to describe and validate the method used by the ACTS Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program is used to validate the compensation technique. In this thesis, models in MATLAB are developed to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka-band systems are also presented.

  3. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  4. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Prototype Combiner Spurious Mode Suppression and Power Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, P.; Epp, L.

    2006-01-01

    Results of prototype hardware activities related to a 120-W, 32-GHz (Ka-band) solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) architecture study are presented. Spurious mode suppression and the power-handling capability of a prototype 24-way radial combiner and a prototype 2-way septum binary combiner were investigated. Experimental data indicate that a commercial absorptive filter, designed to pass the circular TE01 mode, effectively suppressed the higher-order modes generated by a narrowband, flower-petal-type mode transducer. However, the same filter was not effective in suppressing higher-order modes generated by the broadband Marie mode transducer that is used in the prototype waveguide radial combiner. Should greater filtering be required by a particular SSPA application, a broadband mode filter that can suppress specifically those higher-order modes that are generated by the Marie transducer will need to be developed. A back-to-back configuration of the prototype radial combiner was tested with drive power up to approximately 50 W. No anomalous behavior was observed. Power measurements of the septum combiner indicate that up to 10-W radio frequency (RF) can be dissipated in the integrated resistive element before a permanent performance shift is observed. Thus, a given adder (a single-stage, 2-way combiner) can safely combine two 20-W sources, and the adder will not be damaged in the event of a source failure. This result is used to calculate the maximum source power that can be safely combined as a function of the number of sources combined and the number of source failures allowed in a multi-stage combiner. The analysis shows that SSPA power >140 W can be generated by power combining 16 sources producing 10 W each. In this configuration, up to three sources could fail with the guarantee that the combiner would not be damaged. Finally, a modified prototype septum combiner design was verified. The improved design reduced the assembly time from over 2 hours to about 15

  5. Combined high-resolution aeromagnetic and radiometric mapping of uranium mineralization and tectonic settings in Northeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepelumi, A. A.; Falade, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    Geological lineaments, depths to the basement, uranium concentrations, and remobilization in parts of the Upper Benue Trough, covering about 55 × 55 km2 (longitudes 11°30'-12°00'E and 10°30'-10°30'N), Northeastern Nigeria were investigated using integrated High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Data (HRAD) and radiometric data. This was with a view to identifying the potential zones of uranium occurrence in the area. The HRAD was processed to accentuate anomalies of interest and depths estimate of 150-1941 m were obtained from source parameter imaging technique. The results from the superposition of the horizontal gradient magnitude, analytical signal amplitude, first vertical derivative, and 3D Euler solutions of the HRAD revealed that the study area was dissected by linear structures that trend ENE-WSW, NE-SW, E-W, NNE-SSW, WNW-ESE, and NW-SE; among which the ENE-WSW and NE-SW trends dominated. Analyses of radiometric data showed that uranium ores in the study area were possibly remobilized epigenetically from the granitic rocks, and were later deposited into sedimentary rocks (Bima formation). Burashika group (Bongna hills) and Wawa area of the study area showed vein-type deposits, while the anatectic migmatite in the northeastern region and the uranium rich Bima formation showed both fault/fracture and contact types of deposition. It was also observed the northwesterly and southeasterly, dominant dip direction, dipping faults dip in the same direction as the paleocurrent direction (direction of depositions of sediments), and trend in a direction perpendicular to the hypothetical direction of uranium deposition. The study concluded that the studied area is dissected by several linear structures and the studied area possibly contains deposits of uranium ore, which are likely to be found in: the Bima Sandstones of Wade, Shinga, Bima hill, Wuyo, Teli, Bryel, Dali, Barkan, Gasi, Kunkun, Boragara, Deba, and Gberundi localities; the anatectic migmatite at Kubuku, Whada

  6. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  7. Calculation of attenuation by rain using the DAH model and diameter of antennas for the Ka Band in Mexico; Calculo de atenuacion por lluvia usando el modelo DAH y diametro de antena para Banda Ka en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landeros-Ayala, S.; Neri-Vela, R; Cruz-Sanchez, H.; Hernandez-Bautista, H. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-03-01

    In the last years, the peak in the demand of satellite communication service has caused the saturation in the use of the frequencies corresponding to the band, Cand Ku. Due to this, the engineers have looked for viable alternatives, in order to satisfy the current requisition, as well as the future demand, for which a considerable increment is expected. One of these alternatives is the use of the Ka Band (20Hz/30Hz), that is why the importance of studying the propagation effects that are experienced at these frequencies, especially the attenuation effect by rain, as in this case, where it is significant. The present article has the purpose to describe the use of the Modelo DAH (whose authors are Asoka Dissanayake, Jeremy Allnutt and Fatim Haidara), mixed with the global maps of distribution of rain by Crane, for the calculation of the attenuation by rain in satellite communication systems operated in the Ka Band. Besides, antenna diameters for the systems of communications in Ka Band in different locations of the Mexican Republic, using for it the attenuation margins for rain obtained through the Modelo DAH, and using as references the characteristics of the ANIK F2 satellite and a terrestrial station VSAT, are proposed. [Spanish] En los ultimos anos, el auge en la demanda de servicios de comunicacion por satelite ha provocado la saturacion en los uso de la frecuencia correspondientes a las bandas C y Ku. Debido a esta razon, se han buscado alternativas viables para poder satisfacer la demanda actual, asi como la demanda futura, para la cual se espera un incremento considerable. Una de estas alternativas es el uso de Banda Ka (20Hz/30Hz), de ahi la importancia del estudio sobre los efectos de programacion que se experimentan a esta frecuencia, en especial, el efecto de atencion por lluvias, ya que sen este caso resulta ser significativa. El presente articulo tiene como finalidad describir el uso del Modelo DAH (cuyos autores son Asoka Dissanayake, Jeremy Allnutt y

  8. Global Ka Band Broadband Satellite Services Overview (1)%全球Ka波段宽带卫星业务的现状和发展(一)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 赵庆锁; 李涛

    2014-01-01

    本文简要回顾了全球卫星通信从C/Ku波段到Ka波段,从话音、广播电视到互联网应用的轨迹;对目前Ka波段HTS卫星网络的架构、地面系统情况以及采用的新技术进行了概述;列出了目前全球Ka波段在轨HTS卫星、建造的HTS卫星的容量、运营公司、使用的地面系统等;介绍了美国Ka波段宽带卫星业务的发展情况。%This article is retrospected the trajectory of global satellite telecommunication industry from C/Ku band to Ka band and from Voice/TV to Internet. The article is listed in HTS satellites which are in orbit and in construction, the capacity , the operators and the ground system. The Ka band broadband satellite business in USA is also introduced.

  9. Global Ka Band Broadband Satellite Services Overview (2)%全球Ka波段宽带卫星业务的现状和发展(二)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 赵庆锁; 李涛

    2014-01-01

    本文简要回顾了全球卫星通信从C/Ku波段到Ka波段,从话音、广播电视到互联网应用的轨迹;对目前Ka波段HTS卫星网络的架构、地面系统情况以及采用的新技术进行了概述;并列出了目前全球Ka波段在轨HTS卫星、建造的HTS卫星的容量、运营公司、使用的地面系统等;并介绍了美国Ka波段宽带卫星业务的发展情况。%This article is retrospected the trajectory of global satellite telecommunication industry from C/Ku band to Ka band and from Voice/TV to Internet. The article is listed in HTS satellites which are in orbit and in construction, the capacity , the operators and the ground system. The Ka band broadband satellite business in USA is also introduced.

  10. Thickness and Composition Tailoring of K- and Ka-Band Microwave Absorption of BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 Ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Singh, Charanjeet

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of M-type barium hexaferrites with chemical formula BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 ( x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) in K and Ka band. Characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm ferrite formation. The frequency dependence of the complex permittivity and complex permeability was studied for prepared ferrite samples in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 40 GHz. Factors such as the quarter-wavelength condition, impedance matching, high dielectric-magnetic losses, as well as ferromagnetic resonance were investigated to determine their contribution to the absorption characteristics. It was found that the quarter-wavelength ( λ/4) model could be successfully applied to predict and understand the position as well as number of reflection peaks in the microwave absorption spectrum. The origin of the reflection loss peaks is explained and verified based on calculations of input impedance, loss tangent, and ferromagnetic resonance. Reflection loss analysis revealed that all six compositions exhibited reflection loss peaks (absorption >90%) at their matching thicknesses and frequencies. Therefore, these ferrites are potential candidates for use in electromagnetic shielding applications requiring low reflectivity in K and Ka band.

  11. Design and ImpIementation of Ka-Band Up-Converer%Ka频段上变频器的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王启; 陈小忠

    2015-01-01

    阐述了一种Ka频段卫星通信上变频器的实现方案,采用一次变频方案将中频信号上变频至Ka频段射频信号,在实现一定增益的同时能够保证设备的杂散、相位噪声以及幅频特性等指标。该设计方法与调试技巧能够广泛应用于卫星通信地球站的上行链路。%Describes an achievement to design a kind of Ka-band up-converter, which converts S-band IF signal to Ka-band RF signal by once frequency conversion. The some gain can be achieved as well as the output spurious, phase noise and amplitude –frequency characteristics. The design and debug method can be used in up-link of satellite communications.

  12. A new airborne Ka-band double-antenna microwave radiometer for cloud liquid water content measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Tao; Gu, Lingjia

    2013-09-01

    A new type upward-looking airborne double-antenna microwave radiometer (ADAMR) system intended for detecting atmospheric cloud liquid water content (LWC) is developed in this paper. The frequency of this radiometer is 31.65 GHz. For the antenna elevation angle, one is 30°and the other is 90°. In order to detect the signals with low effective noise temperature (antenna ports respectively, the technique can elevate the small input noise signal power to the detectable range of the square-law detector and thus realize the weak signal detection. Moreover, in order to eliminate the impacts of the system gain fluctuations and obtain a higher sensitivity, an auto-gain compensation method based on the analog-to-digital converter, microcontroller and host computer software techniques is also proposed. Compared with the traditional radiometers, the radiometer topology is greatly simplified and the gain fluctuations can be readily realtime compensated using the compensation method. The laboratory test results show that radiometric sensitivity is better than 0.2 K for 300ms integration time and the instrument is conforming to specifications. Finally, the flight observation experiment results are presented to prove that the designed instrument is able to detect small changes of noise signal in a wide effective range of noise temperature (10-350K) and is a powerful tool for LWC measurement.

  13. A Ka-Band Transmitter for Deep Space Communication%深空通信Ka频段数传发射机的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁显锋; 张津舟; 谢春坚; 熊蔚明; 安军社; 陈晓敏; 孙辉先

    2012-01-01

    Design of a Ka-band telemetry transmitter is proposed to meet requirements of future deep space missions. Key output characteristics results of the Ka-band transmitter are given. Integrated design and digital technologies are used to develop a light, compact and high efficiency transmitter. Based on CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) recommendations, a concatenated error-control code in channel coding is used for improved performance and different code rate ranges are separately chosen for PCM/BPSK/PM (Pulse Code Modulation/ Quadrature Phase Shift Keying/Phase Modulation), NRZ (Non-Return to Zero)/BPSK and SRRC (Square Root Raised Cosine)-QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) modulation. Equipped with an SSPA (Solid State Power Amplifier), the Ka-band transmitter provides an output power of 2. 0 W 31. 84 GHz center frequency. The supported data rate is up to 2. 0 Mbit/s with QPSK modulation.%针对我国今后深空探测任务的发展需求,提出了应用于深空通信的Ka频段数传发射机技术设计方案,给出了整机关键输出特性结果.采用一体化设计和数字化技术,Ka频段数传发射机实现了轻小型化和高效率.基于CCSDS(空间数据系统咨询委员会)的相关建议标准,信道编码采用级联纠错编码技术和低、中、高速率数传码分段对应选择PCM/BPSK/PM(脉冲编码调制/二相相移键控/调相)、NRZ/BPSK(非归零/二相相移键控)和SRRC-QPSK(平方根升余弦-四相相移键控)的数据调制模式.Ka频段发射机采用KaSSPA(Ka频段固态功率放大器)实现了在31.84 GHz中心频率输出信号功率大于2.0W,QPSK(四相相移键控)调制时支持最大码率2 Mbit/s.

  14. On Solving TM0n Modal Excitation in a Ka-Band Overmoded Circular Waveguide by the Conservation of Complex Power Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Lan; Xi Gao; Zong-Jun Shi

    2009-01-01

    To measure the radiation properties of relativistic diffraction generator (RDG) in Ka-band, a TM0n modal excitation model is established, which consists of an overmoded circular waveguide and a coaxial line feeding probe. Using the transverse E-field mode matching and the conservation of complex power technique (CCPT), we deduce the scattering matrix at coaxial line to coaxial line and coaxial line to circular waveguide junctions. Then using the overall cascaded junction scattering matrix, the numerical results for the reflection coefficient of the coaxial line and the power distribution of TM0n multi-modal are presented. The numerical results are in agreement with HFSS simulation results and experimental results. The analysis shows that by choosing the appropriate position of coaxial line probe, the power proportion of the device operating mode excited in circular waveguide could be the largest.

  15. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of the dynamic characteristics of rain fading channel for satellite-to-Earth links at Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongchao; Wang, Huali

    2007-11-01

    Modeling of rain fading channel dynamics is essential to the real-time prediction of link availability for Ka-band satellite communication system under rain attenuation impairment, and can validate fade mitigation techniques (FMT) such as adaptive transmission and diversity. The mechanism of dynamic rain attenuation model based on time-series generator is firstly concerned in this paper. We further provide a scheme and implementation of real-time simulator for dynamic rain fading channels based on Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation method and general Field Programmable Logic Array (FPGA) device. Finally, the impact of adaptive modulation fade countermeasures (AMFC) in the different state of rain attenuation is evaluated with simulation results.

  16. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  17. The Electron Gun's Design with High Performance for Ka-Band TWT%Ka波段行波管高性能电子枪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国庆; 王文祥; 宫玉彬; 魏彦玉; 黄民智

    2012-01-01

    The initial structure parameters of the electron gun for Ka-band TWT can be obtained by the synthesis iteration proposed by Vaughan, and then, the modifications for electron gun's structure are performed by stimulation and optimization with the TAU. With comparison of the uniformity electron's emission density of the cathode surface, the influence of trajectories for different thermal emission angles of e-lectrons, the trajectory's laminar and the radial current density distribution near the electron beam's waist, the final structure of the electron gun is got. The test result is in agreement with the optimized design for Ka-band TWT electron gun.%利用学者Vaughan等提出的皮尔斯电子枪设计综合迭代法计算得到某Ka波段行波管电子枪的基本结构参数;在此基础上,采用电子光学数值模拟软件Tau进行模拟优化进一步修改电子枪各结构尺寸;在模拟优化过程中,通过量化比较、判断阴极表面电子发射密度的均匀性,比较阴极表面部分热初速电子非垂直发射时对电子注轨迹的影响程度,比较注腰位置附近电子注层流性及径向密度分布均匀性等,最后得到优化的电子枪结构设计.对装配有此优化设计电子枪的行波管进行了实验研究,测试结果达到设计要求.

  18. Detailed geologic field mapping and radiometric dating of the Abanico Formation in the Principal Cordillera, central Chile: Evidence of protracted volcanism and implications for Cenozoic tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosolf, J.; Gans, P. B.; Wyss, A. R.; Cottle, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Many aspects of the long-term evolution of intra-arc processes remain poorly understood, including temporal trends in magmatism, temporal and spatial patterns of volcanism, and styles of arc deformation. The Abanico Formation in the Principal Cordillera of central Chile is a thick, well-exposed section of volcanogenic strata providing a superb locale for the investigation of continental arc dynamics over a 60+ myr timescale. In this study, eight new litho-stratigraphic members of the Abanico Formation are described and mapped in the Río Tinguiririca river area. Mapping and field observations show the Abanico Formation measures up to ~2.5 km in composite stratigraphic thickness. The lower ~1.1 km of the section (> 46 Ma) is dominated by andesitic breccias interbedded with andesite, basaltic andesite, and olivine basalt lavas. The upper 1.4 km of the section (volcanics composed mainly of andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt lavas. A strong deformational overprint has tilted, folded, and faulted the Abanico map units. Fold axes and reverse faults, both east and west directed, are generally N-S trending. Reverse faults achieve up to ~50 Ma of stratigraphic separation, placing Campanian strata on Miocene rocks with up to ~2 km of vertical throw. The Abanico Formation is also offset by numerous steeply-dipping, oblique-slip faults with 100+ meters of slip. The Abanico Formation is interpreted to have been emplaced within an active arc, with progressively more evolved material being erupted up section during the Campanian to Miocene, followed by more mafic volcanism during the Pliocene and Quaternary. Radiometric ages bounding intra-formational unconformities imply that shortening commenced no later than the early Miocene, with an older deformational episode possibly preceding it. Results of this study clearly demonstrate the age of the Abanico Formation extends from Campanian to Miocene, requiring a significant revision of the current mid-Tertiary age paradigm for

  19. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Futang; Zhang, Zuyin

    1999-09-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized channels. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo- color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously, all parameters of flight and radiometric data are sorted in hard disk for post- processing. The sensitivity of the radiometer (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new displaying method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate that the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  20. Ka波段螺旋波纹波导回旋行波管%Linear calculation of Ka-band gyro-TWT with helical waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛智浩; 刘濮鲲; 杜朝海

    2012-01-01

    螺旋波纹波导回旋行波管与采用圆波导的回旋行波管相比,有较大的带宽.介绍了它的线性注波互作用理论,并用该理论计算了不同的磁场与波导表面微扰幅度对Ka波段螺旋波纹波导回旋行渡管线性增益的影响.计算结果与已报道的实验结果基本符合,说明该理论可以初步确定螺旋波纹波导回旋行波管的各项参数.%Gyrotron traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) with helical waveguide has wider instantaneous frequency bandwidth than that with smooth waveguide. This paper introduces the linear theory of its beam-wave interaction, and calculates the influence on linear gain of Ka-band gyro-TWT caused by changing the applied magnetic field and the amplitude of the groove. The results accord with those reported, indicating that the theory can be used to preliminarily determine the parameters of gyro-TWT assembly.

  1. A Compact Ka-Band PHEMT MMIC Voltage Controlled Oscillator%紧凑型Ka波段PHEMT微波单片集成VCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余稳; 孙晓玮; 钱蓉; 张义门

    2005-01-01

    设计并流片制作了基于GaAs PHEMT工艺的Ka波段微波单片集成压控振荡器(MMIC VCO).该VCO具有紧凑、宽电调谐带宽及高输出功率的特点.提出了缩小芯片面积及增大调谐带宽的方法,同时还给出了设计MMIC VCO的基本步骤.该方法设计并流片制做的MMIC VCO的测量结果为:振荡频率为36±1.2GHz,输出功率为10士1dBm,芯片面积为1.3mm×1.0mm.%A compact Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit(MMIC) voltage controlled oscillator (VCO)with wide tuning range and high output power, which is based on GaAs PHEMT process,is presented. A method is introduced to reduce the chip size and to increase the bandwidth of operation. The procedure to design a MMIC VCO is also described here. The measured oscillating frequency of the MMIC VCO is 36±1.2GHz and the output power is 10±1dBm. The fabricated MMIC chip size is 1.3mm× 1.0mm.

  2. Application of Synthetic Storm Technique for Diurnal and Seasonal Variation of Slant Path Ka-Band Rain Attenuation Time Series over a Subtropical Location in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Ojo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As technology advances and more demands are on satellite services, rain-induced attenuation still creates one of the most damaging effects of the atmosphere on the quality of radio communication signals, especially those operating above 10 GHz. System designers therefore require statistical information on rain-induced attenuation over the coverage area in order to determine the appropriate transmitter and receiver characteristics to be adopted. This paper presents results on the time-varying rain characterization and diurnal variation of slant path rain attenuation in the Ka-band frequency simulated with synthetic storm techniques over a subtropical location in South Africa using 10-year rain rate time-series data. The analysis is based on the CDF of one-minute rain rate; time-series seasonal variation of rain rate observed over four time intervals: 00:00–06:00, 06:00–12:00, 12:00–18:00, and 18:00–24:00; diurnal fades margin; and diurnal variation of rain attenuation. Comparison was also made between the synthesized values and measured attenuation data. The predicted statistics are in good agreement with those obtained from the propagation beacon measurement in the area. The overall results will be needed for an acceptable planning that can effectively reduce the fade margin to a very low value for an optimum data communication over this area.

  3. Volcanic Ash Cloud Observation using Ground-based Ka-band Radar and Near-Infrared Lidar Ceilometer during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active remote sensing techniques can probe volcanic ash plumes, but their sensitivity at a given distance depends upon the sensor transmitted power, wavelength and polarization capability. Building on a previous numerical study at centimeter wavelength, this work aims at i simulating the distal ash particles polarimetric response of millimeter-wave radar and multi-wavelength optical lidar; ii developing and applying a model-based statistical retrieval scheme using a multi-sensor approach. The microphysical electromagnetic forward model of volcanic ash particle distribution, previously set up at microwaves, is extended to include non-spherical particle shapes, vesicular composition, silicate content and orientation phenomena for both millimeter and optical bands. Monte Carlo generation of radar and lidar signatures are driven by random variability of volcanic particle main parameters, using constraints from available data and experimental evidences. The considered case study is related to the ground-based observation of the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland volcanic ash plume on May 15, 2010, carried out by the Atmospheric Research Station at Mace Head (Ireland with a 35-GHz Ka-band Doppler cloud radar and a 1064-nm ceilometer lidar. The detection and estimation of ash layer presence and composition is carried out using a Bayesian approach, which is trained by the Monte Carlo model-based dataset. Retrieval results are corroborated exploiting auxiliary data such as those from a ground-based microwave radiometer also positioned at Mace Head.

  4. Review of the Airborne Ku and Ka-band Satellite Communication System%机载Ku、Ka频段卫星通信系统综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾文光; 赵大勇; 邓军

    2011-01-01

    叙述了Ku频段和Ka频段机载卫星通信系统的国内外发展现状,列举了几个典型的卫星通信系统技术指标,并简述了研制机载卫星通信系统应注意的事项和技术途径,其中包括选择天线系统形式,合理分配系统指标,消除多普勒效应的影响等。%This paper reviews the Ku-band and Ka-band airborne satellite communication system both at home and abroad,cites a few typical satellite communication system specifications,and outlines matters that deserve our attention and some technical approaches in the development of airborne satellite communications systems,including choosing the form of antenna system,reasonably allocating system indicators,and eliminating the impact of the Doppler effect.

  5. A Frequency Transfer and Cleanup System for Ultra-High Stability at Both Long and Short Times for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, M. D.; Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    New radio science experiments, including a gravitational wave search and several atmospheric occultation studies, are planned for the Cassini Ka-band experiment. These experiments are made possible by reduced solar-induced phase fluctuations at the high-frequency (32 GHZ) of the radio link between the earth and the spacecraft. In order to match the improved link performance, a significant upgrade is under way to improve the frequency stability capabilities of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). Significant improvements are being undertaken in many areas, including antenna vibration and (wet) tropospheric calibration, in addition to frequency generation and distribution. We describe here the design and development of a system to provide a reference signal with the highest possible frequency stability for both long-term, short-term, and phase noise, at an antenna (DSS 25) that is remote from the frequency standards room at SPC-10 at the Goldstone site. The new technologies were developed in order to meet the very tight requirements. They are: 1) a Stabilized Fiber-Optic Distribution Assembly (SFODA) that includes active compensation of thermal variations to transfer long-term stability over 16 km of ordinary fiber-optic cable, and 2) a Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) that provides short-term performance in a cryocooled sapphire oscillator with ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise.

  6. A low-phase-noise Ka-band push-push voltage-controlled oscillator using CMOS/glass-integrated passive device technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a Ka-band CMOS push-push voltage- controlled oscillator (VCO) integrated into a glass-integrated passive device (GIPD) process is presented. The transformer, λ/4 transmission line, and inductors of the VCO are realized in the GIPD process, achieving superior performances, and therefore improve the phase noise of the VCO. Moreover, the transformer-based VCO is a differential Hartley topology to further reduce the phase noise and chip area. Operating at 1.8 V supply voltage, the VCO core consumes merely 3.8 mW of dc power. The measured phase noise is -109.18 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the 30.84 GHz oscillation frequency. The push-push VCO also demonstrates a 24.5 dB fundamental rejection, and exhibits an 8.4% tuning range. Compared with recently published CMOS-based VCOs, it is observed that the proposed VCO exhibits excellent performance under low power consumption.

  7. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  8. Design of a Novel Ka-band Circular Polarization Microstrip Antenna%一种新型Ka频段圆极化微带天线设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 王昕; 董涛

    2012-01-01

    A novel Ka band circular-polarization microstrip antenna is proposed.The antenna is coupled-fed by L-shaped apertures in the ground plane to realize circular-polarization.The antenna array is analyzed and optimized,then the array is made and measured.Simulated and measured results show the feasibility of the proposed design.Simulated results of the relative impedance bandwidth and axial-ratio bandwidth are 3.9% and 2% respectively,and measured results are 4.2% and 3.5%.With good circular polarization performance,the antenna can be used in satellite communication.%提出了一种Ka频段圆极化微带天线的新设计,采用缝隙耦合馈电方式,通过在接地板开L型缝隙实现天线的圆极化工作。对天线阵列进行了仿真优化和加工实测,仿真和测试结果表明了设计的可行性。天线仿真和实测的相对阻抗带宽分别为3.9%和4.2%,仿真和实测的轴比相对带宽分别为2%和3.5%。天线具有良好的圆极化特性,可应用在卫星通信中。

  9. Data use investigations for applications Explorer Mission A (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission): HCMM's role in studies of the urban heat island, Great Lakes thermal phenomena and radiometric calibration of satellite data. [Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester New York and Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Schimminger, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of data from NASA'a heat capacity mapping mission satellite for studies of the urban heat island, thermal phenomena in large lakes and radiometric calibration of satellite sensors was assessed. The data were found to be of significant value in all cases. Using HCMM data, the existence and microstructure of the heat island can be observed and associated with land cover within the urban complex. The formation and development of the thermal bar in the Great Lakes can be observed and quantitatively mapped using HCMM data. In addition, the thermal patterns observed can be associated with water quality variations observed both from other remote sensing platforms and in situ. The imaging radiometer on-board the HCMM satellite is shown to be calibratible to within about 1.1 C of actual surface temperatures. These findings, as well as the analytical procedures used in studying the HCMM data, are included.

  10. Ka频段遥感卫星数据接收系统跟踪性能测试新方法%A New Tracking Performance Test Method for Ka-band Remote Sensing Satellite Data Receiving System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱维祥; 穆伟; 王万玉; 冯旭祥; 王永华

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problems in the tracking performance test of Ka-band Low Earth Orbit( LEO) re-mote sensing satellite data receiving system,a new method is proposed. Simulation data is generated by u-sing Ka-band LEO satellite,and dynamic target tracking is simulated with the method of tracking Ka-band beacon on the calibration tower by rotating the third axis of antenna. A verification test on tracking per-formance of receiving system is carried out in the developed prototype system. The proposed method pro-vides a reference for acceptance test for Ka-band LEO satellite data receiving system.%针对Ka频段低轨遥感卫星数据接收系统跟踪性能测试中的问题,提出了一种新的测试方法。利用设计的Ka频段低轨卫星动态目标模拟数据,采用转动第三轴跟踪标校塔Ka频段信标的方式模拟动态目标的跟踪,在研制的原型系统中开展了接收系统跟踪性能的测试验证。该测试方法可为Ka频段低轨卫星数据接收系统跟踪性能的测试验收提供参考。

  11. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  12. 一种Ka波段低噪声下变频器组件%Novel Ka-band low-noise down-converter assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鸣; 李兴国

    2006-01-01

    An efficient way to design a down-converter assembly for the Ka-band millimeter system is presented, in which dielectric resonators (DR's) are adopted in the Schottky barrier diode image recovery mixer and the local oscillator (LO). DR structures guarantee high frequency stability with an acceptable volume. The configurations of low noise amplifier, mixer and oscillator in the assembly are described and fabricated to estimate the chain performance. According to the verification results, the assembly exhibits the noise figure of less than 5 dB over 1 GHz frequency range, and the single-sideband phase noise (200 kHz offset from carrier frequency) of - 70 dBc/Hz. Utilizing the DR structure, the frequency stability of the local oscillator is less than 60 × 10-6/℃.%介绍了一种用于毫米波系统的下变频器,其中混频器采用了肖特基二极管镜频回收混频结构,振荡器采用了DRO(dielectric resonator oscillator)结构以提高系统性能,以保证在合适的体积内实现较高的频率稳定度.描述了系统中低噪声放大器、混频器、振荡器的性能,用于评估系统链路性能,最后合并制作在单个基片上.根据测试结果,该下变频器的噪声系数在35 GHz处1 GHz频率范围内小于5 dB,单边带相位噪声系数在偏离载波200 kHz处达到-70 dBc/Hz.由于采用了介质谐振结构,本振的频率稳定度小于60×10-6/℃.

  13. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  14. Data acquisition and processing - helicopter radiometric survey, Krageroe, 1998

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, L P

    2000-01-01

    On 07 October 1998 a helicopter radiometric survey was flown in the vicinity of Krageroe municipality. The purpose of the survey was to provide radiometric information to help assess radon hazard from radioactive rocks in the area. A total of 60 line-kilometres of radiometric data were acquired in a single flight, covering an area of approximately 3 square km with a 50-m line spacing. The data were collected by Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) personnel and processed at NGU. Radiometric data were reduced using the three-channel procedure recommended by the International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded using square cells with 30-m sides and geophysical maps were produced at a scale of 1:5000. This report covers aspects of data acquisition and processing (Author)

  15. Design and study on the dual-band radome with FSS operation at Ku-/Ka-band%Ku/Ka波段双通带频率选择表面雷达罩设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀芝; 高劲松; 徐念喜

    2013-01-01

    In order to meet the multi-band and integration requirements of the communication apparatus, the coupling and resonance mecha-nism can be exploited to design a frequency selective surface (FSS), with two pass-bands at Ku-band and Ka-band, which is composed of three metallic layers and fabricated on a flat substrate equivalent to a solid wall radome or an A-sandwiched radome. According to the physical structure of the FSS, an equivalent circuit model is established to analyze the filtering mechanism, and the transmission characteristics of the radomes with FSS are obtained by using a full-wave analysis software. The first pass-band at Ku-band with miniaturization property can be achieved by coupling the electric and magnetic field of the three surfaces, while the second pass-band at Ka-band can be achieved by the resonance of the square loop slots embedded in the capacitive surfaces. The transmissions of the solid wall radome and A-sandwiched radome with FSS are 89%and 94.7%at Ku-band, and 88.2%and 93.7%at Ka-band, respectively. When the incident angle is varied from normal to 60◦, the frequency response characteristics of the two pass-bands are stable. Finally, the experimental results of the prototype with a solid substrate measured in free-space environment are in good agreement with the simulated values. The proposed radome structure with FSS, which is based on the coupling and resonance mechanism, can achieve two stable pass-bands at Ku-/Ka-band. This may provide some theoretical and experimental assistance for the study of the multi-band and wide band spacing FSS.%为了满足现代通信设备多频带及集成化要求,基于耦合机理和谐振机理,在实心半波壁雷达罩和A夹层雷达罩等效平板基底上设计了一种由容性表面(内嵌谐振单元)-感性表面-容性表面(内嵌谐振单元)-等效基底级联而成的Ku/Ka波段双通带频率选择表面结构.根据FSS的物理结构建立了等效电路模型,分析了滤波机

  16. Ka-BAND MICROSTRIP INTEGRATED LOCAL-OSCILLATOR-MIXER ASSEMBLY USED IN PROJECTILE SENSORS%用于抛掷敏感器的Ka-波段微带集成本振-混频组件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋金水; 李兴国; 吴文; 娄国伟

    2001-01-01

    A compact Ka-band microstrip integrated local-oscillator-mixer assembly used in projectile sensors was introduced. The overall configuration of microstrip circuit of this assembly was given. The functions of each component were described. The environment and reliability tests performed on this assembly were explored in detail, which include vibration, shock and temperature. The Ka-band local-oscillator-mixer assembly exhibits a 3.4~4.2-dB double side band (DSB) noise figure over a 2-GHz RF bandwidth. LO-to-RF isolation is greater than 27dB over the range of operating frequencies. The frequency stability of local oscillator with dielectric resonator used is less than 60ppm/℃.%介绍一种用于抛掷敏感器的结构紧凑的Ka-波段微带集成本振-混频组件,给出了该组件的微带电路结构,叙述了其中每一部件的功能.对该组件仔细做了环境和可靠性实验,其中包括震动,冲击和温度.在2GHz射频带宽内,该组件的双边带噪声系数是3.4~4.2dB,在其工作频带内本振到射频的隔离度大于27dB.由于使用了介质谐振器,本振的频率稳定度小于60ppm/℃.

  17. Airborne Field Campaign Results of Ka-band Precipitation Measuring Radar in China%我国Ka频段降水测量雷达机载校飞试验结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商建; 郭杨; 吴琼; 杨虎; 尹红刚

    2011-01-01

    2010年6-10月在天津与江苏地区开展了国内首次Ku/Ka频段星载降水测量雷达机载校飞试验.此次校飞试验获得了宝贵的机载雷达观测数据和地面、海面同步观测数据,目前已开展了外定标、数据对比与衰减订正等工作.该文给出了天津校飞试验中Ka频段降水测量雷达实测结果,对Ka频段降水测量雷达资料与天津地区S波段地基多普勒雷达资料进行了详细的对比分析,有利于更好地了解Ka频段降水测量雷达仪器本身的性能及其探测降水的能力;利用由GPS探空资料、地基多通道微波辐射计观测亮温结合微波辐射传输模式得到的雷达路径积分衰减量,对Ka频段降水测量雷达进行了衰减订正,为继续开展降水反演工作奠定了基础.%Spaceborne precipitation measuring radar can measure precipitation quantitatively, observe the vertical distribution and provide three dimensional precipitation structures. Spaceborne precipitation measuring radar is an important instrument on FY-3 meteorological satellite constellation. As a possible future member of the Global Precipitation Measurement(GPM) , this satellite will carry dual-frequency precipitation radar operating at Ku and Ka bands to provide scientific data for dual-frequency retrieval algorithm. Its two prototype devices, Ku-band and Ka-band radars have already been developed under the support of National Defense Science and Industry Bureau. Field campaign of Ku/Ka-band airborne precipitation measuring radar is carried out by National Satellite Meteorological Center of China Meteorological Administration combining several groups from June to October in 2010 in Tianjin and Jiangsu, called BH-RM 2010 and JS-RM 2010, respectively. This is the first time that China carries out airborne precipitation measuring radar field campaign. The purposes of this field campaign are to validate the correctness of internal and external calibration scheme under airborne

  18. Uncooled radiometric camera performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bill; Hoelter, T.

    1998-07-01

    Thermal imaging equipment utilizing microbolometer detectors operating at room temperature has found widespread acceptance in both military and commercial applications. Uncooled camera products are becoming effective solutions to applications currently using traditional, photonic infrared sensors. The reduced power consumption and decreased mechanical complexity offered by uncooled cameras have realized highly reliable, low-cost, hand-held instruments. Initially these instruments displayed only relative temperature differences which limited their usefulness in applications such as Thermography. Radiometrically calibrated microbolometer instruments are now available. The ExplorIR Thermography camera leverages the technology developed for Raytheon Systems Company's first production microbolometer imaging camera, the Sentinel. The ExplorIR camera has a demonstrated temperature measurement accuracy of 4 degrees Celsius or 4% of the measured value (whichever is greater) over scene temperatures ranges of minus 20 degrees Celsius to 300 degrees Celsius (minus 20 degrees Celsius to 900 degrees Celsius for extended range models) and camera environmental temperatures of minus 10 degrees Celsius to 40 degrees Celsius. Direct temperature measurement with high resolution video imaging creates some unique challenges when using uncooled detectors. A temperature controlled, field-of-view limiting aperture (cold shield) is not typically included in the small volume dewars used for uncooled detector packages. The lack of a field-of-view shield allows a significant amount of extraneous radiation from the dewar walls and lens body to affect the sensor operation. In addition, the transmission of the Germanium lens elements is a function of ambient temperature. The ExplorIR camera design compensates for these environmental effects while maintaining the accuracy and dynamic range required by today's predictive maintenance and condition monitoring markets.

  19. Radiometric force in dusty plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatov, A M

    2000-01-01

    A radiofrequency glow discharge plasma, which is polluted with a certain number of dusty grains, is studied. In addition to various dusty plasma phenomena, several specific colloidal effects should be considered. We focus on radiometric forces, which are caused by inhomogeneous temperature distribution. Aside from thermophoresis, the role of temperature distribution in dusty plasmas is an open question. It is shown that inhomogeneous heating of the grain by ion flows results in a new photophoresis like force, which is specific for dusty discharges. This radiometric force can be observable under conditions of recent microgravity experiments.

  20. RADIOMETRIC PROPERTIES OFAGRICULTURAL PERMEABLE COVERINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castellano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nets are commonly used for agricultural applications. However, only little is known about the radiometric properties of net types and how to influence them. In order to investigate the influence of net construction parameters on their radiometric properties, a set of radiometric tests were performed on 45 types of agricultural nets. Laboratory tests on large size net samples was performed using a large and a small integrating sphere. Open field radiometric test were carried out by means of an experimental set up (120x120x50 cm and a full scale shade house. Small differences (less than 5% occurred between laboratory and open field tests. Results highlighted that the porosity and the mesh size, combined with the colour and secondarily, with the fabric and the kind of threads of the net influenced the shading performance of the net. The colour influenced the spectral distribution of the radiation passing through the net absorbing its complementary colours. Since nets are three-dimensional structures the transmissivity of direct light under different angles of incident of solar radiation changes when installed in the warp or weft direction. Transmissivity could be considered one of the main parameters involved in the agronomic performances of the netting system.

  1. Ka频段陶瓷基板微带带通滤波器设计分析%Design of Ka-band Microstrip Bandpass Filter on Ceramic Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵飞; 党元兰; 王璇

    2012-01-01

    为满足微波电路小型化的发展要求,基于陶瓷基板设计了一款Ka频段的微带带通滤波器。分析了滤波器的电路设计原理及工艺设计方案,采用电路优化和三维全波仿真结合的方法对电路进行仿真。在优化后的版图基础上,通过改善膜层附着力、提高加工精度等方式对滤波器的加工进行控制。测试结果满足使用要求,证明了电路及工艺设计方案的正确性。%A Ka-band microstrip bandpass filter using ceramic substrate is designed to meet the requirement of microwave IC miniaturization.The circuit design principle and technology design scheme are analyzed.The circuit is simulated by combining the circuit optimization and 3D full-wave simulation.Based on the optimized layout,the processing of filter is controlled by improving the adhesion of the film and increasing the processing accuracy.The test result proves the validity of the microstrip bandpass filter and its design method.

  2. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  3. Statistical synthesis of multiantenna ultrawideband radiometric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosyuk, V. K.; Kravchenko, V. F.; Pavlikov, V. V.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    An optimum signal processing algorithm of radiometric imaging has been synthesized for the first time using multiantenna ultrawideband (UWB) radiometric complexes (RMCs). Radiometric images (RMI) are interpreted physically as intensity depending on the angular coordinates or the spectral radio brightness averaged in the operation frequency band. In accordance with the synthesized algorithm, a structural scheme of ultrawideband radiometric complexes has been developed. An analytical expression for the ambiguity function of radiometric complexes has been obtained. The ambiguity function is modeled in the case of processing narrowband and ultrawideband radiometric signals. As follows from the analysis of the results, new elements of the theory of optimum processing of UWB radiometric signals with the involvement of multielement antenna systems are an important tool in creating highly accurate, biologically and ecologically safe complexes for studying various media and objects.

  4. Ka波段DMTL移相器用RF MEMS电容式并联开关研制%Development of RF MEMS Capacitive Shunt Switch for Ka-Band DMTL Phase Shifter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高杨; 贾小慧; 秦燃; 官承秋

    2012-01-01

    A MEMS capacitive shunt switch for Ka-band 5-bit distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) phase shifter was presented in this paper.The structural dimensions of MEMS capacitive shunt switch were roughly defined by theoretical calculation and engineering experience.The 3D electromagnetic model of the switch was established,and the structural dimensions were optimized by using HFSS software.Simulation results show that the insertion loss of the switch was lower than 0.15 dB and the isolation loss was higher than 15 dB in Ka-band.The driving voltage of the switch was 2.1 V,which was obtained from the simulation of electromechanical coupling by using CoventorWare software.After several modifications of device layout and fabrication process according to the surface micro-machining process restriction of the foundry,preliminary MEMS capacitive shunt switch process sample was obtained.Dynamic characteristics of a single MEMS switch were tested.The results show that the height pulled down by microbridge was about 2 μm with 36 V driving voltage applied.There was a big difference between the tested driving voltage 36 V and the originally designed value 2.1 V,due to the temporary structural design modification according to the process restriction of the foundry.The modifications mainly involve increasing the microbridge height,and increasing the initial distance between the microbridge (top electrode) and the bottom electrode.%本文设计并制作了一种用于Ka波段分布式MEMS传输线(DMTL)移相器的MEMS电容式并联开关.通过理论计算和工程经验,大致定义了开关的结构尺寸.采用HFSS软件建立了开关的三维电磁场模型并优化了关键结构参数.仿真表明:开关在Ka波段插入损耗小于0.15 dB,回波损耗大于15 dB.采用CoventorWare软件进行了开关的机电耦合仿真,得出其驱动电压为2.1V.为了满足流片单位表面微加工工艺的约束,对开关的设计版图和微加工工艺进行了多轮改进,

  5. 一种Ka频段海上卫星通信抗雨衰编码方案%An anti-rain attenuation encoding solution for sea Ka-band satellite communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高化猛; 李智

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of rain attenuation in satellite communication and it's affection to Ka-band satellite communication are analyzed. CCSDS( 15,1/6)standard convolution code is recommended as channel code to anti-rain attenuation the performance of CCSDS( 15,1/6) standard convolution code is researched. The encoding efficiency is found by simulating encoding system in C translation environment. The decoding performance and encoding gain are found by simulating decoding system in BPSK modulation, ACWN channel, viterbi decoding algorithm. Simulation research demonstrates that the CCSDS (15, 1/6 ) standard convolution code is a good channel encoding solution for anti-rain attenuation in satellite communication on the sea because of high encoding velocity, high decoding performance and high encoding gain.%分析卫星通信雨衰现象的产生机制和对Ka频段卫星通信的影响,提出采用CCSDS标准卷积码作为抗雨衰编码方案.研究CCSDS(15,1/6)卷积码编译码性能:使用C语言编译环境,仿真CCSDS(15,1/6)编码系统,得出编码效率;使用二进制相移键控调制、加性高斯白噪声信道、维特比译码,仿真CCSDS(15,1/6)译码系统,得出译码性能和编码增益.仿真计算表明,CCSDS(15,1/6)具有编码速度快,译码性能好,编码增益高的特点,是一种好的海上卫星通信抗雨衰编码方案.

  6. Design of a Ka-band 10 W Adaptive RF Predistortion Linearization Power Amplifier%Ka频段10W自适应射频预失真线性化固态功放研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凯; 张科; 张能波

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic of radio frequency power amplifier ( RFPA) will change with the channel switching,environment temperature,working conditions and other factors. In order to guarantee the steady operation of the predistortion RFPA,the predistortion system with adaptive performance is very important. This paper proposes a detection method of adaptive feedback,and uses the multidirectional search algorithm to minimize the amplitude distortion and phase distortion of the RFPA′s output signal to optimize the pre-distortion system,to make the system operate in optimum state all the time. An adaptive RF predistortion linearization solid-state power amplifier operating at the Ka-band is developed. In 3 GHz operation fre-quency band,the three-order intermodulation of the developed RFPA is effectively enhanced to be better than -32 dBc at -40℃ ~ 60℃. The test results show that the power amplifier has the characteristics of wide operation frequency band and wide temperature adaptability.%射频功率放大器的特性会随信道切换、环境温度、工作状态等多种因素发生变化,为了保证功率放大器的优良工作特性,具有自适应性能的预失真系统就显得非常重要。提出了一种自适应反馈检测方法,以减小放大器输出信号的幅度失真和相位失真作为系统自适应的优化目标,采用多方向搜索优化算法对预失真系统进行优化调整,使系统始终处于最优工作状态。研制了工作于 Ka 频段10 W自适应射频预失真线性化固态功放原理样机,当工作温度为-40℃~+60℃时,在3 GHz的工作带宽内,三阶交调指标优于-32 dBc。测试结果表明该功放具有工作频带宽、温度适应性广等特点。

  7. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  8. Radiometric studies of Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, E E; Larson, S M; Tepper, B S; Wagner, H N

    1976-01-01

    The radiometric method has been applied for studying the metabolism of M. lepraemurium and the conditions which might force or inhibit its metabolic activity in vitro. These organisms assimilate and oxidize (U-14C) glycerol, and (U-14C) acetate, but are unable to oxidize (U-14C) glucose, (U-14C) pyruvate, (U-14C) glycine and 14C-formate. When incubated at 30 degrees C M. lepraemurium oxidizes (U-14C) acetate to 14CO2 faster than 37 degrees C. The smae effect was observed with increasing concentrations of polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), or the 14C-substrate. No change in metabolic rate was observed when the organisms were kept at -20 degrees C for 12 days. Although tried several times, it was not possible to demonstrate any "inhibitors" of bacterial metabolism in the reaction system. The radiometric method seems to be an important tool for studying metabolic pathways and the influence of physical and biochemical factors on the metabolism of M. lepraemurium in vitro.

  9. Radiometric studies of mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwaldo E. Camargo

    1987-02-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro assay system that included automated radiometric quantification of 14CO2 released as a result of oxidation of 14C- substrates was applied for studying the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis under various experimental conditions. These experiments included the study of a mtabolic pathways, b detection times for various inoculum sizes, c effect of filtration on reproducibility of results, d influence of stress environment e minimal inhibitory concentrations for isoniazid, streptomycin, ethambutol and rifampin, and f generation times of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. These organisms were found to metabolize 14C-for-mate, (U-14C acetate, (U-14C glycerol, (1-14C palmitic acid, 1-14C lauric acid, (U-14C L-malic acid, (U-14C D-glucose, and (U-14C D-glucose, but not (1-14C L-glucose, (U-14C glycine, or (U-14C pyruvate to 14CO2. By using either 14C-for-mate, (1-14C palmitic acid, or (1-14C lauric acid, 10(7 organisms/vial could be detected within 24 48 hours and as few as 10 organisms/vial within 16-20 days. Reproducible results could be obtained without filtering the bacterial suspension, provided that the organisms were grown in liquid 7H9 medium with 0.05% polysorbate 80 and homogenized prior to the study. Drugs that block protein synthesis were found to have lower minimal inhibitory concentrations with the radiometric method when compared to the conventional agar dilution method. The mean generation time obtained for M. bovis and different strains of M. tuberculosis with various substrates was 9 ± 1 hours.

  10. Optimal design of sampling and mapping schemes in the radiometric exploration of Chipilapa, El Salvador (Geo-statistics); Diseno optimo de esquemas de muestreo y mapeo en la exploracion radiometrica de Chipilapa, El Salvador (Geo-estadistica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M.; Flores R, J.H

    1992-01-15

    As part of the knowledge about the radiometric surface exploration, carried out in the geothermal field of Chipilapa, El Salvador, its were considered the geo-statistical parameters starting from the calculated variogram of the field data, being that the maxim distance of correlation of the samples in 'radon' in the different observation addresses (N-S, E-W, N W-S E, N E-S W), it was of 121 mts for the monitoring grill in future prospectus in the same area. Being derived of it an optimization (minimum cost) in the spacing of the field samples by means of geo-statistical techniques, without losing the detection of the anomaly. (Author)

  11. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation.

  12. Relative Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Castillo Sanz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A correct radiometric normalization between both images is fundamental for change detection. MAD method and its IR-MAD extension in an implementation on multisprectral aerial images is described in this paper

  13. Lansat MSS, Radiometric Processing Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Sebastien; Salgues, Germain; Gascon, Ferran; Biaasutti, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The reprocessing campaigns of Landsat European Space Agency (ESA) data archive have been initiated since 3 years [1]. As part of this project, the processing algorithms have been upgraded. This article focuses on the radiometric processing of historical data observed with the Multi Spectral Scanner (MSS) instruments on board Landsat 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.The Landsat MSS data have been recorded data from 1972 up to 1990. The MSS instruments have been designed with four visible bands covering the near / infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, allowing the spatial sampling of our Earth surface at 60 meter.The current calibration method has shown some limitations in case of data observed out of mid latitude areas, where the Earth surface is bright because of desert or snow. The resulting image data suffers from saturations and is not fit for the potential application purposes.Although, when saturation exist, further investigations have shown that the radiometry of the raw data involved in the production of the Level 1 images is generally correct. As consequences, experiments have been undertaken to adapt the current processing in order to produce image data saturation free products.

  14. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  15. Reduction of Radiometric Miscalibration—Applications to Pushbroom Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Roessner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework—Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME—considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data.

  16. RADIOMETRIC TECHNIQUES IN HEAVY MINERAL EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; TANCZOS, IC; STAPEL, C

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the Environmental Research Group of the KVI has been developing a number of radiometric techniques that may be employed in mineral sand exploration. These techniques involve: radiometric fingerprinting for assessing sand provenances and mineralogical composition; thermoluminescence

  17. RADIOMETRIC TECHNIQUES IN HEAVY MINERAL EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; TANCZOS, IC; STAPEL, C

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the Environmental Research Group of the KVI has been developing a number of radiometric techniques that may be employed in mineral sand exploration. These techniques involve: radiometric fingerprinting for assessing sand provenances and mineralogical composition; thermoluminescence f

  18. RADIOMETRIC NORMALIZATION OF LARGE AIRBORNE IMAGE DATA SETS ACQUIRED BY DIFFERENT SENSOR TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gehrke

    2016-06-01

    HxMap software. It has been successfully applied to large sets of heterogeneous imagery, including the adjustment of original sensor images prior to quality control and further processing as well as radiometric adjustment for ortho-image mosaic generation.

  19. Radiometric Receiver for Passive Microwave Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaichin Anton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new method to develop a zero-type W-band radiometric receiver. The block diagram and operating algorithm of the digital control system are presented. The main advantages of the zero method in passive radio physical investigations in comparison with classical engineering solutions are shown.

  20. Radiometric Correction of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Biday,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Repeated observation of a given area over time yields potential for many forms of change detection analysis. These repeated observations are confounded in terms of radiometric consistency due to changes in sensor calibration over time, differences in illumination, observation angles and variation in atmospheric effects. Also major problem with satellite images is that regions below clouds are not covered by sensor. Cloud detection, removal and data prediction in cloudy region is essential for image interpretation. Approach: This study demonstrated applicability of empirical relative radiometric normalization methods to a set of multitemporal cloudy images acquired by Resourcesat-1 LISS III sensor. Objective of this study was to detect and remove cloud cover and normalize an image radiometrically. Cloud detection was achieved by using Average Brightness Threshold (ABT algorithm. The detected cloud removed and replaced with data from another images of the same area. We proposed a new method in which cloudy pixels are replaced with predicted pixel values obtained by regression. After cloud removal, the proposed normalization method was applied to reduce the radiometric influence caused by non surface factors. This process identified landscape elements whose reflectance values are nearly constant over time, i.e., the subset of non-changing pixels are identified using frequency based correlation technique. Further, we proposed another method of radiometric correction in frequency domain, Pseudo-Invariant Feature regression and this process removed landscape elements such as vegetation whose reflectance values are not constant over time. It takes advantage of vegetation being typically high frequency area, can be removed by low pass filter. Results: The quality of radiometric normalization is statistically assessed by R2 value and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE between each pair of analogous band. Further we verified that difference

  1. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Y. Han; Jin, X.; Y. Chen; D. A. Tremblay

    2015-01-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly com...

  2. GEOMETRIC AND RADIOMETRIC EVALUATION OF RASAT IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space Technologies Research Institute (Ankara. RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD and RGB (15 m GSD bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  3. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  4. The radiometric characteristics of KOMPSAT-3A by using reference radiometric tarps and ground measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jong-Min

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we performed the vicarious radiometric calibration of KOMPSAT-3A multispectral bands by using 6S radiative transfer model, radiometric tarps, MFRSR measurements. Furthermore, to prepare the accurate input parameter, we also did experiment work to measure the BRDF of radiometric tarps based on hyperspectral gonioradiometer to compensate the observation geometry difference between satellite and ASD Fieldspec 3. Also, we measured point spread function (PSF) by using the bright star and corrected multispectral bands based on the Wiener filter. For accurate atmospheric constituent effects such as aerosol optical depth, column water, and total ozone, we used MFRSR instrument and estimated related optical depth of each gases. Based on input parameters for 6S radiative transfer model, we simulated top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance by observed by KOMPSAT-3A and matched-up the digital number. Consequently, DN to radiance coefficients was determined based on aforementioned methods and showed reasonable statistics results.

  5. INTRABAND RADIOMETRIC PERFORMANCE OF THE LANDSAT 4 THEMATIC MAPPER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Eliason, Eric M.; Chavez, Pat S.; ,

    1985-01-01

    This preliminary report examines those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data. Analysis is based largely on radiometrically raw (B type) data of three daytime and two nighttime scenes; in most scenes, a set of 512 lines were examined on an individual-detector basis. Subscenes selected for uniform-radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems.

  6. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  7. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors’ radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors’ application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data. PMID:28117745

  8. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  9. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric calibration status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S.; Helder, Dennis L.; Hook, Simon J.; Schott, John R.; Haque, Md. Obaidul

    2016-09-01

    Now in its 17th year of operation, the Enhanced Thematic Mapper + (ETM+), on board the Landsat-7 satellite, continues to systematically acquire imagery of the Earth to add to the 40+ year archive of Landsat data. Characterization of the ETM+ on-orbit radiometric performance has been on-going since its launch in 1999. The radiometric calibration of the reflective bands is still monitored using on-board calibration devices, though the Pseudo-Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS) method has proven to be an effective tool as well. The calibration gains were updated in April 2013 based primarily on PICS results, which corrected for a change of as much as -0.2%/year degradation in the worst case bands. A new comparison with the SADE database of PICS results indicates no additional degradation in the updated calibration. PICS data are still being tracked though the recent trends are not well understood. The thermal band calibration was updated last in October 2013 based on a continued calibration effort by NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab and Rochester Institute of Technology. The update accounted for a 0.036 W/m2 sr μm or 0.26K at 300K bias error. The updated lifetime trend is now stable to within +/- 0.4K.

  10. The Influence of Colour on Radiometric Performances of Agricultural Nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellano, S.; Hemming, S.; Russo, G.

    2008-01-01

    The whole construction parameters of the net, combined with the shape of the structure, the position of the sun and the sky conditions affect the radiometric performance of the permeable covering system. The radiometric properties of the permeable membrane influence the quality of the agricultural p

  11. The Influence of Colour on Radiometric Performances of Agricultural Nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellano, S.; Hemming, S.; Russo, G.

    2008-01-01

    The whole construction parameters of the net, combined with the shape of the structure, the position of the sun and the sky conditions affect the radiometric performance of the permeable covering system. The radiometric properties of the permeable membrane influence the quality of the agricultural

  12. Coherent resonant Ka-band photonic microwave receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Seidel, David; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute

    2008-01-01

    We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally a coherent microwave photonic receiver operating at 35 GHz carrier frequency. The device is based on a lithium niobate or lithium tantalate optical whispering gallery mode resonator coupled to a microwave strip line resonator. Microwave local oscillator is fed into the microwave resonator along with the microwave signal. We show that the sensitivity of this receiver significantly exceeds the sensitivity of the incoherent quadratic receiver based on the same technology. The coherent receiver can possess a dynamic range in excess of 100 dB in 5 MHz band if a low noise laser is utilized.

  13. Weather Forecasting for Ka-band Operations: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Wu, L.; Slobin, S.

    2016-08-01

    As lower frequency bands (e.g., 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz) have become oversubscribed during the past several decades, NASA has become interested in using higher frequency bands (e.g., 26 GHz and 32 GHz) for telemetry, thus making use of the available wider bandwidth. However, these bands are more susceptible to atmospheric degradation. Currently, flight projects tend to be conservative in preparing their communications links by using worst-case or conservative assumptions. Such assumptions result in nonoptimum data return. We explore the use of weather forecasting for Goldstone and Madrid for different weather condition scenarios to determine more optimal values of atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature for use in telecommunication link design. We find that the use of weather forecasting can provide up to 2 dB or more of increased data return when more favorable conditions are forecast. Future plans involve further developing the technique for operational scenarios with interested flight projects.

  14. High-Power Ka-Band Window and Resonant Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-11-29

    A stand-alone 200 MW rf test station is needed for carrying out development of accelerator structures and components for a future high-gradient multi-TeV collider, such as CLIC. A high-power rf window is needed to isolate the test station from a structure element under test. This project aimed to develop such a window for use at a frequency in the range 30-35 GHz, and to also develop a high-power resonant ring for testing the window. During Phase I, successful conceptual designs were completed for the window and the resonant ring, and cold tests of each were carried out that confirmed the designs.

  15. Miniature Ka-band Automated Swath Mapper (KASM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal discusses the development and demonstration of a swath-based airborne instrument suite intended as a calibration and validation with relevance to the...

  16. Frequency-Agile Monolithic Ka-Band Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    Watts, (v) low power consumption in the device and control circuit, (vi) fast switching speed, and (vii) temperature stability. The Phase II...nGimat 5. FABRICATION/TESTING nGimat/GT 6. OPTIMIZE FERRITE FILMS nGimat 7. FERRITE FILTERS nGimat/GT 8...Optimize Ferrite Films 60% 7. Ferrite Filters 35% 8. Prototyping 90% 9. Scale-up 80% 10. Customer Relations 70% 11. Report 100%

  17. Technology Issues for Mobile Ka-band Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satorius, E.; Jedrey, T.; Davarian, F.; Divsalar, D.

    1993-01-01

    The key to success of any future telecommunications System is its ability to provide many users with a diversity of services in a cost-effective manner. An important consideration is system capacity which is requred to suport a large pool of users and their varied demands.

  18. GIFTS SM EDU Radiometric and Spectral Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J.; Reisse, R. a.; Johnson, D. G.; Gazarik, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Sensor Module (SM) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is a high resolution spectral imager designed to measure infrared (IR) radiance using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The GIFTS instrument gathers measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. This paper describes the processing algorithms involved in the calibration. The calibration procedures can be subdivided into three categories: the pre-calibration stage, the calibration stage, and finally, the post-calibration stage. Detailed derivations for each stage are presented in this paper.

  19. Ka-Band Reliability Improvement. Part I. Volume III. Ka-Band SATCOM Set Analysis. Appendix C

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    SECURIT L S1 ICATION OF THIS PAGE flWbon flati Frtir-d NO ADDRESS ( IBFORE COLEING FRORMTTS 2. OW ACIESIOr REA E WO’S CAT MBER IS DISTA RII BITA T Y...wYwI 4 - # .1. z I op W 1 0 . . . ..a, I 𔃾*1 4l I c, . 4g c co n . ......... %%C C CoCs. 4 3’. 1 .I4 ." . . . ., 11 *1 Ir %, I -’ulx - I. . .,Z. 4 1. r

  20. Reduction of Striping Noise in Overlapping LIDAR Intensity Data by Radiometric Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Shaker, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    To serve seamless mapping, airborne LiDAR data are usually collected with multiple parallel strips with one or two cross strip(s). Nevertheless, the overlapping regions of LiDAR data strips are usually found with unbalanced intensity values, resulting in the appearance of stripping noise. Despite that physical intensity correction methods are recently proposed, some of the system and environmental parameters are assumed as constant or not disclosed, leading to such an intensity discrepancy. This paper presents a new normalization technique to adjust the radiometric misalignment found in the overlapping LiDAR data strips. The normalization technique is built upon a second-order polynomial function fitted on the joint histogram plot, which is generated with a set of pairwise closest data points identified within the overlapping region. The method was tested on Teledyne Optech's Gemini dataset (at 1064 nm wavelength), where the LiDAR intensity data were first radiometrically corrected based on the radar (range) equation. Five land cover features were selected to evaluate the coefficient of variation (cv) of the intensity values before and after implementing the proposed method. Reduction of cv was found by 19% to 59% in the Gemini dataset, where the striping noise was significantly reduced in the radiometrically corrected and normalized intensity data. The Gemini dataset was also used to conduct land cover classification, and the overall accuracy yielded a notable improvement of 9% to 18%. As a result, LiDAR intensity data should be pre-processed with radiometric correction and normalization prior to any data manipulation.

  1. Improved Absolute Radiometric Calibration of a UHF Airborne Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Elaine; Hawkins, Brian P.; Harcke, Leif; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling; Michel, Thierry R.; Moreira, Laila; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Shimada, Joanne G.; Tham, Kean W.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The AirMOSS airborne SAR operates at UHF and produces fully polarimetric imagery. The AirMOSS radar data are used to produce Root Zone Soil Moisture (RZSM) depth profiles. The absolute radiometric accuracy of the imagery, ideally of better than 0.5 dB, is key to retrieving RZSM, especially in wet soils where the backscatter as a function of soil moisture function tends to flatten out. In this paper we assess the absolute radiometric uncertainty in previously delivered data, describe a method to utilize Built In Test (BIT) data to improve the radiometric calibration, and evaluate the improvement from applying the method.

  2. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter has...

  3. Spectral and Radiometric Calibration using Tunable Lasers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —  SIRCUS-based calibration relies on a set of monitoring radiometers and tunable laser sources to provide an absolute radiometric calibration that can approach...

  4. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Radiometric Measurement Lian Shen Department of Mechanical Engineering & St. Anthony Falls Laboratory University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. The Radiometric Bode's Law and Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Lazio, T J W; Dietrick, J; Greenlees, E; Hogan, E; Jones, C; Hennig, L A

    2004-01-01

    We predict the radio flux densities of the extrasolar planets in the current census, making use of an empirical relation--the radiometric Bode's Law--determined from the five ``magnetic'' planets in the solar system (Earth and the four gas giants). Radio emission from these planets results from solar-wind powered electron currents depositing energy in the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10--1000 MHz and, under favorable circumstances, have typical flux densities as large as 1 mJy. We also describe an initial, systematic effort to search for radio emission in low radio frequency images acquired with the Very Large Array. The limits set by the VLA images (~ 300 mJy) are consistent with, but do not provide strong constraints on, the predictions of the model. Future radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), should be able to detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits ...

  6. Radiometric dating of the Siloam Tunnel, Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Amos; Shimron, Aryeh; Rosenbaum, Jeff

    2003-09-11

    The historical credibility of texts from the Bible is often debated when compared with Iron Age archaeological finds (refs. 1, 2 and references therein). Modern scientific methods may, in principle, be used to independently date structures that seem to be mentioned in the biblical text, to evaluate its historical authenticity. In reality, however, this approach is extremely difficult because of poor archaeological preservation, uncertainty in identification, scarcity of datable materials, and restricted scientific access into well-identified worship sites. Because of these problems, no well-identified Biblical structure has been radiometrically dated until now. Here we report radiocarbon and U-Th dating of the Siloam Tunnel, proving its Iron Age II date; we conclude that the Biblical text presents an accurate historic record of the Siloam Tunnel's construction. Being one of the longest ancient water tunnels lacking intermediate shafts, dating the Siloam Tunnel is a key to determining where and when this technological breakthrough took place. Siloam Tunnel dating also refutes a claim that the tunnel was constructed in the second century bc.

  7. The importance of geoprocessing tools in radiometric monitoring of large areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Danila Carrijo da Silva [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas; Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da; Alberti, Heber Luiz Caponi; Guerrero, Eder Tadeu Zenun, E-mail: ncsilva@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: heber@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: edertzg@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    Throughout history, the natural tendency of men to physically characterize their different surroundings has played an important role on the evolution of societies. Today, that tendency combined to the development of computer technologies, has allowed the accelerated growth of the Geographical Information Systems, which permits the analysis and manipulation of spatial data from diverse sources, producing geo referenced databases. The gamma radiation, one of the main contributors of human exposure to natural radiation, is known for its high penetration energy. Today, the environmental gamma radiation is measured through radiometric tracking mobile units, allowing large scale samplings and precise assessments. As a geo processing case study, a radiometric monitoring work was conducted in the town of Aguas da Prata-SP using a tracking mobile system, composed by a scintillator detector, a GPS and a computer, all installed in a vehicle. The data made of collected points and their respective doses and geographical references were captured and stored in a computer software and then inserted and treated in a GIS environment. After a cartographic base was created using a digitalized map of Aguas da Prata, the sampled points were plotted and interpolated with the cartographic base, producing two maps that demonstrate the tracking route and the gamma radiation dose range throughout the monitored area. Geo processing tools have shown great efficiency in this study, allowing agile manipulation and management of a large quantity of data, thus promoting a spatial analysis of natural radiation levels in the studied region. (author)

  8. RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Briese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS is a widely used technique for the sampling of the earth's surface. Nowadays a wide range of ALS sensor systems with different technical specifications can be found. One parameter is the laser wavelength which leads to a sensitivity for the wavelength dependent backscatter characteristic of sensed surfaces. Current ALS sensors usually record next to the geometric information additional information on the recorded signal strength of each echo. In order to utilize this information for the study of the backscatter characteristic of the sensed surface, radiometric calibration is essential. This paper focuses on the radiometric calibration of multi-wavelength ALS data and is based on previous work on the topic of radiometric calibration of monochromatic (single-wavelength ALS data. After a short introduction the theory and whole workflow for calibrating ALS data radiometrically based on in-situ reference surfaces is presented. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that this approach for the monochromatic calibration can be used for each channel of multi-wavelength ALS data. The resulting active multi-channel radiometric image does not have any shadows and from a geometric viewpoint the position of the objects on top of the terrain surface is not altered (the result is a multi-channel true orthophoto. Within this paper the approach is demonstrated by three different single-wavelength ALS data acquisition campaigns (532nm, 1064nm and 1550nm covering the area of the city Horn (Austria. The results and practical issues are discussed.

  9. Outdoor relative radiometric calibration method using gray scale targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; YiNi; YAN; Lei; YANG; Bin; JING; Xin; CHEN; Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiometric calibration of remote sensors is a basis and prerequisite of information quantification in remote sensing. This paper proposes a method for outdoor relative radiometric calibration using gray scale targets. In this method, the idea of two substitutions is adopted. Sunlight is used to replace the integrating sphere light source, and gray scale targets are used to re-place the diffuser. In this way, images at different radiance levels obtained outdoors can calculate the relative radiometric cali-bration coefficients using the least square method. The characteristics of this method are as follows. Firstly, compared with la-boratory calibration, it greatly reduces the complexity of the calibration method and the test cost. Secondly, compared with the existing outdoor relative radiometric calibration of a single radiance level, it uses test images of different radiance levels to re-duce errors. Thirdly, it is easy to operate with fewer environmental requirements, has obvious advantages in the rapid calibra-tion of airborne remote sensors before or after flight and is practical in engineering. This paper theoretically and experimental-ly proves the feasibility of this method. Calibration experiments were conducted on the wide-view multispectral imager (WVMI) using this method, and the precision of this method was evaluated by analyzing the corrected images of large uniform targets on ground. The experiment results have demonstrated that the new method is effective and its precision meets the re-quirement of the absolute radiometric calibration.

  10. Radiometric Study of Soil Profiles in the Infrared Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, T. V.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of radiometric survey of soil profiles in the infrared range for the analysis of soil physical properties was studied. Radiometric data were obtained for different dates of the growing season for a number of soil profiles. The specificity of temperature profiles of texture-differentiated soils (Luvisols and Retisols) as related to weather conditions of the growing season was examined. The correlation analysis showed a close relationship between the air and surface soil temperatures and between the radiometric and thermodynamic soil temperatures in the upper 10 cm. In the studied profiles, the gradient of radiometric temperatures reached 0.5-0.8°C/cm in the humus horizons and sharply decreased at the depth of more than 15-20 cm. The gradient analysis of radiometric images made it possible to outline the boundaries of soil horizons. For the texture-differentiated soils, the most distinct boundaries were established between the gray-humus AY horizon and the underlying eluvial EL horizon in podzolic soils and between the AY horizon and the underlying humus-eluvial AEL horizon in gray soils.

  11. Radiometric rectification - Toward a common radiometric response among multidate, multisensor images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. G.; Strebel, D. E.; Nickeson, J. E.; Goetz, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for relating scene digital counts among several images of the same scene by identifying radiometric control sets with mean reflectances that are basically constant. The average digital-count values of the control sets are utilized to compute linear transforms that relate digital count values between images. Two Landsat TM images are studied by means of the technique using simulations of a wide range of atmospheric conditions. In the visible and near-IR bands the algorithm effectively adjusts the surface reflectance for the effects of relative atmospheric differences to within 1 percent. The proposed method is found to be an effective relative correction procedure that can be used when atmospheric optical-depth data and calibration coefficients are not available.

  12. Radiometric model for the stereo camera STC onboard the BepiColombo ESA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Deppo, Vania; Martellato, Elena; Simioni, Emanuele; Naletto, Giampiero; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2016-08-01

    The STereoscopic imaging Channel (STC) is one of the instruments on-board the BepiColombo mission, which is an ESA/JAXA Cornerstone mission dedicated to the investigation of the Mercury planet. STC is part of the Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory SYStem (SIMBIO-SYS) suite. STC main scientific objective is the 3D global mapping of the entire surface of Mercury with a mean scale factor of 55 m per pixel at periherm. To determine the design requirements and to model the on-ground and in-flight performance of STC, a radiometric model has been developed. In particular, STC optical characteristics have been used to define the instrument response function. As input for the model, different sources can be taken into account depending on the applications, i.e. to simulate the in-flight or on-ground performances. Mercury expected radiance, the measured Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) integrating sphere radiance, or calibrated stellar fluxes can be considered. Primary outputs of the model are the expected signal per pixel expressed in function of the integration time and its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These outputs allow then to calculate the most appropriate integration times to be used during the different phases of the mission; in particular for the images taken during the calibration campaign on-ground and for the in-flight ones, i.e. surface imaging along the orbit around Mercury and stellar calibration acquisitions. This paper describes the radiometric model structure philosophy, the input and output parameters and presents the radiometric model derived for STC. The predictions of the model will be compared with some measurements obtained during the Flight Model (FM) ground calibration campaign. The results show that the model is valid, in fact the foreseen simulated values are in good agreement with the real measured ones.

  13. Radiometric Methods for Rapid Diagnosis of Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    6/ NL IL 1-2 1-N6 U..V. -- V-- 1** ’~r I Ii’sW - -Kw RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR RAPID DIAGNOSIS OF VIRAL INFECTION o Annual Report Min-Fu Tsan, M.D...REPORT DATE Command November 22, 1976 *U. S.. Army Medical Research and Development/ 13 NUMBER OF P!AGES Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD1 21701,5012 21...by black number) , Radiometric methods Virus r; fV 20. AISSY fRACT (Continue on, reverse sie it nwc. urr and ldvntity by block nuaibe,) -Vrtwo

  14. Influence of Lossy Compressed DEM on Radiometric Correction for Land Cover Classification of Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, G.; Pesquer, L.; Blanes, I.; Serra-Sagristà, J.; Pons, X.

    2012-12-01

    delimiting coastline, avoiding the confusion between elevation and no-data values. Six (from March 2005 to May 2007) geometrically corrected Landsat-5 images on the path-row 197-031 have been used. The six optical bands and the NDVI for each date have been introduced in a powerful hybrid classification process. The training areas and the ground truth have been obtained from the Mapa de Cobertes del Sòl de Catalunya (v. 3), a land cover map created by photointerpretation of 0.5 m orthophotomaps acquired between 2005 and 2007 and covering all the extension of Catalonia. The legend has been reduced from 233 categories to 21. Preliminary results have shown that the effect on land cover classification of applying lossy compression to the DEM used in the radiometric correction is small (lower than 1%) even for compression ratios up to 200:1. Comparing classification performance after a compression of 5:1 and and a compression of 200:1 with both coding standards showed that: a) the percentage of correctly classified image was 73%; b) 20% was wrongly classified; c) 3.5% was wrongly classified at compression ratio 5:1; and d) also 3.5% was wrongly classified at compression ratio 200:1. These results are the first in the literature to analyze the effect of DEM lossy compressing when DEM are employed for radiometric correction.

  15. Radiometric estimation of water vapor content over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Maiti, M.; Sett, S.; Angelis, C. F.; Machado, L. A. T.

    2011-11-01

    A multi-channel microwave radiometre (make: Radiometrics Corporation) is installed at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, Brazil (22°S). The radiometric output of two channels of the radiometer in the form of brightness temperature at 23.834 GHz and 30 GHz, initially, were used to find out the ambient water vapor content and the non-precipitable cloud liquid water content. The necessary algorithm was developed for the purpose. The best results were obtained using the hinge frequency 23.834 GHz and 30 GHz pair having an r.m.s. error of only 2.64. The same methodology was then adopted exploiting 23.034 GHz and 30 GHz pair. In that case the r.m.s. error was 3.42. These results were then compared with those obtained over Kolkata (22°N), India, by using 22.234 GHz and 31.4 GHz radiometric data. This work conclusively suggests the use of a frequency should not be at the water vapor resonance line. Instead, while measuring the vapor content for separation of vapor and cloud liquid, one of them should be a few GHz left or right from the resonance line i.e., at 23.834 GHz and the other one should be around 30 GHz.

  16. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Bøgh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne;

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combi...

  17. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Albert van der

    1987-01-01

    De Engelse titel van dit proegschrift \\"Radiometric Dating by Alpha Spectometry on Uranium Series Nuclides\\" kan in het Nederlands wellicht het best worden weergegeven door \\"ouderdomsdbepalingen door stralingsmeting aan kernen uit de uraniumreeks met behulp van alfaspectometrie\\". In dit laatste ho

  18. Results of radiometric ash-content measurements at the Dudar coal mine, Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csoti, T. (Veszpremi Szenbanyak Dudari Banyauezeme, Dudar (Hungary))

    1983-12-01

    The regression analysis of the results of calorimetric and radiometric ash-content measurements of 1239 coal samples have shown that the calorific values which cannot be measured easily with traditional means can be approximated reasonably from the more easily measured radiometric data. The introduction of the radiometric measurements can be recommended for coal deposits. 6 refs.

  19. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza G. Kashani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR systems also record “intensity”, loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of “normalization”, “correction”, or “calibration” techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration.

  20. The Glacier and Ice Sheet Topography Interferometer: An Update on a Unique Sensor for High Accuracy Swath Mapping of Land Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Heavey, B.; Hensley, S.; Hodges, R.; Rengarajan, S.; Rignot, E.; Sadowy, G.; Simard, M.; Zawadzki, M.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss the innovative concept and technology development of a Ka-band (35 GHz) radar for mapping the surface topography of glaciers and ice sheets. The "Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer" (GLISTIN) is a single-pass, single platform interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) with an 8mm wavelength, which minimizes snow penetration yet remains relatively impervious to atmospheric attenuation. Such a system has the potential for delivering topographic maps at high spatial resolution, high vertical accuracy, independent of cloud cover, with a subseasonal update and would greatly enhance current observational and modeling capabilities of ice mass-balance and glacial retreat. To enable such measurements, a digitally beamformed antenna array is utilized to provide a wide measurement swath at a technologically feasible transmit power. To prove this concept and advance the technology readiness of this design we are currently funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to build and test a 1m x 1m digitally-beamformed (DBF) Ka-band slotted waveguide antenna with integrated digital receivers. This antenna provides 16 simultaneous receive beams, effectively broadening the swath without reducing receive antenna gain. The implementation of such a large aperture at Ka-band presents many design, manufacturing and calibration challenges which are addressed as part of this IIP. The integrated DBF array will be fielded at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's antenna range to demonstrate the overall calibration, beamforming and interferometric performance through creation of topographic imagery of the local Arroyo Seco. Currently entering the third year of the program, we will overview the system concept, array implementation and status of the technology. While the IIP addresses the development of the major technology challenges, an additional effort will demonstrate the phenomenology of the measurement by

  1. Application of a scattered-light radiometric power meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, James N; DiComo, Gregory P; Ting, Antonio C; Fischer, Richard P

    2011-04-01

    The power measurement of high-power continuous-wave laser beams typically calls for the use of water-cooled thermopile power meters. Large thermopile meters have slow response times that can prove insufficient to conduct certain tests, such as determining the influence of atmospheric turbulence on transmitted beam power. To achieve faster response times, we calibrated a digital camera to measure the power level as the optical beam is projected onto a white surface. This scattered-light radiometric power meter saves the expense of purchasing a large area power meter and the required water cooling. In addition, the system can report the power distribution, changes in the position, and the spot size of the beam. This paper presents the theory of the scattered-light radiometric power meter and demonstrates its use during a field test at a 2.2 km optical range. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Radiometric microbiologic assay for the biologically active forms of niacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertcher, J.A.; Guilarte, T.R.; Chen, M.F.; Rider, A.A.; McIntyre, P.A.

    1979-05-01

    A radiometric microbiologic assay has been developed for the determination of niacin in biologic fluids. Lactobacillus plantarum produced /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(U-/sup 14/C) malic acid in quantities proportional to the amount of niacin present. The assay is specific for the biologically active forms of niacin in humans. Thirty normal hemolysates were analyzed and the values ranged from 13.0 to 17.8 ..mu..g niacin/ml RBC (mean = 15.27 +- 1.33 s.d.). Good recovery and reproducibility studies were obtained with this assay. On thirty blood samples, correlation was excellent between the radiometric and the conventional turbidimetric assays.

  3. SLC-off Landsat-7 ETM+ reflective band radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Thome, K.J.; Barker, J.L.; Scaramuzza, P.L.; Helder, D.L.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Since May 31, 2003, when the scan line corrector (SLC) on the Landsat-7 ETM+ failed, the primary foci of Landsat-7 ETM+ analyses have been on understanding and attempting to fix the problem and later on developing composited products to mitigate the problem. In the meantime, the Image Assessment System personnel and vicarious calibration teams have continued to monitor the radiometric performance of the ETM+ reflective bands. The SLC failure produced no measurable change in the radiometric calibration of the ETM+ bands. No trends in the calibration are definitively present over the mission lifetime, and, if present, are less than 0.5% per year. Detector 12 in Band 7 dropped about 0.5% in response relative to the rest of the detectors in the band in May 2004 and recovered back to within 0.1% of its initial relative gain in October 2004.

  4. The OLI Radiometric Scale Realization Round Robin Measurement Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutlip, Hansford; Cole,Jerold; Johnson, B. Carol; Maxwell, Stephen; Markham, Brian; Ong, Lawrence; Hom, Milton; Biggar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A round robin radiometric scale realization was performed at the Ball Aerospace Radiometric Calibration Laboratory in January/February 2011 in support of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Program. Participants included Ball Aerospace, NIST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and the University of Arizona. The eight day campaign included multiple observations of three integrating sphere sources by nine radiometers. The objective of the campaign was to validate the radiance calibration uncertainty ascribed to the integrating sphere used to calibrate the OLI instrument. The instrument level calibration source uncertainty was validated by quatnifying: (1) the long term stability of the NIST calibrated radiance artifact, (2) the responsivity scale of the Ball Aerospace transfer radiometer and (3) the operational characteristics of the large integrating sphere.

  5. Development and calibration of UV/VUV radiometric sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    A program exists at NIST to calibrate radiometric sources for the spectral range from 118-350 nm. These include deuterium lamps, hollow-cathode lamps, RF-excited dimer lamps, and wall-stabilized argon arcs. Sources have been calibrated for and used by researchers in solar physics, astrophysics, atmospheric physics (ozone measurements), magnetically controlled fusion, and photobiology. The argon arcs were developed in our laboratory, and provide intense sources of both radiance and irradiance. Calibrations are performed relative to two primary sources, a wall-stabilized hydrogen arc and a 12,000 K black-body line arc, both developed in our laboratory. Also we recently have begun periodic calibrations on the NIST storage ring, SURF II, to insure consistency between our respective radiometric bases. Various sources have been calibrated for space' applications, including several which are flyable. Also, some development and testing of radiometers for semiconductor lithography were recently carried out with an intense argon arc source.

  6. Radiometric Methods for Rapid Diagnosis of Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    4, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection, infection time beginning when the 14C-labeled medium was added. Nucleic acid sT, thesis system. Stationary...coccus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter caloaceticus var. anitratus) had no effect on the DNA synthesis of HSV-1 infected or...7 UNCLASS 41 RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR RAPID DIAGNIS F VIRA ~ /fl INFECTION (U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MDUNC . IFEDH N WAG ER FT AL. NOV 75

  7. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-31

    2. REPORT DATE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...WORK UNIT NUMBER 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 31-03-2015...Final March 2013 -- February 2015 Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements N00014-13-1-0352 Yue, Dick K.P

  8. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Wijk, Albert van der

    1987-01-01

    De Engelse titel van dit proegschrift \\"Radiometric Dating by Alpha Spectometry on Uranium Series Nuclides\\" kan in het Nederlands wellicht het best worden weergegeven door \\"ouderdomsdbepalingen door stralingsmeting aan kernen uit de uraniumreeks met behulp van alfaspectometrie\\". In dit laatste hoofdstuk wil ik proberen om op beknopte, ook voor de niet gespecialiseerde lezer, de inhoud en achtergrond van het onderzoek samen te vatten. Aan het eind van de vorige eeuw werd het verschijnsel ra...

  9. The Radiometric Bode’s law and Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    THE RADIOMETRIC BODE’S LAW AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS T. Joseph, W. Lazio Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375-5351; joseph.lazio...the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10–1000 MHz and, under favorable...detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits on their radio emission. Planets with masses much lower than those in the current census

  10. Novel techniques for the analysis of the TOA radiometric uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorroño, Javier; Banks, Andrew; Gascon, Ferran; Fox, Nigel P.; Underwood, Craig I.

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of the European Copernicus programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the Sentinel-2 (S2) Earth Observation (EO) mission which provides optical high spatial -resolution imagery over land and coastal areas. As part of this mission, a tool (named S2-RUT, from Sentinel-2 Radiometric Uncertainty Tool) estimates the radiometric uncertainties associated to each pixel using as input the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance factor images provided by ESA. The initial version of the tool has been implemented — code and user guide available1 — and integrated as part of the Sentinel Toolbox. The tool required the study of several radiometric uncertainty sources as well as the calculation and validation of the combined standard uncertainty in order to estimate the TOA reflectance factor uncertainty per pixel. Here we describe the recent research in order to accommodate novel uncertainty contributions to the TOA reflectance uncertainty estimates in future versions of the tool. The two contributions that we explore are the radiometric impact of the spectral knowledge and the uncertainty propagation of the resampling associated to the orthorectification process. The former is produced by the uncertainty associated to the spectral calibration as well as the spectral variations across the instrument focal plane and the instrument degradation. The latter results of the focal plane image propagation into the provided orthoimage. The uncertainty propagation depends on the radiance levels on the pixel neighbourhood and the pixel correlation in the temporal and spatial dimensions. Special effort has been made studying non-stable scenarios and the comparison with different interpolation methods.

  11. A Radiometric Uncertainty Tool for the Sentinel 2 Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gorroño

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the European Copernicus programme, the European Space Agency (ESA has launched the Sentinel-2 (S2 Earth Observation (EO mission which provides optical high spatial resolution imagery over land and coastal areas. As part of this mission, a tool (named S2-RUT, from Sentinel-2 Radiometric Uncertainty Tool has been developed. The tool estimates the radiometric uncertainty associated with each pixel in the top-of-atmosphere (TOA reflectance factor images provided by ESA. This paper describes the design and development process of the initial version of the S2-RUT tool. The initial design step describes the S2 radiometric model where a set of uncertainty contributors are identified. Each of the uncertainty contributors is specified by reviewing the pre- and post-launch characterisation. The identified uncertainty contributors are combined following the guidelines in the ‘Guide to Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement’ (GUM model and this combination model is further validated by comparing the results to a multivariate Monte Carlo Method (MCM. In addition, the correlation between the different uncertainty contributions and the impact of simplifications in the combination model have been studied. The software design of the tool prioritises an efficient strategy to read the TOA reflectance factor images, extract the auxiliary information from the metadata in the satellite products and the codification of the resulting uncertainty image. This initial version of the tool has been implemented and integrated as part of the Sentinels Application Platform (SNAP.

  12. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, Antonio [Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Paiva, Isabel, E-mail: ipaiva@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Trindade, Romao [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Santos, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in

  13. Gravity, magnetic, and radiometric data for Newberry Volcano, Oregon, and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is a 3,100-square-kilometer (1,200-square-mile) shield-shaped composite volcano, occupying a location east of the main north-south trend of the High Cascades volcanoes and forming a transition between the High Lava Plains subprovince of the Basin and Range Province to the east and the Cascade Range to the west. Magnetic, gravity, and radiometric data have been gathered and assessed for the region around the volcano. These data have widely varying quality and resolution, even within a given dataset, and these limitations are evaluated and described in this release. Publicly available gravity data in general are too sparse to permit detailed modeling except along a few roads with high-density coverage. Likewise, magnetic data are also unsuitable for all but very local modeling, primarily because available data consist of a patchwork of datasets with widely varying line-spacing. Gravity data show only the broadest correlation with mapped geology, whereas magnetic data show moderate correlation with features only in the vicinity of Newberry Caldera. At large scales, magnetic data correlate poorly with both geologic mapping and gravity data. These poor correlations are largely due to the different sensing depths of the two potential fields methods, which respond to physical properties deeper than the surficial geology. Magnetic data derive from rocks no deeper than the Curie-point isotherm depth (10 to 15 kilometers, km, maximum), whereas gravity data reflect density-contrasts to 100 to 150 km depths. Radiometric data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) surveys of the 1980s have perhaps the coarsest line-spacing of all (as much as 10 km between lines) and are extremely “noisy” for several reasons inherent to this kind of data. Despite its shallow-sensing character, only a few larger anomalies in the NURE data correlate well with geologic mapping. The purpose of this data series release is to collect and place the

  14. Galactic foreground contribution to the BEAST CMB Anisotropy Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Mejia, J; Burigana, C; Childers, J; Figueiredo, N; Kangas, M; Lubin, P; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marvil, J; Meinhold, P; O'Dwyer, I; O'Neill, H; Platania, P; Seiffert, M; Stebor, N; Tello, C A S; Villela, T; Wandelt, B; Wünsche, C A; Mej\\'{\\i}a, Jorge; Bersanelli, Marco; Burigana, Carlo; Childers, Jeff; Figueiredo, Newton; Kangas, Miikka; Lubin, Philip; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Josh; Meinhold, Peter; Dwyer, Ian O'; Neill, Hugh O'; Platania, Paola; Seiffert, Michael; Stebor, Nathan; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an H${\\alpha}$ map, a de-striped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 $\\mu$m IRAS/DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST $\\sim10^\\circ$ declination band into 24 one-hour (RA) wide sectors with $\\sim7900$ pixels each, where we calculate: (a) the linear correlation coefficient between the anisotropy maps and the templates; (b) the coupling constants between the specific intensity units of the templates and the antenna temperature at the BEAST frequencies and (c) the individual foreground contributions to the BEAST anisotropy maps. The peak sector contributions of the contaminants in the Ka-band are of 56.5% free-free with a coupling constant of $8.3\\pm0.4$ $\\mu$K/R, and 67.4% dust with $45.0\\pm2.0$ $\\mu$K/...

  15. Millimeter-Wave Airborne Interferometry for High-accuracy Topography Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Rodriguez, E.

    2011-12-01

    In April 2009, an airborne Ka-band single pass interferometric SAR (GLISTIN-A) was demonstrated as a modification to the UAVSAR system. GLISTIN-A was developed under the NASA International Polar Year program to demonstrate swath-mapping for ice-surface topography. Instrument performance confirmed swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a 3m x 3m posting. However processing challenges were encountered on several fronts to achieve the required accuracies including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. A combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. Funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office, upgrades are currently underway to improve the performance (swath >10km) and portability of GLISTIN-A. The upgraded GLISTIN-A will be compatible with the GlobalHawk making Antarctica regional mapping feasible. Beyond this, the surface water and ocean topography (SWOT) mission slated for launch in 2019, needs an airborne sensor to support pre-mission phenomenology measurements and mission calibration and valibration (cal/val). SWOT is unique and distinct from precursor ocean altimetry missions in some notable regards: 1) 100km+ of swath will provide complete ocean elevation coverage, 2) in addition the land surface water will be mapped for storage measurement and discharge estimation and 3) Ka-band single-pass interferometry will produce the 2-D water surface elevation (WSE) maps. In support of SWOT, en-route to Greenland, GLISTIN-A collected a limited amount of data over surface-water targets in North Dakota. While instructive as a preliminary validation of Ka-band interferometry over inland water bodies, further application is limited because GLISTIN-A itself was not designed to address SWOT needs. While ideal for a the ice topography mapping application, the combination of

  16. Geology, tephrochronology, radiometric ages, and cross sections of the Mark West Springs 7.5 degree quadrangle, Sonoma and Napa counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojicki, A. M.; Fleck, R.J.; Wright, W.H.; Levin, V.R.G.; Valin, Z.C.

    2004-01-01

    This geologic map database and cross sections presents new geologic mapping by the authors in addition to new radiometric ages and tephrochronology of volcanic rock units. The map database depicts the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area and provides a context for interpreting the evolution of active faults in the region. Together with the accompanying PDF file (SIM2858-pamphlet.pdf), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:24,000 or smaller.

  17. Radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2 and PRISM sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, S.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Bouvet, M.; Collet, B.; Mambimba, A.; Kocaman, Aksakal S.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24, 2006, by a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-IIA launcher. It carries three remote-sensing sensors: 1) the Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2); 2) the Panchromatic Remote-Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM); and 3) the Phased-Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR). Within the framework of ALOS Data European Node, as part of the European Space Agency (ESA), the European Space Research Institute worked alongside JAXA to provide contributions to the ALOS commissioning phase plan. This paper summarizes the strategy that was adopted by ESA to define and implement a data verification plan for missions operated by external agencies; these missions are classified by the ESA as third-party missions. The ESA was supported in the design and execution of this plan by GAEL Consultant. The verification of ALOS optical data from PRISM and AVNIR-2 sensors was initiated 4 months after satellite launch, and a team of principal investigators assembled to provide technical expertise. This paper includes a description of the verification plan and summarizes the methodologies that were used for radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment. The successful completion of the commissioning phase has led to the sensors being declared fit for operations. The consolidated measurements indicate that the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 sensor is stable and agrees with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and the Envisat MEdium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer calibration. The geometrical accuracy of PRISM and AVNIR-2 products improved significantly and remains under control. The PRISM modulation transfer function is monitored for improved characterization. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  18. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  19. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  20. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net.

  1. Evaluation of radiometric faecal culture and direct PCR on pooled faeces for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamens, Graeme J; Whittington, Richard J; Turner, Mark J; Austin, Susan L; Fell, Shayne A; Marsh, Ian B

    2007-11-15

    Dilution rates for pooled faecal culture (PFC) and direct IS900 polymerase chain reaction (D-PCR) tests were evaluated on faecal samples from infected cows mixed with uninfected faeces in dilutions from 1 in 5 to 1 in 50. PFC was performed by radiometric culture, with confirmation by IS900 PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR/REA) on growth, and by mycobactin dependency testing on solid medium. Using 37 culture positive faecal samples from 12 subclinical cows, 83.8% and 94.6% of samples were confirmed positive in the PFC assay at dilutions of 1 in 50 and 1 in 30, respectively. Lower dilutions (1 in 5 to 1 in 20) provided only marginally better sensitivity, and confirmation of PFC growth by PCR/REA was significantly more sensitive than mycobactin dependency. D-PCR had significantly lower sensitivity than PFC confirmed by PCR/REA, with pools of 1 in 50, 30, 10 and 5 yielding positive results in 64.9%, 70.3%, 78.4% and 83.8% of samples, respectively. Cattle considered to be shedding 1.5 x 10(6) viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map)/g faeces (on the basis of estimated losses in processing and growth rates in radiometric broth) were positive at dilutions up to 1 in 50 in the PFC and D-PCR. Those shedding 5 x 10(5) viable Map/g were positive in the PFC at dilutions up to 1 in 40, but required a 1 in 10 dilution or less for D-PCR. The results suggest that for cattle shedding relatively high concentrations of Map in faeces (>2 x 10(5) viable Map/g), maximal dilutions of 1 in 30 for PFC and 1 in 10 for D-PCR would be applicable.

  2. Off-line radiometric analysis of Planck-LFI data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, M; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Galeotta, S; Maris, M [LFI-DPC INAF-OATs, Via Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Lowe, S R [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mendes, L [Planck Science Office, European Space Agency, ESAC, P.O. box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Leonardi, R; Meinhold, P [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Villa, F; Sandri, M; Cuttaia, F; Terenzi, L; Valenziano, L; Butler, R C [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti, 101, 40129, Bologna (Italy); Cappellini, B [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gregorio, A [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Via Valerio, 2 Trieste I-34127 (Italy); Salmon, M J [Departamento de IngenierIa de Comunicaciones, Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los Castros s/n. 39005 Santander (Spain); Binko, P [ISDC Data Centre for Astrophysics, University of Geneva, ch. d' Ecogia 16, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); D' Arcangelo, O, E-mail: tomasi@lambrate.inaf.i [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers on-board the Planck satellite to measure temperature and polarization anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in three frequency bands (30, 44 and 70 GHz). To calibrate and verify the performances of the LFI, a software suite named LIFE has been developed. Its aims are to provide a common platform to use for analyzing the results of the tests performed on the single components of the instrument (RCAs, Radiometric Chain Assemblies) and on the integrated Radiometric Array Assembly (RAA). Moreover, its analysis tools are designed to be used during the flight as well to produce periodic reports on the status of the instrument. The LIFE suite has been developed using a multi-layered, cross-platform approach. It implements a number of analysis modules written in RSI IDL, each accessing the data through a portable and heavily optimized library of functions written in C and C++. One of the most important features of LIFE is its ability to run the same data analysis codes both using ground test data and real flight data as input. The LIFE software suite has been successfully used during the RCA/RAA tests and the Planck Integrated System Tests. Moreover, the software has also passed the verification for its in-flight use during the System Operations Verification Tests, held in October 2008.

  3. a Comparison of LIDAR Reflectance and Radiometrically Calibrated Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncat, A.; Briese, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    In order to retrieve results comparable under different flight parameters and among different flight campaigns, passive remote sensing data such as hyperspectral imagery need to undergo a radiometric calibration. While this calibration, aiming at the derivation of physically meaningful surface attributes such as a reflectance value, is quite cumbersome for passively sensed data and relies on a number of external parameters, the situation is by far less complicated for active remote sensing techniques such as lidar. This fact motivates the investigation of the suitability of full-waveform lidar as a "single-wavelength reflectometer" to support radiometric calibration of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, this suitability was investigated by means of an airborne hyperspectral imagery campaign and an airborne lidar campaign recorded over the same area. Criteria are given to assess diffuse reflectance behaviour; the distribution of reflectance derived by the two techniques were found comparable in four test areas where these criteria were met. This is a promising result especially in the context of current developments of multi-spectral lidar systems.

  4. Off-line radiometric analysis of Planck/LFI data

    CERN Document Server

    Tomasi, M; Galeotta, S; Lowe, S R; Mendes, L; Leonardi, R; Villa, F; Cappellini, B; Gregorio, A; Meinhold, P; Sandri, M; Cuttaia, F; Terenzi, L; Maris, M; Valenziano, L; Salmon, M J; Bersanelli, M; Binko, P; Butler, R C; D'Arcangelo, O; Fogliani, S; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gasparo, F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Malaspina, M; Mandolesi, N; Manzato, P; Meharga, M; Morgante, G; Morisset, N; Pasian, F; Perrotta, F; Rohlfs, R; Turler, M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12020

    2009-01-01

    The Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers on-board the Planck satellite to measure temperature and polarization anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in three frequency bands (30, 44 and 70 GHz). To calibrate and verify the performances of the LFI, a software suite named LIFE has been developed. Its aims are to provide a common platform to use for analyzing the results of the tests performed on the single components of the instrument (RCAs, Radiometric Chain Assemblies) and on the integrated Radiometric Array Assembly (RAA). Moreover, its analysis tools are designed to be used during the flight as well to produce periodic reports on the status of the instrument. The LIFE suite has been developed using a multi-layered, cross-platform approach. It implements a number of analysis modules written in RSI IDL, each accessing the data through a portable and heavily optimized library of functions written in C and C++. One of the most important features ...

  5. Microwave radiometric signatures of temperature anomalies in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Sobers, Tamara; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Capraro, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Because of its ability to measure the temperature-dependent power of electromagnetic radiation emitted from tissue down to several centimeters beneath the skin, microwave radiometry has long been of interest as a means for identifying the internal tissue temperature anomalies that arise from abnormalities in physiological parameters such as metabolic and blood perfusion rates. However, the inherent lack of specificity and resolution in microwave radiometer measurements has limited the clinical usefulness of the technique. The idea underlying this work is to make use of information (assumed to be available from some other modality) about the tissue configuration in the volume of interest to study and improve the accuracy of anomaly detection and estimation from radiometric data. In particular, knowledge of the specific anatomy and the properties of the overall measurement system enable determination of the signatures of localized physiological abnormalities in the radiometry data. These signatures are used to investigate the accuracy with which the location of an anomaly can be determined from radiometric measurements. Algorithms based on matches to entries in a signature dictionary are developed for anomaly detection and estimation. The accuracy of anomaly identification is improved when the coupling of power from the body to the sensor is optimized. We describe the design of a radiometer waveguide having dielectric properties appropriate for biomedical applications.

  6. RADIOMETRIC AND GEOMETRIC ACCURACY ANALYSIS OF RASAT PAN IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kocaman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RASAT is the second Turkish Earth Observation satellite which was launched in 2011. It operates with pushbroom principle and acquires panchromatic and MS images with 7.5 m and 15 m resolutions, respectively. The swath width of the sensor is 30 km. The main aim of this study is to analyse the radiometric and geometric quality of RASAT images. A systematic validation approach for the RASAT imagery and its products is being applied. RASAT image pair acquired over Kesan city in Edirne province of Turkey are used for the investigations. The raw RASAT data (L0 are processed by Turkish Space Agency (TUBITAK-UZAY to produce higher level image products. The image products include radiometrically processed (L1, georeferenced (L2 and orthorectified (L3 data, as well as pansharpened images. The image quality assessments include visual inspections, noise, MTF and histogram analyses. The geometric accuracy assessment results are only preliminary and the assessment is performed using the raw images. The geometric accuracy potential is investigated using 3D ground control points extracted from road intersections, which were measured manually in stereo from aerial images with 20 cm resolution and accuracy. The initial results of the study, which were performed using one RASAT panchromatic image pair, are presented in this paper.

  7. An Assessment of Polynomial Regression Techniques for the Relative Radiometric Normalization (RRN of High-Resolution Multi-Temporal Airborne Thermal Infrared (TIR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mustafizur Rahman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal Infrared (TIR remote sensing images of urban environments are increasingly available from airborne and satellite platforms. However, limited access to high-spatial resolution (H-res: ~1 m TIR satellite images requires the use of TIR airborne sensors for mapping large complex urban surfaces, especially at micro-scales. A critical limitation of such H-res mapping is the need to acquire a large scene composed of multiple flight lines and mosaic them together. This results in the same scene components (e.g., roads, buildings, green space and water exhibiting different temperatures in different flight lines. To mitigate these effects, linear relative radiometric normalization (RRN techniques are often applied. However, the Earth’s surface is composed of features whose thermal behaviour is characterized by complexity and non-linearity. Therefore, we hypothesize that non-linear RRN techniques should demonstrate increased radiometric agreement over similar linear techniques. To test this hypothesis, this paper evaluates four (linear and non-linear RRN techniques, including: (i histogram matching (HM; (ii pseudo-invariant feature-based polynomial regression (PIF_Poly; (iii no-change stratified random sample-based linear regression (NCSRS_Lin; and (iv no-change stratified random sample-based polynomial regression (NCSRS_Poly; two of which (ii and iv are newly proposed non-linear techniques. When applied over two adjacent flight lines (~70 km2 of TABI-1800 airborne data, visual and statistical results show that both new non-linear techniques improved radiometric agreement over the previously evaluated linear techniques, with the new fully-automated method, NCSRS-based polynomial regression, providing the highest improvement in radiometric agreement between the master and the slave images, at ~56%. This is ~5% higher than the best previously evaluated linear technique (NCSRS-based linear regression.

  8. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  9. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  10. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager (OLI) Radiometric Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.; Knight, Edward J.; Kvaran, Geir; Barsi, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) has a comprehensive radiometric characterization and calibration program beginning with the instrument design, and extending through integration and test, on-orbit operations and science data processing. Key instrument design features for radiometric calibration include dual solar diffusers and multi-lamped on-board calibrators. The radiometric calibration transfer procedure from NIST standards has multiple checks on the radiometric scale throughout the process and uses a heliostat as part of the transfer to orbit of the radiometric calibration. On-orbit lunar imaging will be used to track the instruments stability and side slither maneuvers will be used in addition to the solar diffuser to flat field across the thousands of detectors per band. A Calibration Validation Team is continuously involved in the process from design to operations. This team uses an Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the ground system to characterize and calibrate the on-orbit data.

  11. ROSCAM: a 95-GHz radiometric one-second camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger M.; Sundstrom, Bryce M.; Belcher, Byron W.; Ewen, Doc

    1998-08-01

    The ability to obtain millimeter wave images under a variety of environmental conditions, such as rain, snow, fog, smoke, dust, etc., has numerous DoD as well as commercial applications. The demonstrated ability to look through doors, walls and clothing has recently extended potential millimeter wave applications to contraband detection and surveillance within buildings. Though the phenomenology supports the generation of high quality millimeter wave images, present-day frame time capabilities limit the use of millimeter wave cameras. Several solutions to frame time reduction are currently being investigated within government and industry. Two popular approaches include: (1) Electronic scanning focal plane arrays (FPA); (2) Mechanical raster scanning of a single antenna beam. One significant difference between the two approaches noted above is the number of receiving channels required. This is important because camera cost is driven by the number of receiver channels used in a camera, as well as the added complexities associated with inter-channel gain stability. There are a number of applications that do not require a motion picture capability. Images obtained sequentially at a nominal rate of one per second would satisfy the needs of a wide range of applications. It is evident, however, that the motion picture quality of a starring FPA may ultimately reduce the market for one-second cameras. In the interim, the one-second camera fills an important need. The goal of the Radiometric One Second Camera (ROSCAM) investigation is to demonstrate a practical millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) camera, with a frame time of approximately one second. The approach combines a high-speed mechanical raster scanning antenna system with a single-channel radiometric receiving system. For baseline comparison, it is assumed that the scene is comprised of 1,000 pixels, each sampled for one millisecond, to generate a single frame in one second. The ROSCAM is based on combining a state

  12. A comparison of radiometric correction techniques in the evaluation of the relationship between LST and NDVI in Landsat imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Chooi; Lim, Hwee San; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric corrections for multi-temporal optical satellite images are necessary, especially in change detection analyses, such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) rationing. Abrupt change detection analysis using remote-sensing techniques requires radiometric congruity and atmospheric correction to monitor terrestrial surfaces over time. Two atmospheric correction methods were used for this study: relative radiometric normalization and the simplified method for atmospheric correction (SMAC) in the solar spectrum. A multi-temporal data set consisting of two sets of Landsat images from the period between 1991 and 2002 of Penang Island, Malaysia, was used to compare NDVI maps, which were generated using the proposed atmospheric correction methods. Land surface temperature (LST) was retrieved using ATCOR3_T in PCI Geomatica 10.1 image processing software. Linear regression analysis was utilized to analyze the relationship between NDVI and LST. This study reveals that both of the proposed atmospheric correction methods yielded high accuracy through examination of the linear correlation coefficients. To check for the accuracy of the equation obtained through linear regression analysis for every single satellite image, 20 points were randomly chosen. The results showed that the SMAC method yielded a constant value (in terms of error) to predict the NDVI value from linear regression analysis-derived equation. The errors (average) from both proposed atmospheric correction methods were less than 10%.

  13. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  14. Radiometric Calibrations, Measurements, and Standards Development at NREL: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Gotseff, P.; Kay, B.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Radiometric calibrations, measurements, and standards development at NREL. We describe proposed revisions to current reference standard spectral distributions used to evaluate photovoltaic device performance and durability of materials. Improvements in broadband outdoor radiometer calibrations reduce uncertainties in broadband radiometer calibrations. We report a method to quantify the rate of change of broadband radiometer responsivities as a function of integrated exposure to irradiance and thermal energy. The results of applying a vector of calibration factors or responsivities to field data to remove zenith-angle dependent errors in global solar radiation measurements are shown. We report on the relative sensitivity of radiometers to daily versus biweekly cleaning.

  15. Simulation study of element plastic migration from radiometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Faena M.L.; Manzoli, Jose Eduardo; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, Eufemia Paez [Escola SENAI Fundacao Zerrenner, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: eufemia@sp.senai.br

    2007-07-01

    Element migration from plastic packaging to either foodstuffs or medicine is a serious public health. Many conventional experimental techniques such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy or calorimetric methods are used to measure total and specific migration of components from plastic packaging. The radiometric method is also used to measure the element migration. In this study a numerical technique was employed to simulate the experimental migration results obtained from measurements of elements from dairy product polymeric packages into 3% acetic acid solution which is a normative food simulant. This numerical technique can be used as complementary tool for the experimental measurements, allowing for a better understanding of the diffusion process and to estimate element migration situations not experimentally measured. (author)

  16. LFI Radiometric Chain Assembly (RCA) data handling "Rachel"

    CERN Document Server

    Malaspina, M; Battaglia, P; Binko, P; Butler, R C; D'Arcangelo, O; Fogliani, S; Frailis, M; Franceschet, C; Galeotta, S; Gasparo, F; Gregorio, A; Lapolla, M; Leonardi, R; Maggio, G; Mandolesi, N; Manzato, P; Maris, M; Meharga, M; Meinhold, P; Morisset, N; Pasian, F; Perrotta, F; Rohlfs, R; Sandri, M; Tomasi, M; Turler, M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12017

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST (http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/1748-0221). Planck's Low Frequency Instrument is an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. Before integrating the overall array assembly, a first set of tests has been performed for each radiometer chain assembly (RCA), consisting of two radiometers. In this paper, we describe Rachel, a software application which has been purposely developed and used during the RCA test campaign to carry out both near-realtime on-line data analysis and data storage (in FITS format) of the raw output from the radiometric chains.

  17. Development of a portable ambient temperature radiometric assaying instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    There is a strong need for portable radiometric instrumentation that can accurately confirm the presence of nuclear materials and allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. To fulfill this need we are developing a hand-held, non-cryogenic, low-power gamma- and x-ray measurement and analysis instrument that can both search and then accurately verify the presence of nuclear materials. We report on the use of cadmium zinc telluride detectors, signal processing electronics, and the new field-portable instrument based on the MicroNOMAD Multichannel Analyzer from EG&G ORTBC. We also describe the isotopic analysis that allows uranium enrichment measurements to be made accurately in the field.

  18. New Sentinel-2 radiometric validation approaches (SEOM program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruniquel, Véronique; Lamquin, Nicolas; Ferron, Stéphane; Govaerts, Yves; Woolliams, Emma; Dilo, Arta; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is an ESA program element whose one of the objectives aims at launching state-of-the-art studies for the scientific exploitation of operational missions. In the frame of this program, ESA awarded ACRI-ST and its partners Rayference and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) early 2016 for a R&D study on the development and intercomparison of algorithms for validating the Sentinel-2 radiometric L1 data products beyond the baseline algorithms used operationally in the frame of the S2 Mission Performance Centre. In this context, several algorithms have been proposed and are currently in development: The first one is based on the exploitation of Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) observations over ocean. This method allows an inter-band radiometry validation from the blue to the NIR (typically from B1 to B8a) from a reference band already validated for example with the well-known Rayleigh method. Due to their physical properties, DCCs appear from the remote sensing point of view to have bright and cold tops and they can be used as invariant targets to monitor the radiometric response degradation of reflective solar bands. The DCC approach is statistical i.e. the method shall be applied on a large number of measurements to derive reliable statistics and decrease the impact of the perturbing contributors. The second radiometric validation method is based on the exploitation of matchups combining both concomitant in-situ measurements and Sentinel-2 observations. The in-situ measurements which are used here correspond to measurements acquired in the frame of the RadCalNet networks. The validation is performed for the Sentinel-2 bands similar to the bands of the instruments equipping the validation site. The measurements from the Cimel CE 318 12-filters BRDF Sun Photometer installed recently in the Gobabeb site near the Namib desert are used for this method. A comprehensive verification of the calibration requires an analysis of MSI radiances over the full dynamic range

  19. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Qiang; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 μm to 12.01 μm]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  20. Inter-Band Radiometric Comparison and Calibration of ASTER Visible and Near-Infrared Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Obata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates inter-band radiometric consistency across the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER visible and near-infrared (VNIR bands and develops an inter-band calibration algorithm to improve radiometric consistency. Inter-band radiometric comparison of current ASTER data shows a root mean square error (RMSE of 3.8%–5.7% among radiance outputs of spectral bands due primarily to differences between calibration strategies of the NIR band for nadir-looking (Band 3N and the other two bands (green and red bands, corresponding to Bands 1 and 2. An algorithm for radiometric calibration of Bands 2 and 3N with reference to Band 1 is developed based on the band translation technique and is used to obtain new radiometric calibration coefficients (RCCs for sensor sensitivity degradation. The systematic errors between radiance outputs are decreased by applying the derived RCCs, which result in reducing the RMSE from 3.8%–5.7% to 2.2%–2.9%. The remaining errors are approximately equal to or smaller than the intrinsic uncertainties of inter-band calibration derived by sensitivity analysis. Improvement of the radiometric consistency would increase the accuracy of band algebra (e.g., vegetation indices and its application. The algorithm can be used to evaluate inter-band radiometric consistency, as well as for the calibration of other sensors.

  1. Some observations from radiometric ‘8 bit’ data of sediment thin sections based on alternative petrographic image analysis method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudip Dey; Suvendu Ghosh; Chandrani Debbarma; Prasamita Sarkar; Mhu Aris Marfai; Sabyasachi Maiti

    2009-04-01

    This paper deals with the experiment of sediment microstructure analysis especially microfabric mapping by digital imaging.For that purpose the greyscale images (Red band from RGB combination)of the thin sections have been prepared from the selected 12 samples.The basis of this mapping is the reflectance capacity of different sediments which is influenced by the physical parameters like grain size and colour.The reflectances of different sediments are represented in digital format by different DN values from 0 –255 within the radiometric ranges of ‘8 bit ’data. Density slicing has been chosen as the method of microstructure mapping in this research.This study shows that lower DN values normally present dark coloured coarser sand and clay while higher DN values present light coloured finer sediment samples.In the selected samples for this study the maximum DN value has been found from micaceous materials.Another remarkable thing observed from the microfabric mapping is that the presence of coarser sediments forms complex microfabric pattern than the finer sediments in the study area.Though this method have some demerits,still its simple technique can be very useful for accurate microstructure analysis.

  2. Correlation of VLF-EM Data with Radiometric Measurements: Implications for Uranium Exploration around Beldih, South Purulia Shear Zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to correlate VLF-EM data with the radiometric measurements to decipher the subsurface structure and to locate uranium mineralization in the shear zone. The study area is around Beldih mine which is an open cast apatite mine located on the South Purulia Shear Zone. VLF method has been applied to map the structure and the presence of radioactive minerals has been delineated by the detection of high α and γ counts with respect to the background radiations. High radiation counts and high surface γ activity are found just above the higher apparent current-density zones in all the profiles studied, at various locations, indicating uranium and/or thorium mineralization as well as good correlation between these techniques.

  3. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  4. MISR FIRSTLOOK radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the FIRSTLOOK Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask (RCCM) dataset produced using ancillary inputs (RCCT) from the previous time period. It is...

  5. Intra-annual NDVI validation of the Landsat 5 TM radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Groeneveld, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone of the extensive archive of moderate‐resolution Earth imagery. Even after more than 24 years of service, the L5 TM is still operational. Given the longevity of the satellite, the detectors have aged and the sensor's radiometric characteristics have changed since launch. The calibration procedures and parameters in the National Land Archive Production System (NLAPS) have also changed with time. Revised radiometric calibrations in 2003 and 2007 have improved the radiometric accuracy of recently processed data. This letter uses the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a metric to evaluate the radiometric calibration. The calibration change has improved absolute calibration accuracy, consistency over time, and consistency with Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic radiometry and will provide the basis for continued long‐term studies of the Earth's land surfaces.

  6. Signature modelling and radiometric rendering equations in infrared scene simulation systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Willers, CJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The development and optimisation of modern infrared systems necessitates the use of simulation systems to create radiometrically realistic representations (e.g. images) of infrared scenes. Such simulation systems are used in signature prediction...

  7. Simultaneous Inflight Spectral and Radiometric Calibration Validation of AVRIS and HYDICE Over Lunar Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrien, Thomas; Green, Robert; Chovit, Chris; Faust, Jessica; Johnson, Howell; Basedow, Robert; Zalewski, Edward; Colwell, John

    1995-01-01

    An experiment to check the spectral and radiometric calibration of two sensors--the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectromenter (AVRIS) and the Hyperspectral digital image collection experiment (HYDICE)--is described.

  8. Radiometric Measurements of Slant Path Attenuation in the V/W Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    MM-YYYY) SEPTEMBER 2014 2. REPORT TYPE INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2012 – APR 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RADIOMETRIC ... RADIOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF SLANT PATH ATTENUATION IN THE V/W BANDS SEPTEMBER 2014 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD

  9. An Infrared Focal Plane Array Camera System for Stereo-based Radiometric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Plane Array Calibrated System ( FPACS ) utilizes several features to help ensure radiometric accuracy. Some features help minimize unwanted radiation...possible, and beyond that, the FPACS design ensures that the operator is made aware when operating conditions may lead to radiometric inaccuracies. Primary...components of FPACS are illustrated in Fig. 1. Components are 1) Optics, 2) FPA/Dewar, 3) Camera Electronics, 4) Pan & Tilt platform, and 4) Windows

  10. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager Radiometric Calibration and Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Markham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI was radiometrically calibrated prior to launch in terms of spectral radiance, using an integrating sphere source traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST standards of spectral irradiance. It was calibrated on-orbit in terms of reflectance using diffusers characterized prior to launch using NIST traceable standards. The radiance calibration was performed with an uncertainty of ~3%; the reflectance calibration to an uncertainty of ~2%. On-orbit, multiple calibration techniques indicate that the sensor has been stable to better than 0.3% to date, with the exception of the shortest wavelength band, which has degraded about 1.0%. A transfer to orbit experiment conducted using the OLI’s heliostat-illuminated diffuser suggests that some bands increased in sensitivity on transition to orbit by as much as 5%, with an uncertainty of ~2.5%. On-orbit comparisons to other instruments and vicarious calibration techniques show the radiance (without a transfer to orbit adjustment, and reflectance calibrations generally agree with other instruments and ground measurements to within the uncertainties. Calibration coefficients are provided with the data products to convert to either radiance or reflectance units.

  11. NERO: General concept of a NEO radiometric observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellino, A.; Somma, R.; Tommasi, L.; Paolinetti, R.; Muinonen, K.; Virtanen, J.; Tedesco, E. F.

    NERO (Near-Earth Objects Radiometric Observatory) is one of the six studies for possible missions dedicated to near-Earth objects, that were funded by the ESA in 2002-2003. NERO is a further development of previous studies already submitted to ESA (Sysiphos,Spaceguard-1). The general concept is that a small satellite equipped with both a CCD for visible wavelengths and an array for thermal IR measurements around 10 microns would be an ideal platform for simultaneously obtaining two of the major objectives of current NEO science, namely the physical characterization of the objects and the discovery of NEOs which are difficult to detect because they have orbits entirely or partly interior to the Earth's orbit. The NERO study included a comprehensive analysis of the advantages and drawbacks of different orbital options for the satellite (including L2 of Earth and L2 of Venus) and a preliminary simulation of the effectiveness in deriving reliable orbits of the newly detected objects. The main results of this study, including also a preliminary design of the payload (optics, detectors, cooling system, etc.) are briefly summarized.

  12. Radiometric dating of sediment records in European mountain lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. APPLEBY

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Sediment cores from seven European mountain lakes collected as part of a study of palaeolimnogical records of climate change (the MOLAR project were dated radiometrically by 210Pb. In spite of the remote locations, only one site recorded more or less uniform sediment accumulation throughout the past 150 years. At three further sites the 210Pb record indicated uniform sedimentation up until ca 1950 but significant increases since then. Stratigraphic dates based on records of fallout 137Cs and 241Am showed that 210Pb supply rates to these core sites had nonetheless remained relatively constant and that the sediments could be dated by the CRS model. At the remaining sites there were indications of episodic changes in both sedimentation rates and 210Pb supply rates. Since the changes were not in proportion, neither of the simple dating models (CRS or CIC was applicable. Using the 137Cs and 241Am stratigraphic dates as reference points it was however possible to construct a realistic chronology for these cores by applying the CRS model piecewise to each time-bounded section.

  13. Selection of chemotherapy for patient treatment utilizing a radiometric versus a cloning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Hoff, D D; Forseth, B J; Turner, J N; Clark, G M; Warfel, L E

    1986-01-01

    From the 1950s to the 1970s, a number of in vitro systems that measured inhibition of glucose metabolism were used to predict the responsiveness of patients' tumors to chemotherapy. In vitro-in vivo correlations were excellent, with true positive predictions ranging from 68% to 96% and true negative predictions of 95% to 100%. The radiometric system is a new in vitro technique that measures the conversion of 14C-glucose to 14CO2. The system already has been utilized to screen prospective new antineoplastic agents for cytotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to determine if the radiometric system might be used to predict correctly the responsiveness of an individual patient's tumor to single-agent or combination-agent chemotherapy. Fifty-six tumor specimens were divided and tested for drug sensitivity in the radiometric system and a conventional human tumor clonning system. Overall, there was a significant correlation between in vitro and in vivo results for the conventional cloning system (P = 0.03). However, there was no significant relationship between in vitro and in vivo results for the radiometric system. The radiometric system consistently failed to predict the tumor's clinical sensitivity to single agents. A radiometric system is not useful in predicting the responsiveness of a patient's tumor to single agent chemotherapy and is not a replacement for the more biologically attractive human tumor cloning system.

  14. Evaluation of relative radiometric correction techniques on Landsat 8 OLI sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Antonio; Caradonna, Grazia; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2016-08-01

    The quality of information derived from processed remotely sensed data may depend upon many factors, mostly related to the extent data acquisition is influenced by atmospheric conditions, topographic effects, sun angle and so on. The goal of radiometric corrections is to reduce such effects in order enhance the performance of change detection analysis. There are two approaches to radiometric correction: absolute and relative calibrations. Due to the large amount of free data products available, absolute radiometric calibration techniques may be time consuming and financially expensive because of the necessary inputs for absolute calibration models (often these data are not available and can be difficult to obtain). The relative approach to radiometric correction, known as relative radiometric normalization, is preferred with some research topics because no in situ ancillary data, at the time of satellite overpasses, are required. In this study we evaluated three well known relative radiometric correction techniques using two Landsat 8 - OLI scenes over a subset area of the Apulia Region (southern Italy): the IR-MAD (Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection), the HM (Histogram Matching) and the DOS (Dark Object Subtraction). IR-MAD results were statistically assessed within a territory with an extremely heterogeneous landscape and all computations performed in a Matlab environment. The panchromatic and thermal bands were excluded from the comparisons.

  15. Precise quantitation of PAIgG: A new radiometric microtechnique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, K.A.; Gauger, J.A.; Davis, J.M. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-03-01

    We report the development of a radiometric assay for platelet-bound IgG that is both sensitive and quantitative. The assay utilized 96-well millititer plates incorporating a 0.2 microns filter membrane in the bottom. A 125I-labeled monoclonal antihuman IgG, as a secondary antibody, detected the platelet-bound human IgG. Since 5 x 10(6) platelets were used for each assay, tests for platelet-bound IgG can be performed on persons with severe thrombocytopenia. For the detection of circulating antiplatelet alloantibodies, as little as 10 microliters of platelet-free plasma per assay is required. Antiplatelet IgG was quantitated by using anti-PIA1 antibody that was purified with affinity and elution and DEAE chromatography. This purified antiplatelet antibody was labeled with 125I and was used to determine the binding ratio of secondary antibody to primary antibody. Under our standard conditions, this ratio was found to be stable at approximately 0.35 over the sensitivity range of the assay. The assay can detect approximately 200 molecules of human IgG per platelet (0.1 ng of secondary antibody bound per 5 x 10(6) platelets). It has a linear range from 0 to 7,000 molecules per platelet. Quantitation of anti-PIA1 binding for platelets stored for up to 6 months under refrigeration showed no change in number of PIA1 binding sites. Clinical studies showed that 18 of 19 ITP patients had an increased number of IgG molecules per platelet as did patients with malignancy and drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia. Patients who had received multiple platelet transfusions had antiplatelet antibody in their plasma. Normal amounts of PAIgG were observed in platelets and plasma of patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenia.

  16. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of GF-4 in Multispectral Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixia Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The GaoFen-4 (GF-4, launched at the end of December 2015, is China’s first high-resolution geostationary optical satellite. A panchromatic and multispectral sensor (PMS is onboard the GF-4 satellite. Unfortunately, the GF-4 has no onboard calibration assembly, so on-orbit radiometric calibration is required. Like the charge-coupled device (CCD onboard HuanJing-1 (HJ or the wide field of view sensor (WFV onboard GaoFen-1 (GF-1, GF-4 also has a wide field of view, which provides challenges for cross-calibration with narrow field of view sensors, like the Landsat series. A new technique has been developed and used to calibrate HJ-1/CCD and GF-1/WFV, which is verified viable. The technique has three key steps: (1 calculate the surface using the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF characterization of a site, taking advantage of its uniform surface material and natural topographic variation using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+/Operational Land Imager (OLI imagery and digital elevation model (DEM products; (2 calculate the radiance at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA with the simulated surface reflectance using the atmosphere radiant transfer model; and (3 fit the calibration coefficients with the TOA radiance and corresponding Digital Number (DN values of the image. This study attempts to demonstrate the technique is also feasible to calibrate GF-4 multispectral bands. After fitting the calibration coefficients using the technique, extensive validation is conducted by cross-validation using the image pairs of GF-4/PMS and Landsat-8/OLI with similar transit times and close view zenith. The validation result indicates a higher accuracy and frequency than that given by the China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Application (CRESDA using vicarious calibration. The study shows that the new technique is also quite feasible for GF-4 multispectral bands as a routine long-term procedure.

  17. An Overview of MODIS Radiometric Calibration and Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the key instruments for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), currently operating on both the Terra and Aqua satellites. The MODIS is a major advance over the previous generation of sensors in terms of its spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions. It has 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with center wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.1μm and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB) with center wavelengths from 3.7 to 14.4μm,making observations at three spatial resolutions: 250 m (bands 1-2), 500 m (bands 3-7), and 1km (bands 8-36). MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer with a wide field-of-view, providing a complete global coverage of the Earth in less than 2 days. Both Terra and Aqua MODIS went through extensive pre-launch calibration and characterization at various levels. In orbit, the calibration and characterization tasks are performed using its on-board calibrators (OBCs) that include a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a v-grooved flat panel blackbody (BB), and a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). In this paper, we present an overview of MODIS calibration and characterization activities, methodologies, and lessons learned from pre-launch characterization and in-orbit operation. Key issues discussed in this paper include in-orbit efforts of monitoring the noise characteristics of the detectors,tracking the solar diffuser and optics degradations, and updating the sensor's response versus scan angle.The experiences and lessons learned through MODIS have played and will continue to play major roles in the design and characterization of future sensors.

  18. Landsat-7 EMT+ On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barker, J. L.; Kaita, E.; Seiferth, J.; Morfitt, Ron

    1999-01-01

    Landsat-7 was launched on April 15, 1999 and completed its on orbit initialization and verification period on June 28, 1999. The ETM+ payload is similar to the TM sensors on previous Landsat satellites and incorporates two new devices to improve its absolute radiometric calibration. The Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) is a deployable diffuser panel. This device has been deployed 9 times to date, with a normal deployment schedule of once per month. The initial analysis of the FASC data has given absolute calibration results within 5% of the prelaunch integrating sphere calibrations and a range of variation of 2% between dates. The Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC), is a set of auxiliary optics that allows the ETM+ to view the sun through a reduced aperture. Data have normally been acquired on a daily basis with the PASC. Initial results with the PASC were encouraging, despite some unexpected saturation in the shortest wavelength band. The response of the ETM+ short wavelength (silicon) bands to the PASC increased initially and has begun to decrease in some of these bands. The longer wavelength (InSb) bands have shown up to 30% oscillations that vary between detectors within the band. Studies are ongoing to better characterize the response to the PASC. The ETM+ also incorporates an internal calibrator (IC), a shutter that oscillates in front of the focal plane that directs light from the internal calibrator lamps to the focal plane. The responses to this device are also varying, though differently than the PASC results. Both the IC and PASC results are attributable to the calibration devices as opposed to the ETM+ itself.

  19. Initial Radiometric Characteristics of KOMPSAT-3A Multispectral Imagery Using the 6S Radiative Transfer Model, Well-Known Radiometric Tarps, and MFRSR Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Yeom

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available On-orbit radiometric characterization of the multispectral (MS imagery of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI’s Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A, which was launched on 25 March 2015, was conducted to provide quantitative radiometric information about KOMPSAT-3A. During the in-orbit test (IOT, vicarious radiometric calibration of KOMPSAT-3A was performed using the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S radiative transfer model. The characteristics of radiometric tarps, the atmospheric optical depth from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR measurements, and sun–sensor–geometry were carefully considered, in order to calculate the exact top of atmosphere (TOA radiance received by KOMPSAT-3A MS bands. In addition, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF behaviors of the radiometric tarps were measured in the laboratory with a two-dimensional hyperspectral gonioradiometer, to compensate for the geometry discrepancy between the satellite and the ASD FieldSpec® 3 spectroradiometer. The match-up datasets between the TOA radiance and the digital number (DN from KOMPSAT-3A were used to determine DN-to-radiance conversion factors, based on linear least squares fitting for two field campaigns. The final results showed that the R2 values between the observed and simulated radiances for the blue, green, red, and near-infrared (NIR bands, are greater than 0.998. An approximate error budget analysis for the vicarious calibration of KOMPSAT-3A showed an error of less than 6.8%. When applying the laboratory-based BRDF correction to the case of higher viewing zenith angle geometry, the gain ratio was improved, particularly for the blue (1.3% and green (1.2% bands, which exhibit high sensitivity to the BRDF of radiometric tarps during the backward-scattering phase. The calculated gain ratio between the first and second campaigns showed a less than 5% discrepancy, indicating that

  20. English/Russian terminology on radiometric calibration of space-borne optoelectronic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalsky, V.; Zakharenkov, V.; Humpherys, T.; Sapritsky, V.; Datla, R.

    The efficient use of data acquired through exo-atmospheric observations of the Earth within the framework of existing and newly planned programs requires a unique understanding of respective terms and definitions. Yet, the last large-scale document on the subject - The International Electrotechnical Vocabulary - had been published 18 years ago. This lack of a proper document, which would reflect the changes that had occurred in the area since that time, is especially detrimental to the developing international efforts aimed at global observations of the Earth from space such as the Global Earth Observations Program proposed by the U.S.A. at the 2003 WMO Congress. To cover this gap at least partially, a bi-lingual explanatory dictionary of terms and definitions in the area of radiometric calibration of space-borne IR sensors is developed. The objectives are to produce a uniform terminology for the global space-borne observations of the Earth, establish a unique understanding of terms and definitions by the radiometric communities, including a correspondence between the Russian and American terms and definitions, and to develop a formal English/Russian reference dictionary for use by scientists and engineers involved in radiometric observations of the Earth from space. The dictionary includes close to 400 items covering basic concepts of geometric, wave and corpuscular optics, remote sensing technologies, and ground-based calibration as well as more detailed treatment of terms and definitions in the areas of radiometric quantities, symbols and units, optical phenomena and optical properties of objects and media, and radiometric systems and their properties. The dictionary contains six chapters: Basic Concepts, Quantities, Symbols, and Units, Optical phenomena, Optical characteristics of surfaces and media, Components of Radiometric Systems, Characteristics of radiometric system components, plus English/Russian and Russian/Inglish indices.

  1. Experimental methods of indoor millimeter-wave radiometric imaging for personnel concealed contraband detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xiao, Zelong; Li, Hao; Lv, Rongchuan; Lu, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    The increasingly emerging terrorism attacks and violence crimes around the world have posed severe threats to public security, so carrying out relevant research on advanced experimental methods of personnel concealed contraband detection is crucial and meaningful. All of the advantages of imaging covertly, avoidance of interference with other systems, intrinsic property of being safe to persons under screening , and the superior ability of imaging through natural or manmade obscurants, have significantly combined to enable millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometric imaging to offer great potential in personnel concealed contraband detection. Based upon the current research status of MMW radiometric imaging and urgent demands of personnel security screening, this paper mainly focuses on the experimental methods of indoor MMW radiometric imaging. The reverse radiation noise resulting from super-heterodyne receivers seriously affects the image experiments carried out at short range, so both the generation mechanism and reducing methods of this noise are investigated. Then, the benefit of sky illumination no longer exists for the indoor radiometric imaging, and this leads to the decrease in radiometric temperature contrast between target and background. In order to enhance the radiometric temperature contrast for improving indoor imaging performance, the noise illumination technique is adopted in the indoor imaging scenario. In addition, the speed and accuracy of concealed contraband detection from acquired MMW radiometric images are usually restricted to the deficiencies in traditional artificial interpretation by security inspectors, thus an automatic recognition and location algorithm by integrating improved Fuzzy C-means clustering with moment invariants is put forward. A series of original results are also presented to demonstrate the significance and validity of these methods.

  2. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  3. UNDERWATER MAPPING USING GLORIA AND MIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Pat S.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Schoonmaker, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in digital image processing of the (GLORIA) Geological Long-Range Induced Asdic) sidescan-sonar image data have made it technically and economically possible to map large areas of the ocean floor including the Exclusive Economic Zone. Software was written to correct both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original raw GLORIA data. A digital mosaicking technique was developed enabling 2 degree by 2 degree quadrangles to be generated.

  4. Vicarious absolute radiometric calibration of GF-2 PMS2 sensor using permanent artificial targets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaokai; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Ning; Qian, Yonggang; Tang, Lingli

    2016-10-01

    GF-2, launched on August 19 2014, is one of the high-resolution land resource observing satellite of the China GF series satellites plan. The radiometric performance evaluation of the onboard optical pan and multispectral (PMS2) sensor of GF-2 satellite is very important for the further application of the data. And, the vicarious absolute radiometric calibration approach is one of the most useful way to monitor the radiometric performance of the onboard optical sensors. In this study, the traditional reflectance-based method is used to vicarious radiometrically calibrate the onboard PMS2 sensor of GF-2 satellite using three black, gray and white reflected permanent artificial targets located in the AOE Baotou site in China. Vicarious field calibration campaign were carried out in the AOE-Baotou calibration site on 22 April 2016. And, the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients were determined with in situ measured atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance of the permanent artificial calibration targets. The predicted TOA radiance of a selected desert area with our determined calibrated coefficients were compared with the official distributed calibration coefficients. Comparison results show a good consistent and the mean relative difference of the multispectral channels is less than 5%. Uncertainty analysis was also carried out and a total uncertainty with 3.87% is determined of the TOA radiance.

  5. A Wide-band, Ka-band Amplifier and Radar System for Precipitation Retrievals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is committed to measuring precipitation on a global scale. In 1997, NASA launched the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission which carried the first spaceborne...

  6. Solid state Ka-band pulse oscillator with frequency electronic switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvornichenko V. P.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transmitting devices for small radars in the millimeter wavelength range with high resolution on range and noise immunity. The work presents the results of research and development of compact pulse oscillators with digital frequency switching from pulse to pulse. The oscillator consists of a frequency synthesizer and a synchronized amplifier on the IMPATT diode. Reference oscillator of synthesizer is synchronized by crystal oscillator with digital PLL system and contains a frequency multiplier and an amplifier operating in pulse mode. Small-sized frequency synthesizer of 8 mm wave lengths provides an output power of ~1.2 W per pulse with a frequency stability of no worse than 2•10–6. Radiation frequency is controlled by three-digit binary code in OOL levels. Synchronized amplifier made on IMPATT diodes provides microwave power up to 20 W in oscillator output with microwave pulse duration of 100—300 ns in an operating band. The oscillator can be used as a driving source for the synchronization of semiconductor and electro-vacuum devices of pulsed mode, and also as a transmitting device for small-sized radar of millimeter wave range.

  7. High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Richard; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Williams, Wallace; Bhasin, Kul; Robbins, Neal; Dibb, Daniel; Menninger, William; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert; Burdette, James

    2007-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Model 999H traveling-wave tube (TWT) has been demonstrated to generate an output power of 144 W at 60-percent overall efficiency in continuous-wave operation over the frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The best TWT heretofore commercially available for operation in the affected frequency band is characterized by an output power of only 35 W and an efficiency of 50 percent. Moreover, whereas prior TWTs are limited to single output power levels, it has been shown that the output power of the Model 999H can be varied from 54 to 144 W. A TWT is a vacuum electronic device used to amplify microwave signals. TWTs are typically used in free-space communication systems because they are capable of operating at power and efficiency levels significantly higher than those of solid-state devices. In a TWT, an electron beam is generated by an electron gun consisting of a cathode, focusing electrodes, and an anode. The electrons pass through a hole in the anode and are focused into a cylindrical beam by a stack of periodic permanent magnets and travel along the axis of an electrically conductive helix, along which propagates an electromagnetic wave that has been launched by an input signal that is to be amplified. The beam travels within the helix at a velocity close to the phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field decelerates some of the electrons and accelerates others, causing the beam to become formed into electron bunches, which further interact with the electromagnetic wave in such a manner as to surrender kinetic energy to the wave, thereby amplifying the wave. The net result is to amplify the input signal by a factor of about 100,000. After the electrons have passed along the helix, they impinge on electrodes in a collector. The collector decelerates the electrons in such a manner as to recover most of the remaining kinetic energy and thereby significantly increase the power efficiency of the TWT.

  8. Ka-Band PAA for Satellite Telemetry System for RLVs & Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development and implementation of passive phased array antennas (PAAs) offers significant performance benefits over the current active arrays. The keys to...

  9. Superradiant Ka-band Cherenkov oscillator with 2-GW peak power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The generation of a 2-GW microwave superradiance (SR) pulses has been demonstrated at 29-GHz using a single-mode relativistic backward-wave oscillator possessing the beam-to-wave power conversion factor no worse than 100%. A record-breaking radiation power density in the slow-wave structure (SWS) of ˜1.5 GW/cm2 required the use of high guiding magnetic field (7 T) decreasing the beam losses to the SWS in strong rf fields. Despite the field strength at the SWS wall of 2 MV/cm, a single-pass transmission mode of a short SR pulse in the SWS allows one to obtain extremely high power density in subnanosecond time scale due to time delay in the development of the breakdown phenomena.

  10. SWIFT-HPX - High Data Rate Ka-band Commications for Small Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging TUI's SWIFT software defined radio (SDR) architecture, we propose to develop a 100 Mbps downlink and intersatellite crosslink capability with ranging and...

  11. Design and Performance of Ka-Band Fiber-Optic Delay Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    usually erbium-doped fiber amplifiers ( EDFAs ). Laser RIN is a major concern in analog photonics. Laser noise at the RF carrier frequency as well as...amplification will be required in long FODLs to maintain the signal level. The optical amplifier of choice is the EDFA . A classical work on EDFAs is provided...introduction to EDFA noise and the concept of EDFA noise penalty is applied to FODL design in Section 3. Shown in Fig. 12 is a data set for an EDFA

  12. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-06-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  13. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  14. Ka-Band AlGaN/GaN HEMT high power and driver amplifier MMICs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijningen, M. van; Vliet, F.E. van; Quay, R.; Raay, F. van; Kiefer, R.; Mueller, S.; Krausse, D.; Seelmann-Eggebert, M.; Mikulla, M.; Schlechtweg, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the MMIC technology, design and characterization of a high power amplifier and driver amplifier MMIC at 30 GHz in AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology are presented. The MMICs are designed using CPW technology on a 390 μm thick SiC substrate. The measured small-signal gain of the driver is 14 dB

  15. Design, Analysis, and Verification of Ka-Band Pattern Reconfigurable Patch Antenna Using RF MEMS Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Deng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a radiating pattern reconfigurable antenna by employing RF Micro-electromechanical Systems (RF MEMS switches. The antenna has a low profile and small size of 4 mm × 5 mm × 0.4 mm, and mainly consists of one main patch, two assistant patches, and two RF MEMS switches. By changing the RF MEMS switches operating modes, the proposed antenna can switch among three radiating patterns (with main lobe directions of approximately −17.0°, 0° and +17.0° at 35 GHz. The far-field vector addition model is applied to analyse the pattern. Comparing the measured results with analytical and simulated results, good agreements are obtained.

  16. a KA-BAND Chirped-Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matthew T.; Pate, Brooks H.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2010-06-01

    The design and performance of a new chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer operating from 25-40 GHz will be discussed. A 10.5-3 GHz linear frequency sweep, generated by a 24 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator, is upconverted by a 23.00 GHz phase-locked oscillator, then fed into an active doubler to create a 25-40 GHz chirped pulse. After amplification with a 60-80 W pulsed traveling wave tube amplifier, the pulse is broadcast across a molecular beam chamber where it interacts with a molecular sample. The molecular FID signal is downconverted with the 23 GHz oscillator so that it can be digitized on a 50 GS/s oscilloscope with 16 GHz hardware bandwidth. The sensitivity and phase stability of this spectrometer is comparable to that of the previously reported 6.5-18.5 CP-FTMW spectrometer. On propyne (μ=0.78 D), a single-shot signal to noise ratio of approximately 200:1 is observed on the J=2-1 rotational transition at 34183 MHz when the full bandwidth is swept; optimal excitation is observed for this transition with a 250 MHz bandwidth sweep. The emission has a T_2 lifetime of 4 μs. Early results from this spectrometer, particularly in the study of species of astrochemical interest, will be presented. G.G. Brown et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 053103.

  17. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna Pointing Calibration Using Wideband Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buu, C.; Calvo, J.; Cheng, T.-H.; Vazquez, M.

    2010-08-01

    A new method of performing a system end-to-end monopulse antenna calibration using widely available wideband astronomical radio sources is presented as an alternative to the current method of using a spacecraft signal. Current monopulse calibration requires a spacecraft carrier signal to measure amplitude and phase differences in the monopulse feed and low-noise amplifiers (LNAs). The alternative method presented here will allow the ground station to perform monopulse calibrations during maintenance periods instead of spacecraft track time, and provide an end-to-end system check-out capability without requiring a spacecraft signal. In this article, we give an overview of the current calibration approach, describe a new method for calibrating with radio sources, and present results from field testing of this new method.

  18. Two stage dual gate MESFET monolithic gain control amplifier for Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Contolatis, A.

    A monolithic two stage gain control amplifier has been developed using submicron gate length dual gate MESFETs fabricated on ion implanted material. The amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 30 GHz with a gain control range of over 30 dB. This ion implanted monolithic IC is readily integrable with other phased array receiver functions such as low noise amplifiers and phase shifters.

  19. RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF MARS HiRISE HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY BASED ON FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  20. Preparation of a new autonomous instrumented radiometric calibration site: Gobabeb, Namib Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Claire; Bialek, Agnieszka; Marks, Amelia; Woolliams, Emma; Berthelot, Béatrice; Meygret, Aimé; Marcq, Sébastien; Bouvet, Marc; Fox, Nigel

    2015-10-01

    A new permanently instrumented radiometric calibration site for high/medium resolution imaging satellite sensors is currently under development, focussing on the visible and near infra-red parts of the spectrum. The site will become a European contribution to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) initiative RadCalNet (Radiometric Calibration Network). The exact location of the permanent monitoring instrumentation will be defined following the initial site characterisation. The new ESA/CNES RadCalNet site will have a robust uncertainty budget and its data fully SI traceable through detailed characterisation and calibration by NPL of the instruments and artefacts to be used on the site. This includes a CIMEL sun photometer (the permanent instrumentation) an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer, Gonio Radiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS), and reference reflectance standards.

  1. Inflight Radiometric Calibration of New Horizons' Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Howett, C J A; Olkin, C B; Reuter, D C; Ennico, K; Grundy, W M; Graps, A L; Harrison, K P; Throop, H B; Buie, M W; Lovering, J R; Porter, S B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A; Stern, S A; Beyer, R A; Binzell, R P; Buratti, B J; Cheng, A F; Cook, J C; Cruikshank, D P; Ore, C M Dalle; Earle, A M; Jennings, D E; Linscott, I R; Lunsford, A W; Parker, J Wm; Phillippe, S; Protopapa, S; Quirico, E; Schenk, P M; Schmitt, B; Singer, K N; Spencer, J R; Stansberry, J A; Tsang, C C C; Weigle, G E; Verbiscer, A J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two semi-independent calibration techniques used to determine the in-flight radiometric calibration for the New Horizons' Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The first calibration technique compares the observed stellar flux to modeled values. The difference between the two provides a calibration factor that allows the observed flux to be adjusted to the expected levels for all observations, for each detector. The second calibration technique is a channel-wise relative radiometric calibration for MVIC's blue, near-infrared and methane color channels using observations of Charon and scaling from the red channel stellar calibration. Both calibration techniques produce very similar results (better than 7% agreement), providing strong validation for the techniques used. Since the stellar calibration can be performed without a color target in the field of view and covers all of MVIC's detectors, this calibration was used to provide the radiometric keywords delivered by the New Horizons project...

  2. Evaluation of Two Absolute Radiometric Normalization Algorithms for Pre-processing of Landsat Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hanqiu

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate radiometric normalization techniques, two image normalization algorithms for absolute radiometric correction of Landsat imagery were quantitatively compared in this paper, which are the Illumination Correction Model proposed by Markham and Irish and the Illumination and Atmospheric Correction Model developed by the Remote Sensing and GIS Laboratory of the Utah State University. Relative noise, correlation coefficient and slope value were used as the criteria for the evaluation and comparison, which were derived from pseudo-invariant features identified from multitemtween the normalized multitemporal images were significantly reduced when the seasons of multitemporal images were different. However, there was no significant difference between the normalized and unnormalized images with a similar seasonal condition. Furthermore, the correction results of two algorithms are similar when the images are relatively clear with a uniform atmospheric condition. Therefore, the radiometric normalization procedures should be carried out if the multitemporal images have a significant seasonal difference.

  3. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi Krooks

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data.

  4. Lack of clinical relevance in routine final subcultures of radiometrically negative BACTEC blood culture vials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plorde, J.J.; Carlson, L.G.; Dau, M.E.

    1982-11-01

    During a 38-month period, 10,106 blood specimens were received in the laboratory for culture. These were inoculated into 26,424 vials and processed using the BACTEC radiometric detection system. Of these vials, 1,914 were eventually found to be microbiologically positive. Isolates from 836 vials were judged to be contaminants. In the remaining 1,078 vials, growth was first detected visually or radiometrically in 1,062 and by final subculture in 16. Growth from these sixteen bottles represented 12 clinically significant bacteremic episodes in as many patients. In nine of these episodes, other culture vials from the same patient were positive radiometrically. Therefore, 358 of 361 (99.2%) bacteremic episodes were detected without the benefit of routine final subcultures. The three patients whose bacteremia was missed were diagnosed clinically and placed on appropriate therapy prior to the detection of the bacteremias by final subculture.

  5. Radiometric Observations of Supercooled Liquid Water within a Split Front over the Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggli, Mark F.; Reynolds, David W.

    1985-11-01

    A storm bearing close structural resemblance to a katafront was observed from the ground with microwave radiometry and a vertically pointing Ka-band radar over the Sierra Nevada of California. The onset and duration of supercooled liquid water was determined and matched to a split front model used to describe the synoptic features of a katafront. Results indicate that prior to the passage of the upper front no supercooled liquid water was observed. This portion of the storm provided the deepest cloud and coldest cloud tops. Supercooled liquid water was most prevalent after the upper front passage, and persisted until the suspected surface front passage. The duration of measured supercooled water was 16 hours.This information broadens the knowledge regarding the presence of supercooled liquid water, and thus possible seeding potential, within winter storms so that treatment can be confined to the period of storms amenable to cloud seeding. Future studies may well confirm the ease with which these periods can be predicted on an operational basis in the Sierra Nevada.

  6. Radiometric-microbiologic assay of niacin using Kloeckera brevis: analysis of human blood and food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilarte, T.R.; Pravlik, K.

    1983-12-01

    Kloeckera brevis, a yeast, was used as the test organism for the development of a radiometric-microbiologic (RMA) assay for niacin. The assay was determined to be sensitive to the 2 ng niacin per vial level and specific for the biologically active forms of this vitamin. The method was shown to be simple, accurate, and precise in the analysis of niacin in human blood and food. The application of the radiometric technique eliminates some of the problems encountered with conventional turbidimetric-microbiologic assay.

  7. Radiometric survey in mammography: problems and challenges; Levantamento radiometrico em mamografia: problemas e desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, M.V.T.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Garcia, I.F.M.; Ferreira, M.J.; Macedo, E.M., E-mail: navarro@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude

    2015-07-01

    In addition to being mandatory, the radiometric survey is a necessity, especially in the Brazilian reality with the construction of smaller and smaller rooms. However, calibration conditions, the instrumentation and its use, can produce underestimated factors. Measures made at Labprosaud/IFBA, with five different instruments and the ISO N 25 radiation quality, show the possibility of the values presented in the radiometric surveys are underestimated by up to 10 times. The results indicate the need for meters to be calibrated in ISO N qualities, in mammography energy range, in integrated dose mode and exposure times shorter or equal to 1 s. (author)

  8. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James,; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr ...

  9. Airborne lidar and radiometric observations of PBL- and low clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, P. H.; Valentin, R.; Pelon, J.

    1992-01-01

    lidar and narrowbeam IR radiometer is conducted to study the scale integration problem. A good agreement within less than 100 m relies on spatial uniformity and an optically thick layer. In the presence of holes, a discrepancy is observed. This is illustrated in figure 2, displaying as a function of time (1) the lidar signals; (2) the target temperature (either clouds or sea surface) retreived from a narrowbeam IR radiometer, 17 C is the sea surface temperature on that day; and (3) the visible flux, linked to cloud albedo, measured by a pyranometer. In preparation of ASTEX, down- and up-looking measurements where conducted on stratocumulus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean near Quimper in Brittany. Depending on the flight pattern orientation with respect to the wind, the top and bottom cloud morphologies are different. Preliminary results are given on cloud morphology, cloud top PDFs, optical porosity, fractional cloudiness, and comparison of lidar and radiometric measurements.

  10. Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Mason G.

    Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation emitted by rocket-triggered lightning (RTL) have been made in the ultraviolet (UV, 200-360 nm), the visible and near infrared (VNIR, 400-1000 nm), and the long wave infrared (LWIR, 8-12 microm) spectral bands. Measurements were recorded from a distance of 198 m at the University of Florida International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during the summers of 2011 and 2012. The ICLRT provided time-correlated measurements of the current at the base of the RTL channels. Following the onset of a return stroke, the dominant mechanism for the initial rise of the UV and VNIR waveforms was the geometrical growth of the channel in the field-of-view of the sensors. The UV emissions peaked about 0.7 micros after the current peak, with a peak spectral power emitted by the source per unit length of channel of 10 +/- 7 kW/(nm-m) in the UV. The VNIR emissions peaked 0.9 micros after the current peak, with a spectral power of at 7 +/- 4 kW/(nm-m). The LWIR emissions peaked 30-50 micros after the current peak, and the mean peak spectral power was 940 +/- 380 mW/(nm-m), a value that is about 4 orders of magnitude lower than the other spectral band emissions. In some returns strokes the LWIR peak coincides with a secondary maximum in the VNIR band that occurs during a steady decrease in channel current. Examples of the optical waveforms in each spectral band are shown as a function of time and are discussed in the context of the current measured at the channel base. Source power estimates in the VNIR band have a mean and standard deviation of 2.5 +/- 2.2 MW/m and are in excellent agreement with similar estimates of the emission from natural subsequent strokes that remain in a pre-existing channel which have a mean and standard deviation of 2.3 +/- 3.4 MW/m. The peak optical power emitted by RTL in the UV and VNIR bands are observed to be proportional to the square of the peak current at the

  11. Radiometric quality and performance of TIMESAT for smoothing moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer enhanced vegetation index time series from western Bahia State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Elane F.; Sano, Edson E.; Medrado, Euzébio

    2014-01-01

    The launch of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Terra and Aqua platforms in 1999 and 2002, respectively, with temporal resolutions of 1 to 2 days opened the possibility of using a longtime series of satellite images to map land use and land cover classes from different regions of the Earth, to study vegetation phenology, and to monitor regional and global climate change, among other applications. The main objectives of this study were twofold: to analyze the radiometric quality of the time series of enhanced vegetation index (EVI) products derived from the Terra MODIS sensor in western Bahia State, Brazil, and to identify the most appropriate filter to smooth MODIS EVI time series of the study area among those available in the public domain, the TIMESAT algorithm. The 2000 to 2011 time period was considered (a total of 276 scenes). The radiometric quality was analyzed based on the pixel reliability data set available in the MOD13Q1 product. The performances of the three smoothing filters available within TIMESAT (double logistic, Savitzky-Golay, and asymmetric Gaussian) were analyzed using the Graybill's F test and Willmott statistics. Five percent of the MODIS pixels from the study area were cloud-affected, almost all of which were from the rainy season. The double logistic filter presented the best performance.

  12. Automatic Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery with the Iteratively Re-weighted MAD Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton John; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2008-01-01

    A recently proposed method for automatic radiometric normalization of multi- and hyper-spectral imagery based on the invariance property of the Multivariate Alteration Detection (MAD) transformation and orthogonal linear regression is extended by using an iterative re-weighting scheme involving no...

  13. Observations of the moon by the global ozone monitoring experiment: radiometric calibration and lunar albedo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobber, M.R.; Goede, A.P.H.; Burrows, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new instrument, which was launched aboard the second European Remoting Sensing satellite ESA-ERS2 in 1995. For its long-term radiometric and spectral calibration the GOME observes the sun and less frequently the moon on a regular basis. These measur

  14. Effects of agrochemicals, ultra violet stabilisers and solar radiation on the radiometric properties of greenhouse films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Agrochemicals, based on iron, sulphur and chlorine, generate by products that lead to a degradation of greenhouse films together with a decrease in their mechanical and physical properties. The degradation due to agrochemicals depends on their active principles, method and frequency of application, and greenhouse ventilation. The aim of the research was to evaluate how agrochemical contamination and solar radiation influence the radiometric properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer greenhouse films by means of laboratory and field tests. The films, manufactured on purpose with the addition of different light stabiliser systems, were exposed to natural outdoor weathering at the experimental farm of the University of Bari (Italy; 41° 05’ N in the period from 2006 to 2008. Each film was tested for two low tunnels: one low tunnel was sprayed from inside with the agrochemicals containing iron, chlorine and sulphur while the other one was not sprayed and served as control. Radiometric laboratory tests were carried out on the new films and on samples taken at the end of the trials. The experimental tests showed that both the natural weathering together with the agrochemicals did not modify significantly the radiometric properties of the films in the solar and in the photosynthetically active radiation wavelength range. Within six months of experimental field tests the variations in these radiometric characteristics were at most 10%. Significant variations, up to 70% of the initial value, were recorded for the stabilised films in the long-wave infrared radiation wavelength range.

  15. Development of a five-hour radiometric serum antibacterial assay for gram-positive cocci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckwith, D.G.; Guidon, P.T. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    A preliminary report on a 5-hr radiometric serum antibacterial assay (ABA) for Gram-positive cocci is presented. The method agreed within +- one twofold dilution with static ABA endpoints in 24/26 (92%) of the assays and with cidal ABA end-points in 23/26 (88%) of the assays performed.

  16. New radiometric and petrological constraints on the evolution of the Pichincha volcanic complex (Ecuador)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Fornari, Michel; Mothes, Patricia; van der Plicht, Johannes; Stix, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fieldwork, radiometric ((40)Ar/(39)Ar and (14)C) ages and whole-rock geochemistry allow a reconstruction of eruptive stages at the active, mainly dacitic, Pichincha Volcanic Complex (PVC), whose eruptions have repeatedly threatened Quito, most recently from 1999 to 2001. After the emplacement of bas

  17. New radiometric and petrological constraints on the evolution of the Pichincha volcanic complex (Ecuador)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Fornari, Michel; Mothes, Patricia; van der Plicht, Johannes; Stix, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fieldwork, radiometric ((40)Ar/(39)Ar and (14)C) ages and whole-rock geochemistry allow a reconstruction of eruptive stages at the active, mainly dacitic, Pichincha Volcanic Complex (PVC), whose eruptions have repeatedly threatened Quito, most recently from 1999 to 2001. After the emplacement of bas

  18. Radiometric flight results from the HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg; Smith, Paul; Belting, Chris; Castleman, Zach; Drake, Ginger; Espejo, Joey; Heuerman, Karl; Lanzi, James; Stuchlik, David

    2017-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of the Earth-reflected solar spectrum is necessary for discerning and attributing changes in climate. High radiometric accuracy enables such monitoring over decadal timescales with non-overlapping instruments, and high precision enables trend detection on shorter timescales. The HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS) is a visible and near-infrared spatial/spectral imaging spectrometer intended to ultimately achieve ˜ 0.2 % radiometric accuracies of Earth scenes from space, providing an order-of-magnitude improvement over existing space-based imagers. On-orbit calibrations from measurements of spectral solar irradiances acquired by direct views of the Sun enable radiometric calibrations with superior long-term stability than is currently possible with any manmade spaceflight light source or detector. Solar and lunar observations enable in-flight focal-plane array (FPA) flat-fielding and other instrument calibrations. The HySICS has demonstrated this solar cross-calibration technique for future spaceflight instrumentation via two high-altitude balloon flights. The second of these two flights acquired high-radiometric-accuracy measurements of the ground, clouds, the Earth's limb, and the Moon. Those results and the details of the uncertainty analyses of those flight data are described.

  19. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI Radiometric Performance On-Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Morfitt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  20. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfitt, Ron; Barsi, Julia A.; Levy, Raviv; Markham, Brian L.; Micijevic, Esad; Ong, Lawrence; Scaramuzza, Pat; Vanderwerff, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  1. Radiometric trace analysis of cobalt with diethyldithiocarbamate-35S, or 203Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, P.C. van

    1962-01-01

    Two radiometric methods for the determination of submugram amounts of cobalt are described. (A) Cobalt is extracted from an ammoniacal solution with a zinc-diethyldithiocarbamate-35S solution in chloroform. Excess reagent and interfering metals are removed with mercury(II) and cyanide. The 35S in

  2. Application of radioisotopes Au -198 to radiometrical field investigation of spraying machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraczko, W.; Kocorowska, E. [Technical Univeristy, Poznan (Poland). Radio and Photo-Chemistry Department

    1997-10-01

    The poster shows application of radioisotope {sup 198}Au to radiometrical field testing of spraying machine. In the research was tested the Polish suspensioned tractor OZS400 type spraying machine. The machine worked in two different variants: without and with the beam stabilisation (oscillatory stabilisation)

  3. Establishing metrological traceability for radiometric calibration of earth observation sensor in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S. W.; Zulkifli, A.

    2016-10-01

    The space borne earth observation (EO) sensor provides a continuous large spatial coverage over the earth at relatively low cost (cost-effective) and can be practically accessible worldwide. The daily synoptic view offered by instrument in earth orbit is tremendously useful in various applications, particularly long term global monitoring that needs multi-disciplinary, multi-temporal and multi-sensor data. Due to the indirect measurement nature of the EO sensor, calibration and validation (cal/val) are essentially required to establish the linkage between the acquired raw data and the actual target of interest. Ultimately, EO sensor provider must strive to deliver “the right information, at the right time, to the right people”. This paper is authored with the main aim to report the process of establishing metrological traceability for radiometric calibration of EO sensor at Optical Calibration Laboratory (OCL), National Space Agency of Malaysia (ANGKASA). The paper is structured into six sections. The first section introduces the context of EO and background of radiometric calibration. The next section discusses the requirements for metrological traceability in radiometric calibration while the following third section outlines ANGKASA efforts in setting up the metrological traceability laboratory in radiometric calibration. Meanwhile, the uncertainty estimation results is reported in the fourth section and the fifth section explains some of the continuous efforts made in order to improve the current metrological traceability set up. Lastly, the summary of this paper is provided in the last section.

  4. ANALYZING SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SHADOW AREA FROM ADS-40 HIGH RADIOMETRIC RESOLUTION AERIAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-T. Hsieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40 is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  5. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  6. Analyzing Spectral Characteristics of Shadow Area from ADS-40 High Radiometric Resolution Aerial Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ta; Wu, Shou-Tsung; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Chen, Jan-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i) The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii) DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii) The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv) The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v) Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI) still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40) is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  7. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: An Airborne Proof-of-concept Mapping Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Chuang, C.; Fisher, C.; Muellerschoen, R.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Rignot, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year activities. This was achieved by integrating a Ka-band single-pass interferometric synthetic radar on the NASA Dryden Gulfstream III for a coordinated deployment. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. This proof-of-concept demonstration was motivated by the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN) Instrument Incubator Program and furthermore, highly leveraged existing ESTO hardware and software assets (the Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) and processor and the PR2 (precipitation radar 2) RF assembly and power amplifier). Initial Ka-band test flights occurred in March and April of 2009 followed by the Greenland deployment. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. However, for this application the electromagnetic wave will penetrate an unknown amount into the snow cover thus producing an effective bias that must be calibrated. This penetration will be characterized as part of this program and is expected to vary as a function of snow wetness and radar incidence angle. To evaluate this, we flew a coordinated collection with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper on a transect from Greenland’s Summit its West coast. This flight included two field calibration sites at Colorado Institute for Research in Environmental Science’s Swiss Camp and the National Science Foundation’s Summit station. Additional collections entailed flying a grid over Jakobshavn glacier which were repeated after 6 days to reveal surface dynamics. In this time frame we were able to observe horizontal motion of over 1km on the glacier. While developed for

  8. Automated geographic registration and radiometric correction for UAV-based mosaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, J. Alex; Shi, Yeyin; Sima, Chao; Yang, Chenghai; Cope, Dale A.

    2017-05-01

    Texas A and M University has been operating a large-scale, UAV-based, agricultural remote-sensing research project since 2015. To use UAV-based images in agricultural production, many high-resolution images must be mosaicked together to create an image of an agricultural field. Two key difficulties to science-based utilization of such mosaics are geographic registration and radiometric calibration. In our current research project, image files are taken to the computer laboratory after the flight, and semi-manual pre-processing is implemented on the raw image data, including ortho-mosaicking and radiometric calibration. Ground control points (GCPs) are critical for high-quality geographic registration of images during mosaicking. Applications requiring accurate reflectance data also require radiometric-calibration references so that reflectance values of image objects can be calculated. We have developed a method for automated geographic registration and radiometric correction with targets that are installed semi-permanently at distributed locations around fields. The targets are a combination of black (≍5% reflectance), dark gray (≍20% reflectance), and light gray (≍40% reflectance) sections that provide for a transformation of pixel-value to reflectance in the dynamic range of crop fields. The exact spectral reflectance of each target is known, having been measured with a spectrophotometer. At the time of installation, each target is measured for position with a real-time kinematic GPS receiver to give its precise latitude and longitude. Automated location of the reference targets in the images is required for precise, automated, geographic registration; and automated calculation of the digital-number to reflectance transformation is required for automated radiometric calibration. To validate the system for radiometric calibration, a calibrated UAV-based image mosaic of a field was compared to a calibrated single image from a manned aircraft. Reflectance

  9. Mississippi exploration field trials using microbial, radiometrics, free soil gas, and other techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.S.; Brown, L.R.; Thieling, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mississippi Office of Geology has conducted field trials using the surface exploration techniques of geomicrobial, radiometrics, and free soil gas. The objective of these trials is to determine if Mississippi oil and gas fields have surface hydrocarbon expression resulting from vertical microseepage migration. Six fields have been surveyed ranging in depth from 3,330 ft to 18,500 ft. The fields differ in trapping styles and hydrocarbon type. The results so far indicate that these fields do have a surface expression and that geomicrobial analysis as well as radiometrics and free soil gas can detect hydrocarbon microseepage from pressurized reservoirs. All three exploration techniques located the reservoirs independent of depth, hydrocarbon type, or trapping style.

  10. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  11. Determination of Cloud Ice Water Content and Geometrical Thickness Using Microwave and Infrared Radiometric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man-Li C.

    1987-08-01

    Cloud ice water content and cloud geometrical thickness have been determined using a combination of near-infrared, thermal infrared and thermal microwave radiometric measurements. The radiometric measurements are from a Multispectral Cloud Radiometer, which has seven channels ranging from visible to thermal infrared, and an Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder, which has four channels ranging from 90 to 183 GHz. Studies indicate that the microwave brightness temperatures depend not only on the amount of ice water content but also on the vertical distribution of ice water content. Studies also show that the low brightness temperature at 92 GHz for large ice water content is due to cloud reflection which reflects most of the irradiance incident at the cloud base downward. Therefore the 92 GHz channel detects a low brightness temperature at the cloud top.

  12. Contact sensitivity in mice evaluated by means of ear swelling and a radiometric test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeck, O.; Larsen, A.

    1982-04-01

    Contact sensitivity to picryl chloride was investigated by means of the ear swelling test and a radiometric test in order to establish optimal experimental conditions for these assays. Contact sensitivity was demonstrated as soon as 2 days after sensitization, with a maximum reaction 3-4 days after sensitization, when a 48 hr test reaction was registered. The test reaction was followed for 72 hr and maximum was arrived at after 24 hr and 48 hr for the ear swelling test and the radiometric test, respectively. Optimal sensitization was reached with a 7% solution of picryl chloride and a maximum test reaction was found with 0.75-1.0% picryl chloride. It is concluded that both assays measure contact sensitivity in quantitative terms and a future replacement of the guinea pig maximization test is discussed.

  13. HJ-1A HSI on-orbit radiometric calibration and validation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The calibration experiment data at Dunhuang radiometric calibration site in October, 2008 were used to achieve the on-orbit radiometric calibration for HJ-1A hyper spectral imager (HSI). Two other field experiments data were used to validate the Dunhuang calibration results. One field experiment took place in Inner-Mongolia, China in September, 2008, and the other field experiment took place in Lake Frome, Australia in February, 2009. Finally, the ‘confidence interval of calibration error’ concept was put forward for quantitatively computing the calibration coefficient error confidence interval. The results showed that the Dunhuang calibration results in 2008 had high reliability. The confidence intervals of calibration error for all HSI channels were between 2% to 12%, which could satisfy the requirement of the HSI quantitative applications.

  14. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  15. Determination of in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to cephalosporins by radiometric and conventional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifets, L.B.; Iseman, M.D.; Cook, J.L.; Lindholm-Levy, P.J.; Drupa, I.

    1985-01-01

    Among eight cephalosporins and cephamycins tested in preliminary in vitro screening against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the most promising for further study was found to be ceforanide, followed by ceftizoxime, cephapirin, and cefotaxime. Moxalactam, cefoxitin, cefamandole, and cephalothin were found to be not active enough against M. tuberculosis to be considered for further in vitro studies. The antibacterial activity of various ceforanide concentrations was investigated by three methods: (i) the dynamics of radiometric readings (growth index) in 7H12 broth; (ii) the number of CFU in the same medium; and (iii) the proportion method on 7H11 agar plates. There was a good correlation among the results obtained with these methods. The MIC for most strains ranged from 6.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml. The BACTEC radiometric method is a reliable, rapid, and convenient method for preliminary screening and determination of the level of antibacterial activity of drugs not commonly used against M. tuberculosis.

  16. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  17. Development of absolute radiometric response functions for HyPlant & G-LiHT using SIRCUS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to provide absolute radiometric and cross-calibrated spectral characterizations for G-LiHT and HyPlant.  The objectives are: (i) to...

  18. A new relative radiometric consistency processing method for change detection based on wavelet transform and a low-pass filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The research purpose of this paper is to show the limitations of the existing radiometric normalization approaches and their disadvantages in change detection of artificial objects by comparing the existing approaches,on the basis of which a preprocessing approach to radiometric consistency,based on wavelet transform and a spatial low-pass filter,has been devised.This approach first separates the high frequency information and low frequency information by wavelet transform.Then,the processing of relative radiometric consistency based on a low-pass filter is conducted on the low frequency parts.After processing,an inverse wavelet transform is conducted to obtain the results image.The experimental results show that this approach can substantially reduce the influence on change detection of linear or nonlinear radiometric differences in multi-temporal images.

  19. Improving Ocean Color Data Products using a Purely Empirical Approach: Reducing the Requirement for Radiometric Calibration Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric calibration is the foundation upon which ocean color remote sensing is built. Quality derived geophysical products, such as chlorophyll, are assumed to be critically dependent upon the quality of the radiometric calibration. Unfortunately, the goals of radiometric calibration are not typically met in global and large-scale regional analyses, and are especially deficient in coastal regions. The consequences of the uncertainty in calibration are very large in terms of global and regional ocean chlorophyll estimates. In fact, stability in global chlorophyll requires calibration uncertainty much greater than the goals, and outside of modern capabilities. Using a purely empirical approach, we show that stable and consistent global chlorophyll values can be achieved over very wide ranges of uncertainty. Furthermore, the approach yields statistically improved comparisons with in situ data, suggesting improved quality. The results suggest that accuracy requirements for radiometric calibration cab be reduced if alternative empirical approaches are used.

  20. High-speed radiometric imaging with a gated, intensified, digitally controlled camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Charles C.; Sturz, Richard A.

    1997-05-01

    The development of an advanced instrument for real-time radiometric imaging of high-speed events is described. The Intensified Digitally-Controlled Gated (IDG) camera is a microprocessor-controlled instrument based on an intensified CCD that is specifically designed to provide radiometric optical data. The IDG supports a variety of camera- synchronous and camera-asynchronous imaging tasks in both passive imaging and active laser range-gated applications. It features both automatic and manual modes of operation, digital precision and repeatability, and ease of use. The IDG produces radiometric imagery by digitally controlling the instrument's optical gain and exposure duration, and by encoding and annotating the parameters necessary for radiometric analysis onto the resultant video signal. Additional inputs, such as date, time, GPS, IRIG-B timing, and other data can also be encoded and annotated. The IDG optical sensitivity can be readily calibrated, with calibration data tables stored in the camera's nonvolatile flash memory. The microprocessor then uses this data to provide a linear, calibrated output. The IDG possesses both synchronous and asynchronous imaging modes in order to allow internal or external control of exposure, timing, and direct interface to external equipment such as event triggers and frame grabbers. Support for laser range-gating is implemented by providing precise asynchronous CCD operation and nanosecond resolution of the intensifier photocathode gate duration and timing. Innovative methods used to control the CCD for asynchronous image capture, as well as other sensor and system considerations relevant to high-speed imaging are discussed in this paper.

  1. A procedure for radiometric recalibration of Landsat 5 TM reflective-band data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Haque, M.O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has been benefiting from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for the L5 TM imagery used the detectors' response to the internal calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time, causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20%. In May 2003, the L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center through the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) were updated to use a lifetime lookup-table (LUT) gain model to radiometrically calibrate TM data instead of using scene-specific IC gains. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. The L5 TM data processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work-order report that was included in the original standard data product delivery is available. However, if users do not have the original work-order report, the IC trends can be used for recalibration. The IC trends were generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database. This paper provides the details of the recalibration procedure for the following: 1) data processed using IC where users have the work-order file; 2) data processed using IC where users do not have the work-order file; 3) data processed using prelaunch calibration parameters; and 4) data processed using the previous version of the LUT (e.g., LUT03) that was released before April 2, 2007.

  2. Impact of the cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determining spectral reflectance coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orych, A.; Walczykowski, P.; Jenerowicz, A.; Zdunek, Z.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays remote sensing plays a very important role in many different study fields, i.e. environmental studies, hydrology, mineralogy, ecosystem studies, etc. One of the key areas of remote sensing applications is water quality monitoring. Understanding and monitoring of the water quality parameters and detecting different water contaminants is an important issue in water management and protection of whole environment and especially the water ecosystem. There are many remote sensing methods to monitor water quality and detect water pollutants. One of the most widely used method for substance detection with remote sensing techniques is based on usage of spectral reflectance coefficients. They are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements. These however can be very time consuming, therefore image-based methods are used more and more often. In order to work out the proper methodology of obtaining spectral reflectance coefficients from hyperspectral and multispectral images, it is necessary to verify the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determination of them. This paper presents laboratory experiments that were conducted using two monochromatic XEVA video sensors (400-1700 nm spectral data registration) with two different radiometric resolutions (12 and 14 bits). In view of determining spectral characteristics from images, the research team used set of interferometric filters. All data collected with multispectral digital video cameras were compared with spectral reflectance coefficients obtained with spectroradiometer. The objective of this research is to find the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on reflectance values in chosen wavelength. The main topic of this study is the analysis of accuracy of spectral coefficients from sensors with different radiometric resolution. By comparing values collected from images acquired with XEVA sensors and with the curves obtained with spectroradiometer it

  3. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  4. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Andujar Marquez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  5. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  6. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A.; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J.; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρapp), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρapp are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρapp error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρapp from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  7. Radiometric resolution enhancement by lossy compression as compared to truncation followed by lossless compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.; Manohar, Mareboyana

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology make it possible to obtain imagery data of the Earth at high spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions from Earth orbiting satellites. The rate at which the data is collected from these satellites can far exceed the channel capacity of the data downlink. Reducing the data rate to within the channel capacity can often require painful trade-offs in which certain scientific returns are sacrificed for the sake of others. In this paper we model the radiometric version of this form of lossy compression by dropping a specified number of least significant bits from each data pixel and compressing the remaining bits using an appropriate lossless compression technique. We call this approach 'truncation followed by lossless compression' or TLLC. We compare the TLLC approach with applying a lossy compression technique to the data for reducing the data rate to the channel capacity, and demonstrate that each of three different lossy compression techniques (JPEG/DCT, VQ and Model-Based VQ) give a better effective radiometric resolution than TLLC for a given channel rate.

  8. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  9. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility.

  10. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Buizert, Christo; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination, and 2) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (MIS 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samp...

  11. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L B; Strahler, Alan H; Schaaf, Crystal B; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-03-02

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna(®) Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρ(app)), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρ(app) are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρ(app) error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρ(app) from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars.

  12. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  13. Gamma-ray-based measurement of concentration distribution in pipe flow of settling slurry: vertical profiles and tomographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupička Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Principles of gamma-ray-based measurement are summarized and their application is demonstrated on an operation of the radiometric facility installed in the test loop for slurry flows at the Institute of Hydrodynamics. The facility is able to measure vertical profiles of chord-averaged concentrations and concentration maps in the pipe cross section. A methodology of measurement is proposed including detection and quantification of random and systematic errors. Experimental results are discussed in the light of the proposed methodology. Experimentally determined vertical profiles of concentration are presented for slurry flows of four different fractions of glass beads. The tomographic application of the radiometric device is demonstrated on a measured concentration map and a suitable image reconstruction method is tested. High reliability of measured concentration distributions is proved except for regions near the pipe wall. The radiometric method is shown to be a useful tool for measurement of concentration distribution in slurry flow through a pipe.

  14. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume 1: Processing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennel, E. P.; Hinze, W. J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in preparing regional profile and contour maps are discussed. Survey contractor supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer based procedure. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps: (1) profile map of contractor supplied magnetic anomaly data; (2) profile map of high cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track; (3) profile map of critical point data with contour levels indicated; and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data.

  15. Urban vegetation detection using radiometrically calibrated small-footprint full-waveform airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfle, Bernhard; Hollaus, Markus; Hagenauer, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new GIS workflow for urban vegetation mapping from high-density (50 pts./m 2) full-waveform airborne LiDAR data, combining the advantages of both raster and point cloud based analysis. Polygon segments derived by edge-based segmentation of the normalized digital surface model are used for classification. A rich set of segment features based on the point cloud and derived from full-waveform attributes is built, serving as input for a decision tree and artificial neural network (ANN) classifier. Exploratory data analysis and detailed investigation of the discriminative power of selected point cloud and full-waveform LiDAR observables indicate a high value of the occurrence of multiple distinct targets in a laser beam (i.e. 'echo ratio') for vegetation classification (98% correctness). The radiometric full-waveform observables (e.g. backscattering coefficient) do not suffice as single discriminators with low correctness values using a decision tree classifier (⩽72% correctness) but higher values with ANN (⩽95% correctness). Tests using reduced point densities indicate that the derived segment features and classification accuracies remain relatively stable even up to a reduction factor of 10 (5 pts./m 2). In a representative study area in the City of Vienna/Austria the applicability of the developed object-based GIS workflow is demonstrated. The unique high density full-waveform LiDAR data open a new scale in 3D object characterization but demands for novel joint strategies in object-based raster and 3D point cloud analysis.

  16. Results from the radiometric validation of Sentinel-3 optical sensors using natural targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougnie, Bertrand; Desjardins, Camille; Besson, Bruno; Bruniquel, Véronique; Meskini, Naceur; Nieke, Jens; Bouvet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The recently launched SENTINEL-3 mission measures sea surface topography, sea/land surface temperature, and ocean/land surface colour with high accuracy. The mission provides data continuity with the ENVISAT mission through acquisitions by multiple sensing instruments. Two of them, OLCI (Ocean and Land Colour Imager) and SLSTR (Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer) are optical sensors designed to provide continuity with Envisat's MERIS and AATSR instruments. During the commissioning, in-orbit calibration and validation activities are conducted. Instruments are in-flight calibrated and characterized primarily using on-board devices which include diffusers and black body. Afterward, vicarious calibration methods are used in order to validate the OLCI and SLSTR radiometry for the reflective bands. The calibration can be checked over dedicated natural targets such as Rayleigh scattering, sunglint, desert sites, Antarctica, and tentatively deep convective clouds. Tools have been developed and/or adapted (S3ETRAC, MUSCLE) to extract and process Sentinel-3 data. Based on these matchups, it is possible to provide an accurate checking of many radiometric aspects such as the absolute and interband calibrations, the trending correction, the calibration consistency within the field-of-view, and more generally this will provide an evaluation of the radiometric consistency for various type of targets. Another important aspect will be the checking of cross-calibration between many other instruments such as MERIS and AATSR (bridge between ENVISAT and Sentinel-3), MODIS (bridge to the GSICS radiometric standard), as well as Sentinel-2 (bridge between Sentinel missions). The early results, based on the available OLCI and SLSTR data, will be presented and discussed.

  17. Detection of anti-tuberculosis activity in some folklore plants by radiometric BACTEC assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Shukla, C; Bisht, G R S; Saikia, D; Kumar, S; Thakur, R L

    2011-01-01

    The anti-tubercular drugs are less effective because of the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis, so plants being an alternative source of anti-microbial compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-tuberculosis potential of the plants using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a rapid screening model for detection of anti-mycobacterial activity and further to evaluate the active plants for anti-tuberculosis activity against M. tuberculosis using radiometric BACTEC assay. The 15 plants were screened for anti-mycobacterial activity against M. smegmatis by the disk diffusion assay. The ethanolic extracts of Mallotus philippensis, Vitex negundo, Colebrookea oppositifolia, Rumex hastatus, Mimosa pudica, Kalanchoe integra and Flacourtia ramontchii were active against M. smegmatis in primary screening. The anti-tuberculosis potential was identified in the leaves extracts of Mallotus philippensis by radiometric BACTEC assay. The ethanolic extract of M. philippensis showed anti-tuberculosis activity against virulent and avirulent strains of M. tuberculosis H(37) Rv and M. tuberculosis H(37) Ra with minimum inhibitory concentration 0·25 and 0·125 mg ml(-1), respectively. The inhibition in growth index values of M. tuberculosis was observed in the presence of ethyl acetate fraction at a minimum concentration of 0·05 mg ml(-1). We found that BACTEC radiometric assay is a valuable method for detection of anti-tuberculosis activity of the plant extracts. The results indicate that ethanolic extract and ethyl acetate fraction of M. philippensis exhibited significant anti-mycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis. These findings provide scientific evidence to support the traditional medicinal uses of M. philippensis and indicate a promising potential of this plant for the development of anti-tuberculosis agent. © 2010 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied

  18. Analysis of Sentinel-1 Radiometric Stability and Quality for Land Surface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad El Hajj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Land monitoring using temporal series of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images requires radiometrically well calibrated sensors. In this paper, the radiometric stability of the new SAR Sentinel-1A “S-1A” sensor was first assessed by analyzing temporal variations of the backscattering coefficient (σ° returned from invariant targets. Second, the radiometric level of invariant targets was compared from S-1A and Radarsat-2 “RS-2” data. The results show three stable sub-time series of S-1A data. The first (between 1 October 2014 and 19 March 2015 and third (between 25 November 2015 and 1 February 2016 sub-time series have almost the same mean σ°-values (a difference lower than 0.3 dB. The mean σ°-value of the second sub-time series (between 19 March 2015 and 25 November 2015 is higher than that of the first and the third sub-time series by roughly 0.9 dB. Moreover, our results show that the stability of each sub-time series is better than 0.48 dB. In addition, the results show that S-1A images of the first and third sub-time series appear to be well calibrated in comparison to RS-2 data, with a difference between S-1A and RS-2 lower than 0.3 dB. However, the S-1A images of the second sub-time series have σ°-values that are higher than those from RS-2 by roughly 1 dB.

  19. L5 TM radiometric recalibration procedure using the internal calibration trends from the NLAPS trending database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Haque, Md. O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the earth science user community has benefited from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20 percent. In May 2003 the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) was updated to use a gain model rather than the scene acquisition specific IC gains to calibrate TM data processed in the United States. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. L5 TM data that were processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing Level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work order report that was originally included in the standard data product delivery is available. However, many users may not have the original work order report. In such cases, the IC gain look-up table that was generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database can be used for recalibration. This paper discusses the procedure to recalibrate L5 TM data when the work order report originally used in processing is not available. A companion paper discusses the generation of the NLAPS IC gain and bias look-up tables required to perform the recalibration.

  20. Spatial and radiometric characterization of multi-spectrum satellite images through multi-fractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carmelo; Tarquis, Ana M.; Zúñiga, Ignacio; Benito, Rosa M.

    2017-03-01

    Several studies have shown that vegetation indexes can be used to estimate root zone soil moisture. Earth surface images, obtained by high-resolution satellites, presently give a lot of information on these indexes, based on the data of several wavelengths. Because of the potential capacity for systematic observations at various scales, remote sensing technology extends the possible data archives from the present time to several decades back. Because of this advantage, enormous efforts have been made by researchers and application specialists to delineate vegetation indexes from local scale to global scale by applying remote sensing imagery. In this work, four band images have been considered, which are involved in these vegetation indexes, and were taken by satellites Ikonos-2 and Landsat-7 of the same geographic location, to study the effect of both spatial (pixel size) and radiometric (number of bits coding the image) resolution on these wavelength bands as well as two vegetation indexes: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). In order to do so, a multi-fractal analysis of these multi-spectral images was applied in each of these bands and the two indexes derived. The results showed that spatial resolution has a similar scaling effect in the four bands, but radiometric resolution has a larger influence in blue and green bands than in red and near-infrared bands. The NDVI showed a higher sensitivity to the radiometric resolution than EVI. Both were equally affected by the spatial resolution. From both factors, the spatial resolution has a major impact in the multi-fractal spectrum for all the bands and the vegetation indexes. This information should be taken in to account when vegetation indexes based on different satellite sensors are obtained.

  1. Radiometric trend of lunar calibration compared with vicarious calibration for GOSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, K.; Kawakami, S.; Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Hashiguchi, T.; Kataoka, F.; Higuchi, R.; Bruegge, C. J.; Schwandner, F. M.; Chapsky, L.

    2014-12-01

    GOSAT observes a nearly full moon for the on-orbit radiometric calibration of the FTS SWIR bands and the CAI. Lunar calibrations are operated in April/May for investigation of continuous annual radiometric trends and in June/July, corresponding to the annual Railroad Valley Cal/Val campaign. JAXA's Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) is since 2009 in polar orbit to monitor greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 from space. GOSAT consists of a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and a Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The FTS has 3 polarized SWIR narrow bands and a TIR wide band. The FTS observes globally with gridded points of 10 km FOV using discrete pointing. The CAI carries 4 radiometers in the UV to SWIR with high spatial resolution of 0.5-1.5 km and a wide swath of 1000 km. Since the 3rd year, lunar calibration has been planned to observe at a phase angle around 7 degrees from normal incidence. This choice avoids the reflectance opposition surge in order to target the nearly-unchanged and brightest reflectance as a function of phase angle. The Railroad Valley vicarious calibration campaign is conducted by measuring the surface reflectance and atmospheric parameters coincident with a dedicated GOSAT target observation, to derive top-of-the-atmosphere radiance. The nadir surface reflectance is collected in 500x500 m areas corresponding to the CAI resolution. The off-nadir reflectance is measured simultaneously with BRDF values, for correction. We will summarize the radiometric study of the GOSAT lunar calibration compared with the vicarious calibration. In-flight coincident calibration activities will continue with GOSAT and OCO-2.

  2. A novel solution for car traffic control based on radiometric microwave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Denisov, Alexander; Speziale, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The significant problem of traffic in big cities, connected with huge and building up quantity of automobile cars, demands for novel strategies, based on nonconventional solutions, in order to improve system traffic control, especially at crossroads. As well known, the usual solution is based on the time relay, which requires the installation of a fixed traffic interval (signal light switching) at a crossroad; this solution is low cost, but does not account for the actual traffic conditions. Therefore, in the recent years, attention is towards to new designs, where the monitoring of the and control of traffic is carried out by using various methods including, optical, the infrared, magnetic, radar tracking, acoustical ones. In this work, we discuss the deployment of high sensitivity radiometric systems and radiometers(sensor) in the microwave range [1, 2]. In fact, the radiometer as "sensor" can provide an always updated information about the car traffic in any weather condition and in absence or low visibility conditions. In fact, the radiometric sensor detects the cars thanks to the different behavior of the car roofs which reflect the cold sky whereas the road asphalt is visible as warm object (at around outside temperature). [1] A. G. Denisov, V. P. Gorishnyak, S. E. Kuzmin et al., "Some experiments concerning resolution of 32 sensors passive 8mm wave imaging system," in Proceedings of the International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology (ISSTT '09), Charlottesville, Va, USA, April 2009. [2] F. Soldovieri, A. Natale, V. Gorishnyak, A. Pavluchenko, A. Denisov, and L. Chen, "Radiometric Imaging for Monitoring and Surveillance Issues," International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, vol. 2013, Article ID 272561, 8 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/272561.

  3. Titan Density Reconstruction Using Radiometric and Cassini Attitude Control Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luis G., Jr.; Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods of Titan atmospheric density reconstruction for the Titan 87 Cassini flyby. T87 was a unique flyby that provided independent Doppler radiometric measurements on the ground throughout the flyby including at Titan closest approach. At the same time, the onboard accelerometer provided an independent estimate of atmospheric drag force and density during the flyby. These results are compared with the normal method of reconstructing atmospheric density using thruster on-time and angular momentum accumulation. Differences between the estimates are analyzed and a possible explanation for the differences is evaluated.

  4. Analysis of radiometric signal in sedimentating suspension flow in open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zych Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues related to the estimation of the sedimentating solid particles average flow velocity in an open channel using radiometric methods. Due to the composition of the compound, which formed water and diatomite, received data have a very weak signal to noise ratio. In the process analysis the known determining of the solid phase transportation time delay the classical cross-correlation function is the most reliable method. The use of advanced frequency analysis based on mutual spectral density function and wavelet transform of recorded signals allows a reduction of the noise contribution.

  5. Analysis of radiometric signal in sedimentating suspension flow in open channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Petryka, Leszek; Świsulski, Dariusz; Doktor, Marek; Mastej, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    The article discusses issues related to the estimation of the sedimentating solid particles average flow velocity in an open channel using radiometric methods. Due to the composition of the compound, which formed water and diatomite, received data have a very weak signal to noise ratio. In the process analysis the known determining of the solid phase transportation time delay the classical cross-correlation function is the most reliable method. The use of advanced frequency analysis based on mutual spectral density function and wavelet transform of recorded signals allows a reduction of the noise contribution.

  6. On-Orbit Radiometric Performance of the Landsat 8 ThermalInfrared Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Montanaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS requirements for noise, stability, and uniformity were designed to ensure the radiometric integrity of the data products. Since the launch of Landsat 8 in February 2013, many of these evaluations have been based on routine measurements of the onboard calibration sources, which include a variable-temperature blackbody and a deep space view port. The noise equivalent change in temperature (NEdT of TIRS data is approximately 0.05 K @ 300 K in both bands, exceeding requirements by about a factor of 8 and Landsat 7 ETM+ performance by a factor of 3. Coherent noise is not readily apparent in TIRS data. No apparent change in the detector linearization has been observed. The radiometric stability of the TIRS instrument over the period between radiometric calibrations (about 40 min is less than one count of dark current and the variation in terms of radiance is less than 0.015 \\(W/m^2/sr/\\mu m\\ (or 0.13 K at 300 K, easily meeting the short term stability requirements. Long term stability analysis has indicated a degradation of about 0.2% or less per year. The operational calibration is only updated using the biases taken every orbit, due to the fundamental stability of the instrument. By combining the data from two active detector rows per band, 100% detector operability is maintained for the instrument. No trends in the noise, operability, or short term radiometric stability are apparent over the mission life. The uniformity performance is more difficult to evaluate as scene-varying banding artifacts have been observed in Earth imagery. Analyses have shown that stray light is affecting the recorded signal from the Earth and inducing the banding depending on the content of the surrounding Earth surface. As the stray light effects are stronger in the longer wavelength TIRS band11 (12.0 \\(\\mu m\\, the uniformity is better in the shorter wavelength band10 (10.9 \\(\\mu m\\. Both bands have exceptional noise and

  7. Titan Density Reconstruction Using Radiometric and Cassini Attitude Control Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luis G., Jr.; Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods of Titan atmospheric density reconstruction for the Titan 87 Cassini flyby. T87 was a unique flyby that provided independent Doppler radiometric measurements on the ground throughout the flyby including at Titan closest approach. At the same time, the onboard accelerometer provided an independent estimate of atmospheric drag force and density during the flyby. These results are compared with the normal method of reconstructing atmospheric density using thruster on-time and angular momentum accumulation. Differences between the estimates are analyzed and a possible explanation for the differences is evaluated.

  8. A Kalman Approach to Lunar Surface Navigation using Radiometric and Inertial Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David T.; Welch, Bryan W.; Sands, O. Scott; Nguyen, Binh V.

    2009-01-01

    Future lunar missions supporting the NASA Vision for Space Exploration will rely on a surface navigation system to determine astronaut position, guide exploration, and return safely to the lunar habitat. In this report, we investigate one potential architecture for surface navigation, using an extended Kalman filter to integrate radiometric and inertial measurements. We present a possible infrastructure to support this technique, and we examine an approach to simulating navigational accuracy based on several different system configurations. The results show that position error can be reduced to 1 m after 5 min of processing, given two satellites, one surface communication terminal, and knowledge of the starting position to within 100 m.

  9. CrIS Sensor Temperature Effects on CrIS Radiometric Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Esplin, Mark; Zavyalov, Vladimir; Grant, Kevin; Scott, Deron

    2012-01-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) sensor was launched on the Suomi NPP spacecraft October 28, 2011. The CrIS sensor is a Michelson interferometer with a 3 x 3 detectors for each of three spectral bands: LWIR 650-1095 wavenumbers, MWIR 1210-1750 wavenumbers and SWIR 2155-2550 wavenumbers. The CrIS sensor is performing very well and is generally exceeding the noise, radiometric and spectral performance requirements for its primary weather sensing mission. However, for climate change appli...

  10. Radiometric and spectral calibrations of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) using principle component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-10-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw GIFTS interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. The radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. The absolute radiometric performance of the instrument is affected by several factors including the FPA off-axis effect, detector/readout electronics induced nonlinearity distortions, and fore-optics offsets. The GIFTS-EDU, being the very first imaging spectrometer to use ultra-high speed electronics to readout its large area format focal plane array detectors, operating at wavelengths as large as 15 microns, possessed non-linearity's not easily removable in the initial calibration process. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts remaining after the initial radiometric calibration process, thus, further enhance the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is

  11. Vicarious Radiometric Calibration of a Multispectral Camera on Board an Unmanned Aerial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Del Pozo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of unmanned aerial platforms and multispectral sensors are considered low-cost tools for detailed spatial and temporal studies addressing spectral signatures, opening a broad range of applications in remote sensing. Thus, a key step in this process is knowledge of multi-spectral sensor calibration parameters in order to identify the physical variables collected by the sensor. This paper discusses the radiometric calibration process by means of a vicarious method applied to a high-spatial resolution unmanned flight using low-cost artificial and natural covers as control and check surfaces, respectively.

  12. Algorithms for Relative Radiometric Correction in Earth Observing Systems Resource-P and Canopus-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenin, V. A.; Eremeev, V. V.; Kuznetcov, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper has considered two algorithms of the relative radiometric correction of information obtained from a multimatrix imagery instrument of the spacecraft "Resource-P" and frame imagery systems of the spacecraft "Canopus-V". The first algorithm is intended for elimination of vertical stripes on the image that are caused by difference in transfer characteristics of CCD matrices and CCD detectors. Correction coefficients are determined on the basis of analysis of images that are homogeneous by brightness. The second algorithm ensures an acquisition of microframes homogeneous by brightness from which seamless images of the Earth surface are synthesized. Examples of practical usage of the developed algorithms are mentioned.

  13. FPGA-based data processing module design of on-board radiometric calibration in visible/near infrared bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Li, Chenyang; Yue, Tao; Liu, Na; Jiang, Linjun; Sun, Yue; Li, Mingyan

    2015-12-01

    FPGA technology has long been applied to on-board radiometric calibration data processing however the integration of FPGA program is not good enough. For example, some sensors compressed remote sensing images and transferred to ground station to calculate the calibration coefficients. It will affect the timeliness of on-board radiometric calibration. This paper designs an integrated flow chart of on-board radiometric calibration. Building FPGA-based radiometric calibration data processing modules uses system generator. Thesis focuses on analyzing the calculation accuracy of FPGA-based two-point method and verifies the feasibility of this method. Calibration data was acquired by hardware platform which was built using integrating sphere, CMOS camera (canon 60d), ASD spectrometers and light filter (center wavelength: 690nm, bandwidth: 45nm). The platform can simulate single-band on-board radiometric calibration data acquisition in visible/near infrared band. Making an experiment of calibration coefficients calculation uses obtained data and FPGA modules. Experimental results show that: the camera linearity is above 99% meeting the experimental requirement. Compares with MATLAB the calculation accuracy of two-point method by FPGA are as follows: the error of gain value is 0.0053%; the error of offset value is 0.00038719%. Those results meet experimental accuracy requirement.

  14. PHASS99: A software program for retrieving and decoding the radiometric ages of igneous rocks from the international database IGBADAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mishwat, Ali T.

    2016-05-01

    PHASS99 is a FORTRAN program designed to retrieve and decode radiometric and other physical age information of igneous rocks contained in the international database IGBADAT (Igneous Base Data File). In the database, ages are stored in a proprietary format using mnemonic representations. The program can handle up to 99 ages in an igneous rock specimen and caters to forty radiometric age systems. The radiometric age alphanumeric strings assigned to each specimen description in the database consist of four components: the numeric age and its exponential modifier, a four-character mnemonic method identification, a two-character mnemonic name of analysed material, and the reference number in the rock group bibliography vector. For each specimen, the program searches for radiometric age strings, extracts them, parses them, decodes the different age components, and converts them to high-level English equivalents. IGBADAT and similarly-structured files are used for input. The output includes three files: a flat raw ASCII text file containing retrieved radiometric age information, a generic spreadsheet-compatible file for data import to spreadsheets, and an error file. PHASS99 builds on the old program TSTPHA (Test Physical Age) decoder program and expands greatly its capabilities. PHASS99 is simple, user friendly, fast, efficient, and does not require users to have knowledge of programing.

  15. Analysis of Properties of Reflectance Reference Targets for Permanent Radiometric Test Sites of High Resolution Airborne Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Ahokas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and optimal exploitation of rapidly developing airborne imaging methods requires geometric and radiometric quality assurance of production systems in operational conditions. Permanent test sites are the most promising approach for cost-efficient performance assessment. Optimal construction of permanent radiometric test sites for high resolution airborne imaging systems is an unresolved issue. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of commercially available gravels and painted and unpainted concrete targets for permanent, open-air radiometric test sites under sub-optimal climate conditions in Southern Finland. The reflectance spectrum and reflectance anisotropy and their stability were characterized during the summer of 2009. The management of reflectance anisotropy and stability were shown to be the key issues for better than 5% reflectance accuracy.

  16. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%.

  17. Measurements and analysis of solar direct irradiance-meter on Dunhuang radiometric calibration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, En-chao; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yan-na; Zheng, Xiao-bing; Yan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    In order to realize the quantitative application of satellite remote sensing data and adapt to the demand of field calibration of hyper-spectral remote sensors, the solar direct spectral irradiance-meter was developed. According to the sampling principle of spectral irradiance, the irradiance-meter was designed with some technical improvements, the radiometric calibration based on system-level detector were adopted. Irradiance-meter took part in field calibration experiment on Dunhuang radiometric calibration sites and the correct data results were collected. The measurement results of spectral irradiance were consistent with simulated ground irradiance by MODTRAN model. The relative deviation of atmospheric optical depth(AOD) compared with solar radiometer CE318 was less than 4.84%. The whole day results of the irradiance observations and atmospheric transmission in the data applications were collected, the local atmosphere mode and the change of environment were reflected accurately, the input information of the atmospheric parameter were provided for the study of atmospheric properties and field calibration of remote sensors.

  18. Radiometric assay of red cell and plasma cholinesterase in pesticide appliers from Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, W T; Garry, V F; Kelly, J T; Tarone, R; Griffith, J; Nelson, R L

    1993-03-01

    In this study we demonstrate the uses of radiometric assay to detect anticholinesterases in a human population (N = 80) exposed to a broad spectrum of pesticides. The assay is nondilutional. Therefore, anticholinesterase (AChE) agents with low binding affinity can be detected. Our initial results show statistically significant exposure-related decreases in either red cell (AChE) or plasma cholinesterase activity ((butyrl)cholinesterase; BuChE) occurred not only among pesticide appliers who use organophosphates, but also among appliers of the fumigant phosphine. These data extend earlier observations made in laboratory animals exposed to this fumigant. Significant exposure-related decreases in AChE activity were seen in herbicide appliers and appear to be associated with exposure to the herbicide 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid. There was no evidence of exposure-related decreases in BuChE activity in herbicide appliers. Our in vivo data, coupled with preliminary in vitro studies of phosphine (50% AChE inhibition, 10 ppm) and 2-methoxy-3,6-chlorobenzoic acid (50% AChE and BuChE inhibition, 70 ppm), suggest that the radiometric assay may be used to detect a broader spectrum of biologically active anticholinesterase agents.

  19. Progress in the determination of some astronomical constants from radiometric observations of planets and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitjeva, E. V.

    2001-05-01

    Modern radiometric observations of planets, beginning in 1961, make it possible to determine and improve a broad set of astronomical constants from the value of the astronomical unit (AU) to parameters of PPN formalism. Three main factors that influence the progress in the determination of astronomical constants - 1) reductions of the observational data, 2) dynamical models of planet motion, 3) observational data themselves - are demonstrated in this paper. The reduction of the measurements included all relevant corrections, including the modeling of the topography of Mercury and Venus which reduced the rms residuals for observations by 14.5% and 23% correspondingly. The formal standard deviations of the solution elements of the planets and the AU are improved by 30-50% using the DE405 or EPM2000 ephemerides constructed in IAA (Russia) instead of DE200. It was shown that including the measurements of the Viking and Pathfinder landers, being free from the uncertainties due to planetary topography, into the observational data reduces the uncertainties of adjusted parameters by 1-2 orders. The astronomical constants obtained in the fitting process of the DE405 and EPM2000 ephemerides to data totaling more 80 000 radiometric observations of planets and spacecraft are given.

  20. METHOD OF RADIOMETRIC DISTORTION CORRECTION OF MULTISPECTRAL DATA FOR THE EARTH REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Grigoriev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with technologies of ground secondary processing of heterogeneous multispectral data. The factors of heterogeneous data include uneven illumination of objects on the Earth surface caused by different properties of the relief. A procedure for the image restoration of spectral channels by means of terrain distortion compensation is developed. The object matter of this paper is to improve the quality of the results during image restoration of areas with large and medium landforms. Methods. Researches are based on the elements of the digital image processing theory, statistical processing of the observation results and the theory of multi-dimensional arrays. Main Results. The author has introduced operations on multidimensional arrays: concatenation and elementwise division. Extended model description for input data about the area is given. The model contains all necessary data for image restoration. Correction method for multispectral data radiometric distortions of the Earth remote sensing has been developed. The method consists of two phases: construction of empirical dependences for spectral reflectance on the relief properties and restoration of spectral images according to semiempirical data. Practical Relevance. Research novelty lies in developme nt of the application theory of multidimensional arrays with respect to the processing of multispectral data, together with data on the topography and terrain objects. The results are usable for development of radiometric data correction tools. Processing is performed on the basis of a digital terrain model without carrying out ground works connected with research of the objects reflective properties.

  1. JPSS-1 VIIRS Radiometric Characterization and Calibration Based on Pre-Launch Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Oudrari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1 mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP mission. VIIRS instrument has 22 spectral bands covering the spectrum between 0.4 and 12.6 μm. It is a cross-track scanning radiometer capable of providing global measurements twice daily, through observations at two spatial resolutions, 375 m and 750 m at nadir for the imaging and moderate bands, respectively. This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the government independent team to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR Look-Up-Tables (LUTs. This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs, radiance dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS, and scattered light response. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to both the VIIRS sensor specification and the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  2. Combining mobile terrestrial laser scanning geometric and radiometric data to eliminate accessories in circular metro tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai; Cheng, Xiaojun; Ju, Qiaoqiao

    2016-07-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a noninvasive technique to monitor surface conditions and morphological characteristics of structures and has been successfully introduced to the regular inspection and maintenance of metro tunnels. To accurately analyze the deformation and structural conditions of a metro tunnel, nonliner points (e.g., outliers and accessories) should be detected and eliminated. Nevertheless, the accessories are attached very closely to the liner and cannot be thoroughly eliminated by three-dimensional (3D) geometric information. This study proposes to separate the liner and accessories by combining TLS geometric and radiometric information. A refitted mobile Faro Focus3D X330 system is used for data collection of a new-built metro tunnel in Hangzhou, China. The results show that the corrected intensity data are an effective physical criterion and a complementary data source to remove accessories that cannot be eliminated by geometric data. After the removal of accessories by geometric and radiometric data, the remaining liner points can accurately reflect the actual structural and deformation conditions of metro tunnels.

  3. Sensible and latent heat flux from radiometric surface temperatures at the regional scale: methodology and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Miglietta

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The CarboEurope Regional Experiment Strategy (CERES was designed to develop and test a range of methodologies to assess regional surface energy and mass exchange of a large study area in the south-western part of France. This paper describes a methodology to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes on the basis of net radiation, surface radiometric temperature measurements and information obtained from available products derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG geostationary meteorological satellite, weather stations and ground-based eddy covariance towers. It is based on a simplified bulk formulation of sensible heat flux that considers the degree of coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere and estimates latent heat as the residual term of net radiation. Estimates of regional energy fluxes obtained in this way are validated at the regional scale by means of a comparison with direct flux measurements made by airborne eddy-covariance. The results show an overall good matching between airborne fluxes and estimates of sensible and latent heat flux obtained from radiometric surface temperatures that holds for different weather conditions and different land use types. The overall applicability of the proposed methodology to regional studies is discussed.

  4. The moon as a radiometric reference source for on-orbit sensor stability calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    The wealth of data generated by the world's Earth-observing satellites, now spanning decades, allows the construction of long-term climate records. A key consideration for detecting climate trends is precise quantification of temporal changes in sensor calibration on-orbit. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (near-UV to shortwave-IR), the Moon can be viewed as a solar diffuser with exceptional stability properties. A model for the lunar spectral irradiance that predicts the geometric variations in the Moon's brightness with ???1% precision has been developed at the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, AZ. Lunar model results corresponding to a series of Moon observations taken by an instrument can be used to stabilize sensor calibration with sub-percent per year precision, as demonstrated by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The inherent stability of the Moon and the operational model to utilize the lunar irradiance quantity provide the Moon as a reference source for monitoring radiometric calibration in orbit. This represents an important capability for detecting terrestrial climate change from space-based radiometric measurements.

  5. Imager-to-radiometer inflight cross calibration: RSP radiometric comparison with airborne and satellite sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. McCorkel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP that takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS, which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI. First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  6. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, R. A.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Woods, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. ( Solar Phys., 2010, doi:10.1007/s11207-009-9485-8). In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  7. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  8. A Radiometric Varying Robust Stereo Matching Algorithm%一种光照度不一致鲁棒立体匹配算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晓倩; 马彩文

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the matching rate of radiometric varying stereo images, a novel stereo matching algorithm based on the improved epipolar distance transformation in log-chromaticity space is proposed. In log-chromaticity space, the intensity proportion of stereo image pairs is computed firstly according to raw disparity map;secondly, epipolar distance transformation is performed on left and right images respectively using proportional intensity deviation parameters;at last, the final disparity map is acquired by the belief propagation method. Theoretically, the matching rate of the proposed algorithm is independent of radiometric varying situations including differences in light source’s position, spectrum, intensity and the parameters setting of cameras. Experimental results indicate that the matching rate of the proposed algorithm is improved at most 60%comparing with the original epipolar distance transformation algorithm and at most 78%comparing with the state of art algorithms such as ANCC (adaptive normalized cross correlation) when applied to textureless image pairs.%为了提高光照度不一致立体图像对的匹配率,提出一种基于对数颜色空间下改进极线距离变换的立体匹配算法。在对数颜色空间下,首先根据初始视差图计算立体图像对的灰度比;然后,采用与灰度比成比例的灰度误差系数,分别对左右图像进行极线距离变换;最后利用置信度传播算法计算视差图。理论上,本文算法的匹配结果不会受光源位置、光源谱分布、光照强度以及摄像机参数设置等光照度不一致因素的影响。实验表明:本文算法的匹配率相对于原始极线距离变换算法最多可提高60%;而应用于弱纹理图像对时,相对于当前先进的自适应归一化算法,匹配率最多可提高78%。

  9. Mapping of magnetic chrons: paleomagnetic polarity map of East Iceland, 0-13 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Through data on palaeomagnetism, stratigraphy and radiometric age dating an immense database on magnetic chrons has been established for the lava succession in Iceland (e.g. Kristjánsson, 2008). Correlation of magnetic chrons with the geomagnetic time scale provides a reasonable age estimate for vast stratigraphic sequences. The basalt lava succession in Iceland has a thickness of tens of kilometers. The magnetostratigraphic data offer, through the help of paleomagnetism and radiometric dating, a detailed timing of events in the evolution of the Iceland mantle plume region. Yet a magnetic polarity map for Iceland has been lacking but during the last 50 years, comprehensive stratigraphic mapping has paved the way for a magnetic polarity map in various parts of Iceland. Here, such a map is presented for a segment of East Iceland, i.e. for lavas ranging in age from 0 to 13 M yr. The map is a compilation based on various studies into the cliff section and stratigraphic work performed by numerous research initiatives, both in relation to hydroelectric research as well as academic projects. References: Kristjánsson, L., 2008. Paleomagnetic research on Icelandic lava flows. Jökull, 58, 101-116. Helgason, J., Duncan, R.A., Franzson, H., Guðmundsson, Á., and M. Riishuus., 2015. Magnetic polarity map of Akrafjall and Skarðsheiði and new 40Ar-39Ar age dating from West Iceland., Presentation at the spring conference of the Icelandic Geological Society, held on March 13th 2015 at the University of Iceland.

  10. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lutz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud fraction estimation using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 on-board the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude and to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud top height (CTH, cloud top pressure (CTP, cloud top albedo (CTA and cloud optical thickness (COT with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than six years of GOME-2A data (February 2007–June 2013, reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing angle dependent and latitude dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with co-located AVHRR geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of −0.15±0.20. From operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its extremely fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument, TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA by using the polarization measurement devices (PMDs.

  11. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Ronny; Loyola, Diego; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Romahn, Fabian

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud-fraction estimation) using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) onboard the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA) is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude) to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud-top height (CTH), cloud-top pressure (CTP), cloud-top albedo (CTA) and cloud optical thickness (COT) with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN) algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than five years of GOME-2A data (April 2008 to June 2013), reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing-angle-dependent and latitude-dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with colocated AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of -0.15 ± 0.20. From an operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its very fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud-fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA using polarization measurement devices (PMDs).

  12. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  13. Dawn Maps the Surface Composition of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T.; Palmer, E.; Reedy, R.; Sykes, M.; Yingst, R.; McSween, H.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccinoni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Filacchione, G.; Magni, G.; Ammannito, E.; Carraro, F.; Coradini, A.; Fonte, S.; Noschese, R.; Tosi, F.; Blewett, D.; Denevi, B.; Lawrence, D.; Buratti, B.; Raymond, C. A.; Combe, J. P.; McCord, T.; Forni, O.

    2011-01-01

    By 7-October-2011, the Dawn mission will have completed Survey orbit and commenced high altitude mapping of 4-Vesta. We present a preliminary analysis of data acquired by Dawn's Framing Camera (FC) and the Visual and InfraRed Spectrometer (VIR) to map mineralogy and surface temperature, and to detect and quantify surficial OH. The radiometric calibration of VIR and FC is described. Background counting data acquired by GRaND are used to determine elemental detection limits from measurements at low altitude, which will commence in November. Geochemical models used in the interpretation of the data are described. Thermal properties, mineral-, and geochemical-data are combined to provide constraints on Vesta s formation and thermal evolution, the delivery of exogenic materials, space weathering processes, and the origin of the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  14. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  15. Optical detectors for integration into a low cost radiometric device for in-water applications: A feasibility study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramkilowan, A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -based remote sensing techniques, coupled with in-situ radiometric technology to offer a powerful and potentially cost effective method of addressing algal bloom related hazards. The work presented in this paper focuses on the decision making processes involved...

  16. Radiometric Measurements on Ag/n-Si Composite Films for Detecting Radiation in the Earth’s Atmospheric Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AFOSR/NE 875 N. Randolph Street Suite 324, room 3112 Arlington VA 22203-1768 Dr. Silversmith 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...008 to 30-11-008 AFOSR Grant # FA9550-08-1-0008 Program Manager - Dr. Donald Silversmith Radiometric Measurements on Ag/n-Si Composite Films for

  17. The Relationship between Balancing Reactions and Reaction Lifetimes: A Consideration of the Potassium-Argon Radiometric Method for Dating Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, William A.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed examination of a commonly accepted practice in geology offers an example of how to stimulate critical thinking, teaches students how to read reactions, and challenges students to formulate better experiments for determining mineral ages more accurately. A demonstration of a Potassium-Argon radiometric method for dating minerals is…

  18. Application of a radiometric method for evaluation of loss of salicylic acid during isolation from biologic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, A

    1983-01-01

    A radiometric method for evaluation of loss of salicylic acid in the process of isolation from biologic material is described. According to this study the mean loss during the total process of isolation amounts to 33.59%, the specific values being 19.47% during protein precipitation, 10.68% during extraction, and 3.44% during evaporation of solvent.

  19. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  20. Experimental results and simulations from aperture synthesis three-dimensional radiometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Neil A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the theory and algorithm of how a three-dimensional (3D) image can be generated using crosscorrelations of radiometric emission from a source measured using antennas in the near field. An example of how the algorithm is used to create 3D images of emission measured from a noise source is presented, indicating the presence of Fresnel noise and aliasing in the experimental data when the source is moved away from the phase centre. Simulations are presented which reproduce the Fresnel noise as generated by a 3x3x3 array of point sources located at the centre of a 2 metre diameter array of antennas representing a security screening portal. Two methods of reducing the Fresnel noise are presented: 1) a software method which makes successive more accurate estimates of the locations and intensities of sources; 2) a hardware method which reduces the coherence length of the radiation by increasing the radiation bandwidth.

  1. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  2. A HISTORICAL OUTLINE OF RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINATION OF THE YENISEY FLOODPLAIN BASED ON LANDSCAPE AND RADIOMETRIC SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Linnik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of technogenic radionuclides discharged by the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (KMCC, Zheleznogorsk in the period from 1958 to 1992 has been studied in floodplain landscapes of the Yenisey river. After shutting down the direct-flow reactors the radioactive contamination of the Yenisey river became dozen times lower. Performed landscape and radiometric studies revealed factors responsible for radionuclide differentiation and the character of radionuclide distribution within two landscape segments of the Yenisey river floodplain. The first segment characterized the impact zone from 16 km to 20 downstream the discharge, the second one was studied in the remote zone as far as 2000 km down the river. Artificial radionuclide contamination was most intensive in the 60-ies of the past century when it reached the Kara Sea. Traces of that contamination were registered in soils of both sites at the depth of 20–50 cm.

  3. Age and duration of the Deccan Traps, India: A review of radiometric and paleomagnetic constraints

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan Pande

    2002-06-01

    A review of the available radiometric and paleomagnetic data from the Deccan Flood Basalt Province (DFBP) suggests that the volcanism was episodic in nature and probably continued over an extended duration from 69Ma to 63Ma between 31R and 28N. It is likely that the most intense pulse of volcanism at 66.9 ± 0.2Ma preceded the Cretaceous Tertiary Boundary (KTB, 65.2 ± 0.2Ma) events by ∼1.7Ma. The magnetostratigraphic record in the Deccan lava pile is incomplete and it is therefore possible that the lava ows constituting the reverse polarity sequence were erupted in more than one reversed magnetic chron.

  4. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT THE CHINA RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION TEST SITE FOR THE REMOTE SENSING SATELITE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉香; 张广顺; 刘志权; 张立军; 朱顺斌; 戎志国; 邱康睦

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive field experiment was made with the support of the project of China Radiometric Calibration Site (CRCS) during June-July 1999. Ground reflectance spectra were measured at Dunhuang Calibration Test Site in the experiment. More than two thousands of spectral curves were acquired in a 20 km × 20 km area. The spectral coverage is from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The measurement values show that reflectance is between 10% and 33% at the VISSWIR spectral region. The standard deviation of reflectance is between 1.0% and 2.0% for the spectral range. Optical characteristics and ground reflectance measurements at the Dunhuang test site, result analysis and error source were described. In addition, a comparison of the reflectance obtained in 1999 with those measured in 1994 and 1996 was also made.

  5. Pre-Launch Radiometric Characterization of JPSS-1 VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff McIntire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-launch characterization and calibration of the thermal emissive spectral bands on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1 Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS is critical to ensure high quality data products for environmental and climate data records post-launch. A comprehensive test program was conducted at the Raytheon El Segundo facility in 2013–2014, including extensive environmental testing. This work is focused on the thermal band radiometric performance and stability, including evaluation of a number of sensor performance metrics and estimation of uncertainties. Analysis has shown that JPSS-1 VIIRS thermal bands perform very well in relation to their design specifications, and comparisons to the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP VIIRS instrument have shown their performance to be comparable.

  6. Radiometric quality of the MODIS bands at 667 and 678nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-10-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the topof- atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  7. DEM-Based SAR Pixel Area Estimation For Enhanced Geocoding Refinement And Radiometric Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Othmar; Santoro, Maurizio; Werner, Charles L.; Wegmuller, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Precise terrain-corrected georeferencing of SAR images and derived products in range-Doppler coordinates is important with respect to several aspects, such as data interpretation, combination with other geodata products, and transformation of, e.g., terrain heights into SAR geometry as used in DInSAR applications. For georeferencing a look-up table is calculated and refined based on a coregistration of the actual SAR image to a simulated SAR image. The impact of using two different implementations of such a simulator of topography-induced radar brightness, an approach based on angular relationships and a pixel-area based method are discussed in this paper. It is found that the pixel-area-based method leads to considerable improvements with regard to the robustness of georeferencing and also with regard to radiometric normalization in layover- affected areas.

  8. Time course of radiometric detection of positive blood cultures in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadow, W.L.; Schwartz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    We have determined the time course of radiometric detection of microbial growth in 2348 positive blood culture specimens obtained at Wyler Children's Hospital during a 5-year interval. Overall 72 and 88% of isolates were detected within 48 and 72 hours after sampling, respectively. For pathogenic organisms aerobic detection was generally more rapid and more inclusive than anaerobic detection. At 48 hours of incubation the detection of six potential pathogens (Salmonella sp., Haemophilus influenzae, Group D streptococci, Neisseria meningitidis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida sp.) was significantly delayed compared with detection of other pathogenic organisms recovered from blood. At 72 hours of incubation the detection rates remained less than 95% for H. influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., coagulase-negative staphylococci, Group D streptococci and Candida sp. These data should assist clinical decisions regarding duration of antibiotic therapy for the presumptive diagnosis of bacteremia in children.

  9. Laboratory experience with radiometric detection of bacteremia with three culture media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicher, K.; Koscinski, D.

    1984-10-01

    In two long-term studies, the BACTEC radiometric system for detection of bacteremia was evaluated with three culture media each: (i) BACTEC media 6A (for aerobes) and 7B (for anaerobes) plus a thioglycolate medium and (ii) BACTEC media 6A, 7B, and 8A (hypertonic). In study 1, clinically significant isolates were identified in 1,873 (13.9%) of 13,432 blood cultures with all three media. The thioglycolate medium revealed 143 (1.1%) organisms not recovered from the 6A and 7B media. In study 2, isolates were identified in 1,135 (12.9%) of 8,759 cultures with all three media; 104 (1.2%) organisms were isolated only from the hypertonic medium. The increased yield of positive cultures in the three-medium system is likely due to the larger volume of blood cultured.

  10. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@ioe.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  11. Importance of radiometric survey in radiodiagnosis installationscalculated; Importancia del levantamiento radiometrico en instalaciones de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, Fernando; Alarcon, Luis; Zapata, Victor H.; Ortega, Dulia; Ramirez, Alfredo; Aravena, Gonzalo [Hospital Clinico Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Ubeda, Carlos [Universidad de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile); Oyarzun, Carlos [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN), Santiago (Chile); Inzulza, Alonso [Hospital Juan Noe (Chile)

    2005-07-01

    A radiometric survey was conducted in two services of imaging with a total of 7 evaluated radiology rooms. The Quality Control Protocol methodology was used in Radiology ARCAL (Regional Agreement of cooperation for the promotion of nuclear science and technology in Latin America and the Caribbean) XLIX of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The effective dose in different positions of interest rates were calculated, from the point of view of radiation protection. All evaluated rooms have rates of effective doses that meet the values limits set in the Protocol ARCAL XLIX, for 82% of the positions evaluated. However operators located in the position A (controlled area) exceed on average 370% with a range of [1-870] the limit proposed by ARCAL XLIX.

  12. Forest Vertical Parameter Estimation Using PolInSAR Imagery Based on Radiometric Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces an innovative radiometric terrain correction algorithm using PolInSAR imagery for improving forest vertical structure parameter estimation. The variance of radar backscattering caused by terrain undulation has been considered in this research by exploiting an iteration optimization procedure to improve the backscattering estimation for a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image. To eliminate the variance of backscatter coefficients caused by the local incident angle, a radiometric normalization algorithm has been investigated to compensate the influence of terrain on backscattering values, which hinders forest vertical parameter estimation. In vertical parameter estimation, species diversity and the spatial distribution of different vegetation have been modeled. Then, a combination of Fisher’s Alpha-Diversity model parameter estimation and the three-stage inversion method was designed for the vertical structure parameter. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in forest height estimation, the classical phase difference and three-stage inversion approach have been performed for the purpose of comparison. The proposed algorithm is tested on ALOS PALSAR (Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar and RADARSAT-2 (Radio Direction and Range Satellite 2 data sets for the Great Xing’an Mountain area and BioSAR (Biomass Synthetic Aperture Radar 2007 data sets for the Remningstorp area. Height estimation results have also been validated using in-situ measurements. Experiments indicate the proposed method has the ability to compensate the influence of terrain undulation and improving the accuracy of forest vertical structure parameter estimation.

  13. Accelerator physics and radiometric properties of superconducting wavelength shifters; Beschleunigerphysik und radiometrische Eigenschaften supraleitender Wellenlaengenschieber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, Michael

    2008-11-17

    Subject of this thesis is the operation of wave-length shifters at electron storage rings and their use in radiometry. The basic aspects of the radiometry, the technical requirements, the influence of wave-length shifters on the storage ring, and results of first measurements are presented for a device installed at BESSY. Most of the calculations are carried out by the program WAVE, which has been developed within this thesis. WAVE allows to calculate the synchrotron radiation spectra of wavelength shifters within an relative uncertainty of 1/100000. The properties of wave-length shifters in terms of accelerator physics as well as a generating function for symplectic tracking calculations can also be calculated by WAVE. The later was implemented in the tracking code BETA to investigate the influence of insertion devices on the dynamic aperture and emittance of the storage ring. These studies led to the concept of alternating low- and high-beta-sections at BESSY-II, which allow to operate superconducting insertion devices without a significant distortion of the magnetic optics. To investigate the experimental aspects of the radiometry at wave-length shifters, a program based on the Monte-Carlo-code GEANT4 has been developed. It allows to simulate the radiometrical measurements and the absorption properties of detectors. With the developed codes first radiometrical measurements by the PTB have been analysed. A comparison of measurements and calculations show a reasonable agreement with deviations of about five percent in the spectral range of 40-60 keV behind a 1-mm-Cu filter. A better agreement was found between 20 keV and 80 keV without Cu filter. In this case the measured data agreed within a systematic uncertainty of two percent with the results of the calculations. (orig.)

  14. RLS Instrument Radiometric Model: Instrument performance theoretical evaluation and experimental checks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, César; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Pérez, Carlos; Hutchinson, Ian; INGLEY, Richard; Rull, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is one of the Pasteur payload instruments located at the Rover of the ExoMars mission and within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme. RLS will explore the Mars surface composition through the Raman spectroscopy technique. The instrument is divided into several units: a laser for Raman emission stimulation, an internal optical head (iOH) for sample excitation and for Raman emission recovering, a spectrometer with a CCD located at its output (SPU), the optical harness (OH) for the units connection, from the laser to the excitation path of the iOH and from the iOH reception path to the spectrometer, and the corresponding electronics for the CCD operation.Due to the variability of the samples to be analyzed on Mars, a radiometry prediction for the instrument performance results to be of the critical importance. In such a framework, and taking into account the SNR (signal to noise ratio) required for the achievement of successful results from the scientific point of view (a proper information about the Mars surface composition), a radiometric model has been developed to provide the requirements for the different units, i.e. the laser irradiance, the iOH, OH, and SPU throughputs, and the samples that will be possible to be analyzed in terms of its Raman emission and the relationship of the Raman signal with respect to fluorescence emission, among others.The radiometric model fundamentals (calculations and approximations), as well as the first results obtained during the bread board characterization campaign are here reported on.

  15. Assessment of the Short-Term Radiometric Stability between Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaxiong; Chander, G.; Angal, Amit

    2009-01-01

    The Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) sensor was launched on April 15th, 1999 and has been in operation for over nine years. It has six reflective solar spectral bands located in the visible and shortwave infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum (0.5 - 2.5 micron) at a spatial resolution of 30 m. The on-board calibrators are used to monitor the on-orbit sensor system changes. The ETM+ performs solar calibrations using on-board Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) and the Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC). The Internal Calibrator Lamp (IC) lamps, a blackbody and shutter optics constitute the on-orbit calibration mechanism for ETM+. On 31 May 2003, a malfunction of the scan-line corrector (SLC) mirror assembly resulted in the loss of approximately 22% of the normal scene area. The missing data affects most of the image with scan gaps varying in width from one pixel or less near the centre of the image to 14 pixels along the east and west edges of the image, creating a wedge-shaped pattern. However, the SLC failure has no impacts on the radiometric performance of the valid pixels. On December 18, 1999, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Proto-Flight Model (PFM) was launched on-board the NASA's EOS Terra spacecraft. Terra MODIS has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 14.5 micron and collects data over a wide field of view angle (+/-55 deg) at three nadir spatial resolutions of 250 m, 500 in 1 km for bands 1 to 2, 3 to 7, and 8 to 36, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with spectral wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The RSB radiometric calibration is performed by using on-board solar diffuser (SD), solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), space-view (SV), and spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). Through the SV port, periodic lunar observations are used to track radiometric response changes at different angles of incidence (AOI) of the scan mirror. As a part of the AM

  16. Study of fade and inter-fade durations in Ku- and Ka- band frequencies using OLYMPUS satellite beacons

    OpenAIRE

    Ajaz, Haroon

    1993-01-01

    Fade and inter-fade duration data obtained from the three beacons at 12, 20, and 30 GHz aboard the OLYMPUS satellite were analyzed. The different types of signal impairments and their causes were highlighted and a literature survey conducted. Twelve months of fade and inter-fade data were analyzed and the results of these statistics are presented in the form of tables and figures. The analysis was done on both the monthly and annual data. These tables and figures show that at t...

  17. A High Efficiency, Miniaturized Ka Band Traveling Wave Tube Based on a Novel Finned Ladder RF Circuit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Wilson, J. D.; Vaden, K. R.; Force, D. A.; Freeman, J. C.; Lesny, G. G.; Kory, C. L.; Chevalier, C. T.; Ebihara, B.; Dayton, J. A.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Space communications architectures are being planned to meet the high rate data distribution requirements of future NASA Enterprise missions. These will require the use of traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) to provide the high frequency, RF (radio frequency) power and efficiency needed for many of the communications links. A program addressing these requirements is currently underway at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the development of a high efficiency, 20 watt, 32 GHz TWT of reduced size and weight that is based on a novel high gain n circuit design, termed the 'finned ladder'.

  18. Radiation Hard Multichannel AlN/GaN HEMT for High Efficiency X- and Ka-Band Power Amplifiers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is directed to the development of low-loss, high power-density Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Gallium Nitride (GaN) heterostructure based transistors for...

  19. KARIN: The Ka-Band Radar Interferometer for the Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Peral, Eva; McWatters, Dalia; Pollard, Brian; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Hughes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several nadir profiling radar altimeters have provided our first global look at the ocean basin-scale circulation and the ocean mesoscale at wavelengths longer than 100 km. Due to sampling limitations, nadir altimetry is unable to resolve the small wavelength ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale that are responsible for the vertical mixing of ocean heat and gases and the dissipation of kinetic energy from large to small scales. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would be a partnership between NASA, CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales) and the Canadian Space Agency, and would have as one of its main goals the measurement of ocean topography with kilometer-scale spatial resolution and centimeter scale accuracy. In this paper, we provide an overview of all ocean error sources that would contribute to the SWOT mission.

  20. Self-Biased Radiation Hardened Ka-Band Circulators for Size, Weight and Power Restricted Long Range Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ferrite control components including circulators and isolators are fundamental building blocks of Transmit/Receive modules (TRM) utilized in high data rate active...

  1. Self-Biased Radiation Hardened Ka-Band Circulators for Size, Weight and Power Restricted Long Range Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ferrite control components including circulators and isolators are fundamental building blocks of Transmit/Receive modules (TRM) utilized in high data rate active...

  2. Over the horizon Ka Band Radio Wave Propagation Studies in the Coastal South Australian Spencer Gulf Region (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    of four vertically distributed 35 GHz continuous wave (CW) carrier transmitters and four vertically distributed receivers at a distance of 26 km. An...transmissions, each of ~45 dBm effective radiated power ( ERP ) at 35.002, 35.004 and 35.006 GHz, were directed towards the receiver site at Point Lowly...Equivalent Radiated Powers ( ERP ) of these sources are similar as are the distributed receiver sensitivities. Invariant of the height location of each

  3. Ku/Ka-band electrically-scanned line array for tri-band cloud and precipitation radar applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spaceborne radar system that operates simultaneously at multiple frequency bands from microwave through millimeter-wave frequencies can exploit the largely varying...

  4. Effects of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus radiometric and geometric calibrations and corrections on landscape characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, James E.; Helder, Dennis; Morfitt, Ron; Choate, Michael J.; Merchant, James W.; Bulley, Henry

    2001-01-01

    The Thematic Mapper (TM) instruments onboard Landsats 4 and 5 provide high-quality imagery appropriate for many different applications, including land cover mapping, landscape ecology, and change detection. Precise calibration was considered to be critical to the success of the Landsat 7 mission and, thus, issues of calibration were given high priority during the development of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Data sets from the Landsat 5 TM are not routinely corrected for a number of radiometric and geometric artifacts, including memory effect, gain/bias, and interfocal plane misalignment. In the current investigation, the effects of correcting vs. not correcting these factors were investigated for several applications. Gain/bias calibrations were found to have a greater impact on most applications than did memory effect calibrations. Correcting interfocal plane offsets was found to have a moderate effect on applications. On June 2, 1999, Landsats 5 and 7 data were acquired nearly simultaneously over a study site in the Niobrara, NE area. Field radiometer data acquired at that site were used to facilitate crosscalibrations of Landsats 5 and 7 data. Current findings and results from previous investigations indicate that the internal calibrator of Landsat 5 TM tracked instrument gain well until 1988. After this, the internal calibrator diverged from the data derived from vicarious calibrations. Results from this study also indicate very good agreement between prelaunch measurements and vicarious calibration data for all Landsat 7 reflective bands except Band 4. Values are within about 3.5% of each other, except for Band 4, which differs by 10%. Coefficient of variation (CV) values derived from selected targets in the imagery were also analyzed. The Niobrara Landsat 7 imagery was found to have lower CV values than Landsat 5 data, implying that lower levels of noise characterize Landsat 7 data than current Landsat 5 data. It was also found that following

  5. Digital Airborne Photogrammetry—A New Tool for Quantitative Remote Sensing?—A State-of-the-Art Review On Radiometric Aspects of Digital Photogrammetric Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Veje

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The transition from film imaging to digital imaging in photogrammetric data capture is opening interesting possibilities for photogrammetric processes. A great advantage of digital sensors is their radiometric potential. This article presents a state-of-the-art review on the radiometric aspects of digital photogrammetric images. The analysis is based on a literature research and a questionnaire submitted to various interest groups related to the photogrammetric process. An important contribution to this paper is a characterization of the photogrammetric image acquisition and image product generation systems. The questionnaire revealed many weaknesses in current processes, but the future prospects of radiometrically quantitative photogrammetry are promising.

  6. Map Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaderpour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce some known map projections from a model of the Earth to a flat sheet of paper or map and derive the plotting equations for these projections. The first fundamental form and the Gaussian fundamental quantities are defined and applied to obtain the plotting equations and distortions in length, shape and size for some of these map projections.

  7. Joint depth map and color consistency estimation for stereo images with different illuminations and cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yong Seok; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Lee, Sang Uk

    2013-05-01

    Abstract—In this paper, we propose a method that infers both accurate depth maps and color-consistent stereo images for radiometrically varying stereo images. In general, stereo matching and performing color consistency between stereo images are a chicken-and-egg problem since it is not a trivial task to simultaneously achieve both goals. Hence, we have developed an iterative framework in which these two processes can boost each other. First, we transform the input color images to log-chromaticity color space, from which a linear relationship can be established during constructing a joint pdf of transformed left and right color images. From this joint pdf, we can estimate a linear function that relates the corresponding pixels in stereo images. Based on this linear property, we present a new stereo matching cost by combining Mutual Information (MI), SIFT descriptor, and segment-based plane-fitting to robustly find correspondence for stereo image pairs which undergo radiometric variations. Meanwhile, we devise a Stereo Color Histogram Equalization (SCHE) method to produce color-consistent stereo image pairs, which conversely boost the disparity map estimation. Experimental results show that our method produces both accurate depth maps and color-consistent stereo images, even for stereo images with severe radiometric differences.

  8. CO₂ laser welding of corneal cuts with albumin solder using radiometric temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmann, Eyal; Livny, Eitan; Loya, Nino; Kariv, Noam; Ravid, Avi; Katzir, Abraham; Gaton, Dan D

    2013-01-01

    To examine the efficacy and reproducibility of CO₂ laser soldering of corneal cuts using real-time infrared fiber-optic radiometric control of tissue temperature in bovine eyes (in vitro) and to evaluate the duration of this procedure in rabbit eyes (in vivo). In vitro experiment: a 6-mm central perforating cut was induced in 40 fresh bovine eyes and sealed with a CO₂ laser, with or without albumin soldering, following placement of a single approximating nylon suture. A fiber-optic radiometric temperature control system for the CO₂ laser was used. Leaking pressure and histological findings were analyzed and compared between groups. In vivo experiment: following creation of a central perforation, 6 rabbit eyes were treated with a CO₂ laser with albumin solder and 6 rabbit eyes were treated with 10-0 nylon sutures. The amount of time needed for completion of the procedures was compared. In vitro experiment: effective sealing was achieved by CO₂ laser soldering. Mean (± SD) leaking pressure was 109 ± 30 mm Hg in the bovine corneas treated by the laser with albumin solder compared to 51 ± 7 mm Hg in the sutured control eyes (n = 10 each; p laser without albumin solder (48 ± 12 mm Hg) and in the cuts sealed only with albumin without laser welding (6.3 ± 4 mm Hg) than in the cuts treated with laser welding and albumin solder. In vivo experiment: mean surgical time was 140 ± 17 s in the laser-treated rabbits compared to 330 ± 30 s in the sutured controls (n = 6; p laser soldering revealed sealed corneal edges with a small gap bridged by coagulated albumin. The inflammatory reaction was minimal in contrast to the sutured controls. No thermal damage was detected at the wound edges. CO₂ laser soldering combined with the fiber-optic radiometer is an effective, reliable, and rapid tool for the closure of corneal wounds, and holds advantages over conventional suturing in terms of leaking pressure and surgical time. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Making SAR Data Accessible - ASF's ALOS PALSAR Radiometric Terrain Correction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. J.; Arko, S. A.; Gens, R.

    2015-12-01

    While SAR data have proven valuable for a wide range of geophysical research questions, so far, largely only the SAR-educated science communities have been able to fully exploit the information content of internationally available SAR archives. The main issues that have been preventing a more widespread utilization of SAR are related to (1) the diversity and complexity of SAR data formats, (2) the complexity of the processing flows needed to extract geophysical information from SAR, (3) the lack of standardization and automation of these processing flows, and (4) the often ignored geocoding procedures, leaving the data in image coordinate space. In order to improve upon this situation, ASF's radiometric terrain-correction (RTC) project is generating uniformly formatted and easily accessible value-added products from the ASF Distributed Active Archive Center's (DAAC) five-year archive of JAXA's ALOS PALSAR sensor. Specifically, the project applies geometric and radiometric corrections to SAR data to allow for an easy and direct combination of obliquely acquired SAR data with remote sensing imagery acquired in nadir observation geometries. Finally, the value-added data is provided to the user in the broadly accepted Geotiff format, in order to support the easy integration of SAR data into GIS environments. The goal of ASF's RTC project is to make SAR data more accessible and more attractive to the broader SAR applications community, especially to those users that currently have limited SAR expertise. Production of RTC products commenced October 2014 and will conclude late in 2015. As of July 2015, processing of 71% of ASF's ALOS PALSAR archive was completed. Adding to the utility of this dataset are recent changes to the data access policy that allow the full-resolution RTC products to be provided to the public, without restriction. In this paper we will introduce the processing flow that was developed for the RTC project and summarize the calibration and validation

  10. Review of Terra MODIS thermal emissive band L1B radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Chris; Menzel, W. P.; Quinn, Greg

    2014-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Earth Observing System Terra satellite, launched into orbit on 18 December 1999, will have a "first light" 15th anniversary on 24 February 2015. For nearly 15 years the MODIS instrument has provided radiances in all spectral bands. Though some detectors have fallen below SNR thresholds, the vast majority of spectral bands continue to provide high quality L1B measurements for use in L2 science algorithms supporting global climate research. Radiometric accuracy of the Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands (TEBs) in the C6 L1B product has been assessed using various approaches over the nearly 15 year Terra MODIS data record, including comparisons with instruments on the ground, in aircraft under-flights, and on other satellites. All of these approaches contribute to the understanding of the Terra MODIS radiometric L1B performance. Early in the lifetime of Terra, ground-based measurements and NASA ER-2 aircraft under-flights revealed that TEBs in the infrared window ("window" bands) are well calibrated and performing within accuracy specifications. The ER-2 under-flights also suggested that many atmospheric bands may be performing outside of specification, especially LWIR CO2 sensitive bands that are subject to optical crosstalk, although analysis uncertainties are larger for atmospheric bands. Beginning in 2007, MetOp-A IASI observations were used to evaluate Terra MODIS TEB performance through Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNO) comparisons. These inter-satellite comparisons largely affirm the early aircraft and ground-based evaluations, showing that all Terra MODIS window bands have small biases, minimal trending, and minor detector and mirror side striping over the 2007-2013 timeframe. Most atmospheric bands are performing satisfactorily near to specification; however, biases, striping and trending are large and significantly out of specification in the water vapor sensitive band 27 and ozone sensitive

  11. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of the HJ-1B IRS in the Thermal Infrared Spectral Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.

    2012-12-01

    The natural calamities occur continually, environment pollution and destruction in a severe position on the earth presently, which restricts societal and economic development. The satellite remote sensing technology has an important effect on improving surveillance ability of environment pollution and natural calamities. The radiometric calibration is precondition of quantitative remote sensing; which accuracy decides quality of the retrieval parameters. Since the China Environment Satellite (HJ-1A/B) has been launched successfully on September 6th, 2008, it has made an important role in the economic development of China. The satellite has four infrared bands; and one of it is thermal infrared. With application fields of quantitative remote sensing in china, finding appropriate calibration method becomes more and more important. Many kinds of independent methods can be used to do the absolute radiometric calibration. In this paper, according to the characteristic of thermal infrared channel of HJ-1B thermal infrared multi-spectral camera, the thermal infrared spectral band of HJ-1B IRS was calibrated using cross-calibration methods based on MODIS data. Firstly, the corresponding bands of the two sensors were obtained. Secondly, the MONDTRAN was run to analyze the influences of different spectral response, satellite view zenith angle, atmosphere condition and temperature on the match factor. In the end, their band match factor was calculated in different temperature, considering the dissimilar band response of the match bands. Seven images of Lake Qinghai in different time were chosen as the calibration data. On the basis of radiance of MODIS and match factor, the IRS radiance was calculated. And then the calibration coefficients were obtained by linearly regressing the radiance and the DN value. We compared the result of this cross-calibration with that of the onboard blackbody calibration, which consistency was good.The maximum difference of brightness temperature

  12. Parallel algorithms of relative radiometric correction for images of TH-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Tingtao; Cheng, Jiasheng; Yang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    The first generation of transitive stereo-metric satellites in China, TH-1 Satellite, is able to gain stereo images of three-line-array with resolution of 5 meters, multispectral images of 10 meters, and panchromatic high resolution images of 2 meters. The procedure between level 0 and level 1A of high resolution images is so called relative radiometric correction (RRC for short). The processing algorithm of high resolution images, with large volumes of data, is complicated and time consuming. In order to bring up the processing speed, people in industry commonly apply parallel processing techniques based on CPU or GPU. This article firstly introduces the whole process and each step of the algorithm - that is in application - of RRC for high resolution images in level 0; secondly, the theory and characteristics of MPI (Message Passing Interface) and OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) parallel programming techniques is briefly described, as well as the superiority for parallel technique in image processing field; thirdly, aiming at each step of the algorithm in application and based on MPI+OpenMP hybrid paradigm, the parallelizability and the strategies of parallelism for three processing steps: Radiometric Correction, Splicing Pieces of TDICCD (Time Delay Integration Charge-Coupled Device) and Gray Level Adjustment among pieces of TDICCD are deeply discussed, and furthermore, deducts the theoretical acceleration rates of each step and the one of whole procedure, according to the processing styles and independence of calculation; for the step Splicing Pieces of TDICCD, two different strategies of parallelism are proposed, which are to be chosen with consideration of hardware capabilities; finally, series of experiments are carried out to verify the parallel algorithms by applying 2-meter panchromatic high resolution images of TH-1 Satellite, and the experimental results are analyzed. Strictly on the basis of former parallel algorithms, the programs in the experiments

  13. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  14. Experimental tests and radiometric calculations for the feasibility of fluorescence LIDAR-based discrimination of oil spills from UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Palombi, Lorenzo; Lognoli, David; Masini, Andrea; Simeone, Emilio

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents experimental tests and radiometric calculations for the feasibility of an ultra-compact fluorescence LIDAR from an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) for the characterisation of oil spills in natural waters. The first step of this study was to define the experimental conditions for a LIDAR and its budget constraints on the basis of the specifications of small UAVs already available on the market. The second step consisted of a set of fluorescence LIDAR measurements on oil spills in the laboratory in order to propose a simplified discrimination method and to calculate the oil fluorescence conversion efficiency. Lastly, the main technical specifications of the payload were defined and radiometric calculations carried out to evaluate the performances of both the payload and the proposed discrimination method.

  15. A definitive calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper anchored to the Landsat-7 radiometric scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, P.M.; Helder, D.L.; Ruggles, T.A.; Landry, R.; Ahern, F.J.; Higgs, N.J.; Barsi, J.; Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Thome, K.J.; Schott, J.R.; Palluconi, Frank Don

    2004-01-01

    A coordinated effort on the part of several agencies has led to the specification of a definitive radiometric calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper (TM) for its lifetime since launch in 1984. The time-dependent calibration record for Landsat-5 TM has been placed on the same radiometric scale as the Landsat-7 enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+). It has been implemented in the National Landsat Archive Production Systems (NLAPS) in use in North America. This paper documents the results of this collaborative effort and the specifications for the related calibration processing algorithms. The specifications include (i) anchoring of the Landsat-5 TM calibration record to the Landsat-7 ETM+ absolute radiometric calibration, (ii) new time-dependent calibration processing equations and procedures applicable to raw Landsat-5 TM data, and (iii) algorithms for recalibration computations applicable to some of the existing processed datasets in the North American context. The cross-calibration between Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ was achieved using image pairs from the tandem-orbit configuration period that was programmed early in the Laridsat-7 mission. The time-dependent calibration for Landsat-5 TM is based on a detailed trend analysis of data from the on-board internal calibrator. The new lifetime radiometric calibration record for Landsat-5 will overcome problems with earlier product generation owing to inadequate maintenance and documentation of the calibration over time and will facilitate the quantitative examination of a continuous, near-global dataset at 30-m scale that spans almost two decades.

  16. Analysis of airborne radiometric data. Volume 2. Description, listing, and operating instructions for the code DELPHI/MAZAS. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, M.; Shreve, D.C.

    1978-12-01

    The computer code DELPHI is an interactive English language command system for the analysis of airborne radiometric data. The code includes modules for data reduction, data simulation, time filtering, data adjustment and graphical presentation of the results. DELPHI is implemented in FORTRAN on a DEC-10 computer. This volume gives a brief set of operations instructions, samples of the output obtained from hard copies of the display on a Tektronix terminal and finally a listing of the code.

  17. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  18. Analysis of hyperspectral field radiometric data for monitoring nitrogen concentration in rice crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroppiana, D.; Boschetti, M.; Confalonieri, R.; Bocchi, S.; Brivio, P. A.

    2005-10-01

    Monitoring crop conditions and assessing nutrition requirements is fundamental for implementing sustainable agriculture. Rational nitrogen fertilization is of particular importance in rice crops in order to guarantee high production levels while minimising the impact on the environment. In fact, the typical flooded condition of rice fields can be a significant source of greenhouse gasses. Information on plant nitrogen concentration can be used, coupled with information about the phenological stage, to plan strategies for a rational and spatially differentiated fertilization schedule. A field experiment was carried out in a rice field Northern Italy, in order to evaluate the potential of field radiometric measurements for the prediction of rice nitrogen concentration. The results indicate that rice reflectance is influenced by nitrogen supply at certain wavelengths although N concentration cannot be accurately predicted based on the reflectance measured at a given wavelength. Regression analysis highlighted that the visible region of the spectrum is most sensitive to plant nitrogen concentration when reflectance measures are combined into a spectral index. An automated procedure allowed the analysis of all the possible combinations into a Normalized Difference Index (NDI) of the narrow spectral bands derived by spectral resampling of field measurements. The derived index appeared to be least influenced by plant biomass and Leaf Area Index (LAI) providing a useful approach to detect rice nutritional status. The validation of the regressive model showed that the model is able to predict rice N concentration (R2=0.55 [p<0.01] RRMSE=29.4; modelling efficiency close to the optimum value).

  19. Determining water use of sorghum from two-source energy balance and radiometric temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of surface actual evapotranspiration (ET can assist in predicting crop water requirements. An alternative to the traditional crop-coefficient methods are the energy balance models. The objective of this research was to show how surface temperature observations can be used, together with a two-source energy balance model, to determine crop water use throughout the different phenological stages of a crop grown. Radiometric temperatures were collected in a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor field as part of an experimental campaign carried out in Barrax, Spain, during the 2010 summer growing season. Performance of the Simplified Two-Source Energy Balance (STSEB model was evaluated by comparison of estimated ET with values measured on a weighing lysimeter. Errors of ±0.14 mm h−1 and ±1.0 mm d−1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively. Total accumulated crop water use during the campaign was underestimated by 5%. It is then shown that thermal radiometry can provide precise crop water necessities and is a promising tool for irrigation management.

  20. A W-Band Radiometer with the Offset Parabolic Antenna for Radiometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of a W-band noise-adding radiometer which combines the millimeter-wave (MMW radiometric measurements with a high-resolution imager. The offset parabolic antenna is presented to achieve an accurate measurement and a high resolution. To reduce the cross-polarization level of the antenna, a multimode feed horn with a multistep structure is proposed to match the focal region fields of the reflector. It has advantages over the corrugated horns in lower mass and easier manufacturing. In addition, due to an unavoidable settling time for the noise-adding radiometer output signal passing through the low-pass filter, a theoretical criterion for the optimum duty cycle determination to reject extraneous contributions from the transient is proposed in this paper. The appropriate duty cycle threshold is 0.33 for the developed W-band radiometer. Also, a geometric correction method is presented to correct the obtained passive image suffering from a distortion for a better image interpretation. Preliminary experimental results are given to illustrate and verify the presented techniques.

  1. Radiometric in-situ calibration of satelital sensors of Earth observation using a spectroradiometer

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    By using the satelital information of Earth observation unloaded by a station constructed in the country and reflectances measurements of the soil, we found the total radiation attenuation of the atmosphere for a small region of the Colombian territory. It was necessary to use the Fourier's theory that describes the ideal filters of signals to find the transfer functions between the spectral response of an spectroradiometer and the satelital sensor, whose radiative sign we are going to calibrate. After that, we used the reflectance spectrum of the soil taken with our spectroradiometer, the information in digital numbers (DN) of a pixel of the satelital image of the same region at the same time, and using again the theory of ideal filters we found the transfer function between the responses of both sensors to the radiance of the soil. The relation between both signals provides us the total intensity of the radiation attenuation of the atmosphere for pixel, which is fundamental to do a radiometric calibration o...

  2. NERO: General concept of a Near-Earth object Radiometric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellino, A.; Somma, R.; Tommasi, L.; Paolinetti, R.; Muinonen, K.; Virtanen, J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Delbò, M.

    Near-Earth objects Radiometric Observatory (NERO) is one of the six studies for possible missions dedicated to near-Earth objects, that were funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2002 2003. It is a further development of some previous studies already submitted to ESA (Sysiphos, Spaceguard-1). The general concept is that a small satellite equipped with both a detector for visible wavelengths and an array for thermal IR measurements around 10 μm would be an ideal platform to obtain simultaneously two of the major objectives of current NEO science, namely the physical characterization of the objects and the discovery of those NEOs that are difficult to detect from the ground because their orbits are entirely or partly inside the Earth’s orbit. The NERO study includes a comprehensive analysis of the advantages and drawbacks of different orbital options for the satellite (including L2 of Earth and L2 of Venus) and a preliminary simulation of the effectiveness of orbit determination based on NERO observations of newly detected objects. The main results of this study, including also a preliminary sketch of the payload design (optics, detectors, cooling system, etc.) are briefly summarized.

  3. Evaluation of Radiometric Performance for the Thermal Infrared Sensor Onboard Landsat 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huazhong Ren

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiometric performance of remotely-sensed images is important for the applications of such data in monitoring land surface, ocean and atmospheric status. One requirement placed on the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS onboard Landsat 8 was that the noise-equivalent change in temperature (NEΔT should be ≤0.4 K at 300 K for its two thermal infrared bands. In order to optimize the use of TIRS data, this study investigated the on-orbit NEΔT of the TIRS two bands from a scene-based method using clear-sky images over uniform ground surfaces, including lake, deep ocean, snow, desert and Gobi, as well as dense vegetation. Results showed that the NEΔTs of the two bands were 0.051 and 0.06 K at 300 K, which exceeded the design specification by an order of magnitude. The effect of NEΔT on the land surface temperature (LST retrieval using a split window algorithm was discussed, and the estimated NEΔT could contribute only 3.5% to the final LST error in theory, whereas the required NEΔT could contribute up to 26.4%. Low NEΔT could improve the application of TIRS images. However, efforts are needed in the future to remove the effects of unwanted stray light that appears in the current TIRS images.

  4. Radiometric compensation for cooperative distributed multi-projection system through 2-DOF distributed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Jun; Iwai, Daisuke; Kashima, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiometric compensation technique for cooperative projection system based-on distributed optimization. To achieve high scalability and robustness, we assume cooperative projection environments such that 1. each projector does not have information about other projectors as well as target images, 2. the camera does not have information about the projectors either, while having the target images, and 3. only a broadcast communication from the camera to the projectors is allowed to suppress the data transfer bandwidth. To this end, we first investigate a distributed optimization based feedback mechanism that is suitable for the required decentralized information processing environment. Next, we show that this mechanism works well for still image projection, however not necessary for moving images due to the lack of dynamic responsiveness. To overcome this issue, we propose to implement an additional feedforward mechanism. Such a 2 Degree Of Freedom (2-DOF) control structure is well-known in control engineering community as a typical method to enhance not only disturbance rejection but also reference tracking capability, simultaneously. We theoretically guarantee and experimentally demonstrate that this 2-DOF structure yields the moving image projection accuracy that is overwhelming the best achievable performance only by the distributed optimization mechanisms.

  5. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  6. Radiometric immunosorbent assay for the detection of anti-hormone-binding protein antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, E.A.; Dame, M.C.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1986-02-15

    A radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) for the detection of monoclonal antibodies to hormone-binding proteins has been developed. The assay involves incubating hybridoma supernatants in microtiter wells that have been coated with goat anti-mouse IgG antibodies. Any mouse IgG in the test supernatant is thus specifically retained in the wells. Radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes are then incubated in the wells. The presence of anti-binding protein antibodies in the supernatant is indicated by specific retention of radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes in the wells. Crude antigen preparations, such as tissue homogenates, can be used to detect antibodies. The assay is capable of detecting antibody at concentrations 20 ng/ml (approx. 100 pM IgG). The RISA has been used successfully to screen for monoclonal antibodies to the intracellular receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and should be useful for the detection of antibodies to ligand-binding proteins in general.

  7. Radiometric and Geometric Analysis of Hyperspectral Imagery Acquired from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F. Glenn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV hyperspectral calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS and inertial navigation sensors (INS under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 m (based on RMSE with a flying height of 344 m above ground level (AGL.

  8. New Radiometric Age Constraints for the Matuyama-Bruhnes Reversal and Santa Rosa Excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbas, A.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Kent, D. V.; Coe, R. S.; Konrad, K.; Clark, P. U.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of the timing of the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) position and the absolute paleointensities for geomagnetic events is vital for understanding the Earth's geodynamo. Here we present new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations using an ARGUS-VI multi-collector mass spectrometer for lava flows on Floreana Island, Galapagos, and Tahiti Nui, Society Islands. New Galapagos ages (n=6) place the GA-79 lava flow on Floreana Island, which records an excursional VGP from an equatorial region (Cox and Dalrymple, 1966), within the Santa Rosa excursion. This flow contains extremely low paleointesity values of 1.1 x 1022 Am2 (n=11; Wang and Kent, 2013). We also present 52 new ages on 18 lava flows from the Punaruu valley, Tahiti, which record the Matuyama-Bruhnes reversal. The new ages confirm that the lavas record this reversal, but the ages differ from the original stratigraphy presented in Mochizuki et al. (2011). Our new ages using the Kuiper et al. (2008) fish canyon sanidine ages for Punaruu valley lava flows are concordant with previous astronomically tuned ages (Channell et al. 2002, 2009) and represent the highest precision radiometric ages for the most recent reversal. Here we show that paleointensity lows associated with excursional events can be comparable to or less than those associated with reversals. In addition, such field strength reductions can occur in time intervals as short as 3 thousand years.

  9. Radiometric Cross-calibration of KOMPSAT-3A with Landsat-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. Y.; Ahn, H. Y.; Lee, S. G.; Choi, C. U.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Cross calibration was conducted at the Libya 4 PICS site on 2015 using Landsat-8 and KOMPSAT-3A. Ideally a cross calibration should be calculated for each individual scene pair because on any given date the TOA spectral profile is influenced by sun and satellite view geometry and the atmospheric conditions. However, using the near-simultaneous images minimizes this effect because the sensors are viewing the same atmosphere. For the cross calibration, the calibration coefficient was calculated by comparing the at sensor spectral radiance for the same location calculated using the Landsat-8 calibration parameters in metadata and the DN of KOMPSAT-3A for the regions of interest (ROI). Cross calibration can be conducted because the satellite sensors used for overpass have a similar bandwidth. However, not all satellites have the same color filter transmittance and sensor reactivity, even though the purpose is to observe the visible bands. Therefore, the differences in the RSR should be corrected. For the cross-calibration, a calibration coefficient was calculated using the TOA radiance and KOMPSAT-3 DN of the Landsat-8 OLI overpassed at the Libya 4 Site, As a result, the accuracy of the calibration coefficient at the site was assumed to be ± 1.0%. In terms of the results, the radiometric calibration coefficients suggested here are thought to be useful for maintaining the optical quality of the KOMPSAT-3A.

  10. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  11. Determining water use of sorghum from two-source energy balance and radiometric temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J. M.; López-Urrea, R.; Rubio, E.; Caselles, V.

    2011-10-01

    Estimates of surface actual evapotranspiration (ET) can assist in predicting crop water requirements. An alternative to the traditional crop-coefficient methods are the energy balance models. The objective of this research was to show how surface temperature observations can be used, together with a two-source energy balance model, to determine crop water use throughout the different phenological stages of a crop grown. Radiometric temperatures were collected in a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) field as part of an experimental campaign carried out in Barrax, Spain, during the 2010 summer growing season. Performance of the Simplified Two-Source Energy Balance (STSEB) model was evaluated by comparison of estimated ET with values measured on a weighing lysimeter. Errors of ±0.14 mm h-1 and ±1.0 mm d-1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively. Total accumulated crop water use during the campaign was underestimated by 5%. It is then shown that thermal radiometry can provide precise crop water necessities and is a promising tool for irrigation management.

  12. XRTD: An X-Windows based, real-time radiometric display and analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmeier, Vincent M.

    1993-01-01

    XRTD is a graphical user interface (GUI) based tool for monitoring real time radiometric spacecraft data. The tool is designed to allow the navigation analyst to both view and analyze the characteristics of Doppler and ranging data. This capability is critical if ground personnel wish to verify the correct performance of ongoing maneuvers. The raw tracking data is transferred from Deep Space Network (DSN) computers to a local workstation, where the predicted value for the observable is subtracted from the actual observed value to create a residual. The tool then allows the navigation analyst to rescale and replot the data using simple GUI techniques. The navigator may then perform a number of data analysis and modeling techniques on the resulting residuals to allow for the real time characterization of spacecraft events. These techniques include the modeling of maneuvers, the compression and differencing of data, and Fast Fourier transforms of the data. This tool has shortened the amount of time required for initial characterization of spacecraft maneuvers from several hours to a few minutes.

  13. Radiometric Short-Term Fourier Transform analysis of photonic Doppler velocimetry recordings and detectivity limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, G.; Berthe, L.; Bénier, J.; Bozier, O.; Mercier, P.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: for example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach "PDV Radiometric analysis" resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derive an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit, which may be compared to the fraction of the incoming power which has been back-scattered by the particle and then collected by the probe. This fraction increases with their size. At last, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it shows the improvement of detectivity with respect to the Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) of the digitizer.

  14. Landsat 8 OLI radiometric calibration performance after three years (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfitt, Ron A.

    2016-09-01

    The Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) impressed science users soon after launch in early 2013 with both its radiometric and geometric performance. After three years on-orbit, OLI continues to exceed expectations with its high signal-to-noise ratio, low striping, and stable response. The few artifacts that do exist, such as ghosting, continue to be minimal and show no signs of increasing. The on-board calibration sources showed a small decrease in response during the first six months of operations in the coastal aerosol band, but that decrease has stabilized to less than a half percent per year since that time. The other eight bands exhibit very little change over the past three years and have remained well within a half percent of their initial response to all on-board calibration sources. Analysis of lunar acquisitions also agree with the on-board calibrators. Overall, the OLI on-board the Landsat 8 spacecraft continues to provide exceptional measurements of the Earth's surface to continue the long tradition of Landsat.

  15. Assessment of Infrared Sounder Radiometric Noise from Analysis of Spectral Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, E.; Klonecki, A.; Standfuss, C.; Tournier, B.; Serio, C.; Masiello, G.; Tjemkes, S.; Stuhlmann, R.

    2016-08-01

    For the preparation and performance monitoring of the future generation of hyperspectral InfraRed sounders dedicated to the precise vertical profiling of the atmospheric state, such as the Meteosat Third Generation hyperspectral InfraRed Sounder, a reliable assessment of the instrument radiometric error covariance matrix is needed.Ideally, an inflight estimation of the radiometrric noise is recommended as certain sources of noise can be driven by the spectral signature of the observed Earth/ atmosphere radiance. Also, unknown correlated noise sources, generally related to incomplete knowledge of the instrument state, can be present, so a caracterisation of the noise spectral correlation is also neeed.A methodology, relying on the analysis of post-retreival spectral residuals, is designed and implemented to derive in-flight the covariance matrix on the basis of Earth scenes measurements. This methodology is successfully demonstrated using IASI observations as MTG-IRS proxy data and made it possible to highlight anticipated correlation structures explained by apodization and micro-vibration effects (ghost). This analysis is corroborated by a parallel estimation based on an IASI black body measurement dataset and the results of an independent micro-vibration model.

  16. A study of elemental migration from poly(ethylene terephthalate) of food packagings to simulated solutions by radiometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Eufemia Paez [Escola SENAI Fundacao Zerrenner, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]|[Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: eufemia@sp.senai.br; Saki, Mitiko; Silva, Leonardo G.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: mitiko@ipen.br, E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Brazilian plastic production for food packagings, in recent years, has grown in the same proportion as food consumption. Considering that the plastic manufacturing involves catalytic processes and the use of additives, when the foods are in direct contact with these materials, the components present in plastics may migrate to the food. The Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has established boundary-values of migrants as well as procedures to evaluate migration of elements and substances from plastic packaging to food. In this study elemental composition of poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET - packaging and results of elemental migration were obtained. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine elemental concentrations in PET packagings and the radiometric method was applied for elemental migration determination. This radiometric method consisted of irradiating the PET samples with neutrons, followed by migration exposition and radioactivity measurement in food-simulated solution. Experimental conditions used for migration were 10 days exposure period at 40 deg C. Migration was evaluated for soft drink, juice and water PET packaging. The analytical results indicated that PET packagings contain Co and Sb and those elements are transferred to the simulated solutions. However, these migration results were lower than the maximum tolerance values established by ANVISA. The migration detection limits also indicated high sensitivity of the radiometric method. (author)

  17. Radiometric stability of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) following 15 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Val, Sebastian; Diner, David J.; Jovanovic, Veljko; Gray, Ellyn; Di Girolamo, Larry; Zhao, Guangyu

    2014-09-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has successfully operated on the EOS/ Terra spacecraft since 1999. It consists of nine cameras pointing from nadir to 70.5° view angle with four spectral channels per camera. Specifications call for a radiometric uncertainty of 3% absolute and 1% relative to the other cameras. To accomplish this, MISR utilizes an on-board calibrator (OBC) to measure camera response changes. Once every two months the two Spectralon panels are deployed to direct solar-light into the cameras. Six photodiode sets measure the illumination level that are compared to MISR raw digital numbers, thus determining the radiometric gain coefficients used in Level 1 data processing. Although panel stability is not required, there has been little detectable change in panel reflectance, attributed to careful preflight handling techniques. The cameras themselves have degraded in radiometric response by 10% since launch, but calibration updates using the detector-based scheme has compensated for these drifts and allowed the radiance products to meet accuracy requirements. Validation using Sahara desert observations show that there has been a drift of ~1% in the reported nadir-view radiance over a decade, common to all spectral bands.

  18. [In-Flight Radiometric Calibration for ZY-3 Satellite Multispectral Sensor by Modified Reflectance-Based Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Xie, Yong; Gu, Xing-fa; Yu, Tao; Liu, Qi-yue; Gao, Rong-jun

    2015-03-01

    Through integrating multi-spectral sensor characteristics of ZY-3 satellite, a modified reflectance-based method is proposed and used to achieve ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor in-flight radiometric calibration. This method chooses level 1A image as data source and establishes geometric model to get an accurate observation geometric parameters at calibration site according to the information provided in image auxiliary documentation, which can reduce the influences on the calibration accuracy from image resampling and observation geometry errors. We use two-point and multi-points methods to calculate the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor based on the large campaign at Dongying city, Shan Dong province. Compared with ZY-3 official calibration coefficients, multi-points method has higher accuracy than two-point method. Through analyzing the dispersion between each calibration point and the fitting line, we find that the residual error of water calibration site is larger than others, which of green band is approximately 67.39%. Treating water calibration site as an error, we filter it out using 95.4% confidence level as standard and recalculate the calibration coefficients with multi-points method. The final calibration coefficients show that the relative differences of the first three bands are less than 2% and the last band is less than 5%, which manifests that the proposed radiometric calibration method can obtain accurate and reliable calibration coefficients and is useful for other similar satellites in future.

  19. Temporal dynamics of sand dune bidirectional reflectance characteristics for absolute radiometric calibration of optical remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Craig A.; Logie, Gordon; Beaver, Jason

    2016-09-01

    The use of Pseudo Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS) for establishing the radiometric trending of optical remote sensing systems has a long history of successful implementation. Past studies have shown that the PICS method is useful for evaluating the trend of sensors over time or cross-calibration of sensors but was not considered until recently for deriving absolute calibration. Current interest in using this approach to establish absolute radiometric calibration stems from recent research that indicates that with empirically derived models of the surface properties and careful atmospheric characterisation Top of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance values can be predicted and used for absolute sensor radiometric calibration. Critical to the continued development of this approach is the accurate characterization of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of PICS sites. This paper presents BRDF data collected by a high-performance portable goniometer system in order to develop a temporal BRDF model for the Algodones Dunes in California. The results demonstrated that the BRDF of a reasonably simple sand surface was complex with changes in anisotropy taking place in response to changing solar zenith angles. The nature of these complex interactions would present challenges to future model development.

  20. Mapping Deeply

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Wood

    2015-01-01

    This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, wate...