WorldWideScience

Sample records for k-12 online learning

  1. Designer Librarian: Embedded in K12 Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, shifts in technology have altered the roles of school librarians in a multitude of ways. New rigorous standards, proliferation of devices, and steady growth of online and blended learning for the K12 market now demand librarians engage with learners in online environments. Taking an instructional design approach is the…

  2. The Preparation of Teacher Candidates for K-12 Online Learning Environments: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nicole V.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how teacher education programs may better prepare teacher candidates to teach in K-12 online learning environments. The primary research question addressed was: What specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions should teacher education programs include in their curriculum to better prepare teacher…

  3. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  4. Learning Analysis of K-12 Students' Online Problem Solving: A Three-Stage Assessment Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiling; Wu, Bian; Gu, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving is considered a fundamental human skill. However, large-scale assessment of problem solving in K-12 education remains a challenging task. Researchers have argued for the development of an enhanced assessment approach through joint effort from multiple disciplines. In this study, a three-stage approach based on an evidence-centered…

  5. Preparing Teacher Candidates for Virtual Field Placements via an Exposure to K-12 Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Hibbard, Laura; Franklin, Teresa; Moore, David Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this project was to determine what effects exposure to online K-12 teaching and learning activities had on teacher candidates' perceptions of K-12 online learning, how the exposure allowed teacher candidates to reach greater understanding of online pedagogy, and what effect such exposure had on teacher candidates'…

  6. Preparing Teacher Candidates for Virtual Field Placements via an Exposure to K-12 Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Hibbard, Laura; Franklin, Teresa; Moore, David Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this project was to determine what effects exposure to online K-12 teaching and learning activities had on teacher candidates' perceptions of K-12 online learning, how the exposure allowed teacher candidates to reach greater understanding of online pedagogy, and what effect such exposure had on teacher candidates'…

  7. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, Paula; Kellerer, Eric; Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Montgomery, Danielle; Clyde, Rozella; Cozart, Joe; Creach, Laura; Hibbard, Laura; LaFrance, Jason; Rupp, Nadine; Walker, Niki; Carter, Theresa; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study exploring rural teacher perspectives on the impact of blended learning on students and teachers was conducted in Idaho during the Fall of 2013. Researchers from Northwest Nazarene University's DOCEO Center in partnership with Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning…

  8. Integrating Data Mining in Program Evaluation of K-12 Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Long; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Rice, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated an innovative approach of program evaluation through analyses of student learning logs, demographic data, and end-of-course evaluation surveys in an online K-12 supplemental program. The results support the development of a program evaluation model for decision making on teaching and learning at the K-12 level. A case study…

  9. Investigating the Potential of MOOCs in K-12 Teaching and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigh, Jennifer; Pytash, Kristine E.; Ferdig, Richard E.; Merchant, William

    2015-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is a relatively new concept in K-12 teaching and learning environments. Although significant work has been done with MOOCs since 2008, it has only been recently that MOOCs have been studied with K-12 populations. The purpose of this study was to further examine the motivation of K-12 students enrolled in a…

  10. Unifying K-12 Learning Processes: Integrating Curricula through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Michael J.; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether a set of cross-curricular learning processes could be found in the respective K-12 US national standards for math, language arts, foreign language, science, social studies, fine arts, and technology. Using a qualitative research methodology, the standards from the national associations for these content…

  11. Is K-12 Blended Learning Disruptive? An Introduction to the Theory of Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Horn, Michael B.; Staker, Heather

    2013-01-01

    The Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation, formerly the Innosight Institute, has published three papers describing the rise of K-12 blended learning--that is, formal education programs that combine online learning and brick-and-mortar schools. This fourth paper is the first to analyze blended learning through the lens of…

  12. The State of Wiki Usage in U.S. K-12 Schools: Leveraging Web 2.0 Data Warehouses to Study Quality and Equality in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Blair Justin Fire

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, I document wiki usage in U.S. K-12 settings by analyzing data on a representative sample drawn from a population of nearly 180,000 wikis. My research group, which I lead and managed, measured the opportunities wikis provide for students to develop 21st century skills such as expert thinking, complex…

  13. The State of Wiki Usage in U.S. K-12 Schools: Leveraging Web 2.0 Data Warehouses to Assess Quality and Equity in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Justin; Murnane, Richard; Willett, John

    2012-01-01

    To document wiki usage in U.S. K-12 settings, this study examined a representative sample drawn from a population of nearly 180,000 wikis. The authors measured the opportunities wikis provide for students to develop 21st-century skills such as expert thinking, complex communication, and new media literacy. The authors found four types of wiki…

  14. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Perceptions toward and Understanding of K-12 Online Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, David N.; Woods, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 30 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010; 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher educators' perceptions toward and understanding of K-12 OLPE. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1986) served as the theoretical framework for this…

  15. Integrating Online GIS into the K-12 Curricula: Lessons from the Development of a Collaborative GIS in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Paul; Semple, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    GIS has shown promise in Project Based Learning (PBL) environments, but many obstacles exist in its integration into school curriculums. This article discusses the development and utilization of an online GIS tool that was created to illustrate that the perceptual gap between relevance and ease of use of GIS software can be bridged at the K-12

  16. Preparing for Online Teaching: Web-Based Assessment and Communication Skills in K12

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNisco, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Students are doing less hand-raising and more clicking as online classes become increasingly popular in K12 instruction, both in combination with brick-and-mortar classrooms and in independent full-time virtual schools. With online instruction comes a change in the nature of teaching, communicating with, and assessing students. As schools move to…

  17. Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover Intention of Online Teachers in the K-12 Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ingle M.; Brantley-Dias, Laurie; Lokey-Vega, Anissa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and explore factors influencing K-12 online teachers' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions. Using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (1954), Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory of Satisfaction (1959, 1968), Meyer and Allen's measure of Organizational Commitment (1997), and Fishbein and…

  18. Designing GIS Learning Materials for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies have proven the usefulness and effectiveness of geographic information system (GIS) use in the K-12 classroom, the rate of teacher adoption remains low. The identified major barrier to its use is a lack of teachers' background and experience. To solve this limitation, many organisations have provided GIS-related teacher…

  19. A Strategy for Incorporating Learning Analytics into the Design and Evaluation of a K-12 Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Carlos; Rangel, Virginia Snodgrass; Whitaker, Reid

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a scalable approach for integrating learning analytics into an online K-12 science curriculum. A description of the curriculum and the underlying pedagogical framework is followed by a discussion of the challenges to be tackled as part of this integration. We include examples of data visualization based on teacher usage…

  20. From Bricks to Clicks: Building Quality K-12 Online Classes through an Innovative Course Review Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huett, Kim C.; Huett, Jason B.; Ringlaben, Ravic

    2011-01-01

    Using an explanatory mixed methods design, this study uses the National Standards of Quality for Online Courses to measure the extent to which teachers in a blended middle school and a fully online supplemental high school are designing quality online learning environments for students. As a part of fully online graduate coursework, graduate…

  1. Applying the Quadratic Usage Framework to Research on K-12 STEM Digital Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policymakers have called for K-12 educators to increase their effectiveness by transforming science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and teaching with digital resources and tools. In this study we outline the significance of studying pressing issues related to use of digital resources in the K-12 environment and…

  2. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of and Their Satisfaction with Interaction Type in Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chun; Belland, Brian R.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Walker, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning is an effective approach to instruction that combines features of face-to-face learning and computer-mediated learning. This study investigated the relationship between student perceptions of three types of interaction and blended learning course satisfaction. The participants included K-12 teachers enrolled in a graduate-level…

  3. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  4. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  5. Public School Districts Master the Online Learning Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Online learning made its debut in higher education, but now it's changing the face of K-12 education. According to the marketing research firm Ambient Insight, roughly 1.75 million K-12 students in the United States are enrolled in at least one online course. Although much of the online learning growth in K-12 first occurred in virtual charter…

  6. Mobile apps for reflection in learning: A design research in K-12 education

    OpenAIRE

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2014-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to correspond to collaborative learning paradigms, such as collaborative progressive inquiry or project-based learning, are scarce. In these pedagogica...

  7. Netflixing Human Capital Development: Personalized Learning Technology and the Corporatization of K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Mahoney, Heather; Means, Alexander J.; Garrison, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced by powerful venture philanthropies, educational technology companies, and the US Department of Education, a growing movement to apply "big data" through "learning analytics" to create "personalized learning" is currently underway in K-12 education in the United States. While scholars have offered various…

  8. Investigating the Potential of the Flipped Classroom Model in K-12 Mathematics Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsa, Maria; Sergis, Stylianos; Sampson, Demetrios G.

    2016-01-01

    The Flipped Classroom model (FCM) is a promising blended educational innovation aiming to improve the teaching and learning practice in various subject domains and educational levels. However, despite this encouraging evidence, research on the explicit benefits of the FCM on K-12 Mathematics education is still scarce and, in some cases, even…

  9. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  10. Using the van Hiele K-12 Geometry Learning Theory to Modify Engineering Mechanics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Janet M.; Zachary, Loren W.

    2004-01-01

    Engineering students use spatial thinking when examining diagrams or models to study structure design. It is expected that most engineering students have solidified spatial thinking skills during K-12 schooling. However, according to what we know about geometry learning and teaching, spatial thinking probably needs to be explicitly taught within…

  11. The Chem-E-Car as a Vehicle for Service Learning through K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdon, William

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of combining the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Chem-E-Car competition activities with engineering outreach to K-12 students in a service-learning course. Survey results are presented to show how the program develops technical skills as well as leadership, teamwork, and communication skills in…

  12. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  13. Teaching and Learning with Mobile Computing Devices: Case Study in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael M.; Tamim, Suha; Brown, Dorian B.; Sweeney, Joseph P.; Ferguson, Fatima K.; Jones, Lakavious B.

    2015-01-01

    While ownership of mobile computing devices, such as cellphones, smartphones, and tablet computers, has been rapid, the adoption of these devices in K-12 classrooms has been measured. Some schools and individual teachers have integrated mobile devices to support teaching and learning. The purpose of this qualitative research was to describe the…

  14. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation Case Studies from Higher Education, K-12 and Corporate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available With the revolution occurred in communication technologies at the beginning of 1990’s, network technologies have emerged as the challenging parameters accelerating improvements of instructional technologies. Online classrooms and management of them appeared as a new domain which necessitates a new paradigm different from the classical ones. User and instructor friendly learning context and management systems (LCMS have brought new approaches, techniques and tools for the assessment and measurement processes. These approaches, techniques and tools embedded in LCMS have redefined not only the way teachers teach but also students learn. WebCT, Blackboard and eCollege and many others as the online instructional environments have provided new opportunities to construct a coherent instructional system which has never been used as a unique environment any before. Assessment and measurement have been redefined within this framework. The successes of assessment and measurement methodologies or system inevitably depend on conceptualization and then implementation to different educational settings.

  15. US K-12 Blended and Online Education in a Global Context:The Present and the Future%全球视野下美国K-12混合与在线教育的现状与未来--与K-12在线教育国际联盟副主席艾雷森·鲍威尔博士的学术对话

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓琳; 胡永斌; 黄荣怀; 艾雷森·鲍威尔

    2015-01-01

    The wave of blended and online education is hitting K-12 education and triggering a revolution in K-12 education system in an unprecedented way. Keeping informed of present status and development trend of the global K-12 blended and online education is of vital practical significance to the current system revolution in China's K-12 education. The interview takes the present and the future of K-12 blended and online learning as a thread, and explores key issues in depth such as the development and openness model of e-resources, the market mechanism, the achievement-based funding model, the teacher training, and etc. In America, as well as many countries in the world, the role that market plays in K-12 education in satisfying learners' needs and providing quality service by promoting competition should be highly valued;achievement-based funding model is a beneficial practice that government could adopt in K-12 blended and online learning;most students prefer blended learning to full online learning, while full online learning is more likely to be adopted by the students who have special needs;the balance of educational resources, policy and funding support, teacher training as well as the leadership in ICT integrated into classroom are identified as the crucial issues that will affect the sustaining development of K-12 online and blended learning.%混合与在线教育的浪潮正以前所未有的方式引发K-12教育系统的变革,认识国际K-12混合与在线教育的推进现状并把握其未来发展趋势,对于我国基础教育教学改革具有重要现实意义。美国K-12在线教育国际联盟副主席艾雷森·鲍威尔博士围绕K-12混合与在线教育的现状和未来发展趋势,重点探讨了数字化教育资源的开发和共享模式、市场机制、资助模式、教师发展培训等普遍性和根本性问题。在美国及全球多个国家,K-12混合与在线教育在教育市场中利用竞争优势满足了受教育

  16. Assessment lessons from K-12 education research: Knowledge representation, learning, and motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2012-02-01

    Research on teaching to the test in K-12 settings has documented the lack of generalized understanding of underlying principles in tested subjects. This is similar to the experience of physics students who can complete computational problems without conceptual understanding. The PER community is well aware of the importance of explicit representations of learning goals as well as the role of the formative assessment process, especially feedback and self assessment, in promoting or deterring students' engagement and willingness to take responsibility for their own learning. Key principles from socio-cultural learning theory and research on motivation are summarized and used to identify instructional and assessment practices that hold the most promise for engaging students in developing deep conceptual understanding.

  17. K--12 science educator perception of instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday-Cashwell, Janet Rose

    2000-10-01

    Selected K--12 public school science educators in 14 eastern North Carolina counties were surveyed to examine their perceptions of their undergraduate preparation programs with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom. A quantitative study, this research examined science educator preparedness in instructing students with learning disabilities by evaluating educator perception in regard to mainstrearned and inclusive educational settings. Specifically, two null hypotheses were tested. Null hypothesis I stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' perceptions of their undergraduate teacher education preparation programs and their perceptions of their abilities to instruct students needing accommodations on behalf of their learning disabilities in mainstrearned or inclusive settings. Participants' responses to perception as well as value statements regarding opinions, adaptations, and undergraduate training with respect to mainstreaming and inclusion were evaluated through t-test analyses of 22 Likert-scale items. Null hypothesis 1 was not accepted because a statistically significant difference did exist between the educators' perceptions of their undergraduate training and their perceived abilities to instruct students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive settings. Null hypothesis 2 stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' attained educational level; grade level currently taught, supervised or chaired; and years of experience in teaching science, supervising science education, and/or chairing science departments in selected North Carolina public schools and their opinions of their undergraduate teacher education program with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive educational settings. Null hypothesis 2 was evaluated through an analysis of

  18. Einstein Online: A Web-based Course for K-12 Teachers from the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert

    2004-05-01

    Einstein Online: A Web-based Course for K-12 Teachers from the American Museum of Natural History Robert V. Steiner, Ph.D. Project Director, Seminars on Science American Museum of Natural History The American Museum of Natural History, in collaboration with Hebrew University and the Skirball Cultural Center, has created a major exhibit on Albert Einstein, including extensive coverage of his contributions to relativity, quantum mechanics and unified field theories as well as the social and political dimensions of his life. Leveraging the assets of this exhibit as well as the expertise of the Museum's Department of Astrophysics and its Education Department, a six-week online professional development course for K-12 teachers has been created, providing inquires into some of the frontiers of physics through rich media resources, facilitated discussion forums and assignments. The course, which requires only minimal Web access, offers a unique opportunity for teachers across the United States to explore modern physics guided by a working scientist and a skilled online facilitator. The course includes original essays by Museum scientists, images, video, simulations, web links and digital resources for classroom use. The course design, development, implementation and evaluation are reviewed.

  19. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Moreno León

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three quasi-experimental research designs conducted in three different schools (n=129 students from 2nd and 6th grade, in order to assess the impact of introducing programming with Scratch at different stages and in several subjects. While both 6th grade experimental groups working with coding activities showed a statistically significant improvement in terms of academic performance, this was not the case in the 2nd grade classroom. Notable disparity was also found regarding the subject in which the programming activities were included, as in social studies the effect size was double that in mathematics.

  20. Stripping the Wizard's Curtain: Examining the Practice of Online Grade Booking in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz; Brady, John T.; Izumi, Jared T.

    2016-01-01

    Online grade booking, where parents and students have access to teachers' grade books through the Internet, has become the prevailing method for transmitting daily academic progress for students across the United States. However, this practice has proliferated without consideration of the potential relational impacts of the practice on parents,…

  1. A Qualitative Case Study Analysis for a Potential Model for a K-12 Professional Development Using Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacroce-Tejedor, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three e-learning technologies based on a pedagogical framework for virtual learning environments, and to explore how these technologies could be used to facilitate extended professional learning opportunities whereby K-12 educators could communicate, collaborate, and reflect on their practice. This…

  2. Blended learning in K-12 mathematics and science instruction -- An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason

    Blended learning has developed into a hot topic in education over the past several years. Flipped classrooms, online learning environments, and the use of technology to deliver educational content using rich media continue to garner national attention. While generally well accepted and researched in post-secondary education, not much research has focused on blended learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. This thesis is an exploratory study to begin to determine if students and teachers like blended learning and whether or not it affects the amount of time they spend in math and science. Standardized achievement test data were also analyzed to determine if blended learning had any effect on test scores. Based on student and teacher surveys, this population seems to like blended learning and to work more efficiently in this environment. There is no evidence from this study to support any effect on student achievement.

  3. K-12 Teacher Perceptions Regarding the Flipped Classroom Model for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Evan; DeJong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Baron, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of evidence can be cited from higher education literature on the effectiveness of the flipped classroom; however, very little research was discovered on the flipped classroom at the K-12 level. This study examined K-12 teachers' perceptions regarding the flipped classroom and differences in teachers' perceptions based on grade level…

  4. Studying Teachers' Degree of Classroom Implementation, Teachers' Implementation Practices, and Students' Learning as Outcomes of K-12 STEM Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peiyi

    2013-01-01

    With a growing demand for an enhanced K-12 education for strengthening students' conceptual learning, interest, and career awareness in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, teacher professional development projects have been viewed as an efficient approach. However, a variety of external and teacher factors may prevent such projects…

  5. A Conceptual Framework for Digital Libraries for K-12 Mathematics Education: Part 1, Information Organization, Information Literacy, and Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-liang; Doty, Philip

    2005-01-01

    This article is the first of two that present a six-part conceptual framework for the design and evaluation of digital libraries meant to support mathematics education in K-12 settings (see also pt. 2). This first article concentrates on (1) information organization, (2) information literacy, and (3) integrated learning with multimedia materials.…

  6. A Professional Learning Program Designed to Increase K-12 Teachers' Instructional Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ready availability of many instructional-technology resources, many teachers in the researched Maryland school district are uncomfortable using technology to deliver content. This concurrent mixed methods case study examined the impact of Sharing Technology with Educators Program (STEP) on 269 K-12 teachers' technology use. The study…

  7. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  8. Empowering K-12 Students with Disabilities to Learn Computational Thinking and Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Maya; Wherfel, Quentin M.; Pearson, Jamie; Shehab, Saadeddine; Tapia, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    This article's focus is on including computing and computational thinking in K-12 instruction within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, and to provide that instruction in ways that promote access for students traditionally underrepresented in the STEM fields, such as students with disabilities. Providing computing…

  9. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  10. WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium: Helping to Build a Presence for Science With Online Professional Development Opportunities for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognier, E.

    2002-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its third year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." These courses also support our NSTA-sponsored "Building a Presence for Science" program in California, providing professional development opportunities to help achieve our vision of increased quantity and quality of science education statewide. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Students have consistently embraced the concept of a systems-based approach to science instruction, commenting on how these courses have forever changed their teaching practices and provided a successful means for engaging and involving their students in scientific inquiry. Through offering these online courses, we have learned valuable lessons about recruitment, retention, team-building, and facilitating discussions for classes with no "face to face" component. This format is both rich and challenging, with teammates from diverse geographic regions and timezones, with a variety of connectivity and accessibility issues. In this third year of offering the courses, we are pleased to have students taking their second course with us, wanting to continue learning content and stragtegies to improve their skills as science teachers.

  11. Evaluation of Online Teacher and Student Materials for the Framework for K-12 Science Education Science and Engineering Crosscutting Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Council developed and published the "Framework for K-12 Science Education," a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to be incorporated into science materials and activities, a first in science…

  12. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Barriers and Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Kellerer, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the implementation of blended learning programs in Idaho, and three key takeaways are apparent: (1) Blended learning has a positive impact on teachers; (2) Self-pacing enables students to take ownership and achieve mastery; and (3) Teachers must prepare with comprehensive teacher training. The authors emphasize the need for…

  13. Research on K-12 School-Based Service-Learning: The Evidence Builds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilig, Shelley H.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the prevalence of service learning, growing public support, definitions, quality standards, and salutary research evidence. Service learning positively influences students' personal and interpersonal development, lifestyle choices, appreciation for cultural diversity, sense of civic and social responsibility, motivation, attendance,…

  14. Increasing participation in the Earth sciences through engagement of K-12 educators in Earth system science analysis, inquiry and problem- based learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, S.

    2012-12-01

    Given low course enrollment in geoscience courses, retention in undergraduate geoscience courses, and granting of BA and advanced degrees in the Earth sciences an effective strategy to increase participation in this field is necessary. In response, as K-12 education is a conduit to college education and the future workforce, Earth science education at the K-12 level was targeted with the development of teacher professional development around Earth system science, inquiry and problem-based learning. An NSF, NOAA and NASA funded effort through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies led to the development of the Earth System Science Educational Alliance (ESSEA) and dissemination of interdisciplinary Earth science content modules accessible to the public and educators. These modules formed the basis for two teacher workshops, two graduate level courses for in-service teachers and two university course for undergraduate teacher candidates. Data from all three models will be presented with emphasis on the teacher workshop. Essential components of the workshop model include: teaching and modeling Earth system science analysis; teacher development of interdisciplinary, problem-based academic units for implementation in the classroom; teacher collaboration; daily workshop evaluations; classroom observations; follow-up collaborative meetings/think tanks; and the building of an on-line professional community for continued communication and exchange of best practices. Preliminary data indicate increased understanding of Earth system science, proficiency with Earth system science analysis, and renewed interest in innovative delivery of content amongst teachers. Teacher-participants reported increased student engagement in learning with the implementation of problem-based investigations in Earth science and Earth system science thinking in the classroom, however, increased enthusiasm of the teacher acted as a contributing factor. Teacher feedback on open

  15. Thinking Like a Scientist: The RITES Path for K-12 Students to Learn the Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Dooley, H., Jr.; Cardace, D.

    2015-12-01

    Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences (Manduca et al, 2002) stated that "An overaching goal for geoscience education is to help every student to 'think like a scientist'", and that continues to challenge geoscience education. The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science (RITES) project addresses that goal, and this presentation chronicles that successful effort. RITES strives to improve science education by providing professional development (PD) to the majority of science teachers at the 5th through 12th grade levels throughout Rhode Island. The PD is presented through ~forty 2.5 day workshops that emphasize the innovative use of technology and best teaching practices, consistent with the recommendations detailed in Manduca et al (2002). The presentation will focus on two of these workshops that provide middle and high school teachers with strategies and techniques for guiding student-run explorations of earthquakes as a result of tectonic plate movements. Teachers address these topics much as a scientist would by carrying out the following activities: 1) Identifying the relationships between faults, EQs and plate boundaries; 2) Using GPS data to quantify interseismic deformation; 3) Constructing an Earthquake machine; and 4) Scaling their observations from desktop to crustal scale, and (5) Using the results to forecast earthquakes along the SAF and to estimate the magnitude of earthquakes on ancient faults. As it is unrealistic to expect teachers to be able to incorporate all of this material into their syllabi, we have introduced the concept of Subtle Shifts (Exploratorium, 2006) as a means by which they can easily blend workshop material into their existing courses. Teacher surveys reflect a high level of satisfaction (81-100%), and pre- and post-evaluations show significant normalized gains (Hake, 1998), in about 90% of the courses. Moreover, students of RITES teachers demonstrate statistically significant gains in inquiry skills and content

  16. Lessons learned: Pacific CRYSTAL approaches to K-12 Pre and In-service teacher professional development in Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) is one of five Canadian nationally funded centres (2005-2010) with the mandate to enrich the preparation of young Canadians in math and science. Pacific CRYSTAL’s goal is to link teachers and other community partners, with scientists and science education researchers to build authentic, engaging science experiences for students, and to foster teacher leadership in science literacy through teacher professional development and teacher training, based on the premise that “The fundamental factor in the improvement of students’ learning in science and technology is the quality (knowledge, skills and enthusiasm) of their teachers” (UNESCO 2008). In order to address the issues of teacher reluctance to teach the Earth science curriculum content, and commonly if they do, to rely primarily on textbooks and worksheets, Pacific CRYSTAL in partnership with EdGEO, have developed a variety of hands-on, constructivist based activities (both classroom and field based) to engage students and focus attention on the relevance and importance of Earth science to society. These activities then form the basis for our two approaches to teacher professional development; in and pre- service teacher workshops, and ‘Education’ labs for students intending to become teachers who are enrolled in first year Earth science courses. Both the teacher workshops and the ‘Education’ lab promote Earth science learning, interest and enthusiasm in three ways. Firstly, through teacher experiences with hands-on activities, experiments, fieldtrips and demonstrations transferable to the K-12 classrooms; secondly through providing teachers with classroom resources, such as rock kits, maps, fossils, posters and books which they use during the workshops; and thirdly by providing an environment for networking and mentoring to help overcome the commonly expressed apprehension about science as well as to support teachers in

  17. Hands-on, online, and workshop-based K-12 weather and climate education resources from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Burt, M. A.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; La Grave, M. L.; Russell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fourth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  18. Using K-12 Lessons Learned about How to Balance Accessibility and Test Security to Inform Licensure, Credentialing, and Certification Exam Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; van den Heuvel, Jill R.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how to balance test security and accessibility on licensure, credentialing, and certification exams. It examines K-12 test security policies related to educational assessments across states to discover lessons learned about how to meet accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities while minimizing test security risks. It…

  19. Summary of Research on Online and Blended Learning Programs That Offer Differentiated Learning Options. REL 2017-228

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, R. Marc; Melluzzo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes the methodology, measures, and findings of research on the influence on student achievement outcomes of K-12 online and blended face-to-face and online learning programs that offer differentiated learning options. The report also describes the characteristics of the learning programs. Most of the examined programs used…

  20. The use of Global Positioning System units and ArcGIS Online to engage K-12 Students in Research Being Done in their Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, C. E.; Sparrow, E. B.; Clucas, T.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating K-12 students in scientific research processes and opportunities in their communities is a great way to bridge the gap between research and education and to start building science research capacity at an early age. One goal of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Alaska Adapting to Changing Environments project is to engage the local community in the research as well as to share results with the people. By giving K-12 students Global Positioning System (GPS) units, and allowing them to collect and map their own data, they are being exposed to some of the research methods being used by scientists in the Alaska ACE project. This hands-on, minds-on method has been successfully used in formal education settings such as a Junior High School classroom in Nuiqsut, Alaska as well as in informal education settings such as summer camps in Barrow, Alaska and Kenai, Alaska. The students progress from mapping by hand to collecting location data with their GPS units and cameras, and imputing this information into ArcGIS Online to create map products. The data collected were from sites ranging from important places in the community to sites visited during summer camps, with students reflecting on data and site significance. Collecting data, using technology, and creating map products contribute to science skills and practices students need to conduct research of their own and to understand research being done around them. The goal of this education outreach implementation is to bring students closer to the research, understand the process of science, and have the students continue to collect data and contribute to research in their communities. Support provided for this work from the Alaska EPSCoR NSF Award #OIA-1208927 and the state of Alaska is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  2. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  3. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  4. Design and Enactment of Online Components during Four Blended Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayer, Nicola; Crippen, Kent; Dawson, Kara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the ways in which four K-12 teachers, following professional development in blended learning, designed the online portion of their blended learning courses and how these online components were ultimately enacted with students. Specifically, the study investigates what kind of content, resources, or activities were developed…

  5. Online Pairwise Learning Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yiming; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Pairwise learning usually refers to a learning task that involves a loss function depending on pairs of examples, among which the most notable ones are bipartite ranking, metric learning, and AUC maximization. In this letter we study an online algorithm for pairwise learning with a least-square loss function in an unconstrained setting of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) that we refer to as the Online Pairwise lEaRning Algorithm (OPERA). In contrast to existing works (Kar, Sriperumbudur, Jain, & Karnick, 2013 ; Wang, Khardon, Pechyony, & Jones, 2012 ), which require that the iterates are restricted to a bounded domain or the loss function is strongly convex, OPERA is associated with a non-strongly convex objective function and learns the target function in an unconstrained RKHS. Specifically, we establish a general theorem that guarantees the almost sure convergence for the last iterate of OPERA without any assumptions on the underlying distribution. Explicit convergence rates are derived under the condition of polynomially decaying step sizes. We also establish an interesting property for a family of widely used kernels in the setting of pairwise learning and illustrate the convergence results using such kernels. Our methodology mainly depends on the characterization of RKHSs using its associated integral operators and probability inequalities for random variables with values in a Hilbert space.

  6. Video Streaming in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsell, Taralynn; Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    The use of video in teaching and learning is a common practice in education today. As learning online becomes more of a common practice in education, streaming video and audio will play a bigger role in delivering course materials to online learners. This form of technology brings courses alive by allowing online learners to use their visual and…

  7. Video Streaming in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsell, Taralynn; Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    The use of video in teaching and learning is a common practice in education today. As learning online becomes more of a common practice in education, streaming video and audio will play a bigger role in delivering course materials to online learners. This form of technology brings courses alive by allowing online learners to use their visual and…

  8. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and Minnesota's K-12 schools: public health lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como-Sabetti, Kathryn; Livingston, Franci; Gahr, Pamala; Nagle, Kayla; Martin, Karen; Morin, Craig; Parilla, Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    Prior to 2009, influenza pandemic planners had primarily planned for a virus that would originate in a location other than North America, giving public health officials in the United States time to determine its severity before widespread disease occurred here. Thus, response plans for schools focused on closure in the case of a severe pandemic and potential closure in the event of a moderate one. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic, however, presented a different scenario. The severity of 2009 H1N1 was initially unknown and later was determined to be mild to moderate. Thus, as the pandemic unfolded, state and national public health entities found themselves adapting their recommendations for school closure. This article reviews Minnesota's experience with 2009 H1N1, focusing on the pandemic among school-aged children during the spring (April to August 2009) and fall (September 2009 to April 2010), and it chronicles how outbreak surveillance policies and recommendations for K-12 schools changed over the course of the pandemic.

  9. CoSN K12 Open Technologies Implementation Study #3. Moodle: An Open Learning Content Management System for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consortium for School Networking (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces educators to Moodle, an open-source software program for managing courses online. It briefly defines what Moodle is, what it can do, and gives specific examples of how it is being implemented. An appendix contains brief profiles of five school organizations that are using Moodle.

  10. The Latest Progress of K-12 Digital Learning in the U.S.%美国K-12数字学习最新进展*--一项基于常青教育集团2014年度报告的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方圆媛; 李璐; 张纲

    2016-01-01

    常青教育集团2014年K-12数字学习最新进展报告系统全面地介绍了美国K-12数字学习实践与政策的最新情况。分析并研究美国K-12数字学习的最新进展对我国中小学信息技术教学应用实践开展和政策制定有着重要的启示和借鉴作用。该文基于常青教育集团的报告,对美国K-12数字学习2014年的实践与政策进行了研究。研究结果发现:美国公立学校和学区、特许学校和私立学校都开展了各种类型的数字学习活动;州虚拟学校和慕课学习获得了进一步的发展;不同年段学生的数字学习活动呈现不同的特点,数字学习已融入美国中小学生的学习生活;州与学区层面出台或更新了数字学习的有关政策,为数字学习在美国中小学的进一步发展提供了有力的保障和支持。基于以上结果,该文建议进一步加大我国中小学数字学习的政策支持力度,并根据我国中小学生的实际情况,开发适合学生的数字学习资源,组织适当形式的数字学习活动。%Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning, an Annual Review of Policy and Practice which is written by Evergreen Education Group gives elaborate data and details of K-12 digital learning in the States in 2014. Researching on the latest progress of K-12 digital learning is conductive and enlightening for the development of ICT applying in instruction and learning in the elementary and secondary schools in our country. Based on the report, this paper analyzes the practice and policy of K-12 digital learning in the States. Research result shows:in the U.S., public schools and districts, charter schools, and private schools all have various kinds of digital learning activities;state virtual schools and moocs have gained further development in 2014;the most common types of digital learning vary signiifcantly between high schools, middle schools and elementary schools, and digital learning has been

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury in K-12 Students II: Response to Instruction--When Will They Ever Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Larry E.; McNamara, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Most students who have sustained severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) appear normal when they return to school. Hopeful parents, encouraged by deceptively positive medical feedback, expect a return to regular education. In the classroom, the students initially seem almost ready to resume learning, but instead they fall farther behind grade level…

  12. Investigating the Potential of the Flipped Classroom Model in K-12 ICT Teaching and Learning: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostaris, Christoforos; Sergis, Stylianos; Sampson, Demetrios G.; Giannakos, Michail N.; Pelliccione, Lina

    2017-01-01

    The emerging Flipped Classroom approach has been widely used to enhance teaching practices in many subject domains and educational levels, reporting promising results for enhancing student learning experiences. However, despite this encouraging body of research, the subject domain of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) teaching at…

  13. Laboratory Earth Under the Lens: Diachronic Evaluation of an Integrated Graduate-Level On-Line Earth System Science Course Series for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.; Gosselin, D. C.; Haney, C.; Larson-Miller, C.; Bonnstetter, R.; Mandryk, C.

    2012-12-01

    Educational research strives to identify the pedagogies that promote student learning. However, the body of research identifying the characteristics of effective teacher preparation is "least strong for science," and is largely based on studies of the effectiveness of individual courses or workshops (NRC 2010). The National Research Council's "Preparing Teachers: Building Evidence for Strong Policy," (2010) provides a mandate for teacher education providers to conduct research on program-scale effectiveness. The high priority research agenda identified by the NRC is expected to elicit understanding of the aspects of teacher preparation that critically impact classroom student learning outcomes. The Laboratory Lens project is designed to identify effective practices in a teacher education program, with specific reference to the content domain of Earth science. Now in its fifth year, the Masters of Applied Science (MAS) program at UNL offers a variety of science courses, ranging from entomology to food science. The six-course Lab Earth series serves as the backbone of the Specialization for Science Educators within the MAS program, and provides comprehensive content coverage of all Earth science topics identified in the AAAS Benchmarks. "How People Learn," (NRC 2009) emphasizes that expert knowledge includes not only factual knowledge, but also the well-developed conceptual framework critical to the ability to, "remember, reason, and solve problems." A focus of our research is to document the process by which the transition from novice to expert takes place in Lab Earth's on-line teacher participants. A feature of our research design is the standardization of evaluation instruments across the six courses. We have used data derived from implementation of the Community of Inquiry Survey (COI) in pilot offerings to ensure that the course sequence is effective in developing a community of learners, while developing their content knowledge. A pre- and post- course

  14. Prospective Science Teachers' Field Experiences in K-12 STEM Academy Classrooms: Opportunities to Learn High-Leverage Science Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Stacey Lynn

    Science education reform efforts in the U.S. have emphasized shifting away from teacher-centered instruction and teaching science as isolated facts, to more student-centered instruction where students engage in disciplinary discourse and science and engineering practices to learn more connected concepts. As such, teachers need to be prepared to teach science in these reform-based ways; however, many teachers have neither experienced reform-based science instruction in their own science learning, nor witnessed reform-based science instruction in their preservice classroom field experiences. At the same time, there has been an emphasis in teacher education on organizing the preparation of new teachers around high-leverage teaching practices--equitable teaching practices that are known to result in student learning and form a strong base for future teacher learning. In this qualitative study, I investigated eight prospective secondary science teachers as they participated in the unique field experience contexts of classrooms in STEM-focused high school academies. Using a lens of situated learning theory, I examined how prospective teachers from two classroom-based field experiences engaged in high-leverage teaching practices and how their experiences in these classrooms shaped their own visions of science teaching. I analyzed video data of classroom instruction, along with prospective and mentor teacher interviews and surveys, to determine the instructional contexts of each academy and the science teaching strategies (including high-leverage practices) that prospective teachers had opportunities to observe and participate in. I also analyzed prospective teacher interviews and surveys to determine their visions of effective science teaching, what high-leverage science teaching practices prospective teachers included in their visions, and how their visions changed throughout the experience. I found that both academy contexts featured more student work, particularly

  15. The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON): Hands-on Experiential K- 12 Learning in the North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K.; Jeffries, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON) was initiated by Martin Jeffries (UAF polar scientist), Delena Norris-Tull (UAF education professor) and Ron Reihl (middle school science teacher, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District). The snow and ice measurement protocols were developed in 1999-2000 at the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska scientists and tested by home school teacher/students in winter 2001-2002 in Fairbanks, AK. The project was launched in 2002 with seven sites around the state (PFRR, Fairbanks, Barrow, Mystic Lake, Nome, Shageluk and Wasilla). The project reached its broadest distribution in 2005-2006 with 22 sites. The schools range from urban (Wasilla) to primarily Alaska native villages (Shageluk). They include public schools, charter schools, home schooled students and parents, informal educators and citizen scientists. The grade levels range from upper elementary to high school. Well over a thousand students have participated in ALISON since its inception. Equipment is provided to the observers at each site. Measurements include ice thickness (with a hot wire ice thickness gauge), snow depth and snow temperature (surface and base). Snow samples are taken and snow density derived. Snow variables are used to calculate the conductive heat flux through the ice and snow cover to the atmosphere. All data are available on the Web site. The students and teachers are scientific partners in the study of lake ice processes, contributing to new scientific knowledge and understanding while also learning science by doing science with familiar and abundant materials. Each autumn, scientists visit each location to work with the teachers and students, helping them to set up the study site, showing them how to make the measurements and enter the data into the computer, and discussing snow, ice and polar environmental change. A number of 'veteran' teachers are now setting up the study sites on

  16. Whose Accountability Is It? Conceptual Metaphor and Affinity for Learning Outcomes Based Accountability: Comparisons between California PreK-12 and Higher Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Devin Dag

    2010-01-01

    The strength of leaders' identification with education accountability language framed by Conceptual Metaphor (Lakoff & Johnson, 2002) was evaluated across California PreK-12 and Higher Education groups. Survey and short-answer data from 549 California college deans, college presidents, PreK-12 superintendents, and PreK-12 school principals…

  17. ONLINE EDUCATION FOR LIFELONG LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayram

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This book was edited by, Yukiko Inoue, professor of educational research at the University of Guam, where she teaches online and face-to-face courses. It was published by Information Science Publishing in 2007. The authors of the chapters in this bookare selected from different universities from Guam,Australia, Turkey and Greece. Online education hasprovided considerable opportunities for all peoplein lifelong learning. People who use online learningmaterials has interactive medium for lifelonglearning. The aim of this book is to examine online environment in terms of development, implementation, theories, technology and case studies. It provides theoretical and practical information about online lifelong learning; consequently, it can appeal to researchers, practitioners, online learners and anyone interested in online lifelong learning. This book covers 14 chapters divided into fivesections.

  18. National Standards for Quality Online Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Liz; Wicks, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The mission of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, iNACOL, is to ensure all students have access to a world-class education and quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. This document, the International Association for K-12 Online Learning's (iNACOL) "National Standards for Quality…

  19. What K-12 Teachers of Earth Science Need from the Earth Science Research Community: Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES), a Minnesota Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Pound, K. S.; Rosok, K.; Baumtrog, J.

    2009-12-01

    NSF-style Broader Impacts activities in the Earth Sciences take many forms, from long term partnerships between universities and informal science institutions to one-time K-12 classroom visits by scientists. Broader Impacts that include K-12 teachers range from those that convey broad Earth Science concepts to others stressing direct connections to very specific current research methods and results. Design of these programs is often informed by prior successful models and a broad understanding of teacher needs, but is not specifically designed to address needs expressed by teachers themselves. In order to better understand teachers’ perceived needs for connections to Earth Science research, we have formed the Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES) research team. Our team includes a geology faculty member experienced in undergraduate and professional Earth Science teacher training, two in-service middle school Earth Science teachers, and the Education Director of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. Members of the team have designed, taught and experienced many of these models, from the Andrill ARISE program to NCED’s summer institutes and teacher internship program. We are administering the STAPLES survey to ask Earth Science teachers in our own state (Minnesota) which of many models they use to 1) strengthen their own understanding of current Earth Science research and general Earth Science concepts and 2) deepen their students’ understanding of Earth Science content. Our goal is to share survey results to inform more effective Broader Impacts programs in Minnesota and to stimulate a wider national discussion of effective Broader Impacts programs that includes teachers’ voices.

  20. Integrating Game-Based Learning Initiative: Increasing the Usage of Game-Based Learning within K-12 Classrooms through Professional Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Mayben, Robert; Boman, Terri

    2016-01-01

    In the past 15 to 20 years there has been an increased interest in the use of games for learning. A considerable amount of work has already been done by educational researchers and theorists (Gee, Squire, Malone, Lepper, Shaffer, etc.) to identify and to operationalize the native affordances of games that make them good for learning. Unfortunately…

  1. Integrating Game-Based Learning Initiative: Increasing the Usage of Game-Based Learning within K-12 Classrooms through Professional Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Mayben, Robert; Boman, Terri

    2016-01-01

    In the past 15 to 20 years there has been an increased interest in the use of games for learning. A considerable amount of work has already been done by educational researchers and theorists (Gee, Squire, Malone, Lepper, Shaffer, etc.) to identify and to operationalize the native affordances of games that make them good for learning. Unfortunately…

  2. A Consideration of Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Online learning has become a permanent fixture on college campuses. For the past decade, enrollment in online courses has grown faster than the overall student body throughout higher education. This phenomenon is not surprising and, in fact, is part of a history of people seeking more flexible alternatives to traditional, face-to-face instruction.…

  3. Successful online learning the five Ps

    OpenAIRE

    Jim FLOOD

    2004-01-01

    Successful online learning the five Ps Jim FLOOD E-learning Consultant-UK Key learning points An important aspect of design for online learning is visual ergonomics. Learning theories offer poor predictive power in terms of how learners work and learn. Success at learning is closely related to emotional engagementand learning designers tend to ignore this aspect. Online learning poses a challenging experience for learnersand they need support t...

  4. Problem-Based Learning Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Problem- and Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a widely used pedagogical method in higher education. Although PBL encourages self-directed learning and works with the students’ own projects and problems, it also includes teacher presentations, discussions and group reflections, both on......-campus and online. Therefore, the teacher’s plans might be relevant to the students’ projects, but that is not always the case. This study investigates how master’s students interact with an online Problem-Based Learning design and examines how technology influences these interactions. The empirical data stem from...... lessons at an online master’s course, and they were collected and analyzed using a netnographic approach. The study finds that concepts like self-directed learning and active involvement of everyone can have very different meanings from the teachers’ and the students’ points of view. If the students do...

  5. Online learning for all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Simon

    2015-05-30

    Last year, Simon Doherty, president of the North of Ireland Veterinary Association and the BVA's NI Branch, completed a number of MOOCs (massive open online courses) having read about them in Vet Record Careers; here, he describes his experiences.

  6. Microbiology Learning and Education Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Niño, Silvia M

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments

  8. Wondering + Online Inquiry = Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeres, Diane Carver; Coiro, Julie; Castek, Jill; Guzniczak, Lizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital information sources can form the basis of effective inquiry-based learning if teachers construct the information and exercises in ways that will promote collaboration, communication, and problem solving.

  9. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  10. Online Estonian Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teral, Maarika; Rammo, Sirje

    2014-01-01

    This presentation focuses on computer-assisted learning of Estonian, one of the lesser taught European languages belonging to the Finno-Ugric language family. Impulses for this paper came from Estonian courses that started in the University of Tartu in 2010, 2011 and 2012. In all the courses the students gain introductory knowledge of Estonian and…

  11. Quality Control in K-12 Digital Learning: Three (Imperfect) Approaches. Creating Healthy Policy for Digital Learning. A Working Paper Series from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    Digital learning makes possible the "unbundling" of school provisions--that is, it allows children to be served by providers from almost anywhere, in new and more customized ways. At the same time, because it destandardizes and decentralizes educational delivery, digital education is far harder to bring under the yoke of the…

  12. Deep Learning Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    course offered at Stanford University in Winter 2015 and again in Winter 2016 on the topic of “Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition...com- puter science professor at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Prof. Mathias Kolsch, used the materials to teach his own version of the course at...helping the student learn to code the algo- rithms taught in the course. As there was no “expert” in this subject available to teach the course, the

  13. Efficient Online Learning via Randomized Rounding

    CERN Document Server

    Cesa-Bianchi, Nicolò

    2011-01-01

    Most online algorithms used in machine learning today are based on variants of mirror descent or follow-the-leader. In this paper, we present an online algorithm based on a completely different approach, which combines "random playout" and randomized rounding of loss subgradients. As an application of our approach, we provide the first computationally efficient online algorithm for collaborative filtering with norm-constrained matrices. As a second application, we solve an open question linking batch learning and transductive online learning.

  14. Online Support Service Quality, Online Learning Acceptance, and Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Wan

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines potential differences between Korean and American students in terms of their perception levels regarding online education support service quality, online learning acceptance, and satisfaction. Eight hundred and seventy-two samples, which were collected from students in online classes in the United States and Korea, were…

  15. Online Support Service Quality, Online Learning Acceptance, and Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Wan

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines potential differences between Korean and American students in terms of their perception levels regarding online education support service quality, online learning acceptance, and satisfaction. Eight hundred and seventy-two samples, which were collected from students in online classes in the United States and Korea, were…

  16. Implementing and Evaluating Online Service Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Marilyn M.; Rutti, Raina M.; Hervani, Aref Agahei; LaBonte, Joanne; Sarkarat, Sy

    2015-01-01

    As online learning proliferates, professors must adapt traditional projects for an asynchronous environment. Service learning is an effective teaching style fostering interactive learning through integration of classroom activities into communities. While prior studies have documented the appropriateness of service learning in online courses,…

  17. Implementing and Evaluating Online Service Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Marilyn M.; Rutti, Raina M.; Hervani, Aref Agahei; LaBonte, Joanne; Sarkarat, Sy

    2015-01-01

    As online learning proliferates, professors must adapt traditional projects for an asynchronous environment. Service learning is an effective teaching style fostering interactive learning through integration of classroom activities into communities. While prior studies have documented the appropriateness of service learning in online courses,…

  18. Social Processes and Pedagogy in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Lindsay; Hughes, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Online learning environments offer efficient ways of interconnecting group members and satisfying their communicative needs. However, learning does not proceed through shared communication alone; all groups imply social processes and learning groups demand an additional pedagogical intention. Popular online learning systems satisfactorily enable…

  19. Analisis Intensi Berprestasi Mahasiswa Binus Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Putranto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of e-learning can improve learning effectiveness and flexibility. Universitas Bina Nusantara (BINUS provides an online learning program called BINUS Online learning. It offers the student to do a study through online activities, where the students are couraged to learn individually. This research was conducted to obtain a perspective of student intention from BINUS Online learning to mark good achievement. Non experimental method with quatitative approached is implemented where the respondents are students of Information System department and Marketing Management Department. The sampling techniques used is non probability purposive sampling. All variables are measured using questionnaire based on Fishbein and Ajzen model. The data of the research are analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple linier regression analysis. The results show that the intention to mark an achievement of students of BINUS Online learning is very high. It means that BINUS Online learning Program students have strong intention to get good marks and study achievements.

  20. National Standards for Quality Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    North American Council for Online Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL) is to increase educational opportunities and enhance learning by providing collegial expertise and leadership in K-12 online teaching and learning. "National Standards for Quality Online Teaching" is designed to provide states, districts, online programs, and other organizations…

  1. A Reference Model for Online Learning Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Seufert, Sabine; Lechner, Ulrike; Stanoevska, Katarina

    2002-01-01

    Online learning communities are introduced as a comprehensive model for technology-enabled learning. We give an analysis of goals in education and the requirements to community platforms. The main contribution of the article is a reference model for online learning communities that consists of four layers designing the organizational, interaction, channel or service and the technological model of learning communities. This reference model captures didactic goals, learning methods and learning...

  2. Project Management Approaches for Online Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Gulsun; Yuzer, T. Volkan

    2013-01-01

    Developments in online learning and its design are areas that continue to grow in order to enhance students' learning environments and experiences. However, in the implementation of new technologies, the importance of properly and fairly overseeing these courses is often undervalued. "Project Management Approaches for Online Learning Design"…

  3. Project Management Approaches for Online Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Gulsun; Yuzer, T. Volkan

    2013-01-01

    Developments in online learning and its design are areas that continue to grow in order to enhance students' learning environments and experiences. However, in the implementation of new technologies, the importance of properly and fairly overseeing these courses is often undervalued. "Project Management Approaches for Online Learning Design"…

  4. Designing Online Learning Modules in Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Brian K.; Weintraub, Randi J.; Breslin, Whitney; Carpenter, Katie C.; Strohacker, Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Online-learning environment can substantially improve student learning and retention of key health concepts. In this case report, we describe our approach for the design of online learning modules to teach concepts in an undergraduate health science/kinesiology curriculum. This report describes our use of these concepts in two lower division and…

  5. Online Learning between university learning and workplace learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    This paper analyses an online community of master’s students taking a course in ICT and organisational learning. One assignment for the students was to initiate and facilitate an educational design for organisational learning called Proactive Review in the organisations where they were employed....... The study explores the interplay between the students’ learning activities at work and in their master study. By using an online discussion forum on Google groups, they reflected on their experimentation with Proactive Review in their professional organisation in order to learn from the experience and find...... solutions to the problems they identified. Our research question is: How do students learn from experience in two contexts, namely as master students and professionals at work? We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community. Our contribution to research shows how students...

  6. Learning to Facilitate (Online) Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Peter; Bull, Susan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching collaboration skills directly by building on competences for meeting facilitation. (Online) meetings provide a rich arena to practice collaboration since they can serve multiple purposes: learning, problem solving, decision making, idea generation and advancement......, etc.. We argue that facilitating meetings is a competence worth developing in students and describe the main knowledge and skill components that pertain to this competence. We then describe some implemented software tools that can be used in schools and colleges to provide opportunities for practicing...... and developing group facilitation skills....

  7. The Metamorphosis by K. (12)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin we reported on the first run of the new NA62 experiment. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to take a look at the production of the experiment's new kaon beam.   The start of the K12 beam line as seen during the installation of the shielding. 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, 10-6 mbar… send in the protons! Since Thursday 1 November, the P42 beam line of the SPS has once again been sending protons to the beryllium target to produce the K12 kaon beam line eagerly awaited by the NA62 collaboration. This was no trivial matter! The first step was to clear the decks by dismantling the entire H10 beam line and NA60 experiment, as well as most of the NA48 experiment - representing some 1000 tonnes of equipment in total! Next came the complete renovation of the infrastructure, which dated back to 1979. The operation called on the expertise of virtually all branches of the EN and GS departments, as well as the Radiation Protection group: from ...

  8. Moving beyond Bricks and Mortar: Changing the Conversation on Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Teresa; Ribble, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Online learning has changed education in many ways. This change was not mandated, but instead filled a need expressed by students. A problem with this shift toward online teaching is that it has happened randomly and irregularly within K-12 systems. Demands from students for online learning at both K-12 and higher education levels have not always…

  9. Knowledge Transfer in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Research comparing online and traditional course delivery methods has sought to demonstrate the equivalence of student performance in online and traditional courses. This study examines the unique proposition that online course delivery is superior to traditional when it comes to applied learning and is thus superior in the process of knowledge…

  10. Facilitating Online Learning Conversations : Exploring tool affordances in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation aims to facilitate students’ online learning conversations in higher education, using asynchronous online forum discussion. Despite offering a great learning potential, online discussions also present several obstacles for conducting effective learning conversations. Therefore, thi

  11. Online Learning Programs: Evaluation's Challenging Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Derek

    2011-01-01

    With the vast array of contextual factors, pedagogical approaches, models of implementation, and purposes of education and training related to online learning, educators, learners, and the general public alike are seeking answers regarding utility and effectiveness of online learning. This article identifies and responds to many of the challenges…

  12. Open Calculus: A Free Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korey, Jane; Rheinlander, Kim; Wallace, Dorothy

    2007-01-01

    Dartmouth College mathematicians have developed a free online calculus course called "Open Calculus." Open Calculus is an exportable distance-learning/self-study environment for learning calculus including written text, nearly 4000 online homework problems and instructional videos. The paper recounts the evaluation of course elements since 2000 in…

  13. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Do online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Our ideas of best practices within this area have been evolving to keep up with our students. Various tactics have been used to make sure students understand what kinds of…

  14. A Deign Framework for Online Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sanjaya

    2002-01-01

    Discusses use of the Web for online instruction and presents a design framework for creating online learning environments. Highlights include approaches to instruction, including behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism; learning activities; content; learner support; and application of the framework for a graduate course at the Indira Gandhi…

  15. A Deign Framework for Online Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sanjaya

    2002-01-01

    Discusses use of the Web for online instruction and presents a design framework for creating online learning environments. Highlights include approaches to instruction, including behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism; learning activities; content; learner support; and application of the framework for a graduate course at the Indira Gandhi…

  16. Learning Styles and Online Discussion Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Rau

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Scholars have suggested models proposing a variety of learning styles for humans. Human Dynamics is one such model, and it has been suggested within its model that one style of learning is enhanced by discussion among learners. While this style of learning may be accomplished relatively easily in an on-campus person-to-person situation, it is not clear how a discussion mode (online posts of learning might be accomplished in an online format. A study of more than 9,000 posts from 240 students in 11 different online classes was conducted to determine whether differences in online discussion posts by individuals with different learning styles were evident. Results of the study suggest that discussion post activity, if managed with suitable rubrics and guiding principles, and augmented by appropriate modeling behavior, is an effective teaching mode for all dynamics, but seem to be a more successful learning mode for individuals of Physically Centered dynamics.

  17. Optics education for K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, James W.; Gaines Walker, Janice M.

    2000-06-01

    The SPIE Education Committee has developed an outreach program aimed at enhancing the dissemination of information about optics to children in kindergarten through the 12th grade (K-12). The main impetus behind the program was that more practicing optical scientists and engineers would be willing to give lectures and demonstrations aimed at inspiring the next generation about optics if material could be made easily available. Consequently, three instructional `outreach kits' were assembled to use in teaching optics to kids in exciting and fun ways. These kits were beta-tested over the last two years at six different U.S. regional sites. Each `outreach kit' contained: (1) a workbook on Optical Demonstrations on the Overhead Projector; (2) a Science and Math Experience Manual: Light, Color and Their Uses; (3) The Optics Discovery Classroom Kit; (4) a slide show; and (5) a video on careers in optics. The best tests were aimed at evaluating the practical ways of utilizing the kits, developing easy-to-follow instructions for guiding others in their use and providing suggestions on modifications, additions, and deletions to the kits. This paper discuses this outreach program and provides details relative to the kit's composition and future plans.

  18. Using Online Learning for At-Risk Students and Credit Recovery. Promising Practices in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

    2008-01-01

    Online learning programs are designed to expand high-quality educational opportunities and to meet the needs of diverse students. While the primary reason online courses are offered in school districts is to expand offerings to courses that would otherwise be unavailable, the second most commonly cited reason for offering online learning is to…

  19. Applying Learning Analytics to Investigate Timed Release in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Whitmer, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive learning gives learners control of context, pace, and scope of their learning experience. This strategy can be implemented in online learning by using the "Adaptive Release" feature in learning management systems. The purpose of this study was to use learning analytics research methods to explore the extent to which the adaptive…

  20. Blending Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Yamagata-Lynch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will share a qualitative self-study about a 15-week blended 100% online graduate level course facilitated through synchronous meetings on Blackboard Collaborate and asynchronous discussions on Blackboard. I taught the course at the University of Tennessee (UT during the spring 2012 semester and the course topic was online learning environments. The primary research question of this study was: How can the designer/instructor optimize learning experiences for students who are studying about online learning environments in a blended online course relying on both synchronous and asynchronous technologies? I relied on student reflections of course activities during the beginning, middle, and the end of the semester as the primary data source to obtain their insights regarding course experiences. Through the experiences involved in designing and teaching the course and engaging in this study I found that there is room in the instructional technology research community to address strategies for facilitating online synchronous learning that complement asynchronous learning. Synchronous online whole class meetings and well-structured small group meetings can help students feel a stronger sense of connection to their peers and instructor and stay engaged with course activities. In order to provide meaningful learning spaces in synchronous learning environments, the instructor/designer needs to balance the tension between embracing the flexibility that the online space affords to users and designing deliberate structures that will help them take advantage of the flexible space.

  1. Design Education Online: Learning Delivery and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong

    2011-01-01

    Online learning has been recognised as an effective pedagogical method and tool, and is broadly integrated into various types of teaching and learning strategies in higher education. In practice, the use of Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in higher education has become an integral strategy for quality education. The field of design education,…

  2. Assessing Social Ability in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James; Lin, Guan Yu; Lin, Yimei

    2006-01-01

    Education is a social practice and the ability to interact socially is important to social cognitive learning and social learning. Online education is frequently criticized because it lacks social interaction, a sense of social engagement, and the benefits of learning with others. Social ability with computer-mediated social mechanisms is key to…

  3. Engineering Education in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Engineers rely on physicists as well as other scientists and mathematicians to explain the world in which we live. Engineers take this knowledge of the world and use it to create the world that never was. The teaching of physics and other sciences as well as mathematics is critical to maintaining our national workforce. Science and mathematics education are inherently different, however, from engineering education. Engineering educators seek to enable students to develop the habits of mind critical for innovation. Through understanding of the engineering design process and how it differs from the scientific method, students can apply problem and project based learning to solve the challenges facing society today. In this talk, I will discuss the elements critical to a solid K-12 engineering education that integrates science and mathematics to solve challenges throughout the world.

  4. Using Learning Analytics to Assess Student Learning in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Ndoye, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics can be used to enhance student engagement and performance in online courses. Using learning analytics, instructors can collect and analyze data about students and improve the design and delivery of instruction to make it more meaningful for them. In this paper, the authors review different categories of online assessments and…

  5. Avatars: Usefulness in Collaborative Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Lesley; Noël, Tonya

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies that enhance computer-mediated communications are provoking change in the way educators interact with learners. As online course offerings expand and enrollment numbers increase, the challenges of effective online learning call for innovation and creativity. It is beneficial to introduce activities which establish trust and…

  6. Learner Perspectives on Fully Online Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study builds on this author's 2011 article in which the author reflects on the pedagogical challenges and resultant changes made while teaching two fully online foreign language papers over a four-year period (Y. H. S. Sun (2011). Online language teaching: The pedagogical challenges. "Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An…

  7. Blending Formal and Informal Learning Networks for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkawski, Betül C.

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of social software and the advance of web-based technologies, online learning networks provide invaluable opportunities for learning, whether formal or informal. Unlike top-down, instructor-centered, and carefully planned formal learning settings, informal learning networks offer more bottom-up, student-centered participatory…

  8. Learning Software Component Model for Online Tutoring

    OpenAIRE

    Duraiswamy, K.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Web services are interface elements which allow applications to render functional services to requesting clients using open standard protocols. A lecture method combines both social association and urban processing as course design and delivery is termed as Interface Learning. Many Interface learning services is presenting through online. To make an online tutoring scheme more effective, the previous study used web services and application programs like instant messaging ba...

  9. Online Learning in Discrete Hidden Markov Models

    OpenAIRE

    Alamino, Roberto C.; Caticha, Nestor

    2007-01-01

    We present and analyse three online algorithms for learning in discrete Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and compare them with the Baldi-Chauvin Algorithm. Using the Kullback-Leibler divergence as a measure of generalisation error we draw learning curves in simplified situations. The performance for learning drifting concepts of one of the presented algorithms is analysed and compared with the Baldi-Chauvin algorithm in the same situations. A brief discussion about learning and symmetry breaking b...

  10. National Standards for Quality Online Courses: Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) is to ensure all students have access to world-class education and quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. "National Standards for Quality Online Courses" is designed to provide states, districts, online programs, and…

  11. K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson

  12. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  13. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  14. Online Coregularization for Multiview Semisupervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boliang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel online coregularization framework for multiview semisupervised learning based on the notion of duality in constrained optimization. Using the weak duality theorem, we reduce the online coregularization to the task of increasing the dual function. We demonstrate that the existing online coregularization algorithms in previous work can be viewed as an approximation of our dual ascending process using gradient ascent. New algorithms are derived based on the idea of ascending the dual function more aggressively. For practical purpose, we also propose two sparse approximation approaches for kernel representation to reduce the computational complexity. Experiments show that our derived online coregularization algorithms achieve risk and accuracy comparable to offline algorithms while consuming less time and memory. Specially, our online coregularization algorithms are able to deal with concept drift and maintain a much smaller error rate. This paper paves a way to the design and analysis of online coregularization algorithms.

  15. Modelling Typical Online Language Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, Carlos; Hampel, Regine; Stickler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the methods and results of a four-year-long research project focusing on the language learning activity of individual learners using online tasks conducted at the University of Guanajuato (Mexico) in 2009-2013. An activity-theoretical model (Blin, 2010; Engeström, 1987) of the typical language learning activity was used to…

  16. Triangulating Assessment of Online Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jennifer; Johnson, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration plays an integral role in the construction of knowledge in online learning environments. A supportive foundation for learning can be created through the intentional design of formative and summative assessments that embrace self-, peer-, and instructor assessment practices. The purpose of this article is to: (1) examine current…

  17. Utilizing Online Learning Communities in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Daniel W.; Green, Lucy Santos

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors will expand upon the definition of learning communities, discussing the ways in which this concept has changed and adapted through the incorporation/infusion of web-based technologies. In addition, strategies on how to create and use online learning communities both with students and for professional practice will be…

  18. How People Learn in an Asynchronous Online Learning Environment: The Relationships between Graduate Students' Learning Strategies and Learning Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Beomkyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between learners' learning strategies and learning satisfaction in an asynchronous online learning environment. In an attempt to shed some light on how people learn in an online learning environment, one hundred and sixteen graduate students who were taking online learning courses…

  19. Going Online to Make Learning Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Brigham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult students often come to higher education with college-level learning that they have acquired outside of the classroom – from the workplace, military service, self-study, or hobbies. For decades, many forward-thinking colleges and universities have been offering services to evaluate that learning and award it college credit that counts towards a degree. However, for a range of reasons, not every institution can offer prior learning assessment (PLA in every discipline or for every student. With funding from several U.S. philanthropic organizations, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL is launching Learning Counts, a national online service that will offer students a range of opportunities to have their learning evaluated for college credit. This online service will expand the capacity of institutions offering PLA to students and provide an efficient and scalable delivery mechanism for the awarding of credit through PLA.

  20. Global Online Learning among Asia-Pacific Economies: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuhaft, Jack D.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of online learning in a multicultural environment focuses on experiences with the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). Topics include technology problems; differences in learning styles; Web site use; cultural differences, and their influence on learning environments; and language considerations. (LRW)

  1. Brief Review on Learning Objects in Online Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yingli; Yin Guizhi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Learning objects are the important in online learning environment.An increasingly large literature is about it,but some questions and problems exist in the literature.This article will briefly review the definition and evaluation of learning objects,and discuss some of the problems as well.

  2. Standards for K-12 Engineering Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the value and feasibility of developing and implementing content standards for engineering education at the K-12 level. Content standards have been developed for three disciplines in STEM education--science, technology, and mathematic--but not for engineering. To date, a small but growing number of K-12

  3. K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…

  4. Global TIE: Developing a Virtual Network of Robotic Observatories for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. A.; Clark, G.

    2001-11-01

    Astronomy in grades K-12 is traditionally taught (if at all) using textbooks and a few simple hands-on activities. In addition, most students, by High School graduation, will never have even looked through the eyepiece of a telescope. The possibility now exists to establish a network of research grade telescopes, no longer useful to the professional astronomical community, that can be made accessible to schools all across the country through existing IT technologies and applications. These telescopes could provide unparalleled research and educational opportunities for a broad spectrum of K-12 and college students and turns underutilized observatory facilities into valuable, state-of-the-art teaching centers. The NASA-sponsored Telescopes In Education (TIE, http://tie.jpl.nasa.gov) project has been wildly successful in engaging the K-12 education community in real-time, hands-on, interactive astronomy activities. Hundreds of schools in the US, Australia, Canada, England, and Japan have participated in the TIE program, remotely controlling the 24-inch telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory from their classrooms. In recent years, several (approximately 20 to date) other telescopes have been, or are in the process of being, outfitted for remote use as TIE affiliates. Global TIE integrates these telescopes seamlessly into one virtual observatory and provides the services required to operate this facility, including a scheduling service, tools for data manipulation, an online proposal review environment, an online "Virtual TIE Student Ap J" for publication of results, and access to related educational materials provided by the TIE community. Global TIE provides unparalleled research and educational opportunities for a broad spectrum of K-12 and college students and turns essentially unused observatory facilities into valuable, state-of-the-art teaching centers. This presentation describes the Global TIE Observatory data and organizational systems and details the

  5. Learning Software Component Model for Online Tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Duraiswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Web services are interface elements which allow applications to render functional services to requesting clients using open standard protocols. A lecture method combines both social association and urban processing as course design and delivery is termed as Interface Learning. Many Interface learning services is presenting through online. To make an online tutoring scheme more effective, the previous study used web services and application programs like instant messaging based on environments in which students reside. But the downside is that it is difficult to maintain the service request queues online. The services and data storage processes are inefficient. Approach: To overcome all the above issues, a Learning Software Component Model (LSCM framework is formed in the present study to build a component model based on communication services available on the network. In addition to this, the proposed software component modeled with Learning Object (LO aspects integrates the related sub hierarchical components with the main component object framework. Based on LSCM, training schedules are identified efficiently. Results: The proposed LSCM framework is experimented to show the performance improvement with the previous online tutoring scheme based on web services in terms of delivery report, maintenance of tutoring sessions and reliability. Conclusion: Compared to an existing online tutoring through web services, the proposed LSCM framework performance is 75% better in providing learning services to the providers.

  6. What Online Networks Offer: Online Network Compositions and Online Learning Experiences of Three Ethnic Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluijze, Susanne Elisabeth; de Haan, M.J.; Ünlüsoy, A.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines ethno-cultural diversity in youth ́s narratives regarding their online learning experiences while also investigating how these narratives can be understood from the analysis of their online network structure and composition. Based on ego-network data of 79 respondents

  7. What Online Networks Offer: Online Network Compositions and Online Learning Experiences of Three Ethnic Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluijze, Susanne Elisabeth; de Haan, M.J.; Ünlüsoy, A.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines ethno-cultural diversity in youth ́s narratives regarding their online learning experiences while also investigating how these narratives can be understood from the analysis of their online network structure and composition. Based on ego-network data of 79 respondents

  8. West Bloomfield Schools Social Studies Curriculum K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, James E.; And Others

    The curriculum guide outlines behavioral objectives, learning activities, evaluation methods, and resources to help K-12 classroom teachers develop and implement social studies programs. Major objectives are to extend knowledge, develop skills to make effective use of this knowledge, and to facilitate the socialization process. The first section…

  9. [Learning in online education: analysis of concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Viviane Rolim; Pinheiro, Ana Karina Bezerra; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed at clarifying the concept learning in online education, expressed by the literature in the area of health. It is a study of analysis of concept, based on the Evolutionary Model, being highlighted attributes, background, consequents and substitute terms. Learning in the context of online education is characterized by a dynamic and continuous process of active construction of knowledge and acquisition of skills, with physical separation between students and teachers. Among the background events discussed stood out: interest and motivation in learning; dedication and time self-management; and interaction and communication tools. The main evident consequents were: student's autonomy; independent and active study; and construction of own knowledge. The prevailing substitute terms were collaborative learning and self-learning. The understanding of the concept can contribute to its implementation in nursing teaching activities in virtual environments.

  10. Successful online learning – the five Ps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim FLOOD

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful online learning – the five Ps Jim FLOOD E-learning Consultant-UK jimflood@btinternet.com Key learning points • An important aspect of design for online learning is visual ergonomics. • Learning theories offer poor predictive power in terms of how learners work and learn. • Success at learning is closely related to emotional engagement–and learning designers tend to ignore this aspect. • Online learning poses a challenging experience for learners–and they need support to cope with it. • A key goal to achieve Praxis – being able to put learning into practice. Many of you will be familiar with the three (or more Ps of marketing and even if not, as trainers or teachers you are likely to have used mnemonics as an aid to retention and recall. Mnemonics are especially useful when you need to get the key points to ‘stick’ in the minds of your audience. With this in mind I offer you the 5 Ps of online learning: Presentation, Pedagogy, Promotion, Preparation and Props. What I offer is not new; in fact much of it results from the eleven years of online teaching and learning at The Open University, the £22 million it has spent on research and evaluation 1, and the worldwide community that have been sharing experience in recent years. You can therefore consider these 5 Ps to be a convenient re-packing of the information and experience that can be found in abundance on the Internet. Presentation Good graphic design appeals to the subtle process by which the brain processes information and, as a result, we decide if we like the ‘look and feel’ of a visual environment. Part of liking this ‘look and feel’ is the way the text and pictorial layout can appear inviting and encouraging–a vital aspect of any online learning environment. Another aspect of presentation is how the text reads in terms of engaging the learner and introducing the story to be told–as well as being written in clear and concise English When browsing through books

  11. Online Learning of Noisy Data with Kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Cesa-Bianchi, Nicolò; Shamir, Ohad

    2010-01-01

    We study online learning when individual instances are corrupted by random noise. We assume the noise distribution is unknown, and may change over time with no restriction other than having zero mean and bounded variance. Our technique relies on a family of unbiased estimators for non-linear functions, which may be of independent interest. We show that a variant of online gradient descent can learn functions in any dot-product (e.g., polynomial) or Gaussian kernel space with any analytic convex loss function. Our variant uses randomized estimates that need to query a random number of noisy copies of each instance, where with high probability this number is upper bounded by a constant. Allowing such multiple queries cannot be avoided: Indeed, we show that online learning is in general impossible when only one noisy copy of each instance can be accessed.

  12. How should we measure online learning activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim O'Riordan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of Web-based learning objects makes finding and evaluating resources a considerable hurdle for learners to overcome. While established learning analytics methods provide feedback that can aid learner evaluation of learning resources, the adequacy and reliability of these methods is questioned. Because engagement with online learning is different from other Web activity, it is important to establish pedagogically relevant measures that can aid the development of distinct, automated analysis systems. Content analysis is often used to examine online discussion in educational settings, but these instruments are rarely compared with each other which leads to uncertainty regarding their validity and reliability. In this study, participation in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC comment forums was evaluated using four different analytical approaches: the Digital Artefacts for Learning Engagement (DiAL-e framework, Bloom's Taxonomy, Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO and Community of Inquiry (CoI. Results from this study indicate that different approaches to measuring cognitive activity are closely correlated and are distinct from typical interaction measures. This suggests that computational approaches to pedagogical analysis may provide useful insights into learning processes.

  13. Using Scientific Visualizations to Enhance Scientific Thinking In K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, E.

    2016-12-01

    The same scientific visualizations, animations, and images that are powerful tools for geoscientists can serve an important role in K-12 geoscience education by encouraging students to communicate in ways that help them develop habits of thought that are similar to those used by scientists. Resources such as those created by NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS), which are intended to inform researchers and the public about NASA missions, can be used in classrooms to promote thoughtful, engaged learning. Instructional materials that make use of those visualizations have been developed and are being used in K-12 classrooms in ways that demonstrate the vitality of the geosciences. For example, the Center for Geoscience and Society at the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) helped to develop a publication that outlines an inquiry-based approach to introducing students to the interpretation of scientific visualizations, even when they have had little to no prior experience with such media. To facilitate these uses, the SVS team worked with Center staff and others to adapt the visualizations, primarily by removing most of the labels and annotations. Engaging with these visually compelling resources serves as an invitation for students to ask questions, interpret data, draw conclusions, and make use of other processes that are key components of scientific thought. This presentation will share specific resources for K-12 teaching (all of which are available online, from NASA, and/or from AGI), as well as the instructional principles that they incorporate.

  14. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  15. Building an Online Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chein

    2004-01-01

    The Internet was not invented for education at beginning (Pett Grabinger, 1995), but it has influenced educational systems considerably, especially by providing another way for distance learning. This powerful communication function is superior to any other educational media. Students can conduct their own self-directed learning without…

  16. How I Became a Convert to Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Nick

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the author's skepticism about online education turns into belief when he teaches his own online course. Throughout the process of designing and facilitating his online course, he found himself slowly evolving from critic to champion of online education. Here, he shares the benefits of online learning.

  17. Enhancing the online learning experience using virtual interactive classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie, Andrew; Beverley, Ewens; Sian, Maslin-Prothero

    2015-01-01

    ...: 130 undergraduate, 14 postgraduate. Interventions: Classroom options were introduced into two online units, incorporating blended learning approaches and promoting active participation in learning...

  18. The Effect of Culture on Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinasevych, Orest

    2010-01-01

    The author is conducting survey research to identify possible effects of culture on online learning success. The research will consider the cultural dimension of uncertainty avoidance identified by Hofstede (2001). The research participants will be students at Canadian post-secondary institutions. The survey will ask learners about their…

  19. Online Learning as Information Delivery: Digital Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Jan; Reeves, Thomas C.; Oliver, Ron

    2005-01-01

    In business and commerce, the concept of marketing myopia has been a useful tool to predict, analyze and explain the rise and fall of businesses. In this article, we question whether the concept can also be used to predict the ultimate downfall of online learning in higher education, if universities continue to confuse their key mission-education-…

  20. Tank War Using Online Reinforcement Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard Andersen, Kresten; Zeng, Yifeng; Dahl Christensen, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Real-Time Strategy(RTS) games provide a challenging platform to implement online reinforcement learning(RL) techniques in a real application. Computer as one player monitors opponents'(human or other computers) strategies and then updates its own policy using RL methods. In this paper, we propose...

  1. Tank War Using Online Reinforcement Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard Andersen, Kresten; Zeng, Yifeng; Dahl Christensen, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Real-Time Strategy(RTS) games provide a challenging platform to implement online reinforcement learning(RL) techniques in a real application. Computer as one player monitors opponents'(human or other computers) strategies and then updates its own policy using RL methods. In this paper, we propose...

  2. Facilitating Service Learning in the Online Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the author's experience teaching online technical communication courses with an embedded service-learning component, this essay opens the discussion to the potential problems involved in designing online service-learning courses and provides practical approaches to integrating service learning into online coursework. The essay…

  3. Facilitating Service Learning in the Online Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the author's experience teaching online technical communication courses with an embedded service-learning component, this essay opens the discussion to the potential problems involved in designing online service-learning courses and provides practical approaches to integrating service learning into online coursework. The essay…

  4. On-Line Learning: One Way to Bring People Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff-Kfouri, Carol Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the benefits of on-line learning for adult learners and to further demystify three common misconceptions concerning on-line learning: students certainly do receive support from their on-line professors, the professor is pro-active rather than passive, and students may be more motivated to learn than in…

  5. The Impact of a Virtual Social Environment on Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jennifer Eve Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Engagement and motivation for participants in online learning have been studied extensively in business courses and in postsecondary courses. These studies have provided evidence of the difficulty for students to learn from and even complete online courses. Now that online learning is being promoted in high schools to cut costs and provide more…

  6. Online Learning across Ethnicity and Age: A Study on Learning Interaction Participation, Perception, and Learning Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Kwak, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-method study examined whether online learning interaction participation, perception, and learning satisfaction would be consistent across varied age and ethnicity groups. Data were collected from students enrolled in 28 online courses via content analysis with online interaction transcripts, structural equation modeling with the…

  7. The Nature of Online Charter Schools: Evolution and Emerging Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Lisa Hasler; Barbour, Michael K.; Menchaca, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Online charter schools are unique among K-12 online learning options for students. They are full-time, public schools that combine online learning with traditional and home schooling practices. They are often chartered by a state agency, supported in full or in part with state funds and most often managed by a private educational management…

  8. Security Risks and Protection in Online Learning: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a survey of online learning which attempts to determine online learning providers’ awareness of potential security risks and the protection measures that will diminish them. The authors use a combination of two methods: blog mining and a traditional literature search. The findings indicate that, while scholars have identified diverse security risks and have proposed solutions to mitigate the security threats in online learning, bloggers have not discussed security in online learning with great frequency. The differences shown in the survey results generated by the two different methods confirm that online learning providers and practitioners have not considered security as a top priority. The paper also discusses the next generation of an online learning system: a safer personal learning environment which requires a one-stop solution for authentication, assures the security of online assessments, and balances security and usability.

  9. Sociocultural Perspective of Science in Online Learning Environments. Communities of Practice in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Present study reviews empirical research studies related to learning science in online learning environments as a community. Studies published between 1995 and 2015 were searched by using ERIC and EBSCOhost databases. As a result, fifteen studies were selected for review. Identified studies were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis method…

  10. K-12 Math and Science Education: A Physicist Meets Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. For example, their experiences working on research topics of great societal interest (e.g. the energy supply or global warming) can be a great attraction to young people. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  11. Satellite Applications for K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M.; Ackerman, S.; Lettvin, E.; Emerson, N.; Whittaker, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation will highlight interactive on-line curriculum developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. CIMSS has been on the forefront of educational software design for over two decades, routinely integrating on-line activities into courses on satellite remote sensing. In 2006, CIMSS began collaborating with education experts and researchers from the University of Washington to create an NSF-funded distance learning course for science teachers called Satellite Applications for Geoscience Education. This course includes numerous web-based learning activities, including a distance education tool called VISITview which allows instructors to connect with multiple students simultaneously to conduct a lesson. Developed at CIMSS to facilitate training of National Weather Service forecasters economically and remotely, VISITview is especially effective for groups of people discussing and analyzing maps or images interactively from many locations. Along with an on-line chat function, VISITview participants can use a speaker phone or a networked voice-enabled application to create a learning environment similar to a traditional classroom. VISITview will be used in two capacities: first, instructors will convey topics of current relevance in geoscience disciplines via VISITview. Second, the content experts will participate in "virtual visits" to the classrooms of the educators who take the course for full credit. This will enable scientists to interact with both teachers and students to answer questions and discuss exciting or inspiring examples that link satellite data to their areas of research. As long as a school has Internet access, an LCD projector and a speakerphone, VISITview sessions can be shared with an entire classroom. The geoscientists who developed material for the course and conducting VISITview lectures include a geologist from the University of Wisconsin-Richland, an

  12. Emotional Intelligence as a Determinant of Readiness for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar; Tariq, Riaz Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Students' performance in online learning environments is associated with their readiness to adopt a digital learning approach. Traditional concept of readiness for online learning is connected with students' competencies of using technology for learning purposes. We in this research, however, investigated psychometric aspects of students'…

  13. An examination of online learning effectiveness using data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukor, N.B.A.; Tasir, Z.; Meijden, H.A.T. van der

    2015-01-01

    Online learning has become increasingly popular due to technology advancement that allows discussion to occur at distance. Most studies report on students' learning achievement as a result of effective online learning while assessment on the learning process is also necessary. It is possible by

  14. An examination of online learning effectiveness using data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukor, N.B.A.; Tasir, Z.; Meijden, H.A.T. van der

    2015-01-01

    Online learning has become increasingly popular due to technology advancement that allows discussion to occur at distance. Most studies report on students' learning achievement as a result of effective online learning while assessment on the learning process is also necessary. It is possible by appl

  15. Promoting brain-science literacy in the k-12 classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriole, Michaela

    2010-07-01

    There are many simple ways to incorporate neuroscience into the K-12 classroom, even when the subject is not explicitly part of the curriculum. Here, Michaela Labriole, a science instructor at the New York Hall of Science, provides tangible examples of how teachers can encourage brain-science literacy in students at a time when growing knowledge of the brain is shaping our understanding of how to best foster learning.

  16. Learning through Learning: Experiential Resonance in an Online Management Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Starr-Glass

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiential resonance is a pedagogic approach that allows learners to gaina deeper understanding of the subject matter theory by using that theorydirectly in the structure, dynamics, and learning spaces of the course. Learnersinformed about the application of course theory are asked to reflect onits use. In this preliminary study, management principles were embedded inthe learning spaces of two online distance learning management courses. Apost-course survey, although statistically limited because of the sample size,showed strong learner agreement that management theory had been a resonanttheme in the learning experiences and that its uses had been beneficial.

  17. Students' Self-Regulated Learning, Online Information Evaluative Standards and Online Academic Searching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Sheng-Chau; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Online information searching strategies (OISS) used by students can be viewed as a key indicator in online learning environments. Therefore, developments in their OISS may also involve variables such as self-regulated learning (SRL) and online information evaluative standards (OIES). Three instruments, an OISS, a SRL and an OIES were used to…

  18. K-12 Bolsters Ties to Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    When science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is discussed in the K-12 sphere, it often seems like shorthand for mathematics and science, with perhaps a nod to technology and even less, if any, real attention to engineering. But recent developments signal that the "e" in STEM may be gaining a firmer foothold at…

  19. Teaching K-12 Students to Combat Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Physical education is one of the most viable intervention programs to reach overweight and obese children. Since physical activity habits developed early in life are more likely to persist into adulthood, it is important for K-12 physical educators to teach the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will motivate students to become more active. Two…

  20. Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Kathy; Ettrich, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks are organized by division: kindergarten, grades 1-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12. They are descriptors of language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The descriptors are arranged in a continuum of seven language competences across five proficiency levels. Several…

  1. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  2. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  3. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  4. Online Learning, Stability, and Stochastic Gradient Descent

    CERN Document Server

    Poggio, Tomaso; Rosasco, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    In batch learning, stability together with existence and uniqueness of the solution corresponds to well-posedness of Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) methods; recently, it was proved that CV_loo stability is necessary and sufficient for generalization and consistency of ERM. In this note, we introduce CV_on stability, which plays a similar note in online learning. We show that stochastic gradient descent (SDG) with the usual hypotheses is CVon stable and we then discuss the implications of CV_on stability for convergence of SGD.

  5. Online support vector regression for reinforcement learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhenhua; Cai Yuanli

    2007-01-01

    The goal in reinforcement learning is to learn the value of state-action pair in order to maximize the total reward. For continuous states and actions in the real world, the representation of value functions is critical. Furthermore, the samples in value functions are sequentially obtained. Therefore, an online support vector regression (OSVR) is set up, which is a function approximator to estimate value functions in reinforcement learning. OSVR updates the regression function by analyzing the possible variation of support vector sets after new samples are inserted to the training set. To evaluate the OSVR learning ability, it is applied to the mountain-car task. The simulation results indicate that the OSVR has a preferable convergence speed and can solve continuous problems that are infeasible using lookup table.

  6. Collaborative learning framework for online stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Savitsky, Terrance D; Dalal, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Public and stakeholder engagement can improve the quality of both research and policy decision making. However, such engagement poses significant methodological challenges in terms of collecting and analysing input from large, diverse groups. To explain how online approaches can facilitate iterative stakeholder engagement, to describe how input from large and diverse stakeholder groups can be analysed and to propose a collaborative learning framework (CLF) to interpret stakeholder engagement results. We use 'A National Conversation on Reducing the Burden of Suicide in the United States' as a case study of online stakeholder engagement and employ a Bayesian data modelling approach to develop a CLF. Our data modelling results identified six distinct stakeholder clusters that varied in the degree of individual articulation and group agreement and exhibited one of the three learning styles: learning towards consensus, learning by contrast and groupthink. Learning by contrast was the most common, or dominant, learning style in this study. Study results were used to develop a CLF, which helps explore multitude of stakeholder perspectives; identifies clusters of participants with similar shifts in beliefs; offers an empirically derived indicator of engagement quality; and helps determine the dominant learning style. The ability to detect learning by contrast helps illustrate differences in stakeholder perspectives, which may help policymakers, including Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, make better decisions by soliciting and incorporating input from patients, caregivers, health-care providers and researchers. Study results have important implications for soliciting and incorporating input from stakeholders with different interests and perspectives. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Digital Communication Applications in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Krista Jill

    2011-01-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was for the researcher to obtain a better understanding of the online learning environment, to explore the various ways online class instructors have incorporated digital communication applications to try and provide learner-centered online learning environments, and to examine students'…

  8. Applying Distributed Learning Theory in Online Business Communication Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristin

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the critical use of technology in online formats that entail relatively new teaching media. Argues that distributed learning theory is valuable for teachers of online business communication courses for several reasons. Discusses the application of distributed learning theory to the teaching of business communication online. (SG)

  9. Web 3.0: Implications for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of Web 3.0, also known as the Semantic Web, on online learning is yet to be determined as the Semantic Web and its technologies continue to develop. Online instructors must have a rudimentary understanding of Web 3.0 to prepare for the next phase of online learning. This paper provides an understandable definition of the Semantic Web…

  10. Web 3.0: Implications for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of Web 3.0, also known as the Semantic Web, on online learning is yet to be determined as the Semantic Web and its technologies continue to develop. Online instructors must have a rudimentary understanding of Web 3.0 to prepare for the next phase of online learning. This paper provides an understandable definition of the Semantic Web…

  11. Toward Deep Learning for Adult Students in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Xie, Kui

    2009-01-01

    Adult students have become the new majority in online distance education. Research in online distance education, however, is still predominantly based on the historical perspective of the traditional student profile. This study examines adult students' learning engagement in online courses and explores the impact of online course design models and…

  12. Teaching and Learning Communities through Online Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pluijm, B.

    2016-12-01

    What do colleagues do with your assigned textbook? What they say or think about the material? Want students to be more engaged in their learning experience? If so, online materials that complement standard lecture format provide new opportunity through managed, online group annotation that leverages the ubiquity of internet access, while personalizing learning. The concept is illustrated with the new online textbook "Processes in Structural Geology and Tectonics", by Ben van der Pluijm and Stephen Marshak, which offers a platform for sharing of experiences, supplementary materials and approaches, including readings, mathematical applications, exercises, challenge questions, quizzes, alternative explanations, and more. The annotation framework used is Hypothes.is, which offers a free, open platform markup environment for annotation of websites and PDF postings. The annotations can be public, grouped or individualized, as desired, including export access and download of annotations. A teacher group, hosted by a moderator/owner, limits access to members of a user group of teachers, so that its members can use, copy or transcribe annotations for their own lesson material. Likewise, an instructor can host a student group that encourages sharing of observations, questions and answers among students and instructor. Also, the instructor can create one or more closed groups that offers study help and hints to students. Options galore, all of which aim to engage students and to promote greater responsibility for their learning experience. Beyond new capacity, the ability to analyze student annotation supports individual learners and their needs. For example, student notes can be analyzed for key phrases and concepts, and identify misunderstandings, omissions and problems. Also, example annotations can be shared to enhance notetaking skills and to help with studying. Lastly, online annotation allows active application to lecture posted slides, supporting real-time notetaking

  13. Comparing Learning Gains: Audio Versus Text-based Instructor Communication in a Blended Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Dominique

    Though blended course audio feedback has been associated with several measures of course satisfaction at the postsecondary and graduate levels compared to text feedback, it may take longer to prepare and positive results are largely unverified in K-12 literature. The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the time investment and learning impact of audio communications with 228 secondary students in a blended online learning biology unit at a central Florida public high school. A short, individualized audio message regarding the student's progress was given to each student in the audio group; similar text-based messages were given to each student in the text-based group on the same schedule; a control got no feedback. A pretest and posttest were employed to measure learning gains in the three groups. To compare the learning gains in two types of feedback with each other and to no feedback, a controlled, randomized, experimental design was implemented. In addition, the creation and posting of audio and text feedback communications were timed in order to assess whether audio feedback took longer to produce than text only feedback. While audio feedback communications did take longer to create and post, there was no difference between learning gains as measured by posttest scores when student received audio, text-based, or no feedback. Future studies using a similar randomized, controlled experimental design are recommended to verify these results and test whether the trend holds in a broader range of subjects, over different time frames, and using a variety of assessment types to measure student learning.

  14. Self-Directed Online Learning Modules: Students’ Behaviours and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Maloney

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Academic programs are experiencing pressure to produce efficiencies in education by incorporating online learning. Simply transplanting a text-based resource to an online setting by itself does not necessarily provide an effective online learning environment. In collaboration with clinical educators, our academic team constructed an online learning activity designed to reinforce allied health student knowledge of pharmacology. However, anecdotal reports from students entering the clinical environment indicated poor engagement with the online resources. These reports prompted the need for a method of formal analysis of student engagement and insights into student preferences and behaviours with online learning. Through auditing online usage data and survey analysis, our study determines a set of practical recommendations for the design of online resources, and their implementation, in order optimise their utilization and educational value.

  15. Learning through online discussion: a framework evidenced in learners' interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne C. Bain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Online learning, often supported through online discussion, is not only a popular means of supporting off-campus learners, but increasingly has a place within campus-based learning courses. Laurillard and others suggest that there are assumptions being made about learning through online discussion that have yet to be fully tested, and therefore there is a need to examine this area further. Tutors and learners may benefit from having a greater insight and understanding of how engaging in asynchronous online discussion presents opportunities for learning on an individual and a collective basis. This research study focused on learners' engagement with online discussion and their perceptions of how engaging in online discussion impacts on learning. This paper revisits learning through online discussion and proposes a framework, which emerges from the analysis of learners' experiences. A grounded theory approach was used in the collection and analysis of six learner case studies within a higher education setting, exploring learners' interactions in online discussion, and their perceptions of learning through online discussion. Insights into the learners' interactions were provided by the learners themselves through semi-structured interviews. The grounded approach to the analysis of the interviews enabled the learners' voices to be heard in terms of what they thought about learning through online discussion. The insight enabled through the depth of description from the learners and the examination of the online interactions led to the development of a framework for learning through online discussion. The framework raises the importance of articulation as a key process in learning whilst highlighting the opportunities for collaborative informed thinking by engaging with the ideas of others. The focus given to the learning process through the framework will be of interest to tutors and learners who use online asynchronous discussion environments for

  16. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  17. ESSEA: Inquiry-Based, Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) is a partnership between the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and the Center for Educational Technologies (CET) at Wheeling Jesuit University, through funding from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. ESSEA is supporting universities, colleges, and science education organizations in offering Earth system science online graduate courses that have been developed within the CET at Wheeling Jesuit University. ESSEA has created a national professional development program aimed at improving the knowledge, skills, and resources of Earth system science educators, offering state-of-the-art, rigorous, online courses to promote understanding of Earth system science. The three available ESS courses use an innovative instructional design model and are delivered over the Internet - they feature student-centered, knowledge-building virtual communities, the optimal method for teaching and learning. Participants in these exciting professional development courses experience online, collaborative learning, while mastering new content that addresses National Education Science Standards; develop confidence in using technology; design new classroom activities; and identify new Earth system science resources. The courses have been successfully implemented for both in-service and pre-service teacher education.

  18. Web Applications That Promote Learning Communities in Today's Online Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigle, Rosemary R.

    2015-01-01

    The changing online learning environment requires that instructors depend less on the standard tools built into most educational learning platforms and turn their focus to use of Open Educational Resources (OERs) and free or low-cost commercial applications. These applications permit new and more efficient ways to build online learning communities…

  19. How Online Journalists Learn within a Non-Formal Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstad, Morten; Eide, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of workplace learning, with a focus on the non-formal learning that takes place among online journalists. The focus of this article is journalists working in an online newspaper and their experiences with workplace and non-formal learning, centering on framework conditions…

  20. Research on Model of Student Engagement in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, online learning refers students under the guidance of teachers through the online learning platform for organized learning. Based on the analysis of related research results, considering the existing problems, the main contents of this paper include the following aspects: (1) Analyze and study the current student engagement model.…

  1. Online Graduate Students' Perceptions of Best Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweiss, Peggy C.; Joyner, Sheila A.; Fuller, Matthew B.; Henderson, Susan; Young, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of online master's students regarding their best learning experiences. The authors surveyed 86 graduate students concerning what helped them learn in the online environment. Results indicate that although graduate students learned using the same technological tools as undergraduates, they…

  2. Learning Style, Culture and Delivery Mode in Online Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to customer needs is a key component of competitiveness in any service industry. In online HE (higher education), which is increasingly worldwide, this adaptation must include consideration of learning styles. Most research shows that learning style has little impact on learning outcomes in online education. Nevertheless, students with…

  3. Teaching Project Management On-Line: Lessons Learned from MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, Rita; Fernandes, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Creating a course for teaching project management online in a full online distance-learning environment was a challenge. Working with adult learners from different continents that want to complete a Master degree was an additional challenge. This paper describes how different MOOCs were used to learn about teaching -(meta) e-learning. MOOCs…

  4. Online Learning - Between University Studies and Workplace Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    and their professional work places. The study follows a mixed methods approach, using both quantitative and qualitative data to understand the activities taking place in the students’ learning community. In an online Google Groups discussion forum, students reflected on their experimentation with implementing......This study provides new insights into how learning takes place when professionals return to education and use their professional work experience to fulfil their study objectives. We answer the following research question: How do students learn from experiences in two contexts—a master’s course...... at a university and their organisations of employment—by attending a blended learning course? The study builds on Engeström’s (2001) expansive learning model of two interacting activity systems, exploring the elements of interaction between two contexts: namely, the students’ master’s course...

  5. Online Teaching and Learning: When Technology meets Language and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    XU, Zhichang

    2014-01-01

     Technology and high accessibility to networking media in both private and professional contexts have made online teaching and learning a norm and reality for tertiary education across the world. Online teaching and learning do not only apply to distance education and Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), but they also apply effectively to on-campus education as an integral component of blended teaching and learning. Current instructors and students communicate in a wide range of “contact” sit...

  6. AIAA Educator Academy: Enriching STEM Education for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, E.; Bering, E. A.; Longmier, B. W.; Henriquez, E.; Milnes, T.; Wiedorn, P.; Bacon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Mars Rover Celebration Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 3-8. Throughout this module, students learn about Mars and the solar system. Working with given design criteria, students work in teams to do basic research about Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. Then, students participate in the design and construction of a model of a mock-up Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share their rover designs and what they have learned. The Electric Cargo Plan Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 6-12. Throughout this module, students learn about aerodynamics and the four forces of flight. Working individually or in teams, students design and construct an electrically-powered model aircraft to fly a tethered flight of at least one lap without cargo, followed by a second tethered flight of one lap carrying as much cargo as possible. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share what they have learned and compete with their different cargo plane designs. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude

  7. Online Learning of Industrial Manipulators' Dynamics Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polydoros, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    The robotics industry has introduced light-weight compliant manipulators to increase the safety during human-robot interaction. This characteristic is achieved by replacing the stiff actuators of the traditional robots with compliant ones which creates challenges in the analytical derivation...... of the dynamics models. Those mainly derive from physics-based methods and thus they are based on physical properties which are hard to be calculated.  In this thesis, is presented, a novel online machine learning approach  which is able to model both inverse and forward dynamics models of industrial manipulators...

  8. Online Corporate Learning in the Serbian Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zočević

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine corporate learning relationsbetween companies, and to investigate the possibility ofconverting of traditional corporate trainings and meetings to modernmeans of communication and education, with particular referenceto the application of online training and the videoconferencesystem in the process. In addition, the objective of this paperis to examine how well informed companies are about the technologyand its introduction into everyday business practice. Theresearch underlines the results of the analyses concerning thepractical aspect of videoconferences both in Serbian companiesand in foreign ones operating through branches in Serbia.

  9. Nursing student perceptions of community in online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet; Killion, Cheryl M

    2009-01-01

    Nursing faculty need to understand the unique aspects of online learning environments and develop new pedagogies for teaching in the virtual classroom. The concept of community is important in online learning and a strong sense of community can enhance student engagement and improve learning outcomes in online courses. Student perceptions of community in online learning environments were explored in this study. Five focus group sessions were held and online nursing students were asked to give examples of experiences related to sense of community. Fifteen major themes emerged: class structure, required participation, teamwork, technology, becoming, commonalities, disconnects, mutual exchange, online etiquette, informal discussions, aloneness, trepidation, unknowns, nonverbal communication and anonymity. Themes sorted into the categories of structural, processual and emotional factors. Theme descriptions show how sense of community can be enhanced and/or diminished in online courses. This study adds depth and detail to the limited body of research on sense of community in distance education in nursing courses.

  10. Characteristics of Adult Learners with Implications for Online Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The online educational environment is increasingly being used by adults and should be designed based on the needs of adult learners. This article discusses andragogy, an important adult learning theory, and reviews three other adult learning theories: self-directed learning, experiential learning, and transformational learning. During this…

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Student Engagement, Learning, and Satisfaction in Lecture Hall and Online Learning Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe-Hemp, Cara; Woollen, Susan; Humiston, Gail Sears

    2009-01-01

    The current study involves a comparison of student levels of engagement, ability to learn autonomously, and interaction with peers and faculty in two different learning settings: a large lecture hall and online. Results suggest that learning mechanism drives the styles of learning and teaching practiced in traditional and online learning settings.…

  12. Management and Operations of Online Programs: Ensuring Quality and Accountability. Promising Practices in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

    2009-01-01

    Online learning is growing rapidly as states and districts are creating new online schools, and existing programs are adding new courses and students. The growth reflects the spreading understanding that online courses and programs can serve a wide variety of students and needs. These include: (1) Creating opportunities for small and rural school…

  13. Online chats: A strategy to enhance learning in large classes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muntuwenkosi Mtshali

    2015-11-10

    Nov 10, 2015 ... Online-supported teaching and learning is a technological innovation in education that integrates face-to-face .... synchronous chat conversations in virtual learning ..... to investigating different understandings of reality.

  14. Locus of control and online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suretha Esterhuysen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The integration of online learning in university courses is considered to be both inevitable and necessary. Thus there is an increasing need to raise awareness among educators and course designers about the critical issues impacting on online learning. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess the differences between two groups of first-year Business Sciences learners (online and conventional learners in terms of biographic and demographic characteristics and locus of control. The study population consisted of 586 first-year learners of whom 185 completed the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI. The results show that the two groups of learners do not differ statistically significantly from each other with respect to locus of control. The findings and their implications are also discussed. Opsomming Die integrasie van aanlyn-leer in universiteitskursusse word beskou as sowel onafwendbaar as noodsaaklik. Daar is dus ’n toenemende behoefte om bewustheid onder opvoedkundiges en kursusontwerpers te kweek oor die kritiese aspekte wat ’n impak op aanlyn-leer het (Morgan, 1996. Daarom was die doel van hierdie ondersoek om die verskille tussen twee groepe eerstejaarleerders in Bestuurs- en Ekonomiese Wetenskap (aanlyn en konvensionele leerders te bepaal ten opsigte van biografiese en demografiese eienskappe en lokus van beheer. Die populasie het bestaan uit 586 eerstejaarleerders waarvan 185 die Lokus van Beheer Vraelys voltooi het. Die resultate toon dat die twee groepe leerders nie statisties beduidend van mekaar verskil het met betrekking tot lokus van beheer nie. Die bevindinge en implikasies word ook bespreek.

  15. Pressing the Online Learning Advantage: Commitment, Content, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelona, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    These are heady days for online learning in the academy. What was once the domain of innovative institutions, administrators, and faculty is quickly becoming mainstream. Higher education has seen rapid growth in online enrollments relative to the rest of the college population. More than one in five college students has taken a class online. A…

  16. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  17. Learning Outcomes in an Online vs Traditional Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Relative enrollment in online classes has tripled over the last ten years, but the efficacy of learning online remains unclear. While two recent Meta analyses report higher exam grades for online vs. traditional classes, this body of research has been marked by two recurrent limitations: (1) a possible problem of selection bias wherein students…

  18. A Distributed System for Learning Programming On-Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Elena; Regueras, Luisa M.; Verdu, Maria J.; Leal, Jose P.; de Castro, Juan P.; Queiros, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Several Web-based on-line judges or on-line programming trainers have been developed in order to allow students to train their programming skills. However, their pedagogical functionalities in the learning of programming have not been clearly defined. EduJudge is a project which aims to integrate the "UVA On-line Judge", an existing…

  19. The Development of Social Presence in Online Arabic Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrea; Herrington, Jan

    2010-01-01

    An effective online learning community requires the development of social presence, as this helps learners to project themselves online and feel a sense of community. A literature review found that cultural preferences are important in developing relationships online, which may explain why some learners in international contexts may not…

  20. Designing Online Learning Communities of Practice: A Democratic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Murchu, Daithi O.

    2004-01-01

    This study addresses the problem of designing an appropriate learning space or architecture for distributed online courses using net-based communication technologies. We apply Wenger's criteria to explore, identify and discuss the design architectures of two online courses from two comparable online Master's programmes, developed and delivered in…

  1. Online least-squares policy iteration for reinforcement learning control

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcement learning is a promising paradigm for learning optimal control. We consider policy iteration (PI) algorithms for reinforcement learning, which iteratively evaluate and improve control policies. State-of-the-art, least-squares techniques for policy evaluation are sample-efficient and have relaxed convergence requirements. However, they are typically used in offline PI, whereas a central goal of reinforcement learning is to develop online algorithms. Therefore, we propose an online...

  2. Online Learning Room for ”Flipped Classroom”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Ellen Margrethe; Nielsen, Linda Susanna Hauschildt

    2014-01-01

    working actively and innovatively to create a didactic design in our online learning rooms in our LMS that satisfy the demands for flipped learning and at the same time adapted to the special needs of each learning module at the nursing education programme. Keywords: Online learning, flipped classroom......Abstract The “flipped classroom” learning concept is an alternative way of teaching & learning. The fundamental idea of the "flipped classroom" is to change the way students prepare for classes and the work that takes place when the students are together in the classroom. This integrates online...... learning with learning in the classroom. The learning room must support the students’ unassisted learning, their preparation for class and their preparation for supervision in both a motivating and clear way. At the Nursing Education Programme at University College Lillebaelt in Denmark, we have been...

  3. Does Racism Exist in the Online Classroom Learning Environment? Perceptions of Online Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    In U.S. history, racism has existed in traditional brick-and-mortar academic institutions for hundreds of years. With the increase of online learning--a strategic and effective form of education for many academic institutions of higher education--the question being asked is, Does racism exist in the online classroom learning environment? This…

  4. Analyzing Educators' Online Interactions: A Framework of Online Learning Support Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Denise C.; Martin, Caitlin K.; Pinkard, Nichole; Gray, Tené

    2016-01-01

    While the potential benefits of participating in online learning communities are documented, so too are inequities in terms of how different populations access and use them. We present the online learning support roles (OLSR) framework, an approach using both automated analytics and qualitative interpretation to identify and explore online…

  5. Online Project Based Learning in Innovation Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, David

    2003-01-01

    An innovation management course has three strands with face-to-face and online components: (1) seminars with online course notes and slides; (2) assignments (group online case studies, tutorials, in-class presentations); and (3) assessment (online, oral, in-class, written). Students are able to benchmark their work online and teachers use the…

  6. Modeling Best Practice through Online Learning: Building Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerniglia, Ellen G.

    2011-01-01

    Students may fear that they will feel unsupported and isolated when engaged in online learning. They don't know how they will be able to build relationships with their teacher and classmates solely based on written words, without facial expressions, tone of voice, and other nonverbal communication cues. Traditionally, online learning required…

  7. Online Learning for Labour Movement Activists. NALL Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, Peter H.

    A study explored informal learning in relation to online communications and working class people's use of computers as a socially situated practice rooted in collective, communal relationships. It drew on analysis of online learning workshop participation in specially initiated sessions among Canadian labor activist/educators. Findings were based…

  8. The Space for Social Media in Structured Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Gilly; Ross, Bella; Pechenkina, Ekaterina; Chase, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits of using social media in an online educational setting, with a particular focus on the use of Facebook and Twitter by participants in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) developed to enable educators to learn about the Carpe Diem learning design process. We define social media as digital social tools and…

  9. Security Risks and Protection in Online Learning: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; He, Wu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of online learning which attempts to determine online learning providers' awareness of potential security risks and the protection measures that will diminish them. The authors use a combination of two methods: blog mining and a traditional literature search. The findings indicate that, while scholars have…

  10. Improving The Learning Design of Massive Open Online Courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubens, Wilfred; Kalz, Marco; Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be regarded as a promising next step in the evolution of distance education. However, they have been criticised for their poor learning design. This article describes the development of an adequate learning design in a series of nineteen MOOCs (called online m

  11. The New Gold Rush: Establishing Effective Online Learning Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serim, Ferdi

    2007-01-01

    Online learning is the fastest growing segment of educational technology, for both the best and worst of reasons. The promise of delivering student-centered education, anytime, anywhere, at any pace provides the best reason. Online learning certainly has the potential to finally deliver on these promises. The temptation to replace highly skilled…

  12. Improving the Learning Design of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be regarded as a promising next step in the evolution of distance education. However, they have been criticised for their poor learning design. This article describes the development of an adequate learning design in a series of nineteen MOOCs (called online master classes). A formative evaluation focuses on…

  13. Culturally Responsive Online Design: Learning at Intercultural Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, Gail; DesBiens, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence-based guidelines to inform culturally responsive online learning design in higher education. Intercultural understanding is now a recognised core learning outcome in a large majority of Canadian public universities; however, supporting design methodology is underdeveloped, especially in online contexts. Our search…

  14. Extending TAM for Online Learning Systems: An Intrinsic Motivation Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng; ZHAO Jue; TAN Weiwei

    2008-01-01

    To get a better understanding of user behavior towards online learning systems, the technology acceptance model (TAM) was extended to include an intrinsic motivational factor. An online survey posted on a campus BBS was conducted to collect research data with a total of 121 usable responses. The results support the motivational model and show that the explained variance of online learning system use behavior is 71.3% higher than that of the original TAM explanation.

  15. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  16. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  17. Scientists Involved in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The publication of countless reports documenting the dismal state of science education in the 1980s, and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) report (1996) called for a wider involvement of the scientific community in K-12 education and outreach. Improving science education will not happen without the collaboration of educators and scientists working in a coordinated manner and it requires a long-term, continuous effort. To contribute effectively to K-12 education all scientists should refer to the National Science Education Standards, a set of policies that guide the development of curriculum and assessment. Ocean scientists can also specifically refer to the COSEE recommendations (www.cosee.org) that led to the creation of seven regional Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence. Scientists can get involved in K-12 education in a multitude of ways. They should select projects that will accommodate time away from their research and teaching obligations, their talent, and their interest but also contribute to the education reform. A few examples of effective involvement are: 1) collaborating with colleagues in a school of education that can lead to better education of all students and future teachers, 2) acting as a resource for a national program or a local science fair, 3) serving on the advisory board of a program that develops educational material, 4) speaking out at professional meetings about the value of scientists' involvement in education, 5) speaking enthusiastically about the teaching profession. Improving science education in addition to research can seem a large, overwhelming task for scientists. As a result, focusing on projects that will fit the scientist's needs as well as benefit the science reform is of prime importance. It takes an enormous amount of work and financial and personnel resources to start a new program with measurable impact on students. So, finding the right opportunity is a priority, and stepping

  18. A Model of Teaching and Learning Online in Asian Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Kabirul Islam

    2005-01-01

    Online teaching and learning practices in Asian universities are different from that in western universities. Western universities give emphasis on student-student interaction for learning. Online courses offered by most Asian universities are a kind of mixed mode that comprised simultaneous face-to-face tutorials and online interaction facility. In this situation most students use the online facility to collect resources and to contact their teachers. The quantity of student-student interaction was sporadic in many courses. So research is needed to improve the situation and create an environment for students where they can learn what peer group interaction is and practice it. This paper has presented a model of teaching and learning online for Asian universities. Possible barriers in teaching and learning situations in Asia and students' abilities have been considered to develop the model.

  19. Being There: Establishing Instructor Presence in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to critically examine course structure and the role it may play in improving teaching presence in an asynchronous online learning environment. The examination is grounded in experiential learning; adult learning principles; case-based and problem-based learning methods; and peer reviews. The discussion is concluded…

  20. Rethinking Learner Support: The Challenge of Collaborative Online Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of computer-mediated communication in open and distance learning focuses on how learner support of online-intensive and interactive forms of learning and teaching are conceptualized. Topics include virtual learning environments; collaborative learning; interpersonal response; identity; interaction; time and duration; institutional…

  1. Learning Styles and the Online Classroom: Implications for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastanski, Michael; Slick, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of student learning styles within a Distance Learning (DL) classroom. The study examines the learning style preferences of online business students as measured by the Kolb Learning Style Inventory and determines if a significant difference in course grades and course completion rates exist between students when…

  2. You Asked, We Answered! A Podcasting Series by Scientists for K-12 Teachers Through the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Tait, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA) recently initiated a podcasting series "You Asked, We Answered!" for K-12 teachers to increase their science content knowledge through short audio podcasts, supplemented with relevant resources. The 2015-2016 PAESTA President Kathy Tait generated the idea of tapping in to the content expertise of higher education faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students to assist K-12 teachers with increasing their own Earth and space content knowledge. As time and resources for professional development are decreasing for K-12 teachers, PAESTA is committed to not only providing curricular resources through our online database of inquiry-based exercises in the PAESTA Classroom, but providing an opportunity to learn science content from professionals in an audio format.Our goal at PAESTA has been to release at least one new podcast per month that answers the questions asked by PAESTA members. Each podcast is recorded by an Earth/space science professional with content expertise and placed online with supporting images, links, and relevant exercises found in the PAESTA Classroom. Each podcast is available through the PAESTA website (http://www.paesta.psu.edu/podcasts) and PAESTA iTunes channel (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paesta-podcasts/id1017828453). For ADA compliance, the PAESTA website has a transcript for each audio file. In order to provide these podcasts, we need the participation of both K-12 teachers and science professionals. On the PAESTA Podcast website, K-12 teachers can submit discipline questions for us to pass along to our content experts, questions relating to the "what" and "how" of the Earth and space sciences, as well as questions about Earth and space science careers. We ask science professionals for help in answering the questions posed by teachers. We include online instructions and tips to help scientists generate their podcast and supporting materials.

  3. BiteScis: Connecting K-12 teachers with science graduate students to produce lesson plans on modern science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Many students graduate high school having never learned about the process and people behind modern science research. The BiteScis program addresses this gap by providing easily implemented lesson plans that incorporate the whos, whats, and hows of today's scienctific discoveries. We bring together practicing scientists (motivated graduate students from the selective communicating science conference, ComSciCon) with K-12 science teachers to produce, review, and disseminate K-12 lesson plans based on modern science research. These lesson plans vary in topic from environmental science to neurobiology to astrophysics, and involve a range of activities from laboratory exercises to art projects, debates, or group discussion. An integral component of the program is a series of short, "bite-size" articles on modern science research written for K-12 students. The "bite-size" articles and lesson plans will be made freely available online in an easily searchable web interface that includes association with a variety of curriculum standards. This ongoing program is in its first year with about 15 lesson plans produced to date.

  4. Rethinking Lifelong Learning through Online Distance Learning in Chinese Educational Policies, Practices and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a critique of the Chinese philosophy of online distance learning as a means of building a lifelong learning society. Literature about lifelong learning and its implications for online distance learning is reviewed. Documents, reports and research papers are examined to explore the characteristics of the Chinese philosophy of…

  5. On-line and Mobil Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Whittaker, T. M.; Jasmin, T.; Mooney, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Introductory college-level science courses for non-majors are critical gateways to imparting not only discipline-specific information, but also the basics of the scientific method and how science influences society. They are also indispensable for student success to degree. On-line, web-based homework (whether on computers or mobile devices) is a rapidly growing use of the Internet and is becoming a major component of instruction in science, replacing delayed feedback from a few major exams. Web delivery and grading of traditional textbook-type questions is equally effective as having students write them out for hand grading, as measured by student performance on conceptual and problem solving exams. During this presentation we will demonstrate some of the interactive on-line activities used to teach concepts and how scientists approach problem solving, and how these activities have impacted student learning. Evaluation of the activities, including formative and summative, will be discussed and provide evidence that these interactive activities significantly enhance understanding of introductory meteorological concepts in a college-level science course. More advanced interactive activities are also used in our courses for department majors, some of these will be discussed and demonstrated. Bring your mobile devices to play along! Here is an example on teaching contouring: http://profhorn.aos.wisc.edu/wxwise/contour/index.html

  6. Online Learning of Rested and Restless Bandits

    CERN Document Server

    Tekin, Cem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the online learning problem involving rested and restless multiarmed bandits with multiple plays. The system consists of a single player/user and a set of K finite-state discrete-time Markov chains (arms) with unknown state spaces and statistics. At each time step the player can play M arms. The objective of the user is to decide for each step which M of the K arms to play over a sequence of trials so as to maximize its long term reward. The restless multiarmed bandit is particularly relevant to the application of opportunistic spectrum access (OSA), where a (secondary) user has access to a set of K channels, each of time-varying condition as a result of random fading and/or certain primary users' activities.

  7. MIT Orients Course Materials Online to K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Many science and mathematics educators across the country are taking advantage of a Web site created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the famed research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which offers free video, audio, and print lectures and course material taken straight from the school's classes. Those resources…

  8. The Challenges to Connectivist Learning on Open Online Networks: Learning Experiences during a Massive Open Online Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Kop

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-directed learning on open online networks is now a possibility as communication and resources can be combined to create learning environments. But is it really? There are some challenges that might prevent learners from having a quality learning experience. This paper raises questions on levels of learner autonomy, presence, and critical literacies required in active connectivist learning.

  9. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  10. Developing academic literacy through self-regulated online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmaline Lear

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the self-regulated learning (SRL experiences of international students in developing English language academic literacy essential for successful transition to university. The participants in this study were a small, diverse group of first year undergraduate students who sought academic support from the Academic Skills Centre at an Australian university. They were given the opportunity to independently access an online program, Study Skills Success, over the duration of one semester to develop their academic literacy in English. Data for this study were collected from a pre- and post-program questionnaire, interviews, a focus group discussion, and reflective online learning logs. These sources gathered information regarding the participants’ motivation and attitudes, their online learning experiences and strategy use, and the perceived benefits of SRL online. The findings from this study have implications for supporting the transition of first year students to university by developing essential academic skills through independent online learning.

  11. Online Social Media Applications for Constructivism and Observational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Mbati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 technologies have a range of possibilities for fostering constructivist learning and observational learning. This is due to the available applications which allow for synchronous and asynchronous interaction and the sharing of knowledge between users. Web 2.0 tools include online social media applications which have potential pedagogical benefits. Despite these potential benefits, there is inadequate utilization of online social media applications in learning management systems for pedagogical purposes. Reasons cited for the limited uptake of online social media applications in learning management systems include the lack of consideration regarding the pedagogical benefits of these applications (Christie & Garrote-Jurado, 2009, pp. 273-279. There is limited information regarding experiences of the use of online social media that foster constructivist and observational learning. Using a qualitative meta-ethnographic approach, this article explores the experiences of students and instructors regarding online social media applications for constructivism and observational learning. Constructivist criteria (Baviskar, Hartle, & Whitney, 2009, pp. 543-544 and observational learning, based on Bandura’s (2001, pp. 265-299 social cognitive theory, formed the theoretical grounding for this research. The findings suggest that discussion forums are ideal for the stimulation of constructivism and observational learning in online learning programmes.

  12. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  13. Infrared Astronomy Professional Development for K-12 Educators: WISE Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Mendez, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. WISE Telescope (Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) and Spitzer Space Telescope Education programs provided an immersive teacher professional development workshop at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico during the summer of 2009. As many common misconceptions involve scale and distance, teachers worked with Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers built and used basic telescopes, learned about the history of telescopes, explored ground and satellite based telescopes, and explored and worked on models of WISE Telescope. An in-depth explanation of WISE and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. We taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of WISE lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, listening to light by using speakers hooked up to photoreceptor cells, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars. We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development. Funding was provided by WISE Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, Starbucks, Arecibo Observatory, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  14. E-Service-Learning: The Evolution of Service-Learning to Engage a Growing Online Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Leora S.; McGorry, Sue Y.; Widener, Murray C.

    2012-01-01

    E-service-learning (electronic service-learning)--online course instruction and/or service--holds massive potential to transform both service-learning and online learning by freeing service-learning from geographical constraints and by equipping online learning with a powerful and much-needed tool to promote engagement. Students are increasingly…

  15. K-12 Teaching and Physics Enrollment

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed the relevant data from public schools in greater Houston area of Texas. Based and analyzed. Since the data is only limited to a few school, we are still working on getting more data so that we can compare and contrast the results adequately and understand the core of the enrollment issue at the national level. However, based on the raw data and partial analysis, we propose a few recommendations towards the improvement of science education in Texas Schools, in general, and greater Houston area schools in particular. Our results indicate that the quality of science education can be improved significantly if we focus on the improvement of high school education or even intermediate schools when students are first time exposed to science in a little technical way. Simply organizing teacher training programs at K-12 level as school education plays a pivotal role in the decrease in physics enrollment at the higher level. Similar analysis can actually be generalized to other states to f...

  16. Geolinde - a geographical online learning platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmüller, Max

    2017-04-01

    Starting about ten years ago during a classroom project on Africa, two colleagues and me started developing an educational platform with geographic content: www.geolinde.musin.de The basic concept was to collect and present a wide range of free educational materials, which could be used by teachers, students and anyone who is interested in geography as well. Soon we found out that producing units for our students also means working on age-appropriate texts on each topic. We made our learning units matching the curriculum for Bavarian 'Gymnasium' and are still working on the improvement of each single unit, especially on the basis of suggestions by our students and our teaching experience. The main advantage in teaching with units from geolinde is that the students work at their own speed, repeat topics, use the glossary or have a look at the skill pages. Everyone uses the wide range of materials in his own way to achieve the curricular goals. Many topics contain short online tests, so that the students can control their basic understanding. The teacher is set free for giving helpful advice, discussing special questions and to monitor the learning progress. After a certain time a question and answer session follows and puts the focus on major curricular goals. Until now www.geolinde.musin.de consists of several blended learning units: Africa, Europe, Climate, Climate Change, Plate tectonics,… It also contains thematic pages on many geographical skills, a glossary of more than one thousand geographic terms and last but not least a collection of approximately 23.000 photos of places of interest all around the world. All the many thousand web pages can be used freely (CC-BY-SA 4.0). The only limitation is www.geolinde.musin.de is available in German only.

  17. Teaching Project Management on-line: lessons learned from MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Falcao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Creating a course for teaching project management online in a full online distance-learning environment was a challenge. Working with adult learners from different continents that want to complete a Master degree was an additional challenge. This paper describes how different MOOCs were used to learn about teaching -(meta e-learning. MOOCs provide diverse opportunities for teachers to learn and innovate in e-learning. From the analysis of 5 MOOCs in the broad field of project management we took important lessons on how to structure contents, how to prepare complex assignments and, the most important lesson of all, how to help students to learn. This paper describes our journey of learning from MOOCs how to be better online teachers.

  18. Learning Groups in MOOCs: Lessons for Online Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Mayende

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available when there is interaction within online learning groups, meaningful learning is achieved. Motivating and sustaining effective student interactions requires planning, coordination and implementation of curriculum, pedagogy and technology. For our aim to understand online learning group processes to identify effective online learning group mechanisms, comparative analysis was used on a massive open online course (MOOC run in 2015 and 2016. Qualitative (interaction on the platform and quantitative (survey methods were used. The findings revealed several possible ways to improve online learning group processes. This paper concludes that course organization helped in increasing individual participation in the groups. Motivation by peers helped to increase sustainability of interaction in the learning groups. Applying these mechanisms in higher education can make online learning groups more effective.

  19. AN INCLUSIVE APPROACH TO ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS: Models and Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Germain-RUTHERFORD

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ever-increasing numbers of online courses on the demographic composition of classes has meant that the notions of diversity, multiculturality and globalization are now key aspects of curriculum planning. With the internationalization and globalization of education, and faced with rising needs for an increasingly educated and more adequately trained workforce, universities are offering more flexible programs, assisted by new educational and communications technologies. Faced with this diversity of populations and needs, many instructors are becoming aware of the importance of addressing the notions of multiculturality and interculturality in the design of online however this raises many questions. For example, how do we integrate and address this multicultural dimension in a distance education course aimed at students who live in diverse cultural environments? How do the challenges of intercultural communication in an online environment affect online teaching and learning? What are the characteristics of an online course that is inclusive of all types of diversity, and what are the guiding principles for designing such courses? We will attempt to answer some of these questions by first exploring the concepts of culture and learning cultures. This will help us to characterize the impact on online learning of particular cultural dimensions. We will then present and discuss different online instructional design models that are culturally inclusive, and conclude with the description of a mediated instructional training module on the management of the cultural dimension of online teaching and learning. This module is mainly addressed to teachers and designers of online courses.

  20. Invisible Motivation of Online Adult Learners During Contract Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Youn (Yonnie Chyung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a face-to-face classroom, the instructor can easily diagnose students’ motivational status by observing their facial expressions and postures, but such cues are absent in an online classroom. Therefore, online instructors often estimate students’ motivational level based on their online behavior such as the number of messages they post, and look for effective strategies to help them actively participate in online dialogues. One such strategy is contract learning which facilitates self-directed behaviors through structuring an agreed learning process. This study reports a contract learning strategy in a graduate-level online class, examining whether a sample of 28 students’ motivation could indeed be predicted by their online behavior. Results from the study found that the students’ online behavior was not a predictor for their motivational status, though there were age and gender differences in their online behavior. The students felt more self-directed and motivated during contract learning, but what they really liked was being able to select assignments that were relevant to their interests and needs. This paper concludes by discussing practical implications of the findings at the end.The Journal of Educators Online, Volume 4, Number 1, January 2007 1

  1. Program Online Learning Sebagai Faktor Penunjang Keunggulan Kompetitif Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Muliadi Kerta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Online learning has become a way to improve efficiency in the learning process without reducing the quality of learning itself. Colleges that run it hope that the program becomes an attraction for prospective students, especially those with limitation to follow the regular program. The goal of this research was to find out whether Binus Online Learning Program has any influence to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Data were compiled by distributing questionnaires to 100 respondents consist of the students and lecturers on Binus Online Learning Program. This thesis is based on a quantitative methodology to gather and analyze the data to find out if they were any correlation between Online Learning Program and the competitive advantage of Binus University. It can be concluded that there are some positive and significant influences of Online Learning Program to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Therefore, promoting and developing Online Learning Program will increase the competitive advantage of Binus University, and cover the target market which regular programs do not. 

  2. A PEDAGOGICAL CRITICAL REVIEW OF ONLINE LEARNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi SULISWORO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available E-learning which have various shapes such as blog, classroom learning which is facilitated the World Wide Web; a mix of online instruction and meeting the class known as additional models or hybrid; or the full online experience, where all assessment and instruction is done electronically. Object relationship of learning and constructivist educational philosophy and confirmed that online learning has the orientation which is basically a constructivist ideology, where the combination of some of the knowledge is an inquiry-oriented activities and authentic and also promote the progress of the construction of new knowledge. Description of the online learning system in theory and practice can be illustrated in a few examples that have been found in the research that has been done and found new discoveries obtained in the study, but not everything can be done because of several factors. Please note that the components in the online learning system can serve as a learning system which is very strong influence on learning in the class. The objective of this research is to a pedagogical critical review of online learning system in theory and practice that can be applied by teachers in the teaching process in the classroom. The results obtained in this study were teachers and students need extra effort to make online classes and virtual. Further research is needed on appropriate strategies in order to determine the next result is more useful. There some advices for any studies that discuss online learning system are done in certain areas, namely the use of electricity and other disciplines such as social and humanities.

  3. Enhancing Online Language Learning as a Tool to Boost Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Sol; Krauß, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Online learning is a very flexible way to build and improve language knowledge alongside other work and/or study commitments whilst at the same time encouraging autonomous learning, time management, self-motivation and other skills relevant to employability. Learning on your own, however, can also be daunting. Therefore, the Languages for All…

  4. A Groundwater project for K-12 schools: Bringing research into the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Walsh, M.; Gensic, J.

    2011-12-01

    Simple water quality test kits were used in a series of K-12 classrooms to demonstrate scientific processes and to motivate learning in K-12 students. While focused on student learning, this project also allowed collection of regional data on groundwater quality (primarily nitrate) in the study area. The project consisted of development and administration of a weeklong groundwater quality unit introduced to K-12 schools in northern Indiana and taught by a graduate student in an engineering discipline. The structure of the week started with an introduction to basic groundwater concepts modified for the specific grade level; for this project the students ranged from grades 4-12. In addition to groundwater basics, the purpose of the collection of the water quality data, as well as relevance to the research of the graduate student, were outlined. The students were then: (i) introduced to two simple water quality testing methods for nitrates, (ii) required to hypothesize as to which method will likely be "better" in application, and (iii) asked to practice using these two methods under laboratory conditions. Following practice, the students were asked to discuss their hypotheses relative to what was observed during the practice focusing on which testing method was more accurate and/or precise. The students were then encouraged to bring water samples from their home water system (many of which are on private wells) to analyze within groups. At the end of the week, the students shared their experience in this educational effort, as well as the resulting nitrate data from numerous groundwater wells (as collected by the students). Following these discussions the data were added to an online database housed on a wiki sponsored by the Notre Dame Extended Research Community (http://wellhead.michianastem.org/home). These data were plotted using the free service MapAList to visually demonstrate to the students the spatial distribution of the data and how their results have

  5. Perceptions of Online Learning Quality Given Comfort with Technology, Motivation to Learn Technology Skills, Satisfaction, and Online Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Ooms, Ann; Montanez, Marcel; Yan, Yelena L.

    2005-01-01

    Online courses are appearing at a high rate, increasing the competitiveness of the distance learning market. Reluctance to invest in this area is due to cost and quality concerns. This study reports the findings of a survey of 700 professional and graduate education students regarding their comfort with technology, satisfaction with those…

  6. "Flipping" educational technology professional development for K-12 educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Daniel

    As the demand for more effective professional development increases in K-12 schools, trainers must adjust their training methods to meet the needs of their teacher learners. Just as lecture-heavy, teacher-centered instruction only meet the learning needs of a small minority of students, "sit and get" professional development rarely results in the teachers gaining the skills and confidence necessary to use technology effectively in their instruction. To resolve the frustrations of teachers related to ineffective professional development, a "Flipped PD" training model was developed based on the learning needs of adult learners, the integration of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), learning activities, and the Flipped Classroom concept. Under this model, training shifts from a passive, trainer-centered format, to an active, learner-centered format where teachers learn to use technology in their classrooms by first focusing on pedagogical issues, then choosing the options that work best for addressing those issues in their unique situation, and completing "learn-by-doing" projects. Those who participate in "Flipped PD" style trainings tend to have more confidence upon completion that they can use the tools they were trained on in their teaching, as well as believe that the PD was engaging and a good use of their time.

  7. Open Book Testing in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakes, Glenda C.

    2008-01-01

    One continuing concern associated with online courses is assessment of student performance. One option for online assessment is the use of open book tests. This study investigated the impact of training in open book test-taking strategies on student test performance in online, timed, unproctored, open book tests. When the tutorial was required…

  8. Ghosts, Stars, and Learning Online: Analysis of Interaction Patterns in Student Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Peretz, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Discussions are commonly used in online teaching and have been shown to foster student learning and collaboration. This case study uses content analysis to explore the interaction patterns of student online discussions during a semester-long teacher preparation course using concepts from sociometry. Findings suggest that interaction patterns were…

  9. Integrating Collaborative PBL with Blended Learning to Explore Preservice Teachers' Development of Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-chu

    2010-01-01

    This study integrated collaborative problem-based learning (collaborative PBL) with blended learning to explore the emerging process and function of online learning communities among preservice teachers. Thirty-two preservice teachers participated in a 16-week instruction program. Analyses of online group discussions and portfolios found that (a)…

  10. Structural Equation Modeling towards Online Learning Readiness, Academic Motivations, and Perceived Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horzum, Mehmet Baris; Kaymak, Zeliha Demir; Gungoren, Ozlem Canan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between online learning readiness, academic motivations, and perceived learning was investigated via structural equation modeling in the research. The population of the research consisted of 750 students who studied using the online learning programs of Sakarya University. 420 of the students who volunteered for the research and…

  11. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  12. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  13. Cisco Networking Academy: Next-Generation Assessments and Their Implications for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    To illuminate the possibilities for next-generation assessments in K-12 schools, this case study profiles the Cisco Networking Academy, which creates comprehensive online training curriculum to teach networking skills. Since 1997, the Cisco Networking Academy has served more than five million high school and college students and now delivers…

  14. Work in Progress: Learner-Centered Online Learning Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, M.; Zwitserloot, R.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, learner-centered technology for authoring web lectures. Besides seamless integration of video and audio feeds, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, and web-pages, the proposed Online Learning Facility (OLF) also facilitates online interactive testing and review of covered mater

  15. Multiple Intelligences to Promote Metacognition in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    This representative embedded study embraced hermeneutic qualitative methods and was grounded in the constructivist paradigm. The study explored how Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI), promoted metacognition leading to self-efficacy in online learning. The number of colleges offering online courses has grown tremendously,…

  16. Do International Online Collaborative Learning Projects Impact Ethnocentrism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Diane; Kurthen, Hermann; Aniola-Jedrzejek, Lilianna

    2010-01-01

    Preparing students for success in a globalized world invites new approaches. Online collaboration between students from different countries via globally networked learning environments (GNLEs) is one such approach. This article presents the results of a six-semester study beginning in 2006 of international online project collaborations between…

  17. Increasing Social Presence in Online Learning through Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcaoglu, Mete; Lee, Eunbae

    2016-01-01

    Social presence is difficult to achieve, but an imperative component of online learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of group size on students' perceptions of social presence in two graduate-level online courses, comparing small group versus whole class discussions. Our results indicated that when in small group discussions, students…

  18. Student Perceptions of a Successful Online Collaborative Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Michael L.; Su, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This paper shares the perceptions of a group of 11 successful online students regarding the value of the collaborative learning community that developed as part of their participation in the first cohort of the WebIT online Master of Science Degree in Instructional Technology program, at The University of Tennessee at Knoxville during 2008-2010.…

  19. Polysynchronous: Dialogic Construction of Time in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztok, Murat; Wilton, Lesley; Zingaro, Daniel; Mackinnon, Kim; Makos, Alexandra; Phirangee, Krystle; Brett, Clare; Hewitt, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Online learning has been conceptualized for decades as being delivered in one of two modes: synchronous or asynchronous. Technological determinism falls short in describing the role that the individuals' psychological, social and pedagogical factors play in their perception, experience and understanding of time online. This article explores…

  20. Online Distance Learning and Music Training: Benefits, Drawbacks and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2014-01-01

    This study examines online distance learning (ODL) as applied in music and music education programmes at different educational levels with a special focus on the digital tools employed in such programmes. It aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot of the current online courses focusing on the potential benefits and drawbacks of ODL from the…

  1. Work in Progress: Learner-Centered Online Learning Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, M.; Zwitserloot, R.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, learner-centered technology for authoring web lectures. Besides seamless integration of video and audio feeds, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, and web-pages, the proposed Online Learning Facility (OLF) also facilitates online interactive testing and review of covered mater

  2. A small experiment in online learning | Ryan | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small experiment in online learning. ... has been running, the small size of the group and the experience of only one facilitator, it may have large ... true for one of the largest groups served by online classes, non-traditional or adult students ...

  3. Effectiveness of Online Poetry Learning for EFL Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Antonia Hsiu-chen

    This study investigated the effectiveness of online poetry learning and examined whether supplementary Web sites could be used as online course tools. Participants were college students at Taiwan's Wenzao Ursuline College enrolled in a course entitled "Concise English Poetry Appreciation and Recitation." The experimental group included…

  4. Online Learning Environments in Higher Education: Connectivism vs. Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sasha A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade online education has emerged as a way for students and faculty to collaborate more freely, attain greater flexibility, and utilize new media to learn. The burning debate lies in whether online educational options are harmful to traditional education or offer endless benefits necessary to accommodate a 21st century learner.…

  5. Going Online with Protocols: New Tools for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Joseph P.; Zydney, Janet Mannheimer; Dichter, Alan; McDonald, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Many users of the popular professional development book, "The Power of Protocols," discovered that protocols are also very useful for online teaching. This new book, by three of the same authors, focuses on using protocols to enhance learning with their students in multiple environments including online--a growing sector of the educational world.…

  6. Influence of group member familiarity on online collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Jeroen; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul A.; Kanselaar, Gellof

    2010-01-01

    Janssen, J. J. H. M., Erkens, G., Kirschner, P. A., & Kanselaar, G. (2009). Influence of group member familiarity on online collaborative learning computers in human behaviour. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 261-270.

  7. Potential Students' Perceptions on Online Learning as Innovation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential Students' Perceptions on Online Learning as Innovation. ... Responses of five interviewees were written down during individual interviews; the rest were tape ... The interview also involved a focused group discussion session.

  8. Using reflection triggers while learning in an online course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Using reflection triggers while learning in an online course. British Journal of Educational Technology, 43(6), 1030-1040. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2011.01257.x

  9. Preparing for Distance Learning: Designing An Online Student Orientation Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane D. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the analysis undertaken to design a 1-credit-hour online orientation course for students new to online learning. An instructional design team, as a part of an advanced instructional design course, worked with a university-based client. The client identified specific problem areas encountered by novice students of online courses and the team designed a comprehensive program to meet those needs. Analysis of the data revealed surprising differences in expectations between instructors of online courses and their students of what an orientation to online learning should include. The team also conducted a task analysis to aid in further identifying the skills, knowledge and attitudes required by students for success in online courses. Findings indicated that there is a need for online learners to understand the time commitment required of an online course and possess or develop strong time management skills. Because of small sample size, results cannot be generalized beyond the respondents. The authors found a mismatch in the perception of instructor technical skills versus student technical skill. Based on their findings, the paper provides recommendations on the appropriate design, development and implementation of an orientation to online learning.

  10. The emergence of online learning in PN Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, David D

    2008-01-01

    For the fifth year in a row the online learning sector outpaced growth rates of the traditional classroom. Online learning continues to garner increasing levels of positive support from administrators, employers, and students who value the option of online education at increasingly greater levels. PN Education has largely remained on the sidelines of this revolution. However, with the nursing crisis growing, students, governments, and institutions demanding more access and convenience to educational options, and the emergence of the Millennial Generation making up the majority of the students, the time has come for PN programs to embrace the potential of online learning. With its diverse mix of didactic, clinical, and lab requirements, PN education is ideally suited for the newest evolution of online delivery-Blended Learning 2.0. This paper will analyze in detail the overall state of affairs of online learning, especially as it pertains to educating the next generation of practical nurses, and finally to provide an overview of the key components of a quality online program in PN Education.

  11. “SIMPLE Sciernce ”——基于图像的中小学简化科学教育数字图书馆%SIMPLE Science: Image-Based Learning Digital Library for K-12 Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕权; 王群

    2011-01-01

    SIMPLE Science is a digital library project aiming to "overcome barriers to mainstream use of image processing and analysis (IPA) in K-12 education''. It attempts to make IPA accessible and easy to use, provide extensive and updateable archives of imaging data, and design a pedagogical structure that supports national education standards for middle school education. The article provides an extended review on the comtruction and status of the digital library, including project background, resources organization, technological structures, service features, as well as comments and suggestions made by the authors.%SIMPLE Science是一个通过利用图像处理及分析技术(IPA)辅助青少年学习的数字图书馆,通过提供图片信息、教学计划、课程活动使得图像处理和分析能够作为一种学习工具得以使用,同时也为教育工作者在教学过程中使用图像信息提供便利条件.文章对该项目的建设及现状进行了综合性的评析,包括项目概述、数字资源及组织、技术特征、服务特点等.

  12. Telling Your Story: Ocean Scientists in the K-12 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, H.

    2006-12-01

    Most scientists and engineers are accustomed to presenting their research to colleagues or lecturing college or graduate students. But if asked to speak in front of a classroom full of elementary school or junior high school students, many feel less comfortable. TERC, as part of its work with The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-New England (COSEE-NE) has designed a workshop to help ocean scientists and engineers develop skills for working with K-12 teachers and students. We call this program: Telling Your Story (TYS). TYS has been offered 4 times over 18 months for a total audience of approximately 50 ocean scientists. We will discuss the rationale for the program, the program outline, outcomes, and what we have learned. ne.net/edu_project_3/index.php

  13. Ghosts, Stars, and Learning Online: Analysis of Interaction Patterns in Student Online Discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Samuels-Peretz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Discussions are commonly used in online teaching and have been shown to foster student learning and collaboration. This case study uses content analysis to explore the interaction patterns of student online discussions during a semester-long teacher preparation course using concepts from sociometry. Findings suggest that interaction patterns were influenced by the content of student posts. Online discussions in this case were found to be an equitable form of collaborative learning, enabling each student to have a voice. There were, however, indications that gendered ways of knowing may play a role in the content of interaction, if not in the patterns themselves.

  14. Techniques for fostering collaboration in online learning communities

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzi, Francesca; Persico, Donatella

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration is, to date, extensively adopted for supporting learning processes, both in face-to-face and in virtual learning contexts. However, technology profoundly changes the nature of human interactions and, consequently, also changes the nature of the collaborative learning process, yielding a range of new potentialities and problems. "Techniques for Fostering Collaboration in Online Learning Communities: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives" provides a focused assessment of the pecu...

  15. Supporting Professional Learning in a Massive Open Online Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Milligan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Professional learning, combining formal and on the job learning, is important for the development and maintenance of expertise in the modern workplace. To integrate formal and informal learning, professionals have to have good self-regulatory ability. Formal learning opportunities are opening up through massive open online courses (MOOCs, providing free and flexible access to formal education for millions of learners worldwide. MOOCs present a potentially useful mechanism for supporting and enabling professional learning, allowing opportunities to link formal and informal learning. However, there is limited understanding of their effectiveness as professional learning environments. Using self-regulated learning as a theoretical base, this study investigated the learning behaviours of health professionals within Fundamentals of Clinical Trials, a MOOC offered by edX. Thirty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed to explore how the design of this MOOC supported professional learning to occur. The study highlights a mismatch between learning intentions and learning behaviour of professional learners in this course. While the learners are motivated to participate by specific role challenges, their learning effort is ultimately focused on completing course tasks and assignments. The study found little evidence of professional learners routinely relating the course content to their job role or work tasks, and little impact of the course on practice. This study adds to the overall understanding of learning in MOOCs and provides additional empirical data to a nascent research field. The findings provide an insight into how professional learning could be integrated with formal, online learning.

  16. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: K - 12 Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Universe Professional Development Collaborative, Multiwavelength; NASA Data Collaborative, Use of; SEPOF K-12 Formal Education Working Group; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education community. Members of the K - 12 Formal Education community include classroom educators, homeschool educators, students, and curriculum developers. The Forums’ efforts for the K - 12 Formal Education community include a literature review, appraisal of educators’ needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, and support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K - 12 Formal Education community based upon mutual needs and interests.

  17. A Snapshot of State Regulatory Framework Development in Elementary and Secondary Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedrak, Luke J.; Rose, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    With the advent and growth of elementary and secondary online education in the United States, teaching and learning has undergone radical change with unimagined alternatives to traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms, and online education is here to stay. Law and policy in some states has lagged behind the emergence of online K-12 education. The…

  18. Online Adaptation of Game AI with Evolutionary Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of computer games era,artificial intelligence (AI) has been a standard feature of games. The current emphasis in computer game AI is improving the quality of opponent AI. Our research question reads: How can unsupervised online learning be incorporated in Computer Role Playing Game (CRPG) to improve the strategy of the opponent AI? Our goal is to use online evolutionary learning to design strategies that can defeat the opponent. So we apply a novel technique called dynamic scripting that realizes online adaptation of scripted opponent AI and report on experiments performed in a simulated CRPG to assess the adaptive performance obtained with the technique.

  19. Learning from Online Modules in Diverse Instructional Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwen Nugent

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects originally developed for use in online learning environments can also be used to enhance face-to-face instruction. This study examined the learning impacts of online learning objects packaged into modules and used in different contexts for undergraduate education offered on campus at three institutions. A multi-case study approach was used, examining learning impacts across a variety of course subjects, course levels (introductory and advanced undergraduate, student levels (undergraduate and graduate, and instructional goals (i.e., replacement for lecture, remediation. A repeated measures design was used, with learning data collected prior to viewing the online module, after completion of the module, and at the end of the semester. The study provided a broad examination of ways that online modules are typically used in a college classroom, as well as measured learning effectiveness based on different instructional purpose and usage contexts. Results showed the effectiveness of the modules in serving as a substitute for classroom lecture, remediation of course prerequisite material, introduction to content with follow-up lab practice, and review for final exams. In each of these cases, the use of the modules resulted in significant learning increases, as well as retention of the learning until the end of the semester.

  20. Online Experiential Learning: Effective Applications for Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Students today are rarely satisfied with a one-size-fits-all educational experience. The rapid changing landscape of the web and other technologies are breaking down communicationand geographic barries. More students are increasingly turning to the web for quality education that fits into their lives. As a result, higher education institutions are expanding their offerings through online courses. Nonetheless, online learning brings challenges as well as a fresh opportunityfor exploring practices not present in traditional higher education programs, particularly in the sciences. We are in a unique position to empower students to make strategic academic and professional decisions in global terms. Online learning, supportedwith hands-on and minds-on activities, actively engages student with critical thinking skills and higher level learning. This presentation will showcase examples from a series of geoscience and environmental science courses currently offered fully online at SUNY Empire State College (ESC). Taking advantage of the proliferation of tools currently available for online learning management systems, we will explore how we approach course developent to create an interactive learning environment. Students learn through case studies, group projects and understanding real-world issues while learning concepts. Particular focus will be given to an international collaboration with the Tecnologico de Monterrey, Chihuahua Campus. This collaboration took place during the Spring of 2015 with students from the fully-online, lower-level Geology and the Environment course at ESC and the upper-level, face-to-face Mobile Programming course in Mexico. Ultimately, the goal of this presentation is to show faculty members and afministrators the pedagogical principles and approach used with the expectation that it could help support development of online learning opportunities at their institutions.

  1. CHALLENGES OF DEVELOPING ONLINE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud REZAEI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Online learning has now become an accepted and popular method of education for large numbers of universities in Iran, and now many higher education institutions are offering online courses to their students. The present study was carried out with the aim of investigating challenges to developing online learning in higher education. The study was based on survey research method and a questionnaire was developed to gather the data. The study population was postgraduate students (M.Sc. and Ph.D. of different faculties in Tehran University who were selected by applying purposive sampling technique. The sample size for students was 152 persons. Data were analyzed by using SPSS/WIN software and descriptive and inferential methods were used for the data analysis. The results of the research indicated that three major factors explained 74.4% of variances of challenges to developing online learning. These factors were cultural/educational, technical, and financial challenges.

  2. BOOK REVIEW STUDENT-TEACHER INTERACTION IN ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun SERPIL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As online learning environments do not lend themselves to face-to-face interaction between teachers and students, it is essential to understand how to ensure healthy social presence in online learning. This book provides a useful selection of both commonly used and recently developed theories by discussing current research and giving examples of social presence in latest Online Learning Environments (OLEs. The book examines how the appropriate use of technological tools can relate instructors, peers, and course content. The reports on successful implementations are reinforced with research involving pre-service teachers. Both experienced and inexperienced educators will benefit by being informed about the effective use of many valuable tools exemplified here. The last six chapters present an array of new models that support social presence, and demonstrate how traditional paradigms can be used to create online social presence.

  3. Learning Online: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), Connectivism, and Cultural Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Marc; Barbera, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this reflection, we discuss the connectivist conception of learning in Web 2.0 environments, which underpins the pedagogy of what are known as cMOOCs (connectivist massive open online courses). We argue that this conception of learning is inadequate and problematic, and we propose that cultural psychology is best suited to address the…

  4. Cultivating ICT Students' Interpersonal Soft Skills in Online Learning Environments Using Traditional Active Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Trina S.; Blackman, Anna; Andersen, Trevor; Hay, Rachel; Lee, Ickjai; Gray, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Flexible online delivery of tertiary ICT programs is experiencing rapid growth. Creating an online environment that develops team building and interpersonal skills is difficult due to factors such as student isolation and the individual-centric model of online learning that encourages discrete study rather than teamwork. Incorporating teamwork…

  5. Incorporating Online Discussion in Face to Face Classroom Learning: A New Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenli; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses an innovative blended learning strategy which incorporates online discussion in both in-class face to face, and off-classroom settings. Online discussion in a face to face class is compared with its two counterparts, off-class online discussion as well as in-class, face to face oral discussion, to examine the advantages and…

  6. Why Choose Online Learning: Relationship of Existing Factors and Chronobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Pan, Rui; Choi, Jea H.; Mellish, Linda; Strobel, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Existing research on choice of online learning utilized factors such as perceived level of control, independence, and satisfaction, yet the relationship among these factors is under-researched. Due to the value of "learning anytime," biological factors underlying "choice of time" might provide additional insights. This article…

  7. Emotions in Online Learning Environments: Introduction to the Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several scholars have called for more inquiry on the role of emotions in education. And while the dynamics of the emotions that emerge during online learning may be difficult to observe, limited evidence suggests that, not unlike traditional classroom instruction, emotions have important affects on learning, engagement, and…

  8. User-Centered Design of Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambropoulos, Niki, Ed.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    User-centered design (UCD) is gaining popularity in both the educational and business sectors. This is due to the fact that UCD sheds light on the entire process of analyzing, planning, designing, developing, using, evaluating, and maintaining computer-based learning. "User-Centered Design of Online Learning Communities" explains how…

  9. Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, Jane E.; Walti, Christine; Blaschke, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning in an online classroom can take the form of discussion among the whole class or within smaller groups. This paper addresses the latter, examining first whether assessment makes a difference to the level of learner participation and then considering other factors involved in creating effective collaborative learning groups.…

  10. Promoting reflection through annotations in formal online learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Prompting reflection through annotations in formal online learning. In W. Reinhardt, T. D. Ullmann, P. Scott, V. Pammer, O. Conlan, & A. J. Berlanga (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1st European Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Learning Networks (AR

  11. Tacit Knowledge in Online Learning: Community, Identity, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztok, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possibilities that tacit knowledge could provide for social constructivist pedagogies; in particular, pedagogies for online learning. Arguing that the tacit dimension of knowledge is critical for meaning making in situated learning practices and for a community of practice to function, the article considers whether…

  12. Specialization processes in on-line unsupervised learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, M.; Freking, A.; Reents, G.; Schlösser, E.

    1998-01-01

    From the recent analysis of supervised learning by on-line gradient descent in multilayered neural networks it is known that the necessary process of student specialization can be delayed significantly. We demonstrate that this phenomenon also occurs in various models of unsupervised learning. A sol

  13. Generational Perspective of Higher Education Online Student Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chad James

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether students associated with a generational group exhibit similar learning styles as identified by the Felder and Soloman Index of Learning Styles instrument. The secondary purpose was to determine to what degree these generational groups rate their satisfaction with online education through the use…

  14. IT Integration and Online Learning in the Singapore Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David; Tan, Seng Chee; Chen, Der-Thanq

    2003-01-01

    Reviews technology integration efforts in Singapore. Discusses examples of online learning in schools under four broad categories: cyber conferencing, e-learning services providers, e-publication, and wireless technology. Describes ways information technology is being used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore, as a tool for…

  15. Guidelines to foster interaction in online communities for Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Rusman, Ellen; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available from www.springerlink.com. Berlanga, A., Rusman, E., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., & Sloep, P. B. (2009). Guidelines to foster interaction in online communities for Learning Networks. In R. Koper (Ed.), Learning Network Services for Professional Development (pp. 27-42).

  16. Personality Type and Success in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellish, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Online learning continues to be a growing frontier in higher education with increased demand and enrollments reported annually (Allen & Seaman, 2010, 2011). Discovering best practices and methods of instruction as well as assisting students in determining their highest possible level of success in this type of learning environment has been the…

  17. Online Games for Young Learners' Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Yuko Goto; Someya, Yuumi; Fukuhara, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Young learners' use of instructional games in foreign language learning is not yet well understood. Using games that were part of the learning tools for an online assessment, Jido-Eiken, a standardized English proficiency test for young learners in Japan, we examined young learners' game-playing behaviours and the relationship of these behaviours…

  18. Why Choose Online Learning: Relationship of Existing Factors and Chronobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Pan, Rui; Choi, Jea H.; Mellish, Linda; Strobel, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Existing research on choice of online learning utilized factors such as perceived level of control, independence, and satisfaction, yet the relationship among these factors is under-researched. Due to the value of "learning anytime," biological factors underlying "choice of time" might provide additional insights. This article…

  19. Tacit Knowledge in Online Learning: Community, Identity, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztok, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possibilities that tacit knowledge could provide for social constructivist pedagogies; in particular, pedagogies for online learning. Arguing that the tacit dimension of knowledge is critical for meaning making in situated learning practices and for a community of practice to function, the article considers whether…

  20. Online Learning: Is It Meant for Science Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Lau; Mohamad, Fitri Suraya

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a case study experience in conducting scientific courses with undergraduates at the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) using Web-based learning environments to support conventional teaching sessions. Results showed online learning helped students become more interested, encouraged participation in class discussions, and provided more…

  1. Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

  2. Bayesian online algorithms for learning in discrete Hidden Markov Models

    OpenAIRE

    Alamino, Roberto C.; Caticha, Nestor

    2008-01-01

    We propose and analyze two different Bayesian online algorithms for learning in discrete Hidden Markov Models and compare their performance with the already known Baldi-Chauvin Algorithm. Using the Kullback-Leibler divergence as a measure of generalization we draw learning curves in simplified situations for these algorithms and compare their performances.

  3. Online peer assessment: helping to facilitate learning through participation

    OpenAIRE

    Cleland, Jamie; WALTON, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the combination of enquiry-based learning, information literacy and e-learning and how they are embedded in an online peer assessment exercise. What it shall present is a structure and strategy that aids student learning in the short and long-term. Ninety eight students completed a questionnaire before and after a three-week online peer assessment exercise during a first year undergraduate research and study skills module. The results demonstrate that a significa...

  4. K-12 Math and Science Education: Tales from the Santa Fe Alliance for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  5. Social Presence and Implications for Designing Online Learning Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid global proliferation of the Internet and telecommunication networks, online education, one form of distance education is currently becoming the fastest growing trend of domestic and international education. A major challenge to designing online learning is the development of appropriate means to facilitate the social environment that is critical for higher order learning in many disciplines. In many online learning designs, the majority of resources are channeled to web interface design and technology, while little or no resources are devoted to facilitating the teaching and learning process, the negotiation of meaning and the validation of knowledge among peers and instructors that depends on a conducive socio-cultural environment and adequate learner support.

  6. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  7. E-Learning: Investigating Students' Acceptance of Online Learning in Hospitality Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung Mi

    2010-01-01

    Students' perceptions and satisfaction with online learning courses have drawn a lot of attention from educational practitioners and researchers. However, an empirical study of perception and satisfaction with online learning is yet to be found in the hospitality area. Thus, this study addresses gaps in previous studies. This study was…

  8. LEARNERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS ONLINE LANGUAGE LEARNING; AND CORRESPONDING SUCCESS RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah CINKARA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Online teaching has long been a key area of interest recently in every field of education as well as English language teaching. Numerous hardware tools, such as, mp3 players, mobile devices, and so on; and software applications, such as, podcasts, wikis, learning management systems, and so on, have been used in distance and online instruction and they have proved to be useful in facilitating learning individually (Finger, Sun, & Jamieson-Proctor, 2010. Learning management systems (LMS provide a virtual environment and various tools to support learning. The current institution where the researchers work deliver two 2-credit online English courses for a specific group of learners at a state university in south-eastern Turkey by using Modular Object Oriented Distance Learning Environment (MOODLE. Moodle is an open code LMS which provides teachers and course developers with numerous online tools to enhance distance learning/teaching environment. The course has both a synchronous and asynchronous instruction. Synchronous and asynchronous instructions are associated with the delivery of content in campus-based environments; however, their role differs in off the campus environments as they solve the problems of distance learners. Universities, colleges, and other education institutions are integrating online learning into every aspect of higher education. Many teachers and faculty members at higher education institutions who already run face-to-face courses have a website to post lecture notes or slide presentations as well as other course material. There is no doubt that these are effective strategies to expand teaching efforts. Still, there are other educators who design and teach totally online classes. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate learners’ attitudes towards these online language courses, and there are two objectives of this research. The first one is to discover learners’ attitudes towards the online English course; and the

  9. Best practices for learning physiology: combining classroom and online methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lisa C; Krichbaum, Kathleen E

    2017-09-01

    Physiology is a requisite course for many professional allied health programs and is a foundational science for learning pathophysiology, health assessment, and pharmacology. Given the demand for online learning in the health sciences, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of online and in-class teaching methods, especially as they are combined to form hybrid courses. The purpose of this study was to compare two hybrid physiology sections in which one section was offered mostly in-class (85% in-class), and the other section was offered mostly online (85% online). The two sections in 2 yr (year 1 and year 2) were compared in terms of knowledge of physiology measured in exam scores and pretest-posttest improvement, and in measures of student satisfaction with teaching. In year 1, there were some differences on individual exam scores between the two sections, but no significant differences in mean exam scores or in pretest-posttest improvements. However, in terms of student satisfaction, the mostly in-class students in year 1 rated the instructor significantly higher than did the mostly online students. Comparisons between in-class and online students in the year 2 cohort yielded data that showed that mean exam scores were not statistically different, but pre-post changes were significantly greater in the mostly online section; student satisfaction among mostly online students also improved significantly. Education researchers must investigate effective combinations of in-class and online methods for student learning outcomes, while maintaining the flexibility and convenience that online methods provide. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Developing and establishing online student learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Donna Scott; Boswell, Carol; Cannon, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Developing effective learning communities is an important component of Web-based courses. Learning communities offer a social context for learning that greatly enhances the knowledge acquisition of all involved parties. This article describes the development of an effective learning community among Web-based RN-BSN students. The characteristics of the cohort leading to an effective learning community included supportiveness, open sharing of oneself, and socialization.

  11. Conclusion: Directions for Research in Online Learning Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Goodfellow, Robin; Lamy, Marie-Noelle

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors review issues currently under-represented in research on the cultural dimensions of e-learning, such as the institutional cultural hegemony over pedagogy that is enjoyed by Westernized constructions of learning and teaching, identity-work carried out by participants in linguistic and cultural online communication, and issues of power and embodiment in network-based language learning. The Open Educational Resources initiative is identified as a site for future rese...

  12. Language Learning Shifts and Attitudes towards Language Learning in an Online Tandem Program for Beginner Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Constanza; Ordóñez, Claudia Lucía; Guevara, Diana Carolina

    2017-01-01

    We present findings of a project that investigated the potential of an online tandem program to enhance the foreign language learning of two groups of school-aged beginner learners, one learning English in Colombia and the other learning Spanish in New Zealand. We assessed the impact of the project on students' learning with a free writing…

  13. Social Learning Preferences of Adult Women Learners in a Competency-Based Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    In this study a post-assessment survey was analyzed to seek for social learning preferences among women in a competency-based online learning environment. The survey asked what learning resources students used to prepare for the assessment. Each learning resource was given a relative sociability rating. This rating acts as the weighting for a…

  14. Social Learning Preferences of Adult Women Learners in a Competency-Based Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    In this study a post-assessment survey was analyzed to seek for social learning preferences among women in a competency-based online learning environment. The survey asked what learning resources students used to prepare for the assessment. Each learning resource was given a relative sociability rating. This rating acts as the weighting for a…

  15. Motivational Factors in Self-Directed Informal Learning from Online Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donggil; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Learning is becoming more self-directed and informal with the support of emerging technologies. A variety of online resources have promoted informal learning by allowing people to learn on demand and just when needed. It is significant to understand self-directed informal learners' motivational aspects, their learning goals, obstacles, and…

  16. Online cross-validation-based ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkeser, David; Ju, Cheng; Lendle, Sam; van der Laan, Mark

    2017-05-04

    Online estimators update a current estimate with a new incoming batch of data without having to revisit past data thereby providing streaming estimates that are scalable to big data. We develop flexible, ensemble-based online estimators of an infinite-dimensional target parameter, such as a regression function, in the setting where data are generated sequentially by a common conditional data distribution given summary measures of the past. This setting encompasses a wide range of time-series models and, as special case, models for independent and identically distributed data. Our estimator considers a large library of candidate online estimators and uses online cross-validation to identify the algorithm with the best performance. We show that by basing estimates on the cross-validation-selected algorithm, we are asymptotically guaranteed to perform as well as the true, unknown best-performing algorithm. We provide extensions of this approach including online estimation of the optimal ensemble of candidate online estimators. We illustrate excellent performance of our methods using simulations and a real data example where we make streaming predictions of infectious disease incidence using data from a large database. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Making Online Learning Personal: Evolution, Evidentiary Reasoning, and Self-Regulation in an Online Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Robert B.

    An online curriculum about biological evolution was designed according to the Promoting Evidentiary Reasoning and Self-regulation Online (PERSON) theoretical framework. PERSON is an attempt to develop online science instruction focused on supporting evidentiary reasoning and self-regulation. An efficacy study was conducted with 80 suburban high school biology students using a design-based research approach to develop a curriculum to promote biological evolution understandings, evidentiary reasoning, and self-regulation. Data sources and instruments included (1) the Biological Evolution Assessment Measurement (BEAM); (2) the modified Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ); (3) discussion forum posts; (4) formative assessments of evidence based reasoning; (5) Prediction, Monitoring, and Reflection forms (PMR); (6) the Online Instruction Questionnaire; and (7) field notes. Findings revealed that BEAM posttest scores were significantly greater than pretest scores for items designed to measure biological evolution content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. Students tracked in a lower level biology course showed improvement in biological evolution understandings and evidentiary reasoning. It was found that performance on daily evidentiary reasoning tasks strongly predicted BEAM posttest scores. However, findings revealed that students did not meet local standards for performance on items designed to measure evidentiary reasoning. Students expressed a variety of opinions about their learning experiences with the online curriculum. Some students expressed a definite preference for traditional learning environments, while others expressed a definite preference for online learning. Self-regulatory ability did not significantly predict BEAM gain scores. Further, self-regulatory ability was not demonstrably improved as a result of this intervention. Implications for designing science instruction in asynchronous online learning environments to support

  18. Using an Interdisciplinary Approach to Enhance Climate Literacy for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, J. A.; Oches, E. A.; Sliko, J.; Wright, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (2014) will begin to change how K-12 teachers teach science. Using a scaffolding approach, the standards focus on a depth of knowledge across multiple content areas. This philosophy should encourage inquiry-based teaching methods, provided the teacher has both the knowledge and the confidence to teach the content. Although confidence to teach science is high among secondary science (biology, general science, chemistry) teachers, depth of knowledge may be lacking in certain areas, including climate science. To address this issue, a graduate course in climate science (Massachusetts Colleges Online Course of Distinction award winner) was developed to include inquiry-based instruction, connections to current research, and interdisciplinary approaches to teaching science. With the support of the InTeGrate program (SERC) at Carleton College, a module was developed to utilize cli-fi (climate science present in fictional literature) and related climate data. Graduate students gain an appreciation of scientific communication and an understanding of climate data and its connection to societal issues. In addition, the graduate students also gain the ability to connect interdisciplinary concepts for a deeper understanding of climate science and have the opportunity. By the end of the course, the graduate students use the content learned and the examples of pedagogical tools to develop their own activities in his or her classroom.

  19. Economics of Distance and Online Learning Theory, Practice and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reviewed by TOJDE

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Economics of Distance and Online LearningTheory, Practice and ResearchBy William Bramble & Santosh PandaPrice: $125.00ISBN: 978-0-415-96388-6, Binding: Hardback, Publishedby: Routledge, New York, Publication Date: March 2008, Pages: 312TOJDEABOUT THE BOOKThis book provides a comprehensive overview of theorganizational models of distance and online learning froman international perspective and from the point of view ofeconomic planning, costing and management decisionmaking.The book points to directions for the further research anddevelopment in this area, and will promote furtherunderstanding and critical reflection on the part ofadministrators, practitioners and researchers of distanceeducation.The experiences and perspectives in distance education inthe US are balanced with those in other areas of the world.Table of ContentsPrefaceSECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONChapter 1: Organizational and Cost Structures for Distanceand Online Learning, William J. Bramble and Santosh PandaSECTION TWO: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENTChapter 2: Changing Distance Education andChanging Organizational Issues, D. Randy Garrison and Heather KanukaChapter 3: Online Learning and the University, Chris Curran217Chapter 4: Virtual Schooling and Basic Education, Thomas ClarkChapter 5: Historical Perspectives on Distance Education in the United States, Paul J.Edelson and Von PittmanSECTION THREE: FUNDINGChapter 6: Funding of Distance and Online Learning in the United States, Mark J. Smithand William J. BrambleChapter 7: Funding Distance Education: A Regional Perspective, Santosh Panda andAshok GabaSECTION FOUR: COST STRUCTURES AND MODELSChapter 8: Costs and Quality of Online Learning, Alistair InglisChapter 9: Costing Virtual University Education, Insung JungChapter 10: Cost-Benefit of Student Retention Policies and Practices, Ormond SimpsonSECTION FIVE: DISTANCE TRAININGChapter 11: Cost Benefit of Online Learning, Zane Berge and Charlotte DonaldsonChapter 12: Transforming Workplace

  20. Designing Deeper Learning Experiences for Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkawski, Betul C.

    2014-01-01

    Deeper learning promotes students' active engagement in learning environments, so they can continuously explore, reflect and produce information to build complex knowledge structures. Consequently, deeper learning has become a major focus of scholarly investigation and debate. Multiple studies have been conducted to describe the…

  1. Relationship between Learning Outcomes and Online Accesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanpang, Pannee; Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a study carried out in Thailand investigating the relationship between students' use of an e-learning system and their learning outcomes in a course on Business Statistics. The results show a clear relationship between accesses to the e-learning system, as measured by number of "hits", and outcomes, as measured by…

  2. Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through Technological Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies are becoming more commonplace across the K-12 curriculum. In particular, the use of innovative digital technology is expanding the potential of arts education, presenting new opportunities--and challenges--to both curricular design and pedagogical practice. "Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through…

  3. Monitoring the CO2 injection site: K12-B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandeweijer, V.; Meer, B. van der; Hofstee, C.; Mulders, F.; D'Hoore, D.; Graven, H.

    2011-01-01

    The K12-B gas field is located in the Dutch sector of the North Sea. The top of the reservoir lies approximately 3800 meters below sea level, and the ambient temperature of the reservoir is over 127 °C. The K12-B gas field has been producing natural gas from 1987 onwards and is currently operated by

  4. Influences of Globalization on K-12 Language Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of globalization on K-12 language teacher education at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in terms of multilingual practices in the US, with reference to an English-only-state, Arizona. This study explored influences of globalization on K-12 language education practices in the US through teacher…

  5. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments for…

  6. An Investigation of Students’ Attitudes and Motivations Toward Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Kerkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated students’ attitudes and motivations toward online learning. Students in the online course, Introduction to the Visual Arts, were asked to complete questionnaires administered during the first and last week of the online course. A group of questions on Attitude was asked on both surveys. Questions on Interest, Self-management, and Locus of Control were asked only at the beginning of the course. The end of class survey included questions on Study Process Approach. Students in the study were found to have a strong internal Locus of Control. A significant correlation was found between a more internal locus of control and relying on surface strategies for learning. Another significant result was found on the Attitude pre- and post-course comparison regarding missing interaction with other students and getting more information through an online course. Generally, students’ attitude toward online learning was more positive during the last week of the course than in the first week. The study showed that this online course provided a sufficient amount of student to instructor interaction, a high amount of student to material interaction, and a low amount of student to student interaction.

  7. On-line Autonomous Learning Based on Leamerg Expectation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李利娜

    2008-01-01

    On-line autonomous learning of College English is one of the important reforms in colleges recently.This paper aims to explore the changes of teachers'role in the new on-line setting.The article first reviews the theoretical study of learner autonomy,then makes a practical investigation into the attitude and expectation learners have on teachers through a self-designed questionnaire,and explores that teachers should make an adjustment to their role orientation and changes their roles into motivators,evaluators and resources supphers in the new on-line setting.

  8. C-MORE Science Kits: Putting Technology in the Hands of K-12 Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, K.; Weersing, K.; Daniels, C.; Puniwai, N.; Matsuzaki, J.; Bruno, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a NSF Science and Technology Center based at the University of Hawaii. The C-MORE education and outreach program offers a variety of resources and professional development opportunities for science educators, including online resources, participation in oceanography research cruises, teacher-training workshops, mini-grants to incorporate microbial oceanography-related content and activities into their classroom and, most recently, C- MORE science kits. C-MORE science kits provide hands-on classroom, field, and laboratory activities related to microbial oceanography for K-12 students. Each kit comes with complete materials and instructions, and is available free of charge to Hawaii's public school teachers. Several kits are available nationwide. C-MORE science kits cover a range of topics and technologies and are targeted at various grade levels. Here is a sampling of some available kits: 1) Marine Murder Mystery: The Case of the Missing Zooxanthellae. Students learn about the effect of climate change and other environmental threats on coral reef destruction through a murder-mystery experience. Participants also learn how to use DNA to identify a suspect. Grades levels: 3-8. 2) Statistical sampling. Students learn basic statistics through an exercise in random sampling, with applications to microbial oceanography. The laptops provided with this kit enable students to enter, analyze, and graph their data using EXCEL. Grades levels: 6-12. 3) Chlorophyll Lab. A research-quality fluorometer is used to measure the chlorophyll content in marine and freshwater systems. This enables students to compare biomass concentrations in samples collected from various locations. Grades levels: 9-12. 4) Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD). Students predict how certain variables (e.g., temperature, pressure, chlorophyll, oxygen) vary with depth. A CTD, attached to a laptop computer, is deployed into deep water

  9. FACILITATORS' PERCEPTION OF INTERACTIONS IN AN ONLINE LEARNING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan CALISKAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Schools and colleges all around the world have started making use of advanced technology to provide learners effective, efficient and adequate instruction. The use of Internet and Web for learning and teaching has caused many online courses to be offered when teaching-learning activities are required for both students and faculty. The Internet has shown a rapid and important growth in the extent of online education. This has created a new paradigm for teaching and learning that is different from the traditional classroom experience and also different from earlier technology-based attempts (Kearsley, 1998. One of the most important online course components has proven to be interaction, especially learner to learner interaction. Alexander C. lists the top ten ranking components of an optimal online environment, giving peer interaction the first place. Kearsley (1998 also states that discussions among learners are among the most important components. This is not surprising because one of the most important factors in learning appears to be interaction among learners and interaction between instructor and learners. No matter how learning takes place, interaction has always been of great importance so that an effective learning can occur. Especially when instruction is given to learners learning at a distance, this interaction component is of vital importance. Having the lack of social interaction, learners may feel alone and helpless at times they need to get help from someone, especially from their peers taking same course as in any traditional classrooms. Studies suggest that facilitators’ active interactions with students have significant effects on the quality of online distance learning (Thomas, Caswell, Price & Petre, 1998.

  10. The Development of Online Interactive Whiteboard for Supporting Collaboration Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settachai Chaisanit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning innovation was currently considered as the most popular for education among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate if university students consider innovative Internet technology as a useful, meaningful learning environment that could support and enhance their learning. However many students face problems and difficult to learn, practice and time consuming. This is because collaborative time and media are not enough for them. Online learning environment is a one thing for creates a variety of ways to deliver and provide electronic resources for the learner. It’s includes many methods such as using system to deliver text, video chat and activity for learner. Thus, online learning environment is professionals cite benefits to the learner. The learner benefits from the opportunity to prepare them for increase their competitive in a globalization. Therefore the purposes of this research were: (1 to develop online interactive whiteboard for supporting collaboration learning based on PIDP development model, (2 to evaluation online interactive whiteboard for supporting collaboration learning. The samples of this study comprised of 40 students from Sripatum University, Chonburi Campus, Thailand. The sample was obtained by simple random sampling method, used control experimental group evaluation design. The results showed that: the satisfaction of the panel experts, the mean was 4.48 with the standard deviation was 0.36; the satisfaction was in the “High level”. In part of Control/Experimental group evaluation has shown that: the experimental group score higher that control group score. In part of learner’s satisfaction, the mean was 3.99 with the standard deviation was 0.54; the satisfaction was in the “High level”. This can summarized that developed system be successful, various aspects of the online environment should be considered such as application domain knowledge, conceptual theory, user interface design

  11. How to Improve Learning when Going Online Using POPBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Madsen, Per Printz

    2007-01-01

    It is accepted worldwide; that Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a very fine method to improve learning motivation and to satisfy the students being more innovative and creative. Progress in learning is supported by teaching, individual and team reflections and collaborative project work. On......-campus the learning process is organized having scheduled course sessions, regular team meetings and project work in groups. As regards online education, rooms are virtual, team members are spread on different locations and distance teaching makes it difficult to attract attention. Consequently, Didactical......, Pedagogical and Technological (DPT) methods must be selected and used properly to ensure progress in the learning process. Although it has never been proven that PBL increases learning, there are many observations indicating improved learning, e.g. the students are able to learn more beyond required...

  12. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  13. Online learning of objects in a biologically motivated visual architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersing, Heiko; Kirstein, Stephan; Götting, Michael; Brandl, Holger; Dunn, Mark; Mikhailova, Inna; Goerick, Christian; Steil, Jochen; Ritter, Helge; Körner, Edgar

    2007-08-01

    We present a biologically motivated architecture for object recognition that is capable of online learning of several objects based on interaction with a human teacher. The system combines biological principles such as appearance-based representation in topographical feature detection hierarchies and context-driven transfer between different levels of object memory. Training can be performed in an unconstrained environment by presenting objects in front of a stereo camera system and labeling them by speech input. The learning is fully online and thus avoids an artificial separation of the interaction into training and test phases. We demonstrate the performance on a challenging ensemble of 50 objects.

  14. Going against the Grain: Challenges to Peaceful Leadership Styles in a K-12/University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Susan; Chandler, Susanne; Collins, Elaine C.; Snow, Debbie; Williams, Jerri-Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This article shares and examines the challenges, findings, and lessons learned associated with embracing peaceful leadership styles during the first two years of a partnership between a failing K-12 urban school district and a university in the United States. The ongoing daily leadership issues that influenced, but were beyond the scope of, the…

  15. Makerspaces: The Next Iteration for Educational Technology in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    With the continually growing number of computers and mobile devices available in K-12 schools, the need is dwindling for dedicated computer labs and media centers. Some schools are starting to repurpose those facilities into different kinds of exploratory learning environments known as "makerspaces". This article discusses this next…

  16. Plickers: A Formative Assessment Tool for K-12 and PETE Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jennifer M.; O'Neil, Kason; Dauenhauer, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Classroom response systems have become popular in K-12 and higher education settings in recent years in order to gauge student learning. The physical education environment is unique in that it is difficult to manage the technology associated with these systems, and therefore, student assessment can be cumbersome. A free classroom response system…

  17. Integrating the iPod Touch in K-12 Education: Visions and Vices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Savilla

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of ubiquitous computing have long been documenting classroom benefits of one-to-one ratios of students to handheld or laptop computers. The recent sophisticated capabilities of the iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad have encouraged further speculation on exactly how K-12 teaching and learning might be energized by such devices. This paper…

  18. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  19. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  20. The USDA and K-12 Partnership: A Model Program for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Timothy P.; Wilson, Craig; Upchurch, Dan R.; Goldberg, Maria; Bentz, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    The Future Scientists Program of Texas A&M University and the Agricultural Research Service branch of USDA serves as a model program of effective collaboration between a federal agency and K-12. It demonstrates true partnership that contextualizes learning of science and provides quality professional development, benefiting teachers and their…

  1. Mobile Technology in 2020: Predictions and Implications for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Cathleen A.; Soloway, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    While "mobile learning" has gained recognition in K-12 as a category in educational technology, the authors argue that, between 2010 and 2015, at least, its impact hasn't matched the hype. But between 2015 and 2020, hardware, software, and network technologies will mature sufficiently such that educational technology's Holy…

  2. Interactive Teaching as a Recruitment and Training Tool for K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Teacher Preparation (STEMTP) program at the University of Colorado has been designed to recruit and train prospective K-12 science teachers while improving student learning through interactive teaching. The program has four key goals: (1) recruit undergraduate students into K-12 science education, (2) provide these prospective teachers with hands-on experience in an interactive teaching pedagogy, (3) create an intergrated program designed to support (educationally, socially, and financially) and engage these prospective science teachers up until they obtain liscensure and/or their masters degree in education, and (4) improve student learning in large introductory science classes. Currently there are 31 students involved in the program and a total of 72 students have been involved in the year and a half it has been in existence. I will discuss the design of the STEMTP program, the success in recruiting K-12 science teachers, and the affect on student learning in a large lecture class of implementing interactive learning pedagogies by involving these prospective K-12 science teachers. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support for this work. The course transformation project is also supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

  3. Online Learning Community and its Application in the Occupational Training of College Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Object: The analysis of established online learning community, and its structural elements and creation strategies can shed light on the effect of the application of online learning community in the occupational training of college teachers. Methods: detailed analysis of the existing successful online Teacher learning communities like the Wired for Learning and the online learning community established by Beijing Normal University. Conclusion: Traditional learning community took place in a specific physical environment, whose members and resources are limited by the physical environment. Online learning community can help solve many of the existing problems in traditional training and opened new possibilities for occupational training

  4. Developing a constructivist learning environment in online postsecondary science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Sylvester N.

    This Delphi study addressed the concerns of postsecondary educators regarding the quality of education received by postsecondary science students who receive their instruction online. This study was framed with the constructivist learning theory and Piaget's and Dewey's cognitive development theories. The overarching question addressed a gap in research literature surrounding the pedagogical practices that could be successfully applied to future postsecondary online science education. The panel consisted of 30 experts in the area of online postsecondary education. Qualitative data from the initial seed questions were used to create a Likert-type survey to seek consensus of the themes derived from participant responses. Participants reached agreement on six items: apply constructivism to science curricula, identify strengths and challenges of online collegiate students, explicate students' consequences due to lack of participation in discussion forums, ensure that online course content is relevant to students' lives, reinforce academic integrity, and identify qualities face-to-face collegiate science instructors need when transitioning to online science instructors. The majority of participants agreed that gender is not an important factor in determining the success of an online collegiate science student. There was no consensus on the efficacy of virtual labs in an online science classroom. This study contributes to positive social change by providing information to new and struggling postsecondary science teachers to help them successfully align their instruction with students' needs and, as a result, increase students' success.

  5. Assessing Student Learning Online: Overcoming Reliability Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing students in online university courses poses challenges to the reliability factor of the measures being utilized. Some programs have the latitude to incorporate proctored assessments, but this is not always practical in asynchronously structured courses reaching out across a broad geographic region. This paper explores digital audio and…

  6. Understanding IMS Learning Design (Online Educa 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manderveld, Jocelyn; Tattersall, Colin; Burgos, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    This presentation was given at Online Educa 2005 in Berlin. The presentation starts with an introuction to the central concepts of IMS LD, then takes an example and examines how it runs in CopperCore, and rounds off with a look at recent developments in the field (tools, communities of practice etc)

  7. The online informal learning of English

    CERN Document Server

    Sockett, G

    2014-01-01

    Young people around the world are increasingly able to access English language media online for leisure purposes and interact with other users of English. This book examines the extent of these phenomena, their effect on language acquisition and their implications for the teaching of English in the 21st century.

  8. Supporting peer interaction in online learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Ard W.; Mason, L.; Andreuzza, S.; Arfè, B.; Favero, del L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports two studies into the efficacy of sentence openers to foster online peer-to-peer interaction. Sentence openers are pre-defined ways to start an utterance that are implemented in communication facilities as menu’s or buttons. In the first study, typical opening phrases were derived

  9. How to Improve Learning when Going Online Using POPBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Madsen, Per Printz

    2007-01-01

    It is accepted worldwide; that Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a very fine method to improve learning motivation and to satisfy the students being more innovative and creative. Progress in learning is supported by teaching, individual and team reflections and collaborative project work. On...... objectives within the defined time slot. The remote online education Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) at Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark, is using collaborative Project Organized PBL (POPBL) and is using new DPT resulting in very high motivation and in remarkable learning results...

  10. Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Casey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students’ interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author’s action research study, conducted while she was a teacher working in an Australian public high school and completing her PhD. The study investigates the use of a Ning online social network as a learning environment shared by seven classes, and it examines students’ reactions and online activity while using a range of social media and Web 2.0 tools.The authors use Graham Nuthall’s (2007 “lens on learning” to explore the social processes and culture of this shared online classroom. The paper uses his extensive body of research and analyses of classroom learning processes to conceptualize and analyze data throughout the action research cycle. It discusses the pedagogical implications that arise from the use of social media and, in so doing, challenges traditional models of teaching and learning.

  11. Going Online to Make Learning Count

    OpenAIRE

    Cathy Brigham; Rebecca Klein-Collins

    2011-01-01

    Adult students often come to higher education with college-level learning that they have acquired outside of the classroom – from the workplace, military service, self-study, or hobbies. For decades, many forward-thinking colleges and universities have been offering services to evaluate that learning and award it college credit that counts towards a degree. However, for a range of reasons, not every institution can offer prior learning assessment (PLA) in every discipline or for every student...

  12. The Relationship between Engineering Students' Self-Directed Learning Abilities and Online Learning Performances: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pao-Nan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore engineering students' self-directed learning abilities in an online learning environment. The research centered on the correlation relationship between students' self-directed learning abilities and learning outcomes. The instructional activity in one experimental study was to simulate an online learning task in the…

  13. Fostering Environmental Knowledge and Action through Online Learning Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Carmen Daniela

    2010-01-01

    In order to secure correct understanding of environmental issues, to promote behavioral change and to encourage environmental action, more and more educational practices support and provide environmental programs. This article explores the design of online learning resources created for teachers...... and students by the GreenLearning environmental education program. The topic is approached from a social semiotic perspective. I conduct a multimodal analysis of the knowledge processes and the knowledge selection types that characterize the GreenLearning environmental education program and its online...... the new learning design addresses the expertise of multiliterate students allowing for diverse forms of engagement and interaction when fostering environmental knowledge and action.   Key words: multimodality, multiliteracies, environmental education, environmental knowledge, knowledge types, knowledge...

  14. An adaptive online learning approach for Support Vector Regression: Online-SVR-FID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Zio, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    Support Vector Regression (SVR) is a popular supervised data-driven approach for building empirical models from available data. Like all data-driven methods, under non-stationary environmental and operational conditions it needs to be provided with adaptive learning capabilities, which might become computationally burdensome with large datasets cumulating dynamically. In this paper, a cost-efficient online adaptive learning approach is proposed for SVR by combining Feature Vector Selection (FVS) and Incremental and Decremental Learning. The proposed approach adaptively modifies the model only when different pattern drifts are detected according to proposed criteria. Two tolerance parameters are introduced in the approach to control the computational complexity, reduce the influence of the intrinsic noise in the data and avoid the overfitting problem of SVR. Comparisons of the prediction results is made with other online learning approaches e.g. NORMA, SOGA, KRLS, Incremental Learning, on several artificial datasets and a real case study concerning time series prediction based on data recorded on a component of a nuclear power generation system. The performance indicators MSE and MARE computed on the test dataset demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed online learning method.

  15. Going Online to Make Learning Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Cathy; Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Adult students often come to higher education with college-level learning that they have acquired outside of the classroom--from the workplace, military service, self-study, or hobbies. For decades, many forward-thinking colleges and universities have been offering services to evaluate that learning and award it college credit that counts towards…

  16. Networked Learning: Design Considerations for Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkawski, Betul C.

    2016-01-01

    The considerable increase in web-based knowledge networks in the past two decades is strongly influencing learning environments. Learning entails information retrieval, use, communication, and production, and is strongly enriched by socially mediated discussions, debates, and collaborative activities. It is becoming critical for educators to…

  17. Enhancing Student Success in Online Learning Experiences through the Use of Self-Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Sharp, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Online learning experiences have greatly changed the landscape of instruction. Many courses in postsecondary environments incorporate some type of technological enhancement, which holds benefits for both postsecondary institutions and learners. However, online learning experiences require different pedagogical characteristics than traditional…

  18. Enhancing Student Success in Online Learning Experiences through the Use of Self-Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Sharp, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Online learning experiences have greatly changed the landscape of instruction. Many courses in postsecondary environments incorporate some type of technological enhancement, which holds benefits for both postsecondary institutions and learners. However, online learning experiences require different pedagogical characteristics than traditional…

  19. A Cybernetic Design Methodology for 'Intelligent' Online Learning Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, Stephen R.

    The World Wide Web (WWW) provides learners and knowledge workers convenient access to vast stores of information, so much that present methods for refinement of a query or search result are inadequate - there is far too much potentially useful material. The problem often encountered is that users usually do not recognise what may be useful until they have progressed some way through the discovery, learning, and knowledge acquisition process. Additional support is needed to structure and identify potentially relevant information, and to provide constructive feedback. In short, support for learning is needed. The learning envisioned here is not simply the capacity to recall facts or to recognise objects. The focus is on learning that results in the construction of knowledge. Although most online learning platforms are efficient at delivering information, most do not provide tools that support learning as envisaged in this chapter. It is conceivable that Web-based learning environments can incorporate software systems that assist learners to form new associations between concepts and synthesise information to create new knowledge. This chapter details the rationale and theory behind a research study that aims to evolve Web-based learning environments into 'intelligent thinking' systems that respond to natural language human input. Rather than functioning simply as a means of delivering information, it is argued that online learning solutions will 1 day interact directly with students to support their conceptual thinking and cognitive development.

  20. Influence of individual learning styles in online interaction: a case for dynamic frequently asked questions (DFAQ)

    OpenAIRE

    Ng'ambi, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Although current literature on learning styles shows that matching a teacher’s instructional style with the learning styles of students affects performance in a classroom environment, little is known about the influence of learning styles in online interaction. The paper argues that students’ individual learning styles influences how students interact online and that rather than adapt to user’s learning styles, online environments tend to force behavior change on users’ learning styles. The p...

  1. Learning Vocabulary through Paper and Online-Based Glossary

    OpenAIRE

    Ratih Novita Sari

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of teaching glossary and personality traits on vocabulary learning. Two groups of students who had different personality (extroverted and introverted) were exposed to two types of glosses: paper and online-based glossary. The two groups underwent two-month treatment. Prior to and after the treatment, each group was given pre and posttest. In calculating the data, two-way ANOVA was used. The results of the study showed that extroverted students learned vocabulary...

  2. A value creation framework for an online professional learning community

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bot, Gaëlle; Xue, Lina; van Petegem, Wim; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    International audience; As economic constraints leave fewer resources available for professional development, researchers and practitioners have become increasingly interested in the interplay between learning, community and technology. They are examining the potential of online communities of practice (CoP) to enhance and extend traditional professional development opportunities (Booth and Kellogg, 2014). They support the idea that participation in a learning community leads to change practi...

  3. Evaluation of Online Log Variables That Estimate Learners' Time Management in a Korean Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Park, Yeonjeong; Yoon, Meehyun; Sung, Hanall

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the psychological variables and online behavioral patterns of students, collected through a learning management system (LMS). As the psychological variable, time and study environment management (TSEM), one of the sub-constructs of MSLQ, was chosen to verify a set of time-related…

  4. Implementation of Best Practices for Online Teaching and Learning in an Online Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlbeck, Sonja A.

    2008-01-01

    The article documents the creation of and rationale behind best practices to maintain high performance for teaching and learning at an online university. The grassroots involvement of faculty, building on best practice efforts that guided faculty in the past, the effort to engage the full faculty in the review of documents describing best…

  5. The Analysis of the Relationship between Primary Learning Styles and Learning Objects in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between the primary learning styles of students and different learning objects presented simultaneously in an online learning environment in the context of the usage levels of these objects. A total of 103 sophomores from a Turkish State University participated in the study. Felder-Solomon Index of…

  6. Teachers' Personal Learning Networks (PLNs): Exploring the Nature of Self-Initiated Professional Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    In the field of Literacy Studies, online spaces have been recognised as providing many opportunities for spontaneous and self-initiated learning. While some progress has been made in understanding these important learning experiences, little attention has been paid to teachers' self-initiated professional learning. Contributing to the debates…

  7. Teachers' Personal Learning Networks (PLNs): Exploring the Nature of Self-Initiated Professional Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    In the field of Literacy Studies, online spaces have been recognised as providing many opportunities for spontaneous and self-initiated learning. While some progress has been made in understanding these important learning experiences, little attention has been paid to teachers' self-initiated professional learning. Contributing to the debates…

  8. Connectiveness and civility in online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieck, Susan; Crouch, Laura

    2007-11-01

    As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered and from face-to-face to online, nursing faculty members are challenged to promote a sense of connectiveness and social interaction. Making connectiveness more elusive is the perception of rude, impolite, or unkind communication. The purpose of this descriptive-exploratory study was to examine perceptions of connectiveness and civility in online nursing courses. Ninety-six students in four nursing programs participated in the study. Strategies that promote connectiveness with peers are in-person activities whenever possible and discussion assignments that include social activities. Timely feedback when responding to questions and prompt grading are important for student-to-instructor connectiveness. Thirty-five percent of the students encountered rude or unkind communication with peers, and 60% reported incivility from instructors. Their suggestions for effective handling of rude communication included addressing the behavior privately, giving guidance about netiquette, and defining what constitutes rude behavior.

  9. College Students Attitudes toward Learning Process and Outcome of Online Instruction and Distance Learning across Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat-Dao; Zhang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This study uses the Learning-Style Inventory--LSI (Smith & Kolb, 1985) to explore to what extent student attitudes toward learning process and outcome of online instruction and Distance Learning are affected by their cognitive styles and learning behaviors. It finds that there are not much statistically significant differences in perceptions…

  10. Examining the Effects of Flexible Online Exams on Students' Engagement in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Selcuk

    2011-01-01

    Online assessments are essential parts of online learning. There are some debates on quality of online assessments. Nevertheless the study considered online exams as an instructional activity and aimed to examine the effects of online exams on students' engagements related to course goals. The study was conducted on two cases, which are…

  11. Student Perception of Online Learning in ESL Bilingual Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Mayra C.; Schumacher, Gail; Stelter, Nicole; Riley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies are changing delivery options for post-graduate teacher education. Many practicing teachers who return to school to prepare to educate English learners choose distance learning. This article explores teachers' perceived satisfaction with the quality of online courses, with the collaborative tasks required in these, and the…

  12. Students' Groupwork Management in Online Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Du, Jianxia; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates empirical models of groupwork management in online collaborative learning environments, based on the data from 298 students (86 groups) in United States. Data revealed that, at the group level, groupwork management was positively associated with feedback and help seeking. Data further revealed that, at the individual…

  13. Learning Style Responses to an Online Soil Erosion Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Martha; Kettler, Timothy; Hussman, Dann

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate responses from students with different learning styles to the use of computer technology as a supplemental tool in teaching soil erosion concepts. The online lesson utilized photographs, illustrations, animations, and an interactive model that allowed students to manipulate factors influencing soil erosion. Students…

  14. Developing a Constructivist Learning Environment in Online Postsecondary Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Sylvester N.

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study addressed the concerns of postsecondary educators regarding the quality of education received by postsecondary science students who receive their instruction online. This study was framed with the constructivist learning theory and Piaget's and Dewey's cognitive development theories. The overarching question addressed a gap in…

  15. A Conceptual Framework for Evolving, Recommender Online Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, K. Dharini Amitha; Gallupe, R. Brent

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive conceptual framework is developed and described for evolving recommender-driven online learning systems (ROLS). This framework describes how such systems can support students, course authors, course instructors, systems administrators, and policy makers in developing and using these ROLS. The design science information systems…

  16. Trayectorias: A New Model for Online Task-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros i Sole, Cristina; Mardomingo, Raquel

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a framework for designing online tasks that capitalizes on the possibilities that the Internet and the Web offer for language learning. To present such a framework, we draw from constructivist theories (Brooks and Brooks, 1993) and their application to educational technology (Newby, Stepich, Lehman and Russell, 1996; Jonassen,…

  17. 10 Things We Know for Sure about Learning Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahoussaye, Martin; Zemke, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Provides 10 guiding principles related to online learning: (1) know your business, (2) market, (3) respond to needs, (4) know infrastructure, (5) test, (6) create impact, (7) use support systems, (8) use games and simulations, (9) use short modules, and (10) link people through the Web. (JOW)

  18. Online semi-supervised learning: algorithm and application in metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Imangaliyev; B. Keijser; W. Crielaard; E. Tsivtsivadze

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key role in metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm an

  19. Online Semi-Supervised Learning: Algorithm and Application in Metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key rolein metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm and

  20. Do Facilitated Online Dual Credit Classes Result in Deep Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark Education Partnership, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This study, with funding from the Jennings Foundation, sought to answer the following broad research question: Do facilitated online dual credit courses result in deep learning? The answer to this question is key to addressing barriers many students face in bridging from high school to college. This report includes a descriptive case study that…

  1. Online Video Modules for Improvement in Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Matthew; Thomas, Sunil; Kohli, Chiranjeev

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this teaching innovation was to incorporate a comprehensive set of short online video modules covering key topics from the undergraduate principles of marketing class, and to evaluate its effectiveness in improving student learning. A quasiexperimental design was used to compare students who had access to video modules with a…

  2. Online learning algorithm for ensemble of decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We describe an online learning algorithm that builds a system of decision rules for a classification problem. Rules are constructed according to the minimum description length principle by a greedy algorithm or using the dynamic programming approach. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Using Online Video to Support Student Learning and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Pamela; Shea, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Online videos are used increasingly in higher education teaching as part of the explosion of Web 2.0 tools that are now available. YouTube is one popular example of a video-sharing resource that both faculty and students can use effectively, both inside and outside of the classroom, to engage students in their learning, energize classroom…

  4. Developing Evaluative Tool for Online Learning and Teaching Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksal, Fahriye A.

    2011-01-01

    The research study aims to underline the development of a new scale on online learning and teaching process based on factor analysis. Further to this, the research study resulted in acceptable scale which embraces social interaction role, interaction behaviour, barriers, capacity for interaction, group interaction as sub-categories to evaluate…

  5. Enhancing Learning through an Online Secondary School Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David; Sauve, Louise; Renaud, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article consists of four sections: (1) the problems associated with asthma in the province of Quebec and across Canada; (2) the theoretical framework for the learning enhanced by our online educational game entitled "Asthme: 1,2,3 ... Respirez! (Asthma: 1,2,3 ... Breath!)", created by adapting the popular board game…

  6. Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    setting where multiple distributed players share the arms without information exchange. Under both an exogenous restless model and an endogenous ...decision making under unknown models and incomplete observations. The technical approach rests on a stochastic online learning framework based on...general, potentially heavy-tailed distribution. In [1], we developed a general approach based on a Deterministic Sequencing of Exploration and

  7. Enhancing Learning through an Online Secondary School Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David; Sauve, Louise; Renaud, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article consists of four sections: (1) the problems associated with asthma in the province of Quebec and across Canada; (2) the theoretical framework for the learning enhanced by our online educational game entitled "Asthme: 1,2,3 ... Respirez! (Asthma: 1,2,3 ... Breath!)", created by adapting the popular board game…

  8. Learning Analytics for Online Discussions: Embedded and Extracted Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Alyssa Friend; Zhao, Yuting; Hausknecht, Simone Nicole

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an application of learning analytics that builds on an existing research program investigating how students contribute and attend to the messages of others in asynchronous online discussions. We first overview the E-Listening research program and then explain how this work was translated into analytics that students and…

  9. Making Online Professional Development Work for Florida Project Learning Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Lindsey C.; Monroe, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    Large distances and small budgets had made it challenging for Florida Project Learning Tree (PLT) to conduct in-person workshops with volunteer 4-H leaders to disseminate the PreK-8 guide. An online version of a PLT workshop was developed to overcome these barriers. Formative evaluation data suggested that the program effectively introduced PLT to…

  10. Validation of the Self-Regulated Online Learning Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Renée S.; van Leeuwen, Anouschka; Janssen, Jeroen; Kester, Liesbeth; Kalz, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The number of students engaged in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is increasing rapidly. Due to the autonomy of students in this type of education, students in MOOCs are required to regulate their learning to a greater extent than students in traditional, face-to-face education. However, there is no questionnaire available suited for this…

  11. Managing Staff Development for Online Education: A Situated Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Janet A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the implementation and management of staff development for online education underpinned by the principles of situated learning. Describes technological, human resource, pedagogical, and management initiatives and presents a case study of how a small regional institution changed to being an internationally recognized e-university. (EV)

  12. Designing the online oral language learning environment SpeakApps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nic Giolla Mhichíl, Mairéad; Appel, Christine; Ó Ciardubháin, Colm; Jager, Sake; Prizel-Kania, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on SpeakApps, a major collaborative computer-assisted language learning project, developed based on an open source techno-pedagogical solution to facilitate online oral language production and interaction. Design/methodology/approach – A mixed method

  13. Learning from Student Experiences for Online Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, M. Asim; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Use of the Internet for open Web searches is common among university students in academic learning tasks. The tools used by students to find relevant information for online assessment tasks were investigated and their information seeking behaviour was documented to explore the impact on assessment design. Method: A mixed methods…

  14. Conceptualizing and Investigating Instructor Presence in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jennifer C.; Koehler, Adrie A.; Besser, Erin D.; Caskurlu, Secil; Lim, JiEun; Mueller, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    As online learning opportunities continue to grow it is important to continually consider instructor practices. Using case study methodology this study conceptualizes instructor presence, the intersection of social and teaching presence as defined within the Community of Inquiry literature, and is based in the implementation phase of online…

  15. Meaningful Learning with Digital and Online Videos: Theoretical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Paivi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper theoretical perspectives for analyzing the pedagogical meaningfulness of using videos in teaching, studying and learning are presented and discussed with a special focus on using digital and online video materials. The theoretical arguments were applied in the international Joint Inserts Bank (JIBS) for Schools project. Out of…

  16. Narratives of Teaching, Learning, and Service in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Maria Celia; Ehimika, Mabel; Pena, Elida; Miller, Ava

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the service learning activities that surrounded the implementation of eight holistic approaches to chronic disease throughout the community served. Faculty facilitated independent practice related activities that brought knowledge to community agencies. Students, as a part of an online course, developed close relationships…

  17. Stress in Japanese Learners Engaged in Online Collaborative Learning in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Kudo, Masayuki; Choi, Sook-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Many studies report positive learning experience and improved performance in online collaborative learning. However, such learning can also incur unnecessary or excessive stress with a resultant adverse effect on the learning. This study aimed to determine the stress factors in online collaborative learning as perceived by 226 Japanese university…

  18. Live online communication facilitating collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    , new applications and devices are simply making blended learning eaiser than before and therefore support a strongere focus on the learning activities Most web conference systems provide presentation functions enabling users to show slides, share files and engage in oral and visual communication...... a multitude of activities. It is, however, tempting for teachers to simply transfer the well known models and practices of the physical class room to the virtual environment thus maintaining traditional lectures and individual, written assignments as teaching activities. This leaves the teacher in control...... becomes an exchange of information between teacher and student in a formal class room. This presentation stresses that the use of web conference systems for teaching must be based on a didactic model that views learning as an active and social process thus expanding the learning context and opportunities...

  19. K-12 Teacher Understanding of Energy Conservation: Conceptual Metaphor, Dissipation, and Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daane, Abigail R.

    In K-12 educational settings, conservation of energy is typically presented in two ways: the conservation of energy principle (energy is neither created nor destroyed) and the sociopolitical need to conserve energy (we guard against energy being used up). These two meanings of conservation typically remain disconnected from each other and can appear contradictory, even after instruction. In an effort to support teachers in building robust understandings of energy from their existing knowledge, I designed a study to investigate the productive ideas in K-12 teachers' conversations about energy. A micro-analysis of discourse, gestures, and artifacts of professional development courses revealed teachers' productive ideas about three aspects of energy: conceptual metaphor, dissipation and degradation. In learning about energy, K-12 teachers come to use conceptual metaphors in their own language and value attending to students' metaphorical language as a means of formative assessment. Teachers' conversations about dissipation suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong association between forms of energy (thermal) and their perceptible indicators (warmth). Teachers address this challenge by employing an exaggeration strategy to locate the dissipated thermal energy, making the energy indicator perceptible. Finally, teachers' unprompted statements about sociopolitical aspects of energy are related to both statements from the NGSS and aspects of energy degradation. I conclude that energy conservation can be better taught and learned in K-12 Education by: 1) understanding and applying conceptual metaphors about energy in K-12 settings, 2) using prior experiences to better understand dissipative energy processes involving imperceptible thermal energy, thereby understanding how energy conservation applies in all situations, and 3) connecting productive ideas about sociopolitical aspects of energy to canonical physics. Keywords

  20. Interactive Hematology and Digital Learning Online

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Morten

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2001, the University of Oslo decided to prioritize the usage of digital learning systems, and offered funds for their development. We decided to use the opportunity to create a web-based, interactive learning system (1), covering basic physiological and clinical hematology. During initial development, the project was expanded to a general Content-Management System (2) for creating web-based information sites, while maintaining focus on hematology. Method The system was d...

  1. Computer Literacy and Online Learning Attitude toward GSOE Students in Distance Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lung-Yu; Lee, Long-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore graduate students' competencies in computer use and their attitudes toward online learning in asynchronous online courses of distance learning programs in a Graduate School of Education (GSOE) in Taiwan. The research examined the relationship between computer literacy and the online learning attitudes of…

  2. Factors Influencing Adult Learners' Decision to Drop Out or Persist in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hye; Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The number of adult learners who participate in online learning has rapidly grown in the last two decades due to online learning's many advantages. In spite of the growth, the high dropout rate in online learning has been of concern to many higher education institutions and organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether…

  3. Online Learning Software – Why Pay for It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim FLOOD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Numbers with pound signs in front and four noughts following them are quite usual for the basic price of e-learning software. In spite of the high cost of software and criticism of it, many organizations are still locking themselves into expensive contracts when there are freely available alternatives that can deliver most of the attributes of commercially available Learning Management Systems (LMS. Learning Management Systems were developed amid the dot com boom of the 90s and are typical of the simplistic software approach to managing human endeavors that were characteristic of that era. By buying and installing an LMS, it was claimed, an organization could provide online learning to its members, electronically track their progress though online testing and save a huge amount of money on face-to-face training. This claim proved to be somewhat extravagant with experience showing that the software was difficult to install and run, prone to faults and was not at all efficient at facilitating learning. With the benefit of hindsight the problems are easy to identify. For example, many of the learning materials were crudely adapted from paper-based courses and there was little understanding of how learners behave in an online environment. However the main problem was that the development was designer-led and that the learning architecture was ‘locked down’ in the sense that the learning administrators within an organization had no control over it. LMS of this era (and they still exist have been described as an ‘albatross around the neck of a company that stifles learning’ (http://parkinslot.blogspot.com/2004/11/e-learning-adventures-beyond-lms.html .

  4. Robust Control Methods for On-Line Statistical Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capobianco Enrico

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of controlling that data processing in an experiment results not affected by the presence of outliers is relevant for statistical control and learning studies. Learning schemes should thus be tested for their capacity of handling outliers in the observed training set so to achieve reliable estimates with respect to the crucial bias and variance aspects. We describe possible ways of endowing neural networks with statistically robust properties by defining feasible error criteria. It is convenient to cast neural nets in state space representations and apply both Kalman filter and stochastic approximation procedures in order to suggest statistically robustified solutions for on-line learning.

  5. Supporting Climate Literacy in the K12 Classroom by Identifying Educators' Perceived Barriers to and Gaps in Resources for Teaching Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayne, K.

    2015-12-01

    As K12 teachers seek ways to provide meaningful learning opportunities for students to understand climate change, they often face barriers to teaching about climate and/or lack relevant resources on the topic. In an effort to better understand how to support K12 teachers in this role, a survey about "teaching climate change" was created and distributed. The results of the 2015 survey are presented, based on more than 200 teacher responses. Respondents included National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, 2015 STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Fellows and science teachers from several U.S. school districts. The survey identifies teachers' perceived barriers to teaching climate change, for example difficulty integrating climate change concepts into specific core courses (i.e., biology), as well as desired classroom resources, such as climate change project-based learning (PBL) units that connect to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Survey results also indicate possible pathways for federal agencies, non-profits, universities and other organizations to have a more significant impact on climate literacy in the classroom. In response to the survey results, a comprehensive guide is being created to teach climate change in K12 classrooms, addressing barriers and providing resources for teachers. For example, in the survey, some teachers indicated that they lacked confidence in their content knowledge and understanding of climate change, so this guide provides web-based resources to help further an educator's understanding of climate change, as well as opportunities for relevant online and in-person professional development. In this quest for desired resources to teach climate change, gaps in accessible and available online resources are being identified. Information about these "gaps" may help organizations that strive to support climate literacy in the classroom better serve teachers.

  6. This new house: building knowledge through online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robley, Lois R; Farnsworth, Beverly J; Flynn, Janice B; Horne, Christina D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand from baccalaureate-degree nursing students the experience of virtual learning in nursing and to understand how online education enhanced and detracted from learning. Three in-depth, focus-group interviews were conducted with a total of 27 baccalaureate nursing students. Hermeneutic phenomenology was employed to analyze the narrative data. Seven themes were identified from the data. The first theme was "making the framework": (1) providing flexibility; (2) enabling students through observing, guiding, and modeling; (3) faculty as facilitators; and (4) questioning as method. The second theme was "building incredible dialogue": (1) having great discussions, (2) sharing ideas/knowledge, and (3) not being inhibited. The third theme was "critical thinking--the 3-D effect": (1) sitting with the words, (2) using references/research, (3) seeing a variety of perspectives, (4) critiquing self and others, and (5) using selective language. The fourth theme was "personal and professional growth": (1) being connected, (2) feeling valued and respected, and (3) having intimate relationships. The fifth theme, representing the outcomes for online courses, was "more comprehensive learning": (1) deeper understanding and (2) better retention of knowledge. The sixth theme was "being overwhelmed", and the seventh theme was "being frustrated". As a result of this study, an understanding of the phenomenon of online learning was developed. The findings provide direction for future development of the pedagogy of distance learning.

  7. Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E. Brindley

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning in an online classroom can take the form of discussion among the whole class or within smaller groups. This paper addresses the latter, examining first whether assessment makes a difference to the level of learner participation and then considering other factors involved in creating effective collaborative learning groups. Data collected over a three year period (15 cohorts from the Foundations course in the Master of Distance Education (MDE program offered jointly by University of Maryland University College (UMUC and the University of Oldenburg does not support the authors’ original hypothesis that assessment makes a significant difference to learner participation levels in small group learning projects and leads them to question how much emphasis should be placed on grading work completed in study groups to the exclusion of other strategies. Drawing on observations of two MDE courses, including the Foundations course, their extensive online teaching experience, and a review of the literature, the authors identify factors other than grading that contribute positively to the effectiveness of small collaborative learning groups in the online environment. In particular, the paper focuses on specific instructional strategies that facilitate learner participation in small group projects, which result in an enhanced sense of community, increased skill acquisition, and better learning outcomes.

  8. The space for social media in structured online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the benefits of using social media in an online educational setting, with a particular focus on the use of Facebook and Twitter by participants in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC developed to enable educators to learn about the Carpe Diem learning design process. We define social media as digital social tools and environments located outside of the provision of a formal university-provided Learning Management System. We use data collected via interviews and surveys with the MOOC participants as well as social media postings made by the participants throughout the MOOC to offer insights into how participants’ usage and perception of social media in their online learning experiences differed and why. We identified that, although some participants benefitted from social media by crediting it, for example, with networking and knowledge-sharing opportunities, others objected or refused to engage with social media, perceiving it as a waste of their time. We make recommendations for the usage of social media for educational purposes within MOOCs and formal digital learning environments.

  9. Learner Attrition in an Advanced Vocational Online Training: The Role of Computer Attitude, Computer Anxiety, and Online Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Köster, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Online learning has gained importance in education over the last 20 years, but the well-known problem of high dropout rates still persists. According to the multi-dimensional learning tasks model, the cognitive (over)load of learners is essential to attrition when dealing with five challenges (e.g. technology, user interface) of an online training…

  10. Learning Vocabulary through Paper and Online-Based Glossary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Novita Sari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of teaching glossary and personality traits on vocabulary learning. Two groups of students who had different personality (extroverted and introverted were exposed to two types of glosses: paper and online-based glossary. The two groups underwent two-month treatment. Prior to and after the treatment, each group was given pre and posttest. In calculating the data, two-way ANOVA was used. The results of the study showed that extroverted students learned vocabulary better through paper-based glossary, while introverted students learned vocabulary better through online-based. Further research needs to be conducted to determine whether age influences the use of teaching glossary or not

  11. Online multiple kernel similarity learning for visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hao; Hoi, Steven C H; Jin, Rong; Zhao, Peilin

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed a number of studies on distance metric learning to improve visual similarity search in content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Despite their successes, most existing methods on distance metric learning are limited in two aspects. First, they usually assume the target proximity function follows the family of Mahalanobis distances, which limits their capacity of measuring similarity of complex patterns in real applications. Second, they often cannot effectively handle the similarity measure of multimodal data that may originate from multiple resources. To overcome these limitations, this paper investigates an online kernel similarity learning framework for learning kernel-based proximity functions which goes beyond the conventional linear distance metric learning approaches. Based on the framework, we propose a novel online multiple kernel similarity (OMKS) learning method which learns a flexible nonlinear proximity function with multiple kernels to improve visual similarity search in CBIR. We evaluate the proposed technique for CBIR on a variety of image data sets in which encouraging results show that OMKS outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques significantly.

  12. QUEST: Eliminating Online Supervised Learning for Efficient Classification Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardjan Zwartjes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce QUEST (QUantile Estimation after Supervised Training, an adaptive classification algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs that eliminates the necessity for online supervised learning. Online processing is important for many sensor network applications. Transmitting raw sensor data puts high demands on the battery, reducing network life time. By merely transmitting partial results or classifications based on the sampled data, the amount of traffic on the network can be significantly reduced. Such classifications can be made by learning based algorithms using sampled data. An important issue, however, is the training phase of these learning based algorithms. Training a deployed sensor network requires a lot of communication and an impractical amount of human involvement. QUEST is a hybrid algorithm that combines supervised learning in a controlled environment with unsupervised learning on the location of deployment. Using the SITEX02 dataset, we demonstrate that the presented solution works with a performance penalty of less than 10% in 90% of the tests. Under some circumstances, it even outperforms a network of classifiers completely trained with supervised learning. As a result, the need for on-site supervised learning and communication for training is completely eliminated by our solution.

  13. Teaching and learning community work online: can e-learning promote competences for future practice?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an online course in Community Work and the learning outcomes for an international group of students participating in the course. Examples from the process of, and results from the development of virtual-learning material are presented. Finally, the students' learning experience and competences achieved by the use of innovative learning material and ICT communication tools are presented.

  14. Adapting online learning for Canada's Northern public health workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie Bell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Canada's North is a diverse, sparsely populated land, where inequalities and public health issues are evident, particularly for Aboriginal people. The Northern public health workforce is a unique mix of professional and paraprofessional workers. Few have formal public health education. From 2009 to 2012, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC collaborated with a Northern Advisory Group to develop and implement a strategy to strengthen public health capacity in Canada's 3 northern territories. Access to relevant, effective continuing education was identified as a key issue. Challenges include diverse educational and cultural backgrounds of public health workers, geographical isolation and variable technological infrastructure across the north. Methods . PHAC's Skills Online program offers Internet-based continuing education modules for public health professionals. In partnership with the Northern Advisory Group, PHAC conducted 3 pilots between 2008 and 2012 to assess the appropriateness of the Skills Online program for Northern/Aboriginal public health workers. Module content and delivery modalities were adapted for the pilots. Adaptations included adding Inuit and Northern public health examples and using video and teleconference discussions to augment the online self-study component. Results . Findings from the pilots were informative and similar to those from previous Skills Online pilots with learners in developing countries. Online learning is effective in bridging the geographical barriers in remote locations. Incorporating content on Northern and Aboriginal health issues facilitates engagement in learning. Employer support facilitates the recruitment and retention of learners in an online program. Facilitator assets included experience as a public health professional from the north, and flexibility to use modified approaches to support and measure knowledge acquisition and application, especially for First Nations, Inuit and

  15. No Significant Difference in Service Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorry, Sue Y.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are realizing the importance of service learning initiatives in developing awareness of students' civic responsibilities, leadership and management skills, and social responsibility. These skills and responsibilities are the foundation of program outcomes in accredited higher education business programs at…

  16. DISTANCE LEARNING ONLINE WEB 3 .0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Petryk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing methods of identification information in the semantic web, outlines the main problems of its implementation and researches the use of Semantic Web as the part of distance learning. Proposed alternative variant of identification and relationship construction of information and acquired knowledge based on the developed method “spectrum of knowledge”

  17. Undergraduate interest in K--12 teaching and the perceived 'climate' for the K--12 education profession in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdeman, Robert Dean

    Previous research suggests that the natural science setting in universities does not offer a supportive environment for undergraduates interested in K--12 education careers, an important problem given the need for K--12 science teachers. A mixed-method approach was used to examine student perspectives toward K--12 education careers, and the influence of the college experience on perspectives, at a public research university. Quantitative data come from a cross-sectional survey sample (N = 444) of upper-division natural science majors in the university. The survey focused on student background characteristics, undergraduate experiences, perceptions of the college environment, career interests, and satisfaction. Pursuit of K--12 education as a top current career choice was rare among the respondents (3.6%). However, about one-fourth of them indicated some interest in this career and overall interest increased slightly during the college experience. Based on student perceptions, K--12 education was substantially less emphasized within the natural sciences than other career fields. Regression analyses revealed that the most important predictors (aside from initial career interests) of interest in and attitude toward K--12 teaching were self-concept and personality measures. Several college experience measures were also predictors, including perceptions about faculty and peers in the natural sciences. The effect of college experiences differed for students initially more inclined toward K--12 teaching, who reported a net decrease in interest, versus those more disinclined, who reported a net gain in interest. Satisfaction with the college experience was similar for the two groups. Qualitative data come from follow-up interviews conducted with eight survey respondents who recalled a top choice of K--12 teaching upon entering college but had decided to pursue another career. These students perceived other career fields to offer better professional opportunities for

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF MULTIMEDIA IN LEARNING & TEACHING DATA STRUCTURES ONLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahalu JUNAIDU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Online electronic education is now being widely accepted as a major viable component of higher education. This is fuelled by the emergence of worldwide information and computer communications technologies. However, online education is not being adopted in science and engineering subjects as widely as in other fields because of the idiosyncrasies of some science and engineering-based courses. For online engineering education to be broadly accepted and utilized, the quality of online courses must, amongst other things, be comparable to or better than those of traditional face-to-face classroom education. This paper explores and reports on the importance of creating multimedia-rich course content and the important role that animations can play in creating a successful online learning experience. Results of our study on an online data structures course over five years offerings show that students consistently perform much better in questions requiring application of material taught in carefully animated algorithms. These results should carry over to other educational environments.

  19. ATTITUDES TOWARD ONLINE COMMUNICATIONS IN OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem ERDEM AYDIN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article intended to reveal the results of a survey study in which the students’ attitudes toward online communication in open and distance learning were investigated. In the study, affects of the students’ gender and computer experience on their attitudes were also examined. A total of 626 subjects participated in the study and ‘Online Communication Attitude Scale’, developed by Ledbetter, was adapted as the data collection instrument. Mean, standard deviation, independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests were used to analyze the data gathered. The results of the study indicated that students have in general positive attitudes toward online communication in ODL. Also, it showed that there is a significant difference in ‘miscommunication’, ‘social connection’ and ‘ease’ dimensions of online communication between the males and the female students. The female students see online environments as open to communication errors. On the other hand, the study supported the literature about the affect of the students’ computer experience and their attitudes toward online communication in ODL.

  20. Developing Professional Identity in an Online Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Line Helverskov

    2015-01-01

    identity as the outcome for the intern. This paper describes the interactions in an online learning environment. The online platform sought to enable peer interaction between younger and older students in a discussion of the professional identity of Natural and Cultural Heritage Management (NCHM......From a socio-cultural perspective, the development of a professional identity is an on-going process that is social in nature and negotiated in communities of practice (Wenger, 1998). Internships in higher education function as such communities of practice, with an improved sense of professional...... for designing educational activities with this purpose....

  1. Facilitating online project collaboration - new directions for learning design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inez Estelle Harker-Schuch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although research suggests that project collaboration supports deep learning, facilitators frequently face participation and engagement challenges – particularly in 100% online courses and/or courses with students from diverse geographical/cultural backgrounds.  We present our experiences with learning designs featuring online project collaboration by examining student evaluation of the group work component in the course ‘Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation’ and reviewing specific process reports from the course ‘Environmental Management in the Tropics’.  For the CCIAM we discern positive trends over the 2009-2012 period with ‘collaborative dynamics’, ‘organisation/coordination’, ‘burden sharing’ and practical knowledge’ showing significant improvements following revision.  We provide experience from revising the CCIAM course (responding to evaluations - and reflect on the results that such revisions engender.  Determining specific factors that contribute to improvements in student evaluations are not always clear but we offer suggestions for facilitating online project collaboration to circumnavigate the four above-mentioned major issues identified on the CCIAM course: these suggestions are peer assessment, mandatory participation, and grading (as a contribution to the overall final grade.  For EMiT ‘communication’ showed the strongest issue-signal – with organization/coordination ‘cultural issues’ and ‘learning outcomes’ also indicating issue-relevance..  We propose that learning designs for online project collaboration can be improved via teacher-facilitated interventions without undermining the socialisation pathways that students can find motivating and that promote online team building.

  2. Study Circles in Online Learning Environment in the Spirit of Learning-Centered Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simándi Szilvia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the era of information society and knowledge economy, learning in non-formal environments gets a highlighted role: it can supplement, replace or raise the knowledge and skills gained in the school system to a higher level (Forray & Juhász, 2008, as the so-called “valid” knowledge significantly changes due to the acceleration of development. With the appearance of information technology means and their booming development, the possibilities of gaining information have widened and, according to the forecasts, the role of learning communities will grow. Purpose: Our starting point is that today, with the involvement of community sites (e.g. Google+, Facebook etc. there is a new possibility for inspiring learning communities: by utilizing the power of community and the possibilities of network-based learning (Ollé & Lévai, 2013. Methods: We intend to make a synthesis based on former research and literature focusing on the learning-centered approach, online learning environment, learning communities and study circles (Noesgaard & Ørngreen, 2015; Biggs & Tang, 2007; Kindström, 2010 Conclusions: The online learning environment can be well utilized for community learning. In the online learning environment, the process of learning is built on activity-oriented work for which active participation, and an intensive, initiative communication are necessary and cooperative and collaborative learning get an important role.

  3. On-line interprofessional learning: introducing constructivism through enquiry-based learning and peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Matthew; Ventura, Susie; Dando, Mark

    2004-08-01

    Interest in on-line methods of learning has accelerated in recent years. There has also been an interest in developing student-centred approaches to learning and interprofessional education. This paper illustrates the issues in designing a large (more than 700 students), on-line, inter-professional module for third year, undergraduate students drawn from nine professional healthcare courses and from four campus sites. It uses an enquiry-based learning approach. The learning theories of Piaget, Vygotsky and Schön are integrated with the on-line frameworks of Salmon and Collis et al., together with conclusions drawn from the literature and our own experiences, to produce a design that encourages students to learn through participation, re-iteration, peer-review and reflection. Consideration is given to improving student motivation and attitudes towards change, both in the design and the delivery of the module.

  4. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  5. The Effects of Integrating Social Learning Environment with Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopovic, Miroslava; Cvetanovic, Svetlana; Medan, Ivana; Ljubojevic, Danijela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the learning and teaching styles using the Social Learning Environment (SLE), which was developed based on the computer supported collaborative learning approach. To avoid burdening learners with multiple platforms and tools, SLE was designed and developed in order to integrate existing systems, institutional…

  6. Mathematics teaching & learning in k-12 equity and professional development

    CERN Document Server

    Foote, Mary Q

    2010-01-01

    The continuing gap in achievement between traditionally underserved students (students of color, English learners, and poor children) and their middle-class white peers, however, has provoked questions of the effectiveness of current mathematics teaching practices for meeting the needs of these students.

  7. Continuous Online Sequence Learning with an Unsupervised Neural Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuwei; Ahmad, Subutar; Hawkins, Jeff

    2016-09-14

    The ability to recognize and predict temporal sequences of sensory inputs is vital for survival in natural environments. Based on many known properties of cortical neurons, hierarchical temporal memory (HTM) sequence memory recently has been proposed as a theoretical framework for sequence learning in the cortex. In this letter, we analyze properties of HTM sequence memory and apply it to sequence learning and prediction problems with streaming data. We show the model is able to continuously learn a large number of variableorder temporal sequences using an unsupervised Hebbian-like learning rule. The sparse temporal codes formed by the model can robustly handle branching temporal sequences by maintaining multiple predictions until there is sufficient disambiguating evidence. We compare the HTM sequence memory with other sequence learning algorithms, including statistical methods: autoregressive integrated moving average; feedforward neural networks-time delay neural network and online sequential extreme learning machine; and recurrent neural networks-long short-term memory and echo-state networks on sequence prediction problems with both artificial and real-world data. The HTM model achieves comparable accuracy to other state-of-the-art algorithms. The model also exhibits properties that are critical for sequence learning, including continuous online learning, the ability to handle multiple predictions and branching sequences with high-order statistics, robustness to sensor noise and fault tolerance, and good performance without task-specific hyperparameter tuning. Therefore, the HTM sequence memory not only advances our understanding of how the brain may solve the sequence learning problem but is also applicable to real-world sequence learning problems from continuous data streams.

  8. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  9. E-learning on the road: online learning and social media for continuing professional competency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Batt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The impact of social media and online learning in health professions education has previously shown generally positive results in medical, nursing and pharmacy students. To date there has not been any extensive research into social media and online learning use by prehospital health care professionals such as paramedics. Aim & Methods We sought to identify the extent to which Irish pre-hospital practitioners make use of online learning and social media for continuous professional competency (CPC, and the means by which they do so. A cross-sectional online survey of practitioners was conducted to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data. The release of the survey was in a controlled manner to PHECC registrants via various channels. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Results A total of 248 respondents completed the survey in full by closing date of 31 March 2015, representing 5.4% of all registrants (n=4,555. 77% of respondents were male, and the majority were registered as Emergency Medical Technicians (49%, followed by Advanced Paramedics (26%. Over 78% of respondents used a mobile device in the course of their clinical duties; the majority used an iOS device. Social media and online learning were considered learning tools by over 75% of respondents, and over 74% agreed they should be further incorporated into prehospital education. The most popular platforms for CPC activities were YouTube and Facebook. The majority of respondents (88% viewed self-directed activities to constitute continuous professional development activity, but 64% felt that an activity that resulted in the awarding of a certificate was better value. Over 90% of respondents had previous experience with online learning, but only 42% indicated they had previously purchased or paid for online learning. Conclusion Prehospital practitioners in Ireland in the population studied consider online learning and social media acceptable for CPC purposes. The main

  10. Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Rovai and Hope Jordan

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education learning environments. Evidence is provided to suggest that blended courses produce a stronger sense of community among students than either traditional or fully online courses.

  11. How E-Learning with Second Life, an Online Virtual World Technology System, Affects Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sharon Kibbe

    2013-01-01

    Educators face challenges as they seek to ensure their online learning content is interactive, is engaging, and works well for remote learners. Second Life (SL), an online virtual world technology-based system built on Web 2.0 technology, is one approach designed to enrich online instruction and e-learning. This study involved a synthesis of…

  12. An online doctoral education course using problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Carver, Lara; Diaz, Anne; Edmunds, Johnna; Talusan, Richard; Tarrant, Theresa A

    2009-02-01

    The number of doctoral nursing programs has greatly increased over the past several years. There has also been a shift toward delivering programs either partially or fully online. The literature lacks discussions about doctoral-level teaching methods in the online environment. This article describes the use of a semester-long problem-based learning activity in an online doctoral course focusing on nurse educator leadership. The Students-As-Faculty Experience created for this course features the use of a virtual nursing program in which students are cast as faculty members confronting issues via faculty meetings and sharing rotating roles as chairperson. Students were vested in the process by co-designing the course in terms of developing agenda items for the meetings and evaluation rubrics. Through playing the roles of faculty and chairperson, the students reported a distinct improvement in their leadership abilities and confidence at the end of the course.

  13. Use of Signaling to Integrate Desktop Virtual Reality and Online Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Bucky J.; Antonenko, Pavlo D.

    2012-01-01

    Desktop virtual reality is an emerging educational technology that offers many potential benefits for learners in online learning contexts; however, a limited body of research is available that connects current multimedia learning techniques with these new forms of media. Because most formal online learning is delivered using learning management…

  14. A Comparison of Participation Patterns in Selected Formal, Non-Formal, and Informal Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, Richard A.; Seaton, J. X.

    2013-01-01

    Does learner participation vary depending on the learning context? Are there characteristic features of participation evident in formal, non-formal, and informal online learning environments? Six online learning environments were chosen as epitomes of formal, non-formal, and informal learning contexts and compared. Transcripts of online…

  15. FROM TRADITIONAL DISTANCE LEARNING TO MASS ONLINE OPEN COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Vasilev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of transition for higher education institutions of Russia from traditional distance learning to mass electronic education on the basis of the online open courses is considered, its relevance is proved. Analysis of the major prerequisites for transition success is carried out (a demand for the educational Internet resources from mobile devices; existence of a large number of various electronic resources which are successfully used in practice by higher education institutions in remote educational technologies; maintaining experience for electronic magazines of students’ progress for planning and estimation of training results; essential growth of material costs in the world online training market. Key issues of transition are defined and the basic principles of electronic online courses development are formulated. A technique for electronic online course development aimed at the result is given. The technique contains the following four stages: planning of expected training results, course electronic content structuring and training scenarios creation, development of the tests plan and electronic estimated means for automatic control of the planned training results; course realization by means of game mechanics and technologies of network communication between students. Requirements to various forms of control planned in the course of learning results are defined. Two kinds of electronic online courses are assigned (knowledge-intensive and technological courses. Examples of their realization in the authors’ online courses "Wave Optics", "Theory of Graphs ", "Development of Web Interfaces on the Basis of HTML and CSS" created and practically used in NRU ITMO in 2013 are given. Finally, the actual tasks of mass open education development in the leading higher education institutions of Russia are set forth.

  16. Perceptions of Turkish EFL Students on Online Language Learning Platforms and Blended Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istifci, Ilknur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of EFL students studying English at the School of Foreign Languages, Anadolu University (AUSFL) on blended language learning and online learning platforms. The participants of the study consisted of 167 students whose English language proficiency level was B2 according to the Common European…

  17. Influence of Learning Styles on Social Structures in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Karina; Sicilia, Miguel-Ángel; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    In e-learning settings, the interactions of students with one another, with the course content and with the instructors generate a considerable amount of information that may be useful for understanding how people learn online. The objective of the present research was to use social network analysis to explore the social structure of an e-learning…

  18. The Internet, Language Learning, and International Dialogue: Constructing Online Foreign Language Learning Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Erdogan; Uzun, Levent

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we call attention to the close connection between languages and globalization, and we also emphasize the importance of the Internet and online websites in foreign language teaching and learning as unavoidable elements of computer assisted language learning (CALL). We prepared a checklist by which we investigated 28 foreign…

  19. Fostering Critical Thinking Skills in Students with Learning Disabilities through Online Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    As a pedagogical approach, problem-based learning (PBL) has shown success for average and gifted students (HmeloSiver, 2004) and there are numerous incentives for its implementation in online learning environments (Savid-Baden, 2007; Chernobilsky, Nagarajan, & Hmelo-Silver, 2005). However, little research has been conducted regarding the…

  20. Designing Learning Environments for Cultural Inclusivity: A Case Study of Indigenous Online Learning at Tertiary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Catherine; Oliver, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Considers cultural diversity in Web design and traces the design processes involved in the development of an online learning environment for indigenous Australian learners entering university. Highlights include culture, constructivist learning and situated cognition; cultural pluralism in instructional design; and ten design principles for…

  1. The Effects of Student Engagement, Student Satisfaction, and Perceived Learning in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Julie A.; DiLoreto, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that course organization and structure, student engagement, learner interaction, and instructor presence have accounted for considerable variance in student satisfaction and perceived learning in online learning environments through a range of pathways, although no research to date has tested the mediational relationship…

  2. Influence of Learning Styles on Social Structures in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Karina; Sicilia, Miguel-Ángel; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    In e-learning settings, the interactions of students with one another, with the course content and with the instructors generate a considerable amount of information that may be useful for understanding how people learn online. The objective of the present research was to use social network analysis to explore the social structure of an e-learning…

  3. Virtual Spaces: Employing a Synchronous Online Classroom to Facilitate Student Engagement in Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lynn McBrien

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This research study is a collaborative project between faculty in social foundations, special education, and instructional technology in which we analyze student data from six undergraduate and graduate courses related to the use of a virtual classroom space. Transactional distance theory (Moore & Kearsley, 1996 operates as our theoretical framework as we explore the role of a virtual classroom in distance education and analyze the ways in which a synchronous learning environment affects students’ learning experiences. Elluminate Live! was the software employed in the virtual classroom. In this analysis, particular themes emerged related to dialogue, structure, and learner autonomy. In addition, students rated convenience, technical issues, and pedagogical preferences as important elements in their learning experiences. The article discusses these themes as a contribution to reducing the “distance” that students experience in online learning and to developing quality distance education experiences for students in higher education.

  4. Defining useful surrogates for user participation in online medical learning.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beddy, Peter

    2012-02-01

    "School for Surgeons" is a web-based distance learning program which provides online clinical-based tutorials to surgical trainees. Our aim was to determine surrogates of active participation and to assess the efficacy of methods to improve usage. Server logs of the 82 participants in the "School for Surgeons" were assessed for the two terms of the first year of the program. Data collected included total time online, mean session time, page requests, numbers of sessions online and the total number of assignments. An intervention regarding comparative peer usage patterns was delivered to the cohort between terms one and two. Of the 82 trainees enrolled, 83% (85% second term) logged into the program. Of all participants 88% (97% second term) submitted at least one assignment. Median submissions were four (eight second term) per trainee. Assignment submission closely correlated with number of sessions, total time online, downloads and page requests. Peer-based comparative feedback resulted in a significant increase in the number of assignments submitted (p < 0.01). Despite its recent introduction, "School for Surgeons" has a good participation rate. Assignment submission is a valid surrogate for usage. Students can be encouraged to move from passive observation to active participation in a virtual learning environment by providing structured comparative feedback ranking their performance.

  5. Study of Gamification Effectiveness in Online e-Learning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V. Osipov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Online distance e-learning systems allow introducing innovative methods in pedagogy, along with studying their effectiveness. Assessing the system effectiveness is based on analyzing the log files to track the studying time, the number of connections, and earned game bonus points. This study is based on an example of the online application for practical foreign language speaking skills training between random users, which select the role of a teacher or a student on their own. The main features of the developed system include pre-defined synchronized teaching and learning materials displayed for both participants, along with user motivation by means of gamification. The actual percentage of successful connects between specifically unmotivated and unfamiliar with each other users was measured. The obtained result can be used for gauging the developed system success and the proposed teaching methodology in general.

  6. Fractal groups: Emergent dynamics in on-line learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junia de Carvalho Fidelis Braga

    Full Text Available Drawing on complexity theory, this work discusses the complex dynamics and emergent patterns of on-line learning communities based on a doctoral study in the area of Applied Linguistics. The analysis will center on the interlocutions of fifty students who interacted in small groups without the teacher's direct intervention, in an undergraduate course offered by the School of Languages and Literature at the Federal University of Minas Gerais. By analyzing the data, I demonstrate that out of the interactions among the peers of autonomous on-line learning communities arise opportunities for the construction of shared meaning, distributed leadership, as well as other dynamics. I also demonstrate the fractal nature of these communities. Moreover, I discuss how these findings shed light on the creation and development of course designs for large groups.

  7. Science Learning via Participation in Online Citizen Science

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen; Cox, Joe; Simmons, Brooke; Lintott, Chris; Graham, Gary; Greenhill, Anita; Holmes, Kate

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the development of scientific content knowledge of volunteers participating in online citizen science projects in the Zooniverse (www.zooniverse.org), including the astronomy projects Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org) and Planet Hunters (www.planethunters.org). We use econometric methods to test how measures of project participation relate to success in a science quiz, controlling for factors known to correlate with scientific knowledge. Citizen scientists believe they are learning about both the content and processes of science through their participation. Won't don't directly test the latter, but we find evidence to support the former - that more actively engaged participants perform better in a project-specific science knowledge quiz, even after controlling for their general science knowledge. We interpret this as evidence of learning of science content inspired by participation in online citizen science.

  8. On-line Professional Learning Communities: Increasing Teacher Learning and Productivity in Isolated Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Salazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available On-line and distance professional learning communities provides teachers with increased access and flexibility as well as the combination of work and education. It also provides a more learner-centered approach, enrichment and new ways of interacting with teachers in isolated rural areas. For educational administrators, on-line learning offers high quality and usually cost-effective professional development for teachers. It allows upgrading of skills, increased productivity and development of a new learning culture. At the same time, it means sharing of costs, of training time, increased portability of training, and the exchange of creativity, information, and dialogue.

  9. AN APPROACH TO ONLINE LEARNING USING LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartika Kurniali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When higher education institutions want to offer online learning program they need to overcome various constraints. One of them is the system. The Learning Management System (LMS discussed is a web-based system developed and implemented in-house for a private university with a purpose to enable its new online learning program. The program differs from the regular face to face program since it is dominated with online classes. The LMS was designed and implemented to provide the right solution. The LMS succeed to facilitate students and lecturers in obtaining academic information and learning process anytime, anywhere via the internet. Since most of the time the students don’t come to the campus. In this study we explore the findings, discuss issues in the research, suggest how these results may foster improvement and give an input for other higher education institutions.

  10. Online Learning ARMA Controllers With Guaranteed Closed-Loop Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Savas; Guzelis, Cuneyt

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel online block adaptive learning algorithm for autoregressive moving average (ARMA) controller design based on the real data measured from the plant. The method employs ARMA input-output models both for the plant and the resulting closed-loop system. In a sliding window, the plant model parameters are identified first offline using a supervised learning algorithm minimizing an ε -insensitive and regularized identification error, which is the window average of the distances between the measured plant output and the model output for the input provided by the controller. The optimal controller parameters are then determined again offline for another sliding window as the solution to a constrained optimization problem, where the cost is the ε -insensitive and regularized output tracking error and the constraints that are linear inequalities of the controller parameters are imposed for ensuring the closed-loop system to be Schur stable. Not only the identification phase but also the controller design phase uses the input-output samples measured from the plant during online learning. In the developed online controller design method, the controller parameters can always be kept in a parameter region providing Schur stability for the closed-loop system. The ε -insensitiveness provides robustness against disturbances, so does the regularization better generalization performance in the identification and the control. The method is tested on benchmark plants, including the inverted pendulum and dc motor models. The method is also tested on an emulated and also a real dc motor by online block adaptive learning ARMA controllers, in particular, Proportional-Integral-Derivative controllers.

  11. Unsupervised incremental online learning and prediction of musical audio signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marxer, Richard; Purwins, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the idea that musical human-computer interaction may become more effective, intuitive, and creative when basing its computer part on cognitively more plausible learning principles, we employ unsupervised incremental online learning (i.e. clustering) to build a system that predicts...... the next event in a musical sequence, given as audio input. The flow of the system is as follows: 1) segmentation by onset detection, 2) timbre representation of each segment by Mel frequency cepstrum coefficients, 3) discretization by incremental clustering, yielding a tree of different sound classes (e...

  12. Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hardin, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning Karen HARDIN Cameron University Lawton, OK, USA PROBLEM One of the hot topics in education in the past 10 years has been the shift of the role of the educator. Whereas, he has traditionally been the owner and deliverer of the knowledge (Sage on the stage), now his role is shifting to a guide and facilitator (guide by the side). The purpose is to give the students ownership in their own learning process. As tec...

  13. Workplace wellness using online learning tools in a healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly; Gartshore, Emily

    2016-09-01

    The aim was to develop and evaluate an online learning tool for use with UK healthcare employees, healthcare educators and healthcare students, to increase knowledge of workplace wellness as an important public health issue. A 'Workplace Wellness' e-learning tool was developed and peer-reviewed by 14 topic experts. This focused on six key areas relating to workplace wellness: work-related stress, musculoskeletal disorders, diet and nutrition, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption. Each key area provided current evidence-based information on causes and consequences, access to UK government reports and national statistics, and guidance on actions that could be taken to improve health within a workplace setting. 188 users (93.1% female, age 18-60) completed online knowledge questionnaires before (n = 188) and after (n = 88) exposure to the online learning tool. Baseline knowledge of workplace wellness was poor (n = 188; mean accuracy 47.6%, s.d. 11.94). Knowledge significantly improved from baseline to post-intervention (mean accuracy = 77.5%, s.d. 13.71) (t(75) = -14.801, p health parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Online Learning of Safe Patient Transfers in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hayden D. H. Ed., OTR/L, CHT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Online higher education is steadily increasing. For programs in allied health to be offered effectively in an elearning format, clinical psychomotor skills need to be addressed. The aim of this research was to design, implement, and evaluate an online safe patient transfers module for occupational therapy assistant (OTAstudents. The efficacy of teaching safe patient transfers in an e-learning environment was appraised using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The applied research project was completed at a Tennessee community college. A convenience sample of eighteen students participated in the pilot study. Twenty-five studentsparticipated in the subsequent study. The instructional design of the course was based on Mager’s CriterionReferenced Instruction model. Streaming video was used as the delivery method for course material. A pretest/posttest evaluated the students’ cognitive knowledge of safe patient transfers. A behavioral transferscompetency checklist was used to rate videotapes of students’ performance of assisted stand pivot and dependent sliding board transfers. Research findings indicated students were able to learn this psychomotor clinical skill online with beginning proficiency. A paired t-test showed marked improvement of cognitive knowledge. A student learning survey revealed the majority of students preferred at least one hands-on classroom session where instructor feedback and interaction with classmates confirmed safe and effectiveclinical technique.

  15. An Investigation of Practices and Tools that Enabled Technology-Mediated Caring in an Online High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Andrea; Graham, Charles R.; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The ethic of care has been an important part of the dialogue related to learning in traditional K-12 learning environments particularly because emotional relationships and caring pedagogies have been shown to be particularly important for adolescent learners. However, as online learning has become increasingly popular, there are concerns about the…

  16. Use of Evaluation to Design Quality Online Learning: Understanding the Shared Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giering, Judith Ann

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online programs has been substantial over the past decade; such growth has required that an equally substantial number of faculty become proficient in the pedagogy of online learning and the best practices in online course design. At the same time, universities are being called on to provide evidence of student learning and…

  17. The Right Tools for the Job--Technology Options for Adult Online Learning and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Many options exist for using technology as a tool for adult learning, and each day, it becomes easier to share information online than it ever has been. Online learning technology has grown from one-sided communications to numerous options for audience engagement and interactivity. This guide introduces a variety of tools, online platforms, and…

  18. Measuring Teachers and Learners' Perceptions of the Quality of Their Online Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rey, Pilar; Barbera, Elena; Fernández-Navarro, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the quality of the online learning experience based on the Sloan-C framework and the Online Learning Consortium's (OLC) quality scorecard. The OLC index has been implemented to evaluate quality in online programs from different perspectives. Despite this, the opinions of learners are ignored, and it is built using feedback…

  19. Escaping the Comparison Trap: Evaluating Online Learning on Its Own Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, John

    2005-01-01

    Online learning has entered the mainstream of American higher education. Millions of students are taking online courses, and enrollments are projected to triple over the next several years. Although its rapid growth and increasing acceptance has somewhat muted the once-loud voices of its critics, online learning still struggles with lingering…

  20. The Effectiveness of Mutual Aid Learning Communities in Online MSW Practice Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, M. Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Online social work education has grown rapidly in recent years, and practice courses now are frequently taught online. The present study contributes to the growing body of knowledge regarding best practices in online social work education by examining the effects of small-group learning communities on student learning and on student satisfaction…

  1. Analysis of Social Media Influencers and Trends on Online and Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chien-wen; Kuo, Chin-Jin; Ly, Pham Thi Minh

    2017-01-01

    Although educational practitioners have adopted social media to their online or mobile communities, little attention has been paid to investigate the social media messages related to online or mobile learning. The purpose of this research is to identify social media influencers and trends by mining Twitter posts related to online learning and…

  2. Open online spaces of professional learning:Context, personalisation and facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article explores professional learning through online discussion events as sites of communities of learning. The rise of distributed work places and networked labour coincides with a privileging of individualised professional learning. Alongside this focus on the individual has been a growth in informal online learning communities and networks for professional learning and professional identity development. An example of these learning communities can be seen in the synchronous discussio...

  3. Exploring Online Learning at Primary Schools: Students' Perspectives on Cyber Home Learning System through Video Conferencing (CHLS-VC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June; Yoon, Seo Young; Lee, Chung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study are to investigate CHLS (Cyber Home Learning System) in online video conferencing environment in primary school level and to explore the students' responses on CHLS-VC (Cyber Home Learning System through Video Conferencing) in order to explore the possibility of using CHLS-VC as a supportive online learning system. The…

  4. Examining Culture's Impact on the Learning Behaviors of International Students from Confucius Culture Studying in Western Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of shared understanding of how culture impacts learning in online environment. Utilizing document analysis, the authors in this research study culture's impact on the learning behaviors of student sojourners from Confucius culture studying in Western online learning context. The shared understandings of Confucius culture and…

  5. Exploring Self-Directed Learning in the Online Learning Environment: Comparing Traditional versus Nontraditional Learner Populations a Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plews, Rachel Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-directed learning in the online learning context. A sample of traditional and nontraditional learners, who were considered above average in their level of self-direction, participated in qualitative interviews to discuss their learning while engaged in an online course. The findings suggested no major…

  6. Accommodating student learning styles and preferences in an online occupational therapy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy Wolcott; Jacobs, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy's online education must be research-based and inclusive. One way to provide a more inclusive online learning experience is to attend to individual learning styles and preferences. This study uses the best available evidence on learning styles and online education to develop, implement, and study occupational therapy students' experiences with an online learning module and related assignment. Eight students consented to take an online survey after completing a learning module and related assignment in an online post-professional graduate course in occupational therapy. The survey explored their learning experience and its applicability to clinical work. Data gathered from multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-ended questions were descriptively analyzed. Results from this study suggest that students find the study of learning styles and preferences enjoyable and applicable to their clinical work, but are often motivated by factors such as time and technology when selecting the format of a course assignment.

  7. K-12 Engineering Education Standards: Opportunities and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    Does the nation need K-12 engineering education standards? The answer to this question is paradoxically both simple and complex, and requires an examination of a rationale for such standards as well as the opportunities and barriers to developing and implementing the standards. In two decades since 1989, the idea of national standards for…

  8. Inspiring the Next Generation: Astronomy Catalyzes K12 STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Thaller, Michelle; Winglee, Robert; Borders, Kyla

    2017-06-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. NASA's Mission Science provides innovative and accessible opportunities for K-12 teachers. Science questions involve scale and distance, including Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers can gain an understanding of basic telescopes, the history of telescopes, ground and satellite based telescopes, and models of JWST Telescope. An in-depth explanation of JWST and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. During teacher training, we taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars.We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development.Funding was provided by Washington STEM, NASA, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  9. Engaging K-12 Language Learners in Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Joy; Neville, Chon

    2015-01-01

    Calls to integrate media literacy into K-12 language classrooms appear to have gone largely unheeded. However, media literacy skills are seen as crucial for 21st-century learners. This article answers the calls for a focus on media literacy in the language classroom by addressing both why and how systematic attention might be brought to this issue…

  10. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  11. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  12. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: "Divided Loyalties"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    This report mainly aims to provide a critical and in-depth analysis of the K-12 Case, "Divided Loyalty" by Holy and Tartar (2004). The case recounts how the manifestation of inadequate leadership skills in a school setting could affect negatively the performance of students.

  13. Education Nation: Obama, Romney Outline Different K-12, Postsecondary Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervarics, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With negative ads already rampant on radio and TV, it's clear that President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney differ on most issues. That statement carries over to education as well, as both offer starkly different views on K-12 and higher education policy for the fall campaign. Obama is touting a large increase in Pell Grants…

  14. 2008 Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Spradlin, Terry E.; Burroughs, Nathan A.; Hiller, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    During the course of each calendar year since 2003, staff of the Center for Evaluation & Education Policy (CEEP) at Indiana University evaluates the benefits of continuing the Annual Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana. In 2008, the Indiana legislature determined that school corporations would no longer use property tax revenues…

  15. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  16. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  17. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  18. Green Power Partnership Top 30 K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. On this list are the largest green power users among K-12 school partners within the GPP.

  19. A Framework for Educational Computer Usage. K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Julia; And Others

    A framework for educational computer usage in grades K-12 is outlined. For each grade level, objectives are shown for the following knowledge areas: computer-related terminology and use; history and development of computers; the use of the computer as a tool; communicating instructions to the computer; social implications; and robotics. Suggested…

  20. Florida's Opinion on K-12 Public Education Spending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This scientifically representative poll of 1,200 Floridians finds that public opinion about K-12 public education spending is seriously misinformed. Floridians think public schools need more money, but the main reason is that they are badly mistaken about how much money the public schools actually get. Key findings of the study include: (1) Half…