WorldWideScience

Sample records for k-12 curriculum development

  1. Exemplar: A Model for Social Studies Curriculum Development in Delaware, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades K-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The subject matter is divided into the following five themes: 1) Man develops within his physical and cultural environment. 2) Man functions within an interdependent society. 3) Man seeks justice and order. 4) Man experiences conflict and change. 5)…

  2. Do We Need a National Standards-Based K-12 Deaf Studies Curriculum? An Analytic History of Trends and Discourse in Development of Deaf Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernovoj, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    This study provides a complete review of discussion and development leading up to the current trends in Deaf Studies curriculum development, and also analyzes existing known curriculum (or curriculum-like) materials to help inform development of an ideal standards-based Deaf Studies curriculum. The common shared arguments identified in this…

  3. Engineering design skills coverage in K-12 engineering program curriculum materials in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien M.; Mumba, Frackson

    2017-11-01

    The current K-12 Science Education framework and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in the United States emphasise the integration of engineering design in science instruction to promote scientific literacy and engineering design skills among students. As such, many engineering education programmes have developed curriculum materials that are being used in K-12 settings. However, little is known about the nature and extent to which engineering design skills outlined in NGSS are addressed in these K-12 engineering education programme curriculum materials. We analysed nine K-12 engineering education programmes for the nature and extent of engineering design skills coverage. Results show that developing possible solutions and actual designing of prototypes were the highly covered engineering design skills; specification of clear goals, criteria, and constraints received medium coverage; defining and identifying an engineering problem; optimising the design solution; and demonstrating how a prototype works, and making iterations to improve designs were lowly covered. These trends were similar across grade levels and across discipline-specific curriculum materials. These results have implications on engineering design-integrated science teaching and learning in K-12 settings.

  4. Curriculum Guide for Music Education, K-12. Bulletin 1978, No. 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This curriculum guide contains objectives, activities, and evaluation procedures for a K-12 music education program. It would be useful to anyone responsible for teaching music. The authors believe that music education has the dual obligation of developing the aesthetic sensitivity of all students regardless of their individual levels of musical…

  5. Evolution: Its Treatment in K-12 State Science Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, L. S.

    2001-12-01

    State standards are the basis upon which states and local schools build curricula. Usually taking the form of lists of what students are expected to learn at specified grades or clusters of grades, they influence statewide examinations, textbooks, teacher education and credentialing, and other areas in which states typically exercise control over local curriculum development. State science standards vary very widely in overall quality.1,2 This is especially true in their treatment of evolution, both in the life sciences and to a somewhat lesser extent in geology and astronomy. Not surprisingly, a detailed evaluation of the treatment of evolution in state science standards3 has evoked considerably more public interest than the preceding studies of overall quality. We here consider the following questions: What constitutes a good treatment of evolution in science standards and how does one evaluate the standards? Which states have done well, and which less well? What nonscientific influences have been brought to bear on standards, for what reasons, and by whom? What strategies have been used to obscure or distort the role of evolution as the central organizing principle of the historical sciences? What are the effects of such distortions on students' overall understanding of science? What can the scientific community do to assure the publication of good science standards and to counteract attacks on good science teaching? 1. Lerner, L. S., State Science Standards: An Appraisal of Science Standards in 36 States, The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, Washington, D.C., March 1998. 2. Lerner, L. S. et al ., The State of State Standards 2000, ibid., January 2000. 3. Lerner, L. S., Good Science, Bad Science: Teaching Evolution In the States, ibid., September 2000.

  6. Spacemakers: A Leadership Perspective on Curriculum and the Purpose of K-12 Educational Makerspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Jason R.; Hughes, Joan E.

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative research study investigated how educational makerspace leaders, whom we refer to as spacemakers, framed the purpose of the makerspace in K-12 education and how makerspaces support school curriculum. Using interviews with twelve K-12 spacemakers, the study found spacemakers were experienced, self-motivated educators. These leaders…

  7. Sense and Sensibility: The Case for the Nationwide Inclusion of Engineering in the K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Robert E.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Batterson, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The competitive status of the United States is inextricably linked to innovation just as innovation is inseparable from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. To stay competitive in innovation requires that the United States produce a 21st century workforce complete with requisite education, training, skills, and motivation. If we accept a priori that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education are crucial to competitiveness and innovation and that, in terms of innovation, mathematics, science, and engineering are interdependent, why are mathematics and science uniformly ubiquitous in the K-12 curriculum while engineering is conspicuously absent? We are passionate in our belief that the uniform addition of engineering to the K-12 curriculum will help ensure that the nation has "the right" 21st Century workforce. Furthermore, we believe that a nationwide effort, led by a coalition of engineering academics, practitioners, and societies is required to turn this goal into reality. However, accomplishing this goal necessitates, as we are reminded by the title of Jane Austen's timeless novel, "Sense and Sensibility", a workable solution that seeks the "middle ground" between passion and reason. We begin our paper by making two essential points: Engineers are not scientists. Engineering exists separate from science, has its own specialized knowledge community apart from science, and it is largely responsible for many of the most significant advancements and improvements in the quality of our life. Our workable solution requires that K-12 education, nationwide, accommodate the inclusion of engineering as a stand alone curriculum and we offer three reasons to support our position: (1) workforce development, (2) stimulating interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses and careers, and (3) creating a technologically literate society. We conclude with some thoughts on how this important goal can be accomplished.

  8. A FIRST STEP TOWARDS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN A K-12 UNGRADED SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOSTER, GARRETT R.

    A SERIES OF THREE CONFERENCES WAS HELD TO EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING A LONG-RANGE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR AN UNGRADED, K-12 SCHOOL, BASED ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAMBRIDGE CONFERENCE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. OVER 50 MATHEMATICIANS, MATHEMATICS EDUCATORS, AND PERSONS INVOLVED IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  9. Theory to Practice: How Developing a K-12 Curriculum in Emergency Preparedness, Life Safety, or Homeland Security Can Lead to Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    learning . ( Bandura , 1977) Additionally, the main concepts as posited by Bandura about the Social Learning theory are that... social learning had taken place, a piece seemed to be missing that could be explained through another theory . Bandura developed and posited the...of the Social Learning theory . ( Bandura , 1986) 2. Social Cognitive Theory The theory revolves around the process of acquiring

  10. A Nonverbal Language for Imagining and Learning: Dance Education in K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Judith Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Curriculum theorists have provided a knowledge base concerning aesthetics, agency, creativity, lived experience, transcendence, learning through the body, and the power of the arts to engender visions of alternative possibilities in culture, politics, and the environment. However, these theoretical threads do not reveal the potential of K-12 dance…

  11. (Re)Defining the Filipino: Notions of Citizenship in the New K+12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Reyes, Elizer Jay

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the Philippine government implemented what it called the K+12 Curriculum which reformed its basic education system by adding two more years of schooling to the then existing 10-year structure. Complicated by the long experience and participation of the Filipinos in the diaspora, the constantly lingering thought of leaving for greener…

  12. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  13. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments

  14. Infrared Astronomy Professional Development for K-12 Educators: WISE Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Mendez, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. WISE Telescope (Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) and Spitzer Space Telescope Education programs provided an immersive teacher professional development workshop at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico during the summer of 2009. As many common misconceptions involve scale and distance, teachers worked with Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers built and used basic telescopes, learned about the history of telescopes, explored ground and satellite based telescopes, and explored and worked on models of WISE Telescope. An in-depth explanation of WISE and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. We taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of WISE lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, listening to light by using speakers hooked up to photoreceptor cells, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars. We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development. Funding was provided by WISE Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, Starbucks, Arecibo Observatory, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  15. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Moreno León; Gregorio Robles; Marcos Román-González

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three quasi-experimental research designs conducted in three different schools (n=129 students from 2nd and 6th grade), in order to assess the impact of intro...

  16. Tobacco Use Prevention Education. K-12 Lesson Plans from the Montana Model Curriculum for Health Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana State Office of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This publication presents K-12 tobacco use prevention lesson plans for schools in the state of Montana. Lessons for students in grades K-6 include: family connections; body tracing; smokeless tobacco; prenatal development; tobacco look-alikes; tobacco chemicals; analyzing tobacco and alcohol ads; tobacco use and the lungs; and a personal health…

  17. Integration of Geospatial Technologies into K-12 Curriculum: An Investigation of Teacher and Student Perceptions and Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore outcomes of a GIS/GPS integration process: to (a) examine student responses to GIS and GPS inclusion in their curriculum, (b) determine whether a relationship exists between inclusion of GIS into existing K-12 curriculum and student achievement, (c) examine the effectiveness of GIS professional development…

  18. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Moreno León

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three quasi-experimental research designs conducted in three different schools (n=129 students from 2nd and 6th grade, in order to assess the impact of introducing programming with Scratch at different stages and in several subjects. While both 6th grade experimental groups working with coding activities showed a statistically significant improvement in terms of academic performance, this was not the case in the 2nd grade classroom. Notable disparity was also found regarding the subject in which the programming activities were included, as in social studies the effect size was double that in mathematics.

  19. K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson

  20. "Flipping" educational technology professional development for K-12 educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Daniel

    As the demand for more effective professional development increases in K-12 schools, trainers must adjust their training methods to meet the needs of their teacher learners. Just as lecture-heavy, teacher-centered instruction only meet the learning needs of a small minority of students, "sit and get" professional development rarely results in the teachers gaining the skills and confidence necessary to use technology effectively in their instruction. To resolve the frustrations of teachers related to ineffective professional development, a "Flipped PD" training model was developed based on the learning needs of adult learners, the integration of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), learning activities, and the Flipped Classroom concept. Under this model, training shifts from a passive, trainer-centered format, to an active, learner-centered format where teachers learn to use technology in their classrooms by first focusing on pedagogical issues, then choosing the options that work best for addressing those issues in their unique situation, and completing "learn-by-doing" projects. Those who participate in "Flipped PD" style trainings tend to have more confidence upon completion that they can use the tools they were trained on in their teaching, as well as believe that the PD was engaging and a good use of their time.

  1. Integrating Online GIS into the K-12 Curricula: Lessons from the Development of a Collaborative GIS in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Paul; Semple, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    GIS has shown promise in Project Based Learning (PBL) environments, but many obstacles exist in its integration into school curriculums. This article discusses the development and utilization of an online GIS tool that was created to illustrate that the perceptual gap between relevance and ease of use of GIS software can be bridged at the K-12

  2. CESAME: Providing High Quality Professional Development in Science and Mathematics for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Paul

    2002-04-01

    It is appropriate that after almost half a century of Science and Mathematics education reform we take a look back and a peek forward to understand the present state of this wonderfully complex system. Each of the components of this system including teaching, professional development, assessment, content and the district K-12 curriculum all need to work together if we hope to provide quality science, mathematics and technology education for ALL students. How do the state and national standards drive the system? How do state policies on student testing and teacher licensure come into play? How do we improve the preparation, retention and job satisfaction of our K-12 teachers? What initiatives have made or are making a difference? What else needs to be done? What can the physics community do to support local efforts? This job is too big for any single organization or individual but we each can contribute to the effort. Our Center at Northeastern University, with support from the National Science Foundation, has a sharply defined focus: to get high quality, research-based instructional materials into the hands of K-12 classroom teachers and provide the support they need to use the materials effectively in their classrooms.

  3. Engineering Design Skills Coverage in K-12 Engineering Program Curriculum Materials in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien M.; Mumba, Frackson

    2017-01-01

    The current "K-12 Science Education framework" and "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) in the United States emphasise the integration of engineering design in science instruction to promote scientific literacy and engineering design skills among students. As such, many engineering education programmes have developed…

  4. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  5. Development and maturation of Escherichia coli K-12 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Haagensen, J.A.J.; Schembri, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step...... occurred in conjugation pilus proficient plasmid-carrying strains. The final shapes of the expanding structures in the mature biofilm seem to be determined by the pilus configuration, as various mutants affected in the processing and activity of the transfer pili displayed differently structured biofilms....... We further provide evidence that flagella, type 1 fimbriae, curli and Ag43 are all dispensable for the observed biofilm maturation. In addition, our results indicate that cell-to-cell signalling mediated by autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is not required for differentiation of E. coli within a biofilm community...

  6. Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools -- 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2013-02-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-K12) (ASHRAE et al. 2011a). The AEDG-K12 provides recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in K-12 schools over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-K12 was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  7. Connecting Cultures & Classrooms. K-12 Curriculum Guide: Language Arts, Science, Social Studies. Indian Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Sandra J., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This curriculum guide is but one of the resources that the Montana Office of Public Instruction is providing to help teachers implement Indian Education for All. The philosophy of this document promotes the use of Indian literature as an instructional tool. There are no textbooks presently for including aspects of Montana Indian cultures into the…

  8. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-05-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in nanotechnology. In the present study, the Nanotechnology Attitude Scale for K-12 teachers (NAS-T) was developed to assess K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T included 23 Likert-scale items that can be grouped into three components: importance of nanotechnology, affective tendencies in science teaching, and behavioural tendencies to teach nanotechnology. A sample of 233 K-12 teachers who have participated in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was included in the present study to investigate the psychometric properties of the NAS-T. The exploratory factor analysis of this teacher sample suggested that the NAS-T was a three-factor model that explained 64.11% of the total variances. This model was also confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis to validate the factor structure of the NAS-T. The Cronbach's alpha values of three NAS-T subscales ranged from 0.89 to 0.95. Moderate to strong correlations among teachers' NAS-T domain scores, self-perception of own nanoscience knowledge, and their science-teaching efficacy demonstrated good convergent validity of the NAS-T. As a whole, psychometric properties of the NAS-T indicated that this instrument is an effective instrument for assessing K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T will serve as a valuable tool to evaluate teachers' attitude changes after participating in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme.

  9. Design dimensions: In-depth retrospective studies of K-12 science curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, Deborah; McKenney, Susan; Barber, Jacquey; Bopardikar, Anushree; Drayton, Brian; Walkup, Sara; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Schunn, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Design and development are critically important to the educational enterprise. Unfortunately, there is little research on which design and development processes produce optimal outcomes for curricular materials intended for large-scale implementation. The Design Dimensions project asks: Across

  10. Development of a Virtual Technology Coach to Support Technology Integration for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William; van Tryon, Patricia J. Slagter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop a virtual technology coach for K-12 educators, this article analyzed survey results from sixty teachers with regards to specific resources that a technology coach could provide within a virtual environment. A virtual technology coach was proposed as a possible solution to provide continual professional development for…

  11. Development of Problem Sets for K-12 and Engineering on Pharmaceutical Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelski, Mariano J.; Slater, C. Stewart; Del Vecchio, Christopher A.; Kosteleski, Adrian J.; Wilson, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Educational problem sets have been developed on structured organic particulate systems (SOPS) used in pharmaceutical technology. The sets present topics such as particle properties and powder flow and can be integrated into K-12 and college-level curricula. The materials educate students in specific areas of pharmaceutical particulate processing,…

  12. The Ocean Acidification Curriculum Collection - sharing ocean science resources for k-12 classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.

    2016-02-01

    The fish and shellfish provided by ecosystems that abound in the waters of Puget Sound have sustained the Suquamish Tribe for millennia. However, years of development, pollution and over-harvest have reduced some fish and shellfish populations to just a fraction of their former abundance. Now, ocean acidification (OA) and climate change pose additional threats to these essential natural resources. Ocean acidification can't be stopped; however, many of the other human-caused stressors to ocean health can. If human behaviors that harm ocean health can be modified to reduce impacts, fish populations and ecosystems could become more resilient to the changing ocean conditions. School is arguably the best place to convey the ideas and awareness needed for people to adopt new behaviors. Students are open to new ideas and they influence their peers and parents. In addition, they are captive audiences in classrooms for many years.The Suquamish Tribe is helping to foster new generations of ocean stewards by creating an online searchable database (OACurriculumCollection.org). This site is designed to facilitate finding, reviewing and sharing free educational materials on OA. At the same time, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were released providing a great opportunity to get new materials into classrooms. OA provides highly appropriate context to teach many of the ideas in the new standards making it attractive to teachers looking for interesting and relevant materials. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how teachers can use the site as a place to find and share materials on OA. We will also present a framework developed by teachers for understanding OA, its impacts, and the many ways students can help ease the impacts on ocean ecosystems. We will provide examples of how OA can be used as context and content for the NGSS and finally, we will discuss the failures and successes on our journey to get relevant materials into the classroom.

  13. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a

  14. Sustaining K-12 professional development in geology: Recurrent participation in Rockcamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repine, T.E.; Hemler, D.A.; Behling, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    A reconnaissance study of the geology professional development program known as RockCamp was initiated to examine the sustained, or recurrent, participation of K-12 science teachers. Open-ended interviews, concept mapping, and creative writing assignments were used to explore the perceptions of six teachers possessing an exceptional record of participation. Efficacy, fun, right time of life, and support emerged as unanimous reasons for recurrent participation. Content, friendship, and methodology were very important. College credit was not critical. These teachers' perceptions suggest their sustained involvement in the RockCamp Program is stimulated by situated learning experiences stressing a compare, contrast, connect, and construct pedagogy within a supportive learning community.

  15. The Development of a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T.

    2010-12-01

    The National Academy of Sciences has created a committee of 18 National Academy of Science and Engineering members, academic scientists, cognitive and learning scientists, and educators, educational policymakers and researchers to develop a framework to guide new K-12 science education standards. The committee began its work in January, 2010, released a draft of the framework in July, 2010, and intends to have the final framework in the first quarter of 2011. The committee was helped in early phases of the work by consultant design teams. The framework is designed to help realize a vision for science and engineering education in which all students actively engage in science and engineering practices in order to deepen their understanding of core ideas in science over multiple years of school. These three dimensions - core disciplinary ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting elements - must blend together to build an exciting, relevant, and forward looking science education. The framework will be used as a base for development of next generation K-12 science education standards.

  16. Increasing ocean sciences in K and 1st grade classrooms through ocean sciences curriculum aligned to A Framework for K-12 Science Education, and implementation support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, S.; Weiss, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean and climate sciences are rarely introduced at the early elementary levels. Reasons for this vary, but include little direct attention at the national and state levels; lack of quality instructional materials; and, lack of teacher content knowledge. Recent recommendations by the National Research Council, "revise the Earth and Space sciences core ideas and grade band endpoints to include more attention to the ocean whenever possible" (NRC, 2012, p. 336) adopted in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), may increase the call for ocean and climate sciences to be addressed. In response to these recommendations' and the recognition that an understanding of some of the Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) would be incomplete without an understanding of processes or phenomena unique to the ocean and ocean organisms; the ocean Literacy community have created documents that show the alignment of NGSS with the Ocean Literacy Principles and Fundamental Concepts (Ocean Literacy, 2013) as well as the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K-12 (Ocean Literacy, 2010), providing a solid argument for how and to what degree ocean sciences should be part of the curriculum. However, the percentage of science education curricula focused on the ocean remains very low. This session will describe a new project, that draws on the expertise of curriculum developers, ocean literacy advocates, and researchers to meet the challenges of aligning ocean sciences curriculum to NGSS, and supporting its implementation. The desired outcomes of the proposed project are to provide a rigorous standards aligned curricula that addresses all of the Life Sciences, and some Earth and Space Sciences and Engineering Design Core Ideas for Grades K and 1; and provides teachers with the support they need to understand the content and begin implementation. The process and lessons learned will be shared.

  17. Education for a Green and Resilient Economy: An Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 Teachers Across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Ledley, T. S.; Lockwood, J.; Youngman, E.; Manning, C. L. B.; Sullivan, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. is embarking on a major transition to a green and resilient economy, a monumental change requiring all sectors and segments of the population to pull together. Transforming our nation's economic, energy, and environmental systems to in this way will require a sustained level of expertise, innovation, and cooperative effort unseen since the 1940s to meet the challenges involved. Education can - and must - help people understand the true connections, the linkages and interdependencies, between the environment, our energy sources and the economy which underpin and form the very foundation of the concept of a green and resilient economy. To produce such a literate future workforce and citizenry, the United States will need to make major new investments in our educational systems. Teachers across the nation are helping to increase science-based understanding and awareness of current and future climate change, enhancing climate and energy literacy in K-12 classrooms, on college and university campuses. There has been tremendous progress to date, but there is still more work to be done. The new academic standards in mathematics and science (the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)) represent a sea change from the nation's previous sets of standards. Addressing these standards in the currently over 40 percent of the nation's classrooms that have adopted or adapted the NGSS will demand that we prepare new and current teachers, who can effectively address the interdisciplinary nature of climate change and societal responses. To address this opportunity and need a collaboration between NOAA, TERC and CIRES has been established to develop an Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 teachers across the curriculum based on the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. This collaboration is developing an effective way to frame the use of

  18. Developing Standards-Based Geography Curricular Materials from Overseas Field Experiences for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Alex; Palacios, Fabian Araya

    2012-01-01

    Overseas experiences provide educators with exceptional opportunities to incorporate field study, firsthand experiences, and tangible artifacts into the classroom. Despite this potential, teachers must consider curricular standards that direct how such international endeavors can be integrated. Furthermore, geography curriculum development is more…

  19. A Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education: Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tamara J.; Glancy, Aran W.; Tank, Kristina M.; Kersten, Jennifer A.; Smith, Karl A.; Stohlmann, Micah S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent U.S. national documents have laid the foundation for highlighting the connection between science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the K-12 level. However, there is not a clear definition or a well-established tradition of what constitutes a quality engineering education at the K-12 level. The purpose of the current work has been…

  20. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in…

  1. Exploring Arizona K-12 Virtual Educator Experiences and Perspectives Developing Collaborative Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deborah Iyron

    2015-01-01

    Arizona Online Instruction (AOI) provided an instructional alternative to nearly fifty thousand K-12 students in Arizona during the 2012-2013 school year. Growth in online education underscores the importance of evolving the role of the K-12 virtual teacher as the human agent (Turvey, 2008) demonstrating social learning theory (Bandura, 1977) by…

  2. Infusing Multicultural Education into the Curriculum: Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Address Homophobia in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the role multicultural education can play in addressing homophobia in K-12 schools. The author explores the lack of multiculturalism courses in undergraduate teacher education programs. To address the lack of multiculturalism courses, three instructional activities are offered that faculty in teacher education programs can…

  3. Proposed Model for a Streamlined, Cohesive, and Optimized K-12 STEM Curriculum with a Focus on Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Edward

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a proposed model for a clear description of K-12 age-possible engineering knowledge content, in terms of the selection of analytic principles and predictive skills for various grades, based on the mastery of mathematics and science pre-requisites, as mandated by national or state performance standards; and a streamlined,…

  4. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools--30% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.

    2007-09-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings (K-12 AEDG), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in K-12 Schools over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The 30% energy savings target is the first step toward achieving net-zero energy schools; schools that, on an annual basis, draw from outside sources less or equal energy than they generate on site from renewable energy sources.

  5. Fat dogs and coughing horses: K-12 programming for veterinary workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, Sandra F; Carleton Parker, Loran; Adedokun, Omolola A; Burgess, Wilella D; Cipriani Davis, Kauline S; Blossom, Thaddaeus D; Schneider, Jessica L; Mennonno, Ann M; Ruhl, Joseph D; Veatch, Jennifer H; Wackerly, Amy J; Shin, Soo Yeon; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2013-01-01

    Workforce development strategies to educate, inform, and diversify the veterinary profession of the future must begin with children in elementary school. This article provides a description of the Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses program, which takes a multifaceted approach toward informing young students, beginning in first grade, about the interesting work and career opportunities available in the field of veterinary medicine. The program, a collaboration among Purdue University and Indiana public schools, is supported by a Science Education Partnership Award from the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, a component of the National Institutes of Health. The overall goal of the program is to provide formal and informal educational opportunities for students, parents, teachers, and the public about the science involved in keeping people and their animals healthy. Examples of health concerns that impact both people and their pets are used to inform and excite children about careers in the health sciences. The program resulted in (1) curricula for students in Grades 1-3, 6, and 9; (2) four children's books and a set of collectible cards which highlight veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and research scientists who work with animals; and (3) four traveling museum-level quality exhibits. Preliminary assessment data has shown that the implementation of the curricula enhanced student science learning and science attitudes and interests. The program provides evidence that partnerships among professionals in veterinary medicine and K-12 education can result in impactful workforce development programs.

  6. NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT): Professional Development for Montana K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathryn; McKenzie, D.; Des Jardins, A.; Key, J.; Kanode, C.; Willoughby, S.

    2012-05-01

    Piloted during the 2011-2012 academic year, the NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT) teacher workshop program has introduced five solar astronomy and space weather activities to over forty Montana K-12 teachers. Because many Montana schools are geographically isolated (40% of Montana students live more than 50 miles from a city) and/or serve traditionally underrepresented groups (primarily Native Americans), professional development for teachers can be costly and time consuming. However, with funding shared by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly EPO team and the Montana Space Grant Consortium, graduate student specialists are able to host the two-hour NEAT workshops on-site at the schools free of charge, and participating teachers earn two continuing education credits. Leveraging the existing catalogue of research-based NASA activities, the featured NEAT activities were chosen for their ease-of-use and applicability to Montana science standards. These include three advanced activities for older students, such as a paper plate activity for the June 5th, 2012 Transit of Venus, Kinesthetic Astronomy, and the Herschel Infrared experiment, along with two simpler activities for the younger students, such as Solar Cookies and the Electromagnetic War card game. Feedback surveys show that NEAT workshop participants were interested and engaged in the activities and planned on using the activities in their classrooms. With such positive responses, the NEAT program has been a huge success and can serve as a model for other institutions looking to increase their space public outreach and education.

  7. The Effect of Participation in Professional Development on Perceived Change in Teaching Practice by Minnesota K-12 Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertich, Sally Krause

    2013-01-01

    This study used a conceptual framework of professional development theory to identify characteristics of effective learning activities specific to 259 Minnesota K-12 public school physical education and developmental adapted physical education (PE/DAPE) teachers during 2012-2013. Study results confirmed that as PE/DAPE teacher participation in…

  8. #TwitterforTeachers: The Implications of Twitter as a Self-Directed Professional Development Tool for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ryan D.; Evering, Lea Calvert; Barrett, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores how K-12 teachers use Twitter. An online survey was disseminated via Twitter to gauge their usage of, access to, and perceptions of Twitter. The results indicated that teachers highly value Twitter as a means of self-directed professional development. Respondents who reported using Twitter multiple times a day…

  9. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  10. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  11. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for the Bering Strait School District, a geographically isolated area with low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poverty. Scientists from around the globe have converged in this region and other areas of the Arctic to observe and measure changes in climate that are significant, accelerating, and unlike any in recorded history. Climate literacy (the ability to understand Earth system science and to make scientifically informed decisions about climate changes) has become essential for this population. Program resources were designed in collaboration with scientists to mimic the processes used to study Arctic climate. Because the Bering Strait School District serves a 98 percent Alaska Native student population, ACMP focused on best practices shown to increase the success of minority students. Significant research indicates that Alaska Native students succeed academically at higher rates when instruction addresses topics of local interest, links education to the students’ physical and cultural environment, uses local knowledge and culture in the curriculum, and incorporates hands-on, inquiry-based lessons in the classroom. A seven-partner consortium of research institutes and Alaska Native corporations created ACMP to help teachers understand their role in nurturing STM talent and motivating students to explore geoscience careers. Research underscores the importance of increasing school emphasis in content areas, such as climate, that facilitate global awareness and civic responsibility, and that foster critical thinking and

  12. Linking the watershed to the schoolshed: teaching sustainable development in K-12 with the Chester RIver Watershed Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembanis, A. C.; Levin, D.; Seidel, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Chester River has been the subject of ongoing scientific studies in response to both the Clean Water Act and the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program initiatives. The Upper, Middle, and Lower Chester are on the Maryland Department of Environment's list of "impaired waters". The Chester River Watershed (CRW) Observatory is lead by the Center for Environment & Society at Washington College. Eight clusters representing 22 public and private K-12 schools in the CRW provide the sampling sites distributed throughout the watershed. Weather stations will be installed at these sites allowing monitoring of the watershed's microclimate. Each cluster will be assigned a Basic Observation Buoy (BOB), an easy to assemble inexpensive buoy platform for real-time water column and atmospheric condition measurements. The BOBs are fitted with a data sonde to collect similar data parameters (e.g. salinity, temperature) as the main stem Chesapeake Bay buoys do. These assets will be deployed and the data transmitted to the Chester River Geographic Information System site for archival and visual display. Curriculum already developed for the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System by the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office will be adapted to the Chester River Watershed. Social issues of water sustainability will be introduced using the Watershed Game (Northland NEMO ®). During 2011 NOAA's Chesapeake Bay Office completed curriculum projects including Chesapeake Exploration, Build-a-Buoy (BaBs) and Basic Observation Buoys (BOBs). These engaging projects utilize authentic data and hands-on activities to demonstrate the tools scientists use to understand system interactions in the Bay. Chesapeake Exploration is a collection of online activities that provides teachers and students with unprecedented access to Bay data. Students are guided through a series of tasks that explore topics related to the interrelation between watersheds, land-use, weather, water quality, and living resources. The BaBs and BOBs

  13. The Development of Stereotype-Free Teaching Materials for the K-12 Levels. A Selected and Annotated List of Bibliographies on Latin American Studies for Teachers K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Richard D.

    This document contains suggestions and materials for developing stereotype-free teaching materials. The paper is divided into five parts: (1) introduction, (2) bibliographies, (3) proverbs, (4) Spanish names, and (5) Spanish loan words. The introduction outlines 17 suggestions for developing units on cultural enrichment. Multiple resources for…

  14. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  15. Energy Project professional development: Promoting positive attitudes about science among K-12 teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D. Robertson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting positive attitudes about science among teachers has important implications for teachers’ classroom practice and for their relationship to science as a discipline. In this paper, we report positive shifts in teachers’ attitudes about science, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science (CLASS survey, over the course of their participation in a professional development course that emphasized the flexible use of energy representations to understand real world scenarios. Our work contributes to the larger effort to make the case that professional development matters for teacher learning and attitudes.

  16. Fostering Collaboration with Families of Children with Disabilities: Online Professional Development for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Margo; Kingsley, Karla V.; Ovitt, Brigid; Lin, Yi-Ling; Romero Benavidez, Juliette

    2017-01-01

    Technology has reshaped conceptions of professional development by increasing access to information, enabling sustained follow-up efforts, and fostering teacher reflection and collaboration. Drawing on theoretical models of parent involvement and an ethic of caring, this study examined the perceptions and attitudes of educators toward…

  17. Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Reform-minded leaders of Qatar, who have embarked on a sweeping reform of their nation's education system, asked RAND to evaluate the education finance system that has been adopted and to offer suggestions for improvements. The authors analyze the system's evolution and resource allocation patterns between 2004 and 2006 and develop analytic tools…

  18. Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses: K-12 Programming for Veterinary Workforce Development

    OpenAIRE

    San Miguel, Sandra F.; Parker, Loran Carleton; Adedokun, Omolola A.; Burgess, Wilella D.; Cipriani Davis, Kauline S.; Blossom, Thaddaeus D.; Schneider, Jessica L.; Mennonno, Ann M.; Ruhl, Joseph D.; Veatch, Jennifer H.; Wackerly, Amy J.; Shin, Soo Yeon; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Workforce development strategies to educate, inform, and diversify the veterinary profession of the future must begin with children in elementary school. This manuscript provides a description of the Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses program, which takes a multifaceted approach toward informing young students, beginning in first grade, about the interesting work and career opportunities available in the field of veterinary medicine. The program, a collaboration among Purdue University and Indiana ...

  19. Developing successful extra curricular programs for the K-12 grades: Interfacing scientists with schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Meera

    2000-09-01

    Early familiarity is regarded as one of the keys to attracting female students to traditionally male professions. I will describe four different extra curricular programs that my collaborators in the local school district and I have developed for students in grades 5-12. These programs are part of a project entitled "Promoting Young Women in the Physical sciences", which also includes teacher training and programs in which parents participate with the child. Through these sustained and broad-based interventions, we provide early experiences that we expect will prove positive to students. I will also address the successes and difficulties in starting and sustaining these programs.

  20. Development and Engineering Design in Support of "Rover Ranch": A K-12 Outreach Software Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascali, Raresh

    2003-01-01

    A continuation of the initial development started in the summer of 1999, the body of work performed in support of 'ROVer Ranch' Project during the present fellowship dealt with the concrete concept implementation and resolution of the related issues. The original work performed last summer focused on the initial examination and articulation of the concept treatment strategy, audience and market analysis for the learning technologies software. The presented work focused on finalizing the set of parts to be made available for building an AERCam Sprint type robot and on defining, testing and implementing process necessary to convert the design engineering files to VRML files. Through reverse engineering, an initial set of mission critical systems was designed for beta testing in schools. The files were created in ProEngineer, exported to VRML 1.0 and converted to VRML 97 (VRML 2.0) for final integration in the software. Attributes for each part were assigned using an in-house developed JAVA based program. The final set of attributes for each system, their mutual interaction and the identification of the relevant ones to be tracked, still remain to be decided.

  1. First Steps Toward K-12 Teacher Professional Development Using Internet-based Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, K. J.; Gershun, D.; Slater, T. F.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    How can science teachers become more familiar with emerging technology, excite their students and give students a taste of astronomy research? Astronomy teachers do not always have research experience, so it is difficult for them to convey to students how researchers use telescopes. The nature of astronomical observation (e.g., remote sites, expensive equipment, and odd hours) has been a barrier to providing teachers with insight into the process. Robotic telescopes (operated automatically with queued observing schedules) and remotely controlled telescopes (controlled by the user via the Internet) allow scientists to conduct observing sessions on research-grade telescopes half a world away. The same technology can now be harnessed by STEM educators to engage students and reinforce what is being taught in the classroom, as seen in some early research in elementary schools (McKinnon and Mainwaring 2000 and McKinnon and Geissinger 2002), and middle/high schools (Sadler et al. 2001, 2007 and Gehret et al. 2005). However, teachers need to be trained to use these resources. Responding to this need, graduate students and faculty at the University of Wyoming and CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are developing teacher professional development programs using Internet-based telescopes. We conducted an online course in the science education graduate program at the University of Wyoming. This course was designed to sample different types of Internet-based telescopes to evaluate them as resources for teacher professional development. The 10 participants were surveyed at the end of the course to assess their experiences with each activity. In addition, pre-test/post-test data were collected focusing specifically on one of the telescopes (Gershun, Berryhill and Slater 2012). Throughout the course, the participants learned to use a variety of robotic and remote telescopes including SLOOH Space Camera (www.slooh.com), Sky Titan Observatory (www

  2. K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    products laboratories publications nisee b.i.p. members education FAQs links education Education Program Internships K-12 Education Contact the PEER Education Program PEER's Educational Affiliates Student Design Competition Student Leadership Council Classes and Other Educational Activities Site Map Search K-12 Education

  3. Extending the Pathway: Building on a National Science Foundation Workforce Development Project for Underserved k-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Smith, T.

    2014-12-01

    With new career openings in the geosciences expected and a large number of presently employed geoscientists retiring in the next decade there is a critical need for a new cadre of geoscientists to fill these positions. A project funded by the National Science Foundation titled K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators and Higher Education Faculty: Partners Helping Rural Disadvantaged Students Stay on the Pathway to a Geoscience Career involving Wright State University and the Ripley, Lewis, Union, Huntington k-12 school district in Appalachian Ohio took led to dozens of seventh and eighth grade students traveling to Sandy Hook, New Jersey for a one week field experience to study oceanography with staff of the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium. Teachers, parent chaperones, administrators and university faculty accompanied the students in the field. Teachers worked alongside their students in targeted professional development during the weeklong field experience. During the two academic years of the project, both middle school and high school teachers received professional development in Earth system science so that all students, not just those that were on the summer field experience could receive enhanced science learning. All ninth grade high school students were given the opportunity to take a high school/college dual credit Earth system science course. Community outreach provided widespread knowledge of the project and interest among parents to have their children participate. In addition, ninth grade students raised money themselves to fund a trip to the International Field Studies Forfar Field Station on Andros Island, Bahamas to study a tropical aquatic system. Students who before this project had never traveled outside of Ohio are currently discussing ways that they can continue on the pathway to a geoscience career by applying for internships for the summer between their junior and senior years. These are positive steps towards taking charge of their

  4. Defining the requisite knowledge for providers of in-service professional development for K--12 teachers of science: Refining the construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Deborah L.

    Purpose. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to refine, using a Delphi study process, the four categories of the theoretical model of the comprehensive knowledge base required by providers of professional development for K-12 teachers of science generated from a review of the literature. Methodology. This grounded theory study used data collected through a modified Delphi technique and interviews to refine and validate the literature-based knowledge base required by providers of professional development for K-12 teachers of science. Twenty-three participants, experts in the fields of science education, how people learn, instructional and assessment strategies, and learning contexts, responded to the study's questions. Findings. By "densifying" the four categories of the knowledge base, this study determined the causal conditions (the science subject matter knowledge), the intervening conditions (how people learn), the strategies (the effective instructional and assessment strategies), and the context (the context and culture of formal learning environments) surrounding the science professional development process. Eight sections were added to the literature-based knowledge base; the final model comprised of forty-nine sections. The average length of the operational definitions increased nearly threefold and the number of citations per operational definition increased more than twofold. Conclusions. A four-category comprehensive model that can serve as the foundation for the knowledge base required by science professional developers now exists. Subject matter knowledge includes science concepts, inquiry, the nature of science, and scientific habits of mind; how people learn includes the principles of learning, active learning, andragogy, variations in learners, neuroscience and cognitive science, and change theory; effective instructional and assessment strategies include constructivist learning and inquiry-based teaching, differentiation of instruction

  5. An Ecological Approach to a University Course that Develops Partnerships Impacting Health and Wellness in K-12 Schools and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Sharon L.; Gilchrist, Leigh Z.; Nixon, Carol T.; Holland, Barbara A.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been an increased focus on health promotion as opposed to individual health determinants and disease prevention. Given the association between health and academic success, health promotion is a vastly overlooked lever for establishing effective K-12 schools. Student, organizational, and community well-being…

  6. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS MATERIALS ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. FORTY UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED FOR DOCUMENTS DATING FROM 1960 TO 1966. BOOKS, JOURNALS, REPORT MATERIALS, AND SOME UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPTS ARE LISTED IN SUCH AREAS AS COGNITIVE STUDIES, VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, SCIENCE STUDIES, AND…

  8. Curriculum Development Through Delphi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gary; Jauch, Lawrence R.

    1978-01-01

    The basic Delphi methodology is outlined along with possible goals and objectives in a Delphi study. The results of an actual case study in the use of the Delphi method for higher education curriculum development are reported, and attention is given to the problem of selecting participants for a Delphi exercise. (Author/LBH)

  9. "It's Worth Our Time": A Model of Culturally and Linguistically Supportive Professional Development for K-12 STEM Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudley, Anne H. Charity; Mallinson, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural…

  10. AMS Professional Development Courses: Arming K-12 Teachers with the Tools Needed to Increase Students' Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Moran, J. M.; Nugnes, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    To better prepare tomorrow's leaders, it is of utmost importance that today's teachers are science literate. To meet that need, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program offers content-rich, professional development courses and training workshops for precollege teachers in the geosciences. During the fall and spring semesters, the AMS in partnership with NOAA, NASA, and SUNY Brockport, offers a suite of pre-college teacher development courses, DataStreme Atmosphere, DataStreme Ocean and DataStreme Earth's Climate System (ECS). These courses are delivered to small groups of K-12 teachers through Local Implementation Teams (LITs) positioned throughout the U.S. The courses use current, real-world environmental data to investigate the atmosphere, ocean, and climate system and consist of weekly online study materials, weekly mentoring, and several face-to-face meetings, all supplemented by a provided textbook and investigations manual. DataStreme ECS takes an innovative approach to studying climate science, by exploring the fundamental science of Earth's climate system and addressing the societal impacts relevant to today's students and teachers. The course investigates natural and human forcings and feedbacks to examine mitigation and adaptation strategies for the future. Information and data from respected organizations, such as the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA are used throughout the course, including in the online and printed investigations. In addition, participants differentiate between climate, climate variability, and climate change through the AMS Conceptual Energy Model, a basic climate model that follows the flow of energy from space to Earth and back. Participants also have access to NASA's EdGCM, a research-grade Global Climate Model where they can explore various future climate scenarios in the same way that actual research scientists do. Throughout all of the courses, teachers have the opportunity to expand

  11. An Investigation of University Student and K-12 Teacher Reasoning about Key Ideas in the Development of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy D.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation describes a systematic investigation of university student and K-12 teacher reasoning about key ideas relevant to the development of a particulate model for matter. Written assessments and individual demonstration interviews have been used to study the reasoning of introductory and sophomore-level physics students, introductory…

  12. An Investigation of the Factors That Motivate K-12 Christian School Teachers to Participate in Professional Development and the Relationship to Job Satisfaction and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bonita Wingfield

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to advance knowledge by examining the reasons that motivate teachers to participate in professional development and the relationship to teacher job satisfaction and retention in Christian-based K-12 Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) member schools. The study contributes to the literature in the field…

  13. Scientists Involved in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The publication of countless reports documenting the dismal state of science education in the 1980s, and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) report (1996) called for a wider involvement of the scientific community in K-12 education and outreach. Improving science education will not happen without the collaboration of educators and scientists working in a coordinated manner and it requires a long-term, continuous effort. To contribute effectively to K-12 education all scientists should refer to the National Science Education Standards, a set of policies that guide the development of curriculum and assessment. Ocean scientists can also specifically refer to the COSEE recommendations (www.cosee.org) that led to the creation of seven regional Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence. Scientists can get involved in K-12 education in a multitude of ways. They should select projects that will accommodate time away from their research and teaching obligations, their talent, and their interest but also contribute to the education reform. A few examples of effective involvement are: 1) collaborating with colleagues in a school of education that can lead to better education of all students and future teachers, 2) acting as a resource for a national program or a local science fair, 3) serving on the advisory board of a program that develops educational material, 4) speaking out at professional meetings about the value of scientists' involvement in education, 5) speaking enthusiastically about the teaching profession. Improving science education in addition to research can seem a large, overwhelming task for scientists. As a result, focusing on projects that will fit the scientist's needs as well as benefit the science reform is of prime importance. It takes an enormous amount of work and financial and personnel resources to start a new program with measurable impact on students. So, finding the right opportunity is a priority, and stepping

  14. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  15. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  16. GIS in the K-12 Classroom: Research Agenda from EDGIS '96

    OpenAIRE

    National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE); Technical Education Research Centers (TERC)

    1996-01-01

    This meeting of education researchers and teachers immediately followed the November 1996 Annual Meeting of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) in Santa Barbara, California. Participants explored the issues facing the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the K-12 classroom and developed a research agenda related to Pedagogy Issues, Curriculum Issues, Software Issues, and Cognitive Issues.

  17. The Impact of a Well-Developed Social Media Communication Strategy on K12 Schools in a Social Media Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, Curtis W.

    2015-01-01

    The digital revolution has created a new ways for society to interact. As technology continues to evolve so does the way culture begins to use it as a channel for communication. Social media has developed as a two way communication tool used by both corporate America as well as individuals. This research begins to look at how Missouri school…

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: The development of a curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach to environmental education and curriculum innovation. ... transition from an external and rational strategy of curriculum ... 'scientific' approaches to curriculum development .... 'get the conservation message across' so as to foster.

  19. Soil Science Society of America - K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Loynachan, Tom; Mblia, Monday; Robinson, Clay; Chapman, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America created its K12 Committee in 2006 in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers. The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has cooperated and contributed to the American Geologic Institutes' Earth Science Week materials with brochures and lesson plans and with National Association of Conservation Districts by providing peer-review and distribution of materials. The most recent developments from the committee include a web redesign that is more student and teacher friendly, the development of a peer-review system to publish K12 Lesson Plans, and finally the publication of a new soils

  20. Process Evaluation for Improving K12 Program Effectiveness: Case Study of a National Institutes of Health Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Research Career Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Nancy C; Wyman, Jean F; Dighe, Satlaj; Harwood, Eileen M; Hang, Mikow

    2018-06-01

    Process evaluation is an important tool in quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how a systematic and continuous evaluation process can be used to improve the quality of faculty career development programs by using the University of Minnesota's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) K12 program as an exemplar. Data from a rigorous process evaluation incorporating quantitative and qualitative measurements were analyzed and reviewed by the BIRCWH program leadership on a regular basis. Examples are provided of how this evaluation model and processes were used to improve many aspects of the program, thereby improving scholar, mentor, and advisory committee members' satisfaction and scholar outcomes. A rigorous evaluation plan can increase the effectiveness and impact of a research career development plan.

  1. Dental Curriculum Development in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantumvanit, Prathip

    1996-01-01

    Since establishment of formal dental education in Southeast Asia, changes stemming from research and technology have led to dental curriculum changes. Development of the dental curriculum can be divided into three phases: disease oriented; health oriented; and community oriented. Evolution of these phases is traced in the dental curricula of Laos,…

  2. Digital Media for STEM Learning: Developing scientific practice skills in the K-12 STEM classroom with resources from WGBH and PBS LearningMedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Connolly, R.

    2017-12-01

    WGBH's "Bringing the Universe to America's Classrooms" project is a 5-year effort to design, produce and evaluate digital media tools and resources that support scientific practice skills in diverse K-12 learners. Resources leverage data and content from NASA and WGBH signature programs, like NOVA, into sound instructional experiences that provide K-12 STEM teachers with free, quality resources for teaching topics in the Earth and Space Sciences. Resources address the content and practices in the new K-12 Framework for Science Education and are aligned with the NGSS. Participants will learn about design strategies, findings from our evaluation efforts, and how to access free resources on PBS LearningMedia.

  3. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  4. Interstellar Molecules in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Levin, S. M.; MacLaren, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) collaborate in a K-12 educational project in which students conduct observations for several research programs led by radio astronomers. The Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) program provides participating teachers with curriculum elements, based on the students' observing experiences, which support national and state academic standards. The current program is based on 2.2-GHz and 8.4-GHz radiometric observations of variable sources. The research programs monitor Jupiter, Uranus, and a selected set of quasars. The telescope is a decommissioned NASA Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California. In the next three years, a second telescope will be added. This telescope will at least operate at the above frequencies as well as 6 GHz and 12 GHz. Possibly, it will operate in a continuous band from 1.2 GHz to 14 GHz. In either case, the telescope will be able to observe at least the 6.6-GHz and 12.2-GHz methanol maser lines. The success of the GAVRT program depends critically on the participation of scientists committed to the research who have the ability and enthusiasm for interacting with K-12 students, typically through teleconferences. The scientists will initially work with the LCER staff to create curriculum elements around their observing program.

  5. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  6. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  7. ICT tools for curriculum development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, N.M.; van den Akker, J.J.H.; Kuiper, W.J.A.M.; Hameyer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Along with others in this book, this chapter examines a recent trend in curriculum development, namely, employing the computer to support this complex process. Not to be confused with the vast majority of ICT tools for education, which support the teachers and learners more directly, this discussion

  8. Guidelines for Developing Competency-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    1979-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the development of competency-based curriculum formulated as a result of an automotive mechanics curriculum workshop. Listed are specific guidelines for content development, writing style, and illustration. (LRA)

  9. Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Studies? Problematising Theoretical Ambiguities in Doctoral Theses in the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Petro; Simmonds, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so…

  10. Development of an Escherichia coli K12-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and DNA isolation suited to biofilms associated with iron drinking water pipe corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli is one of the most commonly used fecal indicator organisms for drinking water and groundwater systems. In order to understand various biogeochemical and biophysical factors affecting its interactions with biofilms, E. coli K12 was chosen as a model organism. A Ta...

  11. Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change process at ... was started in 1924 and has been running a traditional curriculum for 79 years. ... Methods: The stages taken during the process were described and analysed.

  12. The Metamorphosis by K. (12)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin we reported on the first run of the new NA62 experiment. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to take a look at the production of the experiment's new kaon beam.   The start of the K12 beam line as seen during the installation of the shielding. 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, 10-6 mbar… send in the protons! Since Thursday 1 November, the P42 beam line of the SPS has once again been sending protons to the beryllium target to produce the K12 kaon beam line eagerly awaited by the NA62 collaboration. This was no trivial matter! The first step was to clear the decks by dismantling the entire H10 beam line and NA60 experiment, as well as most of the NA48 experiment - representing some 1000 tonnes of equipment in total! Next came the complete renovation of the infrastructure, which dated back to 1979. The operation called on the expertise of virtually all branches of the EN and GS departments, as well as the Radiation Protection group: from ...

  13. An International Marketing Curriculum - Development and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboushi, Suhail; Lackman, Conway; Peace, A. Graham

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process of market-driven curriculum design in the development of an undergraduate International Marketing (IM) major at Duquesne University (Pennsylvania) School of Business Administration. Reports on a market study revealing profiles and IM curriculum design preferences of exporting companies. Discusses the curriculum development,…

  14. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  15. K-12 Local Network (LAN) Design Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horton, Cody

    1998-01-01

    ...) educators preparing to design and implement LANs in K-12 schools and libraries. Data was collected during the implementation of LANs in K-12 schools of the Monterey Peninsula Uniform School District (MPUSD...

  16. Laboratory Safety Guide for Arkansas K-12 Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents laboratory safety rules for Arkansas K-12 schools which were developed by the Arkansas Science Teachers Association (ASTA) and the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE). Contents include: (1) "Laboratory Safety Guide for Arkansas K-12 Schools"; (2) "Safety Considerations"; (3) "Safety Standards for Science Laboratories";…

  17. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. SUPPLEMENT I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY (SUPPLEMENT I) LISTS MATERIALS ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. EIGHTY-TWO UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED FOR DOCUMENTS DATING FROM 1961 TO 1966. BOOKS, JOURNALS, REPORT MATERIALS, AND SOME UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPTS ARE LISTED IN SUCH AREAS AS EDUCATIONAL GAMES, CURRICULUM CHANGE, CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT, PROGRAM…

  18. Meta-Theory and Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    Curriculum development in any area should be imbued with a meaning that focuses on the cultural values of motivation, logic, and human relationships. The term "meaning" implies seeing relationships (linguistic, economic, political, moral), understanding logic, and being sensitive to the enduring values of the culture. Curriculum developers and…

  19. Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Douglas J., Ed.; Griffith, Bryant, Ed.; Bérci, Margaret E., Ed.; Ortlieb, Evan, Ed.; Sullivan, Pamela, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    While incorporating digital technologies into the classroom has offered new ways of teaching and learning into educational processes, it is essential to take a look at how the digital shift impacts teachers, school administration, and curriculum development. "Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development" presents…

  20. Crowdsourced Curriculum Development for Online Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Eric; Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Trueger, N Seth; Stuntz, Bob; Cooney, Robert; Ahn, James

    2017-12-08

    In recent years online educational content, efforts at quality appraisal, and integration of online material into institutional teaching initiatives have increased. However, medical education has yet to develop large-scale online learning centers. Crowd-sourced curriculum development may expedite the realization of this potential while providing opportunities for innovation and scholarship. This article describes the current landscape, best practices, and future directions for crowdsourced curriculum development using Kern's framework for curriculum development and the example topic of core content in emergency medicine. A scoping review of online educational content was performed by a panel of subject area experts for each step in Kern's framework. Best practices and recommendations for future development for each step were established by the same panel using a modified nominal group consensus process. The most prevalent curriculum design steps were (1) educational content and (2) needs assessments. Identified areas of potential innovation within these steps included targeting gaps in specific content areas and developing underrepresented instructional methods. Steps in curriculum development without significant representation included (1) articulation of goals and objectives and (2) tools for curricular evaluation. By leveraging the power of the community, crowd-sourced curriculum development offers a mechanism to diffuse the burden associated with creating comprehensive online learning centers. There is fertile ground for innovation and scholarship in each step along the continuum of curriculum development. Realization of this paradigm's full potential will require individual developers to strongly consider how their contributions will align with the work of others.

  1. Opinions on Computing Education in Korean K-12 System: Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Kyoo; Jeong, Dongwon; Lu, Lunjin; Debnath, Debatosh; Ming, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The need for computing education in the K-12 curriculum has grown globally. The Republic of Korea is not an exception. In response to the need, the Korean Ministry of Education has announced an outline for software-centric computing education in the K-12 system, which aims at enhancing the current computing education with software emphasis. In…

  2. Shifts in funding for science curriculum design and their (unintended) consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Schunn, Christian; Bernstein, Debra; McKenney, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Federal agencies in the Unites States invest heavily in the development of science curriculum materials, which can significantly facilitate science education reform. The current study describes the characteristics of K-12 science curriculum materials produced by federally funded projects between

  3. Collaborative curriculum development in teacher design teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handelzalts, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Teachers’ participation in collaborative curriculum development is considered as having great potential for creating materials which are suitable for their specific context and for their professional development. However, the process in which teacher teams commonly negotiate the process of

  4. NASA-OAI HPCCP K-12 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-OAI High Performance Communication and Computing K- 12 School Partnership program has been completed. Cleveland School of the Arts, Empire Computech Center, Grafton Local Schools and the Bug O Nay Ge Shig School have all received network equipment and connections. Each school is working toward integrating computer and communications technology into their classroom curriculum. Cleveland School of the Arts students are creating computer software. Empire Computech Center is a magnet school for technology education at the elementary school level. Grafton Local schools is located in a rural community and is using communications technology to bring to their students some of the same benefits students from suburban and urban areas receive. The Bug O Nay Ge Shig School is located on an Indian Reservation in Cass Lake, MN. The students at this school are using the computer to help them with geological studies. A grant has been issued to the friends of the Nashville Library. Nashville is a small township in Holmes County, Ohio. A community organization has been formed to turn their library into a state of the art Media Center. Their goal is to have a place where rural students can learn about different career options and how to go about pursuing those careers. Taylor High School in Cincinnati, Ohio was added to the schools involved in the Wind Tunnel Project. A mini grant has been awarded to Taylor High School for computer equipment. The computer equipment is utilized in the school's geometry class to computationally design objects which will be tested for their aerodynamic properties in the Barberton Wind Tunnel. The students who create the models can view the test in the wind tunnel via desk top conferencing. Two teachers received stipends for helping with the Regional Summer Computer Workshop. Both teachers were brought in to teach a session within the workshop. They were selected to teach the session based on their expertise in particular software applications.

  5. Engineering Education in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Engineers rely on physicists as well as other scientists and mathematicians to explain the world in which we live. Engineers take this knowledge of the world and use it to create the world that never was. The teaching of physics and other sciences as well as mathematics is critical to maintaining our national workforce. Science and mathematics education are inherently different, however, from engineering education. Engineering educators seek to enable students to develop the habits of mind critical for innovation. Through understanding of the engineering design process and how it differs from the scientific method, students can apply problem and project based learning to solve the challenges facing society today. In this talk, I will discuss the elements critical to a solid K-12 engineering education that integrates science and mathematics to solve challenges throughout the world.

  6. Influencing Curriculum Development and Knowledge of Climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agricultural Extension ... Besides, the pedagogies and curricula are centrally defined by university governance structures which ... The study aimed at influencing curriculum development and knowledge of climate change issues at ...

  7. NSF GK-12 Fellows as Mentors for K-12 Teachers Participating in Field Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Perry, E.

    2005-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) recognizes the value of providing educational opportunities to K-12 teachers who play a critical role in shaping the minds of young people who are the future of our science. To that end, UTIG established the "Texas Teachers in the Field" program in 2000 to formalize the participation of K-12 teachers in field programs that included UTIG scientists. In 2002, "Texas Teachers in the Field" evolved through UTIG's involvement in a University of Texas at Austin GK-12 project led by the Environmental Sciences Institute, which enabled UTIG to partner a subset of GK-12 Fellows with teachers participating in geophysical field programs. During the three years of the GK-12 project, UTIG successfully partnered four GK-12 Fellows with five K-12 teachers. The Fellows served as mentors to the teachers, as liaisons between UTIG scientists leading field programs and teachers and their students, and as resources in science, mathematics, and technology instruction. Specifically, Fellows prepared teachers and their students for the field investigations, supervised the design of individual Teacher Research Experience (TRE) projects, and helped teachers to develop standards-aligned curriculum resources related to the field program for use in their own classrooms, as well as broader distribution. Although all but one TRE occurred during the school year, Texas school districts and principals were willing to release teachers to participate because the experience and destinations were so extraordinary (i.e., a land-based program in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina; and research cruises to the Southeast Caribbean Sea and Hess Deep in the Pacific Ocean) and carried opportunities to work with scientists from around the world. This exceptional collaboration of GK-12 Fellows, K-12 teachers and research scientists enriches K-12 student learning and promotes greater enthusiasm for science. The level of mentoring, preparation and follow-up provided

  8. A Substantiation of Macdonald's Models in Science Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A history and analysis of science curriculum development is presented. Factors which influence the selection and organization of content in a science curriculum are discussed, including Macdonald's curriculum development models, propositions for curriculum development, and changes made in science curricula during the last century. (CJ)

  9. Frameworks Shaping an Online Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers of ELLs: Toward Supporting the Sharing of Ideas for Empowering Classroom Teachers Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sedef Uzuner

    2014-01-01

    In efforts to maintain America's global competitiveness in the knowledge-based economy, teacher professional development has moved to center stage. With increasing numbers of English language learners (ELLs) in U.S. schools, several states have adopted mandatory professional development for classroom teachers to equip them with the knowledge…

  10. Horticulture Therapy Curriculum Development. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sally; And Others

    This final report includes two major components: a narrative describing a project at Edmonds Community College, Washington, to develop a horticultural therapy curriculum and descriptions of six courses developed or revised during the project. The narrative reports the development of a supplementary interdisciplinary certification program to train…

  11. Energy Efficiency Programs in K-12 Schools: A Guide to Developing and Implementing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programs. Local Government Climate and Energy Strategy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Saving energy through energy efficiency improvements can cost less than generating, transmitting, and distributing energy from power plants, and provides multiple economic and environmental benefits. Local governments can promote energy efficiency in their jurisdictions by developing and implementing strategies that improve the efficiency of…

  12. Curriculum Development for Enhancing Grade Nine Students' Systems Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernthaisong, Preeyanan; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study the development of a curriculum for enhancing grade 9 students' cognitive skills using a curriculum based on Systems Thinking Process. There were 3 phases: 1) studying of the problem; 2) development of tentative curriculum; and 3) implementation of the curriculum in a pilot study. The samples were 32…

  13. Development of a new fluorescent reporter:operator system: location of AraC regulated genes in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, Laura E; Bryant, Jack A; Sánchez-Romero, María-Antonia; Sánchez-Morán, Eugenio; Busby, Stephen J W; Lee, David J

    2017-08-03

    In bacteria, many transcription activator and repressor proteins regulate multiple transcription units that are often distally distributed on the bacterial genome. To investigate the subcellular location of DNA bound proteins in the folded bacterial nucleoid, fluorescent reporters have been developed which can be targeted to specific DNA operator sites. Such Fluorescent Reporter-Operator System (FROS) probes consist of a fluorescent protein fused to a DNA binding protein, which binds to an array of DNA operator sites located within the genome. Here we have developed a new FROS probe using the Escherichia coli MalI transcription factor, fused to mCherry fluorescent protein. We have used this in combination with a LacI repressor::GFP protein based FROS probe to assess the cellular location of commonly regulated transcription units that are distal on the Escherichia coli genome. We developed a new DNA binding fluorescent reporter, consisting of the Escherichia coli MalI protein fused to the mCherry fluorescent protein. This was used in combination with a Lac repressor:green fluorescent protein fusion to examine the spatial positioning and possible co-localisation of target genes, regulated by the Escherichia coli AraC protein. We report that induction of gene expression with arabinose does not result in co-localisation of AraC-regulated transcription units. However, measurable repositioning was observed when gene expression was induced at the AraC-regulated promoter controlling expression of the araFGH genes, located close to the DNA replication terminus on the chromosome. Moreover, in dividing cells, arabinose-induced expression at the araFGH locus enhanced chromosome segregation after replication. Regions of the chromosome regulated by AraC do not colocalise, but transcription events can induce movement of chromosome loci in bacteria and our observations suggest a role for gene expression in chromosome segregation.

  14. Earth Exploration Toolbook Workshops: Web-Conferencing and Teleconferencing Professional Development Bringing Earth Science Data Analysis and Visualization Tools to K-12 Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, C.; Ledley, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) Workshops Project provides a mechanism for teachers and students to have successful data-using educational experiences. In this professional development project, teachers learn to use National Science Digital Library (NSDL), the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE), and an Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) chapter. In an EET Data Analysis Workshop, participants walk through an Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) chapter, learning basic data analysis techniques and discussing ways to use Earth science datasets and analysis tools with their students. We have offered twenty-eight Data Analysis Workshops since the project began. The total number of participants in the twenty-eight workshops to date is three hundred eleven, which reflects one hundred eighty different teachers participating in one or more workshops. Our workshops reach middle and high school teachers across the United States at schools with lower socioeconomic levels and at schools with large numbers of minority students. Our participants come from thirty-eight different states including Alaska, Maine, Florida, Montana, and many others. Eighty-six percent of our participants are classroom teachers. The remaining fourteen percent are staff development specialists, university faculty, or outreach educators working with teachers. Of the classroom teachers, one third are middle school teachers (grades 6 to 8) and two thirds are high school teachers (grades 9 to 12.) Thirty-four percent of our participants come from schools where minority populations are the majority make up of the school. Twenty-five percent of our participants are at schools where the majority of the students receive free or reduced cost lunches. Our professional development workshops are helping to raise teachers' awareness of both the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) and the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). Prior to taking one of our workshops, forty-two percent of

  15. Information technology tools for curriculum development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, N.M.; Strijker, A.; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    The widespread introduction and use of computers in the workplace began in the early 1990s. Since then, computer-based tools have been developed to support a myriad of task types, including the complex process of curriculum development. This chapter begins by briefly introducing two concepts that

  16. Curriculum Development through YTS Modular Credit Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document reports the evaluation of the collaborately developed Modular Training Framework (MainFrame), a British curriculum development project, built around a commitment to a competency-based, modular credit accumulation program. The collaborators were three local education authorities (LEAs), those of Bedfordshire, Haringey, and Sheffield,…

  17. Social Science Disciplines. Fundamental for Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Johathan C., Ed.

    This guide is written for the social studies curriculum developer interested in developing a structured multidisciplinary program based on the concepts, methodology, and structure of social science disciplines and history. Seven 15-29 page chapters are included on each discipline: Anthropology and Psychology, by Charles R. Berryman; Economics, by…

  18. Designing and Using Virtual Field Environments to Enhance and Extend Field Experience in Professional Development Programs in Geology for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granshaw, Frank Douglas

    2011-12-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is increasingly used to acquaint geoscience novices with some of the observation, data gathering, and problem solving done in actual field situations by geoscientists. VR environments in a variety of forms are used to prepare students for doing geologic fieldwork, as well as to provide proxies for such experience when venturing into the field is not possible. However, despite increased use of VR for these purposes, there is little research on how students learn using these environments, how using them impacts student field experience, or what constitutes effective design in light of emerging theories of geocognition. To address these questions, I investigated the design and use of a virtual reality environment in a professional development program for middle school Earth science teachers called Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE). This environment, called a virtual field environment, or VFE, was based largely on the field sites visited by the participants during summer workshops. It was designed as a tool to prepare the participants for workshop field activities and as a vehicle for taking elements of that experience back to their students. I assessed how effectively the VFE accomplished these goals using a quasi-experimental, mixed method study that involved a series of teaching experiments, interviews, participant surveys, and focus groups. The principle conclusions reached in this study are as follows: 1. In a field trip orientation experiment involving 35 middle school teachers, 90.6% of the participants stated a preference for VFE enhanced orientation over an alternative orientation that used photographs and static maps to complete a practice field activity. When asked about how the VFE prepared them for their field experience, the participants ranked it as most helpful for visualize the location and geography of the field sites. They ranked it lower for helping them visualize structural and geomorphic patterns, and ranked it as least

  19. Enriching K-12 Science and Mathematics Education Using LEGOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keeshan; Igel, Irina; Poveda, Ronald; Kapila, Vikram; Iskander, Magued

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a series of illustrative LEGO Mindstorms-based science and math activities, developed under an NSF GK-12 Fellows project, for elementary, middle, and high school grades. The activities, developed by engineering and science graduate Fellows in partnership with K-12 teachers, are grade appropriate, address pertinent learning…

  20. Energy Retrofit for Aging K-12 Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    3D/International, Houston, TX.

    Successfully retrofitting aging K-12 schools using energy conservation measures (ECM) that can improve the physical plant and reduce energy consumption are explored. Topics explore how certain ECM measures can benefit educational facilities, why retrofitting begun sooner rather than later is important, how to finance the retrofit program, and the…

  1. Approaching K-12 Online Education in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how K-12 schools are addressing the need to accommodate online learners in Pennsylvania. It is built upon a review of literature focusing on educational legislation, the personalization of online learning and online learning solutions. The study posed 21 questions utilizing a mixed methods approach to…

  2. K-12 Mathematics and the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Evan

    2005-01-01

    The Web offers numerous learning resources and opportunities for K-12 mathematics education. This paper discusses those resources and opportunities. Discussion includes (a) asynchronous and synchronous communication tools, (b) the use of data sets to make connections between mathematics concepts and real-world applications, and (c) interactive…

  3. Developing Research Skills across the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Simon; Coates, Lee; Fraser, Ann; Pierce, Pam

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes consortial efforts within the Great Lakes Colleges Association to share expertise and programming to build research skills throughout the undergraduate curriculum. Strategies to scaffold research skill development are provided from Allegheny College, Kalamazoo College, and The College of Wooster.

  4. Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Heejung, Ed.; Alon, Sandra, Ed.; Fuentes, David, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of new and emerging technologies in the education sector has been a topic of interest to researchers, educators, and software developers alike in recent years. Utilizing the proper tools in a classroom setting is a critical factor in student success. "Tablets in K-12 Education: Integrated Experiences and Implications"…

  5. Inspiring the Next Generation: Astronomy Catalyzes K12 STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Thaller, Michelle; Winglee, Robert; Borders, Kyla

    2017-06-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. NASA's Mission Science provides innovative and accessible opportunities for K-12 teachers. Science questions involve scale and distance, including Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers can gain an understanding of basic telescopes, the history of telescopes, ground and satellite based telescopes, and models of JWST Telescope. An in-depth explanation of JWST and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. During teacher training, we taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars.We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development.Funding was provided by Washington STEM, NASA, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  6. An overview of curriculum development in the different periods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005. ... The objective of this article is to overview the practices of elementary and secondary schools curriculum development in the different periods. ... Public and professional engagement in curriculum development is little or non-existent.

  7. Sequence Matching Analysis for Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Yenny Bendatu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations apply information technologies to support their business processes. Using the information technologies, the actual events are recorded and utilized to conform with predefined model. Conformance checking is an approach to measure the fitness and appropriateness between process model and actual events. However, when there are multiple events with the same timestamp, the traditional approach unfit to result such measures. This study attempts to develop a sequence matching analysis. Considering conformance checking as the basis of this approach, this proposed approach utilizes the current control flow technique in process mining domain. A case study in the field of educational process has been conducted. This study also proposes a curriculum analysis framework to test the proposed approach. By considering the learning sequence of students, it results some measurements for curriculum development. Finally, the result of the proposed approach has been verified by relevant instructors for further development.

  8. CURRICULUM POLICY MAKERS PERCEPTIONS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS BASED ON SOLO TAXONOMY IN SECONDARY LEVEL SCHOOLS IN SRI LANKA

    OpenAIRE

    P. H. Kusumawathie; Norhisham Mohamad; Ferdous Azam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the conceptual awareness of curriculum policy makers on curriculum development process based on SOLO Taxonomy curriculum approach in secondary level schools. Further, the study explored the relationship between the curriculum development inputs and the SOLO based curriculum development process. The curriculum development inputs are teacher effectiveness, school community, school environment and technology availability. Method: Data was collecte...

  9. Developing a Telecommunications Curriculum for Students with Physical Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandell, Terry S.; Laufer, Dorothy

    1993-01-01

    A telecommunications curriculum was developed for students (ages 15-21) with physical disabilities. Curriculum content included an internal mailbox program (Mailbox), interactive communication system (Blisscom), bulletin board system (Arctel), and a mainframe system (Compuserv). (JDD)

  10. Development of mathematics curriculum for Medialogy studentsat Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga

    Abstract This paper addresses mathematics curriculum development for Medialogy education. Medialogy as a study line was established in 2002 at Faculty for Engineering and Natural Sciences at Aalborg University, and mathematics curriculum has already been revised tree times. Some of the reasoning...... behind curriculum development, lessons learned and remaining issues are presented and discussed....

  11. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital forensics curriculum design and existing education programs.  Both digital forensics educators and practitioners were surveyed and the results are analyzed to determine what industry and law enforcement need. Based on the survey results and what the industry certificate programs cover, we identified topics that are desired to be covered in digital forensics courses. Finally, we propose six digital forensics courses and their topics that can be offered in both undergraduate and graduate digital forensics programs.

  12. Developing A Food Allergy Curriculum for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Perla A.; Sicherer, Scott H.; Christie, Lynn; Keaveny, Maureen; Noone, Sally; Watkins, Debra; Carlisle, Suzanna K; Jones, Stacie M

    2014-01-01

    Food allergy (FA) is potentially severe and requires intensive education to master allergen avoidance and emergency care. There is evidence suggesting the need for a comprehensive curriculum for food allergic families. This paper describes the results of focus groups conducted to guide the development of a curriculum for parents of food allergic children. The focus groups were conducted using standard methodology with experienced parents of food allergic children. Participants were parents (n=36) with experience managing FA recruited from allergy clinics at two academic centers. Topics identified by parents as key for successful management included as expected: 1) early signs/symptoms, 2) “cross-contamination”, 3) label-reading, 4) self-injectable epinephrine; and 5) becoming a teacher and advocate. Participants also recommended developing a “one pageroad map” to the information, and to provide the information early and be timed according to developmental stages/needs. Suggested first points for curriculum dissemination were emergency rooms, obstetrician and pediatrician offices. Participants also recommended targeting pediatricians, emergency physicians, school personnel, and the community-at-large in educational efforts. Parents often sought FA information from non-medical sources such as the Internet and support groups. These resources were also accessed to find ways to cope with stress. Paradoxically, difficulties gaining access to resources and uncertainty regarding reliability of the information added to the stress experience. Based on reports from experienced parents of food allergic children, newly diagnosed parents could benefit from a comprehensive FA management curriculum. Improving access to clear and concise educational materials would likely reduce stress/anxiety and improve quality of life. PMID:21332804

  13. The Preparation of Teacher Candidates for K-12 Online Learning Environments: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nicole V.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how teacher education programs may better prepare teacher candidates to teach in K-12 online learning environments. The primary research question addressed was: What specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions should teacher education programs include in their curriculum to better prepare teacher…

  14. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  15. Health Education Teacher Resource Handbook: A Practical Guide for K-12 Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Beverly Saxton, Ed.; Olsen, Larry K., Ed.

    This handbook provides background information on the health curriculum, as well as current, comprehensive information on publications, standards, and special materials for K-12 health education. The manual begins with an introduction, by P. Bruce Uhrmacher, which provides an overview of the ideologies and philosophies that have affected curriculum…

  16. Problem-Based Learning in the Physical Science Classroom, K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tom J.; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Janet

    2018-01-01

    "Problem-Based Learning in the Physical Science Classroom, K-12" will help your students truly understand concepts such as motion, energy, and magnetism in true-to-life contexts. The book offers a comprehensive description of why, how, and when to implement problem-based learning (PBL) in your curriculum. Its 14 developmentally…

  17. Cisco Networking Academy: Next-Generation Assessments and Their Implications for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    To illuminate the possibilities for next-generation assessments in K-12 schools, this case study profiles the Cisco Networking Academy, which creates comprehensive online training curriculum to teach networking skills. Since 1997, the Cisco Networking Academy has served more than five million high school and college students and now delivers…

  18. Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Mission EARTH (GME) program delivers climate change science content, pedagogy, and data resources to K12 educators, future teachers, and professional development providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, T.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will include a series of visuals that discuss how hands-on learning activities and field investigations from the the Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Mission EARTH (GME) program deliver climate change science content, pedagogy, and data resources to K12 educators, future teachers, and professional development providers. The GME program poster presentation will also show how teachers strengthen student preparation for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics (STEAM)-related careers while promoting diversity in the future STEM workforce. In addition to engaging students in scientific inquiry, the GME program poster will show how career exploration and preparation experiences is accomplished through direct connection to scientists and real science practices. The poster will show which hands-on learning activities that are being implemented in more than 30,000 schools worldwide, with over a million students, teachers, and scientists collecting environmental measurements using the GLOBE scientific protocols. This poster will also include how Next Generation Science Standards connect to GME learning progressions by grade strands. The poster will present the first year of results from the implementation of the GME program. Data is currently being agrigated by the east, midwest and westen regional operations.

  19. Cataclysms and Catastrophes: A Case Study of Improving K-12 Science Education Through a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T.; Ellins, K. K.; Morris, M.; Christeson, G.

    2003-12-01

    The K-12 science teacher is always seeking ways of improving and updating their curriculum by integrating the latest research into their most effective classroom activities. However, the daily demands of delivering instruction to large numbers of students coupled with the rapid advances in some fields of science can often overwhelm this effort. The NSF-sponsored Cataclysms and Catastrophes curriculum, developed by scientists from the The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), middle and high school teachers, and UT graduate students (NSF GK-12 fellows) working together through the GK-12 program, is a textbook example of how universities can facilitate this quest, benefiting education at both K-12 and university levels. In 1992, "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was developed as an activity in the Planet Earth class at the Liberal Arts and Science Academy of Austin as an interdisciplinary approach to science. Taking advantage of the media attention generated by the impact scenario for the K-T extinction, the activity consists of students participating in a simulated senate hearing on the potential causes of the K-T extinction and their implications for society today. This activity not only exposes students to the wide range of science involved in understanding mass extinctions, but also to the social, political and economic implications when this science is brought into the public arena and the corresponding use of data in decision making and disaster preparedness. While "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was always a popular and effective activity with students, it was in desperate need of updating to keep pace with the evolving scientific debate over the cause of the K-T extinction and the growing body of impact evidence discovered over the past decade. By adding two inquiry-based learning activities that use real geophysical data collected by scientists studying the buried Chicxulub feature as a

  20. How To Make a Curriculum: The 1987 Guidelines for Curriculum Development in the Norwegian High School--A New Paradigma in Curriculum Development Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundem, Bjorg B.

    This paper relates to a research project on the history and current practice of curriculum administration in Norway. An elaboration is provided on the changing high school system and the growing impact of curriculum scholarship on curriculum development. The discussion revolves around three objectives: (1) to determine if the newly formulated set…

  1. Retaining K-12 Online Teachers: A Predictive Model for K-12 Online Teacher Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ingle M.; Lokey-Vega, Anissa; Brantley-Dias, Laurie

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and explore factors influencing K-12 online teachers' turnover intentions, with job satisfaction and organizational commitment serving as moderating variables. Using Fishbein and Ajzen's Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior (1975), this study was conducted in public, private, charter, for-profit,…

  2. K-12 educational outcomes of immigrant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N López

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth López Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across segments of the immigrant population defined by generational status, race and ethnicity, and national origin. A good deal of evidence points to an immigrant advantage in multiple indicators of academic progress, meaning that many youths from immigrant families outperform their peers in school. This apparent advantage is often referred to as the immigrant paradox, in that it occurs despite higher-than-average rates of social and economic disadvantages in this population as a whole. The immigrant paradox, however, is more pronounced among the children of Asian and African immigrants than other groups, and it is stronger for boys than for girls. Furthermore, evidence for the paradox is far more consistent in secondary school than in elementary school. Indeed, school readiness appears to be one area of potential risk for children from immigrant families, especially those of Mexican origin. For many groups, including those from Latin America, any evidence of the immigrant paradox usually emerges after researchers control for family socioeconomic circumstances and youths' English language skills. For others, including those from Asian countries, it is at least partially explained by the tendency for more socioeconomically advantaged residents of those regions to leave their home country for the United States. Bilingualism and strong family ties help to explain immigrant advantages in schooling; school, community, and other contextual disadvantages may suppress these advantages or lead to immigrant risks. Crosnoe and Turley also discuss several policy efforts targeting young people from immigrant families, especially those of Latin

  3. Policy and Curriculum Development in Greece. the Case of Secondary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the politics and values of the secondary school curriculum in Greece and attempts to find out the influences of cultural tradition and centralized control on curriculum development. In particular, it studies the decision-making process and the politics of educational control, employing some theoretical elements from centralist…

  4. The GenDev Curriculum Development Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'cunha, J

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the second Curriculum Development Workshop held in May 1997 at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Bangkok, Thailand. The workshop aimed to review critically and restructure the Gender and Development Studies (GenDev) curriculum and to assess AIT's role in training gender experts for the region. Participants included 22 people from 16 countries in Asia, Europe, and the US who were teaching graduate students about gender issues and who were activists with nongovernmental organizations working on gender issues. It was determined that the following were required courses: Culture, Knowledge and Gender Relations; Gender, Technology, and Development; Principles of Gender Research and Methodology in Science and Technology; and Gender Analysis and Field Methods. Other suggested core courses included: Gender and Natural Resource Management; Enterprise Management, Technology, and Gender; Gender and Agrarian Reform; Urbanization: A Gender Perspective; Gender-Responsive Development Planning; and Gender and Economic Change: Past and Present Concerns. Participants distinguished between GenDev courses offered to anyone attending AIT and training courses designed to produce gender experts in the region. The aim of training courses for AIT graduate students was to sensitize potential managers, technologists, and others on gender issues and to create awareness of the importance of including gender perspectives within decision-making, policy formation, and implementation. Training courses to produce gender experts should be directed to those with a prior background in gender studies and include gender analysis in field methods. Participants agreed that there should be an independent and autonomous field of gender and development studies. Participants made six recommendations for such a field of study.

  5. Development of Curriculum of Learning through Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Aoki, Naokazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    A curriculum of an integrated learning using power of photography in the junior highschool was constructed, and was experimented in the class "Seminar for Photographic Expression" of the integrated learning at a junior high school. The center of the curriculum is viewing photographs and self-expression using photography. By comparing the results of questionnaires investigation between before and after the class it is suggested that the curriculum brings about increase in self-esteem, empathy, and motivation for learning. This educational effect is really to foster ability to live self-sufficient lives. On the basis of these results curriculums which can be conducted by anyone at every junior highschool were proposed.

  6. Extended professional development for systemic curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Mary Elizabeth

    Education standards call for adopting inquiry science instruction. Successful adoption requires professional development (PD) to support teachers, increasing the need for research on PD. This dissertation examines the question: What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term group workshops and related practice on teacher learning? I focus on the following subquestions: (1) What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term, group workshops on teacher knowledge and beliefs? (2) What is the impact of the workshops on teacher practice? (3) What is the influence of practice on student response? (4) What is the impact of practice and student response on teacher knowledge and beliefs? I focus on an instance of PD nested within a long-term systemic change initiative, tracing eleven science teachers' learning from workshops and associated enactments. The data included pre and post-unit interviews (n=22), two post-workshop interviews (n=17), workshop observations (n=2), classroom observations (n=24) and student work (n=351). I used mixed-methods analysis. Quantitative analysis measured teacher learning by comparing pre and post-unit interview ratings. Qualitative components included two case study approaches: logic model technique and cross-case synthesis, examining teacher learning within and across teachers. The findings suggested a teacher-learning model incorporating PD, teacher knowledge, beliefs, practice and student response. PD impacts teachers' knowledge by providing teachers with new knowledge, adapting previous knowledge, or convincing them to value existing knowledge they chose not to use. The workshops can influence beliefs, providing teachers with confidence and motivation to adopt the practice. Beliefs can mediate how knowledge manifested itself in practice that, in turn, impacts students' response. Student response influences the teachers' beliefs, either reinforcing or motivating change. This teacher-learning model

  7. A strategy for teacher involvement in curriculum development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence this study focuses on an effective strategy for teacher involvement in curriculum development. The strength of the strategy is that it involves formal teacher training with semesterised courses. There is phased- in implementation of the different phases of the curriculum development process. This formal training course ...

  8. Developing Sport Psychology in a Girls' Sport Academy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the initial steps in developing and presenting Sport Psychology in a leadership and sport curriculum at Stellenbosch University's (SU) Centre for Human Performance Sciences' (CHPS) Academy for Girls' Leadership and Sport Development. Sport Psychology does not feature within the South African school curriculum specifically,…

  9. Curriculum Analysis and Education for Sustainable Development in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Ingolfur Asgeir; Norodahl, Kristin; Oskarsdottir, Gunnhildur; Palsdottir, Auour; Petursdottir, Bjorg

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how the Icelandic public school curriculum for early childhood, compulsory and upper secondary school deals with education for sustainable development. As the curriculum does not often mention the term sustainability, a key with which to investigate signs of education for sustainable development in the three curricula was…

  10. Efficacy of the World Wide Web in K-12 environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Kimberly Jane

    1998-11-01

    Despite support by teachers, students, and the American public in general, environmental education is not a priority in U.S. schools. Teachers face many barriers to integrating environmental education into K--12 curricula. The focus of this research is teachers' lack of access to environmental education resources. New educational reforms combined with emerging mass communication technologies such as the Internet and World Wide Web present new opportunities for the infusion of environmental content into the curriculum. New technologies can connect teachers and students to a wealth of resources previously unavailable to them. However, significant barriers to using technologies exist that must be overcome to make this promise a reality. Web-based environmental education is a new field and research is urgently needed. If teachers are to use the Web meaningfully in their classrooms, it is essential that their attitudes and perceptions about using this new technology be brought to light. Therefore, this exploratory research investigates teachers' attitudes toward using the Web to share environmental education resources. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate this problem. Two surveys were conducted---self-administered mail survey and a Web-based online survey---to elicit teachers perceptions and comments about environmental education and the Web. Preliminary statistical procedures including frequencies, percentages and correlational measures were performed to interpret the data. In-depth interviews and participant-observation methods were used during an extended environmental education curriculum development project with two practicing teachers to gain insights into the process of creating curricula and placing it online. Findings from the both the mail survey and the Web-based survey suggest that teachers are interested in environmental education---97% of respondents for each survey agreed that environmental education should be taught in K

  11. Processes of Curriculum Development in the Department of Graphic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    national skills shortage by developing responsive curricula which will ensure that graduating students are well ... innovative pedagogy which integrates recent technologies into curriculum development and classroom practice. .... developing confidence amongst staff and in facilitating creative and innovative thinking.

  12. Introducing Game Development into the University Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Peer*

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrating computer games development into computer science curriculum is gaining acceptance. However, the question is how this should be done. In our course on computer game development we present all necessary steps that a game project has to address, from design to publication and marketing, from the theoretical to the practical point of view. The goal is that each student makes a casual game for Apple iOS platform and possibly publishes it. The games are built on our xni framework for iOS, which is a subset of Microsoft’s xna. We take an iterative incremental approach to teaching game development, where we discuss a number of selected topics from various categories, such as gameplay design, graphics and artificial intelligence, each week. Thereafter the students receive mandatory and non-mandatory assignments that force them to add functionality to their game and, thus, steadily progress towards their goal. At the end of the course more than 20 % of all projects were ready for the Apple App Store, which, together with student pools saying that the course was one of the best executed courses they attended, confirms the viability of the suggested scheme.

  13. Development of a British Road Safety Education Support Materials Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Linda H.

    Road safety education needs to be a vital component in the school curriculum. This paper describes a planned road safety education support materials curriculum developed to aid educators in the Wiltshire County (England) primary schools. Teaching strategies include topic webs, lecture, class discussion, group activities, and investigative learning…

  14. Holistic curriculum development: tutoring as a support process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tutor's role in these involves different aspects of teaching and learning. In this article I explore the value of tutoring as a means of supporting the holistic curriculum development process. I reflect on the reason for introducing a system of tutoring for students in curriculum studies and the results of its implementation on ...

  15. Penetration Testing Curriculum Development in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Li

    2015-04-01

    report for the management team to aid in strengthening the system, never to cause any real damages. This paper introduces the development of a penetration testing curriculum as a core class in an undergraduate cybersecurity track in Information Technology. The teaching modules are developed based on the professional penetration testing life cycle. The concepts taught in the class are enforced by hands-on lab exercises. This paper also shares the resources that are available to institutions looking for teaching materials and grant opportunities to support efforts when creating a similar curriculum in cybersecurity.

  16. From the field to classrooms: Scientists and educators collaborating to develop K-12 lessons on arctic carbon cycling and climate change that align with Next Generation Science Standards, and informal outreach programs that bring authentic data to informal audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, R.; Cory, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) calls for students across grade levels to understand climate change and its impacts. To achieve this goal, the NSF-sponsored PolarTREC program paired an educator with scientists studying carbon cycling in the Arctic. The data collection and fieldwork performed by the team will form the basis of hands-on science learning in the classroom and will be incorporated into informal outreach sessions in the community. Over a 16-day period, the educator was stationed at Toolik Field Station in the High Arctic. (Toolik is run by the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology.) She participated in a project that analyzed the effects of sunlight and microbial content on carbon production in Artic watersheds. Data collected will be used to introduce the following NGSS standards into the middle-school science curriculum: 1) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence. 2) Develop a model to explain cycling of water. 3) Develop and use a model to describe phenomena. 4) Analyze and interpret data. 5) A change in one system causes and effect in other systems. Lessons can be telescoped to meet the needs of classrooms in higher or lower grades. Through these activities, students will learn strategies to model an aspect of carbon cycling, interpret authentic scientific data collected in the field, and conduct geoscience research on carbon cycling. Community outreach sessions are also an effective method to introduce and discuss the importance of geoscience education. Informal discussions of firsthand experience gained during fieldwork can help communicate to a lay audience the biological, physical, and chemical aspects of the arctic carbon cycle and the impacts of climate change on these features. Outreach methods will also include novel use of online tools to directly connect audiences with scientists in an effective and time-efficient manner.

  17. Teachers' knowledge about language in mathematics professional development courses : From an intended curriculum to a curriculum in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaike Hajer; Eva Norén

    2017-01-01

    Explicit language objectives are included in the Swedish national curriculum for mathematics. The curriculum states that students should be given opportunities to develop the ability to formulate problems, use and analyse mathematical concepts and relationships between concepts, show and follow

  18. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  19. Digital Learning in California's K-12 Schools. Just the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Niu

    2015-01-01

    This fact page briefly discusses the following facts on digital learning in California's K-12: (1) As California implements new tests in its K-12 schools, technology infrastructure is a key concern; (2) Many districts are confident that they had enough bandwidth for online field tests; (3) Digital learning will require significantly greater…

  20. Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemin, Butch; Pape, Larry

    2017-01-01

    "Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning 2016" marks the thirteenth consecutive year Evergreen has published its annual research of the K-12 education online learning market. The thirteen years of researching, writing and publishing this report represents a time of remarkable change. There has been a constant presence that has become the…

  1. K-12 Technology Accessibility: The Message from State Governments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Natalie L.; Lazar, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined state education technology plans and technology accessibility statutes to attempt to answer the question--is K-12 instructional technology accessibility discussed in state-level technology accessibility statutes and education technology plans across the 50 United States? When a K-12 school district is planning the construction…

  2. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  3. Evaluation of Experiential Outdoor Research Locations in Asia for a K-12 school in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.; Joyce, S.

    2016-12-01

    A team of faculty and administrators from The Independent Schools Foundation Academy spend the 2015 - 2016 academic year identifying possible locations in Asia for a year-round outdoor education center. ISF Academy currently has over 1500 students its K-12 bilingual school in Hong Kong, China. The outdoor education center is an extension of the built campus in Pokfulam and will provide students opportunities to live in a natural setting, participate in outdoor educational activities and study in an environment significantly different than a classroom. Currently ISF Academy students in grades 4 - 12 are off campus twice during the academic year in an experiential learning environment. These current programs include camping, hiking, kayaking, other adventurous activities and service learning opportunities. The purpose of the dedicated site is to have a "home base" for ISF Academy and the experiential learning programs. This past year we looked specifically at programs and locations that could also be used by students for ecology and earth systems based research in the senior school (grades 9 - 12). We have looked at sites in Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and Taiwan. The ideal site will have marine, terrestrial and mangrove ecosystems and allow students to set up long-term research sites in any of these ecosystems. Creating opportunities for authentic research that allows students spend an extended time in a research setting will help them to gain both skills and independence needed in the future at the tertiary level. The evaluation of these sites included identifying potential research partners, site preparation, logistics in and out of the locations, and the heath/safety management of students living and working in a remote location. In parallel to the site evaluations, the curriculum is being developed for the students that is age and skill appropriate using the frame work of the existing guided discovery curriculum in the primary school, and the MYP and DP

  4. Counseling Group Curriculum for Parents on Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, John; Shillingford, M. Ann; Parrish, Mary-Frances; Sheffield, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of bullying on K-12 students and the importance of collaborative partnerships between home and school in decreasing the dramatic effects of student bullying behaviors. The authors present a six-week, research-based, small group curriculum specifically developed for professional school counselors to support parents…

  5. Developing a comprehensive curriculum for public health advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Ayelet; Jernigan, David H

    2012-11-01

    There is a substantial gap in public health school curricula regarding advocacy. Development of such a curriculum faces three challenges: faculty lack advocacy skills and experience; the public health literature on effective advocacy is limited; and yet a successful curriculum must be scalable to meet the needs of approximately 9,000 public health students graduating each year. To meet these challenges, we propose a 100-hour interactive online curriculum in five sections: campaigning and organizing, policy making and lobbying, campaign communications, new media, and fund-raising. We outline the content for individual modules in each of these sections, describe how the curriculum would build on existing interactive learning and social media technologies, and provide readers the opportunity to "test-drive" excerpts of a module on "grasstops" organizing. Developing advocacy skills and expertise is critical to meeting the challenges of public health today, and we provide a blueprint for how such training might be brought to scale in the field.

  6. Designing Successful Science Contests for K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T.; Colleton, N.

    2006-12-01

    Contests can engage, motivate, instruct and inspire students of all grade levels and interests. What are the ingredients necessary for a successful science contest? The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) has recommendations for designing science-based competitions that are both fun and educational for for elementary and secondary students. These recommendations were developed as a result of IGES' experience gained through two annual student competitions that focus on Earth science topics: An annual art contest, for grades 2-4, challenges U.S. students to explore a specific Earth science topic. For example, past themes have included Polar Explorations: Going to Extremes (2006); Connect-4: Air, Land, Water, and Life (2005); and Picture Me: What Kind of Earth Explorer Would I Be? (2004). The contest supports national science education standards for grades K-4, and includes suggested classroom activities, books, and movies. The Thacher Scholarship was founded in 2000 by IGES in honor of the late Peter S. Thacher, a former IGES board member and leader in promoting the use of satellite remote sensing. The $4,000 scholarship is awarded to exceptional high school students displaying the best use of satellite remote sensing in understanding our changing planet.

  7. How to Get Successfully Involved with K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Fraknoi, A.; Bennett, M.

    1998-05-01

    Many astronomers now have some involvement in K-12 education, either through their children, through large projects with an education or outreach office, or through an educational component to their own grants. Some may need to incorporate education components into future proposals. For those new to education, it can be difficult to decide how best to use their limited resources without "re-inventing the wheel." Some astronomers are comfortable taking a direct role in the classroom or working with teachers, others prefer developing web-based or printed materials, while still others wouldrather work with local schools of education to enhance the training of future teachers. Which of these roles is most useful? In this session, participants will learn what has worked well in the past, with special attention paid to ways in which astronomers' and physicists' training and instincts may fail them when working in education. Invited teachers will describe their classrooms and how astronomers can be most helpful to them. Sample (successful) activities will be demonstrated, and information given about the wide range of existing astronomy and space-science education programs around the country. A full menu of useful ways that astronomers can get involved will be presented, as well as the organizations and institutions which can help in devising a meaningful education program. Handouts will include a catalog of national astronomy education projects, a list of educational web sites, information about the NASA OSS education brokers and facilitators, examples of successful educational materials, and a listing of roles astronomers have played or could play to enhance K-12 education. Registration is required; see the AAS Education WWW page or email aased@aas.org.

  8. The Elephant in the (Class)Room: Parental Perceptions of LGBTQ-Inclusivity in K-12 Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Jacqueline; Ferfolja, Tania

    2016-01-01

    While little is known about parental beliefs and desires regarding LGBTQ-inclusive education, assumptions about these appear to justify teachers', curriculum writers' and policy makers' silences regarding sexuality and gender diversity in the K-12 classroom. Thus, in order to better inform educators' practices, this paper presents an analysis of…

  9. A Path to Alignment: Connecting K-12 and Higher Education via the Common Core and the Degree Qualifications Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, David T.; Gaston, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which aim to assure competency in English/language arts and mathematics through the K-12 curriculum, define necessary but not sufficient preparedness for success in college. The Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP), which describes what a college degree should signify, regardless of major, offers useful but…

  10. Projets de developpement de curriculum niveau secondaire (Secondary Level Curriculum Development Projects).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne L.

    Two Australian language curriculum development projects are discussed: the Australian Language Levels (ALL) Project and the National Assessment Framework for Languages at Senior Secondary Level (NAFLSSL). While distinct, both projects are closely linked. Each project was launched in 1985 in a favorable climate and in response to cost, enrollment,…

  11. California's K-12 Public Schools. How Are They Doing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, Stephen J; Krop, Cathy; Arkes, Jeremy; Morrison, Peter A; Flanagan, Ann

    2005-01-01

    ... are no longer performing as well as they did previously or as well as schools in other states. The primary objective of our study was to look closely at California's public system of kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12...

  12. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  13. The Windows to the Universe Project: Using the Internet to Support K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L.; Johnson, R.; Bergman, J.; Russell, R.; Genyuk, J.; La Grave, M.

    2003-12-01

    The World Wide Web can be a powerful tool for reaching the public as well as students and teachers around the world, supporting both formal and informal science education. The Windows to the Universe Project, initiated in 1995, provides a case study of approaches for the use of the web to support earth and space science education and literacy efforts. Through the use of innovative approaches such as easy to use design, multi-level content, and science concepts presented in a broader background context that includes connections to culture and the humanities, Windows to the Universe is an accessible format for individuals of various ages and learning styles. A large global audience regularly uses the web site to learn about earth and space science as well as related humanities content such as myths from around the world. User surveys show that the site has over 4 millions users per year, 65 percent of which are K-12 teachers and students. Approximately 46 percent of users access the site once per week or more. Recently, we have had the opportunity to expand our efforts while we continue to update existing content based on new scientific findings and events. Earth science content on Windows to the Universe is currently growing with a new geology section and development efforts are underway to expand our space weather content with a new curriculum. Educational games allow users to learn about space in a playful context, and an online journaling tool further integrates literacy into the learning experience. In addition, we are currently translating the entire Windows to the Universe web site into Spanish. We have included educators in the project as co-designers from its inception, and by aggressively utilizing and providing professional development opportunities for teachers, the web site is now used in thousands of classrooms around the world. In the past year we have continued to support K-12 educators by adding to our suite of classroom activities and leading

  14. Perceived Requirements of MIS Curriculum Implementation in Bilingual Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeil, Magdy M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses additional requirements associated with implementing a standard curriculum of Management Information Systems (MIS) in bilingual developing countries where both students and workplace users speak English as a second language. In such countries, MIS graduates are required to develop bilingual computer applications and to…

  15. Developing Curriculum for Democracy through International Partnerships. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamot, Gregory E.

    The fall of communism in eastern and central Europe inspired the call for curriculum development in citizenship education throughout the growing democratic world. Many programs between U.S. institutions and newly developing democracies continue to produce curricula for democratic citizenship suited to local needs. This digest discusses: (1)…

  16. Models and automation technologies for the curriculum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the sequence of the curriculum development stages on the basis of the system analysis, as well as to create models and information technologies for the implementation of thesestages.The methods and the models of the systems’ theory and the system analysis, including methods and automated procedures for structuring organizational aims, models and automated procedures for organizing complex expertise.On the basis of the analysis of existing studies in the field of curriculum modeling, using formal mathematical language, including optimization models, that help to make distribution of disciplines by years and semesters in accordance with the relevant restrictions, it is shown, that the complexity and dimension of these tasks require the development of special software; the problem of defining the input data and restrictions requires a large time investment, that seems to be difficult to provide in real conditions of plans’ developing, thus it is almost impossible to verify the objectivity of the input data and the restrictions in such models. For a complete analysis of the process of curriculum development it is proposed to use the system definition, based on the system-targeted approach. On the basis of this definition the reasonable sequence of the integrated stages for the development of the curriculum was justified: 1 definition (specification of the requirements for the educational content; 2 determining the number of subjects, included in the curriculum; 3 definition of the sequence of the subjects; 4 distribution of subjects by semesters. The models and technologies for the implementation of these stages of curriculum development were given in the article: 1 models, based on the information approach of A.Denisov and the modified degree of compliance with objectives based on Denisov’s evaluation index (in the article the idea of evaluating the degree of the impact of disciplines for realization

  17. A review of Computer Science resources for learning and teaching with K-12 computing curricula: an Australian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age children, with the intention to engage children and increase interest, rather than to formally teach concepts and skills. What is the educational quality of existing Computer Science resources and to what extent are they suitable for classroom learning and teaching? In this paper, an assessment framework is presented to evaluate the quality of online Computer Science resources. Further, a semi-systematic review of available online Computer Science resources was conducted to evaluate resources available for classroom learning and teaching and to identify gaps in resource availability, using the Australian curriculum as a case study analysis. The findings reveal a predominance of quality resources, however, a number of critical gaps were identified. This paper provides recommendations and guidance for the development of new and supplementary resources and future research.

  18. Developing a "clinical presentation" curriculum at the University of Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandin, H; Harasym, P; Eagle, C; Watanabe, M

    1995-03-01

    Currently, medical curricula are structured according to disciplines, body systems, or clinical problems. Beginning in 1988, the faculty of the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine (U of C) carefully evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each of these models in seeking to revise their school's curriculum. However, all three models fell short of a curricular structure based on current knowledge and principles of adult learning, clinical problem solving, community demands, and curriculum management. By 1991, the U of C had formulated a strategic plan for a revised curriculum structure based on the way patients present to physicians, and implementation of this plan has begun. In creating the new curriculum, 120 clinical presentations (e.g., "loss of consciousness/syncope") were defined and each was assigned to an individual or small group of faculty for development based on faculty expertise and interest. Terminal objectives (i.e., "what to do") were defined for each presentation to describe the appropriate clinical behaviors of a graduating physician. Experts developed schemes that outlined how they differentiated one cause (i.e., disease category) from another. The underlying enabling objectives (i.e., knowledge, skills, and attitudes) for reaching the terminal objectives for each clinical presentation were assigned as departmental responsibilities. A new administrative structure evolved in which there is a partnership between a centralized multidisciplinary curriculum committee and the departments. This new competency-based, clinical presentation curriculum is expected to significantly enhance students' development of clinical problem-solving skills and affirms the premise that prudent, continuous updating is essential for improving the quality of medical education.

  19. Strategies for Integrating Content from the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment into the K-12 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    That the physical environment shapes the lives and behaviors of people is certainly not news, but communicating the impact of a changing climate on human health and predicting the trajectory of these changes is an active area of study in public health. From air quality concerns to extreme heat to shifts in the range of disease vectors, there are many opportunities to make connections between Earth's changing climate and human health. While many science teachers understand that addressing human health impacts as a result of a changing climate can provide needed relevance, it can be challenging for teachers to do so given an already packed curriculum. This session will share instructional strategies for integrating content from the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment (CHA) by enhancing, rather than displacing content related to climate science. This presentation will feature a data interpretation activity developed in collaboration with geoscientists at the University of North Carolina's Gillings School of Public Health to convey the connection between air quality, climate change and human health. This classroom activity invites students to read excerpts from the CHA and interpret data presented in the scientific literature, thus promoting scientific literacy. In summarizing this activity, I will highlight strategies for effectively engaging geoscientists in developing scientifically rigorous, STEM-focused educational activities that are aligned to state and national science standards and also address the realities of the science classroom. Collaborating with geoscientists and translating their research into classroom activities is an approach that becomes more pertinent with the advent of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Thus, the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment represents an opportunity to cultivate science literacy among K-12 students while providing relevant learning experiences that promote integration of science and engineering practices as

  20. 3-D Teaching of Climate Change: An innovative professional learning model for K-12 teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, M.; Wolfson, J.; Sezen-Barrie, A.

    2017-12-01

    In spite of the presumed controversy over the evidence for climate change, the recently released Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) for K-12 include a focus on climate literacy and explicitly use the term `climate change.' In addition to the increased focus on climate change, the NGSS are also built upon a new three dimensional framework for teaching and learning science. Three dimensional learning has students engaging in scientific and engineering practices (Dimension 1), while using crosscutting concepts (Dimension 2) to explore and explain natural phenomena using disciplinary core ideas (Dimension 3). The adoption of these new standards in many states across the nation has created a critical need for on-going professional learning as in-service science educators begin to implement both climate change instruction and three dimensional teaching and learning in their classrooms. In response to this need, we developed an innovative professional learning model for preparing teachers to effectively integrate climate change into their new curriculum and engage students in three dimensional learning. Our professional learning model utilized ideas that have emerged from recent science education research and include: a) formative assessment probes for three dimensional learning that monitor students' progress; b) collaboration with scientists with expertise in climate science to understand the domain specific ways of doing science; and c) development of a community of practice for in-service teachers to provide feedback to each other on their implementation. In this poster presentation, we will provide details on the development of this professional learning model and discuss the affordances and challenges of implementing this type of professional learning experience.

  1. Teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on lessons learnt in the use of teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development, in the implementation of the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) programme in South Africa. The researchers in this study were amongst the trainers. The study followed a qualitative research approach, where a ...

  2. The development of a new chemistry curriculum in the Netherlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the recent changes in chemistry education in secondary school in the Netherlands. The way these changes came about is described as well as the development of the current curriculum. An example of a module, demonstrating the current features of chemistry teaching in the upper level of secondary ...

  3. Andragogical and Pedagogical Methods for Curriculum and Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X., Ed.; Bryan, Valerie C., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Today's ever-changing learning environment is characterized by the fast pace of technology that drives our society to move forward, and causes our knowledge to increase at an exponential rate. The need for in-depth research that is bound to generate new knowledge about curriculum and program development is becoming ever more relevant.…

  4. Integrating Professional Development across the Curriculum: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Dinella, Lisa M.; Hatchard, Christine J.; Valosin, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The current study empirically tested the effectiveness of a modular approach to integrating professional development across an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Researchers conducted a two-group, between-subjects experiment on 269 undergraduate psychology students assessing perceptions of professional preparedness and learning. Analysis…

  5. Development of a Curriculum in Laser Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, William J.

    A Seattle Central Community College project visited existing programs, surveyed need, and developed a curriculum for a future program in Laser-Electro-Optics (LEO) Technology. To establish contacts and view successful programs, project staff made visits to LEO technology programs at San Jose City College and Texas State Technical Institute, Center…

  6. Examining Development of Curriculum Knowledge of Prospective Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ömer; Soylu, Yasin

    2017-01-01

    Explanatory-confirmatory research design, one of the mixed methods research designs, was used in this study to investigate Curriculum Knowledge developments of prospective teachers regarding algebra. Cross-sectional study method, as a type of descriptive research and one of the non-experimental research designs, was used to collect quantitative…

  7. Cross-District Collaboration: Curriculum and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Deborah J.; Cloud, Nancy; Morris, Patricia; Motta, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Secondary English as a second language (ESL) curricula that address four levels of ESL proficiency and prepare students for the English language arts (ELA) curricula and state-mandated ELA tests are not common. A curriculum jointly developed by two districts is even rarer. Yet two urban districts in Rhode Island undertook such a curriculum…

  8. Curriculum leadership in action : A tale of four community college Heads of Department leading a curriculum development project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to

  9. Curriculum Leadership in Action: A Tale of Four Community College Heads of Department Leading a Curriculum-Development Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to

  10. K-12 Phenology Lessons for the Phenocam Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Phenology is defined as periodic [or annual] life cycles of plants and animals driven by seasonal environmental changes. Climate change impinges a strong effect on phenology, potentially altering the structure and functioning of ecosystems. In the fall of 2011, the Ashburnham-Westminster Regional School District became the first of five schools to join Harvard University's Phenocam Network with the installation of a webcam to monitor phenology (or 'phenocam') at Overlook Middle School in Ashburnham, Massachusetts. Our school district is now part of a network of near-surface remote sensing phenocams that capture and send images of forest, shrub, and grassland vegetation cover at more than 130 diverse sites in North America. Our phenocam provides a digital image every half hour of the mixed forest canopy north from the school, enabling the detection of changes in canopy development, quantified as canopy 'greenness'. As a part of the Phenocam project, students at the K-12 level have expanded the scope of phenological monitoring protocol that is part of the Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program, Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming. In this protocol, students work with ecologists at Harvard Forest to monitor buds and leaves on schoolyard trees to determine the length of the growing season, giving them the opportunity to be a part of real and important research concerning the critical environmental issue of climate change. Students involved in the Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming study have the opportunity to compare their ground data on budburst, color change, and leaf drop to the phenocam images, as well as to similar forested sites in locations throughout the United States. Lessons have been developed for comparing student data to phenocam images, canopy greenness time series graphs extracted from the images, and satellite data. Lessons addressing map scale and the Urban Heat Island effect will also be available for teachers. This project will greatly enhance the

  11. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 37 environmental science activities for students in grades K-12. Topics include water pollution, glaciers, protective coloration, shapes in nature, environmental impacts, recycling, creative writing, litter, shapes found in nature, color, rain cycle, waste management, plastics, energy, pH, landfills, runoff, watersheds,…

  12. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, Paula; Kellerer, Eric; Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Montgomery, Danielle; Clyde, Rozella; Cozart, Joe; Creach, Laura; Hibbard, Laura; LaFrance, Jason; Rupp, Nadine; Walker, Niki; Carter, Theresa; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study exploring rural teacher perspectives on the impact of blended learning on students and teachers was conducted in Idaho during the Fall of 2013. Researchers from Northwest Nazarene University's DOCEO Center in partnership with Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning…

  13. Designer Librarian: Embedded in K12 Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, shifts in technology have altered the roles of school librarians in a multitude of ways. New rigorous standards, proliferation of devices, and steady growth of online and blended learning for the K12 market now demand librarians engage with learners in online environments. Taking an instructional design approach is the…

  14. Designing GIS Learning Materials for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies have proven the usefulness and effectiveness of geographic information system (GIS) use in the K-12 classroom, the rate of teacher adoption remains low. The identified major barrier to its use is a lack of teachers' background and experience. To solve this limitation, many organisations have provided GIS-related teacher…

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 (ATCC 10798)

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrova, Daniela; Engelbrecht, Kathleen C.; Putonti, Catherine; Koenig, David W.; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli ATCC 10798. E.?coli ATCC 10798 is a K-12 strain, one of the most well-studied model microorganisms. The size of the genome was 4,685,496?bp, with a G+C content of 50.70%. This assembly consists of 62 contigs and the F plasmid.

  16. Evaluating the Performance of Online K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick; Kafer, Krista; Reeser, Kelly; Shafer, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    This article examines K-12 online student and school performance across an entire state (Colorado) in the United States through two comparisons. First, state assessment scores of students in online schools are compared to those in traditional brick and mortar schools. Second, the accountability scores of online schools are compared to those of…

  17. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: "Divided Loyalties"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    This report mainly aims to provide a critical and in-depth analysis of the K-12 Case, "Divided Loyalty" by Holy and Tartar (2004). The case recounts how the manifestation of inadequate leadership skills in a school setting could affect negatively the performance of students.

  18. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  19. Online System Adoption and K-12 Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the relationship between K-12 online system adoption (e.g., Blackboard, Edmodo, WordPress) and school-level academic achievement ratings. Utilizing a novel approach to data collection via website data extraction and indexing of all school websites in a target state in the United States (n?=?732) and merging these…

  20. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  1. Florida's Opinion on K-12 Public Education Spending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This scientifically representative poll of 1,200 Floridians finds that public opinion about K-12 public education spending is seriously misinformed. Floridians think public schools need more money, but the main reason is that they are badly mistaken about how much money the public schools actually get. Key findings of the study include: (1) Half…

  2. Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heafner, Tina L., Ed.; Hartshorne, Richard, Ed.; Petty, Teresa, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of technology in classrooms is rapidly emerging as a way to provide more educational opportunities for students. As virtual learning environments become more popular, evaluating the impact of this technology on student success is vital. "Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments" combines…

  3. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  4. Assessment Strategies for Implementing Ngss in K12 Earth System Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, C.

    2016-12-01

    Several science education researchers have led assessment efforts that provide strategies particularly useful for evaluating the threedimensional learning that is central to NGSS (DeBarger, A. H., Penuel, W. R., Harris, C. J., Kennedy, C. K., 2016; Knight, A. M. & McNeill, K. L., 2015; McNeill, K. L., KatshSinger, R. & Pelletier, P., 2015; McNeill K.L., et.al., 2015; McNeill, K.L., & Krajcik, J.S., 2011; Penuel, W., 2016). One of the basic premises of these researchers is that, "Assessment is a practice of argument from evidence based on what students say, do, and write" and that "the classroom is the richest place to gather evidence of what students know (Penuel, W., 2016). The implementation of the NGSS in Earth System Science provides a unique opportunity for geoscience education researchers to study student learning and contribute to the development of this research as well as for geoscience educators to apply these approaches and strategies in their own work with K12 inservice and preservice educators. DeBarger, A. H., Penuel, W. R., Harris, C. J., Kennedy, C. K. (2016). Building an Assessment Argument to Design and Use Next Generation Science Assessments in Efficacy Studies of Curriculum Interventions. American†Journal†of†Evaluation†37(2) 174192Æ Knight, A. M. & McNeill, K. L. (2015). Comparing students' individual written and collaborative oral socioscientific arguments. International Journal of Environmental and Science Education.10(5), 23647. McNeill, K. L., KatshSinger, R. & Pelletier, P. (2015). Assessing science practices-Moving your class along a continuum. Science Scope. McNeill, K.L., & Krajcik, J.S. (2011). Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson. Penuel, W. (2016). Classroom Assessment Strategies for NGSS Earth and Space Sciences. Implementing†the†NGSS†Webinar†Series, February 11, 2016.

  5. The project for an energy-enriched curriculum: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The Project for an Energy-Enriched Curriculum (PEEC) reported was a long-running effort at infusing energy/environment/economics (E/E/E) themes into the K-12 curriculum. While it was conducted as a single integrated effort by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), it is supported by a series of contracts and grants, during the period 1976 to 1984, from the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Development of a Comprehensive Communication Skills Curriculum for Pediatrics Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eleanor B; Boland, Kimberly A; Bryant, Kristina A; McKinley, Tara F; Porter, Melissa B; Potter, Katherine E; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    Effective communication is an essential element of medical care and a priority of medical education. Specific interventions to teach communication skills are at the discretion of individual residency programs. We developed the Resident Communication Skills Curriculum (RCSC), a formal curriculum designed to teach trainees the communication skills essential for high-quality practice. A multidisciplinary working group contributed to the development of the RCSC, guided by an institutional needs assessment, literature review, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The result was a cohesive curriculum that incorporates didactic, role play, and real-life experiences over the course of the entire training period. Methods to assess curricular outcomes included self-reporting, surveys, and periodic faculty evaluations of the residents. Curricular components have been highly rated by residents (3.95-3.97 based on a 4-point Likert scale), and residents' self-reported communication skills demonstrated an improvement over the course of residency in the domains of requesting a consultation, providing effective handoffs, handling conflict, and having difficult conversations (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.0 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  ≤ .002). Faculty evaluations of residents have also demonstrated improvement over time (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.5 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  communication skills curriculum for pediatrics residents was implemented, with a multistep evaluative process showing improvement in skills over the course of the residency program. Positive resident evaluations and informal comments from faculty support its general acceptance. The use of existing resources makes this curriculum feasible.

  7. The Design of Curriculum Development Based on Entrepreneurship through Balanced Scorecard Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Muhammad; Musa, Chalid Imran; Haerani, Siti; Sudirman, Indrianti

    2015-01-01

    This research is intended to develop curriculum based on entrepreneurship through balanced scorecard approach at the School of Business or "Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Ekonomi" (STIE) Nobel Indonesia. In order to develop the curriculum, a need analysis in terms of curriculum development that involves all stakeholders at STIE Nobel in Indonesia…

  8. Developing Public Mind Curriculum for Lower Secondary School Classes Using Contemplative Education Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijumnong, Sirithorn; Sri-ampai, Pissamai; Chano, Jiraporn

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a public mind curriculum with Contemplative Education and to study the effect of using the curriculum to enhance public minds. The study was carried out using the research and development process, consisting of three phases: investigating fundamental data, developing a curriculum, and evaluating the…

  9. Enhancing the Impact of Evidence-Based Publications on K-12 ESL Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Marilyn L.; Lee, Kent; Rossiter, Marian J.

    2017-01-01

    The reading of current research-informed publications is an essential component of teacher professional development that has the potential to lead to or reinforce the implementation of effective instructional practices. To our knowledge, no studies have examined kindergarten to grade 12 (K-12) ESL teacher engagement in professional reading related…

  10. Standards Based Design: Teaching K-12 Educators to Build Quality Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, René E.; Ritter, Nicola L.; Li, Yun; Newton, Rhonda C.; Palkar, Trupti

    2016-01-01

    The number of online courses, programs, and schools are growing exponentially in K-12 education. Given the unique nature of online courses and the distinct skills necessary to create a quality online course, it is essential that effective professional development be provided for teachers designing online courses. Online courses need to be of the…

  11. Benefits and Pitfalls: Simple Guidelines for the Use of Social Networking Tools in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The article will outline a framework for the use of social networking tools in K-12 education framed around four thought provoking questions: 1) what are the benefits and pitfalls of using social networking tools in P-12 education, 2) how do we plan effectively for the use of social networking tool, 3) what role does professional development play…

  12. The Chem-E-Car as a Vehicle for Service Learning through K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdon, William

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of combining the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Chem-E-Car competition activities with engineering outreach to K-12 students in a service-learning course. Survey results are presented to show how the program develops technical skills as well as leadership, teamwork, and communication skills in…

  13. Technology-Related Strategies Used by Educational Leaders to Increase Prosocial Behavior in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Jason Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify technology-related strategies used by educational leaders to increase prosocial behavior in K-12 schools. Information and communication technology (ICT) is developing at a rapid rate and is becoming more ubiquitous among students. Discovering and understanding common technology-related strategies…

  14. Addressing the NETS*S in K-12 Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Dale S.; Lindstrom, Denise L.; Strobel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS*S) were developed to provide guidelines for effective and meaningful technology use with K-12 students. In the present study we used the NETS*S as a framework to analyze ways that teachers integrated instructional technology use and provided opportunities for their students to…

  15. A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Social Studies Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    Designed to provide social studies educators with specific information for the development of local school district K-12 curriculum, this guide is organized into eight sections. Following an introduction, section 1 provides a rationale, goals, and major themes for the social studies and social sciences. Section 2 presents a scope and sequence…

  16. Integrating Career Development into the Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Susan B.; Sumner, Dana F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a series of integrated career development activities offered in several required courses which are designed to help accounting majors gain a competitive edge in the job market. Supported by a partnership between the School of Business and the Academic and Career Planning Office, the Career Tool Kit program consists of…

  17. Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, Jon G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Manwell, James F. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lackner, Matthew A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2012-12-31

    Utility-scale electricity produced from offshore wind farms has the potential to contribute significantly to the energy production of the United States. In order for the U.S. to rapidly develop these abundant resources, knowledgeable scientists and engineers with sound understanding of offshore wind energy systems are critical. This report summarizes the development of an upper-level engineering course in "Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering." This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of both the technical challenges of offshore wind energy and the practical regulatory, permitting, and planning aspects of developing offshore wind farms in the U.S. This course was offered on a pilot basis in 2011 at the University of Massachusetts and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), TU Delft, and GL Garrad Hassan have reviewed its content. As summarized in this report, the course consists of 17 separate topic areas emphasizing appropriate engineering fundamentals as well as development, planning, and regulatory issues. In addition to the course summary, the report gives the details of a public Internet site where references and related course material can be obtained. This course will fill a pressing need for the education and training of the U.S. workforce in this critically important area. Fundamentally, this course will be unique due to two attributes: an emphasis on the engineering and technical aspects of offshore wind energy systems, and a focus on offshore wind energy issues specific to the United States.

  18. Child Development and Curriculum in Waldorf Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Stegmann, Astrid

    Every educational theory has behind it a particular image of human beings and their development that supports a particular view of the learning process. This paper examines the image of children underlying Waldorf education. The paper identifies the individual and unique Self as the "third factor," that together with heredity and…

  19. Validating Curriculum Development Using Text Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity requires the collaboration of two or more disciplines to combine their expertise to jointly develop and deliver learning and teaching outcomes appropriate for a subject area. Curricula and assessment mapping are critical components to foster and enhance interdisciplinary learning environments. Emerging careers in data science…

  20. Developing an Online Curriculum: Technologies and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lynnette R.

    2004-01-01

    This book acts as a guidebook for teachers and administrators as they look for support with their online education programs. It offers teaching suggestions for everything from course development to time management and community building. The book is designed to provide information to help teachers work more effectively with online tools, develop…

  1. Critical Path to Nuclear Science and Technology Knowledge Transfer and Skill Development in K-12 Schools: Why America Needs Action and Support from Federal and State Education Departments Now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincenti, J.R.; Anderson, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    With the signing of President Bush's energy bill in August of 2005, the successful application of the new energy legislation may have more to do with educational standards required in our schools than applications of research and technology in the long-term. Looking inside the new legislation, the future of that legislation's success may not just hinge on investment in technology, but ensuring that our citizens, especially our youth, are prepared and better informed to be able to understand, react, and apply the economically and national security driven intent of the law. How can our citizens make sense of change if they lack the skills to be able to understand, not only the technology, but also the science that drives the change? President Bush's passage of the 1,724-page bill emphasizes conservation, clean energy research, and new and improved technology. The legislation also provides for economic incentives toward building more nuclear power plants. This paper will use four questions as a focal point to emphasize the need for both state and federal education departments to review their current standards and respond to deficiencies regarding learning about radioactivity, radiation, and nuclear science and technology. The questions are: 1. Will America accept new nuclear power development? 2. Will waste issues be resolved concerning high- and low-level radioactive waste management and disposal? 3. Will nuclear 'anything' be politically correct when it comes to your backyard? 4. Is our youth adequately educated and informed about radioactivity, radiation, and nuclear science and technology? This paper will use Pennsylvania as a case study to better understand the implications and importance of the educational standards in our school systems. This paper will also show how the deficiency found in Pennsylvania's academic standards, and in other states, has a significant impact on the ability to fulfill the legislation's intent of realizing energy independence and

  2. Teacher Directed Design: Content Knowledge, Pedagogy and Assessment under the Nevada K-12 Real-Time Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, P.; Ewing-Taylor, J.; Crippen, K. J.; Smith, K. D.; Snelson, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    Education professionals and seismologists under the emerging SUN (Shaking Up Nevada) program are leveraging the existing infrastructure of the real-time Nevada K-12 Seismic Network to provide a unique inquiry based science experience for teachers. The concept and effort are driven by teacher needs and emphasize rigorous content knowledge acquisition coupled with the translation of that knowledge into an integrated seismology based earth sciences curriculum development process. We are developing a pedagogical framework, graduate level coursework, and materials to initiate the SUN model for teacher professional development in an effort to integrate the research benefits of real-time seismic data with science education needs in Nevada. A component of SUN is to evaluate teacher acquisition of qualified seismological and earth science information and pedagogy both in workshops and in the classroom and to assess the impact on student achievement. SUN's mission is to positively impact earth science education practices. With the upcoming EarthScope initiative, the program is timely and will incorporate EarthScope real-time seismic data (USArray) and educational materials in graduate course materials and teacher development programs. A number of schools in Nevada are contributing real-time data from both inexpensive and high-quality seismographs that are integrated with Nevada regional seismic network operations as well as the IRIS DMC. A powerful and unique component of the Nevada technology model is that schools can receive "stable" continuous live data feeds from 100's seismograph stations in Nevada, California and world (including live data from Earthworm systems and the IRIS DMC BUD - Buffer of Uniform Data). Students and teachers see their own networked seismograph station within a global context, as participants in regional and global monitoring. The robust real-time Internet communications protocols invoked in the Nevada network provide for local data acquisition

  3. Developing a pilot curriculum to foster humanism among graduate medical trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Dotters-Katz

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: A pilot humanism curriculum for residents was well-received. Participants showed decreased burnout and trended to improved compassion scores. Development and evaluation of an expanded curriculum would further explore feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention.

  4. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldwasser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Torcellini, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Studer, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This technical feasibility study provides documentation and research results supporting a possible set of strategies to achieve source zero energy K-12 school buildings as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) zero energy building (ZEB) definition (DOE 2015a). Under this definition, a ZEB is an energy-efficient building in which, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 (ATCC 10798).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Daniela; Engelbrecht, Kathleen C; Putonti, Catherine; Koenig, David W; Wolfe, Alan J

    2017-07-06

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli ATCC 10798. E. coli ATCC 10798 is a K-12 strain, one of the most well-studied model microorganisms. The size of the genome was 4,685,496 bp, with a G+C content of 50.70%. This assembly consists of 62 contigs and the F plasmid. Copyright © 2017 Dimitrova et al.

  6. K-12 STEM Educators and the Inclusive Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songze

    2016-01-01

    The United States public schools promote inclusion and educational equity among diverse student populations. Considerable and growing numbers of students with categorical disabilities and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) are enrolled in regular classrooms. The systemic barriers in learning that they have could impact teacher perceptions and decisions about teaching practices as well as the teaching profession. These students have challenged K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathemat...

  7. Developing a New Industrial Engineering Curriculum Using a Systems Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyurgan, Nebil; Kiassat, Corey

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of an engineering curriculum for a new industrial engineering programme at a medium-sized private university in the northeast United States. A systems engineering process has been followed to design and develop the new curriculum. Considering the programme curriculum as a system, first the stakeholders have…

  8. Development of an Aviation Maintenance Curriculum in an Aerospace Engineering Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miau, Jiun-Jih; Chiu, Huei-Huang; Wu, Yuh-Yi; Lin, Chin-E; Choi, Siu-Tong; Yang, Shih-Ming; Jenq, Syh-Tsang

    This paper describes the motivation of developing the Aviation Maintenance Curriculum, at National Chang Kung University (seven elective courses) contents of the elective courses, and university-industry collaborations developed along with the Curriculum. The curriculum represents an effort to respond to the needs of manpower in the aviation…

  9. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-01-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  10. Lon gene and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waksman, G.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A. (Institut de Recherche en Biologie Moleculaire, Group de Photobiologie Moleculaire, Paris (France))

    1984-03-01

    Photoprotection, i.e. the increased resistance of the cells preilluminated with near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) to the lethal action of 254nm radiations requires either an integrated prophage or a recA mutation in Escherichia coli K12 strains. Significant photoprotection occurs in an Escherichia coli K12 recA/sup +/ cell containing the lon allele responsible for filamentous growth after 254nm irradiation. The Fil phenotype can be suppressed by the sfiA or sfiB suppressor genes. Since the E. coli K12 recA/sup +/ lon sfiB strain exhibits no more photoprotection, it is concluded that in lon strains photoprotection is due to the abolition of the 254nm induced filamentation by the near ultraviolet treatment. In addition, near ultraviolet illumination of the cells leads to a severe restriction of the bulk protein synthesis. This effect is observed only in nuv/sup +/ cells that contain 4-thiouridine the chromophore responsible for photoprotection. It is proposed that in lon (lysogenic strains) photoprotection is due to prevention of the SOS response. During the growth lag, the low residual level of protein synthesis does not allow the induction of the SOS response and accordingly prevents filamentation (the lytic cycle).

  11. The lon gene and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, G.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A.

    1984-01-01

    Photoprotection, i.e. the increased resistance of the cells preilluminated with near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) to the lethal action of 254nm radiations requires either an integrated prophage or a recA mutation in Escherichia coli K12 strains. Significant photoprotection occurs in an Escherichia coli K12 recA + cell containing the lon allele responsible for filamentous growth after 254nm irradiation. The Fil phenotype can be suppressed by the sfiA or sfiB suppressor genes. Since the E. coli K12 recA + lon sfiB strain exhibits no more photoprotection, it is concluded that in lon strains photoprotection is due to the abolition of the 254nm induced filamentation by the near ultraviolet treatment. In addition, near ultraviolet illumination of the cells leads to a severe restriction of the bulk protein synthesis. This effect is observed only in nuv + cells that contain 4-thiouridine the chromophore responsible for photoprotection. It is proposed that in lon (lysogenic strains) photoprotection is due to prevention of the SOS response. During the growth lag, the low residual level of protein synthesis does not allow the induction of the SOS response and accordingly prevents filamentation (the lytic cycle). (author)

  12. Next generation of procedural skills curriculum development: Proficiency-based progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Satava

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The FRS use a new process (full life-cycle curriculum development with proficiency-based progression which can be used in order to develop any quantitative procedural curriculum, through generic templates that have been developed. Such an approach will dramatically decrease the cost, time and effort to develop a new specific curriculum, while producing uniformity in approach, inter-operability among different curricula and consistency in objective assessment. This process is currently online, open source and freely available, to encourage the adoption of a scholarly and rigorous approach to curriculum development which is flexible enough to be adopted and adapted to most technical skills curriculum needs.

  13. Learning about Makerspaces: Professional Development with K-12 Inservice Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lana; Scharber, Cassandra

    2018-01-01

    Makerspaces are the latest educational movement that may disrupt the "grammar of schooling." Makerspaces may change the ways schools use technology; change the ways schools engage in learning and teaching; and change the forms of learning that count in schools. However, without deliberate professional learning and planning, the glamor of…

  14. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Eight awards in chemistry curriculum development for FY1996 have been announced. One award, to a consortium centered at the University of California-Los Angeles, represents the fifth award in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Although no proposals will be accepted in this program for either planning or full grants for FY1997, it is anticipated that proposals will be accepted in June of 1997 for projects that would adapt and adopt materials developed by the five funded consortia: Molecular Science centered at the University of California-Los Angeles; ChemLinks centered at Beloit College; MolecularChem Consortium centered at the University of California-Berkeley; Workshop Chemistry centered at CUNY City College; and New Traditions centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Seven awards have been made in the Course and Curriculum Development program. This ongoing program continues to accept proposals in chemistry as usual. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Award. Molecular Science. Orville L. Chapman University of California-Los Angeles DUE 9555605 FY96 725,000 FY97 575,000, FY98 575,000 FY99 275,000, FY00 275,000 The UCLA-CSUF-Community College Alliance (24 area community colleges that have worked together for more than 15 years) proposes a sweeping restructuring of the lower division chemistry curriculum and the auxiliary learning and assessment processes. In forming our new curriculum, we reject the positivist approach to science education in favor of a constructivist approach that emphasizes problem solving and exploratory learning. We make this change in order to focus on the developing key skills, traits, and abilities of our students. Our new curriculum, the Molecular Science Curriculum, cuts across departments and disciplines to embrace all activities that involve the study of atoms and molecules. In particular, environmental science, materials science, and molecular life science have

  15. A Commentary on "Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Correa Ruiz notes that from his analysis, Owen (2013) identified the essential elements to be included in a modern professional accounting curriculum, described how Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) has embedded "Integrated Reporting" in its curriculum, and discussed future curriculum development,…

  16. Dealing with Distinctiveness. Development of Chinese in the "Australian Curriculum: Languages"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Andrew; Foster, Marnie; Mao, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    This article explores some of the distinctive challenges in Chinese language education in schools and discusses how the development of the "Australian Curriculum: Chinese" has responded to these challenges. It details how the curriculum framework outlined in the "Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Languages" (ACARA, 2011)…

  17. A Curriculum Development Route Map for a Technology Enhanced Learning Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Linda; Prendes, Paz

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we are trying to present a model of analysis that includes a comprehensive perspective of the state of the art in the specialized literature about curriculum development. From this theoretical approach, we get a complete curriculum overview. Including insights into: what are the curriculum principal elements, what we already know…

  18. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  19. A Talent for Tinkering: Developing Talents in Children from Low-Income Households through Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ann; Adelson, Jill L.; Kidd, Kristy A.; Cunningham, Christine M.

    2018-01-01

    Guided by the theoretical framework of curriculum as a platform for talent development, this quasi-experimental field study investigated an intervention focused on engineering curriculum and curriculum based on a biography of a scientist through a comparative design implemented in low-income schools. Student outcome measures included science…

  20. The Evidence Base for Developing a Veterinary Business Management Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jackson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper sets out to highlight the ongoing need for integrated teaching of business skills in the veterinary curriculum.Background: In response to the changing environment of the veterinary profession, it is important to understand the future needs of veterinary practitioners. While changes to the veterinary curriculum have been made in recent years, they have been highly varied across schools and little evidence is available on how these have improved students’ non-technical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes. Evidentiary value: This literature review of 23 papers provides a solid basis for the further development of knowledge on business management issues in veterinary curricula. The impact on practice from our findings is substantial. The role of clinicians in academia is recognised as a primary source of engaging students with business management through their day-to-day teaching. Furthermore, the role of first-opinion vets who take on placement students (known as extra mural studies or ‘EMS’ in the UK cannot be underestimated as they play an essential role in ensuring that students perceive business skills with the same importance as clinical skills.Methods: This research draws on the findings of 23 papers that emerged as relevant from the structured literature search.  The search yielded 124 papers but many were excluded because they focused on issues beyond the search strategy, did not report empirical findings so were based largely on discussion and conjecture, were not about the undergraduate veterinary curriculum, were not written in English or were not related to business teaching.Results:  Employers of recent graduates highly value business skills, and often base their hiring decision on non-technical skills, rather than clinical skills. While changes to the veterinary curriculum have been made to include more non-technical training by individual veterinary schools, it is unclear how effective these

  1. Females and STEM: Determining the K-12 Experiences that Influenced Women to Pursue STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Marie

    In the United States, careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are increasing yet there are not enough trained personnel to meet this demand. In addition, of those that seek to pursue STEM fields in the United States, only 26% are female. In order to increase the number of women seeking STEM based bachelor's degrees, K-12 education must provide a foundation that prepares students for entry into these fields. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the perceived K-12 experiences that influenced females to pursue a STEM field. Twelve college juniors or seniors seeking a degree in Biology, Mathematics, or Physics were interviewed concerning their K-12 experiences. These interviews were analyzed and six themes emerged. Teacher passion and classroom characteristics such as incorporating challenging activities played a significant role in the females' decisions to enter STEM fields. Extra-curricular activities such as volunteer and mentor opportunities and the females' need to benefit others also influenced females in their career choice. Both the formal (within the school) and informal (outside of the traditional classroom) pipeline opportunities that these students encountered helped develop a sense of self-efficacy in science and mathematics; this self-efficacy enabled them to persist in pursuing these career fields. Several participants cited barriers that they encountered in K-12 education, but these barriers were primarily internal as they struggled with overcoming self-imposed obstacles in learning and being competitive in the mathematics and science classrooms. The experiences from these female students can be used by K-12 educators to prepare and encourage current female students to enter STEM occupations.

  2. 4-thiouridine and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Gilles; Favre, Alain

    1977-01-01

    A high level of protection is observed in the Escherichia coli K 12 strain AB 1157 rec A 1 nuv + whose transfer RNA contains 4-thiouridine. In contrast, the photoprotection level is low and observed at higher doses in a strain which differs from the former by a single mutation nuv - , (lack of 4-thiouridine). This nucleoside is therefore an important chromophore leading to photoprotection. This conclusion is corroborated by the similarity of the action spectra for 8-13 link formation in tRNA and for photoprotection [fr

  3. The SERC K12 Educators Portal to Teaching Activities and Pedagogic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.; Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Schmitt, L.

    2013-12-01

    activities and approaches that use maps as the basis of instruction for a wide range of topics commonly taught in K12 science courses such as natural hazards, urban development, plate tectonics, climate change, ocean science, and water resources; and (2) Providing easy access to a vast collection of materials specifically for teachers of AP and IB classes including collections of teaching activities for all science disciplines as well as pedagogic approaches that are appropriate for the lab-intensive nature of these classes. The contents of the K12 portal are drawn from a number of projects and collaborations, including CLEAN, Earth Exploration Toolbook, Minnesota Science Teachers Education Project, Pedagogy in Action, EarthLabs, NAGT and On the Cutting Edge. Teachers can add their own materials to the site by sharing lessons plans, activities, and labs. K12 educators of all levels will find a wide variety of resources to spark the curiosity and interest of students. Explore the SERC K12 Educators Portal at: http://serc.carleton.edu/k12/index.html

  4. Culturally responsible curriculum development in hospitality, tourism and events management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Losekoot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi (1840 to Higher Education in New Zealand and how this influences the educational experience of hospitality, tourism and event management students. The paper reviews the literature on cultural diversity, internationalization and curriculum development, the role of culture in educating domestic and international students, and how the acculturation Higher Education students experience as part of their studies might lead to a deeper understanding of culture and identity in the hospitality workplace. The gap in the literature concerns how a higher education curriculum can assist in the development of cultural awareness and an understanding of historical commitments. The paper therefore identifies a number of key principles which are regarded as essential to the identity of those living in New Zealand/Aotearoa. The paper then goes on to illustrate how these principles could be applied to Higher Education. It suggests that these principles enshrined in the Treaty of Waitangi are also worth considering when creating an inclusive curriculum which supports all hospitality, tourism and events management students, irrespective of ethnic background, culture or upbringing. Finally, this paper proposes a matrix of ‘hooks’ - tools which academics can use to ensure their lectures address the needs of all learners. This matrix is developed from a study of the educational goals of the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi (ToW, the founding document of this country. This research adds value by creating an awareness of the diverse environment in which academics and students operate, thereby enabling students to develop a cultural sensitivity to the international hospitality industry they will be employed in on graduation.

  5. Overcoming Constraints of Building Successful Partnerships Incorporating STEM Research Into K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE is currently in its second year of partnering ten graduate students from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in the classrooms. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach throughout the local community. Numerous challenges were met during the formation of the program as well as throughout the first year in which the project management team worked together to find solutions ensuring that INSPIRE maintained successful partnerships for all involved. Proposed solutions of the following key components were identified by INSPIRE through the development, implementation, and continuous evaluation (internal and external) of the first year of the program as areas that can pose challenges to the construction of strong relationships between STEM research and K-12 classrooms: initializing the partnerships with the K-12 classrooms and STEM graduate fields at the university; maintaining strong partnerships; providing appropriate training and support; developing sound

  6. Action Research for Curriculum Development: An Alternative Approach in the Algerian Centralised Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas GHERZOULI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature in the field of curriculum is debating the extent to which teachers should or could participate in the developmental process of the curriculum they enact. Being the practitioners, teachers are the ones who transmit theory into practice. However, they are not only consumers of curriculum knowledge, but also significant producers of it. Thus, teachers’ active participation as primary stakeholders in the curriculum development process is a necessity. The paper outlines one approach for teacher participation in curriculum development, which is action research. The main aim of this paper is twofold; first: it explores literature about ‘curriculum’, ‘curriculum development’ and ‘action research’; and second, it emphasizes the prominence of teachers’ involvement and research in curriculum development, paying specific attention to the Algerian secondary school educational reform, which is highly controlled and centralised.

  7. Development of a subspecialty cardiology curriculum for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This online interactive curriculum was followed by several site visits to ... Evaluation of the curriculum model included post-module quizzes on cardiac topics as ... Conclusions: Our innovative hybrid approach, combining online educational ...

  8. Joint Curriculum Developments in the Field of Virtual Space Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael; Zupancic, Tadeja; Juvancic, Matevz

    2006-01-01

    initiates a discussion-forum to raise and discuss open questions of joint curriculum development in the field of virtual space design, especially where CVE-s take the key role within the educational process. The starting points of the discussion can be found in the ongoing endeavours of the e......The topic of joint degrees is high on the higher education policy agenda. The eCAADe 2006 theme offers the opportunity to investigate the topic from the aspect of virtual space design, especially within the second conference topic: communicating within mediated spaces (CVE-s). The paper proposed...

  9. Developing Musical Creativity: Student and Teacher Perceptions of a High School Music Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2013-01-01

    Music technology classes designed to use the latest in music software to develop music compositional skills within high school students are becoming more prominent in K-12 education. The purpose of this case study was to describe the development of creativity in high school students through their participation in a music technology course at one…

  10. Children's understanding of area concepts: development, curriculum and educational achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Trevor G; Parkinson, Kellie

    2010-01-01

    As one part of a series of studies undertaken to investigate the contribution of developmental attributes of learners to school learning, a representative sample of forty-two students (age from 5 years and 3 months to 13 years and 1 month) was randomly selected from a total student population of 142 students at a small private primary school in northern Australia. Those children's understandings of area concepts taught during the primary school years were assessed by their performance in two testing situations. The first consisted of a written classroom test of ability to solve area problems with items drawn directly from school texts, school examinations and other relevant curriculum documents. The second, which focused more directly on each child's cognitive development, was an individual interview for each child in which four "area" tasks such as the Meadows and Farmhouse Experiment taken from Chapter 11 of The Child's Conception of Geometry (Piaget, Inhelder and Szeminska, 1960, pp. 261-301) were administered. Analysis using the Rasch Partial Credit Model provided a finely detailed quantitative description of the developmental and learning progressions revealed in the data. It is evident that the school mathematics curriculum does not satisfactorily match the learner's developmental sequence at some key points. Moreover, the children's ability to conserve area on the Piagetian tasks, rather than other learner characteristics, such as age and school grade seems to be a precursor for complete success on the mathematical test of area. The discussion focuses on the assessment of developmental (and other) characteristics of school-aged learners and suggests how curriculum and school organization might better capitalize on such information in the design and sequencing of learning experiences for school children. Some features unique to the Rasch family of measurement models are held to have special significance in elucidating the development/attainment nexus.

  11. Development of a virtual reality training curriculum for phacoemulsification surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, A V; Aggarwal, R; Kersey, T L; Sira, M; Benjamin, L; Darzi, A W; Bloom, P A

    2014-01-01

    Training within a proficiency-based virtual reality (VR) curriculum may reduce errors during real surgical procedures. This study used a scientific methodology to develop a VR training curriculum for phacoemulsification surgery (PS). Ten novice-(n) (performed 500) surgeons were recruited. Construct validity was defined as the ability to differentiate between the three levels of experience, based on the simulator-derived metrics for two abstract modules (four tasks) and three procedural modules (five tasks) on a high-fidelity VR simulator. Proficiency measures were based on the performance of experienced surgeons. Abstract modules demonstrated a 'ceiling effect' with construct validity established between groups (n) and (i) but not between groups (i) and (e)-Forceps 1 (46, 87, and 95; P<0.001). Increasing difficulty of task showed significantly reduced performance in (n) but minimal difference for (i) and (e)-Anti-tremor 4 (0, 51, and 59; P<0.001), Forceps 4 (11, 73, and 94; P<0.001). Procedural modules were found to be construct valid between groups (n) and (i) and between groups (i) and (e)-Lens-cracking (0, 22, and 51; P<0.05) and Phaco-quadrants (16, 53, and 87; P<0.05). This was also the case with Capsulorhexis (0, 19, and 63; P<0.05) with the performance decreasing in the (n) and (i) group but improving in the (e) group (0, 55, and 73; P<0.05) and (0, 48, and 76; P<0.05) as task difficulty increased. Experienced/intermediate benchmark skill levels are defined allowing the development of a proficiency-based VR training curriculum for PS for novices using a structured scientific methodology.

  12. Skills Development, Habits of Mind, and the Spiral Curriculum: A Dialectical Approach to Undergraduate General Education Curriculum Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    This essay seeks to contribute to growing discussion concerning the need for more intentional inclusion of habits of mind in curriculum development, particularly in undergraduate general education, and to fuel an examination of the "dialectical" relationship between skills development and the development of habits of mind. The essay…

  13. Science Curriculum Guide, Level 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark School District, DE.

    The fourth of four levels in a K-12 science curriculum is outlined. In Level 4 (grades 9-12), science areas include earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics. Six major themes provide the basis for study in all levels (K-12). These are: Change, Continuity, Diversity, Interaction, Limitation, and Organization. In Level 4, all six themes are…

  14. The landscape of PreK-12 engineering online resources for teachers: global trends

    OpenAIRE

    Bagiati, Aikaterini; Evangelou, Demetra; Magana, Alejandra; Kaloustian, Garene; Zhu, Jiabin; Yoon, So Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Background: The newly formed discipline of engineering education is addressing the need to (a) enhance STEM education for precollege students and (b) identify optimum ways to introduce engineering content starting, perhaps, from the early ages. Introducing engineering at the Prekindergarten through 12th grade (PreK-12) education level requires significant changes in teacher preparation and support. It highlights the need for developing developmentally appropriate content knowledge and ped...

  15. Women Education and Economic Development in Kenya: Implications for Curriculum Development and Implementation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syomwene, Anne; Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the relationship between women education and sustainable economic development in Kenya and its implications for curriculum development and implementation processes. The argument advanced in this paper is that the solution to the development problems in Kenya and other developing nations lies on women education.…

  16. [The development of a caring curriculum in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Lee-Hsieh, Jane; Wang, Pi-Ling

    2007-08-01

    Caring is the essence of nursing and the core of nursing education. This paper describes the experience of developing a caring curriculum in a five-year junior college nursing program which included three core courses in caring, in the hope of stimulating further dialogue with fellow educators and cultivating students' caring competencies. The first course was Introduction to Caring, which gave students an understanding of basic concepts of caring, along with the opportunity to practice and experience caring by caring for oneself, one's family and one's peers. The second course was Application of Caring Concepts, which enabled students to learn about caring models, especially the dynamic caring model, and expanded their knowledge of caring behaviors from interpersonal caring to caring for society. The third course was Professional Caring, which explained professional caring and related caring theories, and introduced the caring model used in nursing in Taiwan, showing students how to practice caring in clinical situations. The participating teachers used the action research method to plan, design, implement, and evaluate the caring curriculum. These teachers set the teaching objectives and developed course materials by working together in workshops and participating in teachers' caring groups. They adopted various teaching strategies, such as role modeling, dialogue, caring groups, confirmation, literature, film, caring action projects, reflection, and journaling, which have been proven to be effective at raising students' learning motivation and caring performance.

  17. Using Scientific Visualizations to Enhance Scientific Thinking In K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, E.

    2016-12-01

    The same scientific visualizations, animations, and images that are powerful tools for geoscientists can serve an important role in K-12 geoscience education by encouraging students to communicate in ways that help them develop habits of thought that are similar to those used by scientists. Resources such as those created by NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS), which are intended to inform researchers and the public about NASA missions, can be used in classrooms to promote thoughtful, engaged learning. Instructional materials that make use of those visualizations have been developed and are being used in K-12 classrooms in ways that demonstrate the vitality of the geosciences. For example, the Center for Geoscience and Society at the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) helped to develop a publication that outlines an inquiry-based approach to introducing students to the interpretation of scientific visualizations, even when they have had little to no prior experience with such media. To facilitate these uses, the SVS team worked with Center staff and others to adapt the visualizations, primarily by removing most of the labels and annotations. Engaging with these visually compelling resources serves as an invitation for students to ask questions, interpret data, draw conclusions, and make use of other processes that are key components of scientific thought. This presentation will share specific resources for K-12 teaching (all of which are available online, from NASA, and/or from AGI), as well as the instructional principles that they incorporate.

  18. Master Curriculum Guide in Economics. A Framework for Teaching the Basic Concepts. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Phillip; And Others

    Intended for curriculum developers, this revised Framework presents a set of basic concepts for teaching K-12 economics. The revision reflects the change and development which the field of economics has undergone and includes improvements suggested by users of the first edition. The purpose of teaching economics is to impart a general…

  19. Development of a Comprehensive Digital Avionics Curriculum for the Aeronautical Engineer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofer, Thomas W

    2006-01-01

    ... avionics curriculum does not yet exist that satisfies the needs of graduates who will serve as aeronautical engineers involved with the development, integration, testing, fielding, and supporting...

  20. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit energy efficiency measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings nationwide. U.S. K-12 school districts spend more than $8 billion each year on energy - more than they spend on computers and textbooks combined. Most occupy older buildings that often have poor operational performance - more than 30% of schools were built before 1960. The average age of a school is about 42 years - which is nearly the expected serviceable lifespan of the building. K-12 schools offer unique opportunities for deep, cost-effective energy efficiency improvements, and this guide provides convenient and practical guidance for exploiting these opportunities in the context of public, private, and parochial schools.

  1. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  2. The Developing Infant Creates a Curriculum for Statistical Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda B; Jayaraman, Swapnaa; Clerkin, Elizabeth; Yu, Chen

    2018-04-01

    New efforts are using head cameras and eye-trackers worn by infants to capture everyday visual environments from the point of view of the infant learner. From this vantage point, the training sets for statistical learning develop as the sensorimotor abilities of the infant develop, yielding a series of ordered datasets for visual learning that differ in content and structure between timepoints but are highly selective at each timepoint. These changing environments may constitute a developmentally ordered curriculum that optimizes learning across many domains. Future advances in computational models will be necessary to connect the developmentally changing content and statistics of infant experience to the internal machinery that does the learning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using deliberation to address controversial issues: Developing Holocaust education curriculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THOMAS MISCO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how a cross-cultural project responded to the need for new Holocaust educational materials for the Republic of Latvia through the method of curriculum deliberation. Analysis of interview, observational, and document data drawn from seven curriculum writers and numerous project members suggest that curriculum deliberation helped awaken a controversial and silenced history while attending to a wide range of needs and concerns for a variety of stakeholders. The findings highlight structural features that empowered the curriculum writers as they engaged in protracted rumination, reflected upon competing norms, and considered the nuances of the curriculum problem in relation to implementation. Understanding the process, challenges, and promises of cross-cultural curriculum deliberation holds significance for educators, curricularists, and educational researchers wishing to advance teaching and learning within silenced histories and controversial issues.

  4. Developing a new industrial engineering curriculum using a systems engineering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyurgan, Nebil; Kiassat, Corey

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the development of an engineering curriculum for a new industrial engineering programme at a medium-sized private university in the northeast United States. A systems engineering process has been followed to design and develop the new curriculum. Considering the programme curriculum as a system, first the stakeholders have been identified, and some preliminary analysis on their needs and requirements has been conducted. Following that, the phases of conceptual design, preliminary design, and detailed design have been pursued during which different levels of validation, assessment, and evaluation processes have been utilised. In addition, a curriculum assessment and continuous improvement process have been developed to assess the curriculum and the courses frequently. The resulting curriculum is flexible, allowing the pursuit of accelerated graduate programmes, a second major, various minor options, and study-abroad; relevant, tailored to the needs of industry partners in the vicinity; and practical, providing hands-on education, resulting in employment-ready graduates.

  5. Towards a Multi-Stakeholder-Driven Model for Excellence in Higher Education Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. H.; Bushney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stakeholder-driven model for excellence in higher education curriculum development has been developed. It is based on the assumption that current efforts to curriculum development take place within a framework of limited stakeholder consultation. A total of 18 multiple stakeholders are identified, including learners, alumni, government,…

  6. The Development of Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence: Amnesia and Deja Vu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark; Humes, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Scotland's new "Curriculum for Excellence" (CfE) has been widely acknowledged as the most significant educational development in a generation, with the potential to transform learning and teaching in Scottish schools. In common with recent developments elsewhere, CfE seeks to re-engage teachers with processes of curriculum development,…

  7. Curriculum Issues: Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries--Zimbabwe Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambudzo, Ignatius Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate curriculum issues, teaching and learning for sustainable development in secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Education for sustainable development (ESD) aims at changing the approach to education by integrating principles, values, practices and needs in all forms of learning. Literature has documented the importance of…

  8. Barriers in the Physics Pipeline from K-12 to Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2016-09-01

    The lack of diversity in physics is a known problem, and yet efforts to change our demographics have only had minor effects during the last decade. I will explain some of the hidden barriers that dissuade underrepresented minorities in becoming physicists using a framework borrowed from sociology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I will draw from current research at the undergraduate to faculty levels over a variety of STEM fields that are also addressing a lack of diversity. I will also provide analysis from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of Elements (JINA-CEE) outreach programs to understand the likelihood of current K-12 students in becoming physicists. Specifically, I will present results from the pre-surveys from our Art 2 Science Camps (ages 8-14) about their attitudes towards science as well as results from analysis of teacher recommendations for our high school summer program. I will conclude with a positive outlook describing the pipeline created by JINA-CEE to retain students from middle school through college. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  9. Career education attitudes and practices of K-12 science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walter S.

    A random sample of 400 K-12 science educators who were members of the National Science Teachers Association were surveyed regarding their attitude toward and practice of career education in their science teaching. These science teachers rejected a narrowly vocational view, favoring instead a conception of career education which included self-perception, values analysis, and vocational skills objectives. The science educators affirmed the importance of career education for a student's education, asserted career education ought to be taught in their existing science courses, and expressed a willingness to do so. Fewer than one-third of the science teachers, however, reported incorporating career education at least on a weekly basis in their science lessons. The major impediment to including more career education in science teaching was seen to be their lack of knowledge of methods and materials relevant to science career education, rather than objections from students, parents, or administrators; their unwillingness; or their evaluation of career education as unimportant. Thus, in order to improve this aspect of science teaching, science teachers need more concrete information about science career education applications.

  10. A Model for the Development of a CDIO Based Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a model providing a structured method for engineering curriculum design. The model is developed to show the major influencers on the curriculum design and the relations between the influencers. These influencers are identified as the engineering science, the business...... environment, the university environment, and the teachers and students. Each of them and their influence on the curriculum is described and the sources of information about the influencers are discussed. The CDIO syllabus has been defined as part of the basis for the Bachelor of Engineering programs...... at the Technical University of Denmark and this gives a strong direct impact of the university environment on the resulting curriculum in electrical engineering. The resulting Bachelor of Engineering curriculum is presented and it is discussed how it complies with the model for curriculum development. The main...

  11. Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6-8: Climate Change Curriculum Developed Through a Collaboration Between Scientists and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E.; Skene, J.; Tran, L.

    2011-12-01

    aligns with the Ocean Literacy and Climate Literacy Frameworks, as well as multiple core ideas in the new National Academy of Sciences Framework for K-12 Science Education. In brief, the curriculum comprises 33 45-minute sessions organized into three thematic units that are each driven by an exploratory question: Unit 1 (11 sessions)-How do the ocean and atmosphere interact?; Unit 2 (8 sessions)-How does carbon flow through the ocean, land, and atmosphere?; and Unit 3 (12 sessions)-What are the causes and effects of climate change? The curriculum deliberately explores the ocean and climate as global systems, and challenges students to use scientific evidence to make explanations about climate change. The Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6-8 is currently being classroom tested by teachers across the United States in a wide variety of classroom settings. Evaluation is also being undertaken to determine the efficacy of the sequence in addressing the curriculum's learning goals.

  12. The Development of e-tutorial on Implementation National Curriculum 2013 for Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Yenita; Satria, Gita; Nur Siregar, Syarifah

    2017-06-01

    Curriculum 2013 is the new national Curriculum in Indonesia that is targeted to be used in all Indonesian schools in 2019. At this time the teacher training continues but the number and locations of teachers very diffuse and time constraints to be an obstacle for the government to be able to conduct training for teachers. This research resulted in the e-tutorial which is designed for mathematics teachers in studying the process of Curriculum implementation. This product will assist the government in accelerating the preparation of teachers in implementation of Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial contains the dynamics of Curriculum development, learning model, learning assessment, lesson plan, curriculum stages of implementation and government regulation that is relevant to the implementation of Curriculum 2013. The product development started with a needs analysis through discussions with mathematics teachers about their difficulties in the implementation of the Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial was developed using Application of Adobe Director 11. This paper discusses the results of need analysis, process development and results of product revisions made based on input from teachers during the FGD. From the discussion, it can be concluded that this e-tutorial easily understood by teachers and help them to understand the implementation of Curriculum 2013

  13. The application of Legacy Cycles in the development of Earth Science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Abernathy, E.; Negrito, K.; McCall, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Institute for Geophysics in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin actively contributes to K-12 education, including the development of rigorous Earth and Space Science curriculum designed for secondary school learning environments. Here we report on our efforts to apply an innovative new pedagogical approach, the Legacy Cycle, to scientific ocean drilling paleoclimate data from fossil corals collected offshore Barbados in 2006 and to the creation of a high school water resources education program for Texas high school students supported by a grant from the Texas Water Development Board. The Legacy Cycle makes use of the Internet and computer technology to engage students in extended inquiry learning. A series of inquiry activities are organized around a set of three driving questions, or challenges. Students mimic the work of scientists by generating ideas to address a given challenge, listening to multiple perspectives from experts on the topic, researching a set of sub-questions and revising their original ideas, testing their mettle with labs and quizzes, and finally composing a project or paper that answers the original challenge. The technology makes it easy for students to move through the challenges and the organizational framework since there are hyperlinks to each of the sections (and to reach the other challenges) at the bottom of each webpage. Students' final work is posted to the Internet for others to see, and in this way they leave behind their legacy. Our Legacy Cycle activities use authentic hydrologic, water quality, geochemical, geophysical data, as well as remotely sensed data such as is collected by satellites. They are aligned with the U.S. National Science Education Standards, the new Ocean, Climate and Earth Science Literacy Principles (in development), and the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Earth and Space Science. The work represents a collaboration involving teachers from The University of

  14. Development of a Case-based Reading Curriculum and Its Effect on Resident Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messman, Anne M; Walker, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Textbook reading plays a foundational role in a resident's knowledge base. Many residency programs place residents on identical reading schedules, regardless of the clinical work or rotation the resident is doing. We sought to develop a reading curriculum that takes into account the clinical work a resident is doing so their reading curriculum corresponds with their clinical work. Preliminary data suggests an increased amount of resident reading and an increased interest in reading as a result of this change to their reading curriculum.

  15. Curriculum development in the Netherlands: introduction of tracks in the 2001 curriculum at Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beukelen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Utrecht has recently introduced two major curriculum changes in order to keep pace with developments in research (the vast increase in scientific knowledge), in society (the quality awareness of veterinary clients), and in the veterinary profession, where a species and sector differentiation can be observed. After about 15 years during which the curriculum remained more or less unchanged, a radical curriculum revision was introduced in 1995. A further revision, with the introduction of separate study tracks, began in 2001. The 2001 curriculum focuses on academic and scientific training, active learning and problem solving, training in communication and professional behavior, and lifelong learning. It is divided into a four-year core curriculum, in which a broad, cross-species pathobiological insight is central, and a two-year track curriculum, through which students achieve a starting competence in a specific species or sector. The main teaching methods are tutorials and group tasks; practical work is used mainly to achieve specific veterinary skills. Teaching hours represent 30-35% of all study hours. Self-teaching is encouraged by providing study materials, self-teaching questions, teachers assigned to assist with self-teaching, and adequate facilities. The five tracks offered are Companion Animals/Equine; Food Animals; Veterinary Public Health; Veterinary Research; and Veterinary Administration and Management. All students follow a uniform 30-week clinical rotation program, while the track program is 42 weeks. A summary of admission procedures is given, as well as the times and procedures for track selection.

  16. The Development, Testing, and Evaluation of an Emotional Intelligence Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald G.; Fischer, Jerome M.

    2003-01-01

    Adult students using an emotional intelligence (EI) curriculum (n=13) and 15 controls in a composition class completed the Emotional Intelligence Test and Emotional Content Quality Index. Significant pre- to posttest changes in the EI group suggest the curriculum positively increased their ability to identify, reflect on, process, and manage…

  17. Developing curriculum design expertise through teacher design teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, T.

    2014-01-01

    To foster the design and especially the implementation of curriculum reform, teacher involvement from the early stages of curriculum reform processes is advocated. By fulfilling the role of designer, it is expected that teachers’ understanding of the reform and their ownership concerning the reform

  18. Developing a Competency-Based Curriculum for a Dental Hygiene Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWald, Janice P.; McCann, Ann L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the three-step process used to develop a competency-based curriculum at the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene (Texas A&M University). The process involved development of a competency document (detailing three domains, nine major competencies, and 54 supporting competencies), an evaluation plan, and a curriculum inventory which defined…

  19. Development and evaluation of a risk communication curriculum for medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, P.K.; Joekes, K.; Elwyn, G.; Mazor, K.M.; Thomson, R.; Sedgwick, P.; Ibison, J.; Wong, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop, pilot, and evaluate a curriculum for teaching clinical risk communication skills to medical students. METHODS: A new experience-based curriculum, "Risk Talk," was developed and piloted over a 1-year period among students at Tufts University School of Medicine. An experimental

  20. Influence of culture on curriculum development in Ghana: an undervalued factor?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervedink Nijhuis, C.J.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Voogt, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum implementation often falls short because of a lack of cultural understanding by curriculum developers and aid organizations. This paper describes a single-case study of a professional development programme for polytechnic Heads of Department in Ghana, which aimed at identifying how

  1. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    A project was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in cooperation with area vocational-technical schools, the first year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. Existing programs were reviewed and private sector input was sought in developing the curriculum and identifying…

  2. Emergency medicine clerkship curriculum in a high-income developing country: methods for development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Arif Alper; Cakal, Elif Dilek; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2018-06-07

    The published recommendations for international emergency medicine curricula cover the content, but exclude teaching and learning methods, assessment, and evaluation. We aim to provide an overview on available emergency medicine clerkship curricula and report the development and application experience of our own curriculum. Our curriculum is an outcome-based education, enriched by e-learning and various up-to-date pedagogic principles. Teaching and learning methods, assessment, and evaluation are described. The theory behind our practice in the light of recent literature is discussed aiming to help other colleagues from developing countries to have a clear map for developing and tailoring their own curricula depending on their needs. The details of our emergency medicine clerkship will serve as an example for developing and developed countries having immature undergraduate emergency medicine clerkship curricula. However, these recommendations will differ in various settings depending on available resources. The main concept of curriculum development is to create a curriculum having learning outcomes and content relevant to the local context, and then align the teaching and learning activities, assessments, and evaluations to be in harmony. This may assure favorable educational outcome even in resource limited settings.

  3. Should I Stay or Should I Go? Factors that Influence the Retention, Turnover, and Attrition of K-12 Music Teachers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a profile of K-12 music teachers in the United States and develop a model to predict their retention, turnover, and attrition. Responses to the "Schools and Staffing Survey" from 47,857 K-12 public and private school teachers, including 1,903 music teachers, were analyzed using comparative…

  4. National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12. A Special Publication of the Journal of School Health. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School Health Association (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper, "National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12," is to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the "essential minimum, core content" for sexuality education that is developmentally and age-appropriate for students in grades K-12. The development of these standards is a result of an…

  5. Interviewing for a Job. The Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement in Industrial Education, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    The intent of this field tested instructional package is to provide the student with an overview of the management element of industry and how it relates to the duties of a shop foreman. Defining behavioral objectives, the course description includes an information section, classroom activities, sample job application forms, and student evaluation…

  6. Apply Deming's Methods to K-12 Curriculum and Improve Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States has been engaged in school reform for three decades. The federal government as well as all fifty states have passed numerous versions of reform legislation to mandate and regulate the process. Educators have adjusted their practices to the policy created by this legislation. They have also allocated hundreds of billions of…

  7. A Subject Matter Expert View of Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Anderson, R. B.; Edgar, L. A.; Gaither, T. A.; Vaughan, R. G.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, NASA selected for funding the PLANETS project: Planetary Learning that Advances the Nexus of Engineering, Technology, and Science. The PLANETS partnership develops planetary science and engineering curricula for out of classroom time (OST) education settings. This partnership is between planetary science Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the US Geological Survey (USGS), curriculum developers at the Boston Museum of Science (MOS) Engineering is Everywhere (EiE), science and engineering teacher professional development experts at Northern Arizona University (NAU) Center for Science Teaching and Learning (CSTL), and OST teacher networks across the world. For the 2016 and 2017 Fiscal Years, our focus was on creating science material for two OST modules designed for middle school students. We have begun development of a third module for elementary school students. The first model teaches about the science and engineering of the availability of water in the Solar System, finding accessible water, evaluating it for quality, treating it for impurities, initial use, a cycle of greywater treatment and re-use, and final treatment of blackwater. This module is described in more detail in the abstract by L. Edgar et al., Water in the Solar System: The Development of Science Education Curriculum Focused on Planetary Exploration (233008) The second module involves the science and engineering of remote sensing in planetary exploration. This includes discussion and activities related to the electromagnetic spectrum, spectroscopy and various remote sensing systems and techniques. In these activities and discussions, we include observation and measurement techniques and tools as well as collection and use of specific data of interest to scientists. This module is described in more detail in the abstract by R. Anderson et al., Remote Sensing Mars Landing Sites: An Out-of-School Time Planetary Science Education Activity for Middle School Students (232683) The third module

  8. Investigating the Potential of MOOCs in K-12 Teaching and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigh, Jennifer; Pytash, Kristine E.; Ferdig, Richard E.; Merchant, William

    2015-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is a relatively new concept in K-12 teaching and learning environments. Although significant work has been done with MOOCs since 2008, it has only been recently that MOOCs have been studied with K-12 populations. The purpose of this study was to further examine the motivation of K-12 students enrolled in a…

  9. Interview with Joe Freidhoff: A Bird's-Eye View of K-12 Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreau, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this article is to introduce long-time "Online Learning" readership to the field of K-12 online learning while also providing direction for the K-12 online learning scholars about where the field is going or should be going in terms of meeting the needs of K-12 stakeholders. Recently an interview was conducted with Dr. Joe…

  10. Harnessing Technology to Improve K-12 Education. Discussion Paper 2012-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Aaron; Jones, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Technological progress has consistently driven remarkable advances in the U.S. economy, yet K-12 education sees little technological change compared to other sectors, even as U.S. K-12 students increasingly lag behind students in other nations. This proposal considers how we can take a signature American strength--innovation--and apply it to K-12

  11. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  12. BiteScis: Connecting K-12 teachers with science graduate students to produce lesson plans on modern science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Many students graduate high school having never learned about the process and people behind modern science research. The BiteScis program addresses this gap by providing easily implemented lesson plans that incorporate the whos, whats, and hows of today's scienctific discoveries. We bring together practicing scientists (motivated graduate students from the selective communicating science conference, ComSciCon) with K-12 science teachers to produce, review, and disseminate K-12 lesson plans based on modern science research. These lesson plans vary in topic from environmental science to neurobiology to astrophysics, and involve a range of activities from laboratory exercises to art projects, debates, or group discussion. An integral component of the program is a series of short, "bite-size" articles on modern science research written for K-12 students. The "bite-size" articles and lesson plans will be made freely available online in an easily searchable web interface that includes association with a variety of curriculum standards. This ongoing program is in its first year with about 15 lesson plans produced to date.

  13. The Use of Minimum Objectives in Curriculum Research and Development, 1975-1976. Technical Report #45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Doris

    This report describes a curriculum, based on stated performance objectives, which was developed and implemented by the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). The structure of the mathematics and reading curriculum is described briefly and the use of performance objectives in evaluating student progress is discussed. Advantages of the…

  14. Knowledge Management ERP Curriculum Design/Mapping (Theory and Development Tools)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Zane; Hepner, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a knowledge management framework for developing and managing enterprise resource planning (ERP) curriculum within business schools. Both theory and a practical implementation are addressed. The knowledge management (KM) framework has two components which utilize ERP from a big picture curriculum overview and a ground level…

  15. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 78 FR 35319 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Curriculum Development: Planning and Implementing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... jails and extensive experience in working with local jails on issues related to inmate mental health... mental illness. Scope of Work: The cooperative agreement awardee will draft a curriculum on (1) the key...--Curriculum Development: Planning and Implementing Effective Mental Health Services in Jails AGENCY: National...

  17. MCD Process Model: A Systematic Approach to Curriculum Development in Black Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Howard J.

    1986-01-01

    Holds that Black Studies programs have had problems surviving because of (1) resistance to curriculum change in colleges and universities, (2) their lack of supporters in positions of administrative power, and (3) lack of an organized, conceptual approach to developing and implementing a Black Studies curriculum. Presents a model designed to…

  18. Social Media and Marketing Education: A Review of Current Practices in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, E. Deanne; White, Nathan James; Bartkus, Kenneth; Brocato, Ashley Ann

    2015-01-01

    Given the presumed importance of social media to marketing, along with the apparent lack of research concerning social media curriculum development, the purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic analysis of social media curriculum through the evaluation of undergraduate course syllabi in the United States. This research is intended to…

  19. Towards a Model of School-Based Curriculum Development and Assessment Using the SOLO Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John

    1989-01-01

    One factor preventing the wider acceptance of school-based curriculum development and assessment is the problem of comparing performances of different students, in different schools. The SOLO taxonomy is used to describe the complexity of learning outcomes in a language that is generally applicable across the curriculum. (Author/MLW)

  20. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  1. Developing the New Columbia Core Curriculum: A Case Study in Managing Radical Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Sandro; Fried, Linda P.; Walker, Julia R.; Rudenstine, Sasha; Glover, Jim W.

    2015-01-01

    Curricular change is essential for maintaining vibrant, timely, and relevant educational programming. However, major renewal of a long-standing curriculum at an established university presents many challenges for leaders, faculty, staff, and students. We present a case study of a dramatic curriculum renewal of one of the nation’s largest Master of Public Health degree programs: Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. We discuss context, motivation for change, the administrative structure established to support the process, data sources to inform our steps, the project timeline, methods for engaging the school community, and the extensive planning that was devoted to evaluation and communication efforts. We highlight key features that we believe are essential for successful curricular change. PMID:25706010

  2. A Study of Curriculum Development: Wing Squadron Officer Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Kerk

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research project is to determine the appropriate curriculum to best address the gap currently existing within the Air Force officer Continuum of Education between the Aerospace Basic Course (ABC...

  3. the development of a new chemistry curriculum in the netherlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    teaching in the upper level of secondary school is given. [AJCE 4(2), Special ... For all subjects this lead to major changes in the curriculum. Most specifically in ..... International Conference on Chemical Education, Mauritius. 12. Graaf, A. v.

  4. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  5. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-27

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern's approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution.

  6. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre–health majors at Portland State University, we aim to teach fundamental physical concepts, such as light absorption and emission and atomic energy levels, through analysis of biological systems and medical devices. The activities address the properties of electromagnetic waves as they relate to the interaction with biological tissue and make links between physics and biomedical applications such as microscopy or laser eye surgery. We report on the effect that engaging students in tasks with actual medical equipment has had on their conceptual understanding of light and spectroscopy. These initial assessments indicate that students’ understanding improves in some areas as a result of taking the course, but gains are not uniform and are relatively low for other topics. We also find a promising “nonshift” in student attitudes toward learning science as a result of taking the course. A long-term goal of this work is to develop these materials to the extent that they can eventually be imported into an introductory curriculum for life sciences majors. PMID:23737632

  7. The Academic Curriculum of Medical Radiation Technologists: Continuous Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergieva, K.; Gagova, P.; Bonninska, N.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The purpose is to present the activities of Department of Radiation technologists at Medical College Sofia in knowledge management (KM) in human health applications and namely: continuous development of academic curriculum (AC) for medical radiation technologists (MRT) in sense of the conference motto “Nuclear Knowledge Management: Challenges and Approaches”. Our challenge is to realize, in practice, the important role of MRT professionals in healthcare. They are the front line in the patient safety and the last person with the patient before exposure. The existing AC has been periodically peer-reviewed: in 2011, 2014, and ongoing reviews, with the aim to guarantee that we are providing knowledge, skills and competencies that meet modern requirements for the training of radiation technologists. The AC compromises both academic and clinical education. The clinical component occurs throughout the academic course, accenting the role of MRT in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine. The approach of continuously developing the AC will meet the stringent requirements recently published by IAEA, with the goal that radiological medical practitioners, medical physicists, medical radiation technologists and other health professionals with specific duties in relation to protection and safety for patients in a given radiological procedure are specialized in the appropriate area. (author

  8. Integrating professional behavior development across a professional allied health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumas, Linda J; Pelletier, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Professional behaviors are an integral part of clinical practice in all allied health and medical fields. A systematic process for instruction, the education, and development of professional behaviors, cannot be taught in the same way that memorization of human anatomy or medical terminology is taught. One cannot expect professional behaviors to just appear in an individual upon graduation and entry into a health care field. Professional behavior development is an essential component of physical therapy professional education and is clearly defined through the guiding documents of the American Physical Therapy Association, which include 'A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education,' 'Evaluative Criteria for Accreditation of Education Programs for the Preparation of Physical Therapists,' and the 'Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.' Building a comprehensive and progressive curricular thread for professional behaviors can pose a challenge for a professional program and the core faculty. This paper will present a curricular model of weaving professional behaviors into a core entry-level professional curriculum using a specific curricular thread, activities for different levels of students, and assessment at each point in the path. This paper will demonstrate the potential for universal application of a professional behaviors.

  9. Developing Curriculum to Help Students Explore the Geosciences' Cultural Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.; Schoof, J. T.; Therrell, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    groups, a content test, an epistemology survey (with think-aloud interviews that also served for cognitive testing purposes), classroom observations, student work, and tracking of student navigation through the digital reader. Overall, the impact this curriculum had on students' affective and academic learning varied; however, the instructional supports we developed to temper challenge with instructional support appear to have had a positive impact on student learning. Analysis of data illustrates how these supports improved their comprehension of multiple, and sometimes conflicting sources. Student feedback from focus groups and interviews also indicate that using a social science lens to learn about concepts such as urban heat island was engaging. In terms of students' understanding of the nature of knowledge in the sciences, the epistemology survey and interview seem to indicate that students lack a complex understanding of continuity and change in scientific knowledge. Further, participants appeared to have many misconceptions about scientific inquiry. As a result, we are currently developing a similar curriculum for a lab-based geography course, GEOG104: Weather, Climate, and Society.

  10. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the in vitro growth of Candida albicans and its protective effect in an oral candidiasis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis.

  11. Investigating the criteria and processes used in the selection, implementation, and evaluation of STEM within K-12 education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Matthew J.

    This study utilized survey research to investigate how school districts within K-12 education select, implement, and evaluate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs. Thirty school districts within the Math and Science Collaborative located in Western Pennsylvania participated in this research. In addition to characterizing the STEM programs of the participating school districts, this study also analyzed the alignment of these programs to the components of comprehensive STEM programs and critical approaches to substantiate STEM program implementation as stated in the literature (Augustine, 2005; Bybee, 2010a, 2010b; Carnevale et al., 2011; DeJarnette, 2010; Epstein & Miller, 2011b; Gardner et al., 1983; Hossain & Robinson, 2011, 2012; Kuenzi, 2008). Findings suggest that the primary goal for school districts, as it relates to STEM program implementation, is to influence students' interest and pursuit of STEM-related careers and degrees. In order to achieve this goal, results of this study indicate the focus of STEM program implementation occurs with the greatest frequency at the middle school (grades seven and eight) level, are developed as an adaptation to the curriculum, and are very diverse from one school district to the next. In addition, findings suggest that although school districts maintain they aim to promote careers and degrees in STEM, districts rely on traditional methods of evaluating STEM program implementation (i.e. standardized test scores) and do not track the longitudinal impact their STEM programs as they related to degrees and careers in STEM. Furthermore, results indicate district STEM programs are not aligned to the characteristics of comprehensive STEM programs as defined by the literature. In order to address the misalignment of school district goals and evaluation processes involved in STEM program implementation and the absence of the characteristics commensurate with comprehensive STEM programs, this study has

  12. Teacher professional development through collaborative curriculum design in. Ghana¿s polytechnics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakah, M.A.B.; Bakah, Marie Afua Baah

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation entitled Teacher professional development through collaborative curriculum design in Ghana‟s polytechnics is a research conducted among polytechnic teachers in Ghana. Polytechnic development, curricular reform, improving the quality of teaching and teachers‟ knowledge needs

  13. Changing Professional Demands in Sustainable Regional Development: A Curriculum Design Process to meet Transboundary Competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansu, Angelique; Boon, Jo; Sloep, Peter; van Dam-Mieras, Rietje

    2012-01-01

    Lansu, A., Boon, J., Sloep, P. B., & Van Dam-Mieras, R. (Accepted). Changing Professional Demands in Sustainable Regional Development: A Curriculum Design Process to meet Transboundary Competence. Journal of Cleaner Production. [Special Issue: Learning for Sustainable Development in Regional

  14. Participative Teaching with Mobile Devices and Social Networks for K-12 Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article details a set of participatory pedagogical experiments conducted within a research grant PN II IDEI (”Time Maps. Real communities, virtual worlds, experimented pasts” performed with the purpose of helping rural communities in identifying their cultural heritage andtransmitting it to the younger generations by means of modern IT technologies, including web 2.0. In a Danubian rural community, several points of archaeological interest (POIs were identified, which were then included in a geographic Augmented Reality application for smartphones and tablets. Subsequently, the geographic data were collected from the archaeological site by the K-12 children, under the coordination of an academic staff member of the National University of Arts in Bucharest, and stored on their devices using Google Maps. The augmented information provided onthe site was annotated and shared with other K-12 children, through different social networks sites (SNS and content postings. This first stage experiment was extended to the development of a social learning environment complementary to the educational site (www.timemaps.net to support thetransmission of several traditional technologies (textile, ceramic, glass in a collaborative manner. We consider that our experiments can significantly increase the visibility of the information pertaining to the identity of target places and communities among the younger generation. A mobile-learning paradigm, in combination with web 2.0 technologies, was the support for a distributed and low-cost platform for communication and collaboration. Social networks linked thearchaeological heritage and the academic research with the larger community of rural K-12 children. The article analyzes this platform as a solution for creating, collecting and sharingeducational content, and presents conclusions on using social media for effective blended learning and transmittal of the cultural heritage.

  15. Increasing the Roles and Significance of Teachers in Policymaking for K-12 Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Convocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Engineering is a small but growing part of K-12 education. Curricula that use the principles and practices of engineering are providing opportunities for elementary, middle, and high school students to design solutions to problems of immediate practical and societal importance. Professional development programs are showing teachers how to use…

  16. Improving curriculum development practices in a technical vocational community college: examining effects of a professional development arrangement for middle managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2015-01-01

    Learning about curriculum development is critical for middle managers of technical vocational institutions in order to assume curriculum leadership in maintaining and enhancing the quality and relevance of their educational programs. This case study reports on the design and effects of a

  17. Re-Examining the Curriculum Development Centre: Coordinative Federalism and Kingdon's Agenda-Setting (1975-87)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, Grant

    2016-01-01

    During period 1975 through to 1987 the Commonwealth ventured into curriculum development, hitherto an activity for states and territories. Unlike the ACARA Curriculum of the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd governments, there was nothing mandatory about the CDC's curriculum development activities. Here, the dominant influence was coordinative federalism. This…

  18. Development of a Curriculum Management Process by Applying Lean Concept for Waste Elimination to Enhance Curriculum Implementation of Primary School Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrangsan, Nadrudee; Sawekngam, Wichai; Thongthew, Sumlee

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to study and develop a curriculum management process by applying Lean concept for waste elimination to enhance curriculum implementation of primary school teacher. This study was conducted with a focus on qualitative data collection by dividing into 2 phases, including (1) analyze and synthesize relevant notions, theories,…

  19. Advancing climate literacy in Idaho K-12 schools using STEM education approaches, open source electronics, and Maker culture as vehicles for teacher training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A. N.; Gelb, L.; Watson, K. A.; Steimke, A.; Chang, C.; Busche, C.; Breidenbach, J.

    2016-12-01

    A climate literate citizenry is essential to the long-term success of climate change adaptation and to enhancing resilience of communities to climate change impacts. In support of a National Science Foundation CAREER award, we developed a teacher training workshop on a project that engages students in creating functioning, low-cost weather stations using open source electronics. The workshop aims to improve climate literacy among K-12 students while providing an authentic opportunity to acquire and hone STEM skills. Each station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light level, soil moisture, and precipitation occurrence. Our day-long workshop focuses on three elements: (1) providing context on the scientific importance of climate observation, (2) equipping teachers with technical skills needed to assemble and use a station from provided components, and (3) highlighting relevant educational standards met by the weather station activities. The workshop was attended by twelve 4th-9th grade teachers from southwest Idaho, all of whom teach at rural and/or Title I schools. Attendees reported having minimal or no previous experience with open source electronics, but all were able to effectively use their weather station with less than two hours of hands-on training. In written and oral post-workshop reflections teachers expressed a strong desire to integrate these activities into classrooms, but also revealed barriers associated with rigid curricular constraints and risk-averse administrators. Continued evolution of the workshop will focus on: (1) extending the duration and exploratory depth of the workshop, (2) refining pre- and post-assessments and performing longitudinal monitoring of teacher participants to measure short- and long-term efficacy of the workshop, and (3) partnering with colleagues to engage school district administrators in dialog on how to integrate authentic activities like this one into K-12 curriculum.

  20. 75 FR 1814 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Curriculum Development: Training for Correctional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... curriculum that will provide Correctional Industries Directors with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to set organizational priorities, identify strategic objectives, create measurable goals... following: Dynamic Leadership; Financial Self-Sufficiency; Offender Workforce Development; Marketing...

  1. Reflections on the development of a pre-service language curriculum for the BEd (Foundation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubeida Desai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The initiative of the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET in South Africa to strengthen foundation phase teaching has resulted in the development of new foundation phase (Grades R–3 programmes at institutions that did not previously offer them. In this article we reflect on the conceptualisation and development of a pre-service language curriculum for one such programme. We base our discussion on principles that underpin teacher education programme development for early childhood education and on issues and insights about appropriate language curriculum content for a foundation phase teacher. Whilst awaiting the outcome of our accreditation, the authors, as two of the persons who assisted in the design of the language curriculum, thought it appropriate to subject the curriculum to an internal scrutiny whilst we prepare to offer the programme. This internal dialogue is informed by the literature on early language development, particularly in multilingual contexts such as in South Africa.

  2. Professional development as a strategy for curriculum implementation in multidisciplinary science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Talitha Christine

    2012-01-01

    Schoolteachers must deal with curriculum innovations during their teaching careers. In 2005, the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science introduced committees to develop and redesign the curricula for chemistry, biology, physics, and mathematics in secondary education. The purpose of

  3. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    OpenAIRE

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J.; Norton, Alyssa N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to partici...

  4. Goodbye Conflict, Hello Development? Curriculum Reform in Timor-Leste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh

    2012-01-01

    Motivations to reform curriculum in post-conflict, or post-colonial states are often driven by the need to (re) construct a cohesive and publicly legitimated national identity that is starkly different to that which existed prior. This paper explores the context behind such action in the Timor-Leste (East Timor) and some challenges which policy…

  5. Cybersecurity Curriculum Development: Introducing Specialties in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Ali; Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The cybersecurity curriculum has grown dramatically over the past decade: once it was just a couple of courses in a computer science graduate program. Today cybersecurity is introduced at the high school level, incorporated into undergraduate computer science and information systems programs, and has resulted in a variety of cybersecurity-specific…

  6. Some Guidelines for the Development of Curriculum for Applied Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, Jerry

    Applied anthropology seeks to integrate anthropological values and knowledge with a rational approach to policy decision-making. This paper discusses some of the barriers faced by those who care about anthropology and are concerned with making a viable space for the discipline in the college curriculum. Anthropology teachers need to further refine…

  7. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed…

  8. Application of Instructional Design Principles in Developing an Online Information Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2016-01-01

    An online information literacy curriculum was developed as an intervention to engage students in independent study and self-assessment of their learning needs and learning outcomes, develop proficiency in information skills, and foster lifelong learning. This column demonstrates how instructional design principles were applied to create the learning experiences integrated into various courses of the medical curriculum to promote active learning of information skills and maximize self-directed learning outcomes for lifelong learning.

  9. Developing a Medical School Curriculum for Psychological, Moral, and Spiritual Wellness: Student and Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Bandini, Julia; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea; Noveroske, Sarah; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy; Balboni, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have addressed the integration of a religion and/or spirituality curriculum into medical school training, few describe the process of curriculum development based on qualitative data from students and faculty. The aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of medical students and chaplaincy trainees regarding the development of a curriculum to facilitate reflection on moral and spiritual dimensions of caring for the critically ill and to train students in self-care practices that promote professionalism. Research staff conducted semiscripted and one-on-one interviews and focus groups. Respondents also completed a short and self-reported demographic questionnaire. Participants included 44 students and faculty members from Harvard Medical School and Harvard Divinity School, specifically senior medical students and divinity school students who have undergone chaplaincy training. Two major qualitative themes emerged: curriculum format and curriculum content. Inter-rater reliability was high (kappa = 0.75). With regard to curriculum format, most participants supported the curriculum being longitudinal, elective, and experiential. With regard to curriculum content, five subthemes emerged: personal religious and/or spiritual (R/S) growth, professional integration of R/S values, addressing patient needs, structural and/or institutional dynamics within the health care system, and controversial social issues. Qualitative findings of this study suggest that development of a future medical school curriculum on R/S and wellness should be elective, longitudinal, and experiential and should focus on the impact and integration of R/S values and self-care practices within self, care for patients, and the medical team. Future research is necessary to study the efficacy of these curricula once implemented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. The organisation and management of curriculum development in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Michael

    1994-01-01

    This article develops a critical analysis of the international transfer of strategies for curriculum change with reference to an historical review of the Papua New Guinean experience. The research documents how international trends have — for better or worse —played a part in shaping the school curriculum and its organisational and administrative structures in this developing country. While much of lasting benefit has been achieved, it is argued that differing contextual factors are often given insufficient attention when educational ideas cross national boundaries. Relationships between the nature and control of the school curriculum and the nature and distribution of power and influence within, and across, societies are also identified as central to an understanding of the debate. In the light of this analysis, the implications of the economic pre-occupations of the 1990s and renewed international interest in modes of centralized curriculum control, are examined for Papua New Guinea and for developing countries in general.

  12. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged

  13. Development of a Case-based Reading Curriculum and Its Effect on Resident Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Messman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Textbook reading plays a foundational role in a resident’s knowledge base. Many residency programs place residents on identical reading schedules, regardless of the clinical work or rotation the resident is doing. We sought to develop a reading curriculum that takes into account the clinical work a resident is doing so their reading curriculum corresponds with their clinical work. Preliminary data suggests an increased amount of resident reading and an increased interest in reading as a result of this change to their reading curriculum.

  14. School District (K-12) Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Local educational agencies (LEAs) play an integral role in protecting the health and safety of their district's staff, students and their families. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed this checklist to assist LEAs in developing and/or improving plans to prepare…

  15. Development of a Literature Curriculum for Young Children. CAREL Arts and Humanities Curriculum Development Program for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Jeanette; And Others

    The purpose of the Central Atlantic Regional Educational Laboratory (CAREL) literature program was to encourage pupils' imaginative and expressive power and to improve their ability to use language effectively. The curriculum was designed for 3- to 8-year-olds who represented a wide socioeconomic background. Specialists trained teachers to relate…

  16. Project BioEYES: Accessible Student-Driven Science for K-12 Students and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuda, Jamie R; Butler, Valerie G; Vary, Robert; Farber, Steven A

    2016-11-01

    BioEYES, a nonprofit outreach program using zebrafish to excite and educate K-12 students about science and how to think and act like scientists, has been integrated into hundreds of under-resourced schools since 2002. During the week-long experiments, students raise zebrafish embryos to learn principles of development and genetics. We have analyzed 19,463 participating students' pre- and post-tests within the program to examine their learning growth and attitude changes towards science. We found that at all grade levels, BioEYES effectively increased students' content knowledge and produced favorable shifts in students' attitudes about science. These outcomes were especially pronounced in younger students. Having served over 100,000 students, we find that our method for providing student-centered experiences and developing long-term partnerships with teachers is essential for the growth and sustainability of outreach and school collaborations.

  17. A national general pediatric clerkship curriculum: the process of development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, A L; Woodhead, J; Berkow, R; Kaufman, N M; Marshall, S G

    2000-07-01

    To describe a new national general pediatrics clerkship curriculum, the development process that built national support for its use, and current progress in implementing the curriculum in pediatric clerkships at US allopathic medical schools. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: A curriculum project team of pediatric clerkship directors and an advisory committee representing professional organizations invested in pediatric student education developed the format and content in collaboration with pediatric educators from the Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) and the Ambulatory Pediatric Association (APA). An iterative process or review by clerkship directors, pediatric departmental chairs, and students finalized the content and built support for the final product. The national dissemination process resulted in consensus among pediatric educators that this curriculum should be used as the national curricular guideline for clerkships. MONITORING IMPLEMENTATION: Surveys were mailed to all pediatric clerkship directors before dissemination (November 1994), and in the first and third academic years after national dissemination (March 1996 and September 1997). The 3 surveys assessed schools' implementation of specific components of the curriculum. The final survey also assessed ways the curriculum was used and barriers to implementation. The final curriculum provided objectives and competencies for attitudes, skills, and 18 knowledge areas of general pediatrics. A total of 216 short clinical cases were also provided as an alternative learning method. An accompanying resource manual provided suggested strategies for implementation, teaching, and evaluation. A total of 103 schools responded to survey 1; 84 schools to survey 2; and 85 schools responded to survey 3 from the 125 medical schools surveyed. Before dissemination, 16% of schools were already using the clinical cases. In the 1995-1996 academic year, 70% of schools were using some or all of the curricular

  18. Development Of Training Curriculum In Improving Community-Based Geological Hazard Mitigation Competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusman Rusman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to provide training curriculum model in improving community-based geological hazard mitigation competency. The goal was achieved through research and development method, is divided into three main stages. First, applied need analysis as the introduction. Second, developed the curriculum model. Third, tested the curriculum model in order to explore the curriculum effectiveness in improving the competency for mitigation measurement related to geological hazard. This study showed that the training curriculum model, which is developed based on the result of need analysis, is effective to improve the participant’s competency. The result of pre-post test shows that the improvement of the participant’s cognitive aspect.  The significant improvement is identified in the training competency showing the effectiveness of Test II in improving the participant’s practical competency to carry out the training. Some factors that support the training curriculum model development related to community-based Landslides management are: (a the public servant’s competency for geological hazard mitigation; (b the motivation of the community who becomes the volunteer; and (c support from the decision maker. On the other hand, the inhibitors are the lack of competency for training related to geological field, the lack of educational background and knowledge of geology and landslides, and the lack of time.

  19. Curriculum Development for Transfer Learning in Dynamic Multiagent Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    this burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson...for future work an automated way of finding it. The procedure then repeats, with Ms possibly becoming the new Mt, until a curriculum emerges . 3.4 Search...HFO) Half field offense [19] is a subtask of Robocup simulated soccer in which a team of m offensive players try to score a goal against n defensive

  20. Perspectives on...Special Collections at ARL Libraries and K-12 Outreach: Current Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the results of a survey sent to Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Special Collections requesting information on outreach to K-12 students. Over half of the respondents work with K-12 and many of those who currently do not are planning to. New pressures and changing philosophies contribute to this trend.

  1. Teacher Perception of Barriers and Benefits in K-12 Technology Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lin B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores K-12 teachers' perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology integration by either teachers or students in K-12 instruction. The sample was composed of 68 students enrolled in online classes in the graduate studies in education department of a small private liberal arts institution in the southeast. Data was collected…

  2. K-12 Online Learning and the Training Needs for School Psychology Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysinger, P. Dawn; Tysinger, Jeff; Diamanduros, Terry; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    K-12 online learning is growing at an exponential rate in the United States and around the world. Students and teachers are entering and embracing the K-12 online learning environment. Thus, it becomes imperative for school psychologists to follow. In order to offer the most productive learning environment for all students, the services provided…

  3. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Perceptions toward and Understanding of K-12 Online Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, David N.; Woods, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 30 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010; 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher educators' perceptions toward and understanding of K-12 OLPE. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1986) served as the theoretical framework for this…

  4. Educating Tomorrow's Workforce: A Report on the Semiconductor Industry's Commitment to Youth in K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiconductor Industry Association, San Jose, CA.

    The U.S. semiconductor industry, now the nation's largest manufacturing industry, displays its commitment to training its current workers and educating future workers by supporting educational efforts on the K-12 level. This catalog describes innovative actions by 16 Semiconductor Industry Association companies to improve education at the K-12

  5. An Exploratory Study on K-12 Teachers' Use of Technology and Multimedia in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Carr, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    21st century has seen new technology and multimedia made available for integration in K-12 classrooms. This exploratory study examines K-12 teachers' use of technology and multimedia in the classroom in two southern counties in the Southeastern United States. The purpose of the study was to answer the following five research questions: 1) What…

  6. Generic vs. Modality-Specific Competencies for K-12 Online and Blended Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulham, Emily B.; Graham, Charles R.; Short, Cecil R.

    2018-01-01

    Although research has explored teacher competencies in K-12 blended and online learning, it has not specified which competencies are appropriate to an online or digital medium, which refer to blending in-person with online experiences, or which are generic--applicable in any teaching modality. This article explores selected K-12 online and blended…

  7. Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice. Eleventh Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Pape, Larry; Murin, Amy; Gemin, Butch; Vashaw, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    "Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning" (2014) is the 11th in a series of annual reports that began in 2004 that examine the status of K-12 online education across the country. The report provides an overview of the latest policies, practices, and trends affecting online learning programs across all 50 states. It summarizes that at a…

  8. Problem-Based Learning in the Life Science Classroom, K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tom; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Janet

    2016-01-01

    "Problem-Based Learning in the Life Science Classroom, K-12" offers a great new way to ignite your creativity. Authors Tom McConnell, Joyce Parker, and Janet Eberhardt show you how to engage students with scenarios that represent real-world science in all its messy, thought-provoking glory. The scenarios prompt K-12 learners to immerse…

  9. Applying the Quadratic Usage Framework to Research on K-12 STEM Digital Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policymakers have called for K-12 educators to increase their effectiveness by transforming science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and teaching with digital resources and tools. In this study we outline the significance of studying pressing issues related to use of digital resources in the K-12 environment and…

  10. An Examination of Ideology among Selected K12 Christian School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, Jimmy L.

    2013-01-01

    This research project focused on explaining the decision making process of K12 Christian school superintendents whose schools belong to the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) organization. In spite of their similar religious and philosophical beliefs, ACSI K12 Christian school superintendents differed significantly in…

  11. Virtual Schools: The Changing Landscape of K-12 Education in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppin, Ian N.; Toppin, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtual schools are a growing phenomenon in k-12 education. School systems in almost every state in the United States offer some version of fully online or blended education. It is no longer far-fetched to conclude that if the current trend continues, virtual school enrollments will eclipse those of traditional brick-and-mortar k-12 institutions…

  12. K-12 Teacher Perceptions Regarding the Flipped Classroom Model for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Evan; DeJong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Baron, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of evidence can be cited from higher education literature on the effectiveness of the flipped classroom; however, very little research was discovered on the flipped classroom at the K-12 level. This study examined K-12 teachers' perceptions regarding the flipped classroom and differences in teachers' perceptions based on grade level…

  13. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of School Policy and Fear of School Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Melissa L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1990s, schools have focused their attention on policies designed to improve school safety. Most researches on school violence policies have concentrated on the needs of students and administrators. This study investigated the impact of school violence policies on K-12 teachers' fear. Using self-report data from 447 K-12 teachers from a…

  14. Teaching History with Museums: Strategies for K-12 Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan; Stoddard, Jeremy; Woodward, Walter W.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History with Museums" provides an introduction and overview of the rich pedagogical power of museums. In this comprehensive textbook, the authors show how museums offer a sophisticated understanding of the past and develop habits of mind in ways that are not easily duplicated in the classroom. Using engaging cases to illustrate…

  15. Instructional Coaching Implementation: Considerations for K-12 Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelly Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Instructional coaching is a reality in many schools today, yet administrators often lack experience or background on how to utilize this professional development model effectively. Instructional coaching can help administrators balance the managerial and instructional leadership responsibilities required of their role. As districts adopt the…

  16. The Role of the Mathematics Supervisor in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenes, Carole

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of "the Common Core Standards for Mathematics" and the assessments of those concepts, skills, reasoning methods, and mathematical practices that are in development necessitate the updating of teachers' knowledge of content, pedagogical techniques to enhance engagement and persistence, and strategies for responding to…

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration" included the following reports:Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach; Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education: K-12 Teacher Retention, Renewal, and Involvement in Professional Science; Telling the Tale of Two Deserts: Teacher Training and Utilization of a New Standards-based, Bilingual E/PO Product; Lindstrom M. M. Tobola K. W. Stocco K. Henry M. Allen J. S. McReynolds J. Porter T. T. Veile J. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes -- Update; Utilizing Mars Data in Education: Delivering Standards-based Content by Exposing Educators and Students to Authentic Scientific Opportunities and Curriculum; K. E. Little Elementary School and the Young Astronaut Robotics Program; Integrated Solar System Exploration Education and Public Outreach: Theme, Products and Activities; and Online Access to the NEAR Image Collection: A Resource for Educators and Scientists.

  18. A Mixed-Method Approach on Digital Educational Games for K12: Gender, Attitudes and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Effie Lai-Chong; Gamble, Tim; Schwarz, Daniel; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael D.; Holzinger, Andreas

    Research on the influence of gender on attitudes towards and performance in digital educational games (DEGs) has quite a long history. Generally, males tend to play such games more engagingly than females, consequently attitude and performance of males using DEGs should be presumably higher than that of females. This paper reports an investigation of a DEG, which was developed to enhance the acquisition of geographical knowledge, carried out on British, German and Austrian K12 students aged between 11 and 14. Methods include a survey on initial design concepts, user tests on the system and two single-gender focus groups. Gender and cultural differences in gameplay habit, game type preferences and game character perceptions were observed. The results showed that both genders similarly improved their geographical knowledge, although boys tended to have a higher level of positive user experience than the girls. The qualitative data from the focus groups illustrated some interesting gender differences in perceiving various aspects of the game.

  19. Induction of the lambda bacteriophage synthesis in Escherichia coli K 12 by polonium alpha rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoret, Raymond

    1958-06-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the inducing action of polonium alpha radiations in Escherichia Coli K 12 by using an external irradiation device. This work comprised the development of a method to spread bacteria in layer with a thickness less than 20 microns, and the measurement of the number of α particles falling on the irradiated surface. This measurement has been performed by using a nuclear emulsion and a simple photographic film. It appears that alpha radiations have an inducing action, and that at most 15 per cent of bacteria can be induced. The comparison of the induction curve with the survival curves of lysogen and sensitive stains shows that there is no abortive induction. Thus, it appears that this inducing action is not due to an indirect effect of the irradiated medium [fr

  20. Climate Change Education Today in K-12: What's Happening in the Earth and Space Science Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M. A.; National Earth Science Teachers Association

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is a highly interdisciplinary topic, involving not only multiple fields of science, but also social science and the humanities. There are many aspects of climate change science that make it particularly well-suited for exploration in the K-12 setting, including opportunities to explore the unifying processes of science such as complex systems, models, observations, change and evolution. Furthermore, this field of science offers the opportunity to observe the nature of science in action - including how scientists develop and improve their understanding through research and debate. Finally, climate change is inherently highly relevant to students - indeed, students today will need to deal with the consequences of the climate change. The science of climate change is clearly present in current science education standards, both at the National level as well as in the majority of states. Nonetheless, a significant number of teachers across the country report difficulties addressing climate change in the classroom. The National Earth Science Teachers Association has conducted several surveys of Earth and space science educators across the country over the past several years on a number of issues, including their needs and concerns, including their experience of external influences on what they teach. While the number of teachers that report external pressures to not teach climate change science are in the minority (and less than the pressure to not teach evolution and related topics), our results suggest that this pressure against climate change science in the K-12 classroom has grown over the past several years. Some teachers report being threatened by parents, being encouraged by administrators to not teach the subject, and a belief that the "two sides" of climate change should be taught. Survey results indicate that teachers in religious or politically-conservative districts are more likely to report difficulties in teaching about climate change than in

  1. A Groundwater project for K-12 schools: Bringing research into the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Walsh, M.; Gensic, J.

    2011-12-01

    Simple water quality test kits were used in a series of K-12 classrooms to demonstrate scientific processes and to motivate learning in K-12 students. While focused on student learning, this project also allowed collection of regional data on groundwater quality (primarily nitrate) in the study area. The project consisted of development and administration of a weeklong groundwater quality unit introduced to K-12 schools in northern Indiana and taught by a graduate student in an engineering discipline. The structure of the week started with an introduction to basic groundwater concepts modified for the specific grade level; for this project the students ranged from grades 4-12. In addition to groundwater basics, the purpose of the collection of the water quality data, as well as relevance to the research of the graduate student, were outlined. The students were then: (i) introduced to two simple water quality testing methods for nitrates, (ii) required to hypothesize as to which method will likely be "better" in application, and (iii) asked to practice using these two methods under laboratory conditions. Following practice, the students were asked to discuss their hypotheses relative to what was observed during the practice focusing on which testing method was more accurate and/or precise. The students were then encouraged to bring water samples from their home water system (many of which are on private wells) to analyze within groups. At the end of the week, the students shared their experience in this educational effort, as well as the resulting nitrate data from numerous groundwater wells (as collected by the students). Following these discussions the data were added to an online database housed on a wiki sponsored by the Notre Dame Extended Research Community (http://wellhead.michianastem.org/home). These data were plotted using the free service MapAList to visually demonstrate to the students the spatial distribution of the data and how their results have

  2. Standardizing hysteroscopy teaching: development of a curriculum using the Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marie-Emmanuelle; Debras, Elodie; Niro, Julien; Fernandez, Hervé; Panel, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    Hysteroscopy is performed often and in many indications but is challenging to learn. Hands-on training in live patients faces ethical, legal, and economic obstacles. Virtual reality simulation may hold promise as a hysteroscopy training tool. No validated curriculum specific in hysteroscopy exists. The aim of this study was to develop a hysteroscopy curriculum, using the Delphi method to identify skill requirements. Based on a literature review using the key words "curriculum," "simulation," and "hysteroscopy," we identified five technical and non-technical areas in which skills were required. Twenty hysteroscopy experts from different French hospital departments participated in Delphi rounds to select items in these five areas. The rounds were to be continued until 80-100% agreement was obtained for at least 60% of items. A curriculum was built based on the selected items and was evaluated in residents. From November 2014 to April 2015, 18 of 20 invited experts participated in three Delphi rounds. Of the 51 items selected during the first round, only 25 (49%) had 80-100% agreement during the second round, and a third round was therefore conducted. During this last round, 80-100% agreement was achieved for 31 (61%) items, which were used to create the curriculum. All 14 residents tested felt that a simulator training session was acceptable and helped them to improve their skills. We describe a simulation-based hysteroscopy curriculum focusing on skill requirements identified by a Delphi procedure. Its development allows standardization of training programs offered to residents.

  3. A study on the development of curriculum of nuclear technology development for training engineering technicians in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.S.; Yoon, S.K.; Lee, C.Y.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper, the development of curriculum was studied for Department of Nuclear Technology. In order to make the students suitable for the job as engineering technicians with both theory and practical technique, the basic education in the field related to nuclear energy was emphasized in designing the curriculum. In addition taking the special situation of our department into consideration, we made it a principle to provide them with practical experiences with on-the-job training for 16 weeks. A model curriculum with syllabuses for major subjects, contents of experiments with lists of equipments, and program of on-the-job-training were suggested. (author)

  4. Marshalling Corporate Resources for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James

    2011-03-01

    In 1988, the Education Task Force of the Business Roundtable recommended that American corporations invest in pre-college education. Prior to that date, corporate investment was targeted at higher education. IBM and other corporations responded by encouraging their employees and their corporate philanthropic organizations to develop programs aimed at enhancing pre-college education. The IBM TJ Watson Research Center initiated a Local Education Outreach program, active for these past 23 years, that marshals the resources of our science-rich institution to enhance STEM education in our local schools. We have broad and deep partnerships between the Research Center and local school districts, including New York City. We have just completed our 19th consecutive year of Family Science Saturdays, which brings 4th and 5th grade children, along with their parents, to our Research Center for hands-on workshops in topics like States of Matter, Polymer Science, Kitchen Chemistry, and Sound and Light. The workshops are staffed by IBM volunteers, assisted by local high school student ``Peer Teachers.'' Since 1990, the IBM Corporation has joined with a coalition of other companies, professional engineering societies, and government agencies to sponsor the annual Engineers Week (EWeek) campaign of technical education outreach, serving as Corporate Chair in 1992, 2001, and 2008. In recent years, we have annually recruited around 5000 IBM volunteers to reach out to more than 200,000 K-12 students in order to increase their awareness and appreciation of technical careers and encourage them to continue their studies of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The speaker, who helped found the APS Forum on Education (FED) and served as FED Councillor for 8 years, will review these and other programs for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement.

  5. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  6. A Curriculum-Linked Professional Development Approach to Support Teachers' Adoption of Web GIS Tectonics Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec; Anastasio, David; Sahagian, Dork; Henry, Jill Burrows

    2016-01-01

    A curriculum-linked professional development approach designed to support middle level science teachers' understandings about tectonics and geospatial pedagogical content knowledge was developed. This approach takes into account limited face-to-face professional development time and instead provides pedagogical support within the design of a…

  7. DC Rocks! Using Place-Based Learning to Introduce Washington DC's K-12 Students to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Mattietti, G. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Washington DC area has interesting geology and a multitude of agencies that deal with the geosciences, yet K-12 public school students in DC, most of whom are minorities, have limited exposure to the geosciences. Geoscience agencies in the DC area have a unique opportunity to address this by introducing the geosciences to local students who otherwise may not have such an opportunity, by highlighting the geology in the students' "backyard," and by leveraging partnerships among DC-based geoscience-related agencies. The USGS and George Mason University are developing a project called DC Rocks, which will give DC's students an exciting introduction into the world of geoscience with place-based learning opportunities that will make geoscience relevant to their lives and their futures. Both the need in DC and the potential for lasting impact are great; the geosciences have the lowest racial diversity of all the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, 89% of students in DC public schools are minorities, and there is no dedicated geoscience curriculum in DC. DC Rocks aims to give these students early exposure to the earth sciences, and encourage them to consider careers in the profession. DC Rocks will work with partner agencies to apply several methods that are recommended by researchers to increase the participation of minority students in the geosciences, including providing profoundly positive experiences that spark interest in the geosciences (Levine et al., 2007); increasing students' sense of belonging in the geosciences (Huntoon, et al, 2016); and place-based teaching practices that emphasize the study of local sites (Semken, 2005), such as DC's Rock Creek Park. DC Rocks will apply these methods by coordinating local geoscientists and resources to provide real-world examples of the geosciences' impact on students' lives. Through the DC Rocks website, educators will be able to request geoscience-related resources such as class presentations by

  8. Physiological Function of Rac Prophage During Biofilm Formation and Regulation of Rac Excision in Escherichia coli K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Shigellaspp. Here, we found that rac excision is induced during biofilm formation, and the isogenic...stain without rac is more motile and forms more biofilms in nutrient-rich medium at early stages in E.coli K-12. Additionally, the presence of rac...genes increases cell lysis during biofilm development. In most E. coli strains, rac is integrated into the ttcA gene which encodes a tRNA-thioltransferase

  9. Twelve tips for applying change models to curriculum design, development and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm, Judy; Jones, Paul Kneath

    2017-10-25

    Drawing primarily from business and management literature and the authors' experience, these 12 tips provide guidance to organizations, teams, and individuals involved in curriculum or program development at undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education levels. The tips are based around change models and approaches and can help underpin successful curriculum review, development, and delivery, as well as fostering appropriate educational innovation. A range of tools exist to support systematic program development and review, but even relatively simple changes need to take account of many factors, including the complexity of the environment, stakeholder engagement, cultural and psychological aspects, and the importance of followers.

  10. When constructions of the future meet curriculum development and teaching practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    in direction of still better learning outcomes, personal development and Bildung. On the other hand the educational system’s environment such as for example the economic system, the political system or other parts of the educational system requires outcomes that meet the needs of these systems as well...... and teaching practices that are especially suited to promote such selected constructs. How are these efforts met by curriculum development and how are they met by classroom practitioners? What happens when the constructions of future meets curriculum development and teaching practice?...

  11. Development of a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael J; Shahriari, Neda; Payette, Michael; Mnayer, Laila; Elaba, Zendee

    2016-10-01

    Results of molecular studies are redefining the diagnosis and management of a wide range of skin disorders. Dermatology training programs maintain a relative gap in relevant teaching. To develop a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees at our institution. The aim is to provide trainees with a specialty-appropriate, working knowledge in clinical molecular dermatology. The Departments of Dermatology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine collaborated on the design and implementation of educational objectives and teaching modalities for the new curriculum. A multidisciplinary curriculum was developed. It comprises: (i) assigned reading from the medical literature and reference textbook; (ii) review of teaching sets; (iii) two 1 hour lectures; (iv) trainee presentations; (v) 1-week rotation in a clinical molecular pathology and cytogenetics laboratory; and (vi) assessments and feedback. Residents who participated in the curriculum to date have found the experience to be of value. Our curriculum provides a framework for other dermatology residency programs to develop their own specific approach to molecular diagnostics education. Such training will provide a foundation for lifelong learning as molecular testing evolves and becomes integral to the practice of dermatology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Developing an undergraduate curriculum in Special Care Dentistry - by consensus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dougall, A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that healthcare providers often lack the skills set to provide care for people with disabilities, leading to inequalities in health and reduced access to health care. Newly graduating dentists are likely to see a significant number of patients with special healthcare needs in the course of their practicing lives. However, there is evidence of national and international variation in the availability of education and training at the undergraduate level in this important, emerging area. The quality and content of undergraduate education in Special Care Dentistry has been shown to correlate with students\\' confidence and their expressed willingness, towards providing care for patients with special healthcare needs in their future practice. The aim of this study was to use information from a three-round Delphi process, continued into a face-to-face meeting, to establish consensus on what constitutes the essential core knowledge, skills and attitudes required by a newly qualified dentist so that they are able to deliver patient care to diverse populations following graduation. A high level of agreement was established amongst an international panel of experts from 30 countries. The final core items identified by the panel showed a paradigm shift away from the traditional emphasis on medical diagnosis within a curriculum towards an approach based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with patient-centred treatment planning for people with disabilities and special healthcare needs according to function or environment. Many of the core skills identified by the panel are transferable across a curriculum and should encourage a person-centred approach to treatment planning based on the function, needs and wishes of the patient rather than their specific diagnosis.

  13. Developing a pilot curriculum to foster humanism among graduate medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Chuang, Alice; Weil, Amy; Howell, Jennifer O

    2018-01-01

    Humanism is a central tenant of professionalism, a required competency for all residency programs. Yet, few residencies have formal curriculum for teaching this critical aspect of medicine. Instead, professionalism and humanism are often taught informally through role-modeling. With increased burnout, faculty professionalism may suffer and may compromise resident role-modeling. The objective of this study was to design a pilot curriculum to foster humanism in among residents and assess its ability to do so. Two-phase exploratory sequential mixed methods study. Phase 1: a qualitative analysis of residents' narratives regarding challenges to humanistic behavior, and identified themes of compassion, fatigue, communication challenges, and work-life balance. Themes used as needs assessment to build curriculum. Phase 2: three sessions with themes taken from faculty development course. Participants and controls completed baseline and 60-day follow-up questionnaires assessing burnout, compassion, satisfaction, and ability to practice psychological medicine. Phase one included Obstetrics/Gynecology and internal medicine residents. Phase two included residents from the above programs, who attended at least 2/3 interactive sessions designed to address the themes identified above. Twelve participants began and ten completed curriculum (83%). The curriculum met course objectives and was well-received (4.8/5). Burnout decreased (-3.1 vs. 2.5, P = 0.048). A trend toward improved compassion (4.4 vs.-0.6, P = 0.096) for participants compared to controls was noted. A pilot humanism curriculum for residents was well-received. Participants showed decreased burnout and trended to improved compassion scores. Development and evaluation of an expanded curriculum would further explore feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention.

  14. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  15. Effect of simulated microgravity on E. coli K12 MG1655 growth and gene expression

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study demonstrates simulated microgravity effects on E. coli K 12 MG1655 when grown on LB medium supplemented with glycerol. The results imply that E. coli...

  16. The Elements of Language Curriculum: A Systematic Approach to Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean

    A systematic approach to second language curriculum development is outlined, enumerating the phases and activities involved in developing and implementing a sound and effective language program. The first chapter describes a system whereby all language teaching activities can be classified into approaches, syllabuses, techniques, exercises, or…

  17. Developing a Creativity and Problem Solving Course in Support of the Information Systems Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Ben; Hughes, Jim; Braun, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at and assesses the development and implementation of a problem solving and creativity class for the purpose of providing a basis for a Business Informatics curriculum. The development was fueled by the desire to create a broad based class that 1. Familiarized students to the underlying concepts of problem solving; 2. Introduced…

  18. Developing a Pre-Engineering Curriculum for 3D Printing Skills for High School Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    This study developed an integrated-STEM CO[subscript 2] dragster design course using 3D printing technology. After developing a pre-engineering curriculum, we conducted a teaching experiment to assess students' differences in creativity, race forecast accuracy, and learning performance. We compared student performance in both 3D printing and…

  19. Developing a Peace and Conflict Resolution Curriculum for Quaker Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, Eloise

    2012-01-01

    In 2008-2009, a team of educators from George Fox University, in collaboration with a committee of teachers and administrators from selected Quaker secondary schools in western Kenya, developed the first draft of a peace and conflict resolution curriculum for Kenyan form one (ninth grade) students. This case study offers a model for developing a…

  20. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.; Das, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses ("Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems" and "Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems"), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot…

  1. A Theoretical Framework for Integrating Creativity Development into Curriculum: The Case of a Korean Engineering School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to developing creativity rely on the sporadic teaching of creative thinking techniques or the engagement of learners in a creativity-promoting environment. Such methods cannot develop students' creativity as fully as a multilateral approach that integrates creativity throughout a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  2. Sustainability of Curriculum Development for Enterprise Education: Observations on Cases from Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the variety of approaches to curriculum development for enterprise education developed for schools, further, and higher education under an Entrepreneurship Action Plan in Wales and to consider the sustainability issues for delivery in these sectors. Design/methodology/approach: This investigation adopted a case…

  3. Curriculum Guide for General Education Development or High School Equivalency Examination in Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shobha; Escalona, Margaret Boyter

    This curriculum guide was developed as part of the Worker Education Program for workers in the garment industry. The program was jointly developed by the workers, their employer, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. It contains the materials required to teach a course to help Spanish-speaking individuals pass the General Educational…

  4. Developing a Curriculum for Initial Teacher Education Using a Situated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that the implications of the concept of situated learning are important when developing a curriculum for initial teacher education (ITE). It describes and analyses the use of a model of ITE designed to stimulate discussions promoting the development of professional craft knowledge situated mainly in schools and to connect these…

  5. Armed To Learn: Aiming At California K 12 School Gun Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    AIMING AT CALIFORNIA K-12 SCHOOL GUN POLICY by Catherine Wilson Jones March 2016 Thesis Co-Advisors: Kathleen Kiernan John Rollins...Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ARMED TO LEARN: AIMING AT CALIFORNIA K-12 SCHOOL GUN POLICY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Catherine...gap in viewpoints between gun control advocates who want tighter gun control and constitutionalists who believe as strongly in the Second Amendment

  6. Zero Energy Schools: Designing for the Future: Zero Energy Ready K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Designing, building, and operating zero energy ready K-12 schools provides benefits for districts, students, and teachers. Optimizing energy efficiency is important in any building, but it's particularly important in K-12 schools. Many U.S. school districts struggle for funding, and improving a school building's energy efficiency can free up operational funds that may then be available for educational and other purposes.

  7. Using an Interdisciplinary Approach to Enhance Climate Literacy for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, J. A.; Oches, E. A.; Sliko, J.; Wright, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (2014) will begin to change how K-12 teachers teach science. Using a scaffolding approach, the standards focus on a depth of knowledge across multiple content areas. This philosophy should encourage inquiry-based teaching methods, provided the teacher has both the knowledge and the confidence to teach the content. Although confidence to teach science is high among secondary science (biology, general science, chemistry) teachers, depth of knowledge may be lacking in certain areas, including climate science. To address this issue, a graduate course in climate science (Massachusetts Colleges Online Course of Distinction award winner) was developed to include inquiry-based instruction, connections to current research, and interdisciplinary approaches to teaching science. With the support of the InTeGrate program (SERC) at Carleton College, a module was developed to utilize cli-fi (climate science present in fictional literature) and related climate data. Graduate students gain an appreciation of scientific communication and an understanding of climate data and its connection to societal issues. In addition, the graduate students also gain the ability to connect interdisciplinary concepts for a deeper understanding of climate science and have the opportunity. By the end of the course, the graduate students use the content learned and the examples of pedagogical tools to develop their own activities in his or her classroom.

  8. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Härtl, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum.Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills.Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks “Movement,” “Balance” and “Contact.” The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men’s-women’s-children’s medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments, block practicums, and two scientific projects.Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum

  9. Development of Curriculum Content for a Unique Career Ladder Multi-Entry/Multi-Exit Nursing Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosbach, Ellen M.

    A project was undertaken to develop the curriculum content for a unique career ladder multi-entry/multi-exit nursing program that would provide training for nurse aides, practical nurses, and registered nurses. The major objectives of the project were to conduct a review of the literature on curriculum materials presently in use, to develop 11…

  10. A Study of Curriculum Development and Reform in Residential Schools for the Blind in the United States: Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holiday, Jeremiah

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand curriculum development in residential schools for the blind after the enactment of NCLB and was guided by the research question, "How do residential schools for the blind and visually impaired develop their curriculum to meet the unique needs of students who are blind and visually impaired?" In the…

  11. The Role of Research in Online Curriculum Development: The Case of "EarthLabs" Climate Change and Earth System Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Karen S.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Ledley, Tamara Shapiro; Bardar, Erin; Haddad, Nick; Elins, Kathy; Dutta, Saranee

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on an effort to illustrate the coupling of educational research with ongoing curriculum development to promote effective and evidence-based online learning. The research findings have been used to inform the "EarthLabs" curriculum development team as they revise existing modules and create new modules, in order to…

  12. Science Education Curriculum Development Principles in Taiwan: Connecting with Aboriginal Learning and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Hua; Liu, Yuan-Chen

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects thorough consideration of cultural perspectives in the establishment of science curriculum development principles in Taiwan. The authority explicitly states that education measures and activities of aboriginal peoples' ethnic group should be implemented consistently to incorporate their history, language, art, living customs,…

  13. Two Approaches to Curriculum Development for Educating for Sustainability and CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Wendy; Schapper, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on efforts to develop two stand-alone subjects on sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a mainstream business curriculum at Monash University, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents details on the educational rationale and design of the two subjects in…

  14. Developing a Model for an Innovative Culinary Competency Curriculum and Examining Its Effects on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Lei I-Chen Monica; Horng, Jeou-Shyan; Teng, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The present study designs and develops an innovative culinary competency curriculum (ICCC) model comprising seven sections: innovative culture, aesthetics, techniques, service, product, management, and creativity. The model is formulated based on culinary concept, creativity, innovation, and competency theory. The four elements of curriculum…

  15. From Concepts to Design in Developing Languages in the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Developing curricula for languages in the context of the Australian Curriculum is a complex undertaking that needs to address a number of demands. These include: the nature of language-and-culture learning for contemporary times within an increasingly diverse linguistic and cultural world; the goals of mainstream education and the…

  16. Curriculum Development: The Medium Is the Message and the Message Is Crucial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Donald S.

    1988-01-01

    Being more than managers, school leaders can advance the profession by initiating a comprehensive curriculum development process that examines the future to determine needed skills and knowledge, redefines what constitutes an educated person and good teaching, creates a mission statement, and considers the need for structural or organizational…

  17. Education for Sustainable Development in Technology Education in Irish Schools: A Curriculum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in technology education and the extent to which it is currently addressed in curriculum documents and state examinations in technology education at post-primary level in Ireland. This analysis is conducted amidst the backdrop of considerable change in technology…

  18. Education for a Sustainable Future: A Resource for Curriculum Developers, Teachers, and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg. School Programs Div.

    This document, on social, environmental, and economic sustainability, is a resource for teachers, administrators, and curriculum developers. The increasing human population on the earth directs attention to sustainability, which was not a problem until the industrial revolution. This book uses an interdisciplinary approach and provides assistance…

  19. Communicative Needs in the Workplace and Curriculum Development of Business English Courses in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mable

    2014-01-01

    The pressing need to bridge the gap between workplace communicative needs and curriculum development of business English courses has been documented in the literature. Through a questionnaire survey of 215 working adults, this study examines (a) the spoken and written needs of professionals in the local Hong Kong workplace, (b) the challenges they…

  20. Dimensional evaluation of a rural mobile learning teacher professional development curriculum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adele

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Education Development (ICT4RED) TPD Curriculum was designed and validated as a standalone intervention in a single district, for rural teachers, but did it carry Higher Education Institution accreditation. This implementation gap is addressed in its adaption...

  1. Social and Political Education in British Schools: 50 Years of Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The main developments in this broad curriculum area are traced decade by decade with key signpost successes highlighted, along with examples of retrenchment and opposition to the march of progress. The drivers for change and regression were often central government initiatives but, all along, the activity of progressive educationists/academics and…

  2. Secondary-Postsecondary Curriculum Development in Automotive Mechanics. Automotive Electrical Competencies. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepner, Ronald

    Developed as part of a competency-based curriculum in automotive mechanics which is usable by students at both the secondary and postsecondary levels, this learning package focuses on automotive electrical systems. It is the first unit to be published in a series of eight which will cover the eight subject areas on the national certification…

  3. Development, Dissemination, and Assessment of a Food Safety Systems Management Curriculum for Agribusiness Students in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Siroj; Marcy, Joseph E.; Neilan, Angela M.; Cutter, Catherine N.

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses the development, dissemination, and assessment of a Food Safety System Management (FSSM) curriculum offered to college-aged, agribusiness students in Yerevan, Armenia. Prior to beginning the program, demographic data were collected and a paper-based pretest was administered to access the food safety knowledge, behavior, and…

  4. Faculty Transformation in Curriculum Transformation: The Role of Faculty Development in Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; Williams, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum transformation is often cited as one of the key strategies for internationalizing higher education in the United States, and faculty members play a central role in this process. The purpose of the study we report here was to explore the potential for professional development initiatives to foster the transformation in perspectives…

  5. Developments in the Curriculum and Structures of Upper-Secondary Education in Australia: The Last Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Examines the recent influences on and development of upper-secondary Australian education. These influences include youth unemployment, rapid technological and social change, immigration, increasing federal role, and limited entry to tertiary education. Changes include broader curriculum planning to include all students, and improvement of the…

  6. Conscientious Consumerism: A Curriculum Pilot to Support the Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth O.; Montague, Laura

    2017-01-01

    How can teachers integrate the UN Sustainable Development Goals into their classrooms? A teacher and teacher educator duo provide a wonderfully detailed account of how they designed and implemented a curriculum focused on SDG Goal 12, Responsible Consumption and Production. Through their journey to empower children to be critical and compassionate…

  7. Identification of Industry Needs with Hospitality Management Curriculum Development: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayburry, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify a well-defined, comprehensive portrait of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) expected of students graduating from baccalaureate institutions conferring four-year degrees in hospitality management and further, to utilize those KSAs as foundations for curriculum development. This study provided a…

  8. Guiding Curriculum Development: Student Perceptions for the Second Language Learning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Sinan; Akdemir, Elif

    2018-01-01

    Developing curriculum to enhance student learning is the primer purpose of all curricular activities. Availability of recent tools supporting to teach various skills including reading, listening, speaking and writing has opened a new avenue for curricular activities in technology-enhanced learning environments. Understanding the perceptions of…

  9. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  10. Developing Oral and Written Communication Skills in Undergraduate Computer Science and Information Systems Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsarts, Yana; Fischbach, Adam; Rufinus, Jeff; Utell, Janine M.; Yoon, Suk-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Developing and applying oral and written communication skills in the undergraduate computer science and computer information systems curriculum--one of the ABET accreditation requirements - is a very challenging and, at the same time, a rewarding task that provides various opportunities to enrich the undergraduate computer science and computer…

  11. Developing Integrated Arts Curriculum in Hong Kong: Chaos Theory at Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the development of integrated arts curriculum in two Hong Kong secondary schools over a 9-year period. Initial findings display a range of individual responses to educational change that are both non-predictable and non-linear. Chaos theory is used to explain these varied responses in terms of bifurcations. The findings of…

  12. Retailing I: A Foundation for Marketing and Distributive Education Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn Scruggs

    Designed to serve as a foundation for competency-based marketing and distributive education curriculum development, this package consists of task lists, performance objectives, and performance guides for use in planning an introductory level retailing course. Job descriptions are given for receiving clerks, stock clerks, and salespersons/sales…

  13. Working Locally as a True Professional: Case Studies in the Development of Local Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasewiyon, Kirin

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates the dynamic overall picture concerning the development of local curriculum in Thailand through action research conducted by 27 Thai elementary school teachers in three private schools in Fang District, Chiang Mai Province. This was the teachers' first experience with action research. The article examines the following…

  14. Phenomenological versus Instructional Approach to Curriculum Formation for Sustainable Development: A Lithuanian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duobliene, Lilija

    2013-01-01

    The policy and philosophy of school curriculum formation in this article is interpreted from phenomenological and critical pedagogy perspectives. The main features of the phenomenology, set against the instructional method for an individual's development, and his/her relationship with the surroundings, are herein explicated. The distinction…

  15. Mechanical Engineering at RWTH Aachen University: Professional Curriculum Development and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Klaus; Bornefeld, Gero; Brall, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    This paper offers a multi-perspective view on engineering education at RWTH Aachen University: curriculum design, examples of newly developed teaching methods for engineering curricula, and teaching competencies and teacher qualification. It is based on the theories of student-centred learning, project learning, social skills, etc., but the paper…

  16. Re-Engineering the Curriculum at a Rural Institution: Reflection on the Process of Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, A.; Wium, A. M.; du Plessis, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at the University of Limpopo (Medunsa Campus) redesigned their curriculum at the beginning of 2010. The template that was developed shows the horizontal and vertical integration of outcomes. Although the outcomes of the entire process met the requirements of the Health Professions Council…

  17. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Automated Systems/Robotics Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    The project described in this report was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in conjunction with area vocational-technical schools, the second year of a competency-based curriculum in automated systems/robotics technology. During the project, a task force of teachers from the area schools and the college…

  18. Curriculum Change in the Developing Country: The Case of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Paul

    Based on current thought in multicultural education, this paper discusses the need for Americans to help Saudi Arabia integrate western technology into education without subjecting the country to cultural imperialism. The paper is purported to rest on the "reconceptualist" theories of curriculum development. The author cites four…

  19. Classroom-Level Teacher Professional Development and Satisfaction: Teachers Learn in the Context of Classroom-Level Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawer, Saad

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of classroom-level teacher professional development (CTPD) and curriculum transmission on teacher professional development and satisfaction. Based on work with English-as-a-foreign-language college teachers and students, data analysis showed that CTPD significantly improved student-teacher subject,…

  20. A survey among potential employers for developing a curriculum in public health nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torheim, Liv E; Granli, Gry I; Barikmo, Ingrid; Oshaug, Arne

    2009-08-01

    To describe which functions potential employers of public health nutritionists in Norway find important for a person trained in public health nutrition to be able to carry out. Further, to illustrate how the findings were used in the development of a curriculum for a bachelor in public health nutrition at Akershus University College. A non-random, cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire with both pre-coded and open-ended questions. Ninety-one establishments working in various fields more or less related to nutrition responded (response rate of 45 %). Local offices of the Norwegian Food Safety Authority were over-represented among respondents. Functions related to communication and food and nutrition laws and regulations were most frequently rated as important by the respondents. Functions in nutrition research, project work and policy and planning were also regarded important by more than half of the respondents. The priorities of the potential employers together with the additional comments and suggestions were taken into account when a new curriculum on public health nutrition was developed. The assessment of functions prioritized by employers of public health nutritionists gave a valuable input for developing a new curriculum in public health nutrition. It reflected the challenges of the real world that public health nutritionists will work in and therefore helped making the curriculum potentially more relevant.

  1. Energy: options for the future. Curriculum development project for high school teachers. Final report. [Packet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, T.O.

    1978-04-01

    Recent state and regional energy crises demonstrate the delicate balance between energy systems, the environment, and the economy. Indeed, the interaction between these three elements of society is very complex. This project develops curriculum materials that would better provide students with an understanding and awareness of fundamental principles of energy supply, conversion processes, and utilization now and in the future. The project had two specific objectives: to transfer knowledge of energy systems, analysis techniques, and advanced technologies from the energy analyst community to the teacher participants; and to involve teachers in the preparation of modular case studies on energy issues for use within the classroom. These curriculum modules are intended to enhance the teacher's ability to provide energy-related education to students within his or her own academic setting. The project is organized as a three-week summer program, as noted in the flyer (Appendix A). Mornings are spent in seminars with energy and environmental specialists (their handout lecture notes are included as Appendix B); afternoons are devoted to high school curriculum development based on the seminar discussions. The curriculum development is limited to five areas: conservation, electricity demand scheduling, energy in the food system, new technologies (solar, wind, biomass), and environment. Appendix C consists of one-day lession plans in these areas.

  2. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Pakes, Barry; Rouleau, Katherine; MacDonald, Colla J; Arya, Neil; Purkey, Eva; Schultz, Karen; Dhatt, Reena; Wilson, Briana; Hadi, Abdullahel; Pottie, Kevin

    2011-07-22

    Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to develop this framework can be applied

  3. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Briana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the

  4. Formative evaluation of an adaptive game for engaging learners of programming concepts in K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renny S. N. Lindberg

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available As the global demand for programmers is soaring, several countries have integrated programming into their K-12 curricula. Finding effective ways to engage children in programming education is an important objective. One effective method for this can be presenting learning materials via games, which are known to increase engagement and motivation. Current programming education games often focus on a single genre and offer one-size-fits-all experience to heterogeneous learners. In this study, we presented Minerva, a multi-genre (adventure, action, puzzle game to engage elementary school students in learning programming concepts. The game content is adapted to play and learning styles of the player to personalize the gameplay. We conducted a formative mixed-method evaluation of Minerva with 32 Korean 6th grade students who played the game and compared their learning outcomes with 32 6th grade students who studied the same concepts using handouts. The results indicated that, in terms of retention, learning was equally effective in both groups. Furthermore, the game was shown to facilitate engagement among the students. These results, together with uncovered issues, will guide Minerva’s further development.

  5. Scientists in the Classroom Mentor Model Program - Bringing real time science into the K - 12 classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worssam, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field research finally within classroom walls, data driven, hands on with students using a series of electronic projects to show evidence of scientific mentor collaboration. You do not want to miss this session in which I will be sharing the steps to develop an interactive mentor program between scientists in the field and students in the classroom. Using next generation science standards and common core language skills you will be able to blend scientific exploration with scientific writing and communication skills. Learn how to make connections in your own community with STEM businesses, agencies and organizations. Learn how to connect with scientists across the globe to make your classroom instruction interactive and live for all students. Scientists, you too will want to participate, see how you can reach out and be a part of the K-12 educational system with students learning about YOUR science, a great component for NSF grants! "Scientists in the Classroom," a model program for all, bringing real time science, data and knowledge into the classroom.

  6. High-Performance Schools: Affordable Green Design for K-12 Schools; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plympton, P.; Brown, J.; Stevens, K.

    2004-08-01

    Schools in the United States spend $7.8 billion on energy each year-more than the cost of computers and textbooks combined, according to a 2003 report from the National Center for Education Statistics. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that these high utility bills could be reduced as much as 25% if schools adopt readily available high performance design principles and technologies. Accordingly, hundreds of K-12 schools across the country have made a commitment to improve the learning and teaching environment of schools while saving money and energy and protecting the environment. DOE and its public- and private-sector partners have developed Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools, customized for nine climate zones in U.S. states and territories. These design guidelines provide information for school decision makers and design professionals on the advantages of energy efficiency and renewable energy designs and technologies. With such features as natural day lighting, efficient electric lights, water conservation, and renewable energy, schools in all types of climates are proving that school buildings, and the students and teachers who occupy them, are indeed high performers. This paper describes high performance schools from each of the nine climate zones associated with the Energy Design Guidelines. The nine case studies focus on the high performance design strategies implemented in each school, as well as the cost savings and benefits realized by students, faculty, the community, and the environment.

  7. SYMBIOSIS: development, implementation, and assessment of a model curriculum across biology and mathematics at the introductory level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depelteau, Audrey M; Joplin, Karl H; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    "It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power." Alan Cohen (Used by permission. All rights reserved. For more information on Alan Cohen's books and programs, see (www.alancohen.com.) With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology-math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18 curriculum modules, designed this three-semester curriculum, known as SYMBIOSIS. This curriculum was piloted to two student cohorts during the developmental stage. The positive feedback and assessment results of this project have given us the foundation to implement the SYMBIOSIS curriculum as a replacement for the standard biology majors curriculum at the introductory level. This article addresses the history and development of the curriculum, previous assessment results and current assessment protocol, and the future of ETSU's approach to implementing the SYMBIOSIS curriculum.

  8. Analyzing Primary Social Studies Curriculum of Turkey in Terms of UNESCO Educational for Sustainable Development Theme

    OpenAIRE

    Elvan YALÇINKAYA

    2013-01-01

    These three terms have been used at website of UNESCO: Sustainable development(SD), education for sustainable development (ESD) and the United Nations Decade ofEducation for Sustainable Development (DESD). In this website, it is mentioned that thethree terms have the same goal; creating abetter world for this generation and futuregenerations of all living things on planet Earth. The aim of this study is to analyzePrimary Social Studies Curriculum of Turkeyin terms of UNESCO ESD Theme. Datawas...

  9. UNDERSTANDING IDEA OF CURRICULUM 2013 AND ITS CONSISTENCY ON DEVELOPING CURRICULUM DOCUMENT AT LEVEL OF EDUCATION UNIT (KTSP AT PRIMARY SCHOOL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Prihantini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:. This study is based on various issues of Curriculum 2013, both in terms of teacher readiness to accept the Curriculum 2013, an understanding of the idea of Curriculum 2013, as well as in the implementation of teaching and learning. In the curriculum development theory, curriculum ideas are an important component that the curriculum development team needs to understand, so that the development of curriculum documents composed reflects continuity with curriculum ideas. The purpose of this study is to describe and explore the understanding of principals and teachers about the idea of Curriculum 2013 and its consistency on developing Education Unit Level Curriculum (KTSP at elementary school in Sukalarang sub-district, Sukabumi regency. The research method applied is qualitative research with descriptive exploratory approach. The conclusions of the study are: (1 the understanding of principals and teachers about the idea of the  Curriculum 2013 at the know stage, the understanding that curriculum ideas have consistency in the development of the Education Unit Level Curriculum (KTSP document is not yet owned; (2 the development of KTSP document shows no consistency between the idea of Curriculum 2013 with the documents of Book I KTSP, Book II KTSP, and Book III KTSP; (3 the problems faced by school principals and teachers in relation to the Curriculum 2013 is assessment of learning, both with regard to the techniques and types of assessment and techniques of administering the results of the assessment.Recommendations are proposed to policy makers that training strategies need to be changed from "theory oriented" to "practice oriented" and need to be varied in implementation at the Kecamatan or Cluster levels and enhanced effectiveness of curriculum counseling 2013. For principals and teachers expected to disseminate the 2013 Curriculum should be supported by presenting expert resources during the workshop, Principal Working Group (K3S and

  10. Assessing the Impact of a K-12 Engagement Program on Graduate Learning Outcomes for Communicating with Diverse Audiences, Pedagogy, and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Faith; Harbor, Jon

    2014-01-01

    A large midwestern university has developed a program that places graduate students in middle school classrooms to enhance the graduate students' communication skills with diverse audiences, develop pedagogical knowledge, and provide a foundation for effective future K-12 engagement. After observing and co-teaching, participants develop and…

  11. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  12. How we developed a bioethics theme in an undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghias, Kulsoom; Ali, Syeda Kauser; Khan, Kausar S; Khan, Robyna; Khan, Murad M; Farooqui, Arshi; Nayani, Parvez

    2011-01-01

    The 5-year undergraduate medical curriculum at Aga Khan University integrates basic sciences with clinical and community health sciences. Multimodal strategies of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on problem-based learning, are utilized to equip students with knowledge, skills, behaviours, attitudes and values necessary for a high-calibre medical graduate. Bioethics teaching was introduced in the medical curriculum in 1988 and has since undergone several changes. In 2009, a multidisciplinary voluntary group began review of undergraduate bioethics teaching and invested over 350 man-hours in curricular revision. This involved formulating terminal objectives, delineating specific objectives and identifying instructional methodologies and assessment strategies appropriate for the contents of each objective. Innovative strategies were specially devised to work within the time constraints of the existing medical curriculum and importantly, to increase student interest and engagement. The new bioethics curriculum is designed to be comprehensive and robust, and strives to develop graduates who, in addition to being technically skilled and competent, are well-versed in the history and philosophy of ethics and bioethics and are ethical in their thinking and practice, especially in the context of a developing country like Pakistan where health indicators are among the worst in the region, and clinical practices are not effectively regulated to ensure quality of care.

  13. Development of a clinical forensic medicine curriculum for emergency physicians in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, W S

    1994-06-01

    To address the forensic needs of living patients, the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, USA initiated the first clinical forensic medicine training programme in the USA. In July 1991, formal training in clinical forensic medicine was incorporated into the core curriculum of the USA's second oldest academic emergency medicine training programme. The University of Louisville, in cooperation with the Kentucky Medical Examiner's Office, developed the curriculum to provide the emergency physician with the knowledge base and technical skills to perform forensic evaluations of living patients. Forensic lectures are given monthly by local and regional forensic experts including: forensic pathologists, prosecuting attorneys, firearm and ballistics examiners, law enforcement officers, forensic chemists and forensic odontologists. Topics which are presented include: forensic pathology, forensic photography, ballistics and firearms analysis, paediatric physical and sexual assault, crime scene investigation, forensic odontology, courtroom and expert testimony and the forensic evaluation of penetrating trauma. As a result of the introduction of clinical forensic medicine into the core curriculum of an emergency medicine training programme the residents are now actively addressing the forensic issues encountered in the Emergency department. Key, often short-lived forensic evidence, which was frequently overlooked or discarded while delivering patient care is now recognized, documented and preserved. The development and introduction of a clinical forensic medicine curriculum into emergency medicine training has greatly enhanced the emergency physician's ability to recognize, document and address the forensic needs of their patients who are victims of violent and non-fatal trauma.

  14. Developing a Canadian Curriculum for Simulation-Based Education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Catherine; Posner, Glenn D

    2017-09-01

    As obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) residency training programs move towards a competence-based approach to training and assessment, the development of a national standardized simulation curriculum is essential. The primary goal of this study was to define the fundamental content for the Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology Simulation curriculum. A modified Delphi technique was used to achieve consensus in three rounds by surveying residency program directors or their local simulation educator delegates in 16 accredited Canadian Ob/Gyn residency programs. A consensus rate of 80% was agreed upon. Survey results were collected over 11 months in 2016. Response rates for the Delphi were 50% for the first round, 81% for the second round, and 94% for the third round. The first survey resulted in 84 suggested topics. These were organized into four categories: obstetrics high acuity low frequency events, obstetrics common events, gynaecology high acuity low frequency events, and gynaecology common events. Using the modified Delphi method, consensus was reached on 6 scenarios. This study identified the content for a national simulation-based curriculum for Ob/Gyn residency training programs and is the first step in the development of this curriculum. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K-12 Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, David J

    2016-03-01

    Exposing K-12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), "engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use." This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K-12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K-12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  16. The K-12 Educational Technology Value Chain: Apps for Kids, Tools for Teachers and Levers for Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Glenn L.; Cleary, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Historically implementing, maintaining and managing educational technology has been difficult for K-12 educational systems. Consequently, opportunities for significant advances in K-12 education have often gone unrealized. With the maturation of Internet delivered services along with K-12 institutional trends, educational technologies are poised…

  17. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute

  18. VISL: A Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory For Outreach and K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Moore, J.; Dunn, S.; Perez, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present an update on our developing Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory (VISL). Geared to K-12 classrooms and the general public, VISL's main goal is to improve climate literacy, especially in regards to the crucial role of the polar ice sheets in Earth's climate and sea level. VISL will allow users to perform guided experiments using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), a state-of-the-art ice flow model developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine that simulates the near-term evolution of the ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. VISL users will access ISSM via a graphical interface that can be launched from a web browser on a computer, tablet or smart phone. Users select climate conditions and run time by moving graphic sliders then watch how a given region evolves in time under those conditions. Lesson plans will include conceptual background, instructions for table top experiments related to the concepts addressed in a given lesson, and a guide for performing model experiments and interpreting their results. Activities with different degrees of complexity will aim for consistency with NGSS Physical Science criteria for different grade bands (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12), although they will not be labeled as such to encourage a broad user base. Activities will emphasize the development of physical intuition and critical thinking skills, understanding conceptual and computational models, as well as observation recording, concept articulation, hypothesis formulation and testing, and mathematical analysis. At our present phase of development, we seek input from the greater science education and outreach communities regarding VISL's planned content, as well as additional features and topic areas that educators and students would find useful.

  19. A Comparative Study of Entrepreneurship Curriculum Development and Review at the University of Zimbabwe and Botho University, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Svotwa, Douglas; Rudhumbu, Norman; Mutsau, Morgen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make comparative study of the development and review process of the entrepreneurship curriculum at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Faculty of Commerce and Botho University, (BU) Faculty of Business and Accounting in Gaborone, Botswana. The study focused on the processes and influences of curriculum development…

  20. The Development of a Competency Based Food Preparations Curriculum for High School Special Needs Students in New Castle County, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard Lee

    A competency-based culinary arts food preparation curriculum for Delaware high school students with special needs was developed during a project that included the following activities: review of the state's existing culinary arts curriculum for regular education students; incumbent worker survey administered to 24 restaurant…

  1. SYMBIOSIS: Development, Implementation, and Assessment of a Model Curriculum across Biology and Mathematics at the Introductory Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depelteau, Audrey M.; Joplin, Karl H.; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A., III; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology-math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18…

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERACTIVE E-BOOK BASED ON CHEMICAL REPRESENTATION REFER TO CURRICULUM 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tania

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop an interactive e-book based representations of chemistry; describes the characteristics of the interactive e-book developed; the teachers responses in content suitability with curriculum and graphics aspects; and student responses in readibility aspects. The method used was research and development. The characteristics of interactive e-book: it was developed referring to the core competencies (KI and basic competence (KD in the curriculum 2013, allowed active interaction between students and e-book, completed with pictures, animations or videos in three levels of the chemical representation. Teachers’ responses to the content suitability and graphic aspects were very good with the percentage of each 98.46% and 97.5%. The students’ responses in readibility aspects was very good with percentage of 88.5%.

  3. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Wholey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs.

  4. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R.; LaVenture, Martin; Rajamani, Sripriya; Kreiger, Rob; Hedberg, Craig; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI) curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs. PMID:29770321

  5. Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Geller, Stacie; Regensteiner, Judith G; Raymond, Nancy; Nagel, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors-current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs-to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

  6. Thai Learners’ Linguistic Needs and Language Skills: Implications for Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. Ulla

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Learners’ success in language learning always has implications for curriculum and instruction. Thus, it is important to take into account the kinds of learning experiences that these learners will find helpful in learning English as a foreign language; and, highlight them when planning a curriculum and adapting classroom activities. This study, with 72 first year engineering students, 3 English for Specific Purposes (ESP teachers of King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT Ratchaburi, and 3 other stakeholders as respondents, aimed to identify the Thai engineering students’ linguistic needs and the language skills needed for them to get a job in the future. It also assessed whether the linguistic needs and the language skills required for the students were addressed in the curriculum. Methods used in this study were modified questionnaire, focus groups and semistructured individual interviews. Findings revealed that students wanted to go abroad and to be successful in their future careers; thus, considered speaking as the most important skill to be developed and should be emphasized in their English classes. Students preferred to learn through engaging classroom activities and strategies, exposure to the language, and use of technology in the classroom. However, the ESP curriculum did not provide these linguistic needs and language skills.

  7. Development of the Astronomy-Themed Interdisciplinary Curriculum At Taipei First Girls' High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.-C.; Jin, R.; Lai, S.-P.; Kong, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Wu, P.-H.

    2014-07-01

    With the advent of satellite-based telescopes and abundant data open to the public, senior high school students can now be allowed access to the latest observational data collected by those cutting-edge telescopes. Following the official guidelines for high school curricula in Taiwan, we designed a 24-hour, four-module curriculum, the themes of which are: properties of light and spectra, multi-wavelength observations, evolution of stars, and introduction to cosmology. The curriculum makes use of free online astronomical databases, software for data analysis, and teaching platforms. Many of the courses are inquiry-oriented, focusing on hands-on experiments and discussions. They can be taught separately in their own fields or combined to form research project courses as well. The curriculum development was funded by the National Science Council of Taiwan (High Scope Project) and supported by three institutes in universities. More than 700 students are participating in the pilot program. We are now promoting the curriculum to other schools, with a hope to encourage students to carry out projects on topics in astronomy.

  8. Developing "Reflective" Development Practitioners through an Action-Learning Curriculum: Problems and Challenges in a South African Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, S.; Luckett, K.

    1999-01-01

    A South African university's community development program attempted to integrate Checkland's soft-systems method into Kolb's learning-cycle theory. Evaluation revealed shortcomings in the curriculum design, including the assumption of learner autonomy, necessity of assessing students individually, and difficulty of allowing learners to construct…

  9. Marketing Education (ME)--Curriculum Development and Business Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    This publication contains 47 competitive events developed by 40 businesspeople who worked with 20 marketing education teachers. The events are intended for use at the Distributive Education Clubs of America State Career Development Conference. These events are divided into the following categories: advertising services; apparel and accessories;…

  10. Integrating Leadership Development throughout the Undergraduate Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kelynne E.; Aiello, David P.; Barton, Lance F.; Gould, Stephanie L.; McCain, Karla S.; Richardson, John M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Teaching and Research (STAR) Leadership Program, developed at Austin College, which engages students in activities integrated into undergraduate STEM courses that promote the development of leadership behaviors. Students focus on interpersonal communication,…

  11. The Development of Community Competence in the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Vandyck, Inne; Akkerman, Sanne; Graaff, Rick de; Beishuizen, Jos; Pilot, Albert; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay attention to and aim to stimulate the development of…

  12. Implications for a Green Curriculum Application toward Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Elvan; Ertepinar, Hamide; Teksoz, Gaye

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study was two-fold: (1) to determine university students' familiarity and understandings of "sustainable development", (2) to examine their attitudes toward sustainable development, environmental values, and their behaviors toward sustainable life styles. The data collected by on-line administration of a questionnaire…

  13. Curated Collections for Educators: Five Key Papers about Residents as Teachers Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzaniak, Sara M; Cherney, Alan; Messman, Anne; Natesan, Sreeja; Overbeck, Michael; Schnapp, Benjamin; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2018-02-04

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires residency programs to prepare residents to teach and assess medical students and other learners. In order to achieve this, many programs develop formal residents as teachers (RAT) curricula. Medical educators may seek the guidance of previously published literature during the development of RAT programs at their institutions. The authors sought to identify key articles published on the subject of RAT programs over the last 10 years. The authors utilized a formal literature search with the help of a medical librarian and identified additional articles from virtual discussions among the author group and an open call for articles on Twitter using the hashtag #MedEd. Virtual discussions occurred within an online community of practice, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator. The lead author conducted a four-round modified Delphi process among the author group in order to narrow the broad article list to five key articles on RAT programs. The authors summarize each article and provide considerations for junior faculty as well as faculty developers. Curriculum development and program evaluation should utilize established frameworks and evidence-based approaches. The papers identified by this Delphi process will help faculty use best practices when creating or revising new RAT curriculum. In addition, faculty tasked with guiding junior faculty in this process or creating faculty development programs around curriculum development will find these articles to be a great resource for building content.

  14. [Development of a portfolio for competency-based assessment in a clinical clerkship curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, HyeRin; Lee, Jong-Tae; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe our experience in planning and developing a portfolio for a clinical clerkship curriculum. We have developed a portfolio for assessing student competency since 2007. During an annual workshop on clinical clerkship curricula, clerkship directors from five Paik hospitals of Inje University met to improve the assessment of the portfolio. We generated templates for students to record their activities and reflection and receive feedback. We uploaded these templates to our school's website for students to download freely. Annually, we have held a faculty development seminar and a workshop for portfolio assessment and feedback. Also, we established an orientation program on how to construct a learning portfolio for students. Future actions include creating a ubiquitous portfolio system, extending the portfolio to the entire curriculum, setting up an advisor system, and managing the quality of the portfolio. This study could be helpful for medical schools that plan to improve their portfolio assessment with an outcome-based approach.

  15. Gap analysis: a method to assess core competency development in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fater, Kerry H

    2013-01-01

    To determine the extent to which safety and quality improvement core competency development occurs in an undergraduate nursing program. Rapid change and increased complexity of health care environments demands that health care professionals are adequately prepared to provide high quality, safe care. A gap analysis compared the present state of competency development to a desirable (ideal) state. The core competencies, Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies, reflect the ideal state and represent minimal expectations for entry into practice from pre-licensure programs. Findings from the gap analysis suggest significant strengths in numerous competency domains, deficiencies in two competency domains, and areas of redundancy in the curriculum. Gap analysis provides valuable data to direct curriculum revision. Opportunities for competency development were identified, and strategies were created jointly with the practice partner, thereby enhancing relevant knowledge, attitudes, and skills nurses need for clinical practice currently and in the future.

  16. Parenting for Yourself and Your Child. A Parenting Curriculum for High Risk Families. Neglectful and Abusive Parents: Curriculum Development and Pilot Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Janet

    Developed for use by parent educators and others working with high risk, abusive, or neglectful families, this curriculum guide is intended to enable and facilitate the growth of this target population in key parenting learning and skill areas. Section 1 provides an overview of the manual, offers suggestions for home visits following each class…

  17. an under theorised icon in research and curriculum development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews participation as an emerging moral imperative in a democratising South Africa. .... The issue developed as an extended theme in environmental education where the ..... as a participatory training business on a global scale.

  18. The development of community competence in the teacher education curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobber, M.; Vandyck, I.J.J.; Akkerman, S.F.; de Graaff, R.; Beishuizen, J.J.; Pilot, A.; Verloop, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay

  19. Good Morning from Barrow, Alaska! Helping K-12 students understand the importance of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, M.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation focuses on how an educator experiences scientific research and how those experiences can help foster K-12 students’ understanding of research being conducted in Barrow, Alaska. According to Zhang and Fulford (1994), real-time electronic field trips help to provide a sense of closeness and relevance. In combination with experts in the field, the electronic experience can help students to better understand the phenomenon being studied, thus strengthening the student’s conceptual knowledge (Zhang & Fulford, 1994). During a seven day research trip to study the arctic sea ice, five rural Virginia teachers and their students participated in Skype sessions with the participating educator and other members of the Radford University research team. The students were able to view the current conditions in Barrow, listen to members of the research team describe what their contributions were to the research, and ask questions about the research and Alaska in general. Collaborations between students and scientist can have long lasting benefits for both educators and students in promoting an understanding of the research process and understanding why our world is changing. By using multimedia venues such as Skype students are able to interact with researchers both visually and verbally, forming the basis for students’ interest in science. A learner’s level of engagement is affected by the use of multimedia, especially the level of cognitive processing. Visual images alone do no promote the development of good problem solving skills. However, the students are able to develop better problem solving skills when both visual images and verbal interactions are used together. As students form higher confidence levels by improving their ability to problem solve, their interest in science also increases. It is possible that this interest could turn into a passion for science, which could result in more students wanting to become scientists or science teachers.

  20. Businesses assisting K--12 science instruction: Four case studies of long-term school partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Trieste, Lynne M.

    Businesses lack enough qualified applicants to fill the increasing need for scientists and engineers while educators lack many resources for science programs in K-12 schools. This series of case studies searched for successful collaborations between the two in four geographic locations: Boise, Idaho; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles County, California, and Orange County, California. These science education partnerships were investigated to gain an understanding of long-term partnership structure, functioning and evaluation methods. Forty-nine individual interviews with representatives from the groups of stakeholders these programs impact were also conducted. Stakeholder groups included students, teachers, parents, school administrators, business liaisons, and non-profit representatives. Several recurring themes in these partnerships reinforced the existing literature research findings. Collaboration and communication between partners, teacher professional development, the need for more minority and female representation in physical science careers, and self-efficacy in relation to how people come to view their scientific abilities, are among these themes. Topics such as program replication, the importance of role models, programs using "hands-on" activities, reward systems for program participants, and program outcome measurement also emerged from the cases investigated. Third-party assistance by a non-profit entity is occurring within all of these partnerships. This assistance ranges from a service providing material resources such as equipment, lesson plans and meeting space, to managing the partnership fundraising, program development and evaluations. Discussions based upon the findings that support or threaten sustainment of these four partnerships, what a "perfect" partnership might look like, and areas in need of further investigation conclude this study.

  1. The Air Force Academy’s Falcon Telescope Network: An Educational and Research Network for K-12 and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Francis; Tippets, Roger; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Polsgrove, Daniel; Gresham, Kimberlee; Barnaby, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is a global network of small aperture telescopes developed by the Center for Space Situational Awareness Research in the Department of Physics at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). Consisting of commercially available equipment, the FTN is a collaborative effort between USAFA and other educational institutions ranging from two- and four-year colleges to major research universities. USAFA provides the equipment (e.g. telescope, mount, camera, filter wheel, dome, weather station, computers and storage devices) while the educational partners provide the building and infrastructure to support an observatory. The user base includes USAFA along with K-12 and higher education faculty and students. The diversity of the users implies a wide variety of observing interests, and thus the FTN collects images on diverse objects, including satellites, galactic and extragalactic objects, and objects popular for education and public outreach. The raw imagery, all in the public domain, will be accessible to FTN partners and will be archived at USAFA. USAFA cadets use the FTN to continue a tradition of satellite characterization and astronomical research; this tradition is the model used for designing the network to serve undergraduate research needs. Additionally, cadets have led the development of the FTN by investigating observation priority schemes and conducting a 'day-in-the-life' study of the FTN in regards to satellite observations. With respect to K-12 outreach, cadets have provided feedback to K-12 students and teachers through evaluation of first-light proposals. In this paper, we present the current status of the network and results from student participation in the project.

  2. Impact of Guided Notes on Achievement in K-12 and Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwin, Karen H.; Dawson, Daniel; Erickson, Matthew; Larwin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The common practice of using of guided notes in the K-12 and special education classroom is not fully appreciated or understood. In an effort to add to the existing research about this phenomenon, the current investigation expands on previously published research and one previously published meta-analysis that examined the impact of guided notes…

  3. Effects of a Haptic Augmented Simulation on K-12 Students' Achievement and Their Attitudes Towards Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civelek, Turhan; Ucar, Erdem; Ustunel, Hakan; Aydin, Mehmet Kemal

    2014-01-01

    The current research aims to explore the effects of a haptic augmented simulation on students' achievement and their attitudes towards Physics in an immersive virtual reality environment (VRE). A quasi-experimental post-test design was employed utilizing experiment and control groups. The participants were 215 students from a K-12 school in…

  4. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  5. An Empirical Evaluation of Distance Learning's Effectiveness in the K-12 Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Packer, Jerilyn D.; Ségol, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of online instruction on the academic achievement of K--12 students in ten states as measured by the percentage of proficient students in reading and mathematics at the school level. We used publicly available data provided by the Department of Education in Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania,…

  6. Preparing University Students to Lead K-12 Engineering Outreach Programmes: A Design Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Anika B.; Greene, Howard; Post, Paul E.; Parkhurst, Andrew; Zhan, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an engineering outreach programme designed to increase the interest of under-represented youth in engineering and to disseminate pre-engineering design challenge materials to K-12 educators and volunteers. Given university students' critical role as facilitators of the outreach programme, researchers conducted a two-year…

  7. Technology Integration in K-12 Science Classrooms: An Analysis of Barriers and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard P.; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the barriers to technology integration for Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators (n = 430) based on a 10-item online survey; results are analyzed according to teaching stream using the Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework. Quantitative descriptive statistics indicated that the leading barriers…

  8. Community Engagement in K-12 Tutoring Programs: A Research-Based Guide for Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozolic, Jennifer; Shuster, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This report on historical trends and recent findings in the literature on academic tutoring is the first step in a community-based research collaboration between faculty and students at a small liberal arts college, the local public school district, and a nonprofit foundation that supports public K-12 education. Each year, this nonprofit…

  9. Empowered Intersectionality among Black Female K-12 Leaders: A Transcendental Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Black female school leaders remain underrepresented as educational leaders in the K-12 context as marginalizing factors persist in the field. The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of Black female school leaders through the lens of intersectionality. For this research study, intersectionality…

  10. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12: Books Published in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers and mentors continue to be challenged to meet the high expectations of "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" and the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"). Indeed the "Framework" urges to help learners "[build] progressively more sophisticated explanations of natural…

  11. Cloning and expression of the Escherichia coli K-12 sad gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, L E; Henson, J M

    1988-01-01

    The Escherichia coli K-12 sad gene, which encodes an NAD-dependent succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, was cloned into a high-copy-number vector. Minicells carrying a sad+ plasmid produced a 55,000-dalton peptide, the probable sad gene product.

  12. Using the van Hiele K-12 Geometry Learning Theory to Modify Engineering Mechanics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Janet M.; Zachary, Loren W.

    2004-01-01

    Engineering students use spatial thinking when examining diagrams or models to study structure design. It is expected that most engineering students have solidified spatial thinking skills during K-12 schooling. However, according to what we know about geometry learning and teaching, spatial thinking probably needs to be explicitly taught within…

  13. Manifesting Destiny: Re/Presentations of Indigenous Peoples in K-12 U.S. History Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shear, Sarah B.; Knowles, Ryan T.; Soden, Gregory J.; Castro, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    In this mixed-methods study, we use a postcolonial framework to investigate how state standards represent Indigenous histories and cultures. The research questions that guided this study include: (a) What is the frequency of Indigenous content (histories, cultures, current issues) covered in state-level U.S. history standards for K-12? (b) What is…

  14. Environmental Education and K-12 Student Outcomes: A Review and Analysis of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Bowers, Alison W.; Roth, Noelle Wyman; Holthuis, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Many practitioners and researchers describe academic and environmental benefits of environmental education for kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12) students. To consider the empirical underpinnings of those program descriptions, we systematically analyzed the peer-reviewed literature (1994-2013), focusing on outcomes of environmental…

  15. What Is (Or Should Be) Scientific Evidence Use in K-12 Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Berland, Leema

    2017-01-01

    Research and reform efforts frequently identify evidence as an essential component of science classroom instruction to actively engage students in science practices. Despite this agreement on the primacy of evidence, there is a lack of consensus around what counts as "evidence" in k-12 classrooms (e.g., ages 5-18): scholarship and…

  16. Analysis of 3D Modeling Software Usage Patterns for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Chieh; Liao, Wen-Hung; Chi, Ming-Te; Li, Tsai-Yen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the recent trend in maker movement, teachers are learning 3D techniques actively and bringing 3D printing into the classroom to enhance variety and creativity in designing lectures. This study investigates the usage pattern of a 3D modeling software, Qmodel Creator, which is targeted at K-12 students. User logs containing…

  17. Plickers: A Formative Assessment Tool for K-12 and PETE Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jennifer M.; O'Neil, Kason; Dauenhauer, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Classroom response systems have become popular in K-12 and higher education settings in recent years in order to gauge student learning. The physical education environment is unique in that it is difficult to manage the technology associated with these systems, and therefore, student assessment can be cumbersome. A free classroom response system…

  18. Blueprint for Incorporating Service Learning: A Basic, Developmental, K-12 Service Learning Typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Alice W.; Bohnenberger, Jann E.

    2004-01-01

    Citing the need for a basic, K-12 developmental framework for service learning, this article describes such a model. This model, an inclusive typology of service learning, distinguishes three levels of service learning: Community Service, Community Exploration, and Community Action. The authors correlate this typology to Piaget's cognitive…

  19. Qatar's K-12 Education Reform Has Achieved Success in Its Early Years. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Judy

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate progress made in the first years of Qatar's implementation of K-12 education reform, RAND analyzed data from school-level observations, national surveys, and national student assessments. The study found that students in the new, Independent schools were performing better than those in Ministry schools, and there was greater student…

  20. How to Launch an Energy Star Energy Efficiency Competition for K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utebay Kudret; McArthur, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, schools have been forced by rising costs and shrinking budgets to stretch their resources further than ever before in order to meet the educational needs of today's students. EPA's ENERGY STAR program helps K-12 schools and districts improve energy efficiency, reduce operating costs and redirect critical resources into the…

  1. Explaining Technology Integration in K-12 Classrooms: A Multilevel Path Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Dawson, Kara; Barron, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design and test a model of classroom technology integration in the context of K-12 schools. The proposed multilevel path analysis model includes teacher, contextual, and school related variables on a teacher's use of technology and confidence and comfort using technology as mediators of classroom technology…

  2. Perceptions and Experiences of K-12 Educational Leaders in Response to the 27 April 2011 Tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, William E.; Fifolt, Matthew; Peters, Gary B.; Gurley, D. Keith; Collins, Loucrecia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to capture first-hand accounts of K-12 educational leaders whose school districts were directly affected by the deadly 27 April 2011 tornadoes in rural Alabama, USA. This study was framed by the literature base of leadership; specifically crisis leadership and resilience theory. Findings are organised…

  3. How Vocational Psychologists Can Make a Difference in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Shannon, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In general, vocational psychologists have not been engaged in applied research that demonstrates how career interventions can improve educational problems that matter to relevant decision-makers and stakeholders. This article describes how vocational psychology can make a difference in K-12 education by embracing an interdisciplinary…

  4. Makerspaces: The Next Iteration for Educational Technology in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    With the continually growing number of computers and mobile devices available in K-12 schools, the need is dwindling for dedicated computer labs and media centers. Some schools are starting to repurpose those facilities into different kinds of exploratory learning environments known as "makerspaces". This article discusses this next…

  5. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  6. Problem-Based Learning in the Earth and Space Science Classroom, K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tom J.; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Janet

    2017-01-01

    If you've ever asked yourself whether problem-based learning (PBL) can bring new life to both your teaching and your students' learning, here's your answer: Yes. This all-in-one guide will help you engage your students in scenarios that represent real-world science in all its messy, thought-provoking glory. The scenarios will prompt K-12 students…

  7. Commercially Available or Home-Grown: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of K-12 Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Online learning in K-12 education is becoming a familiar option for students. By the end of 2011, all 50 states and the District of Columbia offered some form of online learning as an option for some students (Watson, Murin, Vashaw, Gemin, & Rapp, 2011). Online courses are appealing to students for a variety of reasons. The five most common…

  8. Peer Mentoring and Peer Tutoring among K-12 Students: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine research on peer mentoring among K-12 students to assist practitioners with how to incorporate these instructional techniques into their own music programs. Primary themes across the music education literature of peer mentoring include the role of music teachers, the role of students as they…

  9. Mixed Methods Evaluation of Statewide Implementation of Mathematics Education Technology for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiel, Sarah; Martin, Taylor; Jeong, Soojeong; Yuan, Min

    2016-01-01

    An extensive body of research has demonstrated that the use in a K-12 classroom of technology, such as the Internet, computers, and software programs, enhances the learning of mathematics (Cheung & Slavin, 2013; Cohen & Hollebrands, 2011). In particular, growing empirical evidence supports that certain types of technology, such as…

  10. Are K-12 Learners Motivated in Physical Education? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Senlin; Chen, Ang; Zhu, Xihe

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies devoted to K-12 learner motivation in physical education share a general assumption that students may lack motivation. This meta-analytic study examined published original studies (n = 79) to determine students' motivation level and the association between motivation and outcomes. Original means of motivation measures were…

  11. Active commuting among K-12 educators: a study examining walking and biking to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J; Norton, Alyssa N

    2013-01-01

    Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors). t-tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Participants actively commuted 0.51 ± 1.93 times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population.

  12. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bopp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators ( was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors. -tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Results. Participants actively commuted times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. Conclusions. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population.

  13. Jumping the PBL Implementation Hurdle: Supporting the Efforts of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Simons, Krista D.

    2006-01-01

    While problem-based learning (PBL) has a relatively long history of successful use in medical and pre-professional schools, it has yet to be widely adopted by K--12 teachers. This may be due, in part, to the numerous challenges teachers experience when implementing PBL. In this paper, we describe specific hurdles that teachers are likely to…

  14. Restriction alleviation of phage λ in Escherichia Coli K-12 cells after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinkova, E.V.; Torosyan, M.V.; Fradkin, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In γ-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli K-12 restriction allevation of an unmodified phage λ is only observed in AB1157 strain. No restriction allevation by γ-rays is registered in AB1157 mutants (rec A and ssb-1)

  15. A Survey of K-12 Teachers' Utilization of Social Networks as a Professional Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Leah J.; Hall, Cristin M.

    2018-01-01

    Teachers are increasingly using social networks, including social media and other Internet applications, to look for educational resources. This study shares results from a survey examining patterns of social network application use among K-12 teachers in the United States. A sample of 154 teachers (18 males, 136 females) in the United States…

  16. California K-12 Schools and Communities Collaborate to Support Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbridge, Michelle W.; Goldweber, Asha; Yu, Jennifer; Golan, Shari; Stein, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    Across the education, public health, and human and social services areas, there is renewed interest in bringing agency representatives together to work on the promotion of student mental health and wellness. One of the aims of California's Prevention and Early Intervention (PEI) K-12 Student Mental Health (SMH) initiative funded under Proposition…

  17. Is K-12 Blended Learning Disruptive? An Introduction to the Theory of Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Horn, Michael B.; Staker, Heather

    2013-01-01

    The Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation, formerly the Innosight Institute, has published three papers describing the rise of K-12 blended learning--that is, formal education programs that combine online learning and brick-and-mortar schools. This fourth paper is the first to analyze blended learning through the lens of…

  18. Preparing for Online Teaching: Web-Based Assessment and Communication Skills in K12

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNisco, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Students are doing less hand-raising and more clicking as online classes become increasingly popular in K12 instruction, both in combination with brick-and-mortar classrooms and in independent full-time virtual schools. With online instruction comes a change in the nature of teaching, communicating with, and assessing students. As schools move to…

  19. Examining Student-Adult Relationships during K-12 School Age Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappi, Shelly J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between dependent and independent variables and the effects relationships have on K-12 students as they struggle through life stressors. Thus, the research study was based upon this over arching question: How does having positive student-adult relationships impact a student's ability to cope with life…

  20. iPads in K-12 Schools: A Grounded Theory Study of Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Mary Beth

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative grounded theory study investigated the value of iPads in K-12 schools when used in one-to-one ratios. The purpose of the study was to understand the perspectives of teachers using iPads in one-to-one ratios for teaching and learning in the classroom and administrators responsible for the implementation of these devices. The…