WorldWideScience

Sample records for k-12 computer science

  1. The Future of K-12 Computer Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Gene; Sundell, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Children born since the early 1990s have never known a world in which computer and information technologies are not essential to every aspect of their lives. However, far too many young people, especially low-income and minority youth, lack opportunities to learn about the impact of computer and information technologies on their lives and become…

  2. The Future of K-12 Computer Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Gene; Sundell, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Children born since the early 1990s have never known a world in which computer and information technologies are not essential to every aspect of their lives. However, far too many young people, especially low-income and minority youth, lack opportunities to learn about the impact of computer and information technologies on their lives and become…

  3. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  4. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  5. How to Implement Rigorous Computer Science Education in K-12 Schools? Some Answers and Many Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to collect various concepts, approaches, and strategies for improving computer science education in K-12 schools, we edited this second special issue of the "ACM TOCE" journal. Our intention was to collect a set of case studies from different countries that would describe all relevant aspects of specific implementations of…

  6. How to Implement Rigorous Computer Science Education in K-12 Schools? Some Answers and Many Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to collect various concepts, approaches, and strategies for improving computer science education in K-12 schools, we edited this second special issue of the "ACM TOCE" journal. Our intention was to collect a set of case studies from different countries that would describe all relevant aspects of specific implementations of…

  7. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  8. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  9. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  10. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  11. Computer Science in K-12 School Curricula of the 2lst Century: Why, What and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mary; Davis, Niki; Bell, Tim; Katz, Yaacov J.; Reynolds, Nicholas; Chambers, Dianne P.; Syslo, Maciej M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we have examined the position and roles of Computer Science in curricula in the light of recent calls for curriculum change and we have proposed principles and issues to consider in curriculum design as well as identifying priority areas for further research. The paper is based on discussions within and beyond the International…

  12. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  13. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  14. Graded Course of Study, Science (K-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euclid City Schools, OH.

    This course of study specifies the science skills and concepts that are to be taught in the various grades of the Euclid (Ohio) City Schools. Included are instructional objectives for the life, physical, and earth sciences for grades K to 6, suggested field trips and planetarium schedules (by elementary grade levels), and scope and sequence charts…

  15. Web Adventures in K-12 Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Edward A.; McGrath, Beth; Baron, Joshua

    1997-01-01

    Describes activities at the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education at Stevens Institute of Technology (New Jersey) that have explored applications of the Internet in elementary and secondary school science classrooms. Highlights include working with real-time data, teacher training for the Web, and examples of curriculum activities.…

  16. A Framework for Educational Computer Usage. K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Julia; And Others

    A framework for educational computer usage in grades K-12 is outlined. For each grade level, objectives are shown for the following knowledge areas: computer-related terminology and use; history and development of computers; the use of the computer as a tool; communicating instructions to the computer; social implications; and robotics. Suggested…

  17. Enriching K-12 Science and Mathematics Education Using LEGOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keeshan; Igel, Irina; Poveda, Ronald; Kapila, Vikram; Iskander, Magued

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a series of illustrative LEGO Mindstorms-based science and math activities, developed under an NSF GK-12 Fellows project, for elementary, middle, and high school grades. The activities, developed by engineering and science graduate Fellows in partnership with K-12 teachers, are grade appropriate, address pertinent learning…

  18. Empowering K-12 Students with Disabilities to Learn Computational Thinking and Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Maya; Wherfel, Quentin M.; Pearson, Jamie; Shehab, Saadeddine; Tapia, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    This article's focus is on including computing and computational thinking in K-12 instruction within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, and to provide that instruction in ways that promote access for students traditionally underrepresented in the STEM fields, such as students with disabilities. Providing computing…

  19. Promoting brain-science literacy in the k-12 classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriole, Michaela

    2010-07-01

    There are many simple ways to incorporate neuroscience into the K-12 classroom, even when the subject is not explicitly part of the curriculum. Here, Michaela Labriole, a science instructor at the New York Hall of Science, provides tangible examples of how teachers can encourage brain-science literacy in students at a time when growing knowledge of the brain is shaping our understanding of how to best foster learning.

  20. Merging University Students into K?12 Science Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    limited to the K–12 classrooms but were related to the broader issue of creating university- school partnerships as a strategy for science education reform...of interest to federal policymakers who are concerned with science education reform and the development of partnerships between universities and K–12...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Merging University Students into K?12 Science Education Reform Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  1. K-12 Math and Science Education: A Physicist Meets Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. For example, their experiences working on research topics of great societal interest (e.g. the energy supply or global warming) can be a great attraction to young people. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  2. Soil Science Society of America - K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Loynachan, Tom; Mblia, Monday; Robinson, Clay; Chapman, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America created its K12 Committee in 2006 in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers. The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has cooperated and contributed to the American Geologic Institutes' Earth Science Week materials with brochures and lesson plans and with National Association of Conservation Districts by providing peer-review and distribution of materials. The most recent developments from the committee include a web redesign that is more student and teacher friendly, the development of a peer-review system to publish K12 Lesson Plans, and finally the publication of a new soils

  3. K-12 science education: A teacher`s view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, P.

    1994-12-31

    Science education has experienced significant changes over the past two decades. Science is now vital to good citizenship, performance in the workplace, and everyday life.It is time to re-tool and re-design the entire K-12 science education system, employing the same principles and methods used in the practice of science itself. We can no longer ignore the special needs of science instruction. All students need a course that develops their scientific literacy and critical thinking skills every year. Each science program needs meaningful, useful content and skill standards to drive and continuously update the curriculum content and enabel usefull assessment. Science teachers must articulate their needs and develop opportunities for professional development and the strengthening of their profession. We need a national plan that gets the many different participants working coherently towards a common goal.

  4. Undergraduate interest in K--12 teaching and the perceived 'climate' for the K--12 education profession in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdeman, Robert Dean

    Previous research suggests that the natural science setting in universities does not offer a supportive environment for undergraduates interested in K--12 education careers, an important problem given the need for K--12 science teachers. A mixed-method approach was used to examine student perspectives toward K--12 education careers, and the influence of the college experience on perspectives, at a public research university. Quantitative data come from a cross-sectional survey sample (N = 444) of upper-division natural science majors in the university. The survey focused on student background characteristics, undergraduate experiences, perceptions of the college environment, career interests, and satisfaction. Pursuit of K--12 education as a top current career choice was rare among the respondents (3.6%). However, about one-fourth of them indicated some interest in this career and overall interest increased slightly during the college experience. Based on student perceptions, K--12 education was substantially less emphasized within the natural sciences than other career fields. Regression analyses revealed that the most important predictors (aside from initial career interests) of interest in and attitude toward K--12 teaching were self-concept and personality measures. Several college experience measures were also predictors, including perceptions about faculty and peers in the natural sciences. The effect of college experiences differed for students initially more inclined toward K--12 teaching, who reported a net decrease in interest, versus those more disinclined, who reported a net gain in interest. Satisfaction with the college experience was similar for the two groups. Qualitative data come from follow-up interviews conducted with eight survey respondents who recalled a top choice of K--12 teaching upon entering college but had decided to pursue another career. These students perceived other career fields to offer better professional opportunities for

  5. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments

  6. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  7. Development and Evaluation of Food Safety Modules for K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Travis K.; Pfuntner, Rachel C.; Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Career and educational opportunities in food science and food safety are underrecognized by K-12 students and educators. Additionally, misperceptions regarding nature of science understanding persist in K-12 students despite being emphasized as an important component of science education for over 100 y. In an effort to increase awareness…

  8. K-12 Math and Science Education: Tales from the Santa Fe Alliance for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  9. Merging University Students into K-12 Science Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    consider the effects of outreach programs on university science students. Improved communication in science , increased enrollment in science courses as a...education side. Improved communication in science , increased enrollment in science courses as a result of adding an outreach component to traditional

  10. I-LLINI Partnerships to improve K-12 Earth Science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkin, J. H.; Wong, K.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    I-LLINI Partnerships is a three-year State of Illinois funded program to initiate enhanced communication between the faculty at University of Illinois and K-12 teachers in the surrounding communities. The program focuses on math and science with a particular emphasis on the use of technology to teaching math and science to middle-school aged children. The Partnership provides participating teachers with a suite of technology including a computer, digital camera, and software, as well as a small stipend. University partners include representatives from the Departments of Mathematics as well as the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and the Department of Geology. The Atmospheric Sciences and Geology faculty have partnered to provide content using an Earth Systems Science approach to improving Earth Science education for in- and pre-service teachers through new undergraduate and graduate classes that focus on fundamental earth science content, State K-12 standards, and transferable lesson plans and materials that enable course participants to easily transfer university practice to the classroom.

  11. Identity and Biography as Mediators of Science and Mathematics Faculty's Involvement in K-12 Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison; Sevian, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores aspects of science and mathematics faculty identities and biographies that mediated their involvement in K-12 service. Faculty expressed five motivations for participating in K-12 service--advancing their research agenda, advocating environmental consciousness, desiring to be involved in their children's schools, aspiring to…

  12. Identity and Biography as Mediators of Science and Mathematics Faculty's Involvement in K-12 Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison; Sevian, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores aspects of science and mathematics faculty identities and biographies that mediated their involvement in K-12 service. Faculty expressed five motivations for participating in K-12 service--advancing their research agenda, advocating environmental consciousness, desiring to be involved in their children's schools, aspiring to…

  13. Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texley, Juliana

    2010-01-01

    What makes an outstanding book for a young reader? Although it would be hard to create a rubric for every book, experienced teachers recognize them quickly. They fascinate and captivate with both their content and style. Award-winning trade books inspire young readers to want more... more information, more books, more inquiry, more science. The…

  14. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  15. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  16. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12: Books Published in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers and mentors continue to be challenged to meet the high expectations of "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" and the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"). Indeed the "Framework" urges to help learners "[build] progressively more sophisticated explanations of natural…

  17. Improving indicators of the quality of science and mathematics education in grades K-12

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murnane, Richard J; Raizen, Senta A

    ... and Mathematics Education in in Grades K- -12 12 Richard J. Murnane and Senta A. Raizen, Editors Committee on Indicators of Precollege Science and Mathematics Education Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1988 Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for...

  18. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  19. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  20. Interactive Teaching as a Recruitment and Training Tool for K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Teacher Preparation (STEMTP) program at the University of Colorado has been designed to recruit and train prospective K-12 science teachers while improving student learning through interactive teaching. The program has four key goals: (1) recruit undergraduate students into K-12 science education, (2) provide these prospective teachers with hands-on experience in an interactive teaching pedagogy, (3) create an intergrated program designed to support (educationally, socially, and financially) and engage these prospective science teachers up until they obtain liscensure and/or their masters degree in education, and (4) improve student learning in large introductory science classes. Currently there are 31 students involved in the program and a total of 72 students have been involved in the year and a half it has been in existence. I will discuss the design of the STEMTP program, the success in recruiting K-12 science teachers, and the affect on student learning in a large lecture class of implementing interactive learning pedagogies by involving these prospective K-12 science teachers. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support for this work. The course transformation project is also supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

  1. Cataclysms and Catastrophes: A Case Study of Improving K-12 Science Education Through a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T.; Ellins, K. K.; Morris, M.; Christeson, G.

    2003-12-01

    The K-12 science teacher is always seeking ways of improving and updating their curriculum by integrating the latest research into their most effective classroom activities. However, the daily demands of delivering instruction to large numbers of students coupled with the rapid advances in some fields of science can often overwhelm this effort. The NSF-sponsored Cataclysms and Catastrophes curriculum, developed by scientists from the The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), middle and high school teachers, and UT graduate students (NSF GK-12 fellows) working together through the GK-12 program, is a textbook example of how universities can facilitate this quest, benefiting education at both K-12 and university levels. In 1992, "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was developed as an activity in the Planet Earth class at the Liberal Arts and Science Academy of Austin as an interdisciplinary approach to science. Taking advantage of the media attention generated by the impact scenario for the K-T extinction, the activity consists of students participating in a simulated senate hearing on the potential causes of the K-T extinction and their implications for society today. This activity not only exposes students to the wide range of science involved in understanding mass extinctions, but also to the social, political and economic implications when this science is brought into the public arena and the corresponding use of data in decision making and disaster preparedness. While "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was always a popular and effective activity with students, it was in desperate need of updating to keep pace with the evolving scientific debate over the cause of the K-T extinction and the growing body of impact evidence discovered over the past decade. By adding two inquiry-based learning activities that use real geophysical data collected by scientists studying the buried Chicxulub feature as a

  2. Teaching and Learning with Mobile Computing Devices: Case Study in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael M.; Tamim, Suha; Brown, Dorian B.; Sweeney, Joseph P.; Ferguson, Fatima K.; Jones, Lakavious B.

    2015-01-01

    While ownership of mobile computing devices, such as cellphones, smartphones, and tablet computers, has been rapid, the adoption of these devices in K-12 classrooms has been measured. Some schools and individual teachers have integrated mobile devices to support teaching and learning. The purpose of this qualitative research was to describe the…

  3. Agriculture's Role in K-12 Education: Proceedings of a Forum on the National Science Education Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Agriculture.

    The Board on Agriculture organized a Forum on Agriculture's Role in K-12 Education to provide an opportunity for agricultural professional societies to explore ways in which examples from agriculture, food, and environment systems can be used to enhance inquiry-based science education. Participants discussed how professional societies could…

  4. Forum on Technology in K-12 Education: Envisioning a New Future Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    This paper examines the impacts of instructional technologies on K-12 science instruction. The first section addresses the question, "What is technology?" The dimensions of technology identified by the International Technology Education Association are summarized, and definitions of technology from the American Association for the…

  5. C-MORE Science Kits: Putting Technology in the Hands of K-12 Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, K.; Weersing, K.; Daniels, C.; Puniwai, N.; Matsuzaki, J.; Bruno, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a NSF Science and Technology Center based at the University of Hawaii. The C-MORE education and outreach program offers a variety of resources and professional development opportunities for science educators, including online resources, participation in oceanography research cruises, teacher-training workshops, mini-grants to incorporate microbial oceanography-related content and activities into their classroom and, most recently, C- MORE science kits. C-MORE science kits provide hands-on classroom, field, and laboratory activities related to microbial oceanography for K-12 students. Each kit comes with complete materials and instructions, and is available free of charge to Hawaii's public school teachers. Several kits are available nationwide. C-MORE science kits cover a range of topics and technologies and are targeted at various grade levels. Here is a sampling of some available kits: 1) Marine Murder Mystery: The Case of the Missing Zooxanthellae. Students learn about the effect of climate change and other environmental threats on coral reef destruction through a murder-mystery experience. Participants also learn how to use DNA to identify a suspect. Grades levels: 3-8. 2) Statistical sampling. Students learn basic statistics through an exercise in random sampling, with applications to microbial oceanography. The laptops provided with this kit enable students to enter, analyze, and graph their data using EXCEL. Grades levels: 6-12. 3) Chlorophyll Lab. A research-quality fluorometer is used to measure the chlorophyll content in marine and freshwater systems. This enables students to compare biomass concentrations in samples collected from various locations. Grades levels: 9-12. 4) Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD). Students predict how certain variables (e.g., temperature, pressure, chlorophyll, oxygen) vary with depth. A CTD, attached to a laptop computer, is deployed into deep water

  6. Idaho Robotics Opportunities for K-12 Students: A K-12 Pipeline of Activities Promoting Careers in Science, Engineering, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Timothy G.

    2010-01-01

    4-H youth development programs nationwide are responding to the 4-H National Science, Engineering, and Technology (4-H SET) Initiative to involve more youth in Science, Engineering, and Technology activities. The goal is to increase the numbers of youth choosing to pursue SET careers. This article describes a program that is having great success…

  7. Forging an identity: Four science doctoral students in a collaborative partnership with K--12 science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinsky, Martin G.

    2006-12-01

    A primary conflict regarding the identity of science education is the competition between those emphasizing science aspects of science education versus those who emphasize the education. I examine a National Science Foundation funded program at "Southern State University" (pseudonym) known as the GK-12 Project that placed science doctoral students into K-12 classrooms, where they worked with practicing science teachers. My research question was: How do GK-12 Fellows forge an identity through their experiences as both teachers and doctoral students? I used the "hermeneutic dialectic circle", a process whereby I interviewed each stakeholder in turn, and conducted member checks. My primary sources were interviews, and my primary subjects were four Fellows. One of the Fellows, Jose, left the program after one year. The other three in my study, Wanda, Rebecca, and Nathan, remained for all three years. The starting point for their learning was admitting what they did not know. These three learned about science outside of their fields because they learned how to learn. They also took an interest in and enacted making connections to students. In negotiating two cultures, the Fellows achieved heightened awareness of the SSU science culture's current practices in college science teaching, particularly the problems. They noted the ineffectiveness of the didactic delivery style and the lack of formative assessment. These three Fellows manifested rational and pluralistic worldviews. Because of his frames that were derived from growing up under an authoritarian government in Cuba, Jose experienced the program differently than the other three Fellows. For Jose, his identity as a scientist and as an educator remained more static, as he identified more with the authoritarian outlook on education espoused in SSU's science departments. The science culture at SSU is centered in the authoritarian value structure sees a need for a "fixing" of education, to improve "poorly prepared

  8. Teaching K-12 teachers and students about nanoscale science through microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. NNIN's education and outreach programs are large and varied and includes outreach to the K-12 community in the form of professional development workshops and school programs. Two important components of nanoscale science education are understanding size and scale and the tools used in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE). As part of our K-12 endeavors, we educate K-12 students and teachers about the tools of nanoscience by providing experiences with the Hitachi TM 3000 tabletop Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). There are three of these across the network that are used in education and outreach. This paper will discuss approaches we use to engage the K-12 community at NNIN's site at Georgia Institute of Technology to understand size and scale and the applications of a variety of microscopes to demonstrate the imaging capabilities of these to see both the micro and nano scales. We not only use the tabletop SEM but also include USB digital microscopes, a Keyence VHX- 600 Digital Microscope, and even a small lens used with smart phones. The goal of this outreach is to educate students as well as teachers about the capabilities of the various instruments and their importance at different size scales.

  9. Evaluation of Online Teacher and Student Materials for the Framework for K-12 Science Education Science and Engineering Crosscutting Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Council developed and published the "Framework for K-12 Science Education," a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to be incorporated into science materials and activities, a first in science…

  10. Science Museum Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Science museums engage in a wide range of activities not apparent to exhibit hall visitors. Many of them can support research outreach to public and K-12 teachers and students. In addition to exhibits in science centers, and demonstrations on topics like electricity or cryogenics, science museums offer courses for children and adults, out-of-school programs for students, teacher professional development; some do K-12 curriculum development and some run science magnet schools. In recent years science museums have increased their capacity to communicate with the public about current research. The Museum of Science, for instance, created a Current Science and Technology Center in 2001 dedicated to science in the news and current research developments. Through this Center, the Museum partnered with Harvard University to provide a wide range of public engagement activities as part of Harvard's Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center focused on the Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications. In the past five years a number of new collaborations among science museums have developed, many in partnership with researchers and research centers. Perhaps the largest or these, the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Net) was launched in 2005 with funding from the National Science Foundation. The NISE Net links informal science education organizations together and to university research centers to raise the capacity of all the participant organizations to increase public awareness, understanding, and engagement with nanoscale science, engineering, and technology. Nearly 300 informal educational organizations in every state nationwide make use of NISE Net's educational materials, professional development, national and regional meetings, and online resources. NISE Net is an open source network with all of its materials freely available to everyone.

  11. CESAME: Providing High Quality Professional Development in Science and Mathematics for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Paul

    2002-04-01

    It is appropriate that after almost half a century of Science and Mathematics education reform we take a look back and a peek forward to understand the present state of this wonderfully complex system. Each of the components of this system including teaching, professional development, assessment, content and the district K-12 curriculum all need to work together if we hope to provide quality science, mathematics and technology education for ALL students. How do the state and national standards drive the system? How do state policies on student testing and teacher licensure come into play? How do we improve the preparation, retention and job satisfaction of our K-12 teachers? What initiatives have made or are making a difference? What else needs to be done? What can the physics community do to support local efforts? This job is too big for any single organization or individual but we each can contribute to the effort. Our Center at Northeastern University, with support from the National Science Foundation, has a sharply defined focus: to get high quality, research-based instructional materials into the hands of K-12 classroom teachers and provide the support they need to use the materials effectively in their classrooms.

  12. Implications of the Next Generation Science Standards for K-12, EPO, and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, G.; Barber, J.; Pomeroy, R.; Reagan, G.

    2014-07-01

    The newly-released Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have been under development for a few years with broad community input and explicit involvement of many states likely to adopt these as their own science standards. Several key features of the NGSS make these a substantial advance from the existing National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996), including focus on three dimensions previously outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC 2011): Science and Engineering Practices; Cross-cutting Concepts; and Disciplinary Core Ideas. What are the implications of all this now for K-12 educators, in the immediate term and in the long-term? What do the NGSS imply for EPO professionals, especially those involved in science curriculum development and teacher professional development? What should higher education faculty know about the NGSS, especially as it relates to the preparation of incoming college students, as well as the education of future elementary and secondary science teachers in college (including in Astro 101-type courses)?

  13. Turning K-12 Science Education Inside Out, Knocking Down Walls and Empowering the Disenchanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A. Y. M.

    2016-12-01

    For a 'user' there are several genres of citizen science activities one can enlist themselves in, from microtasked analytics to data collection. Often times design conversation for these efforts are focused around the goal of collecting high quality data for an urgent scientific question. However, there is much to be discussed around the opportunity to expand upon the interaction experience of the 'user'. This is particularly relevant in the integration of citizen science in the classroom. Here we explore the role of citizen science in formal K-12 science education through the lens of "Project Based Learning", examining design challenges in classroom adoption (including standards alignment) as well as interaction design focused around long term user/student motivation and engagement in the science exploration.

  14. Project BioEYES: Accessible Student-Driven Science for K-12 Students and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuda, Jamie R; Butler, Valerie G; Vary, Robert; Farber, Steven A

    2016-11-01

    BioEYES, a nonprofit outreach program using zebrafish to excite and educate K-12 students about science and how to think and act like scientists, has been integrated into hundreds of under-resourced schools since 2002. During the week-long experiments, students raise zebrafish embryos to learn principles of development and genetics. We have analyzed 19,463 participating students' pre- and post-tests within the program to examine their learning growth and attitude changes towards science. We found that at all grade levels, BioEYES effectively increased students' content knowledge and produced favorable shifts in students' attitudes about science. These outcomes were especially pronounced in younger students. Having served over 100,000 students, we find that our method for providing student-centered experiences and developing long-term partnerships with teachers is essential for the growth and sustainability of outreach and school collaborations.

  15. K--12 science educator perception of instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday-Cashwell, Janet Rose

    2000-10-01

    Selected K--12 public school science educators in 14 eastern North Carolina counties were surveyed to examine their perceptions of their undergraduate preparation programs with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom. A quantitative study, this research examined science educator preparedness in instructing students with learning disabilities by evaluating educator perception in regard to mainstrearned and inclusive educational settings. Specifically, two null hypotheses were tested. Null hypothesis I stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' perceptions of their undergraduate teacher education preparation programs and their perceptions of their abilities to instruct students needing accommodations on behalf of their learning disabilities in mainstrearned or inclusive settings. Participants' responses to perception as well as value statements regarding opinions, adaptations, and undergraduate training with respect to mainstreaming and inclusion were evaluated through t-test analyses of 22 Likert-scale items. Null hypothesis 1 was not accepted because a statistically significant difference did exist between the educators' perceptions of their undergraduate training and their perceived abilities to instruct students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive settings. Null hypothesis 2 stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' attained educational level; grade level currently taught, supervised or chaired; and years of experience in teaching science, supervising science education, and/or chairing science departments in selected North Carolina public schools and their opinions of their undergraduate teacher education program with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive educational settings. Null hypothesis 2 was evaluated through an analysis of

  16. BiteScis: Connecting K-12 teachers with science graduate students to produce lesson plans on modern science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Many students graduate high school having never learned about the process and people behind modern science research. The BiteScis program addresses this gap by providing easily implemented lesson plans that incorporate the whos, whats, and hows of today's scienctific discoveries. We bring together practicing scientists (motivated graduate students from the selective communicating science conference, ComSciCon) with K-12 science teachers to produce, review, and disseminate K-12 lesson plans based on modern science research. These lesson plans vary in topic from environmental science to neurobiology to astrophysics, and involve a range of activities from laboratory exercises to art projects, debates, or group discussion. An integral component of the program is a series of short, "bite-size" articles on modern science research written for K-12 students. The "bite-size" articles and lesson plans will be made freely available online in an easily searchable web interface that includes association with a variety of curriculum standards. This ongoing program is in its first year with about 15 lesson plans produced to date.

  17. K-12 science education reform will take a decade, and community partnerships hold best hope for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keever, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Fundamental change in K-12 science education in the United States, essential for full citizenship in an increasingly technological world, will take a decade or more to accomplish, and only the sustained, cooperative efforts of people in their own communities -- scientists, teachers, and concerned citizens -- will likely ensure success. These were among the themes at Sigma Xi`s national K-12 science education forum.

  18. Assessment Strategies for Implementing Ngss in K12 Earth System Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, C.

    2016-12-01

    Several science education researchers have led assessment efforts that provide strategies particularly useful for evaluating the threedimensional learning that is central to NGSS (DeBarger, A. H., Penuel, W. R., Harris, C. J., Kennedy, C. K., 2016; Knight, A. M. & McNeill, K. L., 2015; McNeill, K. L., KatshSinger, R. & Pelletier, P., 2015; McNeill K.L., et.al., 2015; McNeill, K.L., & Krajcik, J.S., 2011; Penuel, W., 2016). One of the basic premises of these researchers is that, "Assessment is a practice of argument from evidence based on what students say, do, and write" and that "the classroom is the richest place to gather evidence of what students know (Penuel, W., 2016). The implementation of the NGSS in Earth System Science provides a unique opportunity for geoscience education researchers to study student learning and contribute to the development of this research as well as for geoscience educators to apply these approaches and strategies in their own work with K12 inservice and preservice educators. DeBarger, A. H., Penuel, W. R., Harris, C. J., Kennedy, C. K. (2016). Building an Assessment Argument to Design and Use Next Generation Science Assessments in Efficacy Studies of Curriculum Interventions. American†Journal†of†Evaluation†37(2) 174192Æ Knight, A. M. & McNeill, K. L. (2015). Comparing students' individual written and collaborative oral socioscientific arguments. International Journal of Environmental and Science Education.10(5), 23647. McNeill, K. L., KatshSinger, R. & Pelletier, P. (2015). Assessing science practices-Moving your class along a continuum. Science Scope. McNeill, K.L., & Krajcik, J.S. (2011). Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson. Penuel, W. (2016). Classroom Assessment Strategies for NGSS Earth and Space Sciences. Implementing†the†NGSS†Webinar†Series, February 11, 2016.

  19. First Year K-12 Teachers as High Leverage Point to Implement GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Mendez, B. J.; Schultz, G.; Wierman, T.

    2013-01-01

    The recurring challenge for curriculum developers is how to efficiently prepare K-12 classroom teachers to use new curricula. First-year teachers, numbering nearly 250,000 in the US each year, have the greatest potential to impact the largest number of students because they have potential to be in the classroom for thirty years. At the same time, these novice teachers are often the most open minded about adopting curricular innovation because they are not yet deeply entrenched in existing practices. To take advantage of this high leverage point, a collaborative of space scientists and science educators at the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science and Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory with experts from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the University of Wyoming, and the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education experimented with a unique professional development model focused on helping master teachers work closely with pre-service teachers during their student teaching internship field experience. The Advancing Mentor and Novice Teachers in Space Science (AMANTISS) team first identified master teachers who supervise novice, student teachers and trained these master teachers to use the GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence. Then, these master teachers were mentored in coaching interning student teachers assigned to them in using GEMS materials. Evaluation showed that novice teachers mentored by the master teachers felt knowledgeable after teaching the GEMS units. However, they seemed relatively less confident about the solar system and objects beyond the solar system. Overall, mentees felt strongly at the end of the year that they have acquired good strategies for teaching the various topics, suggesting that the support they received while teaching and working with a mentor was of real benefit to them. Funding provided in part by NASA ROSES AMANTISS NNX09AD51G

  20. Ocean Science in a K-12 setting: Promoting Inquiry Based Science though Graduate Student and Teacher Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodico, J. M.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.; Pyrtle, A.; Ivey, S.; Madeiros, A.; Saleem, S.

    2005-12-01

    The University of South Florida, College of Marine Science Oceans: GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program is successfully enriching science learning via the oceans. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the program provides a unique opportunity among scientists and K-12 teachers to interact with the intention of bringing ocean science concepts and research to the classroom environment enhance the experience of learning and doing science, and to promote `citizen scientists' for the 21st century. The success of the program relies heavily on the extensive summer training program where graduate students develop teaching skills, create inquiry based science activities for a summer Oceanography Camp for Girls program and build a relationship with their mentor teacher. For the last year and a half, two graduate students from the College of Marine Science have worked in cooperation with teachers from the Pinellas county School District, Southside Fundamental Middle School. Successful lesson plans brought into a 6th grade Earth Science classroom include Weather and climate: Global warming, The Geologic timescale: It's all about time, Density: Layering liquids, and Erosion processes: What moves water and sediment. The school and students have benefited greatly from the program experiencing hands-on inquiry based science and the establishment of an after school science club providing opportunities for students to work on their science fair projects and pursuit other science interests. Students are provided scoring rubrics and their progress is creatively assessed through KWL worksheets, concept maps, surveys, oral one on one and classroom discussions and writing samples. The year culminated with a series of hands on lessons at the nearby beach, where students demonstrated their mastery of skills through practical application. Benefits to the graduate student include improved communication of current science research to a diverse audience, a better understanding of the

  1. Science achievement as an indicator of educational opportunity available in rural K--12 districts in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capehart, Cheryl Louise

    Purpose of the study. This study examined Rural K--12 Texas districts to investigate whether science achievement could serve as a gauge to measure the availability and quality of rigorous educational opportunities in Rural Texas districts. Procedure. A Case II criterion-group design was used; 2 groups of districts were selected based on their 3-year performances on the 8th grade Science Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS)---the statewide criterion-referenced test. The High Performing Group (HPG) was composed of 30 top performing districts; the Low Performing Group (LPG) was composed of 30 lowest performing districts. Data collection was limited to archived quantitative data from Texas Education Agency's open records. Achievement variables were percent passing (1) Science TASS, (2) Biology End-of-Course (EoC) test and (3) the composite passing all Reading, Writing, and Mathematics TAAS. Academic variables were percent participating in (1) advanced courses, (2) rigorous graduation programs, and (3) college entrance examinations. District quality indicators also included 3 budget variables: (1) average teacher salary, (2) per pupil instructional expenditure, (3) percent allocated for instructional leadership; and 4 staff variables: (1) percent teachers fully certified, (2) percent teachers with advanced degrees, (3) average years teacher experience, (4) average percent non-turnover of teachers. One score per variable was obtained for each district. The HPG and LPG were compared on each variable using the group means, standard deviations, standard errors of the mean, Levene's test for equality of variance, and a t test for equality of means with a 95% confidence level. The Pearson correlation with two-tailed significance calculated the relationship of each independent variable (budget and staff factors) to each dependent variable (performance measures). Science TASS and a Combined Science score (grand mean of Science TASS & Biology EoC passing rates) were

  2. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration" included the following reports:Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach; Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education: K-12 Teacher Retention, Renewal, and Involvement in Professional Science; Telling the Tale of Two Deserts: Teacher Training and Utilization of a New Standards-based, Bilingual E/PO Product; Lindstrom M. M. Tobola K. W. Stocco K. Henry M. Allen J. S. McReynolds J. Porter T. T. Veile J. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes -- Update; Utilizing Mars Data in Education: Delivering Standards-based Content by Exposing Educators and Students to Authentic Scientific Opportunities and Curriculum; K. E. Little Elementary School and the Young Astronaut Robotics Program; Integrated Solar System Exploration Education and Public Outreach: Theme, Products and Activities; and Online Access to the NEAR Image Collection: A Resource for Educators and Scientists.

  3. Computational Thinking in K-12: A Review of the State of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Shuchi; Pea, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Jeannette Wing's influential article on computational thinking 6 years ago argued for adding this new competency to every child's analytical ability as a vital ingredient of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning. What is computational thinking? Why did this article resonate with so many and serve as a rallying cry for…

  4. Businesses assisting K--12 science instruction: Four case studies of long-term school partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Trieste, Lynne M.

    Businesses lack enough qualified applicants to fill the increasing need for scientists and engineers while educators lack many resources for science programs in K-12 schools. This series of case studies searched for successful collaborations between the two in four geographic locations: Boise, Idaho; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles County, California, and Orange County, California. These science education partnerships were investigated to gain an understanding of long-term partnership structure, functioning and evaluation methods. Forty-nine individual interviews with representatives from the groups of stakeholders these programs impact were also conducted. Stakeholder groups included students, teachers, parents, school administrators, business liaisons, and non-profit representatives. Several recurring themes in these partnerships reinforced the existing literature research findings. Collaboration and communication between partners, teacher professional development, the need for more minority and female representation in physical science careers, and self-efficacy in relation to how people come to view their scientific abilities, are among these themes. Topics such as program replication, the importance of role models, programs using "hands-on" activities, reward systems for program participants, and program outcome measurement also emerged from the cases investigated. Third-party assistance by a non-profit entity is occurring within all of these partnerships. This assistance ranges from a service providing material resources such as equipment, lesson plans and meeting space, to managing the partnership fundraising, program development and evaluations. Discussions based upon the findings that support or threaten sustainment of these four partnerships, what a "perfect" partnership might look like, and areas in need of further investigation conclude this study.

  5. MY NASA DATA: Making Earth Science Data Accessible to the K-12 Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    In 2004, the Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and Earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA) project began. The goal of this project is to enable K-12 and citizen science communities to make use of the large volume of Earth System Science data that NASA has collected and archived. One major outcome is to allow students to select a problem of real-life importance, and to explore it using high quality data sources without spending months looking for and then learning how to use a dataset. The key element of the MY NASA DATA project is the implementation of a Live Access Server (LAS). The LAS is an open source software tool, developed by NOAA, that provides access to a variety of data sources through a single, fairly simple, point- and- click interface. This tool truly enables use of the available data - more than 100 parameters are offered so far - in an inquiry-based educational setting. It readily gives students the opportunity to browse images for times and places they define, and also provides direct access to the underlying data values - a key feature of this educational effort. The team quickly discovered, however, that even a simple and fairly intuitive tool is not enough to make most teachers comfortable with data exploration. User feedback has led us to create a friendly LAS Introduction page, which uses the analogy of a restaurant to explain to our audience the basic concept of an LAS. In addition, we have created a "Time Coverage at a Glance" chart to show what data are available when. This keeps our audience from being too confused by the patchwork of data availability caused by the start and end of individual missions. Finally, we have found it necessary to develop a substantial amount of age appropriate documentation, including topical pages and a science glossary, to help our audience understand the parameters they are exploring and how these parameters fit into the larger picture of Earth System Science. MY NASA DATA

  6. Using Off-the-Shelf Gaming Controllers For Computer Control in the K-12 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, N. L.; Withee, J.; Segee, M.; Birkel, S. D.; Albee, E.; Koons, P. O.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B.

    2009-12-01

    In the classroom, the interaction between students, teachers, and datasets is becoming more game like. Software such as GoogleEarth allow students to interact with data on a more personal level; allowing them the dynamically change variables, move arbitrarily, and personalize their experience with the datasets. As this becomes more immersive, traditional software control such as keyboard and mouse begin to hold the student back in terms of intuitive interfacing with the data. This is a problem that has best been tackled by modern gaming systems such as the Wii, XBox 360, and Playstation 3 Systems. By utilizing the solutions given by these gaming systems, it is possible to further a students immersion with a system. Through an NSF ITEST (Information and Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers) grant, researchers at the University of Maine have experimented with using the game controller that is used for interacting with the Nintendo Wii (often called a Wiimote) with existing geodynamic systems in an effort to eases interaction with these systems. Since these game controllers operate using Bluetooth, a common protocol in computing, Wiimotes can easily communicate with existing laptop computers that are issued to Maine students. This paper describes the technical requirements, setup, and usage of Wiimotes as an input device to complex geodynamical systems for use in the K-12 classroom.

  7. Connecting Three Pivotal Concepts in K-12 Science State Standards and Maps of Conceptual Growth to Research in Physics Education

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes three conceptual areas in physics that are particularly important targets for educational interventions in K-12 science. These conceptual areas are force and motion, conservation of energy, and geometrical optics, which were prominent in the US national and four US state standards that we examined. The four US state standards that were analyzed to explore the extent to which the K-12 science standards differ in different states were selected to include states in different geographic regions and of different sizes. The three conceptual areas that were common to all the four state standards are conceptual building blocks for other science concepts covered in the K-12 curriculum. Since these three areas have been found to be ripe with deep student misconceptions that are resilient to conventional physics instruction, the nature of difficulties in these areas is described in some depth, along with pointers towards approaches that have met with some success in each conceptual area.

  8. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a

  9. Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Geller, Stacie; Regensteiner, Judith G; Raymond, Nancy; Nagel, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors-current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs-to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

  10. Promoting K-12 Community Research and Service through the Washington Earth Science Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John; DeBari, Susan; Gallagher, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes a K-12 teacher enhancement program in Washington state that provides teachers with the background knowledge, human and material resources, and time to develop community-based studies on environmental issues facing the citizens of Washington. (Author/KHR)

  11. Computational Thinking for All: Pedagogical Approaches to Embedding 21st Century Problem Solving in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Aman; Hong, Hai; Stephenson, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The recent focus on computational thinking as a key 21st century skill for all students has led to a number of curriculum initiatives to embed it in K-12 classrooms. In this paper, we discuss the key computational thinking constructs, including algorithms, abstraction, and automation. We further discuss how these ideas are related to current…

  12. A Strategy for Incorporating Learning Analytics into the Design and Evaluation of a K-12 Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Carlos; Rangel, Virginia Snodgrass; Whitaker, Reid

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a scalable approach for integrating learning analytics into an online K-12 science curriculum. A description of the curriculum and the underlying pedagogical framework is followed by a discussion of the challenges to be tackled as part of this integration. We include examples of data visualization based on teacher usage…

  13. Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    AND SUBTITLE Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle...college. Three students have gone through the NRL internships and now are full time employees at NRL. This pattern of direct corporate, government and

  14. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  15. What K-12 Teachers of Earth Science Need from the Earth Science Research Community: Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES), a Minnesota Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Pound, K. S.; Rosok, K.; Baumtrog, J.

    2009-12-01

    NSF-style Broader Impacts activities in the Earth Sciences take many forms, from long term partnerships between universities and informal science institutions to one-time K-12 classroom visits by scientists. Broader Impacts that include K-12 teachers range from those that convey broad Earth Science concepts to others stressing direct connections to very specific current research methods and results. Design of these programs is often informed by prior successful models and a broad understanding of teacher needs, but is not specifically designed to address needs expressed by teachers themselves. In order to better understand teachers’ perceived needs for connections to Earth Science research, we have formed the Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES) research team. Our team includes a geology faculty member experienced in undergraduate and professional Earth Science teacher training, two in-service middle school Earth Science teachers, and the Education Director of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. Members of the team have designed, taught and experienced many of these models, from the Andrill ARISE program to NCED’s summer institutes and teacher internship program. We are administering the STAPLES survey to ask Earth Science teachers in our own state (Minnesota) which of many models they use to 1) strengthen their own understanding of current Earth Science research and general Earth Science concepts and 2) deepen their students’ understanding of Earth Science content. Our goal is to share survey results to inform more effective Broader Impacts programs in Minnesota and to stimulate a wider national discussion of effective Broader Impacts programs that includes teachers’ voices.

  16. Open Educational Resources from Performance Task using Video Analysis and Modeling - Tracker and K12 science education framework

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2014-01-01

    This invited paper discusses why Physics performance task by grade 9 students in Singapore is worth participating in for two reasons; 1) the video analysis and modeling are open access, licensed creative commons attribution for advancing open educational resources in the world and 2) allows students to be like physicists, where the K12 science education framework is adopted. Personal reflections on how physics education can be made more meaningful in particular Practice 1: Ask Questions, Practice 2: Use Models and Practice 5: Mathematical and Computational Thinking using Video Modeling supported by evidence based data from video analysis. This paper hopes to spur fellow colleagues to look into open education initiatives such as our Singapore Tracker community open educational resources curate on http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/p/physics-applets-virtual-lab.html as well as digital libraries http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/ directly accessible through Tracker 4.86, EJSS reader app on Android and iOS and EJS 5....

  17. Ground Truth Studies - A hands-on environmental science program for students, grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, John; Chappell, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the background and the objectives of the Ground Truth Studies (GTSs), an activity-based teaching program which integrates local environmental studies with global change topics, utilizing remotely sensed earth imagery. Special attention is given to the five key concepts around which the GTS programs are organized, the pilot program, the initial pilot study evaluation, and the GTS Handbook. The GTS Handbook contains a primer on global change and remote sensing, aerial and satellite images, student activities, glossary, and an appendix of reference material. Also described is a K-12 teacher training model. International participation in the program is to be initiated during the 1992-1993 school year.

  18. Performance Task using Video Analysis and Modelling to promote K12 eight practices of science

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2015-01-01

    We will share on the use of Tracker as a pedagogical tool in the effective learning and teaching of physics performance tasks taking root in some Singapore Grade 9 (Secondary 3) schools. We discuss the pedagogical use of Tracker help students to be like scientists in these 6 to 10 weeks where all Grade 9 students are to conduct a personal video analysis and where appropriate the 8 practices of sciences (1. ask question, 2. use models, 3. Plan and carry out investigation, 4. Analyse and interpret data, 5. Using mathematical and computational thinking, 6. Construct explanations, 7. Discuss from evidence and 8. Communicating information). We will situate our sharing on actual students work and discuss how tracker could be an effective pedagogical tool. Initial research findings suggest that allowing learners conduct performance task using Tracker, a free open source video analysis and modelling tool, guided by the 8 practices of sciences and engineering, could be an innovative and effective way to mentor authent...

  19. Instituting a standards-based K--12 science curriculum supplement program at the National Institutes of Health: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherly, Jeffre

    Research on student achievement indicates the U.S. K-12 education system is not adequately preparing American students to compete in the 21st century global economy in the areas of science and mathematics. Congress has asked the scientific entities of the federal government to help increase K-12 science learning by creating standards-based learning tools for science classrooms as part of a "voluntary curriculum." One problem facing federal entities, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the need to create science-learning tools that conform to the National Science Education Standards (NSES) for curriculum materials and, therefore, are standards-based and applicable to the K-12 curriculum. This case study sought to better understand the change process at one federal agency as it went from producing K-12 learning tools that were educational in nature to a program that produced K-12 standards-based learning tools: the NIH Science Curriculum Supplement Program (NIH SCSP). The NIH SCSP was studied to gain insight into how this change in educational approach occurred, what factors enabled or inhibited the change process, and what the long-term benefits of the NIH SCSP are to the NIH. Kurt Lewin's three-step theory of change guided data gathering and data analysis. Semi-structured interviews and programmatic document review served as the major data gathering sources. Details describing the process of organizational change at the NIH were revealed during analysis of these data following the coding of interview transcripts and written record documents. The study found the process of change at the NIH proceeded in a manner generally predicted by the Lewinian change model. Enablers to the change were cost-sharing with individual institutes, support of senior leadership, and crediting the role of individual institutes prominently in each supplement. The cost of creating a supplement was reported as the single inhibitor to the program. This case study yielded a

  20. Offering a Geoscience Professional Development Program to Promote Science Education and Provide Hands-on Experiences for K-12 Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; Pollard, David A.; Snipes, Vincent T.; Atkinson, Alvin

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective strategy for promoting science education and professional development of K-12 science educators is a national priority to strengthen the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. This article reports the outcomes of a Geoscience Professional Development Program (GPDP) workshop…

  1. Energy Project Professional Development: Promoting Positive Attitudes about Science among K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy D.; Daane, Abigail R.

    2017-01-01

    Promoting positive attitudes about science among teachers has important implications for teachers' classroom practice and for their relationship to science as a discipline. In this paper, we report positive shifts in teachers' attitudes about science, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science (CLASS) survey, over the course of…

  2. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12: Books Published in 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Provides a list of outstanding science trade books for elementary and secondary students published in 2002. Focuses on the areas of archaeology, anthropology, paleontology, biography, environment and ecology, life science, physical science, and science-related careers. Presents the selection criteria. (YDS)

  3. Developing Young Researchers: 15 Years of Authentic Science Experiences for K-12 with NASA's S'COOL Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Crecelius, S.; Rogerson, T.; Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S.; Madigan, J. J.; Deller, C.; Taylor, J.

    2012-12-01

    In late 1996, members of the Atmospheric Science Directorate at NASA's Langley Research Center decided that there had to be a better way to share the excitement of our research than black and white, text-heavy Fact Sheets. We invited a group of local teachers to a half-day session on Center to help guide an improved approach. We suggested a variety of approaches to them, and asked for feedback. They were eager for anything other than black and white Fact Sheets! Fortunately, one local middle school science teacher took us up on the offer to stick around and talk over lunch. In that conversation, she said that anything that would connect the science her kids studied in the classroom to the outside world - especially to NASA! - would be very motivating to her students. From that conversation was born the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL Project), now a nearly 16-year experiment in K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement. S'COOL is the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, and involves K-12 students as a source of ground truth for satellite cloud retrievals. It was designed from the beginning as a 2-way project, with communication of information from the students to NASA, but also from NASA back to the students. With technology evolution since the project began, we have continued to enhance this focus on 2-way interaction. S'COOL involves students with observation skills, math skills (to compute cloud cover from multiple observers or convert units), geography skills (locating their school on a map and comparing to satellite imagery), and exposes them to cutting edge engineering in the form of a series of NASA satellites. As a priority Earth Observing Instrument, CERES currently flies on Terra, Aqua and NPP, with an additional instrument in development for JPSS. Students are involved in occasional Intensive Observing Periods (as with the launch of NPP), and are

  4. Energy Project professional development: Promoting positive attitudes about science among K-12 teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D. Robertson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting positive attitudes about science among teachers has important implications for teachers’ classroom practice and for their relationship to science as a discipline. In this paper, we report positive shifts in teachers’ attitudes about science, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science (CLASS survey, over the course of their participation in a professional development course that emphasized the flexible use of energy representations to understand real world scenarios. Our work contributes to the larger effort to make the case that professional development matters for teacher learning and attitudes.

  5. Computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Edward K

    2011-01-01

    Computer Science: The Hardware, Software and Heart of It focuses on the deeper aspects of the two recognized subdivisions of Computer Science, Software and Hardware. These subdivisions are shown to be closely interrelated as a result of the stored-program concept. Computer Science: The Hardware, Software and Heart of It includes certain classical theoretical computer science topics such as Unsolvability (e.g. the halting problem) and Undecidability (e.g. Godel's incompleteness theorem) that treat problems that exist under the Church-Turing thesis of computation. These problem topics explain in

  6. Integrating local environmental research into K-12 science classrooms and the value of graduate student-educator partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N. D.; Petrik-Finley, R.

    2015-12-01

    Collaboration between researchers and K-12 educators enables an invaluable exchange of teaching philosophies and educational tools. Programs that partner graduate students with K-12 educators serve the dual purpose of training future educators and providing K-12 students with unique opportunities and perspectives. The benefits of this type of partnership include providing students with enhanced educational experiences and positive student-mentor relationships, training STEM graduate students in effective teaching strategies, and providing teachers with a firsthand resource for scientific information and novel educational materials. Many high school students have had little exposure to science beyond the classroom. Frequent interactions with "real-life" scientists can help make science more approachable and is an effective strategy for promoting science as a career. Here I describe my experiences and several lessons designed as a NSK GK-12 fellow. For example, a month-long unit on biogeochemical principles was framed as a crime scene investigation of a fish kill event in Hood Canal, Washington, in which students were given additional pieces of evidence to solve the mystery as they satisfied checkpoints in their understanding of key concepts. The evidence pieces included scientific plots, maps, datasets, and laboratory exercises. A clear benefit of this investigation-style unit is that students were able to learn the material at their individual pace. This structure allowed for a streamlined integration of differentiated materials such as simplified background readings or visual learning aids for struggling students or more detailed news articles and primary literature for more advanced students. Although the NSF GK-12 program has been archived, educators and researchers should pursue new partnerships, leveraging local and state-level STEM outreach programs with the goal of increasing national exposure of the societal benefits of such synergistic activities.

  7. The Diffusion of Computer-Based Technology in K-12 Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colandrea, John Louis

    2012-01-01

    Because computer technology represents a major financial outlay for school districts and is an efficient method of preparing and delivering lessons, studying the process of teacher adoption of computer use is beneficial and adds to the current body of knowledge. Because the teacher is the ultimate user of computer technology for lesson preparation…

  8. Preparing the Future Workforce: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Policy in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Anneliese; Schwabe, Amy; Schmidt, Jeff; Henken, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Last December, the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Coalition--a national organization of more than 600 groups representing knowledge workers, educators, scientists, engineers, and technicians--wrote to President-elect Obama urging him to "not lose sight of the critical role that STEM education plays in…

  9. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are cultural achievements that reflect our humanity, power our economy, and constitute fundamental aspects of our lives as citizens, consumers, parents, and members of the workforce. Providing all students with access to quality education in the STEM disciplines is important to our nation's…

  10. Diffusing Innovations: Adoption of Serious Educational Games by K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallett, David; Annetta, Leonard; Lamb, Richard; Bowling, Brandy

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is a term that has become widely used in education; especially as it pertains to technology infusion. Applying the corporate theory of diffusing innovation to educational practice is an innovation in itself. This mixed-methods study examined 38 teachers in a science educational gaming professional development program that provided…

  11. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 (Books Published in 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2010

    2010-01-01

    What makes an outstanding book for a young reader? Although it would be hard to create a rubric for every book, experienced teachers recognize them quickly. They fascinate and captivate with both their content and style. Award-winning trade books inspire young readers to want more... more information, more books, more inquiry, more science. The…

  12. IMPACT STATEMENTS ON THE K-12 SCIENCE PROGRAM IN THE ENHANCED BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM IN PROVINCIAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Grace S. Cabansag,

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study described the knowledge, observations, benefits, expectations or potentials and sources of misinterpretations on the K-12 science program on its first implementation in selected provincial high schools in the Philippines. The impact statements of teachers, students and parent-respondents were analyzed using thematic content coding technique. Coding frames were constructed by adopting both “a priori” and “in-vivo” codes. The results showed the respondents viewed the K-12 science program as a means of preparing students toward better employment opportunities in the country or abroad. It also reports the program is viewed for holistic development of the 21st century learners equipped with necessary life skills who can contribute for economic and social development of the family and community. The impact statements suggest the need for close monitoring of the program implementation and provision of continuous professional trainings for teachers to clear areas of misinterpretations. Misconceptions on the nature of additional years of study further suggest the provision and wide dissemination of policy standards on employment and education opportunities in the ASEAN Economic Community integration.

  13. Extending the Pathway: Building on a National Science Foundation Workforce Development Project for Underserved k-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Smith, T.

    2014-12-01

    With new career openings in the geosciences expected and a large number of presently employed geoscientists retiring in the next decade there is a critical need for a new cadre of geoscientists to fill these positions. A project funded by the National Science Foundation titled K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators and Higher Education Faculty: Partners Helping Rural Disadvantaged Students Stay on the Pathway to a Geoscience Career involving Wright State University and the Ripley, Lewis, Union, Huntington k-12 school district in Appalachian Ohio took led to dozens of seventh and eighth grade students traveling to Sandy Hook, New Jersey for a one week field experience to study oceanography with staff of the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium. Teachers, parent chaperones, administrators and university faculty accompanied the students in the field. Teachers worked alongside their students in targeted professional development during the weeklong field experience. During the two academic years of the project, both middle school and high school teachers received professional development in Earth system science so that all students, not just those that were on the summer field experience could receive enhanced science learning. All ninth grade high school students were given the opportunity to take a high school/college dual credit Earth system science course. Community outreach provided widespread knowledge of the project and interest among parents to have their children participate. In addition, ninth grade students raised money themselves to fund a trip to the International Field Studies Forfar Field Station on Andros Island, Bahamas to study a tropical aquatic system. Students who before this project had never traveled outside of Ohio are currently discussing ways that they can continue on the pathway to a geoscience career by applying for internships for the summer between their junior and senior years. These are positive steps towards taking charge of their

  14. Blended learning in K-12 mathematics and science instruction -- An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason

    Blended learning has developed into a hot topic in education over the past several years. Flipped classrooms, online learning environments, and the use of technology to deliver educational content using rich media continue to garner national attention. While generally well accepted and researched in post-secondary education, not much research has focused on blended learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. This thesis is an exploratory study to begin to determine if students and teachers like blended learning and whether or not it affects the amount of time they spend in math and science. Standardized achievement test data were also analyzed to determine if blended learning had any effect on test scores. Based on student and teacher surveys, this population seems to like blended learning and to work more efficiently in this environment. There is no evidence from this study to support any effect on student achievement.

  15. A Library approach to establish an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that supports K-12 data science sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, B. D.; Wegner, K.; Smith, S.; Schulze, D. G.; Merwade, V.; Jung, J.; Bessenbacher, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been the tradition of the libraries to support literacy. Now in the realm of Executive Order, Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information, May 9, 2013, the library has the responsibility to support geospatial data, big data, earth science data or cyber infrastructure data that may support STEM for educational pipeline stimulation. (Such information can be found at http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/05/09/executive-order-making-open-and-machine-readable-new-default-government-.) Provided is an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that has been initiated in Purdue research, geospatial data service engagement and outreach endeavors for future consideration and application to augment such data science and climate literacy needs of future global citizens. In addition, this endorsement of this framework by the GLOBE program may facilitate further EDCF implementations, discussion points and prototypes for libraries. In addition, the ECDF will support teacher-led, placed-based and large scale climate or earth science learning systems where such knowledge transfer of climate or earth science data is effectively transferred from higher education research of cyberinfrastructure use such as, NOAA or NASA, to K-12 teachers and school systems. The purpose of this effort is to establish best practices for sustainable K-12 data science delivery system or GLOBE-provided system (http://vis.globe.gov/GLOBE/) where libraries manage the data curation and data appropriateness as data reference experts for such digital data. Here, the Purdue University Libraries' GIS department works to support soils, LIDAR and water science data experiences to support teacher training for an EDCF development effort. Lastly, it should be noted that the interdisciplinary collaboration and demonstration of library supported outreach partners and national organizations such the GLOBE program may best foster EDCF development. This trend in data

  16. Lessons learned: Pacific CRYSTAL approaches to K-12 Pre and In-service teacher professional development in Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) is one of five Canadian nationally funded centres (2005-2010) with the mandate to enrich the preparation of young Canadians in math and science. Pacific CRYSTAL’s goal is to link teachers and other community partners, with scientists and science education researchers to build authentic, engaging science experiences for students, and to foster teacher leadership in science literacy through teacher professional development and teacher training, based on the premise that “The fundamental factor in the improvement of students’ learning in science and technology is the quality (knowledge, skills and enthusiasm) of their teachers” (UNESCO 2008). In order to address the issues of teacher reluctance to teach the Earth science curriculum content, and commonly if they do, to rely primarily on textbooks and worksheets, Pacific CRYSTAL in partnership with EdGEO, have developed a variety of hands-on, constructivist based activities (both classroom and field based) to engage students and focus attention on the relevance and importance of Earth science to society. These activities then form the basis for our two approaches to teacher professional development; in and pre- service teacher workshops, and ‘Education’ labs for students intending to become teachers who are enrolled in first year Earth science courses. Both the teacher workshops and the ‘Education’ lab promote Earth science learning, interest and enthusiasm in three ways. Firstly, through teacher experiences with hands-on activities, experiments, fieldtrips and demonstrations transferable to the K-12 classrooms; secondly through providing teachers with classroom resources, such as rock kits, maps, fossils, posters and books which they use during the workshops; and thirdly by providing an environment for networking and mentoring to help overcome the commonly expressed apprehension about science as well as to support teachers in

  17. Computer sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  18. Computational Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Li

    2007-01-01

    @@ Computer science is the discipline that anchors the computer industry which has been improving processor performance, communication bandwidth and storage capacity on the so called "Moore's law" curve or at the rate of doubling every 18 to 24 months during the past decades.

  19. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  20. Research-infused K-12 Science at the "Uttermost Part of the Earth:" An NSF GK-12 Fellow's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E.; Ellins, K.; Ormiston, C.; Dovzak, N.; Anderson, S.; Tingle, D.; Knettel, P.; Redding, S.; Odle, K.; Dalziel, I.

    2005-12-01

    In March 2005, four students and three teachers from Boerne High School in Texas accompanied UTIG GK-12 Co-PIs Katherine Ellins and Ian Dalziel, and NSF GK-12 Fellow Ethan Perry to Tierra del Fuego to join an international team of scientists studying the climate-tectonic history recorded in Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. For two weeks, students and teachers engaged in authentic scientific research that included geologic field mapping and reconnaissance, and student/teacher developed water and soils sampling routines. The Lago Fagnano experience enabled: (1) the Boerne High School group to be integrated into an active field research program and to bring tangible experiences, knowledge and high-quality data back to the classroom; (2) participating research scientists to convey the importance of their science to a wider audience; and (3) the NSF GK-12 Fellow to gain valuable experience in communicating the essential scientific knowledge and field skills to high school participants before field deployment. The GK-12 Fellow's bridging role through the course of the project enhanced his scientific understanding of the climate-tectonic setting of Tierra del Fuego, fostered the development of new professional contacts with research scientists and led to a fresh perspective on how research science can be integrated in high school science curriculum. The GK-12 Fellow served as the primary mentor to the K-12 participants and the liaison between UTIG research scientists and the Boerne High School group. The Fellow helped prepare the Boerne group for the field research experience and to design a research project using water and soil analyses to assess chemical and isotopic trends within the lake's watershed. Preparatory activities began three months prior to field deployment and included workshops, classroom visits and teleconferences aimed at teaching field skills (reading and creating geologic maps, compass measurements, GPS, field notebooks) and increasing

  1. Science in Computational Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson Cerrosen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing theory in relation to science presents the physics as an ideal, although many sciences not approach the same, so that the current philosophy of science-Theory of Science- is not much help when it comes to analyze the computer science, an emerging field of knowledge that aims investigation of computers, which are included in the materialization of the ideas that try to structure the knowledge and information about the world. Computer Science is based on logic and mathematics, but both theoretical research methods and experimental follow patterns of classical scientific fields. Modeling and computer simulation, as a method, are specific to the discipline and will be further developed in the near future, not only applied to computers but also to other scientific fields. In this article it is analyze the aspects of science in computer science, is presenting an approach to the definition of science and the scientific method in general and describes the relationships between science, research, development and technology.

  2. Science for the Masses: A Public Lecture Series and Associated Course for K-12 Educators at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, K.; Wilch, M. H.; Thompson, R. M.; Ruiz, J.

    2008-12-01

    The College of Science at the University of Arizona in Tucson offers a series of free public lectures each year centered on a science theme of high general interest. Themes have been Evolution (2006), Global Climate Change (2007), and Edges of Life (2008). Speakers are UA faculty members. We have seen an overwhelming response from the public to each lecture series, with a typical audience size of 800-1200. Features that make the lecture series successful are careful choice of the themes, previews of lecture drafts by a panel, and the participation of a graphic design firm in the planning process, from the series title to the design of posters, bookmarks, and postcards used to advertise the series. This model could be successfully transferred to many universities. We offer a course for K-12 grade teachers in association with each lecture series. Teachers attend each public lecture, and participate in inquiry-based classroom activities and discussions of papers related to lecture topics. After each lecture, the speaker answers questions from the public, and then accompanies the teachers to a classroom to hold a private question and answer session lasting 45 minutes. The course and lecture series has been influential in changing attitudes about the nature of science research among teacher participants. In 2006, evolution was the lecture series topic, a science concept whose foundation in authentic science research has been difficult to communicate to the general public. Pre- and post- questionnaires on attitudes towards the science of evolution administered to the teacher participants showed a dramatic increase after the course in their view of the robustness of the theory of evolution, its testable nature, the amount of data supporting the theory, and its degree of consensus among scientists. A pre-course survey of the background of teachers in the course, mostly biology teachers, showed a need for more formal instruction in evolution: 76 percent had no formal course

  3. Some Reflections on "Going beyond the Consensus View" of the Nature of Science in K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hodson and Wong (2017, this issue) argue that, though the nature of science (NOS) is now an established focus of school science education and a key element in defining scientific literacy, "the consensus view" of NOS misrepresents contemporary scientific practice. They then propose a number of alternative approaches to science curriculum…

  4. Prospective Science Teachers' Field Experiences in K-12 STEM Academy Classrooms: Opportunities to Learn High-Leverage Science Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Stacey Lynn

    Science education reform efforts in the U.S. have emphasized shifting away from teacher-centered instruction and teaching science as isolated facts, to more student-centered instruction where students engage in disciplinary discourse and science and engineering practices to learn more connected concepts. As such, teachers need to be prepared to teach science in these reform-based ways; however, many teachers have neither experienced reform-based science instruction in their own science learning, nor witnessed reform-based science instruction in their preservice classroom field experiences. At the same time, there has been an emphasis in teacher education on organizing the preparation of new teachers around high-leverage teaching practices--equitable teaching practices that are known to result in student learning and form a strong base for future teacher learning. In this qualitative study, I investigated eight prospective secondary science teachers as they participated in the unique field experience contexts of classrooms in STEM-focused high school academies. Using a lens of situated learning theory, I examined how prospective teachers from two classroom-based field experiences engaged in high-leverage teaching practices and how their experiences in these classrooms shaped their own visions of science teaching. I analyzed video data of classroom instruction, along with prospective and mentor teacher interviews and surveys, to determine the instructional contexts of each academy and the science teaching strategies (including high-leverage practices) that prospective teachers had opportunities to observe and participate in. I also analyzed prospective teacher interviews and surveys to determine their visions of effective science teaching, what high-leverage science teaching practices prospective teachers included in their visions, and how their visions changed throughout the experience. I found that both academy contexts featured more student work, particularly

  5. The GLOBE Carbon Project: Integrating the Science of Carbon Cycling and Climate Change into K-12 Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Silverberg, S.; Albrechtova, J.; Freuder, R.; Gengarelly, L.; Martin, M.; Randolph, G.; Schloss, A.

    2007-12-01

    The global carbon cycle is a key regulator of the Earth's climate and is central to the normal function of ecological systems. Because rising atmospheric CO2 is the principal cause of climate change, understanding how ecosystems cycle and store carbon has become an extremely important issue. In recent years, the growing importance of the carbon cycle has brought it to the forefront of both science and environmental policy. The need for better scientific understanding has led to establishment of numerous research programs, such as the North American Carbon Program (NACP), which seeks to understand controls on carbon cycling under present and future conditions. Parallel efforts are greatly needed to integrate state-of-the-art science on the carbon cycle and its importance to climate with education and outreach efforts that help prepare society to make sound decisions on energy use, carbon management and climate change adaptation. Here, we present a new effort that joins carbon cycle scientists with the International GLOBE Education program to develop carbon cycle activities for K-12 classrooms. The GLOBE Carbon Cycle project is focused on bringing cutting edge research and research techniques in the field of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling into the classroom. Students will collect data about their school field site through existing protocols of phenology, land cover and soils as well as new protocols focused on leaf traits, and ecosystem growth and change. They will also participate in classroom activities to understand carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, these will include plant- a-plant experiments, hands-on demonstrations of various concepts, and analysis of collected data. In addition to the traditional GLOBE experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their data with emerging and expanding technologies including global and local carbon cycle models and remote sensing toolkits. This program design will allow students to explore research

  6. Increasing participation in the Earth sciences through engagement of K-12 educators in Earth system science analysis, inquiry and problem- based learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, S.

    2012-12-01

    Given low course enrollment in geoscience courses, retention in undergraduate geoscience courses, and granting of BA and advanced degrees in the Earth sciences an effective strategy to increase participation in this field is necessary. In response, as K-12 education is a conduit to college education and the future workforce, Earth science education at the K-12 level was targeted with the development of teacher professional development around Earth system science, inquiry and problem-based learning. An NSF, NOAA and NASA funded effort through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies led to the development of the Earth System Science Educational Alliance (ESSEA) and dissemination of interdisciplinary Earth science content modules accessible to the public and educators. These modules formed the basis for two teacher workshops, two graduate level courses for in-service teachers and two university course for undergraduate teacher candidates. Data from all three models will be presented with emphasis on the teacher workshop. Essential components of the workshop model include: teaching and modeling Earth system science analysis; teacher development of interdisciplinary, problem-based academic units for implementation in the classroom; teacher collaboration; daily workshop evaluations; classroom observations; follow-up collaborative meetings/think tanks; and the building of an on-line professional community for continued communication and exchange of best practices. Preliminary data indicate increased understanding of Earth system science, proficiency with Earth system science analysis, and renewed interest in innovative delivery of content amongst teachers. Teacher-participants reported increased student engagement in learning with the implementation of problem-based investigations in Earth science and Earth system science thinking in the classroom, however, increased enthusiasm of the teacher acted as a contributing factor. Teacher feedback on open

  7. You Asked, We Answered! A Podcasting Series by Scientists for K-12 Teachers Through the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Tait, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA) recently initiated a podcasting series "You Asked, We Answered!" for K-12 teachers to increase their science content knowledge through short audio podcasts, supplemented with relevant resources. The 2015-2016 PAESTA President Kathy Tait generated the idea of tapping in to the content expertise of higher education faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students to assist K-12 teachers with increasing their own Earth and space content knowledge. As time and resources for professional development are decreasing for K-12 teachers, PAESTA is committed to not only providing curricular resources through our online database of inquiry-based exercises in the PAESTA Classroom, but providing an opportunity to learn science content from professionals in an audio format.Our goal at PAESTA has been to release at least one new podcast per month that answers the questions asked by PAESTA members. Each podcast is recorded by an Earth/space science professional with content expertise and placed online with supporting images, links, and relevant exercises found in the PAESTA Classroom. Each podcast is available through the PAESTA website (http://www.paesta.psu.edu/podcasts) and PAESTA iTunes channel (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paesta-podcasts/id1017828453). For ADA compliance, the PAESTA website has a transcript for each audio file. In order to provide these podcasts, we need the participation of both K-12 teachers and science professionals. On the PAESTA Podcast website, K-12 teachers can submit discipline questions for us to pass along to our content experts, questions relating to the "what" and "how" of the Earth and space sciences, as well as questions about Earth and space science careers. We ask science professionals for help in answering the questions posed by teachers. We include online instructions and tips to help scientists generate their podcast and supporting materials.

  8. Monitoring Progress: How the 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education Can Inform a National K-12 STEM Education Indicator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, William O.; Banilower, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    "Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?" (National Research Council, 2013) describes a set of 14 indicators for assessing and tracking the health of pre-college STEM education in the United States. This 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME), is the fifth in a series of…

  9. K-12 Science Education Linked to Mars and the MER Mission: A New Curriculum Entitled Making Tracks on Mars Teacher Resource and Activity Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubele, J. C.; Stanley, J.; Grochowski, A.; Jones, K.; Aragon, J.

    2006-03-01

    Students' interest in Mars can be used as a "hook" to teach a wide range of topics. Mars-related science is used as the basis of a new K-12 integrated curriculum created by the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and classroom educators.

  10. Where can we find future K-12 science and math teachers? a search by academic year, discipline, and academic performance level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Laura J.; Dorfield, Jennifer K.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2005-11-01

    Responding to the increasing math and science teacher shortage in the United States, this study intended to determine which science, engineering, and math (SEM) majors during which years in their undergraduate education and from which academic performance levels are most interested in K-12 teaching. Results may aid policymakers and practitioners in making most effective use of this traditional undergraduate candidate pool when designing K-12 science and math teacher recruitment programs. A survey of SEM majors from two research-oriented, urban universities is used to assess participants' interest in K-12 teaching both compared to other career choices and in isolation. Results indicate that the more successful targets for K-12 teacher recruitment include (1) SEM undergraduates in their junior and senior years independent of SEM major, (2) SEM undergraduates with mid-academic performance levels independent of SEM major and academic year, and (3) math majors followed by natural science majors and, as least promising targets, engineering majors. Results remain independent from gender and ethnicity variables.

  11. Using Virtual and In-Person Engagement Opportunities to Connect K-12 Students, Teachers, and the Public With NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P.; Foxworth, S.; Luckey, M. K.; McInturff, B.; Mosie, A.; Runco, S.; Todd, N.; Willis, K. J.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    Engaging K-12 students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect audiences with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. NASA ARES has effectively engaged audiences with 1) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts, 2) NASA specialized facilities, and 3) NASA astromaterial samples through both virtual and in-person engagement opportunities. These engagement opportunities help connect local and national audiences with STEM role models, promote the exciting work being facilitated through NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and expose our next generation of scientific explorers to science they may be inspired to pursue as a future STEM career.

  12. Computer Science Teacher Professional Development in the United States: A Review of Studies Published between 2004 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    While there has been a remarkable interest to make computer science a core K-12 academic subject in the United States, there is a shortage of K-12 computer science teachers to successfully implement computer sciences courses in schools. In order to enhance computer science teacher capacity, training programs have been offered through teacher…

  13. Computer Science Teacher Professional Development in the United States: A Review of Studies Published between 2004 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    While there has been a remarkable interest to make computer science a core K-12 academic subject in the United States, there is a shortage of K-12 computer science teachers to successfully implement computer sciences courses in schools. In order to enhance computer science teacher capacity, training programs have been offered through teacher…

  14. The Tragedy of the Unexamined Cat: Why K-12 and University Education Are Still in the Dark Ages and How Citizen Science Allows for a Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert R; Urban, Julie; Cavelier, Darlene; Cooper, Caren B

    2016-03-01

    At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to make discoveries. This was true even though the body (and the rest of biology) was very poorly understood. The renaissance eventually brought a revolution in how scholars (and graduate students) were trained and worked. This revolution never occurred in K-12 or university education such that we now teach young students in much the way that scholars were taught in the dark ages, we teach them what is already known rather than the process of knowing. Citizen science offers a way to change K-12 and university education and, in doing so, complete the renaissance. Here we offer an example of such an approach and call for change in the way students are taught science, change that is more possible than it has ever been and is, nonetheless, five hundred years delayed.

  15. Marrying Content and Process in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, A.; Spannagel, C.; Klaudt, D.

    2011-01-01

    Constructivist approaches to computer science education emphasize that as well as knowledge, thinking skills and processes are involved in active knowledge construction. K-12 computer science curricula must not be based on fashions and trends, but on contents and processes that are observable in various domains of computer science, that can be…

  16. Empirical Determination of Competence Areas to Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter; Seitz, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss empirically determined competence areas to K-12 computer science education, emphasizing the cognitive level of competence. The results of a questionnaire with 120 professors of computer science serve as a database. By using multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis, four competence areas to computer science education…

  17. Empirical Determination of Competence Areas to Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter; Seitz, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss empirically determined competence areas to K-12 computer science education, emphasizing the cognitive level of competence. The results of a questionnaire with 120 professors of computer science serve as a database. By using multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis, four competence areas to computer science education…

  18. Marrying Content and Process in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, A.; Spannagel, C.; Klaudt, D.

    2011-01-01

    Constructivist approaches to computer science education emphasize that as well as knowledge, thinking skills and processes are involved in active knowledge construction. K-12 computer science curricula must not be based on fashions and trends, but on contents and processes that are observable in various domains of computer science, that can be…

  19. What good is a scientist in the classroom? Participant outcomes and program design features for a short-duration science outreach intervention in K-12 classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra; Liston, Carrie; Thiry, Heather; Graf, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Many short-duration science outreach interventions have important societal goals of raising science literacy and increasing the size and diversity of the science workforce. Yet, these long-term outcomes are inherently challenging to evaluate. We present findings from a qualitative research study of an inquiry-based, life science outreach program to K-12 classrooms that is typical in design and excellent in execution. By considering this program as a best case of a common outreach model, the "scientist in the classroom," the study examines what benefits may be realized for each participant group and how they are achieved. We find that K-12 students are engaged in authentic, hands-on activities that generate interest in science and new views of science and scientists. Teachers learn new science content and new ways to teach it, and value collegial support of their professional work. Graduate student scientists, who are the program presenters, gain teaching and other skills, greater understanding of education and diversity issues, confidence and intrinsic satisfaction, and career benefits. A few negative outcomes also are described. Program elements that lead to these benefits are identified both from the research findings and from insights of the program developer on program design and implementation choices.

  20. Elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education aligned with STEM designed projects created by Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students in a Reggio Emilio project approach setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Nicole

    This paper examines how elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education standards (National Research Council 2011)---specifically the cross-cutting concept "cause and effect" are aligned with early childhood students' creation of projects of their choice. The study took place in a Reggio Emilio-inspired, K-12 school, in a multi-aged kindergarten, first and second grade classroom with 14 students. Students worked on their projects independently with the assistance of their peers and teachers. The students' projects and the alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards' New Framework were analyzed by using pre and post assessments, student interviews, and discourse analysis. Results indicate that elements of the New Framework for K-12 Science Education emerged through students' project presentation, particularly regarding the notion of "cause and effect". More specifically, results show that initially students perceived the relationship between "cause and effect" to be negative.

  1. Integrating long-term science projects into K-12 curriculum: Fostering teacher-student engagement in urban environmental research through an NSF UCLA GK-12 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.; Moldwin, M.; Nonacs, P.; Daniel, J.; Shope, R.

    2009-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA) has just completed its first year (of a five-year program) and has greatly expanded UCLA’s science and engineering partnerships with LA Unified and Culver City Unified School Districts. The SEE-LA program partners UCLA faculty, graduate students (fellows), middle and high school science teachers and their students into a program of science and engineering exploration that brings the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at the four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science and engineering lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop three inquiry-based lessons in their partner classroom, including a lesson focused on their dissertation research, a lesson focused on the environmental/watershed theme of the project, and a lesson that involves longer-term data collection and synthesis with the grade 6-12 teachers and students. The developed long-term projects ideally involve continued observations and analysis through the five-year project and beyond. During the first year of the project, the ten SEE-LA fellows developed a range of long-term research projects, from seasonal invertebrate observations in an urban stream system, to home energy consumption surveys, to a school bioblitz (quantification of campus animals and insects). Examples of lesson development and integration in the classroom setting will be highlighted as well as tools required for sustainability of the projects. University and local pre-college school partnerships provide an excellent opportunity to support the development of graduate student communication skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of sustainable

  2. ESSEA as an Enhancement to K-12 Earth Systems Science Efforts at San José State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, P.; Metzger, E. P.; Sedlock, R. L.

    2002-12-01

    San José State University's Geology Department has implemented and maintained a two-fold approach to teacher education efforts. Both pre-service and in-service populations have been participants in a wide variety of content-area enrichment, training, and professional development endeavors. Spearheading these initiatives is the Bay Area Earth Science Institute (BAESI); organized in 1990, this program has served more than 1,000 teachers in weekend- and summer-workshops, and field trips. It sustains a network of Bay Area teachers via its Website (http://www.baesi.org), newsletter, and allows teachers to borrow classroom-pertinent materials through the Earth Science Resource Center. The Department has developed a course offering in Earth Systems Science (Geology 103), which targets pre-service teachers within SJSU's multiple-subject credential program. The curriculum satisfies California subject matter competency requirements in the geosciences, and infuses pedagogy into the syllabus. Course activities are intended for pre-service and in-service teachers' adaptation in their own classrooms. The course has been enhanced by two SJSU-NASA collaborations (Project ALERT and the Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum), which have facilitated incorporation of NASA data, imagery, and curricular materials. SJSU's M.A. in Natural Science, a combined effort of the Departments of Geology, Biology, and Program in Science Education, is designed to meet the multi-disciplinary needs of single-subject credential science teachers by providing a flexible, individually-tailored curriculum that combines science course work with a science education project. Several BAESI teachers have extended their Earth science knowledge and teaching skills through such projects as field guides to local sites of geological interest; lab-based modules for teaching about earthquakes, rocks and minerals, water quality, and weather; and interactive online materials for students and teachers of science. In

  3. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  4. Science literacy programs for K-12 teachers, public officials, news media and the public. Final report, 1994--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    On 12 July 94, The Institute for Science and Society received the above titled grant for $300,000 with an additional $323,000 awarded 14 August 95. The Institute completed the programs provided by the Department of Energy grant on 28 February 97. These programs for teachers, public officials, news media and the public will continue through 31 December 97 with funding from other sources. The Institute is a non-profit 501-c-3 corporation. It was organized {open_quotes}... to help increase science literacy in all segments of the population and contribute to a more rational atmosphere than now exists for the public consideration of societal issues involving science and technology, both regional and national.{close_quotes} Institute personnel include the Honorable Mike McCormack, Director; Joan Harris, Associate Director; Kim Freier, Ed.D, Program Manager; and Sharon Hunt, Executive Secretary.

  5. Math and Science Education with English Language Learners: Contributions of the DR K-12 Program. Targeted Study Group Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Rhodes, Hilary; Copson, Elizabeth; Tiano, Megan; DellaRocco, Nicole; Donoghue, Nathaniel; Marco, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Although educational leaders, policy makers, and researchers have long emphasized the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) for the country's continued prosperity, increasing participation in STEM has remained a challenge for both the education and scientific communities (Pearson & Fechter, 1994; National…

  6. Educating for Social Justice: Perspectives from Library and Information Science and Collaboration with K-12 Social Studies Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Jamie Campbell; Sweeney, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Library and Information Science (LIS) as a discipline is guided by core values that emphasize equal access to information, freedom of expression, democracy, and education. Importantly, diversity and social responsibility are specifically called out as foundations of the profession (American Library Association, 2004). Following from this, there…

  7. Defining the requisite knowledge for providers of in-service professional development for K--12 teachers of science: Refining the construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Deborah L.

    Purpose. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to refine, using a Delphi study process, the four categories of the theoretical model of the comprehensive knowledge base required by providers of professional development for K-12 teachers of science generated from a review of the literature. Methodology. This grounded theory study used data collected through a modified Delphi technique and interviews to refine and validate the literature-based knowledge base required by providers of professional development for K-12 teachers of science. Twenty-three participants, experts in the fields of science education, how people learn, instructional and assessment strategies, and learning contexts, responded to the study's questions. Findings. By "densifying" the four categories of the knowledge base, this study determined the causal conditions (the science subject matter knowledge), the intervening conditions (how people learn), the strategies (the effective instructional and assessment strategies), and the context (the context and culture of formal learning environments) surrounding the science professional development process. Eight sections were added to the literature-based knowledge base; the final model comprised of forty-nine sections. The average length of the operational definitions increased nearly threefold and the number of citations per operational definition increased more than twofold. Conclusions. A four-category comprehensive model that can serve as the foundation for the knowledge base required by science professional developers now exists. Subject matter knowledge includes science concepts, inquiry, the nature of science, and scientific habits of mind; how people learn includes the principles of learning, active learning, andragogy, variations in learners, neuroscience and cognitive science, and change theory; effective instructional and assessment strategies include constructivist learning and inquiry-based teaching, differentiation of instruction

  8. Standards for K-12 Engineering Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the value and feasibility of developing and implementing content standards for engineering education at the K-12 level. Content standards have been developed for three disciplines in STEM education--science, technology, and mathematic--but not for engineering. To date, a small but growing number of K-12

  9. Creating Next Generation Teacher Preparation Programs to Support Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards in K-12 Schools: An Opportunity for the Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, E. E.; Egger, A. E.; Julin, S.; Ronca, R.; Vokos, S.; Ebert, E.; Clark-Blickenstaff, J.; Nollmeyer, G.

    2015-12-01

    A consortium of two and four year Washington State Colleges and Universities in partnership with Washington's Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), the Teachers of Teachers of Science, and Teachers of Teachers of Mathematics, and other key stakeholders, is currently working to improve science and mathematics learning for all Washington State students by creating a new vision for STEM teacher preparation in Washington State aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics and Language Arts. Specific objectives include: (1) strengthening elementary and secondary STEM Teacher Preparation courses and curricula, (2) alignment of STEM teacher preparation programs across Washington State with the NGSS and CCSS, (3) development of action plans to support implementation of STEM Teacher Preparation program improvement at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) across the state, (4) stronger collaborations between HEIs, K-12 schools, government agencies, Non-Governmental Organizations, and STEM businesses, involved in the preparation of preservice STEM teachers, (5) new teacher endorsements in Computer Science and Engineering, and (6) development of a proto-type model for rapid, adaptable, and continuous improvement of STEM teacher preparation programs. A 2015 NGSS gap analysis of teacher preparation programs across Washington State indicates relatively good alignment of courses and curricula with NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas and Scientific practices, but minimal alignment with NGSS Engineering practices and Cross Cutting Concepts. Likewise, Computer Science and Sustainability ideas and practices are not well represented in current courses and curricula. During the coming year teams of STEM faculty, education faculty and administrators will work collaboratively to develop unique action plans for aligning and improving STEM teacher preparation courses and curricula at their institutions.

  10. Building Partnerships Between Research Institutions, University Academic Departments, Local School Districts, and Private Enterprise to Advance K-12 Science Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Ganey-Curry, P.; Fennell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) is engaged in six K-12 education and outreach programs, including two NSF-sponsored projects--GK-12: Linking Graduate Fellows with K-12 Students and Teachers and Cataclysms and Catastrophes--Texas Teachers in the Field, Adopt-a-School, Geoscience in the Classroom, and UT's Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program. The GK-12 Program is central to UTIG's effort and links the six education projects together. While the specific objectives of each project differ, the broad goals of UTIG's education and outreach are to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, develop curriculum resources aligned with state and national education standards, and promote interaction between teachers, scientists, graduate students, and science educators. To achieve these goals, UTIG has forged funded partnerships with scientific colleagues at UT's Bureau of Economic Geology, Marine Science Institute and Department of Geological Sciences; science educators at UT's Charles A. Dana Center and in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education; teachers in six Texas independent school districts; and 4empowerment.com, a private education company that established the "Cyberways and Waterways" Web site to integrate technology and education through an environmentally-based curriculum. These partnerships have allowed UTIG to achieve far more than would have been possible through individual projects alone. Examples include the development of more than 30 inquiry-based activities, hosting workshops and a summer institute, and participation in local science fairs. UTIG has expanded the impact of its education and outreach and achieved broader dissemination of learning activities through 4empowerment's web-based programs, which reach ethnically diverse students in schools across Texas. These partnerships have also helped UTIG and 4empowerment to secure additional funding for other education

  11. WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium: Helping to Build a Presence for Science With Online Professional Development Opportunities for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognier, E.

    2002-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its third year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." These courses also support our NSTA-sponsored "Building a Presence for Science" program in California, providing professional development opportunities to help achieve our vision of increased quantity and quality of science education statewide. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Students have consistently embraced the concept of a systems-based approach to science instruction, commenting on how these courses have forever changed their teaching practices and provided a successful means for engaging and involving their students in scientific inquiry. Through offering these online courses, we have learned valuable lessons about recruitment, retention, team-building, and facilitating discussions for classes with no "face to face" component. This format is both rich and challenging, with teammates from diverse geographic regions and timezones, with a variety of connectivity and accessibility issues. In this third year of offering the courses, we are pleased to have students taking their second course with us, wanting to continue learning content and stragtegies to improve their skills as science teachers.

  12. Democratizing Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Ryoo, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Computer science programs are too often identified with a narrow stratum of the student population, often white or Asian boys who have access to computers at home. But because computers play such a huge role in our world today, all students can benefit from the study of computer science and the opportunity to build skills related to computing. The…

  13. Democratizing Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Ryoo, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Computer science programs are too often identified with a narrow stratum of the student population, often white or Asian boys who have access to computers at home. But because computers play such a huge role in our world today, all students can benefit from the study of computer science and the opportunity to build skills related to computing. The…

  14. ICASE Computer Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  15. INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT AND HIGHER-EDUCATION REPRESENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT K-12 INTERVENTION PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Jeffrey M; Williams, Wendy M

    2012-01-01

    The under-representation of women and ethnic minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and professions has resulted in a loss of human capital for the US scientific workforce and spurred the development of myriad STEM educational intervention programs. Increased allocation of resources to such programs begs for a critical, prescriptive, evidence-based review that will enable researchers to develop optimal interventions and administrators to maximize investments. We begin by providing a theoretical backdrop for K-12 STEM programs by reviewing current data on under-representation and developmental research describing individual-level social factors undergirding these data. Next, we review prototypical designs of these programs, highlighting specific programs in the literature as examples of program structures and components currently in use. We then evaluate these interventions in terms of overall effectiveness, as a function of how well they address age-, ethnicity-, or gender-specific factors, suggesting improvements in program design based on these critiques. Finally, program evaluation methods are briefly reviewed and discussed in terms of how their empirical soundness can either enable or limit our ability to delineate effective program components. "Now more than ever, the nation's changing demographics demand that we include all of our citizens in science and engineering education and careers. For the U.S. to benefit from the diverse talents of all its citizens, we must grow the pipeline of qualified, underrepresented minority engineers and scientists to fill positions in industry and academia."-Irving P. McPhail..

  16. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  17. Women and Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breene, L. Anne

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues concerning women in computer science education, and in the workplace, and sex bias in the computer science curriculum. Concludes that computing environment has not improved for women over last 20 years. Warns that, although number of white males entering college is declining, need for scientists and engineers is not. (NB)

  18. Bridging the Divide Between Climate and Global Change Science and Education of Public and K-12 Visitors at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Munoz, R.; Eastburn, T.; Ammann, C.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Committee, S.

    2004-12-01

    The study of climate and global change is an important on-going focus for scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Programs overseen by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach (UCAR-EO) help to translate NCAR's scientific programs, methodologies, and technologies and their societal benefits to over 80,000 visitors to the NCAR Mesa Laboratory each year, including about 10,000 K-12 students. This is currently accomplished through the implementation of an increasingly integrated system of exhibits, guided tours, an audiotour, programs for school groups, and a teachers' guide to the exhibits, which is currently in development. The Climate Discovery Exhibit unveiled in July 2003 and expanded in 2004 offers visitors visually engaging and informative text panels, graphics, artifacts, and interactives describing Sun-Earth connections, dynamic processes that contribute to and mediate climate change, and the Earth's climate history. The exhibit seeks to help visitors to understand why scientists model the global climate system and how information about past and current climate is used to validate models and build scenarios for Earth's future climate. Exhibit-viewers are challenged to ask questions and reflect upon decision making challenges while considering the roles various natural and human-induced factors play in shaping these predictions. With support from NASA and NCAR, a K-12 Teacher's Guide has been developed corresponding the Climate Discovery exhibit's sections addressing the Sun-Earth connection and past climates (the Little Ice Age, in particular). This presentation will review efforts to identify the challenges of communicating with the public and school groups about climate change, while also describing several successful strategies for utilizing visitor questionnaires and interviews to learn how to develop and refine educational resources that will target their interests, bolster their

  19. K-12 Bolsters Ties to Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    When science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is discussed in the K-12 sphere, it often seems like shorthand for mathematics and science, with perhaps a nod to technology and even less, if any, real attention to engineering. But recent developments signal that the "e" in STEM may be gaining a firmer foothold at…

  20. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  1. Philosophy of Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aatami Järvinen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and interdisciplinary of Computer Sciences, and the multiplicity of its uses in other sciences make it difficult to define them and prescribe how to perform them. Furthermore, also cause friction between computer scientists from different branches. Because of how they are structured, these sciences programs are criticized for not offer an adequate methodological training, or a deep understanding of different research traditions. To collaborate on a solution, some have decided to include in their curricula courses that enable students to gain awareness about epistemology and methodological issues in Computer Science, as well as give meaning to the practice of computer scientists. In this article the needs and objectives of the courses on the philosophy of Computer Science are analyzed, and its structure and management are explained.

  2. Philosophy of Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Aatami Järvinen; Adele Mustonen; Jaana Ihalainen; Kaarle Lajunen

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and interdisciplinary of Computer Sciences, and the multiplicity of its uses in other sciences make it difficult to define them and prescribe how to perform them. Furthermore, also cause friction between computer scientists from different branches. Because of how they are structured, these sciences programs are criticized for not offer an adequate methodological training, or a deep understanding of different research traditions. To collaborate on a solution, some have decided to...

  3. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  4. Computer science handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Allen B

    2004-01-01

    Due to the great response to the famous Computer Science Handbook edited by Allen B. Tucker, … in 2004 Chapman & Hall/CRC published a second edition of this comprehensive reference book. Within more than 70 chapters, every one new or significantly revised, one can find any kind of information and references about computer science one can imagine. … All in all, there is absolute nothing about computer science that can not be found in the encyclopedia with its 110 survey articles …-Christoph Meinel, Zentralblatt MATH

  5. Computational Science and Innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, D J

    2010-01-01

    Simulations - utilizing computers to solve complicated science and engineering problems - are a key ingredient of modern science. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a world leader in the development of high-performance computing (HPC), the development of applied math and algorithms that utilize the full potential of HPC platforms, and the application of computing to science and engineering problems. An interesting general question is whether the DOE can strategically utilize its capability in simulations to advance innovation more broadly. In this article, I will argue that this is certainly possible.

  6. Theoretical Computer Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The proceedings contains 8 papers from the Conference on Theoretical Computer Science. Topics discussed include: query by committee, linear separation and random walks; hardness results for neural network approximation problems; a geometric approach to leveraging weak learners; mind change...

  7. Theoretical Computer Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The proceedings contains 8 papers from the Conference on Theoretical Computer Science. Topics discussed include: query by committee, linear separation and random walks; hardness results for neural network approximation problems; a geometric approach to leveraging weak learners; mind change...

  8. Optics education for K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, James W.; Gaines Walker, Janice M.

    2000-06-01

    The SPIE Education Committee has developed an outreach program aimed at enhancing the dissemination of information about optics to children in kindergarten through the 12th grade (K-12). The main impetus behind the program was that more practicing optical scientists and engineers would be willing to give lectures and demonstrations aimed at inspiring the next generation about optics if material could be made easily available. Consequently, three instructional `outreach kits' were assembled to use in teaching optics to kids in exciting and fun ways. These kits were beta-tested over the last two years at six different U.S. regional sites. Each `outreach kit' contained: (1) a workbook on Optical Demonstrations on the Overhead Projector; (2) a Science and Math Experience Manual: Light, Color and Their Uses; (3) The Optics Discovery Classroom Kit; (4) a slide show; and (5) a video on careers in optics. The best tests were aimed at evaluating the practical ways of utilizing the kits, developing easy-to-follow instructions for guiding others in their use and providing suggestions on modifications, additions, and deletions to the kits. This paper discuses this outreach program and provides details relative to the kit's composition and future plans.

  9. Computer science I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science I includes fundamental computer concepts, number representations, Boolean algebra, switching circuits, and computer architecture.

  10. Research in computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Various graduate research activities in the field of computer science are reported. Among the topics discussed are: (1) failure probabilities in multi-version software; (2) Gaussian Elimination on parallel computers; (3) three dimensional Poisson solvers on parallel/vector computers; (4) automated task decomposition for multiple robot arms; (5) multi-color incomplete cholesky conjugate gradient methods on the Cyber 205; and (6) parallel implementation of iterative methods for solving linear equations.

  11. Computer and information science

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 15th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Computer and Information Science (ICIS 2016) which was held on June 26– 29 in Okayama, Japan. The aim of this conference was to bring together researchers and scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, computer users, and students to discuss the numerous fields of computer science and to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and information in a meaningful way. Research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them. The conference organizers selected the best papers from those papers accepted for presentation at the conference. The papers were chosen based on review scores submitted by members of the program committee, and underwent further rigorous rounds of review. This publication captures 12 of the conference’s most promising...

  12. Partners in Earth System Science: a Field, Laboratory and Classroom Based Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers Designed to Build Scientific and Pedagogical Understandings of Teaching Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Lunsford, S.; Diedrick, A.; Crane, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the Partners in Earth System Science summer and academic year professional development program for Ohio K-12 teachers is to build their understandings of the scientific observations, methods and resources that scientists use when studying past and present climate change. Participants then use these tools to develop inquiry-based activities to teach their K-12 students how the scientific method and data are used to understand the effects of global climate change. The summer portion of the program takes teachers from throughout Ohio to the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. There they engage in a physical and biological exploration of the modern and ancient ocean. For example, they collect samples of sediment and test water samples collected from modern coastal environments and connect their findings with evidence of the fauna living in those environments. Then, using observations from the geological record of the Eocene through Pleistocene sediments exposed in eastern North Carolina and inferences from observations made from the modern ocean they seek to answer scientifically testable questions regarding the physical and biological characteristics of the ocean during Cenozoic climate change events. During the academic year participants connect with each other and project faculty online to support the development of inquiry based science activities for their K-12 students. These activities focus on how evidence and observations such as outcrop extent, sediment type and biological assemblages can be used to infer past climates. The activities are taught in participant's classrooms and discussed with other participants in an online discussion space. Assessment of both teachers and K-12 students document significant positive changes in science knowledge, their confidence in being able to do science and a clearer understanding of how oceans are impacted by global climate change.

  13. Partnership in Computational Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huray, Paul G.

    1999-02-24

    This is the final report for the "Partnership in Computational Science" (PICS) award in an amount of $500,000 for the period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993. A copy of the proposal with its budget is attached as Appendix A. This report first describes the consequent significance of the DOE award in building infrastructure of high performance computing in the Southeast and then describes the work accomplished under this grant and a list of publications resulting from it.

  14. Computer/Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Ken; Roughgarden, Tim; Seltzer, Margo; Spohrer, Jim; Stolterman, Erik; Kearsley, Greg; Koszalka, Tiffany; de Jong, Ton

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of computer/information science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Ken Birman, Jennifer Rexford, Tim Roughgarden, Margo Seltzer, Jim Spohrer, and…

  15. EDITORIAL: Computational materials science Computational materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Kresse, Georg

    2011-10-01

    Special issue in honour of Jürgen Hafner On 30 September 2010, Jürgen Hafner, one of the most prominent and influential members within the solid state community, retired. His remarkably broad scientific oeuvre has made him one of the founding fathers of modern computational materials science: more than 600 scientific publications, numerous contributions to books, and a highly cited monograph, which has become a standard reference in the theory of metals, witness not only the remarkable productivity of Jürgen Hafner but also his impact in theoretical solid state physics. In an effort to duly acknowledge Jürgen Hafner's lasting impact in this field, a Festsymposium was held on 27-29 September 2010 at the Universität Wien. The organizers of this symposium (and authors of this editorial) are proud to say that a large number of highly renowned scientists in theoretical condensed matter theory—co-workers, friends and students—accepted the invitation to this celebration of Hafner's jubilee. Some of these speakers also followed our invitation to submit their contribution to this Festschrift, published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, a journal which Jürgen Hafner served in 2000-2003 and 2003-2006 as a member of the Advisory Editorial Board and member of the Executive Board, respectively. In the subsequent article, Volker Heine, friend and co-worker of Jürgen Hafner over many decades, gives an account of Hafner's impact in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. Computational materials science contents Theoretical study of structural, mechanical and spectroscopic properties of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) D Tunega, H Pašalić, M H Gerzabek and H Lischka Ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by chlorine-promoted silver oxide M O Ozbek, I Onal and R A Van Santen First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applicationsA Nagoya, R Asahi and G Kresse Renormalization group study of random quantum magnetsIstván A Kovács and

  16. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  17. Annual review of computer science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, J.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Grosz, B.J. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lampson, B.W. (Digital Equipment Corp. (US)); Nilsson, N.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the annual review of computer science. Topics covered include: Database security, parallel algorithmic techniques for combinatorial computation, algebraic complexity theory, computer applications in manufacturing, and computational geometry.

  18. Computer science II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science II includes organization of a computer, memory and input/output, coding, data structures, and program development. Also included is an overview of the most commonly

  19. Computer Science and Technology Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Computer Science and Technology Board (CSTB) meets three times a year to consider scientific and policy issues in computer science as well as relevant problems in associated technologies. The objectives of the Board include: initiating studies involving computer science and technology as a critical national resource; responding to requests from the government, nonprofit foundations, and industry for advice on computer science and technology; promoting the health of the technology and other fields of pure and applied science and technology; and providing a base of expertise within the NRC in the area of computer science and technology.

  20. Nihithewak Ithiniwak, Nihithewatisiwin and science education: An exploratory narrative study examining Indigenous-based science education in K--12 classrooms from the perspectives of teachers in Woodlands Cree community contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, Herman Jeremiah

    This study was guided by the following research questions: What do the stories of teachers in Nihithewak (Woodlands Cree) school contexts reveal about their experiences and tendencies towards cultural and linguistic-based pedagogical practices and actions in K-12 classrooms? How did these teachers come to teach this way? How do their beliefs and values from their experiences in science education and cultural heritage influence their teaching? Why do these teachers do what they do in their science classroom and instructional practices? The research explores Indigenous-based science education from the perspectives and experiences of science teachers in Nihithewak school contexts. Narrative methodology (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000) was used as a basis for collecting and analyzing data emerging from the research process. The results included thematic portraits and stories of science teaching that is connected to Nihithewak and Nihithewatisiwin (Woodlands Cree Way of Life). Major data sources included conversational interviews, out-of-class observations and occasional in-class observations, field notes, and a research journal. An interview guide with a set of open-ended and semi-structured questions was used to direct the interviews. My role as researcher included participation in storied conversations with ten selected volunteer teachers to document the underlying meanings behind the ways they teach science in Nihithewak contexts. This research is grounded in socio-cultural theory commonly used to support the examination and development of school science in Indigenous cultural contexts (Lemke, 2001; O'Loughlin, 1992). Socio-cultural theory is a framework that links education, language, literacy, and culture (Nieto, 2002). The research encapsulates a literature review that includes the history of Aboriginal education in Canada (Battiste & Barman, 1995; Kirkness, 1992; Perley, 1993), Indigenous-based science education (Cajete, 2000; Aikenhead, 2006a), multi

  1. The Need for Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Bernier, David

    2011-01-01

    Broadening computer science learning to include more students is a crucial item on the United States' education agenda, these authors say. Although policymakers advocate more computer science expertise, computer science offerings in high schools are few--and actually shrinking. In addition, poorly resourced schools with a high percentage of…

  2. Computer Science Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Lin, Su

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of computer science departments at universities in China. Educational principles that characterize Chinese computer science education are discussed, selection of students for universities is described, and curricula for both undergraduate and graduate computer science studies are outlined. (LRW)

  3. The Need for Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Bernier, David

    2011-01-01

    Broadening computer science learning to include more students is a crucial item on the United States' education agenda, these authors say. Although policymakers advocate more computer science expertise, computer science offerings in high schools are few--and actually shrinking. In addition, poorly resourced schools with a high percentage of…

  4. Computer Science Research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-07

    This paper begins with a discussion of the nature of Computer Science Research in India. The type of institutions in which Computer Science research...Finally we study the influence on Indian Computer Science research of the phenomenal growth in exports by the Indian software industry and the arrival

  5. Computer Science Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Lin, Su

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of computer science departments at universities in China. Educational principles that characterize Chinese computer science education are discussed, selection of students for universities is described, and curricula for both undergraduate and graduate computer science studies are outlined. (LRW)

  6. Computer Science Research: Computation Directorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, M.J. (ed.); Grupe, K.F. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains short papers in the following areas: large-scale scientific computation; parallel computing; general-purpose numerical algorithms; distributed operating systems and networks; knowledge-based systems; and technology information systems.

  7. Get set for computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Alistair

    2006-01-01

    This book is aimed at students who are thinking of studying Computer Science or a related topic at university. Part One is a brief introduction to the topics that make up Computer Science, some of which you would expect to find as course modules in a Computer Science programme. These descriptions should help you to tell the difference between Computer Science as taught in different departments and so help you to choose a course that best suits you. Part Two builds on what you have learned about the nature of Computer Science by giving you guidance in choosing universities and making your appli

  8. OCR A level computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, George; O'Byrne, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Develop confident students with our expert authors: their insight and guidance will ensure a thorough understanding of OCR A Level computer science, with challenging tasks and activities to test essential analytical and problem-solving skills. - Endorsed by OCR for use with the OCR AS and A Level Computer Science specification and written by a trusted and experienced author team, OCR Computer Science for A Level:- Endorsed by OCR for use with the OCR AS and A Level Computer Science specification and written by a trusted and experienced author team, OCR Computer Science for A Level:- Builds stu

  9. Cheating in Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Muray, William

    2010-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10. Editor’s Introduction: CISSP Many computer science teachers are very concerned about students cheating in their courses. Surveys report that almost three-quarters of high school students admit to cheating within the past year. John Barrie, founder of the plagiarism-detecting Web site Turnitin.com, says that about a third of the papers submitted to the site have significant levels of plagiarism. Many people say that th...

  10. Computer science a concise introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Computer Science: A Concise Introduction covers the fundamentals of computer science. The book describes micro-, mini-, and mainframe computers and their uses; the ranges and types of computers and peripherals currently available; applications to numerical computation; and commercial data processing and industrial control processes. The functions of data preparation, data control, computer operations, applications programming, systems analysis and design, database administration, and network control are also encompassed. The book then discusses batch, on-line, and real-time systems; the basic

  11. Laboratory Earth Under the Lens: Diachronic Evaluation of an Integrated Graduate-Level On-Line Earth System Science Course Series for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.; Gosselin, D. C.; Haney, C.; Larson-Miller, C.; Bonnstetter, R.; Mandryk, C.

    2012-12-01

    Educational research strives to identify the pedagogies that promote student learning. However, the body of research identifying the characteristics of effective teacher preparation is "least strong for science," and is largely based on studies of the effectiveness of individual courses or workshops (NRC 2010). The National Research Council's "Preparing Teachers: Building Evidence for Strong Policy," (2010) provides a mandate for teacher education providers to conduct research on program-scale effectiveness. The high priority research agenda identified by the NRC is expected to elicit understanding of the aspects of teacher preparation that critically impact classroom student learning outcomes. The Laboratory Lens project is designed to identify effective practices in a teacher education program, with specific reference to the content domain of Earth science. Now in its fifth year, the Masters of Applied Science (MAS) program at UNL offers a variety of science courses, ranging from entomology to food science. The six-course Lab Earth series serves as the backbone of the Specialization for Science Educators within the MAS program, and provides comprehensive content coverage of all Earth science topics identified in the AAAS Benchmarks. "How People Learn," (NRC 2009) emphasizes that expert knowledge includes not only factual knowledge, but also the well-developed conceptual framework critical to the ability to, "remember, reason, and solve problems." A focus of our research is to document the process by which the transition from novice to expert takes place in Lab Earth's on-line teacher participants. A feature of our research design is the standardization of evaluation instruments across the six courses. We have used data derived from implementation of the Community of Inquiry Survey (COI) in pilot offerings to ensure that the course sequence is effective in developing a community of learners, while developing their content knowledge. A pre- and post- course

  12. Scientists Involved in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The publication of countless reports documenting the dismal state of science education in the 1980s, and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) report (1996) called for a wider involvement of the scientific community in K-12 education and outreach. Improving science education will not happen without the collaboration of educators and scientists working in a coordinated manner and it requires a long-term, continuous effort. To contribute effectively to K-12 education all scientists should refer to the National Science Education Standards, a set of policies that guide the development of curriculum and assessment. Ocean scientists can also specifically refer to the COSEE recommendations (www.cosee.org) that led to the creation of seven regional Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence. Scientists can get involved in K-12 education in a multitude of ways. They should select projects that will accommodate time away from their research and teaching obligations, their talent, and their interest but also contribute to the education reform. A few examples of effective involvement are: 1) collaborating with colleagues in a school of education that can lead to better education of all students and future teachers, 2) acting as a resource for a national program or a local science fair, 3) serving on the advisory board of a program that develops educational material, 4) speaking out at professional meetings about the value of scientists' involvement in education, 5) speaking enthusiastically about the teaching profession. Improving science education in addition to research can seem a large, overwhelming task for scientists. As a result, focusing on projects that will fit the scientist's needs as well as benefit the science reform is of prime importance. It takes an enormous amount of work and financial and personnel resources to start a new program with measurable impact on students. So, finding the right opportunity is a priority, and stepping

  13. The Metamorphosis by K. (12)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin we reported on the first run of the new NA62 experiment. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to take a look at the production of the experiment's new kaon beam.   The start of the K12 beam line as seen during the installation of the shielding. 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, 10-6 mbar… send in the protons! Since Thursday 1 November, the P42 beam line of the SPS has once again been sending protons to the beryllium target to produce the K12 kaon beam line eagerly awaited by the NA62 collaboration. This was no trivial matter! The first step was to clear the decks by dismantling the entire H10 beam line and NA60 experiment, as well as most of the NA48 experiment - representing some 1000 tonnes of equipment in total! Next came the complete renovation of the infrastructure, which dated back to 1979. The operation called on the expertise of virtually all branches of the EN and GS departments, as well as the Radiation Protection group: from ...

  14. The skewness of computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Computer science is a relatively young discipline combining science, engineering, and mathematics. The main flavors of computer science research involve the theoretical development of conceptual models for the different aspects of computing and the more applicative building of software artifacts and assessment of their properties. In the computer science publication culture, conferences are an important vehicle to quickly move ideas, and journals often publish deeper versions of papers already presented at conferences. These peculiarities of the discipline make computer science an original research field within the sciences, and, therefore, the assessment of classical bibliometric laws is particularly important for this field. In this paper, we study the skewness of the distribution of citations to journals and conference papers published in computer science venues. We find that the skewness in the distribution of mean citedness of different journals combines with the asymmetry in citedness of articles in eac...

  15. Engineering Education in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Engineers rely on physicists as well as other scientists and mathematicians to explain the world in which we live. Engineers take this knowledge of the world and use it to create the world that never was. The teaching of physics and other sciences as well as mathematics is critical to maintaining our national workforce. Science and mathematics education are inherently different, however, from engineering education. Engineering educators seek to enable students to develop the habits of mind critical for innovation. Through understanding of the engineering design process and how it differs from the scientific method, students can apply problem and project based learning to solve the challenges facing society today. In this talk, I will discuss the elements critical to a solid K-12 engineering education that integrates science and mathematics to solve challenges throughout the world.

  16. Computing handbook computer science and software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Teofilo; Tucker, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Overview of Computer Science Structure and Organization of Computing Peter J. DenningComputational Thinking Valerie BarrAlgorithms and Complexity Data Structures Mark WeissBasic Techniques for Design and Analysis of Algorithms Edward ReingoldGraph and Network Algorithms Samir Khuller and Balaji RaghavachariComputational Geometry Marc van KreveldComplexity Theory Eric Allender, Michael Loui, and Kenneth ReganFormal Models and Computability Tao Jiang, Ming Li, and Bala

  17. Computer science and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, T.

    1988-01-01

    This volume aims to provide up-to-date information on recent research and development in computer science and technology in Japan. In view of the rapid developments in these fields and the urgent demand for more detailed information about Japanese activities and achievements, it has been decided to concentrate on only a few selected topics in each volume. The topics covered will change each year so as to obtain adequate coverage of a broad range of activities over a period of a few years. This edition should not only contribute to the international understanding of technical developments in Japan, but also shed light on the cultural background to these theoretical and practical developments.

  18. Refining, revising, augmenting, compiling and developing computer assisted instruction K-12 aerospace materials for implementation in NASA spacelink electronic information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jean A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Spacelink is an electronic information service operated by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The Spacelink contains extensive NASA news and educational resources that can be accessed by a computer and modem. Updates and information are provided on: current NASA news; aeronautics; space exploration: before the Shuttle; space exploration: the Shuttle and beyond; NASA installations; NASA educational services; materials for classroom use; and space program spinoffs.

  19. Computer modeling in science education: Toward a research and planning agenda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurzeig, W.; Roberts, N.

    1994-12-31

    Computer modeling can dramatically enliven science education by engaging students in active investigation and providing compelling learning experiences that enhance scientific insight and understanding. Computational facilities once limited to the science research community are becoming increasingly available for use in pre-college science education. These include networking and teleconferencing resources, parallel modeling, computer visualization, computer-based laboratory probes, and virtual reality environments. However, there is a significant lag between the new technological capabilities and their effective educational implementation. This panel discusses the question: what research issues need to be addressed in bringing computer modeling into the K--12 science curriculum?

  20. AQA A level computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Bob

    2015-01-01

    AQA A-level Computer Science gives students the chance to think creatively and progress through the AQA AS and A-level Computer Science specifications. Detailed coverage of the specifications will enrich understanding of the fundamental principles of computing, whilst a range of activities help to develop the programming skills and computational thinking skills at A-level and beyond. - Enables students to build a thorough understanding of the fundamental principles in the AQA AS and A-Level Computer Science specifications, with detailed coverage of programming, algorithms, data structures a

  1. Cambridge IGCSE computer science workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, David; Guinness, Paul; Nagle, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    Student workbook to support students throughout their Cambridge IGCSE Computer Science course, with plenty of extra practice questions and activities. Accompanies the Cambridge IGCSE Computer Science student text book, following the contents and chapter order. Students write their answers in the book and keep it for study in class or at home throughout their course.

  2. 美国《科学教育框架》的特点及启示%On the Characteristics of 《A Framework for K-12 Science Education》 in the United States and Its Implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄芳

    2012-01-01

    《A Framework for K-12 Science Education》 released by the National Research Council has proposed the new vision of the science education in the U. S. of the new stage, which has reflected the new tendency of the scheme of talent cultivation of the U.S. as follows : as for the understanding of science, the key points have been transformed from "exploration'! to "practice"; as for the realm of science education, the domains have been transformed from "science and technology" to the integration of "science, technology and engineering", as for the contents of disciplinary education, the key issues have been transformed from the concept of science to the core thoughts of discipline. To carry forward science education of primary and secondary schools in China, we should promote the status of the curricula of primary and secondary science education; pay attention to the enlightenment and fundamentality of science education of primary and secondary schools in the system of talent cultivation; attach great importance to the integration, comprehensiveness and practicality of science curricula to meet the requirement of social development; think highly of the research of science education and the application of the research achievements.%《科学教育框架》提出了新阶段美国科学教育的发展愿景,反映出美国人才培养方案的新动向,在对科学的理解上,实现从“探究”到“实践”的跨越,在科学教育方面,体现从“科学与技术”到“科学、技术与工程”的整合,在学科教育内容方面,体现从科学“概念”到学科核心思想的提升。推进我国中小学科学教育,应提高中小学科学课程地位、重视中小学科学教育在人才培养系统中的启蒙性和基础性作用;注重中小学科学课程的统整性、综合性与实践性,适应社会发展需求;充分重视科学教育研究及其成果运用。

  3. Soft computing in computer and information science

    CERN Document Server

    Fray, Imed; Pejaś, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a carefully selected and reviewed collection of papers presented during the 19th Advanced Computer Systems conference ACS-2014. The Advanced Computer Systems conference concentrated from its beginning on methods and algorithms of artificial intelligence. Further future brought new areas of interest concerning technical informatics related to soft computing and some more technological aspects of computer science such as multimedia and computer graphics, software engineering, web systems, information security and safety or project management. These topics are represented in the present book under the categories Artificial Intelligence, Design of Information and Multimedia Systems, Information Technology Security and Software Technologies.

  4. Computational science for energy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, Rémi; Koren, Barry

    2017-09-01

    Computational science complements theory and experiments. It can deliver knowledge and understanding in application areas where the latter two can not. Computational science is particularly important for the simulation of various energy-related processes, ranging from classical energy processes as combustion and subsurface oil-reservoir flows to more modern processes as wind-farm aerodynamics, photovoltaics and - very challenging from a computational perspective - tokamak-plasma physics.

  5. NASA's computer science research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Following a major assessment of NASA's computing technology needs, a new program of computer science research has been initiated by the Agency. The program includes work in concurrent processing, management of large scale scientific databases, software engineering, reliable computing, and artificial intelligence. The program is driven by applications requirements in computational fluid dynamics, image processing, sensor data management, real-time mission control and autonomous systems. It consists of university research, in-house NASA research, and NASA's Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) and Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE). The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA to exploit advancing computing technology in aerospace applications.

  6. Teachers' Curriculum Guide to the Hayward Shoreline, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This teaching guide gives environmental education ideas for grades K-12. The field trips and activities all relate to the Hayward shoreline of the San Francisco, California, Bay. Included in the guide are 44 science activities, 15 social science activities, and 18 humanities activities. Each activity description gives the experience level, site…

  7. Instruction Sequences for Computer Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    This book demonstrates that the concept of an instruction sequence offers a novel and useful viewpoint on issues relating to diverse subjects in computer science. Selected issues relating to well-known subjects from the theory of computation and the area of computer architecture are rigorously

  8. Computational Science Facility (CSF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) is focused on meeting DOE's mission needs and is part of PNNL's overarching research computing strategy. PIC supports large-scale...

  9. Computational Science Facility (CSF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) is focused on meeting DOE's mission needs and is part of PNNL's overarching research computing strategy. PIC supports large-scale...

  10. Computing with functionals—computability theory or computer science?

    OpenAIRE

    Normann, Dag

    2006-01-01

    We review some of the history of the computability theory of functionals of higher types, and we will demonstrate how contributions from logic and theoretical computer science have shaped this still active subject.

  11. Physical computation and cognitive science

    CERN Document Server

    Fresco, Nir

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a study of digital computation in contemporary cognitive science. Digital computation is a highly ambiguous concept, as there is no common core definition for it in cognitive science. Since this concept plays a central role in cognitive theory, an adequate cognitive explanation requires an explicit account of digital computation. More specifically, it requires an account of how digital computation is implemented in physical systems. The main challenge is to deliver an account encompassing the multiple types of existing models of computation without ending up in pancomputationalism, that is, the view that every physical system is a digital computing system. This book shows that only two accounts, among the ones examined by the author, are adequate for explaining physical computation. One of them is the instructional information processing account, which is developed here for the first time.   “This book provides a thorough and timely analysis of differing accounts of computation while adv...

  12. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  13. K-12 Teaching and Physics Enrollment

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed the relevant data from public schools in greater Houston area of Texas. Based and analyzed. Since the data is only limited to a few school, we are still working on getting more data so that we can compare and contrast the results adequately and understand the core of the enrollment issue at the national level. However, based on the raw data and partial analysis, we propose a few recommendations towards the improvement of science education in Texas Schools, in general, and greater Houston area schools in particular. Our results indicate that the quality of science education can be improved significantly if we focus on the improvement of high school education or even intermediate schools when students are first time exposed to science in a little technical way. Simply organizing teacher training programs at K-12 level as school education plays a pivotal role in the decrease in physics enrollment at the higher level. Similar analysis can actually be generalized to other states to f...

  14. Theoretical computer science and the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno

    2005-12-01

    I present some fundamental theorems in computer science and illustrate their relevance in Biology and Physics. I do not assume prerequisites in mathematics or computer science beyond the set N of natural numbers, functions from N to N, the use of some notational conveniences to describe functions, and at some point, a minimal amount of linear algebra and logic. I start with Cantor's transcendental proof by diagonalization of the non enumerability of the collection of functions from natural numbers to the natural numbers. I explain why this proof is not entirely convincing and show how, by restricting the notion of function in terms of discrete well defined processes, we are led to the non algorithmic enumerability of the computable functions, but also-through Church's thesis-to the algorithmic enumerability of partial computable functions. Such a notion of function constitutes, with respect to our purpose, a crucial generalization of that concept. This will make easy to justify deep and astonishing (counter-intuitive) incompleteness results about computers and similar machines. The modified Cantor diagonalization will provide a theory of concrete self-reference and I illustrate it by pointing toward an elementary theory of self-reproduction-in the Amoeba's way-and cellular self-regeneration-in the flatworm Planaria's way. To make it easier, I introduce a very simple and powerful formal system known as the Schoenfinkel-Curry combinators. I will use the combinators to illustrate in a more concrete way the notion introduced above. The combinators, thanks to their low-level fine grained design, will also make it possible to make a rough but hopefully illuminating description of the main lessons gained by the careful observation of nature, and to describe some new relations, which should exist between computer science, the science of life and the science of inert matter, once some philosophical, if not theological, hypotheses are made in the cognitive sciences. In the

  15. Computer simulation in materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, R.J.; Beeler, J.R.; Esterling, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers on the subject of modeling in materials science. Topics include thermodynamics of metallic solids and fluids, grain-boundary modeling, fracture from an atomistic point of view, and computer simulation of dislocations on an atomistic level.

  16. Expanding Computer Science Education in Schools: Understanding Teacher Experiences and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Aman; Gretter, Sarah; Hambrusch, Susanne; Sands, Phil

    2017-01-01

    The increased push for teaching computer science (CS) in schools in the United States requires training a large number of new K-12 teachers. The current efforts to increase the number of CS teachers have predominantly focused on training teachers from other content areas. In order to support these beginning CS teachers, we need to better…

  17. Effect of Robotics on Elementary Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Science Learning, and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Angeli, Charoula

    2017-01-01

    The current impetus for increasing STEM in K-12 education calls for an examination of how preservice teachers are being prepared to teach STEM. This paper reports on a study that examined elementary preservice teachers' (n = 21) self-efficacy, understanding of science concepts, and computational thinking as they engaged with robotics in a science…

  18. Mathematical logic for computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong Wan Lu

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical logic is essentially related to computer science. This book describes the aspects of mathematical logic that are closely related to each other, including classical logic, constructive logic, and modal logic. This book is intended to attend to both the peculiarities of logical systems and the requirements of computer science.In this edition, the revisions essentially involve rewriting the proofs, increasing the explanations, and adopting new terms and notations.

  19. Computer Science Professionals and Greek Library Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendrinos, Markos N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the current state of computer science penetration into librarianship in terms of both workplace and education issues. The shift from material libraries into digital libraries is mirrored in the corresponding shift from librarians into information scientists. New library data and metadata, as well as new automated…

  20. Transactions on Computational Science IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 9th issue of the Transactions on Computational Science journal, edited by François Anton, is devoted to the subject of Voronoi diagrams in science and engineering. The 9 papers included in the issue constitute extended versions of selected papers from the International Symposium on Voronoi...

  1. Transactions on Computational Science IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 9th issue of the Transactions on Computational Science journal, edited by François Anton, is devoted to the subject of Voronoi diagrams in science and engineering. The 9 papers included in the issue constitute extended versions of selected papers from the International Symposium on Voronoi...

  2. Molecular Science Computing: 2010 Greenbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Cowley, David E.; Dunning, Thom H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2010-04-02

    This 2010 Greenbook outlines the science drivers for performing integrated computational environmental molecular research at EMSL and defines the next-generation HPC capabilities that must be developed at the MSC to address this critical research. The EMSL MSC Science Panel used EMSL’s vision and science focus and white papers from current and potential future EMSL scientific user communities to define the scientific direction and resulting HPC resource requirements presented in this 2010 Greenbook.

  3. K-12 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay

    2013-06-01

    For many school subjects, teachers enlist in professional development activities to fulfill certification requirements to update themselves on recent developments in their field. For astronomy, in addition to certification, many teachers need to acquire basic knowledge and skills since their background is often deficient. Thus, a main goal of professional development workshops is to enhance the knowledge base of the participants. But their needs go beyond what can be acquired in a book or lecture. In response to guidelines of the National Science Education Standards (1996), the participants should actively investigate phenomena and interpret results, be introduced to resources that expand their knowledge, build on their current understanding, and incorporate reflection on the process and outcomes of understanding science through inquiry. Examples of how these elements are incorporated into workshops that emphasize activities and teacher-to-teacher interaction over lecture are offered in this presentation. Setting realistic goals for workshops of different lengths (from one day to one month) and evaluating the results are also components of teacher professional development.

  4. Cloud computing and services science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Sinderen, van Marten; Shishkov, Boris

    2012-01-01

    This book is essentially a collection of the best papers of the International Conference on Cloud Computing and Services Science (CLOSER), which was held in Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands on May 7–9, 2011. The conference addressed technology trends in the domain of cloud computing in relation to a

  5. Serious computer games in computer science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Rugelj

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of serious computer games in contemporary educational practice is presented in this paper as well as the theoretical fundamentals that justify their use in different forms of education. We present a project for designing and developing serious games that take place within the curriculum for computer science teachers’ education as an independent project work in teams. In this project work students have to use their knowledge in the field of didactics and computer science to develop games. The developed game is tested and evaluated in schools in the framework of their practical training. The results of the evaluation can help students improve their games and verify to which extent specified learning goals have been achieved.

  6. An analysis of United States K-12 stem education versus STEM workforce at the dawn of the digital revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franca

    The world is at the dawn of a third industrial revolution, the digital revolution, that brings great changes the world over. Today, computing devices, the Internet, and the World Wide Web are vital technology tools that affect every aspect of everyday life and success. While computing technologies offer enormous benefits, there are equally enormous safety and security risks that have been growing exponentially since they became widely available to the public in 1994. Cybercriminals are increasingly implementing sophisticated and serious hack attacks and breaches upon our nation's government, financial institutions, organizations, communities, and private citizens. There is a great need for computer scientists to carry America's innovation and economic growth forward and for cybersecurity professionals to keep our nation safe from criminal hacking. In this digital age, computer science and cybersecurity are essential foundational ingredients of technological innovation, economic growth, and cybersecurity that span all industries. Yet, America's K-12 education institutions are not teaching the computer science and cybersecurity skills required to produce a technologically-savvy 21st century workforce. Education is the key to preparing students to enter the workforce and, therefore, American K-12 STEM education must be reformed to accommodate the teachings required in the digital age. Keywords: Cybersecurity Education, Cybersecurity Education Initiatives, Computer Science Education, Computer Science Education Initiatives, 21 st Century K-12 STEM Education Reform, 21st Century Digital Literacies, High-Tech Innovative Problem-Solving Skills, 21st Century Digital Workforce, Standardized Testing, Foreign Language and Culture Studies, Utica College, Professor Chris Riddell.

  7. Computational colour science using MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Westland, Stephen; Cheung, Vien

    2012-01-01

    Computational Colour Science Using MATLAB 2nd Edition offers a practical, problem-based approach to colour physics. The book focuses on the key issues encountered in modern colour engineering, including efficient representation of colour information, Fourier analysis of reflectance spectra and advanced colorimetric computation. Emphasis is placed on the practical applications rather than the techniques themselves, with material structured around key topics. These topics include colour calibration of visual displays, computer recipe prediction and models for colour-appearance prediction. Each t

  8. 美国基础教育理科教科书评价标准及其启示%An Overview on K-12 Science Textbook Evaluation in USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文源; 刘恩山

    2013-01-01

    The researches on K-12 textbook evaluation were started in the mid-19th century in United States. Up to now, the studies have been increasingly mature and systematic. Compatible with the education administration system, there are both national“2061 Project”textbook evaluation criteria and state textbook evaluation criteria based on national criteria in United States, which are signiifcant references to our studies on science textbook evaluation.%美国的基础教育教科书评价研究起步较早,发展至今已相对成熟且系统化。与其地方分权的教育管理体制相适应,美国既有跨州的“2061计划”教科书评价标准,也有各州在此基础上制定的本州教科书评价标准,这些标准的研制理念与现代教育评价理论一致,很好地体现了对教科书价值的判定,并使教科书的价值得以量化并外显出来,对我国教科书评价研究及标准的制定具有借鉴和参考意义。

  9. “SIMPLE Sciernce ”——基于图像的中小学简化科学教育数字图书馆%SIMPLE Science: Image-Based Learning Digital Library for K-12 Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕权; 王群

    2011-01-01

    SIMPLE Science is a digital library project aiming to "overcome barriers to mainstream use of image processing and analysis (IPA) in K-12 education''. It attempts to make IPA accessible and easy to use, provide extensive and updateable archives of imaging data, and design a pedagogical structure that supports national education standards for middle school education. The article provides an extended review on the comtruction and status of the digital library, including project background, resources organization, technological structures, service features, as well as comments and suggestions made by the authors.%SIMPLE Science是一个通过利用图像处理及分析技术(IPA)辅助青少年学习的数字图书馆,通过提供图片信息、教学计划、课程活动使得图像处理和分析能够作为一种学习工具得以使用,同时也为教育工作者在教学过程中使用图像信息提供便利条件.文章对该项目的建设及现状进行了综合性的评析,包括项目概述、数字资源及组织、技术特征、服务特点等.

  10. Computational Thinking in High School Science Classrooms: Exploring the Science "Framework" and "NGSS"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneider, Cary; Stephenson, Chris; Schafer, Bruce; Flick, Larry

    2014-01-01

    A "Framework for K-12 Science Education" identified eight practices as "essential elements of the K-12 science and engineering curriculum" (NRC 2012, p. 49). Most of the practices, such as Developing and Using Models, Planning and Carrying Out Investigations, and Analyzing and Interpreting Data, are well known among science…

  11. K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…

  12. Cambridge IGCSE computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Dave; Konrad, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Endorsed by Cambridge International Examinations. Develop your students computational thinking and programming skills with complete coverage of the latest syllabus (0478) from experienced examiners and teachers. - Includes a Student CD-ROM with interactive tests, based on the short answer questions from both papers - Follows the order of the syllabus exactly, ensuring complete coverage - Introduces students to self-learning exercises, helping them learn how to use their knowledge in new scenarios This syllabus is for first examination from 2015.

  13. Computer Science Research at Langley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, S. J. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A workshop was held at Langley Research Center, November 2-5, 1981, to highlight ongoing computer science research at Langley and to identify additional areas of research based upon the computer user requirements. A panel discussion was held in each of nine application areas, and these are summarized in the proceedings. Slides presented by the invited speakers are also included. A survey of scientific, business, data reduction, and microprocessor computer users helped identify areas of focus for the workshop. Several areas of computer science which are of most concern to the Langley computer users were identified during the workshop discussions. These include graphics, distributed processing, programmer support systems and tools, database management, and numerical methods.

  14. Linking computers for science

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    After the success of SETI@home, many other scientists have found computer power donated by the public to be a valuable resource - and sometimes the only possibility to achieve their goals. In July, representatives of several “public resource computing” projects came to CERN to discuss technical issues and R&D activities on the common computing platform they are using, BOINC. This photograph shows the LHC@home screen-saver which uses the BOINC platform: the dots represent protons and the position of the status bar indicates the progress of the calculations. This summer, CERN hosted the first “pangalactic workshop” on BOINC (Berkeley Open Interface for Network Computing). BOINC is modelled on SETI@home, which millions of people have downloaded to help search for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence in radio-astronomical data. BOINC provides a general-purpose framework for scientists to adapt their software to, so that the public can install and run it. An important part of BOINC is managing the...

  15. Writing for computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Zobel, Justin

    2015-01-01

    All researchers need to write or speak about their work, and to have research  that is worth presenting. Based on the author's decades of experience as a researcher and advisor, this third edition provides detailed guidance on writing and presentations and a comprehensive introduction to research methods, the how-to of being a successful scientist.  Topics include: ·         Development of ideas into research questions; ·         How to find, read, evaluate and referee other research; ·         Design and evaluation of experiments and appropriate use of statistics; ·         Ethics, the principles of science and examples of science gone wrong. Much of the book is a step-by-step guide to effective communication, with advice on:  ·         Writing style and editing; ·         Figures, graphs and tables; ·         Mathematics and algorithms; ·         Literature reviews and referees' reports; ·         Structuring of arguments an...

  16. Unifying K-12 Learning Processes: Integrating Curricula through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Michael J.; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether a set of cross-curricular learning processes could be found in the respective K-12 US national standards for math, language arts, foreign language, science, social studies, fine arts, and technology. Using a qualitative research methodology, the standards from the national associations for these content…

  17. The Future of Computer Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John E.Hopcroft

    2009-01-01

    @@ It's a great pleasure for me to be here today and have this opportunity to talk to you about my view of the future of computer science.because I think this is a very important time for those of you,the students.What I like to do is I like tostart out by telling you a very quick story about the early part of my career.I graduated from Standford in 1964 from the electrical engineering department.This was before computer science got started.I was hired in coincidence in the electrical engineering department,and what I was asked to do was to teach a new course in computer science.

  18. Trends in Computational Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Rubin

    2002-08-01

    Education in computational science and engineering (CSE) has evolved through a number of stages, from recognition in the 1980s to its present early growth. Now a number of courses and degree programs are being designed and implemented at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and students are beginning to receive degrees. This talk will discuss various aspects of this development, including the impact on faculty and students, the nature of the job market, the intellectual content of CSE education, and the types of programs and degrees now being offered. Analytic comparisons will be made between the content of Physics degrees versus those of other disciplines, and reasons for changes should be apparent. This talk is based on the papers "Elements of Computational Science Education" by Osman Yasar and Rubin Landau, and "Computational Science Education" by Charles Swanson.

  19. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  20. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  1. Reproducible research in computational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Roger D

    2011-12-02

    Computational science has led to exciting new developments, but the nature of the work has exposed limitations in our ability to evaluate published findings. Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible.

  2. Inspiring the Next Generation: Astronomy Catalyzes K12 STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Thaller, Michelle; Winglee, Robert; Borders, Kyla

    2017-06-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. NASA's Mission Science provides innovative and accessible opportunities for K-12 teachers. Science questions involve scale and distance, including Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers can gain an understanding of basic telescopes, the history of telescopes, ground and satellite based telescopes, and models of JWST Telescope. An in-depth explanation of JWST and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. During teacher training, we taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars.We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development.Funding was provided by Washington STEM, NASA, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  3. 数字土著何以可能?——也谈计算思维进入中小学信息技术教育的必要性和可能性%Meeting Real Digital Natives: The Necessities and Possibilities of Bringing Computational Thinking to K-12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任友群; 隋丰蔚; 李锋

    2016-01-01

    Digitization and computerization have become the basic characteristics of modern society with the ongoing convergence of physical world and digital world. Computational thinking as a skill that is as fundamental as being able to read, write, and do arithmetic receives abroad attention and research in the field of computer science and education, and it is also a measurement standard that could identify digital natives. The paper aims to discuss the necessities of bringing computational thinking to K-12 and how to integrate this kind of ability into information technology curricula. First, we discuss what Computational Thinking is and the importance of teaching it in school. Then, we analyze the inherent characteristics of computational thinking, taking the current China information technology education status into account, list the approaches to infusing and evaluating such skill in K-12 information technology curriculum.%随着现实世界与虚拟世界的不断融合,数字化和计算化逐渐演变成为现代社会的基本形态特征,计算思维的作用和意义越来越突出,成为区分数字土著的重要标准,受到计算机和教育领域的广泛关注.该文通过梳理国内外学术前沿成果,分析国际基础教育改革趋势,阐述了计算思维进入中小学信息技术教育的必要性,并结合计算思维的内在特征和我国信息技术教育现状,归纳总结出计算思维教育在中小学信息技术课程落实的可行取径及与之一致的能力评估方法.

  4. The NASA computer science research program plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A taxonomy of computer science is included, one state of the art of each of the major computer science categories is summarized. A functional breakdown of NASA programs under Aeronautics R and D, space R and T, and institutional support is also included. These areas were assessed against the computer science categories. Concurrent processing, highly reliable computing, and information management are identified.

  5. Computability, complexity, and languages fundamentals of theoretical computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Martin D; Rheinboldt, Werner

    1983-01-01

    Computability, Complexity, and Languages: Fundamentals of Theoretical Computer Science provides an introduction to the various aspects of theoretical computer science. Theoretical computer science is the mathematical study of models of computation. This text is composed of five parts encompassing 17 chapters, and begins with an introduction to the use of proofs in mathematics and the development of computability theory in the context of an extremely simple abstract programming language. The succeeding parts demonstrate the performance of abstract programming language using a macro expa

  6. Computers in Information Sciences: On-Line Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMPUTERS, *BIBLIOGRAPHIES, *ONLINE SYSTEMS, * INFORMATION SCIENCES , DATA PROCESSING, DATA MANAGEMENT, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, COMPUTER GRAPHICS, DIGITAL COMPUTERS, ANALOG COMPUTERS.

  7. Computer science and operations research

    CERN Document Server

    Balci, Osman

    1992-01-01

    The interface of Operation Research and Computer Science - although elusive to a precise definition - has been a fertile area of both methodological and applied research. The papers in this book, written by experts in their respective fields, convey the current state-of-the-art in this interface across a broad spectrum of research domains which include optimization techniques, linear programming, interior point algorithms, networks, computer graphics in operations research, parallel algorithms and implementations, planning and scheduling, genetic algorithms, heuristic search techniques and dat

  8. Computer science faculty explore thermal-aware computing

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Kirk Cameron and Dimitrios Nikolopoulos, associate professors of computer science in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, have earned a National Science Foundation (NSF) - Computer Science Research (CSR) award of $350,000 to help improve the reliability of computer systems' processors.

  9. Advanced in Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Neil; Park, James; CSA 2013

    2014-01-01

    The theme of CSA is focused on the various aspects of computer science and its applications for advances in computer science and its applications and provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of computer science and its applications. Therefore this book will be include the various theories and practical applications in computer science and its applications.

  10. Wanted: Female Computer-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The Computing Research Association revealed that the percentage of American women in computer science and related fields remains low and stagnant, while other fields, like mathematics, science, and chemistry are seeing growing enrollment of women. Some researchers suggest computer-science programs are stacked women and the way they learn, but…

  11. Computer Science and the Liberal Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Computer science and the liberal arts have much to offer each other. Yet liberal arts colleges, in particular, have been slow to recognize the opportunity that the study of computer science provides for achieving the goals of a liberal education. After the precipitous drop in computer science enrollments during the first decade of this century,…

  12. Girls Save the World through Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christine

    2011-01-01

    It's no secret that fewer and fewer women are entering computer science fields. Attracting high school girls to computer science is only part of the solution. Retaining them while they are in higher education or the workforce is also a challenge. To solve this, there is a need to show girls that computer science is a wide-open field that offers…

  13. Preparing Future Secondary Computer Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajwa, Iyad

    2007-01-01

    Although nearly every college offers a major in computer science, many computer science teachers at the secondary level have received little formal training. This paper presents details of a project that could make a significant contribution to national efforts to improve computer science education by combining teacher education and professional…

  14. Computer Science and the Liberal Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Computer science and the liberal arts have much to offer each other. Yet liberal arts colleges, in particular, have been slow to recognize the opportunity that the study of computer science provides for achieving the goals of a liberal education. After the precipitous drop in computer science enrollments during the first decade of this century,…

  15. Preparing Future Secondary Computer Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajwa, Iyad

    2007-01-01

    Although nearly every college offers a major in computer science, many computer science teachers at the secondary level have received little formal training. This paper presents details of a project that could make a significant contribution to national efforts to improve computer science education by combining teacher education and professional…

  16. Teaching K-12 Students to Combat Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Physical education is one of the most viable intervention programs to reach overweight and obese children. Since physical activity habits developed early in life are more likely to persist into adulthood, it is important for K-12 physical educators to teach the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will motivate students to become more active. Two…

  17. Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Kathy; Ettrich, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks are organized by division: kindergarten, grades 1-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12. They are descriptors of language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The descriptors are arranged in a continuum of seven language competences across five proficiency levels. Several…

  18. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  19. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  20. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  1. Manifesto of computational social science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, R.; Gilbert, N.; Bonelli, G.; Cioffi-Revilla, C.; Deffuant, G.; Kertesz, J.; Loreto, V.; Moat, S.; Nadal, J.-P.; Sanchez, A.; Nowak, A.; Flache, A.; San Miguel, M.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    The increasing integration of technology into our lives has created unprecedented volumes of data on society's everyday behaviour. Such data opens up exciting new opportunities to work towards a quantitative understanding of our complex social systems, within the realms of a new discipline known as Computational Social Science. Against a background of financial crises, riots and international epidemics, the urgent need for a greater comprehension of the complexity of our interconnected global society and an ability to apply such insights in policy decisions is clear. This manifesto outlines the objectives of this new scientific direction, considering the challenges involved in it, and the extensive impact on science, technology and society that the success of this endeavour is likely to bring about.

  2. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  3. Functional Programming in Computer Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Loren James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Marion Kei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-19

    We explore functional programming through a 16-week internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Functional programming is a branch of computer science that has exploded in popularity over the past decade due to its high-level syntax, ease of parallelization, and abundant applications. First, we summarize functional programming by listing the advantages of functional programming languages over the usual imperative languages, and we introduce the concept of parsing. Second, we discuss the importance of lambda calculus in the theory of functional programming. Lambda calculus was invented by Alonzo Church in the 1930s to formalize the concept of effective computability, and every functional language is essentially some implementation of lambda calculus. Finally, we display the lasting products of the internship: additions to a compiler and runtime system for the pure functional language STG, including both a set of tests that indicate the validity of updates to the compiler and a compiler pass that checks for illegal instances of duplicate names.

  4. Biomaterial science meets computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Little, J Paige; Pettet, Graeme J; Loessner, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    There is a pressing need for a predictive tool capable of revealing a holistic understanding of fundamental elements in the normal and pathological cell physiology of organoids in order to decipher the mechanoresponse of cells. Therefore, the integration of a systems bioengineering approach into a validated mathematical model is necessary to develop a new simulation tool. This tool can only be innovative by combining biomaterials science with computational biology. Systems-level and multi-scale experimental data are incorporated into a single framework, thus representing both single cells and collective cell behaviour. Such a computational platform needs to be validated in order to discover key mechano-biological factors associated with cell-cell and cell-niche interactions.

  5. A Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education: Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tamara J.; Glancy, Aran W.; Tank, Kristina M.; Kersten, Jennifer A.; Smith, Karl A.; Stohlmann, Micah S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent U.S. national documents have laid the foundation for highlighting the connection between science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the K-12 level. However, there is not a clear definition or a well-established tradition of what constitutes a quality engineering education at the K-12 level. The purpose of the current work has been…

  6. Applying the Quadratic Usage Framework to Research on K-12 STEM Digital Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policymakers have called for K-12 educators to increase their effectiveness by transforming science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and teaching with digital resources and tools. In this study we outline the significance of studying pressing issues related to use of digital resources in the K-12 environment and…

  7. Assessment of computer science knowledge, achieved with »Computer Science Unplugged« activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zaviršek, Manca

    2015-01-01

    The master thesis discusses assessment of computer science knowledge, which students achieved with »Computer Science Unplugged« activities. First off we define what exactly computer science knowledge is and what the computer science concepts are. Then we get over to the modern approaches of teaching computer science, where the emphasis is problem solving. These approaches can be realized with »CS Unplugged« activities and Bebras tasks. The aim of the empirical part is to research whether asse...

  8. THE INTERFACE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND STATISTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer science and statistics have each been separately documented by many books as well as numerous papers. However, the interface of computer ...prerequisites to the computer and mathematical prerequisites to computer science and of the foundations for probability and statistics. Development of statistics prior to 1900 then is reviewed. (Author)... science and statistics, the area of their interaction, has been documented only in part. The paper begins characterization of the entire interface by

  9. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hules, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  10. Inquiry-based learning, the nature of science, and computer technology: New possibilities in science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Kubieck

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of science in the K-12 classroom has been less than successful. Students typically do not develop science literacy and do not understand the role and relevance of science in society. Inquiry-based learning is an approach which promises to improve science teaching by engaging students in authentic investigations, thereby achieving a more realistic conception of scientific endeavour as well as providing a more learner-centred and motivating environment. It can also be used to support teaching the nature of science. The inquiry approach, while lauded by educators, is still not prevalent in the classroom, and is often misused. This may be the result of multiple factors, such as amount of classroom time, lack of effective means for students to conduct independent investigations, the difficulty of incorporating abstract concepts with inquiry, and lack of teacher expertise and experience. Computer technology has evolved now to the point where it can greatly facilitate the use of inquiry learning on many levels, and provide new tools for representing the nature of science in the classroom. This use of technology to support new teaching approaches and objectives holds great promise for improving science education in the classroom, as long as the inherent limitations are recognized and technology is used as a tool rather than as a foundation.

  11. ACSES, An Automated Computer Science Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Jurg; And Others

    A project to accommodate the large and increasing enrollment in introductory computer science courses by automating them with a subsystem for computer science instruction on the PLATO IV Computer-Based Education system at the University of Illinois was started. The subsystem was intended to be used for supplementary instruction at the University…

  12. Topological structures in computer science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efim Khalimsky

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Topologies of finite spaces and spaces with countably many points are investigated. It is proven, using the theory of ordered topological spaces, that any topology in connected ordered spaces, with finitely many points or in spaces similar to the set of all integers, is an interval-alternating topology. Integer and digital lines, arcs, and curves are considered. Topology of N-dimensional digital spaces is described. A digital analog of the intermediate value theorem is proven. The equivalence of connectedness and pathconnectedness in digital and integer spaces is also proven. It is shown here how methods of continuous mathematics, for example, topological methods, can be applied to objects, that used to be investigated only by methods of discrete mathematics. The significance of methods and ideas in digital image and picture processing, robotic vision, computer tomography and system's sciences presented here is well known.

  13. Know Your Discipline: Teaching the Philosophy of Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedre, Matti

    2007-01-01

    The diversity and interdisciplinarity of computer science and the multiplicity of its uses in other sciences make it hard to define computer science and to prescribe how computer science should be carried out. The diversity of computer science also causes friction between computer scientists from different branches. Computer science curricula, as…

  14. Innovations in Computing Sciences and Software Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sobh, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    "Innovations in Computing Sciences and Software Engineering" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the areas of Computer Science, Software Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Systems Engineering and Sciences. The topics covered include: Image and Pattern Recognition: Compression, Image processing, Signal Processing Architectures, Signal Processing for Communication, Signal Processing Implementation, Speech Compression, and Video Coding Architectures; Languages and Systems: Algorithms, Databases,

  15. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  16. Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier: Accelerator Science

    CERN Document Server

    Spentzouris, P; Joshi, C; Amundson, J; An, W; Bruhwiler, D L; Cary, J R; Cowan, B; Decyk, V K; Esarey, E; Fonseca, R A; Friedman, A; Geddes, C G R; Grote, D P; Kourbanis, I; Leemans, W P; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Ng, C; Qiang, Ji; Roberts, T; Ryne, R D; Schroeder, C B; Silva, L O; Tsung, F S; Vay, J -L; Vieira, J

    2013-01-01

    This is the working summary of the Accelerator Science working group of the Computing Frontier of the Snowmass meeting 2013. It summarizes the computing requirements to support accelerator technology in both Energy and Intensity Frontiers.

  17. Advances in Computer Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Second International Conference on Advances in Computer Science and Engineering (CES 2012)

    2012-01-01

    This book includes the proceedings of the second International Conference on Advances in Computer Science and Engineering (CES 2012), which was held during January 13-14, 2012 in Sanya, China. The papers in these proceedings of CES 2012 focus on the researchers’ advanced works in their fields of Computer Science and Engineering mainly organized in four topics, (1) Software Engineering, (2) Intelligent Computing, (3) Computer Networks, and (4) Artificial Intelligence Software.

  18. On teaching computer ethics within a computer science department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    The author has surveyed a quarter of the accredited undergraduate computer science programs in the United States. More than half of these programs offer a 'social and ethical implications of computing' course taught by a computer science faculty member, and there appears to be a trend toward teaching ethics classes within computer science departments. Although the decision to create an 'in house' computer ethics course may sometimes be a pragmatic response to pressure from the accreditation agency, this paper argues that teaching ethics within a computer science department can provide students and faculty members with numerous benefits. The paper lists topics that can be covered in a computer ethics course and offers some practical suggestions for making the course successful.

  19. Sustainable computational science: the ReScience initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Nicolas; Hinsen, Konrad; Alexandre, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Computer science offers a large set of tools for prototyping, writing, running, testing, validating, sharing and reproducing results, however computational science lags behind. In the best case, authors may provide their source code as a compressed archive and they may feel confident their resear...

  20. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Dam, Wim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farhi, Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaitan, Frank [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Humble, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Landahl, Andrew J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Love, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lucas, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Preskill, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svore, Krysta [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiebe, Nathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Carl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  1. Designing Computer-Supported Complex Systems Curricula for the Next Generation Science Standards in High School Science Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a curriculum and instruction framework for computer-supported teaching and learning about complex systems in high school science classrooms. This work responds to a need in K-12 science education research and practice for the articulation of design features for classroom instruction that can address the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS recently launched in the USA. We outline the features of the framework, including curricular relevance, cognitively rich pedagogies, computational tools for teaching and learning, and the development of content expertise, and provide examples of how the framework is translated into practice. We follow this up with evidence from a preliminary study conducted with 10 teachers and 361 students, aimed at understanding the extent to which students learned from the activities. Results demonstrated gains in students’ complex systems understanding and biology content knowledge. In interviews, students identified influences of various aspects of the curriculum and instruction framework on their learning.

  2. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: K - 12 Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Universe Professional Development Collaborative, Multiwavelength; NASA Data Collaborative, Use of; SEPOF K-12 Formal Education Working Group; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education community. Members of the K - 12 Formal Education community include classroom educators, homeschool educators, students, and curriculum developers. The Forums’ efforts for the K - 12 Formal Education community include a literature review, appraisal of educators’ needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, and support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K - 12 Formal Education community based upon mutual needs and interests.

  3. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  4. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  5. Basic proof skills of computer science students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, P.H.; Es, van B.; Tromp, Th.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer science students need mathematical proof skills. At our University, these skills are being taught as part of various mathematics and computer science courses. To test the skills of our students, we have asked them to work out a number of exercises. We found that our students are not as well

  6. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  7. Creating Science Simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    2012-01-01

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction.…

  8. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  9. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  10. COMPUTER SCIENCE DEVELOPMENTS RELEVANT TO PSYCHOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    on-line control of experiments by man-machine interaction. The developments in computer science which make these applications possible are discussed...in some detail. In addition, there are conceptual developments in computer science , particularly in the study of artificial intelligence, which may provide leads in the development of psychological theory. (Author)

  11. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  12. The science of computing - Parallel computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although parallel computation architectures have been known for computers since the 1920s, it was only in the 1970s that microelectronic components technologies advanced to the point where it became feasible to incorporate multiple processors in one machine. Concommitantly, the development of algorithms for parallel processing also lagged due to hardware limitations. The speed of computing with solid-state chips is limited by gate switching delays. The physical limit implies that a 1 Gflop operational speed is the maximum for sequential processors. A computer recently introduced features a 'hypercube' architecture with 128 processors connected in networks at 5, 6 or 7 points per grid, depending on the design choice. Its computing speed rivals that of supercomputers, but at a fraction of the cost. The added speed with less hardware is due to parallel processing, which utilizes algorithms representing different parts of an equation that can be broken into simpler statements and processed simultaneously. Present, highly developed computer languages like FORTRAN, PASCAL, COBOL, etc., rely on sequential instructions. Thus, increased emphasis will now be directed at parallel processing algorithms to exploit the new architectures.

  13. Understanding Science Through the Computational Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M. Karp

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the changing nature of the interaction between computer science and the natural and social sciences.After briefly tracing the history of scientific computation,the article presents the concept of computational lens,a metaphor for a new relationship that is emerging between the world of computation and the world of the sciences.Our main thesis is that,in many scientific fields,the processes being studied can be viewed as computational in nature,in the sense that the processes perform dynamic transformations on information represented as digital data.Viewing natural or engineered systems through the lens of their computational requirements or capabilities provides new insights and ways of thinking.A number of examples are discussed in support of this thesis.The examples are from various fields,including quantum computing,statistical physics,the World Wide Web and the Internet,mathematics,and computational molecular biology.

  14. Bringing computational science to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, James L; Barker, Daniel; Alderson, Rosanna G

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of computers in science allows for the scientific analyses of large datasets at an increasing pace. We provided examples and interactive demonstrations at Dundee Science Centre as part of the 2015 Women in Science festival, to present aspects of computational science to the general public. We used low-cost Raspberry Pi computers to provide hands on experience in computer programming and demonstrated the application of computers to biology. Computer games were used as a means to introduce computers to younger visitors. The success of the event was evaluated by voluntary feedback forms completed by visitors, in conjunction with our own self-evaluation. This work builds on the original work of the 4273π bioinformatics education program of Barker et al. (2013, BMC Bioinform. 14:243). 4273π provides open source education materials in bioinformatics. This work looks at the potential to adapt similar materials for public engagement events. It appears, at least in our small sample of visitors (n = 13), that basic computational science can be conveyed to people of all ages by means of interactive demonstrations. Children as young as five were able to successfully edit simple computer programs with supervision. This was, in many cases, their first experience of computer programming. The feedback is predominantly positive, showing strong support for improving computational science education, but also included suggestions for improvement. Our conclusions are necessarily preliminary. However, feedback forms suggest methods were generally well received among the participants; "Easy to follow. Clear explanation" and "Very easy. Demonstrators were very informative." Our event, held at a local Science Centre in Dundee, demonstrates that computer games and programming activities suitable for young children can be performed alongside a more specialised and applied introduction to computational science for older visitors.

  15. Three New Concepts of Future Computer Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Wei Xu; Dan-Dan Tu

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an observation resulted from the six-year Sino-USA computer science leadership exchanges:the trend towards the emergence of a new computer science that is more universal and fundamental than that in the past.In the 21st century,the field of computer science is experiencing fundamental transformations,from its scope,objects of study,basic metrics,main abstractions,fundamental principles,to its relationship to other sciences and to the human society,while inheriting the basic way of thinking and time-tested body of knowledge accumulated through the past 50 years.We discuss three new concepts related to this trend.They are computational lens and computational thinking articulated by US scientists,and ternary computing for the masses proposed by Chinese scientists.We review the salient features of these concepts,discuss their impact,and summarize future research directions.

  16. The science of computing shaping a discipline

    CERN Document Server

    Tedre, Matti

    2014-01-01

    The identity of computing has been fiercely debated throughout its short history. Why is it still so hard to define computing as an academic discipline? Is computing a scientific, mathematical, or engineering discipline? By describing the mathematical, engineering, and scientific traditions of computing, The Science of Computing: Shaping a Discipline presents a rich picture of computing from the viewpoints of the field's champions. The book helps readers understand the debates about computing as a discipline. It explains the context of computing's central debates and portrays a broad perspecti

  17. Computers in Education and Education in Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis SIERRA-RODRÍGUEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selection of the extended papers related to Computers in Education and Computer Science Education topics presented at the sixteenth edition of the International Symposium on Computers in Education (SIIE 2014, held between 12 and 14 November 2014 in Logroño, La Ri-oja, Spain.

  18. TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE WITHOUT COMPUTER : Teaching Computer Science in Afghan Secondary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Seendani, Ajmal

    2013-01-01

    Computers have become so significant in todays’ world, most of the people use such kind of technology for different purposes in their life: such as computing, designing, calculation and so on. This kind of technology can help the teachers and students in learning process, or we can say that they can be used as a facilitator of the learning process. This study circulates on how the teachers teach computer science in Afghan schools grade (10 to 12), although there are no computers in the classr...

  19. K-12 Students' Perceptions of Scientists: Finding a Valid Measurement and Exploring Whether Exposure to Scientists Makes an Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Susan J.; Bloodsworth, Kylie H.; Tilburg, Charles E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; List, Henrietta E.

    2014-01-01

    This study was launched from a National Science Foundation GK-12 grant in which graduate fellows in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are placed in classrooms to engage K-12 students in STEM activities. The investigation explored whether the STEM Fellows' presence impacted the K-12 students' stereotypical image of a…

  20. Dropping Out of Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study of Student Lived Experiences in Community College Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Valencia, Daniel H.

    California community colleges contribute alarmingly few computer science degree or certificate earners. While the literature shows clear K-12 impediments to CS matriculation in higher education, very little is known about the experiences of those who overcome initial impediments to CS yet do not persist through to program completion. This phenomenological study explores insights into that specific experience by interviewing underrepresented, low income, first-generation college students who began community college intending to transfer to 4-year institutions majoring in CS but switched to another field and remain enrolled or graduated. This study explores the lived experiences of students facing barriers, their avenues for developing interest in CS, and the persistence support systems they encountered, specifically looking at how students constructed their academic choice from these experiences. The growing diversity within California's population necessitates that experiences specific to underrepresented students be considered as part of this exploration. Ten semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted, transcribed and coded. Artifacts supporting student experiences were also collected. Data was analyzed through a social-constructivist lens to provide insight into experiences and how they can be navigated to create actionable strategies for community college computer science departments wishing to increase student success. Three major themes emerged from this research: (1) students shared pre-college characteristics; (2) faced similar challenges in college CS courses; and (3) shared similar reactions to the "work" of computer science. Results of the study included (1) CS interest development hinged on computer ownership in the home; (2) participants shared characteristics that were ideal for college success but not CS success; and (3) encounters in CS departments produced unique challenges for participants. Though CS interest was and remains

  1. A survey of computational physics introductory computational science

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Rubin H; Bordeianu, Cristian C

    2008-01-01

    Computational physics is a rapidly growing subfield of computational science, in large part because computers can solve previously intractable problems or simulate natural processes that do not have analytic solutions. The next step beyond Landau's First Course in Scientific Computing and a follow-up to Landau and Páez's Computational Physics, this text presents a broad survey of key topics in computational physics for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students, including new discussions of visualization tools, wavelet analysis, molecular dynamics, and computational fluid dynamics

  2. COMPUTERS IN INFORMATION SCIENCES, VOLUME 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unclassified and unlimited bibliography compiles references dealing specifically with the role of computers in information sciences . The volume contains 239 annotated references grouped under three major headings: Artificial and Programming Languages, Computer Processing of Analog Data, and Computer Processing of Digital Data. The references

  3. Enabling Earth Science Through Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sean; Riofrio, Andres; Shams, Khawaja; Freeborn, Dana; Springer, Paul; Chafin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing holds tremendous potential for missions across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Several flight missions are already benefiting from an investment in cloud computing for mission critical pipelines and services through faster processing time, higher availability, and drastically lower costs available on cloud systems. However, these processes do not currently extend to general scientific algorithms relevant to earth science missions. The members of the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment task at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have worked closely with the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission to integrate cloud computing into their science data processing pipeline. This paper details the efforts involved in deploying a science data system for the CARVE mission, evaluating and integrating cloud computing solutions with the system and porting their science algorithms for execution in a cloud environment.

  4. Enabling Earth Science Through Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sean; Riofrio, Andres; Shams, Khawaja; Freeborn, Dana; Springer, Paul; Chafin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing holds tremendous potential for missions across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Several flight missions are already benefiting from an investment in cloud computing for mission critical pipelines and services through faster processing time, higher availability, and drastically lower costs available on cloud systems. However, these processes do not currently extend to general scientific algorithms relevant to earth science missions. The members of the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment task at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have worked closely with the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission to integrate cloud computing into their science data processing pipeline. This paper details the efforts involved in deploying a science data system for the CARVE mission, evaluating and integrating cloud computing solutions with the system and porting their science algorithms for execution in a cloud environment.

  5. 1987 computer science research: Computation directorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, J.R.; Grupe, K.F. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    The topics of research presented here reflect our view of the broad range of issues we need to address in support of our computing environment. Large-scale Scientific Computations represents one of our newest ventures. The goal is to more closely link expertise in the problem domains (e.g., fluid dynamics) with expertise in sophisticated numerical methods, thus allowing for a broader range of solution strategies to get better answers. Parallel Numerical Algorithms focuses more tightly on the development and analysis of numerical techniques for use in parallel computing situations. Issues here include the solution of extremely large partial differential equations, matrix solution techniques, and Monte Carlo programming techniques. In the area of General Numerical Algorithms we recognize the need for a significant amount of research on numerics without the additional complexity of parallelism. This area includes work on partial differential equations, ordinary differential equations, interpolation, and a variety of statistical analysis. Parallel Systems Software addresses issues related to going from a parallel algorithm to its correct and efficient implementation on a particular system. Distributed Operating Systems and Networks describes our efforts to provide a very flexible environment for users to access a diverse set of machines and services in an efficient and simple manner. Expert Systems Software covers another relatively new and expanding area. We are looking at various ways that knowledge engineering ideas can reduce development time for writing new code systems and improve our control over experimental processes. In the section on General Purpose Software we include several projects that span a wide range of topics. The last section, Technology Information Systems, reports the status of a special effort to provide sophisticated methods for allowing users to access remote information centers.

  6. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  7. Mechanistic Models in Computational Social Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes -- to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emerging phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  8. Cloud computing with e-science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The amount of data in everyday life has been exploding. This data increase has been especially significant in scientific fields, where substantial amounts of data must be captured, communicated, aggregated, stored, and analyzed. Cloud Computing with e-Science Applications explains how cloud computing can improve data management in data-heavy fields such as bioinformatics, earth science, and computer science. The book begins with an overview of cloud models supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and then:Discusses the challenges imposed by big data on scientific

  9. AIAA Educator Academy: Enriching STEM Education for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, E.; Bering, E. A.; Longmier, B. W.; Henriquez, E.; Milnes, T.; Wiedorn, P.; Bacon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Mars Rover Celebration Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 3-8. Throughout this module, students learn about Mars and the solar system. Working with given design criteria, students work in teams to do basic research about Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. Then, students participate in the design and construction of a model of a mock-up Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share their rover designs and what they have learned. The Electric Cargo Plan Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 6-12. Throughout this module, students learn about aerodynamics and the four forces of flight. Working individually or in teams, students design and construct an electrically-powered model aircraft to fly a tethered flight of at least one lap without cargo, followed by a second tethered flight of one lap carrying as much cargo as possible. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share what they have learned and compete with their different cargo plane designs. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude

  10. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  11. Soft Computing Techniques in Vision Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yeon-Mo

    2012-01-01

    This Special Edited Volume is a unique approach towards Computational solution for the upcoming field of study called Vision Science. From a scientific firmament Optics, Ophthalmology, and Optical Science has surpassed an Odyssey of optimizing configurations of Optical systems, Surveillance Cameras and other Nano optical devices with the metaphor of Nano Science and Technology. Still these systems are falling short of its computational aspect to achieve the pinnacle of human vision system. In this edited volume much attention has been given to address the coupling issues Computational Science and Vision Studies.  It is a comprehensive collection of research works addressing various related areas of Vision Science like Visual Perception and Visual system, Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, Psychophysics and Ophthalmology, linguistic relativity, color vision etc. This issue carries some latest developments in the form of research articles and presentations. The volume is rich of contents with technical tools ...

  12. Computer science alumnus launches Google project

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2010-01-01

    Manas Tungare, a 2009 doctoral graduate from Virginia Tech's Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering, was the first engineer to work on Google Instant during its earliest developmental stage.

  13. Computational Science: Ensuring America`s Competitiveness

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...rationalization and restructuring of computational science within universities and Federal agencies, and the development and maintenance of a multi-decade roadmap...

  14. Philosophy, computing and information science

    CERN Document Server

    Hagengruber, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Over the last four decades computers and the internet have become an intrinsic part of all our lives, but this speed of development has left related philosophical enquiry behind. Featuring the work of computer scientists and philosophers, these essays provide an overview of an exciting new area of philosophy that is still taking shape.

  15. Computer science and the Pygmalion effect

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, João; Silva, João Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    Can computer science learn from the social sciences? We focus our discussions on an undesired phenomenon that commonly affects software developers. Known as the Pygmalion effect, this phenomenon has been studied intensely by social scientists but almost entirely ignored by computer scientists. Pygmalion was a sculptor who fell in love with his statue, Galatea, brought to life for him by Aphrodite. In the 1960s, R. Rosenthal and L. Jacobson, two American psychologists, used this myth to name a...

  16. Computer Science Concept Inventories: Past and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C.; Zingaro, D.; Porter, L.; Webb, K. C.; Lee, C. B.; Clancy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Concept Inventories (CIs) are assessments designed to measure student learning of core concepts. CIs have become well known for their major impact on pedagogical techniques in other sciences, especially physics. Presently, there are no widely used, validated CIs for computer science. However, considerable groundwork has been performed in the form…

  17. Computer Science Concept Inventories: Past and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C.; Zingaro, D.; Porter, L.; Webb, K. C.; Lee, C. B.; Clancy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Concept Inventories (CIs) are assessments designed to measure student learning of core concepts. CIs have become well known for their major impact on pedagogical techniques in other sciences, especially physics. Presently, there are no widely used, validated CIs for computer science. However, considerable groundwork has been performed in the form…

  18. Establishing a K-12 Circuit Design Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoglu, Mustafa M.

    2010-01-01

    Outreach, as defined by Wikipedia, is an effort by an organization or group to connect its ideas or practices to the efforts of other organizations, groups, specific audiences, or the general public. This paper describes a computer engineering outreach project of the Department of Computer Engineering at Ege University, Izmir, Turkey, to a local…

  19. Telling Your Story: Ocean Scientists in the K-12 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, H.

    2006-12-01

    Most scientists and engineers are accustomed to presenting their research to colleagues or lecturing college or graduate students. But if asked to speak in front of a classroom full of elementary school or junior high school students, many feel less comfortable. TERC, as part of its work with The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-New England (COSEE-NE) has designed a workshop to help ocean scientists and engineers develop skills for working with K-12 teachers and students. We call this program: Telling Your Story (TYS). TYS has been offered 4 times over 18 months for a total audience of approximately 50 ocean scientists. We will discuss the rationale for the program, the program outline, outcomes, and what we have learned. ne.net/edu_project_3/index.php

  20. Computer science and the recent innovations of the modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greorghe Popescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Computer science and the recent innovations of the modern society” presents the importance of computer science, with the most important historical moments in its evolution, the main theoretical elements of the computation science, computer elements and architecture and the latest innovations in the computer science, such as Artificial Intelligence.

  1. Computer science research and technology volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Janice P

    2011-01-01

    This book presents leading-edge research from across the globe in the field of computer science research, technology and applications. Each contribution has been carefully selected for inclusion based on the significance of the research to this fast-moving and diverse field. Some topics included are: network topology; agile programming; virtualization; and reconfigurable computing.

  2. What Is (Or Should Be) Scientific Evidence Use in K-12 Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Berland, Leema

    2017-01-01

    Research and reform efforts frequently identify evidence as an essential component of science classroom instruction to actively engage students in science practices. Despite this agreement on the primacy of evidence, there is a lack of consensus around what counts as "evidence" in k-12 classrooms (e.g., ages 5-18): scholarship and…

  3. Monitoring Progress toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework…

  4. Nuclear computational science a century in review

    CERN Document Server

    Azmy, Yousry

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has undergone extensive progress over the years. In the past century, colossal developments have been made and with specific reference to the mathematical theory and computational science underlying this discipline, advances in areas such as high-order discretization methods, Krylov Methods and Iteration Acceleration have steadily grown. Nuclear Computational Science: A Century in Review addresses these topics and many more; topics which hold special ties to the first half of the century, and topics focused around the unique combination of nuclear engineering, computational

  5. OCR computer science for GCSE student book

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, George

    2016-01-01

    Build student confidence and ensure successful progress through GCSE Computer Science. Our expert authors provide insight and guidance to meet the demands of the new OCR specification, with challenging tasks and activities to test the computational skills and knowledge required for success in their exams, and advice for successful completion of the non-examined assessment. - Builds students' knowledge and confidence through detailed topic coverage and explanation of key terms- Develops computational thinking skills with practice exercises and problem-solving tasks- Ens

  6. AQA computer science for GCSE student book

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Build student confidence and ensure successful progress through GCSE Computer Science. Our expert authors provide insight and guidance to meet the demands of the new AQA specification, with challenging tasks and activities to test the computational skills and knowledge required for success in their exams, and advice for successful completion of the non-examined assessment.- Builds students' knowledge and confidence through detailed topic coverage and explanation of key terms- Develops computational thinking skills with practice exercises and problem-solving tasks

  7. Edexcel computer science for GCSE student book

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Build student confidence and ensure successful progress through GCSE Computer Science. Our expert author provides insight and guidance to meet the demands of the new Edexcel specification, with challenging tasks and activities to test the computational skills and knowledge required completing the exams and the non-examined assessment.- Builds students' knowledge and confidence through detailed topic coverage and explanation of key points to match important Edexcel concepts- Develops computational thinking skills with practice exercises and problem-solving tasks- Ens

  8. Learning computer science by watching video games

    OpenAIRE

    Nagataki, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a teaching method that utilizes video games in computer science education. The primary characteristic of this approach is that it utilizes video games as observational materials. The underlying idea is that by observing the computational behavior of a wide variety of video games, learners will easily grasp the fundamental architecture, theory, and technology of computers. The results of a case study conducted indicate that the method enhances the motivation of students for...

  9. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-05-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in nanotechnology. In the present study, the Nanotechnology Attitude Scale for K-12 teachers (NAS-T) was developed to assess K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T included 23 Likert-scale items that can be grouped into three components: importance of nanotechnology, affective tendencies in science teaching, and behavioural tendencies to teach nanotechnology. A sample of 233 K-12 teachers who have participated in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was included in the present study to investigate the psychometric properties of the NAS-T. The exploratory factor analysis of this teacher sample suggested that the NAS-T was a three-factor model that explained 64.11% of the total variances. This model was also confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis to validate the factor structure of the NAS-T. The Cronbach's alpha values of three NAS-T subscales ranged from 0.89 to 0.95. Moderate to strong correlations among teachers' NAS-T domain scores, self-perception of own nanoscience knowledge, and their science-teaching efficacy demonstrated good convergent validity of the NAS-T. As a whole, psychometric properties of the NAS-T indicated that this instrument is an effective instrument for assessing K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T will serve as a valuable tool to evaluate teachers' attitude changes after participating in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme.

  10. Fundamentals: IVC and Computer Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gozalvez, Javier; Haerri, Jerome; Hartenstein, Hannes; Heijenk, Gerhard J.; Kargl, Frank; Petit, Jonathan; Scheuermann, Björn; Tieler, Tessa; Altintas, O.; Dressler, F.; Hartenstein, H.; Tonguz, O.K.

    The working group on “Fundamentals: IVC and Computer Science‿ discussed the lasting value of achieved research results as well as potential future directions in the field of inter- vehicular communication. Two major themes ‘with variations’ were the dependence on a specific technology (particularly

  11. Fundamentals: IVC and Computer Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gozalvez, Javier; Haerri, Jerome; Hartenstein, Hannes; Heijenk, Gerhard J.; Kargl, Frank; Petit, Jonathan; Scheuermann, Björn; Tieler, Tessa; Altintas, O.; Dressler, F.; Hartenstein, H.; Tonguz, O.K.

    2013-01-01

    The working group on “Fundamentals: IVC and Computer Science‿ discussed the lasting value of achieved research results as well as potential future directions in the field of inter- vehicular communication. Two major themes ‘with variations’ were the dependence on a specific technology (particularly

  12. Fundamentals: IVC and computer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gozalvez, Javier; Haerri, Jerome; Hartenstein, Hannes; Heijenk, Geert; Kargl, Frank; Petit, Jonathan; Scheuermann, Björn; Tieler, Tessa; Altintas, O.; Dressler, F.; Hartenstein, H.; Tonguz, O.K.

    2013-01-01

    The working group on “Fundamentals: IVC and Computer Science” discussed the lasting value of achieved research results as well as potential future directions in the field of inter- vehicular communication. Two major themes ‘with variations’ were the dependence on a specific technology (particularly

  13. Computational Thinking Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  14. International Conference on Computer, Communication and Computational Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Krishn; Tiwari, Shailesh; Singh, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Exchange of information and innovative ideas are necessary to accelerate the development of technology. With advent of technology, intelligent and soft computing techniques came into existence with a wide scope of implementation in engineering sciences. Keeping this ideology in preference, this book includes the insights that reflect the ‘Advances in Computer and Computational Sciences’ from upcoming researchers and leading academicians across the globe. It contains high-quality peer-reviewed papers of ‘International Conference on Computer, Communication and Computational Sciences (ICCCCS 2016), held during 12-13 August, 2016 in Ajmer, India. These papers are arranged in the form of chapters. The content of the book is divided into two volumes that cover variety of topics such as intelligent hardware and software design, advanced communications, power and energy optimization, intelligent techniques used in internet of things, intelligent image processing, advanced software engineering, evolutionary and ...

  15. SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    The Second SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering was held in San Diego from February 10-12, 2003. Total conference attendance was 553. This is a 23% increase in attendance over the first conference. The focus of this conference was to draw attention to the tremendous range of major computational efforts on large problems in science and engineering, to promote the interdisciplinary culture required to meet these large-scale challenges, and to encourage the training of the next generation of computational scientists. Computational Science & Engineering (CS&E) is now widely accepted, along with theory and experiment, as a crucial third mode of scientific investigation and engineering design. Aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, semiconductor, and other industrial sectors now rely on simulation for technical decision support. For federal agencies also, CS&E has become an essential support for decisions on resources, transportation, and defense. CS&E is, by nature, interdisciplinary. It grows out of physical applications and it depends on computer architecture, but at its heart are powerful numerical algorithms and sophisticated computer science techniques. From an applied mathematics perspective, much of CS&E has involved analysis, but the future surely includes optimization and design, especially in the presence of uncertainty. Another mathematical frontier is the assimilation of very large data sets through such techniques as adaptive multi-resolution, automated feature search, and low-dimensional parameterization. The themes of the 2003 conference included, but were not limited to: Advanced Discretization Methods; Computational Biology and Bioinformatics; Computational Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Computational Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Computational Electromagnetics; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Computational Medicine and Bioengineering; Computational Physics and Astrophysics; Computational Solid Mechanics and Materials; CS

  16. Barriers in the Physics Pipeline from K-12 to Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2016-09-01

    The lack of diversity in physics is a known problem, and yet efforts to change our demographics have only had minor effects during the last decade. I will explain some of the hidden barriers that dissuade underrepresented minorities in becoming physicists using a framework borrowed from sociology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I will draw from current research at the undergraduate to faculty levels over a variety of STEM fields that are also addressing a lack of diversity. I will also provide analysis from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of Elements (JINA-CEE) outreach programs to understand the likelihood of current K-12 students in becoming physicists. Specifically, I will present results from the pre-surveys from our Art 2 Science Camps (ages 8-14) about their attitudes towards science as well as results from analysis of teacher recommendations for our high school summer program. I will conclude with a positive outlook describing the pipeline created by JINA-CEE to retain students from middle school through college. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  17. Computer Science Research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-29

    vECurfITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE ( hen Date Entered) ° REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGEREDNTRCON% ~READ INSTRUCTIONS R DNBEFORE COMPLIF:TING FORM I. REPORT...University of and multiprocessors. Image processing Berlin. This concept has been imple- is of great interest there, and alga - mented in a computer called...function application. The cessor pyramid architecture made of physical bottleneck does not exist since tapered layers of processors in which * data items

  18. Essential Skills of the K?12 CTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning & Leading with Technology, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The job of overseeing a school district's technology program has grown exponentially in recent years as computers, the Internet, and other technology applications have become essential to the daily operation of schools. What are the essential skills needed to oversee a school district's technology program? The Consortium for School Networking…

  19. Probability, statistics, and computational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerenwinkel, Niko; Siebourg, Juliane

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we review basic concepts from probability theory and computational statistics that are fundamental to evolutionary genomics. We provide a very basic introduction to statistical modeling and discuss general principles, including maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Markov chains, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian network models are introduced in more detail as they occur frequently and in many variations in genomics applications. In particular, we discuss efficient inference algorithms and methods for learning these models from partially observed data. Several simple examples are given throughout the text, some of which point to models that are discussed in more detail in subsequent chapters.

  20. Plagiarism in computer science courses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.K. [Francis Marion Univ., Florence, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Plagiarism of computer programs has long been a problem in higher education. Ease of electronic copying, vague understanding by students as to what constitutes plagiarism, increasing acceptance of plagiarism by students, lack of enforcement by instructors and school administrators, and a whole host of other factors contribute to plagiarism. The first step in curbing plagiarism is prevention, the second (and much less preferable) is detection. History files and software metrics can be used as a tool to aid in detecting possible plagiarism. This paper gives advice concerning how to deal with plagiarism and with using software monitors to detect plagiarism.

  1. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter eHolme

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models, to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  2. Permafrost monitoring K12 outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Saito, T.; Romanovsky, V.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this project is to establish long-term permafrost monitoring sites adjacent to schools along the circum polar permafrost region. Permafrost will be one of the important indicators for monitoring climatic change in the future. Change in permafrost conditions also affects local ecosystems, hydrological regimes and natural disasters. The purpose of the long-term permafrost observation is fitting for future science objectives, and can also benefit students and teachers in remote village schools. Most remote villages depend on a subsistence lifestyle and will be directly affected by changing climate and permafrost condition. Monitoring the permafrost temperature in the arctic for a better understanding of the spatial distribution of permafrost and having students participate to collect the data is an ideal IPY project. Our outreach project involves drilling boreholes at village schools and installing the micro data logger with temperature sensors to measure hourly air and permafrost temperatures. Trained teachers help students download data several times a year and discuss the results in class. The data gathered from these stations is shared and can be viewed by anyone through the Internet (http://www.uaf.edu/permafrost). Using the Internet teachers can also compare their data with data form other monitoring stations. This project is becoming an useful science project for these remote villages, which tends to have limited exposure to science, despite the changing surroundings that they're daily lives depend on. NSF (EPSCoR) funded the previous seeding outreach program. Currently NSF/NASA and the International Polar Year (IPY) program support this project. In the 2006 field season, thirty-one schools participated in installing the monitoring stations. In 2007 we propose the expansion of this project to involve an additional 100 villages along the arctic. The broader impacts of this project are 1). This project will provide opportunities for field

  3. Supporting Geoscientists in Partnerships for K-12 Education at NSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, M.

    2001-12-01

    NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) education activities have evolved over the last decade based on advice from a broad segment of the geosciences community. These activities gained momentum when a Geosciences Education Working Group (GEWG, 1996) recognized the shift from traditional priorities that emphasized only research, to those that support education in geosciences as well. The GEWG report embraced this increased emphasis on education as a component of NSF's role in assuring the long-term health of the geosciences and endorsed the principle that research and education should be well integrated. While many geosciences education activities are funded by the Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) of NSF, the GEWG report highlighted the need to have more active participation by research geoscientists in K-12 education activities, and the need to train them to be able to do so. While some roles in education are clearly best left to educational professionals (e.g. large-scale systemic reform projects, pedagogical development at the K-12 level, and many teacher enhancement projects), activities such as undergraduate research, technology advancement, curriculum content development and informal science are ones in which GEO should actively seek to collaborate with programs in EHR. The GEO education program has expanded over the last decade. Our first education activity, Awards to Facilitate Geoscience Education (AFGE), was very successful in attracting some of the leading researchers in geosciences. This program evolved to become the Geoscience Education Program. An important program funded by GEO that developed from community activity is the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). This program grew out of a joint EHR/GEO award and a series of community workshops. The program will establish an Internet portal for geoscience curricular materials and other teacher resources that will enable further collaboration between the research and education

  4. Applied Mathematics, Modelling and Computational Science

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsireas, Ilias; Makarov, Roman; Melnik, Roderick; Shodiev, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The Applied Mathematics, Modelling, and Computational Science (AMMCS) conference aims to promote interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The contributions in this volume cover the latest research in mathematical and computational sciences, modeling, and simulation as well as their applications in natural and social sciences, engineering and technology, industry, and finance. The 2013 conference, the second in a series of AMMCS meetings, was held August 26–30 and organized in cooperation with AIMS and SIAM, with support from the Fields Institute in Toronto, and Wilfrid Laurier University. There were many young scientists at AMMCS-2013, both as presenters and as organizers. This proceedings contains refereed papers contributed by the participants of the AMMCS-2013 after the conference. This volume is suitable for researchers and graduate students, mathematicians and engineers, industrialists, and anyone who would like to delve into the interdisciplinary research of applied and computational mathematics ...

  5. Applied modelling and computing in social science

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, Janez

    2015-01-01

    In social science outstanding results are yielded by advanced simulation methods, based on state of the art software technologies and an appropriate combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. This book presents examples of successful applications of modelling and computing in social science: business and logistic process simulation and optimization, deeper knowledge extractions from big data, better understanding and predicting of social behaviour and modelling health and environment changes.

  6. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    OpenAIRE

    Petter eHolme; Fredrik eLiljeros

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influenc...

  7. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    OpenAIRE

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes -- to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influ...

  8. Mathematics for engineering, technology and computing science

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Hedley G

    1970-01-01

    Mathematics for Engineering, Technology and Computing Science is a text on mathematics for courses in engineering, technology, and computing science. It covers linear algebra, ordinary differential equations, and vector analysis, together with line and multiple integrals. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with a discussion on determinants and linear equations, with emphasis on how the value of a determinant is defined and how it may be obtained. Solution of linear equations and the dependence between linear equations are also considered. The next chapter introduces the reader to

  9. Demystifying computer science for molecular ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Mahdi; Toonen, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    In this age of data-driven science and high-throughput biology, computational thinking is becoming an increasingly important skill for tackling both new and long-standing biological questions. However, despite its obvious importance and conspicuous integration into many areas of biology, computer science is still viewed as an obscure field that has, thus far, permeated into only a few of the biology curricula across the nation. A national survey has shown that lack of computational literacy in environmental sciences is the norm rather than the exception [Valle & Berdanier (2012) Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, 93, 373-389]. In this article, we seek to introduce a few important concepts in computer science with the aim of providing a context-specific introduction aimed at research biologists. Our goal was to help biologists understand some of the most important mainstream computational concepts to better appreciate bioinformatics methods and trade-offs that are not obvious to the uninitiated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Makerspaces: The Next Iteration for Educational Technology in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    With the continually growing number of computers and mobile devices available in K-12 schools, the need is dwindling for dedicated computer labs and media centers. Some schools are starting to repurpose those facilities into different kinds of exploratory learning environments known as "makerspaces". This article discusses this next…

  11. Integrating the iPod Touch in K-12 Education: Visions and Vices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Savilla

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of ubiquitous computing have long been documenting classroom benefits of one-to-one ratios of students to handheld or laptop computers. The recent sophisticated capabilities of the iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad have encouraged further speculation on exactly how K-12 teaching and learning might be energized by such devices. This paper…

  12. Digital Da Vinci computers in the arts and sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Newton

    2014-01-01

    Explores polymathic education through unconventional and creative applications of computer science in the arts and sciences Examines the use of visual computation, 3d printing, social robotics and computer modeling for computational art creation and design Includes contributions from leading researchers and practitioners in computer science, architecture and digital media

  13. AQA GCSE computer science student's book

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Written by a subject expert and experienced author, AQA GCSE Computer Science Student's Book guide you through the differently assessed elements of the specification and covers Component 1: Practical Programming (controlled assessment) and Component 2: Computing Fundamental s (examined component). - Provides strategies for teachers and students for tackling the practical elements of the course. - Supports students in understanding the theoretical aspects of the course and developing key skills. - Covers the key aspects of designing a solution, solution development, programming techniques, and

  14. What Has Literature to Offer Computer Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Dougherty

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I ask the question: what has literature to offer computer science? Can a bilateral programme of research be started with the aim of discovering the same kind of deep intertwining of ideas between computer science and literature, as already exists between computer science and linguistics? What practical use could such results yield? I begin by studying a classic forum for some of the most unintelligible pieces of prose ever written, the computer manual. Why are these books so hard to understand? Could a richer diet of metaphor and onomatopoeia help me get my laser printer working? I then dig down a little deeper and explore computer programs themselves as literature. Do they exhibit aesthetics, emotion and all the other multifarious aspects of true literature? If so, does this support their purpose and understandability? Finally I explore the link between computer code and the human writer. Rather than write large amounts of code directly, we encourage students to write algorithms as pseudo-code as a first step. Pseudo-code tells a story within a semi-formalised framework of conventions. Is this the intertwining we should be looking for?

  15. Democratizing Children's Computation: Learning Computational Science as Aesthetic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Amy Voss; Sengupta, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Amy Voss Farris and Pratim Sengupta argue that a democratic approach to children's computing education in a science class must focus on the "aesthetics" of children's experience. In "Democracy and Education," Dewey links "democracy" with a distinctive understanding of "experience." For Dewey,…

  16. My revision notes AQA GCSE computer science computing fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Unlock your full potential with this revision guide which focuses on the key content and skills you need to know. With My Revision Notes for AQA GCSE Computer Science, which perfectly matches the latest examined elements of the course, you can:. - Take control of your revision: plan and focus on the areas you need to revise, with advice, summaries and notes from author Steve Cushing. - Show you fully understand key topics by using specific strategies and theories to add depth to your knowledge of programming and computing issues and processes. - Apply programming and computing terms accurately

  17. Computer science approach to quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzing, D.

    2006-07-01

    Whereas it is obvious that every computation process is a physical process it has hardly been recognized that many complex physical processes bear similarities to computation processes. This is in particular true for the control of physical systems on the nanoscopic level: usually the system can only be accessed via a rather limited set of elementary control operations and for many purposes only a concatenation of a large number of these basic operations will implement the desired process. This concatenation is in many cases quite similar to building complex programs from elementary steps and principles for designing algorithm may thus be a paradigm for designing control processes. For instance, one can decrease the temperature of one part of a molecule by transferring its heat to the remaining part where it is then dissipated to the environment. But the implementation of such a process involves a complex sequence of electromagnetic pulses. This work considers several hypothetical control processes on the nanoscopic level and show their analogy to computation processes. We show that measuring certain types of quantum observables is such a complex task that every instrument that is able to perform it would necessarily be an extremely powerful computer. Likewise, the implementation of a heat engine on the nanoscale requires to process the heat in a way that is similar to information processing and it can be shown that heat engines with maximal efficiency would be powerful computers, too. In the same way as problems in computer science can be classified by complexity classes we can also classify control problems according to their complexity. Moreover, we directly relate these complexity classes for control problems to the classes in computer science. Unifying notions of complexity in computer science and physics has therefore two aspects: on the one hand, computer science methods help to analyze the complexity of physical processes. On the other hand, reasonable

  18. Effect of Robotics on Elementary Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Science Learning, and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Angeli, Charoula

    2016-12-01

    The current impetus for increasing STEM in K-12 education calls for an examination of how preservice teachers are being prepared to teach STEM. This paper reports on a study that examined elementary preservice teachers' (n = 21) self-efficacy, understanding of science concepts, and computational thinking as they engaged with robotics in a science methods course. Data collection methods included pretests and posttests on science content, prequestionnaires and postquestionnaires for interest and self-efficacy, and four programming assignments. Statistical results showed that preservice teachers' interest and self-efficacy with robotics increased. There was a statistically significant difference between preknowledge and postknowledge scores, and preservice teachers did show gains in learning how to write algorithms and debug programs over repeated programming tasks. The findings suggest that the robotics activity was an effective instructional strategy to enhance interest in robotics, increase self-efficacy to teach with robotics, develop understandings of science concepts, and promote the development of computational thinking skills. Study findings contribute quantitative evidence to the STEM literature on how robotics develops preservice teachers' self-efficacy, science knowledge, and computational thinking skills in higher education science classroom contexts.

  19. Effect of Robotics on Elementary Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Science Learning, and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Angeli, Charoula

    2017-04-01

    The current impetus for increasing STEM in K-12 education calls for an examination of how preservice teachers are being prepared to teach STEM. This paper reports on a study that examined elementary preservice teachers' ( n = 21) self-efficacy, understanding of science concepts, and computational thinking as they engaged with robotics in a science methods course. Data collection methods included pretests and posttests on science content, prequestionnaires and postquestionnaires for interest and self-efficacy, and four programming assignments. Statistical results showed that preservice teachers' interest and self-efficacy with robotics increased. There was a statistically significant difference between preknowledge and postknowledge scores, and preservice teachers did show gains in learning how to write algorithms and debug programs over repeated programming tasks. The findings suggest that the robotics activity was an effective instructional strategy to enhance interest in robotics, increase self-efficacy to teach with robotics, develop understandings of science concepts, and promote the development of computational thinking skills. Study findings contribute quantitative evidence to the STEM literature on how robotics develops preservice teachers' self-efficacy, science knowledge, and computational thinking skills in higher education science classroom contexts.

  20. Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

    2007-12-01

    Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

  1. Computational Science: Ensuring America’s Competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    organisms, inexpensive microarrays, which can simultaneously test the differential expression of thousands of genes in a small sample, and high-resolution...FOR COMPET I T IVENESS The U.S. has long maintained a schizophrenic approach to computational science infrastructure procurements, particularly of

  2. Situated Learning in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2004-01-01

    Sociocultural theories of learning such as Wenger and Lave's situated learning have been suggested as alternatives to cognitive theories of learning like constructivism. This article examines situated learning within the context of computer science (CS) education. Situated learning accurately describes some CS communities like open-source software…

  3. Learning Computer Science Concepts with Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Armoni, Michal; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Scratch is a visual programming environment that is widely used by young people. We investigated if Scratch can be used to teach concepts of computer science (CS). We developed learning materials for middle-school students that were designed according to the constructionist philosophy of Scratch and evaluated them in a few schools during two…

  4. Learning Computer Science Concepts with Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Armoni, Michal; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Scratch is a visual programming environment that is widely used by young people. We investigated if Scratch can be used to teach concepts of computer science (CS). We developed learning materials for middle-school students that were designed according to the constructionist philosophy of Scratch and evaluated them in a few schools during two…

  5. The Student/Library Computer Science Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jim

    2015-01-01

    With funding from an Institute of Museum and Library Services demonstration grant, librarians of the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with students in computer science courses to design and build student-centered mobile apps. The grant work called for demonstration of student collaboration…

  6. The Student/Library Computer Science Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jim

    2015-01-01

    With funding from an Institute of Museum and Library Services demonstration grant, librarians of the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with students in computer science courses to design and build student-centered mobile apps. The grant work called for demonstration of student collaboration…

  7. Handbook of mathematics and computational science

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, John W

    1998-01-01

    Handbook of Mathematics and Computational Science Offers mathematics information for everyday use in problem solving, examinations, and homework. This book includes hundreds of tables of frequently used functions, formulae, transformations, and series. It is suitable for working scientists, engineers, and students.

  8. International Conference on Computational Engineering Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yagawa, G

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this Conference was to become a forum for discussion of both academic and industrial research in those areas of computational engineering science and mechanics which involve and enrich the rational application of computers, numerical methods, and mechanics, in modern technology. The papers presented at this Conference cover the following topics: Solid and Structural Mechanics, Constitutive Modelling, Inelastic and Finite Deformation Response, Transient Analysis, Structural Control and Optimization, Fracture Mechanics and Structural Integrity, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Compressible and Incompressible Flow, Aerodynamics, Transport Phenomena, Heat Transfer and Solidification, Electromagnetic Field, Related Soil Mechanics and MHD, Modern Variational Methods, Biomechanics, and Off-Shore-Structural Mechanics.

  9. Democratizing Children's Computation: Learning Computational Science as Aesthetic Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Farris, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that a democratic approach to children's computing education in a science class must focus on the aesthetics of children's experience. In Democracy and Education, Dewey links "democracy" with a distinctive understanding of "experience". For Dewey, the value of educational experiences lies in "the unity or integrity of experience" (DE, 248). In Art as Experience, Dewey presents aesthetic experience as the fundamental form of human experience that undergirds all other forms of experiences, and can also bring together multiple forms of experiences, locating this form of experience in the work of artists. Particularly relevant to our current concern (computational literacy), Dewey calls the process through which a person transforms a material into an expressive medium an aesthetic experience (AE, 68-69). We argue here that the kind of experience that is appropriate for a democratic education in the context of children's computational science is essentially aesthetic in nature. Given that a...

  10. Computational Experiments for Science and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles

    2011-01-01

    How to integrate simulation-based engineering and science (SBES) into the science curriculum smoothly is a challenging question. For the importance of SBES to be appreciated, the core value of simulations-that they help people understand natural phenomena and solve engineering problems-must be taught. A strategy to achieve this goal is to introduce computational experiments to the science curriculum to replace or supplement textbook illustrations and exercises and to complement or frame hands-on or wet lab experiments. In this way, students will have an opportunity to learn about SBES without compromising other learning goals required by the standards and teachers will welcome these tools as they strengthen what they are already teaching. This paper demonstrates this idea using a number of examples in physics, chemistry, and engineering. These exemplary computational experiments show that it is possible to create a curriculum that is both deeper and wider.

  11. Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through Technological Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies are becoming more commonplace across the K-12 curriculum. In particular, the use of innovative digital technology is expanding the potential of arts education, presenting new opportunities--and challenges--to both curricular design and pedagogical practice. "Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through…

  12. Monitoring the CO2 injection site: K12-B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandeweijer, V.; Meer, B. van der; Hofstee, C.; Mulders, F.; D'Hoore, D.; Graven, H.

    2011-01-01

    The K12-B gas field is located in the Dutch sector of the North Sea. The top of the reservoir lies approximately 3800 meters below sea level, and the ambient temperature of the reservoir is over 127 °C. The K12-B gas field has been producing natural gas from 1987 onwards and is currently operated by

  13. Influences of Globalization on K-12 Language Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of globalization on K-12 language teacher education at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in terms of multilingual practices in the US, with reference to an English-only-state, Arizona. This study explored influences of globalization on K-12 language education practices in the US through teacher…

  14. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments for…

  15. Satellite Applications for K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M.; Ackerman, S.; Lettvin, E.; Emerson, N.; Whittaker, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation will highlight interactive on-line curriculum developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. CIMSS has been on the forefront of educational software design for over two decades, routinely integrating on-line activities into courses on satellite remote sensing. In 2006, CIMSS began collaborating with education experts and researchers from the University of Washington to create an NSF-funded distance learning course for science teachers called Satellite Applications for Geoscience Education. This course includes numerous web-based learning activities, including a distance education tool called VISITview which allows instructors to connect with multiple students simultaneously to conduct a lesson. Developed at CIMSS to facilitate training of National Weather Service forecasters economically and remotely, VISITview is especially effective for groups of people discussing and analyzing maps or images interactively from many locations. Along with an on-line chat function, VISITview participants can use a speaker phone or a networked voice-enabled application to create a learning environment similar to a traditional classroom. VISITview will be used in two capacities: first, instructors will convey topics of current relevance in geoscience disciplines via VISITview. Second, the content experts will participate in "virtual visits" to the classrooms of the educators who take the course for full credit. This will enable scientists to interact with both teachers and students to answer questions and discuss exciting or inspiring examples that link satellite data to their areas of research. As long as a school has Internet access, an LCD projector and a speakerphone, VISITview sessions can be shared with an entire classroom. The geoscientists who developed material for the course and conducting VISITview lectures include a geologist from the University of Wisconsin-Richland, an

  16. Computational thinking in life science education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rubinstein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We join the increasing call to take computational education of life science students a step further, beyond teaching mere programming and employing existing software tools. We describe a new course, focusing on enriching the curriculum of life science students with abstract, algorithmic, and logical thinking, and exposing them to the computational "culture." The design, structure, and content of our course are influenced by recent efforts in this area, collaborations with life scientists, and our own instructional experience. Specifically, we suggest that an effective course of this nature should: (1 devote time to explicitly reflect upon computational thinking processes, resisting the temptation to drift to purely practical instruction, (2 focus on discrete notions, rather than on continuous ones, and (3 have basic programming as a prerequisite, so students need not be preoccupied with elementary programming issues. We strongly recommend that the mere use of existing bioinformatics tools and packages should not replace hands-on programming. Yet, we suggest that programming will mostly serve as a means to practice computational thinking processes. This paper deals with the challenges and considerations of such computational education for life science students. It also describes a concrete implementation of the course and encourages its use by others.

  17. Computational thinking in life science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Amir; Chor, Benny

    2014-11-01

    We join the increasing call to take computational education of life science students a step further, beyond teaching mere programming and employing existing software tools. We describe a new course, focusing on enriching the curriculum of life science students with abstract, algorithmic, and logical thinking, and exposing them to the computational "culture." The design, structure, and content of our course are influenced by recent efforts in this area, collaborations with life scientists, and our own instructional experience. Specifically, we suggest that an effective course of this nature should: (1) devote time to explicitly reflect upon computational thinking processes, resisting the temptation to drift to purely practical instruction, (2) focus on discrete notions, rather than on continuous ones, and (3) have basic programming as a prerequisite, so students need not be preoccupied with elementary programming issues. We strongly recommend that the mere use of existing bioinformatics tools and packages should not replace hands-on programming. Yet, we suggest that programming will mostly serve as a means to practice computational thinking processes. This paper deals with the challenges and considerations of such computational education for life science students. It also describes a concrete implementation of the course and encourages its use by others.

  18. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  19. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Today's classrooms have no real walls! Students explore the world on field trips, during virtual journeys on the world wide web, and through the books they read. These pathways help them fly to the ends of the universe to satisfy their scientific curiosity. Again this year, the professionals of the NSTA/CBC Review Panel for Outstanding Science…

  20. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Today's classrooms have no real walls! Students explore the world on field trips, during virtual journeys on the world wide web, and through the books they read. These pathways help them fly to the ends of the universe to satisfy their scientific curiosity. Again this year, the professionals of the NSTA/CBC Review Panel for Outstanding Science…

  1. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  2. Examining the Views of Undergraduate STEM Majors Regarding K-12 Teaching as a Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plecki, Margaret; St. John, Elise; Elfers, Ana

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how undergraduates enrolled in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses view the K-12 teaching profession. A survey was conducted with a sample of undergraduates in community college and university settings (n = 610). We examine whether undergraduates believe that teaching offers what they value in a…

  3. The USDA and K-12 Partnership: A Model Program for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Timothy P.; Wilson, Craig; Upchurch, Dan R.; Goldberg, Maria; Bentz, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    The Future Scientists Program of Texas A&M University and the Agricultural Research Service branch of USDA serves as a model program of effective collaboration between a federal agency and K-12. It demonstrates true partnership that contextualizes learning of science and provides quality professional development, benefiting teachers and their…

  4. Be a Water Watcher: A Resource Guide for Water Conservation, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This is a resource guide (in response to the New York City water emergency) for grades K-12 on the subject of water conservation. Activities are suggested for science, industrial arts, social studies, and communications arts classes. A bibliography on water is also provided. (APM)

  5. Perspectives of the International Conference of Computational Science 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramson, D.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Lees, M.

    2015-01-01

    Computational Science has enabled a raft of science that was either impossible, dangerous, or extremely expensive. It is arguably one of the most multi-disciplinary research endeavors, and draws on foundational work in mathematics and computer science. Computational Science has applicability in

  6. Computer simulations in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John; Barowy, William; Levin, Dov

    1992-03-01

    In this paper we describe software for science instruction that is based upon a constructivist epistemology of learning. From a constructivist perspective, the process of learning is viewed as an active construction of knowledge, rather than a passive reception of information. The computer has the potential to provide an environment in which students can explore their understanding and better construct scientific knowledge. The Explorer is an interactive environment that integrates animated computer models with analytic capabilities for learning and teaching science. The system include graphs, a spreadsheet, scripting, and interactive tools. During formative evaluation of Explorer in the classroom, we have focused on learning the function and effectiveness of computer models in teaching science. Models have helped students relate theory to experiment when used in conjunction with hands-on activities and when the simulation addressed students' naive understanding of the phenomena. Two classroom examples illustrate our findings. The first is based on the dynamics of colliding objects. The second describes a class modeling the function of simple electric circuits. The simulations bridge between phenomena and theory by providing an abstract representation on which students may make measurements. Simulations based on scientific theory help to provide a set of interrelated experiences that challenge students' informal understanding of the science.

  7. Scientific Visualization and Computational Science: Natural Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uselton, Samuel P.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Scientific visualization is developing rapidly, stimulated by computational science, which is gaining acceptance as a third alternative to theory and experiment. Computational science is based on numerical simulations of mathematical models derived from theory. But each individual simulation is like a hypothetical experiment; initial conditions are specified, and the result is a record of the observed conditions. Experiments can be simulated for situations that can not really be created or controlled. Results impossible to measure can be computed.. Even for observable values, computed samples are typically much denser. Numerical simulations also extend scientific exploration where the mathematics is analytically intractable. Numerical simulations are used to study phenomena from subatomic to intergalactic scales and from abstract mathematical structures to pragmatic engineering of everyday objects. But computational science methods would be almost useless without visualization. The obvious reason is that the huge amounts of data produced require the high bandwidth of the human visual system, and interactivity adds to the power. Visualization systems also provide a single context for all the activities involved from debugging the simulations, to exploring the data, to communicating the results. Most of the presentations today have their roots in image processing, where the fundamental task is: Given an image, extract information about the scene. Visualization has developed from computer graphics, and the inverse task: Given a scene description, make an image. Visualization extends the graphics paradigm by expanding the possible input. The goal is still to produce images; the difficulty is that the input is not a scene description displayable by standard graphics methods. Visualization techniques must either transform the data into a scene description or extend graphics techniques to display this odd input. Computational science is a fertile field for visualization

  8. Final Report on the Automated Computer Science Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, R. L.; And Others

    At the University of Illinois at Urbana, a computer based curriculum called Automated Computer Science Education System (ACSES) has been developed to supplement instruction in introductory computer science courses or to assist individuals interested in acquiring a foundation in computer science through independent study. The system, which uses…

  9. A Financial Technology Entrepreneurship Program for Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Joseph, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Education in entrepreneurship is becoming a critical area of curricula for computer science students. Few schools of computer science have a concentration in entrepreneurship in the computing curricula. The paper presents Technology Entrepreneurship in the curricula at a leading school of computer science and information systems, in which students…

  10. The SERC K12 Educators Portal to Teaching Activities and Pedagogic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.; Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Schmitt, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Education Resource Center (SERC) has created a portal to information for K12 educators to provide high-quality grade level appropriate materials from a wide variety of projects and topics. These materials were compiled across the SERC site, showcasing materials that were created for, or easily adaptable to, K12 classrooms. This resource will help support implementation of Next Generation Science Standards by assisting educators in finding innovative resources to address areas of instruction that are conceptually different than previous national and state science standards. Specifically, the K12 portal assists educators in learning about approaches that address the cross-cutting nature of science concepts, increasing students quantitative reasoning and numeracy skills, incorporating technology such as GIS in the classroom, and by assisting educators of all levels of K12 instruction in using relevant and meaningful ways to teach science concepts. The K12 portal supports educators by providing access to hundreds of teaching activities covering a wide array of science topics and grade levels many of which have been rigorously reviewed for pedagogic quality and scientific accuracy. The portal also provides access to web pages that enhance teaching practices that help increase student's system thinking skills, make lectures interactive, assist instructors in conducting safe and effective indoor and outdoor labs, providing support for teaching energy and climate literacy principles, assisting educators in addressing controversial content, provide guidance in engaging students affective domain, and provides a collection of tools for making teaching relevant in 21st century classrooms including using GIS, Google Earth, videos, visualizations and simulations to model and describe scientific concepts. The portal also provides access to material for specific content and audiences by (1) Supporting AGIs 'Map your World' week to specifically highlight teaching

  11. Soft Computing in Humanities and Social Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    González, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    The field of Soft Computing in Humanities and Social Sciences is at a turning point. The strong distinction between “science” and “humanities” has been criticized from many fronts and, at the same time, an increasing cooperation between the so-called “hard sciences” and “soft sciences” is taking place in a wide range of scientific projects dealing with very complex and interdisciplinary topics. In the last fifteen years the area of Soft Computing has also experienced a gradual rapprochement to disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and also in the field of Medicine, Biology and even the Arts, a phenomenon that did not occur much in the previous years.   The collection of this book presents a generous sampling of the new and burgeoning field of Soft Computing in Humanities and Social Sciences, bringing together a wide array of authors and subject matters from different disciplines. Some of the contributors of the book belong to the scientific and technical areas of Soft Computing w...

  12. Applications of Graph Theory in Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of mathematics plays vital role in various fields. One of the important areas in mathematics is graph theory which is used in structural models. This structural arrangements of various objects or technologies lead to new inventions and modifications in the existing environment for enhancement in those fields. The field graph theory started its journey from the problem of Konigsberg Bridge in 1735. This paper gives an overview of the applications of graph theory in heterogeneous fields to some extent but mainly focuses on the computer science applications that uses graph theoretical concepts. Various papers based on graph theory have been studied related to scheduling concepts, computer science applications and an overview has been presented here.Graph theoretical ideas are highly utilized by computer science applications. Especially in research areas of computer science such data mining, image segmentation, clustering, image capturing, networking etc., For example a data structure can be designed in the form of tree which in turn utilized vertices and edges. Similarly modeling of network topologies can be done using graph concepts. In the same way the most important concept of graph coloring is utilized in resource allocation, scheduling. Also, paths, walks and circuits in graph theory are used in tremendous applications say traveling salesman problem, database design concepts, resource networking. This leads to the development of new algorithms and new theorems that can be used in tremendous applications. First section gives the historical background of graph theory and some applications in scheduling. Second section emphasizes how graph theory is utilized in various computer applications.

  13. [Computer Science and Telecommunications Board activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, M.S.

    1993-02-23

    The board considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science, telecommunications, and associated technologies. Functions include providing a base of expertise for these fields in NRC, monitoring and promoting health of these fields, initiating studies of these fields as critical resources and sources of national economic strength, responding to requests for advice, and fostering interaction among the technologies and the other pure and applied science and technology. This document describes its major accomplishments, current programs, other sponsored activities, cooperative ventures, and plans and prospects.

  14. Social sciences via network analysis and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanduc, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    In recent years information and communication technologies have gained significant importance in the social sciences. Because there is such rapid growth of knowledge, methods and computer infrastructure, research can now seamlessly connect interdisciplinary fields such as business process management, data processing and mathematics. This study presents some of the latest results, practices and state-of-the-art approaches in network analysis, machine learning, data mining, data clustering and classifications in the contents of social sciences. It also covers various real-life examples such as t

  15. Reflections about Research in Computer Science regarding the Classification of Sciences and the Scientific Method

    OpenAIRE

    WAZLAWICK, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents some observations about Computer Science and the Scientific Method. Initially, the paper discusses the different aspects of Computer Science regarding the classification of sciences. It is observed that different areas inside Computer Science can be classified as different Sciences. The paper presents the main philosophical schools that define what is understood as the Scientific Method, and their influence on Computer Science. Finally, the paper discusses the distinction ...

  16. My revision notes Edexcel GCSE computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Unlock your full potential with this revision guide which focuses on the key content and skills you need to know. With My Revision Notes for AQA GCSE Computer Science, which perfectly matches the latest examined elements of the course, you can: - Take control of your revision: plan and focus on the areas you need to revise, with advice, summaries and notes from author Steve Cushing - Show you fully understand key topics by using specific strategies and theories to add depth to your knowledge of programming and computing issues and processes - Apply programming and com

  17. Public access computing in health science libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehm, S

    1987-01-01

    Public access computing in health science libraries began with online computer-assisted instruction. Library-based collections and services have expanded with advances in microcomputing hardware and software. This growth presents problems: copyright, quality, instability in the publishing industry, and uncertainty about collection scope; librarians managing the new services require new skills to support their collections. Many find the cooperative efforts of several organizational units are required. Current trends in technology for the purpose of information management indicate that these services will continue to be a significant focus for libraries.

  18. Advances in Computer Science and Education

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    CSE2011 is an integrated conference concentration its focus on computer science and education. In the proceeding, you can learn much more knowledge about computer science and education of researchers from all around the world. The main role of the proceeding is to be used as an exchange pillar for researchers who are working in the mentioned fields. In order to meet the high quality of Springer, AISC series, the organization committee has made their efforts to do the following things. Firstly, poor quality paper has been refused after reviewing course by anonymous referee experts. Secondly, periodically review meetings have been held around the reviewers about five times for exchanging reviewing suggestions. Finally, the conference organizers had several preliminary sessions before the conference. Through efforts of different people and departments, the conference will be successful and fruitful

  19. Questioning Two Myths in Computer Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Key Competencies for Educating ICT Professionals; International audience; This paper examines two statements regarding computer science as a discipline and its theoretical basis. We shall demonstrate how those statements are questionable and in addition they tend to hide the real root-causes of some significant educational issues. Those statements are very popular in the scientific community and have noteworthy negative effect on the researchers who frequently double their efforts and...

  20. What is that Thing Called Computer Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Schokosva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available XXI century society, called Knowledge Society, has a direct dependency of the software products, considered by many as the most important development of modern technology. This dependence generates the need of scientists and professionals who research and develop products that meet social demands. This article describes the computer science area as one of the most demanded professions in this reality, and in order to make it known to more people.

  1. Computer Science Research Review 1974-75

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    mwmmmimmm^m^mmmrm. : i i 1 Faculty and Visitors Mario Barbaccl Research Associate B.S., Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria , Lima, Peru (1966...Engineer, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria , Lima, Peru (1968) Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University (1974) Carnegie. 1969: Design Automation...Compitational Complexity Jack R Buchanan Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Industrial Administration B.S., University of Utah (1965) M.A

  2. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Montag; Éilish Duke; Alexander Markowetz

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting ...

  3. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  4. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of and Their Satisfaction with Interaction Type in Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chun; Belland, Brian R.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Walker, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning is an effective approach to instruction that combines features of face-to-face learning and computer-mediated learning. This study investigated the relationship between student perceptions of three types of interaction and blended learning course satisfaction. The participants included K-12 teachers enrolled in a graduate-level…

  5. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  6. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  7. Reflections about Research in Computer Science regarding the Classification of Sciences and the Scientific Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAZLAWICK, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some observations about Computer Science and the Scientific Method. Initially, the paper discusses the different aspects of Computer Science regarding the classification of sciences. It is observed that different areas inside Computer Science can be classified as different Sciences. The paper presents the main philosophical schools that define what is understood as the Scientific Method, and their influence on Computer Science. Finally, the paper discusses the distinction between Science and Technology and the degrees of maturity in Computer Science research.

  8. NASA Center for Computational Sciences: History and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Nasa Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) has been a leading capacity computing facility, providing a production environment and support resources to address the challenges facing the Earth and space sciences research community.

  9. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  10. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  11. Architecture, systems research and computational sciences

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 1) issue of the Nexus Network Journal is dedicated to the theme “Architecture, Systems Research and Computational Sciences”. This is an outgrowth of the session by the same name which took place during the eighth international, interdisciplinary conference “Nexus 2010: Relationships between Architecture and Mathematics, held in Porto, Portugal, in June 2010. Today computer science is an integral part of even strictly historical investigations, such as those concerning the construction of vaults, where the computer is used to survey the existing building, analyse the data and draw the ideal solution. What the papers in this issue make especially evident is that information technology has had an impact at a much deeper level as well: architecture itself can now be considered as a manifestation of information and as a complex system. The issue is completed with other research papers, conference reports and book reviews.

  12. Education for Computational Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Grcar, Joseph F

    2011-01-01

    Computational science and engineering (CSE) embodies President Obama's challenge for the future, "ours to win." For decades, CSE has been misunderstood to require massive computers, whereas breakthroughs in CSE have historically been the mathematical programs of computing rather than the machines themselves. Whether scientists and engineers become inventors who make these breakthroughs depends on circumstances and their educations. The USA currently has the largest CSE professorate, but the data suggest this prominence is ephemeral. Just one-third of the universities with very high research activity have formal programs for CSE education, and many smaller countries with strong manufacturing sectors have more CSE educators per capita. Considering the contributions that CSE has made which enable all manner of commercial, consumer, medical, military, and scientific devices and the associated industries, the future appears to be ours to lose.

  13. Computational science: Emerging opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Bruce

    2009-07-01

    In the past two decades, computational methods have emerged as an essential component of the scientific and engineering enterprise. A diverse assortment of scientific applications has been simulated and explored via advanced computational techniques. Computer vendors have built enormous parallel machines to support these activities, and the research community has developed new algorithms and codes, and agreed on standards to facilitate ever more ambitious computations. However, this track record of success will be increasingly hard to sustain in coming years. Power limitations constrain processor clock speeds, so further performance improvements will need to come from ever more parallelism. This higher degree of parallelism will require new thinking about algorithms, programming models, and architectural resilience. Simultaneously, cutting edge science increasingly requires more complex simulations with unstructured and adaptive grids, and multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. These new codes will push existing parallelization strategies to their limits and beyond. Emerging data-rich scientific applications are also in need of high performance computing, but their complex spatial and temporal data access patterns do not perform well on existing machines. These interacting forces will reshape high performance computing in the coming years.

  14. Is ""predictability"" in computational sciences a myth?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31

    Within the last two decades, Modeling and Simulation (M&S) has become the tool of choice to investigate the behavior of complex phenomena. Successes encountered in 'hard' sciences are prompting interest to apply a similar approach to Computational Social Sciences in support, for example, of national security applications faced by the Intelligence Community (IC). This manuscript attempts to contribute to the debate on the relevance of M&S to IC problems by offering an overview of what it takes to reach 'predictability' in computational sciences. Even though models developed in 'soft' and 'hard' sciences are different, useful analogies can be drawn. The starting point is to view numerical simulations as 'filters' capable to represent information only within specific length, time or energy bandwidths. This simplified view leads to the discussion of resolving versus modeling which motivates the need for sub-scale modeling. The role that modeling assumptions play in 'hiding' our lack-of-knowledge about sub-scale phenomena is explained which leads to discussing uncertainty in simulations. It is argued that the uncertainty caused by resolution and modeling assumptions should be dealt with differently than uncertainty due to randomness or variability. The corollary is that a predictive capability cannot be defined solely as accuracy, or ability of predictions to match the available physical observations. We propose that 'predictability' is the demonstration that predictions from a class of 'equivalent' models are as consistent as possible. Equivalency stems from defining models that share a minimum requirement of accuracy, while being equally robust to the sources of lack-of-knowledge in the problem. Examples in computational physics and engineering are given to illustrate the discussion.

  15. Some Hail 'Computational Science' as Biggest Advance Since Newton, Galileo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith Axler

    1987-01-01

    Computational science is defined as science done on a computer. A computer can serve as a laboratory for researchers who cannot experiment with their subjects, and as a calculator for those who otherwise might need centuries to solve some problems mathematically. The National Science Foundation's support of supercomputers is discussed. (MLW)

  16. Computer science in Dutch secondary education: independent or integrated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijde, van der Pieter C.; Doornekamp, B. Gerard

    1992-01-01

    Nowadays, in Dutch secondary education, computer science is integrated within school subjects. About ten years ago computer science was considered an independent subject, but in the mid-1980s this idea changed. In our study we investigated whether the objectives of teaching computer science as an in

  17. Hispanic Women Overcoming Deterrents to Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the…

  18. Computer science in Dutch secondary education: independent or integrated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sijde, Peter; Doornekamp, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nowadays, in Dutch secondary education, computer science is integrated within school subjects. About ten years ago computer science was considered an independent subject, but in the mid-1980s this idea changed. In our study we investigated whether the objectives of teaching computer science as an

  19. Some Hail 'Computational Science' as Biggest Advance Since Newton, Galileo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith Axler

    1987-01-01

    Computational science is defined as science done on a computer. A computer can serve as a laboratory for researchers who cannot experiment with their subjects, and as a calculator for those who otherwise might need centuries to solve some problems mathematically. The National Science Foundation's support of supercomputers is discussed. (MLW)

  20. Hispanic Women Overcoming Deterrents to Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the…

  1. Third Workshop on Teaching Computational Science (WTCS 2009)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Tirado-Ramos; A. Shiflet

    2009-01-01

    The Third Workshop on Teaching Computational Science, within the International Conference on Computational Science, provides a platform for discussing innovations in teaching computational sciences at all levels and contexts of higher education. This editorial provides an introduction to the work pr

  2. K-12 Students' Perceptions of Scientists: Finding a Valid Measurement and Exploring Whether Exposure to Scientists Makes an Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Susan J.; Bloodsworth, Kylie H.; Tilburg, Charles E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; List, Henrietta E.

    2014-01-01

    This study was launched from a National Science Foundation GK-12 grant in which graduate fellows in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are placed in classrooms to engage K-12 students in STEM activities. The investigation explored whether the STEM Fellows' presence impacted the K-12 students' stereotypical image of…

  3. Females and STEM: Determining the K-12 Experiences that Influenced Women to Pursue STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Marie

    In the United States, careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are increasing yet there are not enough trained personnel to meet this demand. In addition, of those that seek to pursue STEM fields in the United States, only 26% are female. In order to increase the number of women seeking STEM based bachelor's degrees, K-12 education must provide a foundation that prepares students for entry into these fields. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the perceived K-12 experiences that influenced females to pursue a STEM field. Twelve college juniors or seniors seeking a degree in Biology, Mathematics, or Physics were interviewed concerning their K-12 experiences. These interviews were analyzed and six themes emerged. Teacher passion and classroom characteristics such as incorporating challenging activities played a significant role in the females' decisions to enter STEM fields. Extra-curricular activities such as volunteer and mentor opportunities and the females' need to benefit others also influenced females in their career choice. Both the formal (within the school) and informal (outside of the traditional classroom) pipeline opportunities that these students encountered helped develop a sense of self-efficacy in science and mathematics; this self-efficacy enabled them to persist in pursuing these career fields. Several participants cited barriers that they encountered in K-12 education, but these barriers were primarily internal as they struggled with overcoming self-imposed obstacles in learning and being competitive in the mathematics and science classrooms. The experiences from these female students can be used by K-12 educators to prepare and encourage current female students to enter STEM occupations.

  4. Terascale Computing in Accelerator Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-08-21

    We have entered the age of ''terascale'' scientific computing. Processors and system architecture both continue to evolve; hundred-teraFLOP computers are expected in the next few years, and petaFLOP computers toward the end of this decade are conceivable. This ever-increasing power to solve previously intractable numerical problems benefits almost every field of science and engineering and is revolutionizing some of them, notably including accelerator physics and technology. At existing accelerators, it will help us optimize performance, expand operational parameter envelopes, and increase reliability. Design decisions for next-generation machines will be informed by unprecedented comprehensive and accurate modeling, as well as computer-aided engineering; all this will increase the likelihood that even their most advanced subsystems can be commissioned on time, within budget, and up to specifications. Advanced computing is also vital to developing new means of acceleration and exploring the behavior of beams under extreme conditions. With continued progress it will someday become reasonable to speak of a complete numerical model of all phenomena important to a particular accelerator.

  5. Computer science education for medical informaticians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Judith R; Price, Susan L

    2004-03-18

    The core curriculum in the education of medical informaticians remains a topic of concern and discussion. This paper reports on a survey of medical informaticians with Master's level credentials that asked about computer science (CS) topics or skills that they need in their employment. All subjects were graduates or "near-graduates" of a single medical informatics Master's program that they entered with widely varying educational backgrounds. The survey instrument was validated for face and content validity prior to use. All survey items were rated as having some degree of importance in the work of these professionals, with retrieval and analysis of data from databases, database design and web technologies deemed most important. Least important were networking skills and object-oriented design and concepts. These results are consistent with other work done in the field and suggest that strong emphasis on technical skills, particularly databases, data analysis, web technologies, computer programming and general computer science are part of the core curriculum for medical informatics.

  6. Computer-Game Construction: A Gender-Neutral Attractor to Computing Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Mike; Szafron, Duane; Cutumisu, Maria; Schaeffer, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Computing Science university programs is at a dangerously low level. A major reason for this is the general lack of interest in Computing Science by females. In this paper, we discuss our experience with using a computer game construction environment as a vehicle to encourage female participation in Computing Science. Experiments…

  7. VISL: A Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory For Outreach and K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Moore, J.; Dunn, S.; Perez, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present an update on our developing Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory (VISL). Geared to K-12 classrooms and the general public, VISL's main goal is to improve climate literacy, especially in regards to the crucial role of the polar ice sheets in Earth's climate and sea level. VISL will allow users to perform guided experiments using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), a state-of-the-art ice flow model developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine that simulates the near-term evolution of the ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. VISL users will access ISSM via a graphical interface that can be launched from a web browser on a computer, tablet or smart phone. Users select climate conditions and run time by moving graphic sliders then watch how a given region evolves in time under those conditions. Lesson plans will include conceptual background, instructions for table top experiments related to the concepts addressed in a given lesson, and a guide for performing model experiments and interpreting their results. Activities with different degrees of complexity will aim for consistency with NGSS Physical Science criteria for different grade bands (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12), although they will not be labeled as such to encourage a broad user base. Activities will emphasize the development of physical intuition and critical thinking skills, understanding conceptual and computational models, as well as observation recording, concept articulation, hypothesis formulation and testing, and mathematical analysis. At our present phase of development, we seek input from the greater science education and outreach communities regarding VISL's planned content, as well as additional features and topic areas that educators and students would find useful.

  8. Computing as Empirical Science – Evolution of a Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polak Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the evolution of philosophical and methodological considerations concerning empiricism in computer/computing science. In this study, we trace the most important current events in the history of reflection on computing. The forerunners of Artificial Intelligence H.A. Simon and A. Newell in their paper Computer Science As Empirical Inquiry (1975 started these considerations. Later the concept of empirical computer science was developed by S.S. Shapiro, P. Wegner, A.H. Eden and P.J. Denning. They showed various empirical aspects of computing. This led to a view of the science of computing (or science of information processing - the science of general scope. Some interesting contemporary ways towards a generalized perspective on computations were also shown (e.g. natural computing.

  9. Computer Applications in Health Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, computer application development has experienced exponential growth, not only in the number of publications but also in the scope or contexts that have benefited from its use. In health science training, and medicine specifically, the gradual incorporation of technological developments has transformed the teaching and learning process, resulting in true "educational technology". The goal of this paper is to review the main features involved in these applications and highlight the main lines of research for the future. The results of peer reviewed literature published recently indicate the following features shared by the key technological developments in the field of health science education: first, development of simulation and visualization systems for a more complete and realistic representation of learning material over traditional paper format; second, portability and versatility of the applications, adapted for an increasing number of devices and operative systems; third, increasing focus on open source applications such as Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

  10. Are We Preparing the Next Generation? K-12 Teacher Knowledge and Engagement in Teaching Core STEM Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Nadelson, Louis; Seifert, Anne; Hendricks, J. Kade

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several of the recent reform efforts in K-12 STEM education (e.g. Next Generation Science Standards [NGSS and Common Core State Standards-Mathematics [CCSS-M]) have included significant emphasis on the practices of STEM. We argue that K-12 teachers' ability to effectively engage their students in these core STEM practices is fundamental to the success of potential and current engineering students and their subsequent careers as engineers. Practices such as identifying problems, mo...

  11. Situated Learning in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2004-06-01

    Sociocultural theories of learning such as Wenger and Lave's situated learning have been suggested as alternatives to cognitive theories of learning like constructivism. This article examines situated learning within the context of computer science (CS) education. Situated learning accurately describes some CS communities like open-source software development, but it is not directly applicable to other CS communities, especially those that deal with non-CS application areas. Nevertheless, situated learning can inform CS education by analyzing debates on curriculum and pedagogy within this framework. CS educators should closely examine professional CS communities of practice and design educational activities to model the actual activities of those communities.

  12. How to pass National 5 Computing Science

    CERN Document Server

    Frame, Frank; High, Bannerman

    2013-01-01

    Get your best grade with the SQA endorsed guide to National 5 Computing Science. This book contains all the advice and support you need to revise successfully for your National 5 exam. It combines an overview of the course syllabus with advice from a top expert on how to improve exam performance, so you have the best chance of success.; Refresh your knowledge with complete course notes.; Prepare for the exam with top tips and hints on revision technique.; Get your best grade with advice on how to gain those vital extra marks.

  13. Computer and Information Sciences III : 27th International Symposium on Computer and Information Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Lent, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Information technology is the enabling foundation science and technology for all of human activity at the beginning of the 21st century, and advances in this area are crucial to all of us. These advances are taking place all over the world and can only be followed and perceived when researchers from all over the world assemble, and exchange their ideas in conferences such as the one presented in this proceedings volume regarding the 27th International Symposium on Computer and Information Systems, held at the Institut Henri Poincare' in Paris on October 3 and 4, 2012. Computer and Information Sciences III: 27th International Symposium on Computer and Information Sciences contains novel advances in the state of the art covering applied research in electrical and computer engineering and computer science, across the broad area of information technology. It provides access to the main innovative activities in research across the world, and points to the results obtained recently by some of the most active teams ...

  14. Computer and Information Sciences II : 26th International Symposium on Computer and Information Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Lent, Ricardo; Sakellari, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Information technology is the enabling foundation for all of human activity at the beginning of the 21st century, and advances in this area are crucial to all of us. These advances are taking place all over the world and can only be followed and perceived when researchers from all over the world assemble, and exchange their ideas in conferences such as the one presented in this proceedings volume regarding the 26th International Symposium on Computer and Information Systems, held at the Royal Society in London on 26th to 28th September 2011. Computer and Information Sciences II contains novel advances in the state of the art covering applied research in electrical and computer engineering and computer science, across the broad area of information technology. It provides access to the main innovative activities in research across the world, and points to the results obtained recently by some of the most active teams in both Europe and Asia.

  15. The quantum computer game: citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Sidse; Mølmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Progress in the field of quantum computation is hampered by daunting technical challenges. Here we present an alternative approach to solving these by enlisting the aid of computer players around the world. We have previously examined a quantum computation architecture involving ultracold atoms in optical lattices and strongly focused tweezers of light. In The Quantum Computer Game (see http://www.scienceathome.org/), we have encapsulated the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the problem in a graphical user interface allowing for easy user input. Players can then search the parameter space with real-time graphical feedback in a game context with a global high-score that rewards short gate times and robustness to experimental errors. The game which is still in a demo version has so far been tried by several hundred players. Extensions of the approach to other models such as Gross-Pitaevskii and Bose-Hubbard are currently under development. The game has also been incorporated into science education at high-school and university level as an alternative method for teaching quantum mechanics. Initial quantitative evaluation results are very positive. AU Ideas Center for Community Driven Research, CODER.

  16. The Computer Science Journal of Moldova (ISSN 1561-4042

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board of CSJM

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The Computer Science Journal of Moldova (CSJM is being published since 1993. It is a peer-reviewed international journal. The Advisory Board consists from 19 world recognized researchers. The editorial board is formed from moldavian researchers. The Computer Science Journal of Moldova (CSJMol is issued three times a year by the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova.

  17. Science-Technology Coupling: The Case of Mathematical Logic and Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Dobler, Roland

    1997-01-01

    In the history of science, there have often been periods of sudden rapprochements between pure science and technology-oriented branches of science. Mathematical logic as pure science and computer science as technology-oriented science have experienced such a rapprochement, which is studied in this article in a bibliometric manner. (Author)

  18. Integrating Robot Design Competitions into the Curriculum and K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzato, Robert

    The Penn State Abington campus has integrated several mobile robot design competitions into project-based design activities to provide enhancement for undergraduate engineering and information sciences and technology courses and also to provide outreach to K-12 institutions. The robot competitions, which encourage interdisciplinary design, teamwork, and rapid prototyping, support a wide range of educational outcomes in a variety of courses. A survey of undergraduate students was also implemented to identify the key lessons learned and overall educational quality of the robot competition activities. Overall, the responses on the quality of the robot competition experience were very positive. The strategic selection and implementation of robot design competitions, such as described in this paper, provide a cost-effective approach to enhancing the curriculum, promoting retention, and encouraging interest in science and technology (STEM) careers in K-12 students.

  19. Computer Science and Telecommunications Board summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, M.S.

    1992-03-27

    The Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science, telecommunications, and associated technologies. CSTB actively disseminates the results of its completed projects to those in a position to help implement their recommendations or otherwise use their insights. It provides a forum for the exchange of information on computer science, computing technology, and telecommunications. This report discusses the major accomplishments of CSTB.

  20. Democratizing Computer Science Knowledge: Transforming the Face of Computer Science through Public High School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Jean J.; Margolis, Jane; Lee, Clifford H.; Sandoval, Cueponcaxochitl D. M.; Goode, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that computer science (CS) is the driver of technological innovations across all disciplines and aspects of our lives, including participatory media, high school CS too commonly fails to incorporate the perspectives and concerns of low-income students of color. This article describes a partnership program -- Exploring Computer…

  1. Physical Computing and Its Scope--Towards a Constructionist Computer Science Curriculum with Physical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylla, Mareen; Romeike, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Physical computing covers the design and realization of interactive objects and installations and allows students to develop concrete, tangible products of the real world, which arise from the learners' imagination. This can be used in computer science education to provide students with interesting and motivating access to the different topic…

  2. A research program in empirical computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    During the grant reporting period our primary activities have been to begin preparation for the establishment of a research program in experimental computer science. The focus of research in this program will be safety-critical systems. Many questions that arise in the effort to improve software dependability can only be addressed empirically. For example, there is no way to predict the performance of the various proposed approaches to building fault-tolerant software. Performance models, though valuable, are parameterized and cannot be used to make quantitative predictions without experimental determination of underlying distributions. In the past, experimentation has been able to shed some light on the practical benefits and limitations of software fault tolerance. It is common, also, for experimentation to reveal new questions or new aspects of problems that were previously unknown. A good example is the Consistent Comparison Problem that was revealed by experimentation and subsequently studied in depth. The result was a clear understanding of a previously unknown problem with software fault tolerance. The purpose of a research program in empirical computer science is to perform controlled experiments in the area of real-time, embedded control systems. The goal of the various experiments will be to determine better approaches to the construction of the software for computing systems that have to be relied upon. As such it will validate research concepts from other sources, provide new research results, and facilitate the transition of research results from concepts to practical procedures that can be applied with low risk to NASA flight projects. The target of experimentation will be the production software development activities undertaken by any organization prepared to contribute to the research program. Experimental goals, procedures, data analysis and result reporting will be performed for the most part by the University of Virginia.

  3. Reach for the Stars: Computational Models for Teaching and Learning in Physics, Astronomy and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M. L.

    2013-04-01

    Reach for the Stars is one of the NSF “Graduate Students in K-12 Education” (GK12) programs. PhD candidates from Northwestern University are partnered with a middle or high-school teacher to act as a “resident scientist” in their classroom for the entire academic year. These scientists and engineers spend time both in the classroom and out, developing inquiry-based activities that tie the computational thinking skills essential to their research to the classroom curricula. Reach for the Stars grants graduate students the opportunity to expand and improve their communication skills as they deconstruct their complex research projects in a way that makes them relevant and understandable by a variety of audiences. In the process, they have produced dozens of lesson plans available to teachers everywhere through a program that showcases the benefits of partnering universities with the K-12 school community.

  4. K-12 Engineering Education Standards: Opportunities and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    Does the nation need K-12 engineering education standards? The answer to this question is paradoxically both simple and complex, and requires an examination of a rationale for such standards as well as the opportunities and barriers to developing and implementing the standards. In two decades since 1989, the idea of national standards for…

  5. Designing GIS Learning Materials for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies have proven the usefulness and effectiveness of geographic information system (GIS) use in the K-12 classroom, the rate of teacher adoption remains low. The identified major barrier to its use is a lack of teachers' background and experience. To solve this limitation, many organisations have provided GIS-related teacher…

  6. Engaging K-12 Language Learners in Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Joy; Neville, Chon

    2015-01-01

    Calls to integrate media literacy into K-12 language classrooms appear to have gone largely unheeded. However, media literacy skills are seen as crucial for 21st-century learners. This article answers the calls for a focus on media literacy in the language classroom by addressing both why and how systematic attention might be brought to this issue…

  7. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  8. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  9. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: "Divided Loyalties"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    This report mainly aims to provide a critical and in-depth analysis of the K-12 Case, "Divided Loyalty" by Holy and Tartar (2004). The case recounts how the manifestation of inadequate leadership skills in a school setting could affect negatively the performance of students.

  10. Education Nation: Obama, Romney Outline Different K-12, Postsecondary Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervarics, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With negative ads already rampant on radio and TV, it's clear that President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney differ on most issues. That statement carries over to education as well, as both offer starkly different views on K-12 and higher education policy for the fall campaign. Obama is touting a large increase in Pell Grants…

  11. 2008 Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Spradlin, Terry E.; Burroughs, Nathan A.; Hiller, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    During the course of each calendar year since 2003, staff of the Center for Evaluation & Education Policy (CEEP) at Indiana University evaluates the benefits of continuing the Annual Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana. In 2008, the Indiana legislature determined that school corporations would no longer use property tax revenues…

  12. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  13. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, Paula; Kellerer, Eric; Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Montgomery, Danielle; Clyde, Rozella; Cozart, Joe; Creach, Laura; Hibbard, Laura; LaFrance, Jason; Rupp, Nadine; Walker, Niki; Carter, Theresa; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study exploring rural teacher perspectives on the impact of blended learning on students and teachers was conducted in Idaho during the Fall of 2013. Researchers from Northwest Nazarene University's DOCEO Center in partnership with Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning…

  14. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  15. Green Power Partnership Top 30 K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. On this list are the largest green power users among K-12 school partners within the GPP.

  16. Florida's Opinion on K-12 Public Education Spending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This scientifically representative poll of 1,200 Floridians finds that public opinion about K-12 public education spending is seriously misinformed. Floridians think public schools need more money, but the main reason is that they are badly mistaken about how much money the public schools actually get. Key findings of the study include: (1) Half…

  17. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  18. West Bloomfield Schools Social Studies Curriculum K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, James E.; And Others

    The curriculum guide outlines behavioral objectives, learning activities, evaluation methods, and resources to help K-12 classroom teachers develop and implement social studies programs. Major objectives are to extend knowledge, develop skills to make effective use of this knowledge, and to facilitate the socialization process. The first section…

  19. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  20. Designer Librarian: Embedded in K12 Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, shifts in technology have altered the roles of school librarians in a multitude of ways. New rigorous standards, proliferation of devices, and steady growth of online and blended learning for the K12 market now demand librarians engage with learners in online environments. Taking an instructional design approach is the…

  1. Sense and Sensibility: The Case for the Nationwide Inclusion of Engineering in the K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Robert E.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Batterson, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The competitive status of the United States is inextricably linked to innovation just as innovation is inseparable from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. To stay competitive in innovation requires that the United States produce a 21st century workforce complete with requisite education, training, skills, and motivation. If we accept a priori that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education are crucial to competitiveness and innovation and that, in terms of innovation, mathematics, science, and engineering are interdependent, why are mathematics and science uniformly ubiquitous in the K-12 curriculum while engineering is conspicuously absent? We are passionate in our belief that the uniform addition of engineering to the K-12 curriculum will help ensure that the nation has "the right" 21st Century workforce. Furthermore, we believe that a nationwide effort, led by a coalition of engineering academics, practitioners, and societies is required to turn this goal into reality. However, accomplishing this goal necessitates, as we are reminded by the title of Jane Austen's timeless novel, "Sense and Sensibility", a workable solution that seeks the "middle ground" between passion and reason. We begin our paper by making two essential points: Engineers are not scientists. Engineering exists separate from science, has its own specialized knowledge community apart from science, and it is largely responsible for many of the most significant advancements and improvements in the quality of our life. Our workable solution requires that K-12 education, nationwide, accommodate the inclusion of engineering as a stand alone curriculum and we offer three reasons to support our position: (1) workforce development, (2) stimulating interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses and careers, and (3) creating a technologically literate society. We conclude with some thoughts on how this important goal can be accomplished.

  2. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  3. Defining Computational Thinking for Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrop, David; Beheshti, Elham; Horn, Michael; Orton, Kai; Jona, Kemi; Trouille, Laura; Wilensky, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Science and mathematics are becoming computational endeavors. This fact is reflected in the recently released Next Generation Science Standards and the decision to include "computational thinking" as a core scientific practice. With this addition, and the increased presence of computation in mathematics and scientific contexts, a new…

  4. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  5. Overcoming Constraints of Building Successful Partnerships Incorporating STEM Research Into K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE is currently in its second year of partnering ten graduate students from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in the classrooms. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach throughout the local community. Numerous challenges were met during the formation of the program as well as throughout the first year in which the project management team worked together to find solutions ensuring that INSPIRE maintained successful partnerships for all involved. Proposed solutions of the following key components were identified by INSPIRE through the development, implementation, and continuous evaluation (internal and external) of the first year of the program as areas that can pose challenges to the construction of strong relationships between STEM research and K-12 classrooms: initializing the partnerships with the K-12 classrooms and STEM graduate fields at the university; maintaining strong partnerships; providing appropriate training and support; developing sound

  6. Brains--Computers--Machines: Neural Engineering in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudler, Eric H.; Bergsman, Kristen Clapper

    2016-01-01

    Neural engineering is an emerging field of high relevance to students, teachers, and the general public. This feature presents online resources that educators and scientists can use to introduce students to neural engineering and to integrate core ideas from the life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, computer science, and engineering…

  7. Brains--Computers--Machines: Neural Engineering in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudler, Eric H.; Bergsman, Kristen Clapper

    2016-01-01

    Neural engineering is an emerging field of high relevance to students, teachers, and the general public. This feature presents online resources that educators and scientists can use to introduce students to neural engineering and to integrate core ideas from the life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, computer science, and engineering…

  8. Learning computer science concepts with Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Armoni, Michal; (Moti) Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2013-09-01

    Scratch is a visual programming environment that is widely used by young people. We investigated if Scratch can be used to teach concepts of computer science (CS). We developed learning materials for middle-school students that were designed according to the constructionist philosophy of Scratch and evaluated them in a few schools during two years. Tests were constructed based upon a novel combination of the revised Bloom taxonomy and the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome taxonomy. These instruments were augmented with qualitative tools, such as observations and interviews. The results showed that students could successfully learn important concepts of CS, although there were problems with some concepts such as repeated execution, variables, and concurrency. We believe that these problems can be overcome by modifications to the teaching process that we suggest.

  9. 6th International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stojmenovic, Ivan; Jeong, Hwa; Yi, Gangman

    2015-01-01

    The 6th FTRA International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications (CSA-14) will be held in Guam, USA, Dec. 17 - 19, 2014. CSA-14 presents a comprehensive conference focused on the various aspects of advances in engineering systems in computer science, and applications, including ubiquitous computing, U-Health care system, Big Data, UI/UX for human-centric computing, Computing Service, Bioinformatics and Bio-Inspired Computing and will show recent advances on various aspects of computing technology, Ubiquitous Computing Services and its application.

  10. Supporting large-scale computational science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  11. Computer Related Mathematics and Science Curriculum Materials - A National Science Foundation Cooperative College-School Science Program in Computing Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chuan C.

    Reported is the Cooperative College-School Science Program in Computing Science Education which was conducted by the University of Colorado Department of Civil Engineering in the summer of 1967. The program consisted of two five-week terms. The course work was composed of two formal lecture courses in Computer Related Mathematics and Computer…

  12. Increasing Diversity in Computer Science: Acknowledging, yet Moving Beyond, Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Elizabeth A.; Stubbs, Margaret L.

    Lack of diversity within the computer science field has, thus far, been examined most fully through the lens of gender. This article is based on a follow-on to Margolis and Fisher's (2002) study and includes interviews with 33 Carnegie Mellon University students from the undergraduate senior class of 2002 in the School of Computer Science. We found evidence of similarities among the perceptions of these women and men on definitions of computer science, explanations for the notoriously low proportion of women in the field, characterizations of a typical computer science student, impressions of recent curricular changes, a sense of the atmosphere/culture in the program, views of the Women@SCS campus organization, and suggestions for attracting and retaining well-rounded students in computer science. We conclude that efforts to increase diversity in the computer science field will benefit from a more broad-based approach that considers, but is not limited to, notions of gender difference.

  13. Implementing an Affordable High-Performance Computing for Teaching-Oriented Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Goldschmidt, Kathleen; Elleithy, Yasser; Lee, Jeongkyu

    2013-01-01

    With the advances in computing power, high-performance computing (HPC) platforms have had an impact on not only scientific research in advanced organizations but also computer science curriculum in the educational community. For example, multicore programming and parallel systems are highly desired courses in the computer science major. However,…

  14. Gender Differences in the Use of Computers, Programming, and Peer Interactions in Computer Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian; Egodawatte, Gunawardena

    2010-01-01

    Research shows that female and male students in undergraduate computer science programs view computer culture differently. Female students are interested more in the use of computers than in doing programming, whereas male students see computer science mainly as a programming activity. The overall purpose of our research was not to find new…

  15. Gender Differences in the Use of Computers, Programming, and Peer Interactions in Computer Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian; Egodawatte, Gunawardena

    2010-01-01

    Research shows that female and male students in undergraduate computer science programs view computer culture differently. Female students are interested more in the use of computers than in doing programming, whereas male students see computer science mainly as a programming activity. The overall purpose of our research was not to find new…

  16. Implementing an Affordable High-Performance Computing for Teaching-Oriented Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Goldschmidt, Kathleen; Elleithy, Yasser; Lee, Jeongkyu

    2013-01-01

    With the advances in computing power, high-performance computing (HPC) platforms have had an impact on not only scientific research in advanced organizations but also computer science curriculum in the educational community. For example, multicore programming and parallel systems are highly desired courses in the computer science major. However,…

  17. Computer simulation in nuclear science and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Miya, Kenzo; Iwata, Shuichi; Yagawa, Genki; Kondo, Shusuke (Tokyo Univ. (Japan)); Hoshino, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Akinao; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masatoshi

    1992-03-01

    The numerical simulation technology used for the design of nuclear reactors includes the scientific fields of wide range, and is the cultivated technology which grew in the steady efforts to high calculation accuracy through safety examination, reliability verification test, the assessment of operation results and so on. Taking the opportunity of putting numerical simulation to practical use in wide fields, the numerical simulation of five basic equations which describe the natural world and the progress of its related technologies are reviewed. It is expected that numerical simulation technology contributes to not only the means of design study but also the progress of science and technology such as the construction of new innovative concept, the exploration of new mechanisms and substances, of which the models do not exist in the natural world. The development of atomic energy and the progress of computers, Boltzmann's transport equation and its periphery, Navier-Stokes' equation and its periphery, Maxwell's electromagnetic field equation and its periphery, Schroedinger wave equation and its periphery, computational solid mechanics and its periphery, and probabilistic risk assessment and its periphery are described. (K.I.).

  18. African Journals Online: Technology, Computer Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 29 of 29 ... The Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology (EJST) publishes high .... Sciences is an international journal reporting significant new results in all .... general technology rocketry, space and astronomy, earth sciences, ...

  19. 5th Computer Science On-line Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Senkerik, Roman; Oplatkova, Zuzana; Silhavy, Petr; Prokopova, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    This volume is based on the research papers presented in the 5th Computer Science On-line Conference. The volume Artificial Intelligence Perspectives in Intelligent Systems presents modern trends and methods to real-world problems, and in particular, exploratory research that describes novel approaches in the field of artificial intelligence. New algorithms in a variety of fields are also presented. The Computer Science On-line Conference (CSOC 2016) is intended to provide an international forum for discussions on the latest research results in all areas related to Computer Science. The addressed topics are the theoretical aspects and applications of Computer Science, Artificial Intelligences, Cybernetics, Automation Control Theory and Software Engineering.

  20. Precise determinations of C and D periods by flow cytometry in Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; de Mattos, M.J.T.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2003-01-01

    The C and D cell cycle periods of seven Escherichia coli K-12 strains and three E, coli B/r strains were determined by computer simulation of DNA histograms obtained by flow cytometry of batch cultures grown at several different generation times. To obtain longer generation times two of the K-12...... strains were cultivated at several different dilution rates in glucose-limited chemostats. The replication period (C period) was found to be similar in K-12 and B/r strains grown at similar generation times. At generation times below 60 min the C period was constant; above 60 min it increased linearly...... with increasing generation time. The period from termination of replication to cell division (D period) was more variable. It was much shorter in B/r than in K-12 strains. Like the C period it was relatively constant at generation times below 60 min and it increased with increasing generation times at longer...

  1. Factors Affecting Computer Anxiety in High School Computer Science Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Linda M.; Stephens, Larry

    1989-01-01

    Examines factors related to computer anxiety measured by the Computer Anxiety Index (CAIN). Achievement in two programing courses was inversely related to computer anxiety. Students who had a home computer and had computer experience before high school had lower computer anxiety than those who had not. Lists 14 references. (YP)

  2. Bringing Engineering Research Coupled With Art Into The K-12 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cola, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Partnerships for Research, Innovation and Multi-Scale Engineering Program, a Research Experiences for K-12 Teachers at Georgia Institute of Technology demonstrates a successful program that blends the fine arts with engineering research. Teachers selected for the program improve their science and engineering content knowledge, as well as their understanding of how to use STEAM to increase student comprehension and engagement. Participants in the program designed Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics (STEAM)- based lessons based on faculty engineering research. Examples of some STEAM lessons created will be discussed along with lessons learned.

  3. Defining Computational Thinking for Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrop, David; Beheshti, Elham; Horn, Michael; Orton, Kai; Jona, Kemi; Trouille, Laura; Wilensky, Uri

    2016-02-01

    Science and mathematics are becoming computational endeavors. This fact is reflected in the recently released Next Generation Science Standards and the decision to include "computational thinking" as a core scientific practice. With this addition, and the increased presence of computation in mathematics and scientific contexts, a new urgency has come to the challenge of defining computational thinking and providing a theoretical grounding for what form it should take in school science and mathematics classrooms. This paper presents a response to this challenge by proposing a definition of computational thinking for mathematics and science in the form of a taxonomy consisting of four main categories: data practices, modeling and simulation practices, computational problem solving practices, and systems thinking practices. In formulating this taxonomy, we draw on the existing computational thinking literature, interviews with mathematicians and scientists, and exemplary computational thinking instructional materials. This work was undertaken as part of a larger effort to infuse computational thinking into high school science and mathematics curricular materials. In this paper, we argue for the approach of embedding computational thinking in mathematics and science contexts, present the taxonomy, and discuss how we envision the taxonomy being used to bring current educational efforts in line with the increasingly computational nature of modern science and mathematics.

  4. Development of Computer Science Disciplines - A Social Network Analysis Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pham, Manh Cuong; Jarke, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to many other scientific disciplines, computer science considers conference publications. Conferences have the advantage of providing fast publication of papers and of bringing researchers together to present and discuss the paper with peers. Previous work on knowledge mapping focused on the map of all sciences or a particular domain based on ISI published JCR (Journal Citation Report). Although this data covers most of important journals, it lacks computer science conference and workshop proceedings. That results in an imprecise and incomplete analysis of the computer science knowledge. This paper presents an analysis on the computer science knowledge network constructed from all types of publications, aiming at providing a complete view of computer science research. Based on the combination of two important digital libraries (DBLP and CiteSeerX), we study the knowledge network created at journal/conference level using citation linkage, to identify the development of sub-disciplines. We investiga...

  5. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  6. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, Shanti D.; Torcellini, Paul A.; Bonnema, Eric; Goldwasser, David

    2016-08-26

    A simulation-based technical feasibility study was completed to show the types of technologies required to achieve ZEB status with this building type. These technologies are prioritized across the building's subsystem such that design teams can readily integrate the ideas. Energy use intensity (EUI) targets were established for U.S. climate zones such that K-12 schools can be zero-ready or can procure solar panels or other renewable energy production sources to meet the zero energy building definition. Results showed that it is possible for K-12 schools to achieve zero energy when the EUI is between 20 and 26 kBtu/ft2/yr. Temperate climates required a smaller percentage of solar panel coverage than very hot or very cold climates. The paper provides a foundation for technically achieving zero energy schools with a vision of transforming the school construction market to mainstream zero energy buildings within typical construction budgets.

  7. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldwasser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Torcellini, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Studer, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This technical feasibility study provides documentation and research results supporting a possible set of strategies to achieve source zero energy K-12 school buildings as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) zero energy building (ZEB) definition (DOE 2015a). Under this definition, a ZEB is an energy-efficient building in which, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy.

  8. Core Curriculum for Social Studies Education K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City. Office of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Utah social studies curriculum for grades K-12 is divided into three levels: K-6, 7-8, and 9-12. For K-6, mastery of core concepts is required; for grades 7-8, 1.5 units of United States History and Utah studies are required; and for grades 9-12, three units of world cultural geography, ancient world civilizations, European history, United…

  9. Neutrofiilisten granulosyyttien E. coli K12 -kannan fagosytoosi

    OpenAIRE

    Kautonen, Riina

    2011-01-01

    Tässä työssä tutkittiin bioluminesoivan E. coli K12 pEGFPABCDEamp -kannan viabiliteettiä, mittaamalla bakteerin emittoimaa bioluminesenssia reaaliaikaisesti. Bakteerisolujen tappamiseen käytettiin fagosytoivia neutrofiilisiä granulosyyttejä, jotka eristettiin ihmisen perifeerisestä verestä. Työssä tutkittiin myös veren soluttoman osan seerumin vaikutusta solujen viabiliteettiin ja neutrofiilisten granulosyyttien fagosytoositehokkuuteen. Bakteerisolujen kuolevuutta pyrittiin todistamaan maljaa...

  10. A Heterogeneous High-Performance System for Computational and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Science The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the...System for Computational and Computer Science Report Title This DoD HBC/MI Equipment/Instrumentation grant was awarded in October 2014 for the purchase...Computing (HPC) course taught in the department of computer science as to attract more graduate students from many disciplines where their research

  11. Exploring Theoretical Computer Science Using Paper Toys (for kids)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose the structure of an exploratory course in theoretical computer science intended for a broad range of students (and especially kids). The course is built on computational cards, a simple paper toy, in which playing cards are computational elements; computing machines can...

  12. Exploring Theoretical Computer Science Using Paper Toys (for kids)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose the structure of an exploratory course in theoretical computer science intended for a broad range of students (and especially kids). The course is built on computational cards, a simple paper toy, in which playing cards are computational elements; computing machines can...

  13. Pedagogy for the Connected Science Classroom: Computer Supported Collaborative Science and the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Brian J.; Reveles, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of computers in the classroom is compelling teachers to develop new instructional skills. This paper provides a theoretical perspective on an innovative pedagogical approach to science teaching that takes advantage of technology to create a connected classroom. In the connected classroom, students collaborate and share ideas in…

  14. 76 FR 20051 - Advisory Committee for Computer and Information; Science and Engineering; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Advisory Committee for Computer and Information; Science and Engineering; Notice of Meeting In accordance... announces the following meeting: ] Name: Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science and..., Directorate for Computer and Information, Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson...

  15. 77 FR 24538 - Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science And Engineering; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science And Engineering; Notice of Meeting In... Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science and...: Carmen Whitson, Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, National Science...

  16. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do

  17. Computing Whether She Belongs: Stereotypes Undermine Girls' Interest and Sense of Belonging in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    Computer science has one of the largest gender disparities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. An important reason for this disparity is that girls are less likely than boys to enroll in necessary "pipeline courses," such as introductory computer science. Two experiments investigated whether high-school girls' lower…

  18. Computing Whether She Belongs: Stereotypes Undermine Girls' Interest and Sense of Belonging in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    Computer science has one of the largest gender disparities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. An important reason for this disparity is that girls are less likely than boys to enroll in necessary "pipeline courses," such as introductory computer science. Two experiments investigated whether high-school girls' lower…

  19. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Éilish; Markowetz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting “Big Data” sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline. PMID:27403204

  20. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christian; Duke, Éilish; Markowetz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting "Big Data" sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline.

  1. Logic in the curricula of Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Quindeless

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the programs in Computer Science is to educate and train students to understand the problems and build systems that solve them. This process involves applying a special reasoning to model interactions, capabilities, and limitations of the components involved. A good curriculum must involve the use of tools to assist in these tasks, and one that could be considered as a fundamental is the logic, because with it students develop the necessary reasoning. Besides, software developers analyze the behavior of the program during the designed, the depuration, and testing; hardware designers perform minimization and equivalence verification of circuits; designers of operating systems validate routing protocols, programing, and synchronization; and formal logic underlying all these activities. Therefore, a strong background in applied logic would help students to develop or potentiate their ability to reason about complex systems. Unfortunately, few curricula formed and properly trained in logic. Most includes only one or two courses of Discrete Mathematics, which in a few weeks covered truth tables and the propositional calculus, and nothing more. This is not enough, and higher level courses in which they are applied and many other logical concepts are needed. In addition, students will not see the importance of logic in their careers and need to modify the curriculum committees or adapt the curriculum to reverse this situation.

  2. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Montag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting “Big Data” sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline.

  3. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  4. Encouraging Enrollment and Retention of Women in Computer Science Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Deborah; Moroh, Marsha

    Women computer science students at the College of Staten Island (CSI) in New York have a substantially higher pass rate than their male classmates; however, their enrollment and retention rates are low. During the last year and a half women on the computer science faculty at CSI developed two projects designed to increase the enrollment and…

  5. "Computer Science Can Feed a Lot of Dreams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Horizons, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Pat Yongpradit is the director of education at Code.org. He leads all education efforts, including professional development and curriculum creation, and he builds relationships with school districts. Pat joined "Educational Horizons" to talk about why it is important to teach computer science--even for non-computer science teachers. This…

  6. Arguing for Computer Science in the school curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluck, A.; Webb, M.; Cox, M.; Angeli, C.; Malyn-Smith, J.; Voogt, J.; Zagami, J.

    2016-01-01

    Computer science has been a discipline for some years, and its position in the school curriculum has been contested differently in several countries. This paper looks at its role in three countries to illustrate these differences. A reconsideration of computer science as a separate subject both in p

  7. Studies in Mathematics, Volume 22. Studies in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seymour V., Ed.

    The nine articles in this collection were selected because they represent concerns central to computer science, emphasize topics of particular interest to mathematicians, and underscore the wide range of areas deeply and continually affected by computer science. The contents consist of: "Introduction" (S. V. Pollack), "The…

  8. Gender Digital Divide and Challenges in Undergraduate Computer Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian; McDougall, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed a reduced number of female students registered in computer science studies. In addition, the female students feel isolated, have reduced confidence, and underperform. This article explores differences between female and male students in undergraduate computer science programs in a mid-size university in Ontario. Based on…

  9. Entrepreneurial Health Informatics for Computer Science and Information Systems Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James; Joseph, Anthony; Narula, Stuti

    2014-01-01

    Corporate entrepreneurship is a critical area of curricula for computer science and information systems students. Few institutions of computer science and information systems have entrepreneurship in the curricula however. This paper presents entrepreneurial health informatics as a course in a concentration of Technology Entrepreneurship at a…

  10. Computer Science and the Liberal Arts: A Philosophical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Henry M.; Kelemen, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the philosophy and position of the discipline of computer science within the liberal arts, based upon a discussion of the nature of computer science and a review of the characteristics of the liberal arts. A liberal arts environment provides important opportunities for undergraduate programs, but also presents important…

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Teaching in Undergraduate Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the attitudes of computer science faculty members towards undergraduate teaching. The questions addressed in this study are: (1) How important is effective teaching to computer science faculty members at the undergraduate level and how important do they perceive effective teaching to be to their…

  12. Case Studies of Liberal Arts Computer Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D.; Brady, A.; Danyluk, A.; Adams, J.; Lawrence, A.

    2010-01-01

    Many undergraduate liberal arts institutions offer computer science majors. This article illustrates how quality computer science programs can be realized in a wide variety of liberal arts settings by describing and contrasting the actual programs at five liberal arts colleges: Williams College, Kalamazoo College, the State University of New York…

  13. The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nager, Adams; Atkinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing use of computers and software in every facet of our economy, not until recently has computer science education begun to gain traction in American school systems. The current focus on improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the U.S. School system has disregarded differences within STEM…

  14. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  15. Collaboration, Collusion and Plagiarism in Computer Science Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the nature of academic dishonesty with respect to computer science coursework. We discuss the efficacy of various policies for collaboration with regard to student education, and we consider a number of strategies for mitigating dishonest behaviour on computer science coursework by addressing some common causes. Computer…

  16. Arguing for Computer Science in the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, Andrew; Webb, Mary; Cox, Margaret; Angeli, Charoula; Malyn-Smith, Joyce; Voogt, Joke; Zagami, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Computer science has been a discipline for some years, and its position in the school curriculum has been contested differently in several countries. This paper looks at its role in three countries to illustrate these differences. A reconsideration of computer science as a separate subject both in primary and secondary education is suggested. At…

  17. Computer Science Contests for Secondary School Students: Approaches to Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang POHL

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Olympiad in Informatics currently provides a model which is imitated by the majority of contests for secondary school students in Informatics or Computer Science. However, the IOI model can be criticized, and alternative contest models exist. To support the discussion about contests in Computer Science, several dimensions for characterizing and classifying contests are suggested.

  18. "Computer Science Can Feed a Lot of Dreams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Horizons, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Pat Yongpradit is the director of education at Code.org. He leads all education efforts, including professional development and curriculum creation, and he builds relationships with school districts. Pat joined "Educational Horizons" to talk about why it is important to teach computer science--even for non-computer science teachers. This…

  19. Barbara Ryder to head Department of Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Barbara G. Ryder, professor of computer science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, will become the computer science department head at Virginia Tech, starting in fall 2008. She is the first woman to serve as a department head in the history of the nationally ranked College of Engineering.

  20. The Metamorphosis of an Introduction to Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, Marion G.

    1997-01-01

    Introductory courses in computer science at colleges and universities have undergone significant changes in 20 years. This article provides an overview of the history of introductory computer science (FORTRAN, ANSI flowchart symbols, BASIC, data processing concepts, and PASCAL) and its future (robotics and C++). (PEN)