WorldWideScience

Sample records for jyoti prakash tamang

  1. Jyoti Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Jyoti Rao. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 22 Issue 9 September 2017 pp 829-833 General Article. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2016 · Shekhar C Mande Jyoti Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The Nobel ...

  2. t prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. T PRAKASH. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 2 April 2018 pp 40. Chemical synthesis of highly size-confined triethylamine-capped TiO 2 nanoparticles and its dye-sensitized solar cell performance · T PRAKASH M NAVANEETHAN J ARCHANA ...

  3. Ujjwal Prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Ujjwal Prakash. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 35 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 191-196. Development of P/M Fe–P soft magnetic materials · S K Chaurasia Ujjwal Prakash P S Misra K Chandra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Phosphorous is treated as an ...

  4. S Prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Prakash. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 4 August 2007 pp 309-314 Biomaterials. Characteristics of porous zirconia coated with hydroxyapatite as human bones · V V Narulkar S Prakash K Chandra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  5. lenin prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. LENIN PRAKASH. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 42 Issue 5 May 2017 pp 687-699. A simplified time-domain design and implementation of cascaded PI-sliding mode controller for dc–dc converters used in off-grid photovoltaic applications with field test results · LENIN PRAKASH ...

  6. Prakash, Dr Vishweshwaraiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash, Dr Vishweshwaraiah Ph.D. (Mysore), FNASc, FNAE, FRSC,FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 November 1951. Specialization: S&T Policy, Physical Biochemistry, Chemistry of Macromolecules, Biophysics of Proteins, Enzymes & Thermodynamics, Food Chemistry, Nutrition, Food Biotechnology and Food Science Address: ...

  7. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  8. Kapur, Prof. Prakash Chand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1988 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kapur, Prof. Prakash Chand Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNAE. Date of birth: 3 July 1935. Specialization: Mineral Processing, Particulate Science & Technology, Mathematical Modelling and Waste Management Address: R-485, New Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi 110 060, U.T.

  9. Tandon, Prof. Prakash Narain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1983 Section: Medicine. Tandon, Prof. Prakash Narain M.B.B.S. (Lucknow), M.S., D.Sc. (h.c.), FRCS, FNA, FNASc, FTWAS, FAMS. Date of birth: 13 August 1928. Specialization: Neurosciences and Neurosurgery Address: No. 1, Jagriti Enclave, Vikas Marg Extension, Delhi 110 092, ...

  10. Changing Relations between High Castes and Tamang in Melamchi Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the processes of transformation of social relations between high caste groups and Tamang in Melamchi Valley for the period of 1980-2010. Development interventions made by government of Nepal and (I NGOs, a decade long undergoing Melamchi Water Supply Project and labor migration are major factors for ongoing changes in the study area. Spread of literacy classes and primary education, availability of credit institutions, introduction of modern farming, road networks, seasonal out migration from the area, etc. primarily define new relations among the groups. Borrowing and lending money were one of the basis of high caste and Tamang relation in past. The latter was regarded as borrower loan from first one. Before 1980s, money and agriculture commodities were controlled by few rich and high castes people. Cash income from various sources made enable the Tamang to stand on an equal footing with high caste people. Open political economy and liberal policy for issuing pass port in 1990s and after that encourage the people to diversify the destination of seasonal migration from India to Gulf countries and East Asia. Various processes of socio-economic and political changes led to local peoples to seek their position and identity in the changing context. Discourse of Tamang, high castes and Dalit entered into the Valley along with the development resources of (INGO and political movements of the country. This made possible to Tamang and other disadvantage groups to define and redefine their ethnic identity. Keywords: High castes; Tamang; credit facilities; subsistence farming; identity construction; money lending; wage labor DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4513 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.65-84

  11. Motherhood and subsistence work: the Tamang of rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter-brick, C

    1989-06-01

    A time-allocation study conducted over a 1-year period among rural women in Nepal indicated that these women are able to perform rigorous subsistence labor during pregnancy and motherhood through cultural practices that facilitate a combining of economic and childcare duties. The fieldwork was conducted in 1982-83 in the predominately Tamang village of Salme. A total of 7678 hours of minute-by-minute observation were collected on Tamang women and their male kin from 43 households. The sample included 19 nonpregnant, nonlactating women and 24 pregnant or lactating mothers. Among the Tamang, agriculture is the responsibility of women, and nonpregnant and pregnant/lactating women devoted similar numbers of hours a day (5-8 hours, depending on the season) to working fields. In addition, there were no significant differences in the amount of time nonpregnant and pregnant/lactating women devoted to animal husbandry, mountain work, and travel. The Tamang women did not ease their workloads in the final weeks of pregnancy--a finding that is consistent with a practice of not making allowances in economic activity level for age, sex, physical fitness, or maternal status due to severe labor shortage and the tight time schedule inherent to agricultural production. On the other hand, there was evidence of behavioral flexibility to cope with the demands of women's dual roles. Mothers of infants take their babies to the fields with them and breastfeed during their rest periods. The use of mobile cattle shelters minimizes the amount of time that is spent away from children. Older children care for younger siblings--a phenomenon facilitated by the long interbirth intervals among the Tamang--and contractual exchanges take place among families. The health risk of this arrangement seems greatest for older children who are left behind during periods of intense agricultural activity and are often deprived of adequate nutrition.

  12. Prakash Adhikari 6, Porters and IPPG

    OpenAIRE

    Loomis, Molly

    2012-01-01

    .wav and .mp3 versions of audio file Prakash describes porter’s working conditions and what led to the creation of International Porter Protection Agency which has worked to improve working conditions for porters. These recordings were made on a trek in the spring of 2011 up to Mount Everest Base Camp. The recordings span a wide variety of topics from making and drinking chang to the work of Mount Everest's 'ice fall doctors'.

  13. Examining the Effects of Jyoti Meditation on Stress and the Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Conley, Abigail H.; Young, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined whether Jyoti meditation (JM), a spiritually based meditation (Singh, 2012), influenced student counselors' (N = 60) level of stress and emotional intelligence (EI). Results from a randomized controlled trial and growth curve analysis provided a multilevel model in which JM reduced stress and EI moderated the effect.

  14. Medicinal plants used by the Tamang community in the Makawanpur district of central Nepal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luitel, D. R.; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Timsina, Binu; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 1-11 ISSN 1746-4269 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA ČR GP13-10850P Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : Makawanpur district * Medicinal plants * Pharmacology * Phytochemistry * Tamang community Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EF - Botanics (BU-J) Impact factor: 2.000, year: 2014

  15. Effectiveness of jyoti meditation for patients with chronic neck pain and psychological distress--a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitler, Michael; Brunnhuber, Stefan; Meier, Larissa; Lüdtke, Rainer; Büssing, Arndt; Kessler, Christian; Michalsen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common medical complaint partly mediated by psychosocial distress and having a high socioeconomic impact. There is preliminary evidence that stress reduction by meditation might be beneficial in chronic pain syndromes. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-week meditation program (jyoti meditation) in patients with chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. Eighty-nine patients (aged 49.7 ± 10.5 years, 73 female) with chronic neck pain who scored >40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale and had concomitant increased perceived stress were randomized to an 8-week meditation program (jyoti meditation) with weekly 90-minute classes (n = 45) or to a home-based exercise program (n = 44) with a wait list offer for meditation. Both groups were instructed to practice at home. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 8 weeks. Primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (visual analog scale score) from baseline to week 8. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disability, pain-related bothersomeness, perceived stress, quality of life, and psychological outcomes. Patients had neck pain for a mean of 11 years. Eighteen patients in the meditation group and 16 patients in the exercise group were lost to follow-up. Meditation training significantly reduced pain when compared to the exercise group after 8 weeks (reduction of 45.5 ± 23.3 mm to 21.6 ± 17.2 mm in the meditation group, and 43.8 ± 22.0 mm to 37.7 ± 21.5 mm in the exercise group; mean difference: 13.2 mm [95% confidence interval: 2.1, 24.4; P = .02]). Pain-related bothersomeness decreased more in the meditation group (group difference 11.0 mm [95% confidence interval: 1.0, 21.0; P = .03]). No significant treatment effects were found for pain at motion, psychological scores, and quality of life, although the meditation group showed nonsignificant greater improvements compared to the exercise group. In conclusion

  16. Sharma, Dr Amit Prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Northwestern), FNASc. Date of birth: 12 April 1968. Specialization: Structural Biology, Malaria, Protein Translation Address: Group Leader & Staff Scientist, International Centre for Genetic Engineering, & Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi ...

  17. Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A comparative analysis. Rinki Saha, Anuradha Sinha, Jyoti Prakash Phukan. Abstract. Background: Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) consists of creating a lacrimal drainage pathway to the nasal cavity to restore permanent drainage of previously obstructed ...

  18. Prakash et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) 11(3):239 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    traditional knowledge of folk bio-medicine based on diverse plant species for the ... interest to acquire knowledge on folk medicine and conserve their biodiversity. ...... Effect of external application of herbal cajani preparation on the fibronection ...

  19. Reverse engineering the world: a commentary on Hoffman, Singh, and Prakash, "The interface theory of perception".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Does perception hide the truth? Information theory, computer science, and quantum theory all suggest that the answer is "yes." They suggest, indeed, that useful perception is only feasible because the truth can be hidden.

  20. Proceedings of Prof. Brahm Prakash birth centenary workshop on high temperature materials and hot structures: souvenir and book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, monolithic ceramics and refractory metals were identified for use at high temperatures. Considerations such as higher operating temperatures, increased thermostructural loads, lower density, etc. brought exotic materials such as ceramic matrix composites, carbon based composites, ODS alloy, intermetallics and thermal barrier coatings to the horizon. Advent of ultra high temperature ceramics and functionally graded materials further pushed the threshold of applicability of high temperature materials and hot structures. Impressive progress in this area has been possible because of the fact that characterization tools along with design and simulation techniques have constantly kept pace with advancement occurring in the processing methods of these materials. The workshop scope includes: Thermal Protection Systems and Materials, Hot Structures, Ceramic and Carbon Matrix Composites, Ultra High Temperature Ceramics, Coating Technology, Simulation and Characterization. Articles relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. The interface theory of perception leaves me hungry for more: Commentary on Hoffman, Singh, and Prakash, "The interface theory of perception".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    The interface theory offers a rich blend of logic and mathematical modeling with a dash of evolutionary story-telling, leading to the conclusion that perceptual experience and physical reality are only loosely related. Is the theory convincing? I would have to say "almost"; although it certainly has many elements working in its favor, ultimately, I also found that some important questions were ignored or left unanswered (e.g., a more fully articulated account of how evolutionary mechanisms operate on perception). I am quite optimistic that the next iteration of the theory will be able to address these issues.

  2. Cultural Variations in the Socialization of Young Children's Anger and Shame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Pamela M.; Tamang, Babu Lal; Shrestha, Srijana

    2006-01-01

    Tamang and Brahman Nepali children have culturally specific emotion scripts that may reflect different emotion socialization experiences. To study emotion socialization, the child-adult interactions of 119 children (3-5 years old) were observed and 14 village elders were interviewed about child competence in Tamang and Brahman villages. Tamang…

  3. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    proven effective in the control of agricultural pests in an environmentally ..... Prakash G and Srivastava A K 2005 Statistical media optimization for cell growth and ... Juss. suspension cultures; Process Biochemistry 40 3795–3800. Prakash G ...

  4. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. DIPANA JYOTI MOHANTY. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 43 Issue 3 March 2018 pp 45. Trade-credit modeling for deteriorating item inventory system with preservation technology under random planning horizon · DIPANA JYOTI MOHANTY RAVI SHANKAR KUMAR A GOSWAMI.

  5. Indexes to Volume 78

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A higher-dimensional Bianchi type-I inflationary Universe in general relativity ... confinement as parent in the variationally improved perturbation theory. Bhaskar Jyoti .... quantum well under hydrostatic pressure and electric field. S Panda.

  6. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. BHASKAR JYOTI HAZARIKA1 D K CHOUDHURY1 2. Centre for Theoretical Studies, Pandu College, Guwahati 781 012, India; Physics Academy of North East, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781 014, India ...

  7. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opperwjj

    In India, the gang rape and killing of Jyoti Singh Pandey in New Delhi at .... inequalities and prescribed gender roles, hegemonic masculinities and femininities, and .... INAPPROPRIATE SOCIAL AND STATE RESPONSES TO GBV. Crudely ...

  8. Nucleon–nucleon scattering in the light of supersymmetric quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... Author Affiliations. J Bhoi1 U Laha1 K C Panda2. Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Jamshedpur 831 014, India; School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla 768 019, India ...

  9. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... Author Affiliations. T K Jha1 Keshab C Panda2. Department of Physics, BITS Pilani K K Birla Goa Campus, Goa 403 726, India; School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar 768 019, India ...

  10. Form factors and charge radii in a quantum chromodynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika1 D K choudhury1 2. Centre for Theoretical Studies, Pandu College, Guwahati 781 012, India; Department of Physics, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781 014, India ...

  11. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. D PRAKASH. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 43 Issue 3 March 2018 pp 30. Thermal analysis of building roof assisted with water heater and insulation material · D PRAKASH · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Traditional roof systems are constructed with concrete and weathering coarse ...

  12. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. S Prakash. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 34 Issue 2 April 2009 pp 299-307. Erosion–corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the boiler · T S Sidhu S Prakash R D Agrawal Ramesh Bhagat · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  13. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Volume 12; Issue 9. Cylindrical Furnace Made of Rejected Rheostats. Rajneesh K Srivastava S G Prakash. Classroom Volume 12 Issue 9 September 2007 pp 74-75 ... Author Affiliations. Rajneesh K Srivastava1 S G Prakash1. Department of Electronics and Communication, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002 ...

  14. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heat transfer to MHD oscillatory dusty fluid flow in a channel filled with a porous medium · Om Prakash O D Makinde Devendra Kumar Y K Dwivedi · More Details Abstract Fulltext ... Volume 41 Issue 11 November 2016 pp 1299-1309. Novel quantum inspired binary neural network algorithm · OM PRAKASH PATEL ARUNA ...

  15. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. S Prakash. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 59 Issue 3 September 2002 pp 497-514. Atomic displacements in dilute alloys of Cr, Nb and Mo · Hitesh Sharma S Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Kanzaki lattice static method is used to ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A S Prakash. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 339-345 Ceramics and Glasses. Solution-combustion synthesis of Bi1–LnO1.5 (Ln = Y and La–Yb) oxide ion conductors · Manjunath B Bellakki A S Prakash C Shivakumara M S ...

  17. see Gupta VK 433 Andreev V see Porcellato AM 963 Antony J see ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cryogenic, superconducting and rf results of the SRFQ2 of PIAVE. 963. Prakash P N. Superconducting linear accelerator system for. NSC. 849 see Ghosh S. 881. Prakash S see Sharma Hitesh. 497. Prasad J see Chopra S. 753. Prasad Moonooku see Pande S A. 859. Prasad R L. CO2 laser photoacoustic spectra and vibra-.

  18. Observation of a population of Egyptian Vultures Neophron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Campbell Murn

    Observational study of behavior: sampling methods. Behaviour 49:227- 267. Baral, N., R. Gautam & B. Tamang .2005. Population status and breeding ecology of White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis in Rampur Valley,. Nepal. Forktail 21: 87-91. Brandl, R., Utschick, H & Schmidtke, K. 1985. Raptors and land-use systems.

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. RAVI KANT1 UJJWAL PRAKASH1 VIJAYA AGARWALA1 V V SATYA PRASAD2. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, India; Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058, India ...

  20. South African Journal of Education - Vol 25, No 4 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of transformational leadership on human resource management in primary schools · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Prakash Singh, Kari Lokotsch, 279-286 ...

  1. Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Applied Mathematics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, India; Department of Mathematics, Gayatri Vidya Parishad College of Engineering for Women, Madhurawada, Visakhapatnam 530 048, India; Department of Mathematics, Sri Prakash College of Engineering, Tuni 533 401, India ...

  2. Cassava starch as an alternative cheap gelling agent for the in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-03

    Jul 3, 2007 ... 70% of the total production cost (Prakash, 1993). Moreover, the ... meter pots half filled with well-watered mixture of steam sterilised soil substrate ..... biodegradable and poses no threat to the environment on being properly ...

  3. Brief communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Keywords. Infection frequency; insects; pests; polymerase chain reaction; Wolbachia ... management of uzifly, a parasitoid of silkworn (Puttaraju and. Prakash 2005a ... supply unit EP S200V/400 mA (Amersham Pharmacia. Biotech USA).

  4. Information and Announcements Prize for Innovation in Alternative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    for Innovation in Alternative Fuels for Transportation by the State of Israel. ... and his long-term (over 35 years) associate G K Surya Prakash have been ... Their most significant contribution has been the invention and development of direct.

  5. CIFKAS A Measurer of Functional Disability Status in Knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CIFKAS A Measurer of Functional Disability Status in Knee Osteoarthritis. Vijay Batra, Vijai Prakash Sharma, Meenakshi Batra, Vineet Sharma, Girdhar Gopal Agarwal, Vijay K Singh, Ravindra Mohan Pandey ...

  6. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. The spices ... Supplementary materials pertaining to this article are available on the Journal of Biosciences Website at .... method are reported (Prakash et al. ..... characterization and utilization.

  7. The Himalayas: barrier and conduit for gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayden, Tenzin; Perez, Annabel; Persad, Patrice J; Bukhari, Areej; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Simms, Tanya; Maloney, Trisha; Rodriguez, Kristina; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-06-01

    The Himalayan mountain range is strategically located at the crossroads of the major cultural centers in Asia, the Middle East and Europe. Although previous Y-chromosome studies indicate that the Himalayas served as a natural barrier for gene flow from the south to the Tibetan plateau, this region is believed to have played an important role as a corridor for human migrations between East and West Eurasia along the ancient Silk Road. To evaluate the effects of the Himalayan mountain range in shaping the maternal lineages of populations residing on either side of the cordillera, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA variation in 344 samples from three Nepalese collections (Newar, Kathmandu and Tamang) and a general population of Tibet. Our results revealed a predominantly East Asian-specific component in Tibet and Tamang, whereas Newar and Kathmandu are both characterized by a combination of East and South Central Asian lineages. Interestingly, Newar and Kathmandu harbor several deep-rooted Indian lineages, including M2, R5, and U2, whose coalescent times from this study (U2, >40 kya) and previous reports (M2 and R5, >50 kya) suggest that Nepal was inhabited during the initial peopling of South Central Asia. Comparisons with our previous Y-chromosome data indicate sex-biased migrations in Tamang and a founder effect and/or genetic drift in Tamang and Newar. Altogether, our results confirm that while the Himalayas acted as a geographic barrier for human movement from the Indian subcontinent to the Tibetan highland, it also served as a conduit for gene flow between Central and East Asia. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Das Jyoti (6) 573 (CR). Dattagupta Sushanta (5) 428 (GA). Deshmukh P C (9) 832, (10) 926 (GA). Dhar Deepak (6) 514 (GA). Dutta Kishore (12) ... Narasimhan M S (2) 101 (AIB). Narlikar J V (10) 865 (AIB); 875 (GA). Natarajan S (1) 2 (AIB). Natarajan Vasant (8) 723, (11) 1003 (GA). Padmanabhan T (6) 498, (7) 590, (8) 684,.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 3. Volume 119, Issue 3. June 2010, pages 229-396. pp 229-247. Active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon · M Rajeevan Sulochana Gadgil Jyoti Bhate · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In this paper, we suggest criteria for the ...

  10. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Pinaki Patra. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 80 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 21-30 Research Articles. SUSY formalism for the symmetric double well potential · Pinaki Patra Abhijit Dutta Jyoti Prasad Saha · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Using first- ...

  11. Shekhar C Mande

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Shekhar C Mande. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 22 Issue 9 September 2017 pp 829-833 General Article. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2016 · Shekhar C Mande Jyoti Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  12. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... interactions, leading to the supramolecular organisation of the rings into a spiral-like of chain. Volume 119 Issue 3 May 2007 pp 243-252. Synthesis, spectroscopy and supramolecular structures of two magnesium 4-nitrobenzoate complexes · Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan Jyoti V Sawant Christian Näther Wolfgang Bensch.

  13. Bikshandarkoil R srinivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 119 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 11-20. Synthesis, spectroscopy, thermal studies and supramolecular structures of two new alkali-earth 4-nitrobenzoate complexes containing coordinated imidazole · Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan Jyoti V Sawant Pallepogu Raghavaiah · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The reaction of ...

  14. Accuracy of simple folding model in the calculation of the direct part ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 5 ... School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Sambalpur 768 019, India; Panchayat College, Bargarh 768 028, India; Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Jamshedpur 831 ... Please take note of this change.

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0001195

    It can be a potential enabler for scientists engaged in drug discovery in general and in anti-TB research in particular. On the effect of external perturbation on amino acid salt bridge: a DFT study. Biswa Jyoti Dutta, Nabajit Sarmah and. Pradip KR Bhattacharyya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .533–541. Salt-bridge formation ...

  16. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 78; Issue 4. Isgur–Wise function in a quantum chromodynamicsinspired potential model with confinement as parent in the variationally improved perturbation theory. Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika D K Choudhury. Research Articles Volume 78 Issue 4 April 2012 pp 555-564 ...

  17. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 75; Issue 3. Slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function using variationally improved perturbation theory in a quantum chromodynamics inspired potential model. Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika D K Choudhury. Research Articles Volume 75 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 423- ...

  18. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 1. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino parameters and the twisting structure of the solar magnetic fields from the solar neutrino data. S Dev Jyoti Dhar Sharma U C Pandey S P Sud B C Chauhan. Research Articles Volume 61 Issue 1 ...

  19. Large scale features and assessment of spatial scale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Uma1, T V Lakshmi Kumar1, M S Narayanan1,∗, M Rajeevan2,. Jyoti Bhate3 and K ... satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) version 6 and India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded ... site http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/, has provided an.

  20. Characterization of two freshwater silurid catfish using conventional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyoti Verma1 W. S. Lakra1 B. Kushwaha1 M. Sirajuddin2 N. S. Nagpure1 Ravindra Kumar1. National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (NBFGR), Canal Ring Road, P. O. Dilkusha, Lucknow 226 002, India; Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226 007, India ...

  1. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 75 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 423-438 Research Articles. Slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function using variationally improved perturbation theory in a quantum chromodynamics inspired ...

  2. Isgur–Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model with WKB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-28

    Feb 28, 2017 ... DOI 10.1007/s12043-016-1357-9. Isgur–Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model with WKB approximation. BHASKAR JYOTI HAZARIKA1,∗ and D K CHOUDHURY1,2. 1Centre for Theoretical Studies, Pandu College, Guwahati 781 012, India. 2Physics Academy of North East, Gauhati University, ...

  3. Late Quaternary seismic sequence stratigraphy of the Gulf of Kachchh, northwest of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Michael, L.; Rao, D.G.; Krishna, K.S.; Vora, K.H.

    sediments of Late Quaternary (Chamyal, Maurya, and Raj, 2003) and Holocene (Juyal et al., 1995; Prakash et al., 2000) of Saurashtra and Kachchh peninsula and the submergence of coastal areas i.e., Bet Dwarka sometime after 3,870 yr BP (Gaur, Vora... (Juyal et al., 1995; Prakash et al., 2000) and Recent (Chandrasekhar et al., 2004) mark post-Pleistocene-Holocene neotectonics of the Saurashtra and Kachchh peninsula. Contrary to that, submergence of coastal areas i.e., Bet Dwarka sometime after 3...

  4. Radiation induced early maturing mutants in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Chauhan, S.V.S.; Sharma, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    In M 2 generation, two early maturing plants were screened from a single spike progeny of a plant obtained from 20 kR of gamma-ray irradiation of a six-rowed barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Jyoti). Their true breeding nature was confirmed in M 3 generation. These mutants flower and mature 38 and 22 days earlier than those of control. (auth.)

  5. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    OpenAIRE

    Gorevski, Elizabeth; Succop, Paul; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Volek, Paul; Heaton, Pamela; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Martin-Boone, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney t...

  6. Introduction: Modelling Exemplarity in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gayer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Prashant Tamang, a young Indian police officer of Nepalese origin, became the winner of the third edition of the television show ‘Indian Idol’. This victory was made possible by the mobilization of Tamang’s profession -the Indian Police force- and of his ethnic community -Indians of Nepalese descent- both in India and abroad. The young man had captured the imagination of these two groups with his musical talent but also with his life-story and personality. Born and educated in Darjee...

  7. Man-animal relationships in Central Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohani Usha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nepal is small in size but rich in bio-cultural diversity. The rugged terrain of the country is home to a number of unique assemblages of fauna, some of which are endemic. Not only faunal resources the country also harbors some very ancient populations whose interrelationship with these diverse faunal resources is very intimate and thus demands scientific study. Animals play important role in both material and spiritual spheres of their life. There are more than hundred groups of such populations in the country and the group Tamang is one of these. The present paper studies Tamang-animal relationships in central Nepal. There is a growing trend of scientific ethnozoological studies all across the globe, but this field is yet in its infancy in Nepal. The country is losing important fauna as well as ancient human cultures at the advent of development processes. As a result, ethnozoological knowledge is also teetering on the brink of extinction. Methods Ethnozoological data were collected by applying different participatory approaches techniques such as semi-structured interviews, participatory rural appraisal, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Quantitative data were obtained by employing a household level questionnaire survey. Data were collected from the period of September 2004 to August 2005. Most of the animals were identified up to the species level with the help of standard taxonomic keys. Results The Tamang community treasures knowledge on various uses of 41 genera belonging to 28 families. Out of total number of animals, 14.6% belong to the Invertebrate group and the rest to the Vertebrate group. Of the total uses 58% fall in the food and medicinal use category, 16% in the magico-religious use category, 18% in the category of omen indication, and 2% each in the categories such as weather forecasting, trophy, ethnomusical and taboos. Conclusions The Tamang maintain strong ties with animals both at a

  8. Reviewer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Haranadha RajaH S JoshiHarsh MahajanHarshal SalveHem SatiHema GogiaHemang ShahHemant PawarHimalaya SinghHimanshu AgarwalH NegandhiJeetendra YadavIndrani GogoiI B SareenIpsa MohapatraIqbal M KhanJ NarainJ P MajraJ S ThakurJ V SinghJabanesh PalasJagannath BeheraJai K ShethJai SinghJaideep KumarVidanapathiranaJ DeshpandeyJayanta DasJayanti SemwalJitendera SinghJitendra BhawalkarJitendra KummarJoy ChakmaJugal KishoreJyoti TiwariK B S GuptaK MallikharjunaK RajasekharanK S NegiKallappa MasaliKamalakanta DasKapil AgrawalKapil YadavKarthik BalajeeKejal Joshi ReddyKhaja AhmedK MuzammilKimcheng ChounKishan K BhatiaKoskei AlfredKrishna JoshiKrishnaveni RKriti Bhat KKriti VaishK BrahmbhattKshitij ChoudharyL SatyanarayanaLakshmi PvmLalita SisodiaLatika Nath SinhaLavanya SelvarajLekshmy PillaiLilabi ShakirLivinus EgwudaLt Col R P SinghM RafiqM S A AhmedM SinghMadhavi BhargavaMahender SinghMaj JawaidMalik ItratMamta ChoudharyMandar SadawarteManeesh KumarManish ChaturvediManish GehaniManoj BansalManoj GuptaManu BatraManvi SagarMarie MajellaMary LeeMd Abu BasharMd AlamMd PialMd S BasandraMeenal ThakareMegha LuthraMigom DoleyM BhattacharyaMilind SomkuwarMisnaniartiH Mohammed MerzahMohin SakreMohini PhanseMonica AggarwalMonica KakkarMukhmohit SinghM TambeMuthu KumarN ArlapaNabil Al RabeeiNajam KhaliqueNandini SharmaNaresh SinghNavin AngadiNavneet SandhuNavuluri K ReddyNeerajNeha ChananaNidhi BhatnagarNidhi GuptaNidhi PrasadNikhil GovilN SardeshpandeNimila MathewsNiraj PanditNirankar SinghNitin DhupdaleNiveditha CO Prakash KansalOmair WaniPadmavati MajhiPallabi GuptaPallavi BoroPallavi PotdarPankaj BhardwajPankaj JainPankaj MishraParabjyot KaurParag KumarParnava DasParul SehgalParul SharmaParvathy PPavana BelagaviPawan GoelPawan KumarPawan ParasharPeeyush KariwalPoonam BPoorna C ReddyP AggarwalP ChoudharyPradeep KasarPragya SinhaPramod GuptaPrasad BogamPrasant SabothPrashant HowalPratima GuptaPraveen SaharyaPravin SPreeti PaddaPunit VarmaPunyatoya BejPurva JoshiR SharmaRabindra SinhaRachana A

  9. Fossil wood flora from the Siwalik Group of Arunachal Pradesh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gaurav Srivastava

    2018-02-10

    Feb 10, 2018 ... Banderdewa road. (d) A section of the Middle Siwalik locality of Pappu Nala showing salt-and-pepper coloured sandstone. ..... homogeneous, ray cells 17–43 µm in radial length ..... ley 1997), whereas Intsia consists of nine species found in ... climate reconstruction (Bande and Chandra 1990;. Prakash et al ...

  10. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide ( 314 PAPV 317 to 314 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 4. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity. Krishna Prakash Pramod C Rath. Articles Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 547-556 ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. D S Prasad. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 2 April 2002 pp 79-83 Materials Synthesis. Preparation of high purity tellurium by zone refining · N R Munirathnam D S Prasad Ch Sudheer A J Singh T L Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Ch Sudheer. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 545-547. Tellurium purification: various techniques and limitations · D S Prasad Ch Sudheer N R Munirathnam T L Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Limitations and ...

  13. N R Munirathnam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. N R Munirathnam. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 2 April 2002 pp 79-83 Materials Synthesis. Preparation of high purity tellurium by zone refining · N R Munirathnam D S Prasad Ch Sudheer A J Singh T L Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  14. Characterization of urinary volatiles in Swiss male mice (Mus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and Archunan 2001a), territorial marking (Balakrishnan and Alexander 1985; Prakash et al 1998) mother-young interactions (Leon 1983), and individual identification. (Poddar-Sarkar and Brahmachary 1999). Urine is known to be a major source of mammalian chemosignals invol- ved in this pheromonal communication.

  15. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    outcomes after traumatic brain injury: A multicenter analysis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 84(10), 1441- 1448. Cremer , O. L...Kolesnik Research Assistant 67.5 Sean Jordan Research Assistant 44.5 Sara Wade Research Assistant 90 David Prakash Research Assistant 63.6 Scott Berry

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Amar Agarwal1 K K K K Agarwal2 R Bali2 Chandra Prakash2 Gaurav Joshi2. Laboratorio de Paleomagnetismo, Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico City, Mexico. Centre of Advanced Study in Geology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.

  17. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 23, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Robert Wise, Kim de Vasconcellos, David Skinner, Reitze Rodseth, Dean Gopalan, David Muckart, Zohra Banoo, Tashmin Bisseru, Steve Blakemore, Jenine de Meyer, Michael Faurie, Kom Govender, Timothy Hardcastle, Prakash Jeena, Nicky Kalafatis, Kroshlan Kistan, Theroshnie Kisten, Carolyn Lee, Colin Mitchell, ...

  18. Dr. S. Varadarajan | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow, Royal Soc. of Chem., INSA; President, Indian National Academy of Engg., Nutrition Soc. of India, Oil Technologists Assn. of India. Om Prakash Bhasin Award; Padma Bhushan 85. Sc. Work in organic and Biological Chemistry and Chemical Technology. Worked on natural products, on plant products, particularly ...

  19. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. obesity; HOMA-IR; insulin; polymorphism. Author Affiliations. Jai Prakash1 Balraj Mittal2 Shally Awasthi3 C. G. Agarwal4 Neena Srivastava1. Department of Physiology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow 226 003, India; Department of Genetics, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, ...

  20. Biological Invasion and Loss of Endemic Biodiversity in the Thar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 3. Nature Watch - Biological Invasion and Loss of Endemic Biodiversity in the Thar Desert. Ishwar Prakash. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 76-85. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Optical, mechanical and TEM assessment of titania-doped Bi2V1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 7. Optical, mechanical and TEM assessment of titania-doped Bi2V1−TiO5.5−δ bismuth vanadate oxides. Gurbinder Kaur Gary Pickrell Vishal Kumar Om Prakash Pandey Kulvir Singh Daniel Homa. Volume 37 Issue 7 December 2014 pp ...

  2. Optical, mechanical and TEM assessment of titania-doped Bi2V1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Gurbinder Kaur1 Gary Pickrell1 Vishal Kumar1 2 Om Prakash Pandey3 Kulvir Singh3 Daniel Homa1. Department of Material Science and Engineering, Holden Hall, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060, USA; Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fategarh Sahib 140 406, India; School of Physics ...

  3. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish B R. Studies on synthesis of calcium ferrite-based bio glass ceramics 133. Jai Prakash B S see Krishna B S 355. Jain S K see Khare P K 139. Jani N N ... polyvinyl pyrrolidone films 139. Thermally stimulated current and electrical conduction in metal (1)-ethyl cellulose-metal (l)/(2) systems 207. Khaskalam Amit K.

  4. Attacks on the AJPS Mersenne-based cryptosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. de Boer (Koen); L. Ducas (Léo); S. Jeffery (Stacey); R. M. de Wolf (Ronald)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAggarwal, Joux, Prakash and Santha recently introduced a new potentially quantum-safe public-key cryptosystem, and suggested that a brute-force attack is essentially optimal against it. They consider but then dismiss both Meet-in-the-Middle attacks and LLL-based attacks. Very soon after

  5. Back-thrusting in Lesser Himalaya: Evidences from magnetic fabric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Back-thrusting in Lesser Himalaya: Evidences from magnetic fabric studies in parts of Almora crystalline zone, Kumaun Lesser Himalaya. Amar Agarwal, K K Agarwal, R Bali, Chandra Prakash and Gaurav Joshi. Supplementary data. Table S1. AMS data, representing mean of values from cores (N) collected from each site ...

  6. C Shivakumara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. C Shivakumara. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 339-345 Ceramics and Glasses. Solution-combustion synthesis of Bi1–LnO1.5 (Ln = Y and La–Yb) oxide ion conductors · Manjunath B Bellakki A S Prakash C Shivakumara ...

  7. Geomorphologic, stratigraphic and sedimentologic evidences of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Central Ground Water Board, Mid-eastern Region, 6th and 7th floor, Lok Nayak Jai Prakash Bhawan,. Fraser Road ...... Under the conditions of seasonal/altered flow regime and low ..... stress field in the western Gangetic plains; Curr. Sci.

  8. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Surya Ratna Prakash Dumpa. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 35 Review Article. Planning and Scheduling of Payloads of AstroSat During Initial and Normal Phase Observations · R. Pandiyan S. V. ...

  9. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. S P Senthilkumar. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 113 Issue 3 June 2001 pp 191-196 Organic. A convenient procedure for the synthesis of allyl and benzyl ethers from alcohols and phenols · H Surya Prakash Rao S P Senthilkumar · More Details ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The potential use of solid adsorbents for the adsorption of heavy metal pollutants is envisaged in the present work. pp 7-16 Thin Films and Nanomatter. Effect of fuel characteristics on synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite by solution combustion route · Samir K Ghosh Asit Prakash Someswar Datta Sujit K Roy Debabrata Basu.

  11. K Ramesha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Ramesha. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 2 April 2011 pp 271-277. Synthesis of new (Bi, La)3MSb2O11 phases (M = Cr, Mn, Fe) with KSbO3-type structure and their magnetic and photocatalytic properties · K Ramesha A S Prakash M Sathiya ...

  12. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. P Natarajan1 P Paul1 2 T Dhanasekaran1 H Prakash1. Department of Inorganic Chemistry and National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Chennai 600 025, India; Catalysis Division, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364 002, India ...

  13. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. K Vasantham. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 123 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 411-420. Nitroketene dithioacetal chemistry: Synthesis of coumarins incorporating nitrothiophene moiety · H Surya Prakash Rao K Vasantham · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. S Jothilingam. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 117 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 27-32 Full Papers. Studies on NaI/DMSO induced retro-Michael addition (RMA) reactions on some 1,5-dicarbonyl compounds · H Surya Prakash Rao S Jothilingam.

  15. Novel quantum inspired binary neural network algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This parameter is taken as the threshold of neuron for learning of neural network. This algorithm is tested with three benchmark datasets and ... Author Affiliations. OM PRAKASH PATEL1 ARUNA TIWARI. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552, India ...

  16. K S Boob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Boob. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 153-159. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer · Ravindra Kumar J Alphonsa Ram Prakash K S Boob J Ghanshyam P A Rayjada P M Raole S Mukherjee · More Details ...

  17. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Gargi Meur1 K. Gaikwad2 S. R. Bhat2 S. Prakash2 P. B. Kirti1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India; National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India ...

  18. Effects of SiO2 and TiO2 fillers on thermal and dielectric properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eco-friendly bismuth glass microcomposites of plasma display panels. SHIV PRAKASH SINGH ... MS received 12 November 2008; revised 18 March 2009. Abstract. The effects .... In view of above, in this paper we report the effects of. SiO2 (amorphous) ..... mic Membrane Sections of this institute for carrying out the XRD and ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 3. Effect of composition on the polarization and ohmic resistances of LSM/YSZ composite cathodes in solid oxide fuel cell. B SHRI PRAKASH S SENTHIL KUMAR S T ARUNA. Volume 40 Issue 3 June 2017 pp 441-452 ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Chandra. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 4 August 2007 pp 309-314 Biomaterials. Characteristics of porous zirconia coated with hydroxyapatite as human bones · V V Narulkar S Prakash K Chandra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  1. 2. Home 3. Journals 4. Pramana–Journal of Physics 5. Volume 63 6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the QCD working sub-group at WHEPP-8 which was part of the QCD and QGP working group. Discussion and work on some aspects of resummation and parton distribution are reported. Author Affiliations. Prakash Mathewes1 Rahul Basu2 D Indumathi2 E Laenen3 Swapan Majhi4 Anuradha Misra5 ...

  2. Anuradha Misra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuradha Misra. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 63 Issue 6 December 2004 pp 1367-1379. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics · Prakash Mathewes Rahul Basu D Indumathi E Laenen Swapan Majhi Anuradha Misra Asmita Mukherjee W Vogelsang · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. T S Sidhu. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 34 Issue 2 April 2009 pp 299-307. Erosion–corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the boiler · T S Sidhu S Prakash R D Agrawal Ramesh Bhagat · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  4. On triply diffusive convection in completely confined fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper carries forward Prakash et al. [21] analysis for triple diffusive convection problem in completely confined fluids and derives upper bounds for the complex growth rate of an arbitrary oscillatory disturbance which may be neutral or unstable through the use of some non-trivial integral estimates obtained from the coupled system of governing equations of the problem.

  5. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. O D Makinde. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 40 Issue 4 June 2015 pp 1273-1282 Mechanical Sciences. Heat transfer to MHD oscillatory dusty fluid flow in a channel filled with a porous medium · Om Prakash O D Makinde Devendra Kumar Y K Dwivedi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  6. Preparation, characterization and dielectric behaviour of some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    semiconductors exhibiting relaxor behaviour when doped with more than 1% Y2O3 ... mics according to relation, O0 = 1/2O2 + V0 ± 2e′ (Prakash et al 1987). On cooling ... pattern is shown in figure 1, which was indexed on the basis of cubic ...

  7. Solution-combustion synthesis of Bi1–xLnxO1⋅ 5 (Ln= Y and La–Yb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    combustion synthesis of Bi1–LnO1.5 (Ln = Y and La–Yb) oxide ion conductors. Manjunath B Bellakki A S Prakash C Shivakumara M S Hegde A K Shukla. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 29 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 339-345 ...

  8. Microwave synthesis and sintering characteristics of CaCu3 Ti4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Dielectric Materials Division, Central Power Research Institute, Bangalore 560 080, India. ††. Ceramic ..... Landry C C, Lockwood J and Barron A R 1995 Chem. Mater. 7. 699 ... Thakur O P, Chandra Prakash and Agrawal D K 2002 Mater. Lett.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient () based optical classification of IRS-P3 MOS-B satellite ocean colour data · R K Sarangi Prakash Chauhan S R Nayak · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The optical classification of the different water types provides vital input for studies related to primary productivity, water clarity ...

  10. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abrol, Dr Yash Pal Ph.D. (Chicago), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 December 1935. Specialization: Agriculture: Crop Physiology, Environmental Sciences Address: Chief Patron, Society for Conservation of Nature, Room No. F4, A Block, NASC Complex, Dev Prakash Shastry Marg, P.O. Pusa, New Delhi 110 012, ...

  11. Luminescence performance of Eu -doped lead-free zinc phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    luminescence properties in combination with its non-toxicity and non-hygroscopic nature ..... two colours will appear to the human eye as one colour and. Figure 10. ... [4] Mariappam C R, Govindaraj G, Rathan S V and Vijaya. Prakash G 2005 ...

  12. Cs2CO3-Initiated Trifluoro-Methylation of Chalcones and Ketones for Practical Synthesis of Trifluoromethylated Tertiary Silyl Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Dong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It was found that 1,2-trifluoromethylation reactions of ketones, enones, and aldehydes were easily accomplished using the Prakash reagent in the presence of catalytic amounts of cesium carbonate, which represents an experimentally convenient, atom-economic process for this anionic trifluoromethylation of non-enolisable aldehydes and ketones.

  13. South Sudan Medical Journal - Vol 9, No 3 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How to interpret an unenhanced CT Brain scan. Part 1: Basic principles of Computed Tomography and relevant neuroanatomy · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Thomas Osborne, Christine Tang, Kivraj Sabarwal, Vineet Prakash, 67-69 ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Venkatakrishna R Jala1 V Prakash2 N Appaji Rao1 H S Savithri1. Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India; Department of Protein Chemistry and Technology, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 013, India ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G V Ravi Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 285-295. Shift in detrital sedimentation in the eastern Bay of Bengal during the late Quaternary · C Prakash Babu J N Pattan K Dutta N Basavaiah G V Ravi Prasad D K ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 8. Application of environmental isotopes and hydrochemistry in the identification of source of seepage and likely connection with lake water in Lesser Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India. Shive Prakash Rai Dharmaveer Singh Ashwani Kumar Rai Bhishm ...

  17. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. J Zacharias. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 59 Issue 5 November 2002 pp 849-858. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC · P N Prakash T S Datta B P Ajith Kumar J Antony P Barua J Chacko A Choudhury G K Chadhari S Ghosh S Kar ...

  18. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    performance study as a heterogeneous catalyst. Prakash Chhattise, Kalpana Handore, Amit Horne, Kakasaheb Mohite,. Atul Chaskar, Sabrina Dallavalle and Vasant Chabukswar. . . . 467–475. Polyindole was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization using citric acid as a dopant. The synthesized polymer was well ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S Ignacimuthu. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 3 September 2006 pp 339-345 Articles. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea with -amylase inhibitor gene for insect resistance · S Ignacimuthu S Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  20. Chemical Constituents and Biological Properties of the Marine Soft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    methyldihydroxy steroid from the soft coral. Nephthea chabroli in Indian coast. Journal of the Indian Chemical Society, 1994; 71(6-8):. 523-525. 10. Anjaneyulu ASR, Prakash CVS. New sesqui and diterpenoids from the soft coral Nephthea chabroli of Indian Coast. Indian Journal of. Chemistry, Section B: Organic Chemistry.

  1. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 11, No 103 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partial purification and biochemical characterization of acid phosphatase from germinated mung bean (Vigna radiata) seeds · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Th Surchandra, SS Roy, N Rakesh Singh, MR Sahoo, N Prakash, 16777-16782 ...

  2. Zinc Fertilization in Potato: A Physiological and Bio-chemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hirak Banerjee; Sukamal Sarkar; Prahlad Deb; Ivi Chakraborty; Sayan Sau; Krishnendu Ray

    2017-01-01

    Aims: More than 54% of soils in West Bengal are Zinc (Zn) deficient and therefore, Zn−fertilization is assumed to play a key role not only for increasing potato yield but also for combating wide spread deficiency of micronutrients (mainly Zn) in many potato growing areas of the state. Place and Duration of Study: A two-year field experiment was conducted during winter 2013-14 and 2014-15 at to assess the advantages of Zn nutrition in potato cv. Kufri Jyoti under alluvial soil (Entisols) o...

  3. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-04

    short-term gains. It would sustained minor injuries . One of the ULFA militants was call for quite a change in attitude on the part of Indian also injured...central committee who assist the politburo. They are Mr woo him into the cabinet since his mentor Vasantdada Prakash Karat and Mr Sitaram Yachuri from Delhi...The market share of the Indian yarn was too low for it REP licence system. Success in eliminating quantity to cause material injury . restrictions will

  4. Highly Directive Reflect Array Antenna Design for Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    61102F 6.  AUTHOR(S) Siddhartha Prakash Duttagupta 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.   WORK UNIT NUMBER 7.  PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...this study by Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development (AOARD), USA 06 March, 2017 DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release...D parabolic design. These include suitability for manufacturing, ease of testing, and flexibility of RAA design for different frequencies

  5. Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL - Vol 3, No 2 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lateralization pattern in patients with Schizophrenia and Depression. B Bhushan, A Prakash, R Gupta. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijmu.v3i2.39836 · Gender Determination using Fingertip Features. J-F Wang, C-L Lin, Y-H Chang, ML Nagurka, C-W Yen, C Yeh. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijmu.v3i2.39838 · Effects of smoking on ...

  6. Trifluoromethylselenolation of Aryldiazonium Salts: A Mild and Convenient Copper-Catalyzed Procedure for the Introduction of the SeCF3Group

    KAUST Repository

    Nikolaienko, Pavlo

    2016-01-21

    The straightforward introduction of the trifluoromethylseleno group into aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds is accomplished by the utilization of readily available aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborates, potassium selenocyanate, and Ruppert-Prakash reagent. The reaction tolerates a wide range of aromatic and heteroaromatic diazonium salts and is also amenable to the synthesis of pentafluoroethyl selenoethers. Furthermore, the methodology can be applied directly starting from anilines. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Taking the Measure of the Universe: Precision Astrometry with SIM Planetquest (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-09

    streams, and § 11 explains how astro- metric microlensing provides insight into the mass spec- trum of dark bodies in the Galaxy. § 12 and 13 cover...condensates, and quark matter) can reproduce this mass for a large range of radii (Lattimer & Prakash 2004). However, more recently, there are indications...diameter, repre- sented by the dark circle in the center, was measured with the VLTI while the circumstellar SiO masers were imaged concurrently with

  8. Understanding Counterinsurgency in Democratic Settings: Counterinsurgency Success and Failure in Kashmir and Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    and local-election participation after 2002, the return of tourism , the growth of businesses, and an increased Indian center-state involvement on...violence, increasing popular participation in the political process, improving economic growth, and returning tourism have been observed in Kashmir since...115 Prakash Singh, Kohima to Kashmir: On the Terrorist Trail (New Delhi: Rupa & Company, 2001), 184–185. 31 local insurgents in Kashmir.116 According

  9. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC · P N Prakash T S Datta B P Ajith Kumar J Antony P Barua J Chacko A Choudhury G K Chadhari S Ghosh S Kar S A Krishnan Manoj Kumar Rajesh Kumar A Mandal D S Mathuria R S Meena R Mehta K K Mistri A Pandey M V Suresh Babu B K Sahu A Sarkar S S K Sonti A ...

  10. Trifluoromethylselenolation of Aryldiazonium Salts: A Mild and Convenient Copper-Catalyzed Procedure for the Introduction of the SeCF3Group

    KAUST Repository

    Nikolaienko, Pavlo; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The straightforward introduction of the trifluoromethylseleno group into aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds is accomplished by the utilization of readily available aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborates, potassium selenocyanate, and Ruppert-Prakash reagent. The reaction tolerates a wide range of aromatic and heteroaromatic diazonium salts and is also amenable to the synthesis of pentafluoroethyl selenoethers. Furthermore, the methodology can be applied directly starting from anilines. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Global analysis of genetic variation in human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya; Takeshita, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene at the global level. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was performed in 827 individuals from 10 populations (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetans, Sri Lankan Tamils, Sri Lankan Sinhalese, Nepal Tamangs, Ovambo, and Ghanaian). In the African populations, the A allele in A6144T was not observed; the allele frequencies of C35587 were much lower than those in other populations; the allele frequencies of A37616 and C37950 were relatively higher than those in other populations. Among Asian populations, Mongolians showed a different genotype distribution pattern. A lower C3963 and T6144 frequencies were observed, and, in the C37616A and T37950C polymorphism, the Mongolian population showed higher A37616 and C37950 allele frequencies than other Asian populations, similarly to the African populations. A total of 66 haplotypes were observed in the Ovambo, 48, in the Ghanaian, 99, in the Japanese, 103, in the Korean, 103, in the South Chinese, 20, in the Sri Lankan Tamil, 12, in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, 21, in the Nepal Tamang, 50, in the Tibetan, and 45, in the Mongolian populations. The D' values between the SNP pairs were extremely high in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese population. Relatively higher D' values were observed in Mongolian and Sri Lankan Tamil populations. Network analysis showed two clusters that may have different origins, African and Asians (Chinese and/or Japanese). The present study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a world wide distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT.

  12. In vitro induction of variability through radiation for late blight resistance and heat tolerance in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosal, S.S.; Das, A.; Gopal, J.; Minocha, J.L.; Chopra, H.R.; Dhaliwal, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    In vitro cultured shoots of potato, cvs. 'Kufri Jyoti' and 'Kufri Chandramukhi', were irradiated with 20 and 40 Gy gamma rays. Microtubers, obtained from MIV3 shoots multiplied in vitro, were planted in pots. The resulting plants were screened for resistance to late blight, using detached leaf method. In 'Kufri Chandramukhi', 42% plants and in 'Kufri Jyoti' 36% plants, obtained from 40 Gy treatment, showed resistance to late blight. The frequency of resistant plants was lower from 20 Gy treatment. The progenies of putatively resistant plants were grown in field, and inoculated with sporangial inoculum of late blight fungus. The field grown progeny segregated for disease resistance, and approximately 56% plants showed resistance. During the next propagation, the frequency of resistant plants increased to 72%. For developing heat tolerance, microtubers obtained from 20 and 40 Gy treatments and in vitro multiplied M 1 V 3 shoots were cultured at high temperature of 28C. In both varieties, the number of the microtubers per plant was highly reduced and the resulting microtubers had distorted shape but showed better germination (62%), even in early sowing at relatively higher temperature. Of the two radiation doses, the higher dose of 40 Gy gave better results in both the varieties. Heat tolerance was also assessed from chlorophyll persistence. The progenies from putative heat-tolerant plants were tested in field by planting at higher temperature in two subsequent generations. The heat tolerant plants segregated in each generation, but the frequency of heat-tolerant plants increased. (author)

  13. Approach to malaria in rural hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most common parasitic infections in the developing countries. In Rural India, most patients would be treated by primary and secondary care physicians. This article is aimed at providing a feasible approach to the cases of malaria in mission hospitals and other rural hospitals taking into account all the resource limitations. A study done over one year on patients detected to have malaria at Jiwan Jyoti Christian Hospital in Sonbhadra district has helped the authors to identify the various challenges faced by doctors working in the rural hospitals. The article has looked at the various complications associated with malaria and their management. It has also stressed upon the increasing incidence of chloroquine resistance.

  14. Governance and Tradition in Nineteenth-Century Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, Søren

    2014-01-01

    as a restoration of a Greenlandic culture en route to its own destruction. The colonial authorities claimed that the establishments of new institutions were facilitating a return to the traditional practices of the past. Further the author argues that reforms effectuated in the latter part of the nineteenth...... century reflect a fundamental shift in the rationality behind the colonial project in Greenland. This analytical point is reached through the deployment of the theoretical concept colonial governmentality. Following the work of scholars such as Nicholas Thomas, David Scott and Gyan Prakash, it is argued...

  15. Review of: Legal practice and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2010-01-01

    This anthology comprises contributions from a conference on legal practice and cultural diversity held in London in July 2007, but the editors take their cue from the speech made in February 2008 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The questions central to the book are the same...... that arose after the speech by the Archbishop: whether or to what extent cultural difference should be recognized by legal systems. Legal practice and cultural diversity, edited by Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre´ J. Hoekema, Marcel Maussen, and Prakash Shah, Farnham, UK, Ashgate, 2009...

  16. Notions such as "truth" or "correspondence to the objective world" play no role in explanatory accounts of perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausfeld, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Hoffman, Singh, and Prakash (Psychonomic Review and Bulletin, 2015, in press) intend to show that perceptions are evolutionarily tuned to fitness rather than to truth. I argue, partly in accordance with their objective, that issues of 'truth' or 'veridicality' have no place in explanatory accounts of perception theory, and rather belong to either ordinary discourse or to philosophy. I regard, however, their general presumption that the evolutionary development of core achievements of the human perceptual system would be primarily determined by aspects of fitness and adaption as unwarranted in light of the evidence available.

  17. Mutation induction and isolation in potato through true seed and tuber mutagenesis and use of tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, M.D.; Abraham, M.J.; Dass, B.; Chandra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Advance MV generation clones from hydrazine-sulphate-treated 'O.T' cultures have been field evaluated and 12 cultures have been selected for yield trials. One culture, DN-31-3, has been found to be day-neutral in its tuberization behaviour. Four JL/RA clones have been selected after a large-scale field trial. These clones are the selections from gamma-irradiated self seeds of Kufri Lauvkar (A-7416) and hybrid A-2235. Similarly 15 MV 3 clones have been selected from the populations raised from EMS- and DES-treated self seeds of A-2235. Day-neutral mutants have been selected from the fourth to seventh sprouts taken from EMS-treated tuber halves of Kufri Jyoti. From the sixth sprout harvest from EMS-treated Kufri Jyoti halves, one mutant, BCN-6-2, has been isolated which showed less than 30 cysts of G. rostochiensis in the MV 2 generation. This clone has been multiplied and made disease-free through apical meristem culture. Through the use of a new medium, PM-32, the plating efficiency of mechanically isolated single callus cells of dihaploid PH-258 is 30-35%. Nitsch's medium has been modified to formulate a new medium for direct embryogenesis in single callus cells of Phulwa. All stages up to the globular stage could be observed after five to six weeks of culture. Efforts were continued for the enzymatic isolation of single-leaf mesophyll cells from dihaploid PH-258. A new cell separation medium has been formulated which gives 80% viable cells. The LD 50 and LD 100 doses of EMS for the single callus cells of dihaploid PH-255 were found to be 500 ppm and 1000 ppm respectively. (author)

  18. Breeding Biology of Critically Endangered Long-billed Vulture (Gyps indicus at a Unique Site in Telangana State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikanth Manchiryala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Out of nine species of vultures, the population of three Gyps species, White-backed Vulture (Gyps bengalensis, Slender-billed Vulture (Gyps tenuirostris and Long-billed Vulture (Gyps indicus has declined drastically by 99% over the past decade (Prakash, 1999. The Gyps vultures' population declined in India by 97% and by 92% in Pakistan (Virani, 2006, Prakash et al., 2012. Possibly the widespread usage of Diclofenac drug in the animal led to the rapid population decline for these Vultures (Green et al., 2004. The Long-billed Vulture G. indicus is a bald headed vulture with very broad wings and short tail feathers, having no sexual dimorphism. In Malabar hills region of India the breeding season of Long-billed Vultures was noted to be November to May where it breed mainly on cliffs (Edward, 1915. Presently, it is in the most critical category of endangerment, listed in Schedule-I of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act-1972 followed by IUCN, 2015 (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22729731/0. The Andhra Pradesh State Biodiversity Board, Hyderabad announced that vultures are already 'Extinct' in the state (Medicheti, 2013.

  19. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis presenting with peritonism in a 33-year-old Nepalese man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Smith

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, fulminant, and potentially lethal complication of intra-abdominal suppuration. A retroperitoneal origin is very rare and very few cases have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case is only the fourth case reported of successful management following retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. Case presentation A 33-year-old Tamang man presented to our facility with a history of five days of fever and vomiting and eight days of severe left loin pain. On examination, he had features of peritonism. A laparotomy was performed, revealing extensive necrotizing fasciitis of the retroperitoneum extending to the anterior abdominal wall. Our patient survived following extensive debridement of the necrotic tissues and supportive care. Conclusions Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis can rarely present with features of peritonism, and hence should be included as a possible differential diagnosis for anyone presenting with peritonism. Although a fatal condition, early intervention and aggressive management can save the life of a patient.

  20. Scrub typhus: risks, diagnostic issues, and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash JAJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available John Antony Jude Prakash Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness in the “tsutsugamushi triangle”, transmitted by chiggers that can be treated effectively if detected early. Laboratory testing, including molecular and serological assays, is needed for confirming the diagnosis, especially in the absence of the pathognomonic eschar. In this review, factors that play a role in disease occurrence and clinical clues for diagnosis, in addition to risk factors contributing to disease severity, including mortality, are discussed in detail. Moreover, issues related to diagnostic assays, treatment, and mixed infections are also enumerated and described. Keywords: Orientia tsutsugamushi, disease severity, mortality predictors, diagnosis, coinfections, treatment

  1. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  2. Perceptual representation, veridicality, and the interface theory of perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Hoffman, Singh, and Prakash (henceforth, HSP) argue that perception was not selected for veridical representation, hence that, contrary to a very widespread consensus, there's much less of the latter than you might expect in perception. And they put forward an alternative "interface" theory, on which perception is an adaptively useful but truth-obscuring veil between perceiver and perceived. But HSP's case against veridical perception, and their case for an alternative account, turn crucially on significant misapprehensions in the early going about what veridicality amounts to. In this paper I'll identify this mistake, and then argue that it both undercuts HSP's arguments against perceptual veridicality and prevents them from seeing that their own preferred conception of perception is itself committed to veridical representation, rather than an alternative to it. In the end, I'll conclude, HSP give us no reasons to abandon the standard view that perception veridically represents the world.

  3. Improving patient satisfaction in glaucoma care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Samsul Islam, Ahmad Salha, Saeed Azizi Faculty of Medicine, St George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UKWe read the article by Foo et al1 with great interest. We were intrigued by the factors influencing satisfaction rates among glaucoma patients. It made us question what changes could be made in the future attempting to improve patient satisfaction.\tSimilar to Foo et al,1 we were also surprised to find a lower end-point intraocular pressure was linked with increased patient dissatisfaction. As stated by Foo et al,1 other studies exploring clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction found that a positive clinical state was linked to higher patient satisfaction. Prakash2 proposes a three-way association between patient satisfaction, increased compliance, and better clinical outcomes. Hence, in attempting to investigate patient satisfaction, it would be appropriate to assess patient compliance and clinical outcomes.View the original paper by Foo and colleagues.

  4. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Raju Umaji; Prakash, Amit; Agarwal, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Early and timely pedo-orthodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating the disturbances of skeletal or dentoalveolar development, to harmonize the stomatognathic system before the full eruption of all permanent teeth. The advantages of pendulum appliance are its minimal dependence on patient's compliance (child cooperation), ease of fabrication, onetime activation and adjustment of the springs if necessary to correct minor transverse and vertical molar positions. This article reports a successful treatment method of class II malocclusion with pendulum appliance in mixed dentition phase. Distalization of maxillary molar was done, followed by guidance of canine impaction orthodontically and other dental correction using 0.022 MBT appliances. Posttreatment results were stable and remarkable. How to cite this article: Patil RU, Prakash A, Agarwal A. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):67-73.

  5. Cost Analysis of Operation Theatre Services at an Apex Tertiary Care Trauma Centre of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Kumar, Subodh; Vij, Aarti; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Operating room services are one of the major cost and revenue-generating centres of a hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of operating department services depends on the resources consumed and the unit costs of those resources. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of operation theatre services at Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi. The study was carried out at the operation theatre department of Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC), AIIMS from April 2010 to March 2011 after obtaining approval from concerned authorities. This study was observational and descriptive in nature. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of operation theatre (OT) services. Cost was calculated under two heads; as capital and operating cost. Annualised cost of capital assets was calculated according to the methodology prescribed by the World Health Organization and operating costs were taken on actual basis; thereafter, per day cost of OT services was obtained. The average number of surgeries performed in the trauma centre per day is 13. The annual cost of providing operating room services at JPNATC, New Delhi was calculated to be 197,298,704 Indian rupees (INR) (US$ 3,653,679), while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 22,626.92 (US$ 419). Majority of the expenditures were for human resource (33.63 %) followed by OT capital cost (31.90 %), consumables (29.97 %), engineering maintenance cost (2.55 %), support services operating cost (1.22 %) and support services capital cost (0.73 %). Of the total cost towards the provisioning of OT services, 32.63 % was capital cost while 67.37 % is operating cost. The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 54).

  6. MMS2, Encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating-enzyme-like protein, is a member of the yeast error-free postreplication repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, S.; Chow, B.L.; Xiao, W.

    1998-01-01

    Among the three Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair epistasis groups, the RAD6 group is the most complicated and least characterized, primarily because it consists of two separate repair pathways: an error-free postreplication repair pathway, and a mutagenesis pathway. The rad6 and rad18 mutants are defective in both pathways, and the rev3 mutant affects only the mutagenesis pathway, but a yeast gene that is involved only in error-free postreplication repair has not been reported. We cloned the MMS2 gene from a yeast genomic library by functional complementation of the mms2-1 mutant [Prakash, L. and Prakash, S. (1977) Genetics 86, 33-55]. MMS2 encodes a 137-amino acid, 15.2-kDa protein with significant sequence homology to a conserved family of ubiquitin-conjugating (Ubc) proteins. However, Mms2 does not appear to possess Ubc activity. Genetic analyses indicate that the mms2 mutation is hypostatic to rad6 and rad18 but is synergistic with the rev3 mutation, and the mms2 mutant is proficient in UV-induced mutagenesis. These phenotypes are reminiscent of a pol30-46 mutant known to be impaired in postreplication repair. The mms2 mutant also displayed a REV3-dependent mutator phenotype, strongly suggesting that the MMS2 gene functions in the error-free postreplication repair pathway, parallel to the REV3 mutagenesis pathway. Furthermore, with respect to UV sensitivity, mms2 was found to be hypostatic to the rad6 delta 1-9 mutation, which results in the absence of the first nine amino acids of Rad6. On the basis of these collective results, we propose that the mms2 null mutation and two other allele-specific mutations, rad6 delta 1-9 and pol30-46, define the error-free mode of DNA postreplication repair, and that these mutations may enhance both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation and CIPC treatment- on processing quality of potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirsat, S.G.; Thomas, Paul; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The processing quality of 5 potato cultivars, after inhibition of sprouting by irradiation or chloroisopropyl phenyl carbamate (CIPC) treatment, was compared during storage at 20, 15 and 10 degC upto 9 months. Cultivars K. Jyoti, K Lavkar, Gujrat-S, and Talegaon, with initial reducing sugar levels of 120 to 240 mg/100 g. yielded light coloured chips and French fries. Neither of the treatments affected the processing quality of these cultivars, when stored at 15 and 20 degC up to 6 months, but the storage at 10 degC resulted in darker products, due to higher levels of reducing sugars. In tubers, stored for more than 6 months at 15 degC, reconditioning at 27-32 degC or blanching improved the colour of the products. Cultivars K. Badshah, with initial reducing sugar levels of 310 to 440 mg/100 g was not suitable for processing. In vitro infiltration studies showed that glucose contributed to browning more than fructose or sucrose. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Development of late blight resistance and heat tolerance through gamma irradiation of shoot cultures in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosal, S.S.; Jitender Kaur, Adas; Minocha, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    In vitro shoot cultures of two potato varieties viz., Kufri jyoti and Kufri Chandramukhi were gamma irradiated at 20 Gy and 40 Gy. Micro tubers were induced in micro propagated M1V3 generation. For heat tolerance micro tubers were induced at elevated (28 C ) incubation temperature (optimum being 20 1C ) and were characterized by early sowing, chlorophyll persistence and harvest index. The number of micro tubers/plant was highly reduced at elevated temperature and the resulting tubers exhibited distorted shapes and growth of apical buds. Thus obtained micro tubers exhibited better germination (62.3%) even in early sowing at relatively higher temperature. The progenies from putative heat tolerant plants were grown in the field by sowing at higher temperature for four subsequent generations. Heat tolerant plants segregated in each generation but the frequency of heat tolerant plants increased in the advanced generation. For developing late blight resistance micro tubers produced from irradiated shoot cultures were sown in pots and resulting plants were screened using detached leaf method. The progenies of putative resistant plants grown in the field were artificially inoculated with sporangial inoculum of Phytophthora infection's. Field grown plants exhibited segregation with respect to disease reaction and about 56 per cent plants showed resistance. Segregation was reduced during following generation and the frequency of resistant plants was increased up to 72.3 per cent. Thus, repeated selections has helped in developing stable mutants in both the varieties

  9. In vitro mutagenesis and production of agronomically useful potato variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Gosal, S.S.; Sidhu, J.S.; Dhaliwal, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    In vitro grown shoot cultures of two Indian potato varieties 'Kufri jyoti' and 'Kufri Chandramukhi' were subjected to gamma irradiation at 20 and 40 Gy. The irradiated shoot cultures were subcultured to yield a generation of plantlets. After 4-6 weeks of incubation, these shoots were transferred onto MS medium supplemented with benzylaminopurine, BAP (10mg/1) and sucrose (8% w/v) and incubated at 20 deg. C. The M 1 V 3 plants were screened in vitro for late blight resistance by detached leaf method. The resistant plants were screened in M 1 V 4 generation by artificial inoculation of sporangial inoculum on the pot sown plants. Chlorophyll persistence is a simple screening method for heat tolerance. Chlorophyll persistence of different plantlets showed that the percentage of injury was less in the case of plants, which had been obtained from irradiated material. In the case of control plants, there was one hundred-percent damage to the plants. The mutation frequency was calculated for characters like late blight resistance and heat tolerance (in vitro microtuberisation and chlorophyll persistence). The gamma ray dose of 40 Gy was observed to produce a higher mutation frequency

  10. Relative efficiency of legumes in utilizing soil and fertilizer phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, O.P.; Prasad, R.; Subbiah, B.V.

    1977-01-01

    A pot-culture study was made at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi to study the native P feeding power of six rainy season legumes (green gram, black gram, cowpea, pigeon pea, soyabean and groundnut). Ordinary superphosphate tagged with 32 P was used in the study. At the first harvest (30 days after seeding) soybean and cowpea and at the second harvest (45 days after sowing) cowpea and groundnut removed more P than the other legumes. Pigeon pea removed the least P due to its slow growth. The tracer studies showed that during the first 30 days, groundnut, pigeon pea and soyabean were relatively better feeders of native soil P than the other legumes. Some varietal differences with respect to their capacity to feed on native soil P were also observed and in groundnut the varieties AK-12-24 and Jyoti removed more soil P than the variety NG-268. Differences between the legumes with respect to feeding on native soil P were much less at the second harvest (45 days after seeding). (author)

  11. In vitro induction of variation through radiation for late blight resistance and heat tolerance in potato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, J L; Das, A; Gopal, J; Gosal, S S [Biotechnology Centre, Punjab Agricultural Univ., Ludhiana, Punjab (India)

    1997-07-01

    In vitro plants were obtained from nodal sections of sprouts of cvs. `Kufri Jyoti` and `Kufri Chandramukhi` of potato cultured on MS medium with 3% sucrose. Callus from leaves of in vitro cultured plantlets was induced on modified Linsmaier and Skoog medium supplemented with 5 mg/1 NAA. The obtained shoots and calli were irradiated with 20 and 40 Gy gamma rays. Irradiatied shoots were transferred to MS medium with 8% sucrose for multiplication, and then to MS medium with 8% sucrose and 10 mg/1 BAP to induce microtuber formation, which gave on average 1.3 microtubers per plant. The microtubers were planted in pots and variation was observed in plant morphology and tuber characters. To study variation for late blight resistance, irradiated calli were kept on Gamborg B-5 medium with culture filtrate of Phytophthora infestans. To induce variation for heat tolerance, in vitro shoots from irradiated material were mass-propagated and allowed to produce microtubers at high temperature. (author). 3 refs, 3 tabs.

  12. In vitro induction of variation through radiation for late blight resistance and heat tolerance in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minocha, J.L.; Das, A.; Gopal, J.; Gosal, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro plants were obtained from nodal sections of sprouts of cvs. 'Kufri Jyoti' and 'Kufri Chandramukhi' of potato cultured on MS medium with 3% sucrose. Callus from leaves of in vitro cultured plantlets was induced on modified Linsmaier and Skoog medium supplemented with 5 mg/1 NAA. The obtained shoots and calli were irradiated with 20 and 40 Gy gamma rays. Irradiatied shoots were transferred to MS medium with 8% sucrose for multiplication, and then to MS medium with 8% sucrose and 10 mg/1 BAP to induce microtuber formation, which gave on average 1.3 microtubers per plant. The microtubers were planted in pots and variation was observed in plant morphology and tuber characters. To study variation for late blight resistance, irradiated calli were kept on Gamborg B-5 medium with culture filtrate of Phytophthora infestans. To induce variation for heat tolerance, in vitro shoots from irradiated material were mass-propagated and allowed to produce microtubers at high temperature. (author). 3 refs, 3 tabs

  13. Relative efficiency of legumes in utilizing soil and fertilizer phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, O P; Prasad, R; Subbiah, B V [Indian Agricultural Research Inst., New Delhi. Nuclear Research Lab.

    1977-09-01

    A pot-culture study was made at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi to study the native P feeding power of six rainy season legumes (green gram, black gram, cowpea, pigeon pea, soybean and groundnut). Ordinary superphosphate tagged with /sup 32/P was used in the study. At the first harvest (30 days after seeding) soybean and cowpea and at the second harvest (45 days after sowing) cowpea and groundnut removed more P than the other legumes. Pigeon pea removed the least P due to its slow growth. The tracer studies showed that during the first 30 days, groundnut, pigeon pea and soybean were relatively better feeders of native soil P than the other legumes. Some varietal differences with respect to their capacity to feed on native soil P were also observed and in groundnut the varieties AK-12-24 and Jyoti removed more soil P than the variety NG-268. Differences between the legumes with respect to feeding on native soil P were much less at the second harvest (45 days after seeding).

  14. Chipping quality of γ-irradiated potatoes of three Indian cultivars stored at 8, 12 and 16 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezekiel, R.; Singh, B.; Datta, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Potatoes of cultivars Kufri Chandramukhi, Kufri Jyoti and Kufri Chipsona-2 were irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 kGy γ-rays and stored at 8, 12 and 16 degC and 85-90% RH for 180 days, with CIPC (isopropyl N-(3-chlorophenyl) carbamate) treatment as control. Irradiation increased weight loss and rotting compared to control. There was little change in the dry matter content due to irradiation up to 120 days of storage (DOS) but increased significantly at 180 DOS. The reducing sugar content increased by 18-35% with irradiation and resulted in increased browning of potato chips prepared. There was a significant difference in reducing sugar content and chip colour, between 0.1 and 0.5 kGy irradiation. Irradiation also caused 20-29% increase in sucrose content. Compared to control, free amino acids and phenols content increased with irradiation but there was no significant difference between 0.1 and 0.5 kGy. Amongst the cultivars, Kufri Chipsona-2 showed higher weight loss and rotting, which increased further with irradiation, and increase in storage temperature and duration. (author)

  15. Internal mobility of reactive-site-hydrolyzed recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V characterized by NMR spectroscopy: evidence for differential stabilization of newly formed C- and N-termini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Prakash, O; Huang, Y; Wen, L; Wen, J J; Huang, J K; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1996-09-24

    The solution structure and internal dynamics of the reactive-site (Lys44-Asp45 peptide bond) hydrolyzed form of recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (rCMTI-V*) were characterized by the application of two-dimensional 1H-15N NMR methods to the uniformly 15N-labeled protein. The 1H-15N chemical shift correlation spectra of rCMTI-V* were assigned, and the chemical shift data were compared with those available for rCMTI-V [Liu, J., Prakash, O., Cai, M., Gong, Y., Huang, Y., Wen, L., Wen, J. J., Huang, J.-K., & Krishnamoorthi, R. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 1516-1524] and CMTI-V* [Cai, M., Gong, Y., Prakash, O., & Krishnamoorthi, R. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 12087-12094] for which three-dimensional solution structures have been determined. It was deduced that the solution structure of rCMTI-V* was almost the same as that of CMTI-V*. 15N spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R1 and R2, respectively) and ¿1H¿-15N steady-state heteronuclear Overhauser effects were measured for the peptide NH units and arginine and tryptophan N epsilon H groups in rCMTI-V*, and the model-free parameters [Lipari, G., & Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 4546-4559, 4559-4570] were computed. Most of the backbone of rCMTI-V* is found to be highly constrained (S2 = 0.85), including the N-terminal residues 3-6 (S2 = 0.77). Residues 39-44, forming the C-terminal fragment of the binding loop, exhibit increased mobility (S2 = 0.51); however, the N-terminal segment (residues 46-48) retains rigidity as in the intact form (S2 = 0.83). The S2 values, 0.78 and 0.59, respectively, of Arg50 and Arg52 side chain NHs provide evidence not only for the conservation of the Arg hydrogen-bonds with the binding loop segments but also for the difference in strength between them. This is consistent with the earlier observation made from a study of rCMTI-V at two different pHs and its R50 and R52 mutants [Cai, M., Huang, Y., Prakash, O., Wen, L., Dunkelbarger, S. P., Huang, J.-K., Liu, J

  16. Clinical profile of cerebral malaria at a secondary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral malaria (CM is one of the most common causes for non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. It affects both the urban and rural population. It is a challenge to treat these patients in a resource limited setting; where majority of these cases present. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out from September 2005 to December 2006 at Jiwan Jyoti Christian Hospital in Eastern Uttar Pradesh in India. This is a secondary level care with limited resources. We studied the clinical profile, treatment and outcome of all the patients above the age of 14 years diagnosed with CM. Results: There were a total of 53 patients with CM of which 38 (71.7% of them were females. Among them, 35 (66% patients were less than 30 years of age. The clinical features noted were seizure (39.62%, anemia (84.9%, icterus (16.98%, hypotension (13.2%, bleeding (3.7%, hepatomegaly (5.66%, splenomegaly (5.66%, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (16.98% and renal dysfunction (37.36%. Co-infection with Plasmodium vivax was present in 13 (24.53% of them. Treatment received included artesunin compounds or quinine. Median time of defervescence was 2 (interquartile range1-3. Complete recovery was achieved in 43 (81% of them. Two (3.7% of them died. Conclusion: CM, once considered to be a fatal disease has shown remarkable improvement in the outcome with the wide availability of artesunin and quinine components. To combat the malaria burden, physicians in resource limited setting should be well trained to manage these patients especially in the endemic areas. The key to management is early diagnosis and initiation of treatment based on a high index of suspicion. Anticipation and early recognition of the various complications are crucial.

  17. Copyright

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ‘Talent is always conscious of its own abundance, and does not object to sharing.’ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The First Circle When authors submit an article for publication, most publishers will ask for a signature from the author on a copyright form. The relationship between an author and the publisher is then a partnership but one that many authors are reluctant to enter into. After all, why should a publisher take copyright from an author of an article when the author had the idea and has done all the hard work for the content of the article? In response to this question, publishers will generally claim that copyright transfer agreements protect authors from copyright infringements such as plagiarism, libel and unauthorised uses as well as protecting the integrity of the article. Copyright in the UK was originally concerned with preventing the unlawful copying of printed material in the 17th century in response to the then new technology of book printing. The first copyright act in the UK, the Statute of Anne in 1710, was subtitled ‘An Act for the Encouragement of Learning’, and granted privileges and monopolies to book printers. Since then, copyright law has evolved to incorporate many forms of communication, including photography, film, music, computers, engraving, designs on t-shirts and digital technology among other forms of media. The most recent act in the UK is the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. While copyright covers an author’s right to copy, distribute and revise the work, it does not protect ideas – just their fixation or expression. The moment that an idea is fixed or expressed physically, copyright starts and does not have to be registered. In this article, Pippa Smart provides an overview of the legal framework that protects authors and publishers. Jyoti Shah, Commissioning Editor

  18. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorevski E

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney transplant recipients greater than 1 year post-transplant was conducted. Patients’ adherence with medications was assessed using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale. Personality and depression were assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Scale and Patient Health Questionnaire 9, respectively. Quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36, and functional status was determined using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Results: A total of 86 kidney and 50 liver transplant patients completed the surveys. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association between depression and adherence with immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant recipients. Kidney transplant patients who exhibited “low openness” scores were 91% more likely to be nonadherent. Kidney transplant patients’ physical functional status was strongly associated with nonadherence, and for each point increase in functionality the patients adherence increased by 4%. In the liver sample, age was associated with adherence. For every year increase in age, adherence increased by 7%. Conclusion: The presence of low openness as a personality trait, poor physical functional status, and depression were associated with adherence in the kidney transplant population. In the liver transplant population, younger age was associated with nonadherence. Keywords: adherence, transplant, liver, kidney

  19. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokharel A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amrit Pokharel,1 Gauri Shankar Shrestha,2 Jyoti Baba Shrestha2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, 2B P Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal Purpose: To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods: In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results: Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 µm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=-0.243, P=0.055 and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09 did not correlate with age. Conclusion: Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. Keywords: macular thickness, macular volume, optical coherence tomography, Nepal

  20. Neonatal hypertension – a long-term pilot follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari T

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tejasvi Chaudhari,1 Michael C Falk,2,3 Rajeev Jyoti,2,4 Susan Arney,5 Wendy Burton,5 Alison L Kent1,2 1Department of Neonatology, Canberra Hospital, Woden, ACT, Australia; 2Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3Department of Nephrology, 4Medical Imaging Department, 5Centre for Newborn Care, Canberra Hospital, Woden, ACT, Australia Background: Neonatal hypertension occurs in up to 3% of neonates, more commonly in those admitted to neonatal intensive care. The aims of this study were to review renal function and renal volumes in children who had a history of neonatal hypertension. Methods: Children with a history of neonatal hypertension from January 2001 to December 2008 were included in the study during 2011. Blood pressure, weight, height, and body mass index were recorded. Renal ultrasound with 3D volume, urine for electrolytes, albumin, ß2 microglobulin, and blood for electrolytes, urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphate, renin, and aldosterone were collected depending on parental consent. Results: Of the 41 neonates with neonatal hypertension, eleven (27% were included in the study (six died; 24 moved interstate or declined involvement. One child (9% was still on antihypertensive medication and one was found to be hypertensive on review. This child had small volume kidneys and albuminuria. Three out of nine renal volume measurements were low (33% and two out of eleven had renal scarring (18%. The six available renin/aldosterone results were normal. Conclusion: This study suggests there are long-term renal and blood pressure implications for neonates with hypertension and ongoing surveillance of blood pressure and renal function should be performed throughout childhood and into early adulthood. Keywords: neonate, hypertension, renal ultrasound, 3D

  1. Isospin breaking in nuclear physics: The Nolen-Schiffer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adami, C.; Brown, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    Using the QCD sum rules we calculate the neutron-proton mass difference at zero density as a function of the difference in bare quark mass m d -m u . We confirm results of Hatsuda, Hoegaasen and Prakash that the largest term results from the difference in up and down quark condensates, the explicit C (m d -m u ) entering with the opposite sign. The quark condensates are then extended to finite density to estimate the Nolen-Schiffer effect. The neutron-proton mass difference is extremely density dependent, going to zero at roughly nuclear matter density. The Ioffe formula for the nucleon mass is interpreted as a derivation, within the QCD sum rule approach, of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio formula. This clarifies the N c counting and furthermore provides an alternative interpretation of the Borel mass. We compare calculations in the constituent quark model treated in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio formalism with ours in the QCD sum rule approach. (orig.)

  2. gem-Difluoroolefination of Diazo Compounds with TMSCF3 or TMSCF2Br: Transition-Metal-Free Cross-Coupling of Two Carbene Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingyou; Ni, Chuanfa; Li, Lingchun; Han, Yongxin; Hu, Jinbo

    2015-11-18

    A new olefination protocol for transition-metal-free cross-coupling of two carbene fragments arising from two different sources, namely, a nonfluorinated carbene fragment resulting from a diazo compound and a difluorocarbene fragment derived from Ruppert-Prakash reagent (TMSCF3) or TMSCF2Br, has been developed. This gem-difluoroolefination proceeds through the direct nucleophilic addition of diazo compounds to difluorocarbene followed by elimination of N2. Compared to previously reported Cu-catalyzed gem-difluoroolefination of diazo compounds with TMSCF3, which possesses a narrow substrate scope due to a demanding requirement on the reactivity of diazo compounds and in-situ-generated CuCF3, this transition-metal-free protocol affords a general and efficient approach to various disubstituted 1,1-difluoroalkenes, including difluoroacrylates, diaryldifluoroolefins, as well as arylalkyldifluoroolefins. In view of the ready availability of diazo compounds and difluorocarbene reagents and versatile transformations of 1,1-difluoroalkenes, this new gem-difluoroolefination method is expected to find wide applications in organic synthesis.

  3. Pairing from dynamically screened Coulomb repulsion in bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Lee, Patrick A.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, Prakash et al. have discovered bulk superconductivity in single crystals of bismuth, which is a semimetal with extremely low carrier density. At such low density, we argue that conventional electron-phonon coupling is too weak to be responsible for the binding of electrons into Cooper pairs. We study a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction with effective attraction generated on the scale of the collective plasma modes. We model the electronic states in bismuth to include three Dirac pockets with high velocity and one hole pocket with a significantly smaller velocity. We find a weak-coupling instability, which is greatly enhanced by the presence of the hole pocket. Therefore we argue that bismuth is the first material to exhibit superconductivity driven by retardation effects of Coulomb repulsion alone. By using realistic parameters for bismuth we find that the acoustic plasma mode does not play the central role in pairing. We also discuss a matrix element effect, resulting from the Dirac nature of the conduction band, which may affect Tc in the s -wave channel without breaking time-reversal symmetry.

  4. Doege–Potter Syndrome, cause of nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia: the first case report from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Pant,1 Suman Baral,2 Gita Sayami,3 Prakash Sayami4 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Endocrinology Unit, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Manmohan Cardiothoracic vascular and transplant Center, Institute of Medicine (IOM, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH, Kathmandu, Nepal Abstract: Doege–Potter syndrome (DPS, a paraneoplastic syndrome, presents as a hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia from the ectopic secretion of insulin-like growth factor II from a solitary fibrous tumor which may be intrapleural or extrapleural in origin. We report a case of severe hypoglycemia in a 70-year old female initially admitted for resection of left sided solitary fibrous tumor of pleura. Investigation revealed true hypoglycemia, and DPS was diagnosed. The tumor was completely resected, after which no further hypoglycemic episodes were seen in 2 years follow-up. This is the first case of solitary fibrous tumor of pleura with DPS reported from Nepal. Keywords: insulin-like growth factor II, IGF-II, solitary fibrous tumor, hypoglycemia

  5. Assessment and Implications of Social Withdrawal Subtypes in Young Chinese Children: The Chinese Version of the Child Social Preference Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Coplan, Robert J; Gao, Zhu-Qing; Xu, Pin; Li, Linhui; Zhang, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    The authors' goals were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Child Social Preference Scale (CSPS; R. J. Coplan, K. Prakash, K. O'Neil, & M. Armer, 2004) and examine the links between both shyness and unsociability and indices of socioemotional functioning in young Chinese children. Participants included of two samples recruited from kindergarten classes in two public schools in Shanghai, China. Both samples included children 3-5 years old (Sample 1: n = 350, Mage = 4.72 years, SD = 0.58 years; Sample 2: n = 129, Mage = 4.40 years, SD = 0.58 years). In both samples, mothers rated children's social withdrawal using the newly created Chinese version of the CSPS, and in Sample 2, teachers also provided ratings of socioemotional functioning. Consistent with previous findings from other cultures, results from factor analyses suggested a 2-factor model for the CSPS (shyness and unsociability) among young children in China. In contrast to findings from North America, child shyness and unsociability were associated with socioemotional difficulties in kindergarten. Some gender differences were also noted. Results are discussed in terms of the assessment and implications of social withdrawal in early childhood in China.

  6. Bowman’s layer transplantation: evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bhavana Sharma,1 Aditi Dubey,2 Gaurav Prakash,3 Rasik B Vajpayee4–6 1Department of Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal, India; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal, India; 3Cornea and Refractive Surgery Services, NMC Eye Care, New Medical Center Specialty Hospital, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4Vision Eye Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 5Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 6North West Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Surgical management of keratoconus (KC has undergone a paradigm shift in the last two decades and component corneal transplantation technique of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty has established itself as a modality of choice for management of advanced cases of KC. Every now and then, new minimalist modalities are being innovated for the management of KC. On the same lines, a new technique, Bowman’s layer transplantation, for surgical management of moderate to advanced KC has been reported in recent years. The procedure has shown to be beneficial in reducing ectasia in advanced KC with minimal intraoperative and postoperative complications. In this review, we intend to describe available information and literature with reference to this new surgical technique – Bowman’s layer transplantation. Keywords: keratoconus, Bowman’s Layer, keratoplasty, post PRK haze, component keratoplasty

  7. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. Objective: The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Methodology: Traditional (average or gross costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. Results: The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258 while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%. Conclusion: The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013.

  8. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheetal; Gupta, Shakti; Daga, Anoop; Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Wundavalli, LaxmiTej

    2016-01-01

    For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC) of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258) while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%). The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013).

  9. Application of nonisothermal kinetic techniques on the reduction of three commercial iron ore agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedolla, E.; Leon, C.A.; Aguilar, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of reduction of iron ore agglomerates by both isothermal and nonisothermal TG studies was investigated, and the work was complemented with the structural characterization of the total and partially reacted samples. Three different commercial hematite pellets were studied. The mechanisms of reduction were obtained under isothermal conditions, resulting in a fitting to chemical reaction models. Nonisothermal reduction was carried out using a TGA system (CAHN TG-171) from 600 to 1,000 degree centigree maintaining a lineal heating rate of 4,7 and 10 degree centigree/min, and the reducing atmospheres used were H 2 (100%) and H 2 -CO(95:5). The kinetic parameters were evaluated by Coats and Redfern, Dixit and Ray and Prakash and Ray techniques. It was found that the lower the heating rate, the higher the reduction degree and the higher activation energy. The activation energy for reduction with the mixture H 2 -CO was always higher than that obtained with pure H 2 . (Author)

  10. Recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with ruthenium complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Thangavel,1 Buddolla Viswanath,1 Sanghyo Kim1,2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Bokjeong-Dong, Sujeong-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: In recent years, the field of metal-based drugs has been dominated by other existing precious metal drugs, and many researchers have focused their attention on the synthesis of various ruthenium (Ru complexes due to their potential medical and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial properties of Ru, which make it a highly promising therapeutic agent, include its variable oxidation states, low toxicity, high selectivity for diseased cells, ligand exchange properties, and the ability to mimic iron binding to biomolecules. In addition, Ru complexes have favorable adsorption properties, along with excellent photochemical and photophysical properties, which make them promising tools for photodynamic therapy. At present, nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes have become an efficient way to administer Ru-based anticancer drugs for cancer treatment. In this review, the recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors are discussed. In addition, information on “traditional” (ie, non-nanostructured Ru-based cancer therapies is included in a precise manner. Keywords: metallodrugs, nanotechnology, cancer treatment, cell apoptosis, DNA damage, toxicity

  11. Benefits of statin therapy and compliance in high risk cardiovascular patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A Lardizabal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Joel A Lardizabal1, Prakash C Deedwania21Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California in San Francisco (Fresno-MEP, Fresno, CA, USA; 2University of California in San Francisco, Chief of Cardiology, Veterans Affairs Central California System, Fresno, CA, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the top cause of global mortality. There is considerable evidence that supports the mortality and morbidity benefit of statin therapy in coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke, both in primary and secondary prevention settings. Data also exist pointing to the advantage of statin treatment in other high-risk CVD conditions, such as diabetes, CKD, CHF, and PVD. National and international clinical guidelines in the management of these CVD conditions all advocate for the utilization of statin therapy in appropriate patients. However, overall compliance to statin therapy remains suboptimal. Patient-, physician-, and economic-related factors all play a role. These factors need to be considered in devising approaches to enhance adherence to guideline-based therapies. To fully reap the benefits of statin therapy, interventions which improve long-term treatment compliance in real-world settings should be encouraged.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, statin therapy, coronary heart disease, long-term treatment compliance

  12. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta HE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system and tumor microenvironment has identified immune checkpoint inhibitors as new avenue of immunotherapy. Rather than acting directly on the tumor, these therapies work by removing the inhibition exerted by tumor cell or other immune cells on the immune system, promoting antitumoral immune response. To date, two programmed death-1 inhibitors, namely nivolumab and pembrolizumab, have received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that failed platinum-based chemotherapy. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the pathophysiology of cancer immune evasion, summarizes pertinent data on completed and ongoing clinical trials involving checkpoint inhibitors, discusses the different strategies to optimize their function, and outlines various challenges that are faced in this promising yet evolving field. Keywords: checkpoint inhibitors, immunotherapy, nivolumab, non-small-cell lung cancer, pembrolizumab, programmed death-1, programmed death ligand-1

  13. Posthumanism, Cyberculture & Postcolonialism in Manjula Padmanabhan’s «Harvest»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagnika Chanda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyberculture’s influence in our lives and its possible threat to human physical identity is well documented in Harvest. American Virgil, posing as Ginni, seduces and controls the Prakash family. He uses gadgets like the “Contact Module” or the “Video Couch” to disperse identity through “cybernetic circuits”. Both the receiver and the donor assume new identities in the digital arena. Harvest highlights important questions about “digitization” of identities and separation from the physical form. Can a body “vacated” of its owner be claimed by another? How is identity determined if cyberspace can disguise one’s gender, class or race to divest them of their unique markers? Problematization of identity in cyberspace is pivotal to the discourse of postcolonialism. For marginalized bodies identity politics and suffering is rooted in the physical body. In Harvest, first world exploits the third world via wireless communication and unlimited money. Jaya sustains a postcolonial resistance to such capitalist domination. She claims her body, evocative of her dignity, through the corporeal limitation of death − the postcolonial Other’s triumph in the colonizer’s world of coercion and control.

  14. What are Journals for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallison, S P

    2015-03-01

    hard work and, through this series, I hope the reader will get some useful insight into this service industry for academia. Jyoti Shah Commissioning Editor Reference 1. Ware M, Mabe M. The STM Report. 3rd edn. The Hague: International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers; 2012.

  15. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewale, V. C. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, NDMVPS KBT College of Engineering, Nashik (India); Dongarwar, P. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Military Engineering, Pune (India); Gawande, R. P. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, B.D.C.O.E. Wardha, Nagpur University, NagpurI (India)

    2016-11-15

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results.

  16. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewale, V. C.; Dongarwar, P. R.; Gawande, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results

  17. Measuring the neutron star equation of state with gravitational wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Jocelyn S.; Markakis, Charalampos; Creighton, Jolien D. E.; Friedman, John L.; Shibata, Masaru; Uryu, Koji

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of a first study that uses numerical simulations to estimate the accuracy with which one can use gravitational wave observations of double neutron-star inspiral to measure parameters of the neutron-star equation of state. The simulations use the evolution and initial-data codes of Shibata and Uryu to compute the last several orbits and the merger of neutron stars, with matter described by a parametrized equation of state. Previous work suggested the use of an effective cutoff frequency to place constraints on the equation of state. We find, however, that greater accuracy is obtained by measuring departures from the point-particle limit of the gravitational waveform produced during the late inspiral. As the stars approach their final plunge and merger, the gravitational wave phase accumulates more rapidly for smaller values of the neutron-star compactness (the ratio of the mass of the neutron-star to its radius). We estimate that realistic equations of state will lead to gravitational waveforms that are distinguishable from point-particle inspirals at an effective distance (the distance to an optimally oriented and located system that would produce an equivalent waveform amplitude) of 100 Mpc or less. As Lattimer and Prakash observed, neutron-star radius is closely tied to the pressure at density not far above nuclear. Our results suggest that broadband gravitational wave observations at frequencies between 500 and 1000 Hz will constrain this pressure, and we estimate the accuracy with which it can be measured. Related first estimates of radius measurability show that the radius can be determined to an accuracy of δR∼1 km at 100 Mpc.

  18. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vishnu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC.Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16 in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin, targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100 and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results.Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, novel therapies, mechanisms of resistance, circulating tumor cells

  19. Influence of different functional ingredients on physical properties, rheology, tribology, and oral perceptions of no fat stirred yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sophia Bao Xian; Nguyen, Phuong T M; Bhandari, Bhesh; Prakash, Sangeeta

    2018-06-01

    Effects of adding four functional ingredients: inulin, pectin, galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), and beta glucan on physical, rheology, tribology, and sensory characteristics of skim (0.1% fat) stirred yoghurt were studied. Three levels of each ingredient were chosen: inulin (7, 8, and 9%), pectin (0.2, 0.25, and 0.3%), GOS (9.1, 11.3, and 13.6%), and beta glucan (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%). Among the investigated ingredients, inulin and GOS appeared to be preferable choices due to their ability to both reduce syneresis and slightly increase sample lubrication while maintaining texture, rheology, and sensory characteristics of skim yoghurt. Pectin and beta glucan, conversely, increased viscosity and gel strength, slightly increased sample lubrication for the skim yoghurt but created large particles (i.e., greater than 100 μm) in the product body. This led to the increase in lumpiness and residual coating while reducing smoothness and creaminess of the sample. The observed tribology behaviors of the stirred yoghurts were similar to the previous study of pot-set yoghurt whose friction curves comprised four friction zones (Nguyen, Kravchuk, Bhandari, and Prakash). The sensory characteristics of six selected samples for various texture and mouthfeel attributes obtained from a trained panel were in agreement with particle size, rheology, and tribology characteristics of the yoghurt samples. With the increasing demand for low fat and functional food, there is a need to understand the impact of adding functional ingredients in low fat yoghurt to satisfy consumers' requirements. This study investigates the effects of these functional ingredients at different dosages on physical, rheology, tribology, and sensory characteristics of skim (0.1% fat) stirred yoghurt. The results from this study may guide use of functional ingredients in yoghurt production. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The restriction-modification genes of Escherichia coli K-12 may not be selfish: they do not resist loss and are readily replaced by alleles conferring different specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, M; Chen, A; Murray, N E

    1997-12-23

    Type II restriction and modification (R-M) genes have been described as selfish because they have been shown to impose selection for the maintenance of the plasmid that encodes them. In our experiments, the type I R-M system EcoKI does not behave in the same way. The genes specifying EcoKI are, however, normally residents of the chromosome and therefore our analyses were extended to monitor the deletion of chromosomal genes rather than loss of plasmid vector. If EcoKI were to behave in the same way as the plasmid-encoded type II R-M systems, the loss of the relevant chromosomal genes by mutation or recombination should lead to cell death because the cell would become deficient in modification enzyme and the bacterial chromosome would be vulnerable to the restriction endonuclease. Our data contradict this prediction; they reveal that functional type I R-M genes in the chromosome are readily replaced by mutant alleles and by alleles encoding a type I R-M system of different specificity. The acquisition of allelic genes conferring a new sequence specificity, but not the loss of the resident genes, is dependent on the product of an unlinked gene, one predicted [Prakash-Cheng, A., Chung, S. S. & Ryu, J. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 241, 491-496] to be relevant to control of expression of the genes that encode EcoKI. Our evidence suggests that not all R-M systems are evolving as "selfish" units; rather, the diversity and distribution of the family of type I enzymes we have investigated require an alternative selective pressure.

  1. Exceptional response to cetuximab monotherapy in a patient with metastatic oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a molecular insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddi P

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Peddi,1 Bhavna Paryani,2 Amol Takalkar,2 Paige Bundrick,3 John Ponugupati,4 Binu Nair,5 Hazem El-Osta1 1Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, 4Oncology Department, Herbert J Thomas Memorial Hospital, South Charleston, WV, 5Baylor Scott & White Medical Center - Waxahachie, Waxahachie, TX, USA Background: Metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC carries a very poor prognosis. A better understanding of the molecular driver of the disease and the identification of biomarkers of response remain paramount for an effective personalized therapy. Case report: We report an original case of a 56-year-old patient diagnosed with metastatic HNSCC to both kidneys, who experienced a long-lasting complete response to a single-agent cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody-targeting EGFR. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of the tumor revealed the presence of phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase mutation, EGFR overexpression, and the absence of PD-1/PD-L1 expression. Since PI3K, a downstream effector of EGFR, is activated, the tumor regression may have occurred mainly through a cetuximab-induced immune-mediated response, rather than EGFR signal blockade. It is plausible that this effect was enhanced by the lack of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression. Conclusion: Our case proposes that the absence of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in conjunction with EGFR overexpression may correlate with better response to cetuximab in HNSCC. This hypothesis needs to be examined through a large clinical trial. Keywords: biomarker, cetuximab, EGFR blockade, exceptional response, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

  2. Rapid green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from Chrysanthemum indicum L and its antibacterial and cytotoxic effects: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arokiyaraj S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selvaraj Arokiyaraj,1 Mariadhas Valan Arasu,2 Savariar Vincent,3 Nyayirukannaian Udaya Prakash,4 Seong Ho Choi,5 Young-Kyoon Oh,1 Ki Choon Choi,2 Kyoung Hoon Kim1,61Department of Animal Nutrition and Physiology, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon, Republic of Korea; 2Grassland and Forage Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Seonghwan-Eup, Cheonan-Si, Chungnam, Republic of Korea; 3Center for Environmental Research and Development, Loyola College, Chennai, India; 4Research and Development, Vel Tech Dr RR and Dr SR Technical University, Chennai, India; 5Department of Animal Science, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea; 6Department of Animal Science, Seoul National University, Pyeongchang, Republic of KoreaAbstract: The present work reports a simple, cost-effective, and ecofriendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs using Chrysanthemum indicum and its antibacterial and cytotoxic effects. The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by color change, and it was further characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (435 nm. The phytochemical screening of C. indicum revealed the presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, and glycosides, suggesting that these compounds act as reducing and stabilizing agents. The crystalline nature of the synthesized particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, as they exhibited face-centered cubic symmetry. The size and morphology of the particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, which showed spherical shapes and sizes that ranged between 37.71–71.99 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy documented the presence of silver. The antimicrobial effect of the synthesized AgNPs revealed a significant effect against the bacteria Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Additionally, cytotoxic assays showed no toxicity of AgNPs toward 3T3 mouse embryo

  3. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs. Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials and Methods: Sixty questionnaires were distributed and the results analyzed. A database was prepared and the audit was done. Results: Forty-two (70% questionnaires were filled and returned. A majority (38 of staff nurses expressed awareness of nutrition guidelines. A large number (32 of staff nurses knew about nutrition protocols of the ICU. Almost all (40 opined enteral nutrition to be the preferred route of nutrition unless contraindicated. All staff nurses were of opinion that enteral nutrition is to be started at the earliest (within 24-48 h of the ICU stay. Everyone opined that the absence of bowel sounds is an absolute contraindication to initiate enteral feeding. Passage of flatus was considered mandatory before starting enteral nutrition by 86% of the respondents. Everyone knew that the method of Ryle′s tube feeding in their ICU is intermittent boluses. Only 4 staff nurses were unaware of any method to confirm Ryle′s tube position. The backrest elevation rate was 100%. Gastric residual volumes were always checked, but the amount of the gastric residual volume for the next feed to be withheld varied. The majority said that the unused Ryle′s tube feed is to be discarded after 6 h. The most preferred (48% method to upgrade their knowledge of enteral nutrition was from the ICU protocol manual. Conclusion: Information generated from this study can be helpful in identifying nutrition practices that are lacking and may be used to review and revise enteral feeding

  4. Isolated granulocytic sarcoma of the nasopharynx: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu P

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu,1 Ravindra Reddy Chuda,2 Dick G Hwang,3 David M Aboulafia1,4 1Floyd and Delores Jones Cancer Institute at Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 3Department of Pathology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, 4Division of Hematology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Granulocytic sarcoma (GS is a rare extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It may also represent blastic transformation of myelodysplastic syndromes or myeloproliferative neoplasms. Although usually seen in the context of advanced and poorly controlled disease, it may also present as the first manifestation of illness, without concurrent bone marrow or blood involvement. In the medical literature, chloroma and GS are terms that have been used interchangeably with myeloid sarcoma. GS usually manifests as soft tissue or bony masses in several extracranial sites, such as bone, periosteum, and lymph nodes; involvement of the head and neck region is uncommon. We report a case of a woman with insidious onset of progressive nasal congestion and diminished hearing who was diagnosed with an isolated GS of the nasopharynx. With involved field radiotherapy, she achieved a complete remission of 12-months duration before being diagnosed with overt AML. She has remained disease-free for greater than 18 months following induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Through a MEDLINE®/PubMed® search we identified an additional 13 cases of nasopharyngeal GS. The median age was 37 years (range 1 to 81 years. The cases were equally distributed among the sexes. The most common presenting symptoms were conductive hearing loss and sinonasal congestion. Isolated GS was identified in six cases, and the median time from diagnosis of GS to AML was 12 months (range 3 to 48 months. The treatment varied, but responses were seen in all the patients who received

  5. In vitro studies on oxidative stress-independent, Ag nanoparticles-induced cell toxicity of Candida albicans, an opportunistic pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan VS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Venkatraman Srinivasan Radhakrishnan,1 Surya Prakash Dwivedi,2 Mohammed Haris Siddiqui,3 Tulika Prasad1 1Advanced Instrumentation Research Facility (AIRF, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 2School of Biotechnology, IFTM University, Moradabad, 3Department of Bioengineering, Integral University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: Silver nanoparticles (AgNps have attracted maximal attention among all metal nanoparticles, and the study of their biological properties has gained impetus for further medical adoption. This study evaluated the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the action of AgNps against an opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans. Spherical, stable AgNp (average size 21.6 nm prepared by a chemical reduction method showed minimum inhibitory concentration (required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms at 40 µg/mL. AgNps have been reported to induce oxidative stress-mediated programmed cell death through the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, this study demonstrated that intracellular levels of AgNp-induced ROS could be reversed by using antioxidant ascorbic acid, but the sensitivity of AgNp-treated Candida cells could not be completely reversed. Moreover, in addition to the generation of ROS, the AgNps were found to affect other cellular targets resulting in altered membrane fluidity, membrane microenvironment, ergosterol content, cellular morphology, and ultrastructure. Thus, the generation of ROS does not seem to be the sole major cause of AgNp-mediated cell toxicity in Candida. Rather, the multitargeted action of AgNps, generation of ROS, alterations in ergosterol content, and membrane fluidity together seem to have potentiated anti-Candida action. Thus, this “nano-based drug therapy” is likely to favor broad-spectrum activity, multiple cellular targets, and minimum host toxicity. AgNps, therefore, appear to have the potential to address the challenges in multidrug

  6. The role of propranolol as a radiosensitizer in gastric cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao XH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Xinhua Liao, Prakash Chaudhary, Guanglin Qiu, Xiangming Che, Lin Fan General Surgery Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China Purpose: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines indicate that radiotherapy in gastric cancer shows limited effectiveness at reducing the growth of gastric cancer. Therefore, enhancing the sensitivity and effect of radiotherapy with propranolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, could reduce tumor growth. The role of propranolol as a radiosensitizer has not been adequately studied; therefore, the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of propranolol as a radiosensitizer against gastric cancer in vivo. Methods: Sixty-four male nude mice bearing tumor xenografts were randomly divided into four groups. Cell culture was performed using the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SGC-7901. Mice with tumor xenografts were treated with propranolol, isoproterenol, and radiation. The data for tumor weight and volume were obtained for statistical analyses. Furthermore, the expression levels of COX-2, NF-κB, VEGF, and EGFR were examined using immunohistochemical techniques and Western blotting.Results: The growth in the volume and weight of the tumor was lower in mouse models treated with propranolol and radiation therapy compared to the other groups. Decreased expression of NF-κB was also observed in treatment groups where both propranolol and radiation were used, leading to the reduction of COX-2, EGFR, and VEGF expression compared to that in the other groups.Conclusion: The present study indicated that propranolol potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy in gastric cancer by inhibiting NF-κB expression and its downstream genes: VEGF, EGFR, and COX-2. Keywords: propranolol, radiosensitizer, gastric cancer, radiation therapy 

  7. Start time delays in operating room: Different perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare expenditure is a serious concern, with escalating costs failing to meet the expectations of quality care. The treatment capacities are limited in a hospital setting and the operating rooms (ORs. Their optimal utilization is vital in efficient hospital management. Starting late means considerable wait time for staff, patients and waste of resources. We planned an audit to assess different perspectives of the residents in surgical specialities and anesthesia and OR staff nurses so as to know the causative factors of operative delay. This can help develop a practical model to decrease start time delays in operating room (ORs. Aims: An audit to assess different perspectives of the Operating room (OR staff with respect to the varied causative factors of operative delay in the OR. To aid in the development of a practical model to decrease start time delays in ORs and facilitate on-time starts at Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma centre (JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi. Methods: We prepared a questionnaire seeking the five main reasons of delay as per their perspective. Results: The available data was analysed. Analysis of the data demonstrated the common causative factors in start time operative delays as: a lack of proper planning, deficiencies in team work, communication gap and limited availability of trained supporting staff. Conclusions: The preparation of the equipment and required material for the OR cases must be done well in advance. Utilization of newer technology enables timely booking and scheduling of cases. Improved inter-departmental coordination and compliance with preanesthetic instructions needs to be ensured. It is essential that the anesthesiologists perform their work promptly, well in time . and supervise the proceedings as the OR manager. This audit is a step forward in defining the need of effective OR planning for continuous quality improvement.

  8. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    the authors for giving us the manuscripts in good time. The workshop was financially supported by BRNS, DAE, GoI. We also received partial funding support from the India-FAIR coordination centre, Kolkata, for the organization of the India-PANDA discussion meeting. We acknowledge the financial support received from BRNS and DST (Department of Science and Technology). The assistance from various departments of BARC and the Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education (HBCSE), TIFR is gratefully acknowledged. We also thank the members of the advisory committee and organizing committee and colleagues from NPD and Physics Group, BARC for their contributions. May 2012, Mumbai Bidyut Jyoti Roy A Chatterjee S Kailas Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Hadron 2011 photograph The PDF also contains a list of the workshop's committees and sponsors, photographs from the workshop and the programme of events.

  9. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  10. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  11. Triple-negative (ER, PgR, HER-2/neu breast cancer in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak W Patil

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Vinayak W Patil1, Rajeev Singhai1, Amit V Patil2, Prakash D Gurav21Department of Biochemistry, Grant Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, India; 2Department of Surgery, Government Medical College, Miraj, IndiaAbstract: The aim of our study was to analyze triple-negative (TN breast cancer, which is defined as being negative for the estrogen receptor (ER, the progesterone receptor (PgR, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu and which represents a subset of breast cancer with different biologic behavior. We investigated the clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic indicators of lymph node-negative TN breast cancer. Medical records were reviewed from patients with node-negative breast cancer who underwent curative surgery at Grant Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, India, from May 2007 to October 2010. Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Among 683 patients included, 136 had TN breast cancer and 529 had non-TN breast cancer. TN breast cancer correlated with younger age (<35 years, P = 0.003 and a higher histopathologic and nuclear grade (P < 0.001. It also correlated with a molecular profile associated with biological aggressiveness: negative for Bcl-2 expression (P < 0.001, positive for the epidermal growth factor receptor (P = 0.003, and a high level of p53 (P < 0.001 and Ki-67 expression (P < 0.00. The relapse rates during the follow-up period (median 56.8 months were 14.7% for TN breast cancer and 6.6% for non-TN breast cancer (P = 0.004. Relapse-free survival (RFS was significantly shorter among patients with TN breast cancer compared with those with non-TN breast cancer: 3.5-year RFS rate 85.5% versus 94.2%, respectively; P = 0.001. On multivariate analysis, young age, close resection margin, and triple negativity were independent predictors of shorter RFS. TN breast cancer had a higher relapse rate and more aggressive clinicopathological

  12. Population-based estimation of renal function in healthy young Indian adults based on body mass index and sex correlating renal volume, serum creatinine, and cystatin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prashanth Rajagopalan,1 Georgi Abraham,2 Yuvaram NV Reddy,2 Ravivarman Lakshmanasami,1 ML Prakash,1 Yogesh NV Reddy2 1Department of General Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Puducherry, 2Department of Nephrology, Madras Medical Mission Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: This population-based prospective study was undertaken in Mahatma Gandhi Medical College to estimate the renal function in young healthy Indian adults. A young healthy heterogeneous Indian cohort comprising 978 individuals, predominantly medical students, was assessed by a detailed questionnaire, and variables such as height, weight, body mass index (BMI, birth weight, and blood pressure were documented. Laboratory investigations included serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, blood sugar, urine protein, and imaging of the kidneys with ultrasound. The mean age of the cohort was 25±6 years, comprising 672 males and 306 females. The estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs by the Cockcroft–Gault formula for BMI <18.5 kg/m2, 18.5–24.99 kg/m2, 25–29.99 kg/m2, and ≥30 kg/m2 were 71.29±10.45 mL/min, 86.38±13.46 mL/min, 98.88±15.29 mL/min, and 109.13±21.57 mL/min, respectively; the eGFRs using cystatin C for the four groups of BMI were 84.53±18.14 mL/min, 84.01±40.11 mL/min, 79.18±13.46 mL/min, and 77.30±10.90 mL/min, respectively. This study attempts to establish a normal range of serum creatinine and cystatin C values for the Indian population and shows that in young healthy Indian adults, eGFR and kidney volume vary by BMI and sex. Keywords: eGFR, birth weight, renal volume

  13. Morning cortisol is lower in obese individuals with normal glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen EP

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Edavan P Praveen1, Jaya Prakash Sahoo1, Bindu Kulshreshtha2, Madan L Khurana3, Nandita Gupta1, Sada Nand Dwivedi3, Guresh Kumar3, Ariachery C Ammini11Department of Endocrinology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, 2Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, 3Department of Biostatistics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, IndiaBackground: There is no consensus on the role of cortisol in the pathogenesis of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS. This cross-sectional study aimed to analyze the relationship of morning plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels with body mass index (BMI and glucose tolerance.Subjects and methods: The sample frame was the “Offspring of individuals with diabetes study” database. A total of 358 offspring of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and 287 individuals without a known family history of T2DM were recruited for the study. Subjects who were ≥10 years of age were selected from the database for analysis. Subjects with T2DM were excluded. All participants underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, and blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 minutes for glucose, insulin and C-peptide. Plasma cortisol, ACTH, and lipid profile were estimated from the fasting sample.Results: Four hundred and ninety-five participants (305 males [62%] and 190 females [38%] were included in the analysis. ACTH and cortisol levels were higher in normal-weight subjects than in overweight/obese subjects. Both ACTH and cortisol increased as fasting plasma glucose increased. Cortisol levels were significantly lower in offspring of T2DM subjects with MS than in offspring of T2DM subjects without MS. When adjusted for BMI, the significance was marginal. In males, cortisol levels were negatively correlated with early insulin secretion during OGTT (insulinogenic index [0–30] and positively with waist circumference and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In females, fasting

  14. Novel anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation device reduces slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez MJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandi J Lopez,1 Allen Borne,2 W Todd Monroe,3 Prakash Bommala,1 Laura Kelly,1 Nan Zhang11Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 2Louisiana State University, New Orleans Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, 3Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAbstract: Clinically significant laxity occurs in 10%–30% of knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Graft slippage and tension loss at the hamstring graft tibial fixation site during and after reconstruction surgery contribute to postoperative joint laxity and are detrimental to long-term knee stability and graft properties. Limiting graft slippage will reduce associated complications. We sought to compare the in vitro mechanical properties and in vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use, and graft incorporation of the novel GraftGrab™ (GG device designed to reduce hamstring graft tibial fixation slippage with the commercially available bioabsorbable Bio-Post™ and spiked washer (BP. Mechanical testing was performed on canine tibia-hamstring graft constructs to quantify initial fixation properties. In vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use and graft incorporation of hamstring graft reconstructions were determined in a canine model. Outcomes included tibial translation and ground reaction forces preoperatively and 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three-dimensional graft and bone tunnel dimensions at the latter two time points, and graft-bone microstructure, as well as mechanical properties 8 weeks after implantation. Immediately after fixation, all grafts slipped from the BP constructs versus about 30% of GG constructs. In vivo limb use remained low, and tibial translation increased with time in the BP cohort. These results together

  15. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  16. Effect of Gamma Radiation on The Microbial Production of Selenium Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Zahaby, D.A.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    . However, anaerobic conditions have limitations, such as culture conditions and isolate characteristics that make optimization and scale up in bio-manufacturing processes tedious and challenging (Tejo Prakash et al., 2009). Selenium-tolerant aerobic microorganisms may provide an opportunity to overcome these limitations in the biosynthetic processes. Previous studies (Bajaj et al., 2012; Dhanjal and Cameotra, 2010; Lampis et al., 2014; Losi and Frankenberger, 1997; Yadav et al., 2008) have reported the aerobic formation of selenium nanoparticles by microorganisms. The generation of selenium nanospheres by soil bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus spp., Enterobacter cloacae, Bacillus mycoides SeITE01

  17. Development and characterization of chitosan-PEG-TAT nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Meenakshi Malhotra,1 Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau,1 Shyamali Saha,2 Imen Kahouli,3 Satya Prakash11Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, 2Faculty of Dentistry, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Recently, cell-penetrating peptides have been proposed to translocate antibodies, proteins, and other molecules in targeted drug delivery. The proposed study presents the synthesis and characterization of a peptide-based chitosan nanoparticle for small interfering RNA (siRNA delivery, in-vitro. Specifically, the synthesis included polyethylene glycol (PEG, a hydrophilic polymer, and trans-activated transcription (TAT peptide, which were chemically conjugated on the chitosan polymer. The conjugation was achieved using N-Hydroxysuccinimide-PEG-maleimide (heterobifunctional PEG as a cross-linker, with the bifunctional PEG facilitating the amidation reaction through its N-Hydroxysuccinimide group and reacting with the amines on chitosan. At the other end of PEG, the maleimide group was chemically conjugated with the cysteine-modified TAT peptide. The degree of substitution on chitosan with PEG and on PEG with TAT was confirmed using colorimetric assays. The resultant polymer was used to form nanoparticles complexing siRNA, which were then characterized for particle size, morphology, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity. The nanoparticles were tested in-vitro on mouse neuroblastoma cells (Neuro2a. Particle size and surface charge were characterized and an optimal pH condition and PEG molecular weight were determined to form sterically stable nanoparticles. Results indicate 7.5% of the amines in chitosan polymer were conjugated to the PEG and complete conjugation of TAT peptide was observed on the synthesized PEGylated chitosan polymer. Compared with unmodified chitosan nanoparticles, the nanoparticles formed at pH 6 were

  18. Development of surface-engineered PLGA nanoparticulate-delivery system of Tet-1-conjugated nattokinase enzyme for inhibition of Aβ40 plaques in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt PC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Chandra Bhatt,1 Amita Verma,2 Fahad A Al-Abbasi,3 Firoz Anwar,3 Vikas Kumar,4 Bibhu Prasad Panda1 1Microbial and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Laboratory, Centre for Advanced Research in Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India; 2Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India; 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Natural Product Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, globally there are around 18 million patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and this number is expected to double by 2025. The pathophysiology of AD includes selective deposition of Aβ peptide in the mitochondria of cells, which inhibits uptake of glucose by neurons and key enzyme functions. Current drug treatments for AD are unable to rectify the underlying pathology of the disease; they only provide short-term symptomatic relief, so there is a need for the development of newer treatment regimes. The antiamyloid activity, antifibrinolytic activity, and antithrombotic activity of nattokinase holds potential for the treatment of AD. As nattokinase is a protein, its stability restricts its usage to a greater extent, but this limitation can be overcome by nanoencapsulation. In this work, we successfully synthesized polymeric nanoparticles of nattokinase and characterized its use by different techniques: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, DTS Nano, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T-binding assay, in vitro drug

  19. Mitotic and antiapoptotic effects of nanoparticles coencapsulating human VEGF and human angiopoietin-1 on vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan AA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Afshan Afsar Khan, Arghya Paul, Sana Abbasi, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering Faculty of Medicine, McGill University Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Research towards the application of nanoparticles as carrier vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents is increasingly gaining importance. The angiogenic growth factors, human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and human angiopoietin-1 are known to prevent vascular endothelial cell apoptosis and in fact to stimulate human vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC proliferation. This paper aims to study the combined effect of these bioactive proteins coencapsulated in human serum albumin nanoparticles on HUVECs and to evaluate the potential application of this delivery system towards therapeutic angiogenesis.Methods and results: The angiogenic proteins, human VEGF and human angiopoietin-1, were coencapsulated in albumin nanoparticles for better controlled delivery of the proteins. The application of a nanoparticle system enabled efficient and extended-release kinetics of the proteins. The size of the nanoparticles crosslinked with glutaraldehyde was 101.0 ± 0.9 nm and the zeta potential was found to be -18 ± 2.9 mV. An optimal concentration of glutaraldehyde for the nanoparticle coating process was determined, and this provided stable and less toxic nanoparticles as protein carriers. The results of the study indicate that nanoparticles crosslinked with glutaraldehyde produced nanoparticles with tolerable toxicity which provided efficient and controlled release of the coencapsulated proteins. The nanoparticles were incubated for two weeks to determine the release profiles of the proteins. At the end of the two-week incubation period, it was observed that 49% ± 1.3% of human angiopoietin-1 and 59% ± 2.1% of human VEGF had been released from the nanoparticles. The proliferation and percent apoptosis of the HUVECs in

  20. Hemicrania continua: clinical review, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Prakash,1 Payal Patel2 1Department of Neurology, Smt. B. K. Shah Medical Institute and Research Centre, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 2Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Hemicrania continua (HC is an indomethacin-responsive primary headache disorder which is currently classified under the heading of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs. It is a highly misdiagnosed and underreported primary headache. The pooled mean delay of diagnosis of HC is 8.0 ± 7.2 years. It is not rare. We noted more than 1000 cases in the literature. It represents 1.7% of total headache patients attending headache or neurology clinic. Just like other TACs, it is characterized by strictly unilateral pain in the trigeminal distribution, cranial autonomic features in the same area and agitation during exacerbations/attacks. It is different from other TACs in one aspect. While all other TACs are episodic, HC patients have continuous headaches with superimposed severe exacerbations. The central feature of HC is continuous background headache. However, the patients may be worried only for superimposed exacerbations. Focusing only on exacerbations and ignoring continuous background headache are the most important factors for the misdiagnosis of HC. A large number of patients may have migrainous features during exacerbation phase. Up to 70% patients may fulfill the diagnostic criteria for migraine during exacerbations. Besides migraine, its exacerbations can mimic a large number of other primary and secondary headaches. The other specific feature of HC is a remarkable response to indomethacin. However, a large number of patients develop side effects because of the long-term use of indomethacin. A few other medications may also be effective in a subset of patients with HC. Various surgical interventions have been suggested for patients who are intolerant to indomethacin. Several aspects of HC

  1. Nueva metodología para valorar la calidad de las aguas superficiales para su uso como clase 2 en Costa Rica New methodology for evaluating the surface waters quality to be used as Class 2 in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Calvo-Brenes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Para determinar la calidad de las aguas superficiales se utilizan distintos indicadores físicoquímicos, microbiológicos y biológicos, así como índices de calidad. El reglamento costarricense contempla el uso de dos índices: uno se basa en la determinación de la fauna bentónica y el otro es el Indice Holandés.  Este último requiere únicamente el análisis de tres indicadores físicoquímicos de calidad, lo cual puede generar algún grado de ambigüedad y falta de robustez. Es por ello que es conveniente no descartar el uso de otros índices recomendados en la literatura. La mayoría de ellos requiere la transformación de los indicadores en valores adimensionados (SI en una escala de 0 a 100. En esta investigación, para el cálculo del SI se utilizaron las fórmulas mencionadas por Cude, Nasirian, Dinius, Prakash, Prati, Walski-Parker y Stoner. Los distintos SI así generados deben mostrar un comportamiento que varíe en una escala de 0 a 100, lo cual a su vez también debe concordar con los valores de permisibilidad reportados en nuestro reglamento para cada indicador. En general, a mayor concentración de un indicador en particular, mayor la tendencia del SI hacia 0, lo que representa un mayor grado de contaminación de los ríos.  El objetivo de esta investigación fue verificar la aplicabilidad de dichas fórmulas matemáticas para la obtención del SI y su posible aplicación en Costa Rica, considerando nuestro entorno ambiental y nuestra reglamentación. La aplicación se hizo específicamente para la clase 2 mencionada en el reglamento costarricense. Al analizar las distintas fórmulas de cálculo propuestas por varios investigadores, se encontró que la mayoría son apropiadas para las zonas a las que hacen referencia sus autores y en general son diferentes de nuestro entorno ambiental. También, algunas de ellas son para usos específicos de las aguas superficiales y además los valores de permisibilidad empleados difieren

  2. Infrequent near death experiences in severe brain injury survivors - A quantitative and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yongmei; Huang, Qin; Prakash, Ravi; Chaudhury, Suprakash

    2013-01-01

    were chosen. Near death experience scale (NDES) score of 7 or more was used as the criteria of screening NDE experiences. After identifying such individuals, the Prakash-modification of the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to interview and record the data for qualitative analysis. We found that contrary to earlier incidence reports, NDEs in post head injury patients were markedly low. Only 3 out of 86 of the patients recruited had a clear and confident experience of NDE. We conducted a qualitative study to explore further into these experiences. IPA of these 3 patients revealed four master themes: 1. Unique light visions 2. Intense feelings of astonishment, pleasure, and fear 3. The sense of helplessness 4. Supernatural but rationality of experience. NDE is uncommon in head-injury cases as compared to other near-death conditions. But the persons experiencing it have immense impacts on their belief systems and emotions. This experience should be further explored by studies of larger samples.

  3. Evaluation of amylase and lipase levels in blunt trauma abdomen patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are studies to prove the role of amylase and lipase estimation as a screening diagnostic tool to detect diseases apart from acute pancreatitis. However, there is sparse literature on the role of serum and urine amylase, lipase levels, etc to help predict the specific intra-abdominal injury after blunt trauma abdomen (BTA. Aim: To elucidate the significance of elevation in the levels of amylase and lipase in serum and urine samples as reliable parameters for accurate diagnosis and management of blunt trauma to the abdomen. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis was done on the trauma patients admitted in Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, AIIMS, with blunt abdomen trauma injuries over a period of six months. Blood and urine samples were collected on days 1, 3, and 5 of admission for the estimation of amylase and lipase, liver function tests, serum bicarbonates, urine routine microscopy for red blood cells, and complete hemogram. Clinical details such as time elapsed from injury to admission, type of injury, trauma score, and hypotension were noted. Patients were divided into groups according to the single or multiple organs injured and according to their hospital outcome (dead/discharged. Wilcoxon′s Rank sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare median values in two/three groups. Data analysis was performed using STATA 11.0 statistical software. Results: A total of 55 patients with median age 26 (range, 6-80 years, were enrolled in the study. Of these, 80% were males. Surgery was required for 20% of the patients. Out of 55 patients, 42 had isolated single organ injury [liver or spleen or gastrointestinal tract (GIT or kidney]. Patients with pancreatic injury were excluded. In patients who suffered liver injuries, urine lipase levels on day 1, urine lipase/amylase ratio along with aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP on days 1, 3, and 5, were found to

  4. Evaluation of amylase and lipase levels in blunt trauma abdomen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subodh; Sagar, Sushma; Subramanian, Arulselvi; Albert, Venencia; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Kapoor, Nitika

    2012-04-01

    There are studies to prove the role of amylase and lipase estimation as a screening diagnostic tool to detect diseases apart from acute pancreatitis. However, there is sparse literature on the role of serum and urine amylase, lipase levels, etc to help predict the specific intra-abdominal injury after blunt trauma abdomen (BTA). To elucidate the significance of elevation in the levels of amylase and lipase in serum and urine samples as reliable parameters for accurate diagnosis and management of blunt trauma to the abdomen. A prospective analysis was done on the trauma patients admitted in Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, AIIMS, with blunt abdomen trauma injuries over a period of six months. Blood and urine samples were collected on days 1, 3, and 5 of admission for the estimation of amylase and lipase, liver function tests, serum bicarbonates, urine routine microscopy for red blood cells, and complete hemogram. Clinical details such as time elapsed from injury to admission, type of injury, trauma score, and hypotension were noted. Patients were divided into groups according to the single or multiple organs injured and according to their hospital outcome (dead/discharged). Wilcoxon's Rank sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare median values in two/three groups. Data analysis was performed using STATA 11.0 statistical software. A total of 55 patients with median age 26 (range, 6-80) years, were enrolled in the study. Of these, 80% were males. Surgery was required for 20% of the patients. Out of 55 patients, 42 had isolated single organ injury [liver or spleen or gastrointestinal tract (GIT) or kidney]. Patients with pancreatic injury were excluded. In patients who suffered liver injuries, urine lipase levels on day 1, urine lipase/amylase ratio along with aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) on days 1, 3, and 5, were found to be significant. Day 1 serum amylase, AST, ALT, hemoglobin, and

  5. Infrequent near death experiences in severe brain injury survivors - A quantitative and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Hou

    2013-01-01

    coma following a severe head injury. A total of 86 patients were chosen. Near death experience scale (NDES score of 7 or more was used as the criteria of screening NDE experiences. After identifying such individuals, the Prakash-modification of the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA was used to interview and record the data for qualitative analysis. Results: We found that contrary to earlier incidence reports, NDEs in post head injury patients were markedly low. Only 3 out of 86 of the patients recruited had a clear and confident experience of NDE. We conducted a qualitative study to explore further into these experiences. IPA of these 3 patients revealed four master themes: 1. Unique light visions 2. Intense feelings of astonishment, pleasure, and fear 3. The sense of helplessness 4. Supernatural but rationality of experience. Conclusion: NDE is uncommon in head-injury cases as compared to other near-death conditions. But the persons experiencing it have immense impacts on their belief systems and emotions. This experience should be further explored by studies of larger samples.

  6. Design of a novel theranostic nanomedicine: synthesis and physicochemical properties of a biocompatible polyphosphazene–platinum(II conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avaji PG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash G Avaji,1,2,* Jung Hyun Park,1,* Hyun Jeong Lee,1 Yong Joo Jun,2 Kyung Su Park,3 Kyung Eun Lee,3 Soo-Jin Choi,4 Hwa Jeong Lee,1 Youn Soo Sohn2 1Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2C & Pharm, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To develop a theranostic nanomedicine involving the antitumor-active moiety (dachPt(II (dach: trans-(±-1,2-diaminocyclohexane of oxaliplatin (OX, a new biocompatible polyphosphazene carrier polymer was designed by grafting with a methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG to increase duration of circulation in the blood and with aminoethanol (AE as a spacer group. The antitumor (dachPt moiety was conjugated to the carrier polymer using cis-aconitic acid (AA as a linker, resulting in a polymer conjugate formulated as [NP(MPEG550(AE-AAPt(dach]n, named “Polyplatin” (PP. PP was found to self-assemble into very stable polymeric nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 55.1 nm and a critical aggregation concentration of 18.5 mg/L in saline. PP could easily be labeled with a fluorescence dye such as Cy5.5 for imaging studies. The time-dependent ex vivo image studies on organ distributions and clearance of Cy-labeled PP have shown that PP accumulated in the tumor with high selectivity by the enhanced permeability and retention effect but was cleared out from all the major organs including the liver in about 4 weeks postinjection. Another time-dependent bioimaging study on distribution and clearance of PP in mouse kidney using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy has shown that PP accumulates much less in kidney and is more rapidly excreted than monomeric OX, which is in accord with the

  7. Active and passive infrared thermography applied to the detection and characterization of hidden defects in structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    direct thermal modelling or inverse thermal modelling will be presented and discussed. Conclusion and perspectives will be proposed in link with structure monitoring or cultural heritage applications. References [1] Maldague, X.P.V. "Theory and practice of infrared technology for non-destructive testing", John Wiley & sons Inc., 2001. [2] Dumoulin J. and Averty R., « Development of an infrared system coupled with a weather station for real time atmospheric corrections using GPU computing: Application to bridge monitoring", QIRT 2012, Naples, Italy, June 2012. [3] J. Dumoulin, L. Ibos, C. Ibarra-Castanedo, A Mazioud, M. Marchetti, X. Maldague and A. Bendada, « Active infrared thermography applied to defect detection and characterization on asphalt pavement samples: comparison between experiments and numerical simulations », Journal of Modern Optics, Special Issue on Advanced Infrared Technology and Applications, Volume 57, Issue 18, October 2010 , pages 1759 - 1769, doi:10.1080/09500340.2010.522738 [4] F. Taillade, M. Quiertant, K. Benzarti, J. Dumoulin, Ch. Aubagnac, Chapter 9: "Nondestructive Evaluation of FRP Strengthening Systems Bonded on Concrete Structures using Pulsed Stimulated Infrared Thermography ", pp 193-208, Book title "Infrared Thermography", Editeur Raghu V. Prakash, ISBN 978-953-51-0242-7, Intech, open access at the following address http://www.intechopen.com/books/editor/infrared-thermography, march 2012. [5] Cooley J.W., Tukey J.W., "An algorithm for the machine calculation of complex Fourier series", Mathematics of Computation, vol. 19, n° 90, 1965, p. 297-301. [6] Rajic N., "Principal component thermography for flaw contrast enhancement and flaw depth characterization in composite structures", Composite Structures, vol 58, pp 521-528, 2002. [7] Marinetti S., Grinzato E., Bison P. G., Bozzi E., Chimenti M., Pieri G. and Salvetti O. "Statistical analysis of IR thermographic sequences by PCA," Infrared Physics & Technology vol 46 pp 85-91, 2004.

  8. Books Noted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edward J.

    1999-10-01

    The Colloidal Domain: Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet, 2nd edition D. Fennell Evans and Hakan Wennerstroem. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xl + 632 pp. ISBN 0-471-24247-0. 89.95. Commercial Nuclear Power: Assuring Safety for the Future Charles B. Ramsey and Mohammed Modarres. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1998. xxviii + 508 pp. ISBN 0-471-29186-2. 79.95. Advances in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 4 Bruce E. Maryanoff and Allen B. Reitz, Eds. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. ISBN 1-7623-0064-7. 109.50. Advances in Strained and Interesting Organic Molecules, Vol. 7 Brian Halton, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. xii + 259 pp. ISBN 0-7623-0530-4. 109.50. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Vol. 6 Patrick S. Mariano, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. x + 171 pp. ISBN 0-7623-0213-5. 109.50. Automating Science and Engineering Laboratories with Visual Basic Mark F. Russo and Martin M. Echols. Wiley-Interscience Series on Laboratory Automation. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1999. xx + 355 pp. ISBN 0-471-25493-2. 49.95. Plantwide Process Control Kelvin T. Erickson and John L. Hedrick. Wiley Series in Chemical Engineering. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1999. xii + 547 pp. ISBN 0-471-17835-7. 89.95. Heme Peroxidases H. Brian Dunford. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xiii + 507 pp. ISBN 0-471-24244-6. 195.00. Industrial Ecology: Environmental Chemistry and Hazardous Wastes Stanley E. Manahan. Lewis: Boca Raton, FL, 1999. 318 pp. ISBN 1-56670-381-6. 69.95. Reviews in Computational Chemistry, Vol. 13 Kenny B. Lipkowitz and Donald B. Boyd. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xxxiii + 426 pp. ISBN 0-471-33135-x. 135.00. Surfaces, Interfaces, and Colloids: Principles and Applications, 2nd edition Drew Myers. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xx + 501 pp. ISBN 0-471-33060-4. 94.95. Onium Ions George A. Olah, Kenneth K. Laali, Qi Wang, and G. K. Surya Prakash. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1998. xv + 509 pp. ISBN 0-471-14877-6. 110

  9. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kumar

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available - Chris Ballard, Jeroen A. Overweel, Topics relating to Netherlands New Guinea in Ternate Residency memoranda of transfer and other assorted documents. Leiden: DSALCUL, Jakarta: IRIS, 1995, x + 146 pp. [Irian Jaya Source Materials 13.] - Timothy P. Barnard, Daniel Perret, Sejarah Johor-Riau-Lingga sehingga 1914; Sebuah esei bibliografi. Kuala Lumpur: Kementerian Kebudayaan, Kesenian dan Pelancongan Malaysia/École Francaise d’Extrême Orient, 1998, 460 pp. - Peter Boomgaard, Om Prakash, European commercial enterprise in pre-colonial India. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998, xviii + 377 pp. [The New Cambridge History of India II-5.] - U.T. Bosma, Oliver Kortendick, Drei Schwestern und ihre Kinder; Rekonstruktion von Familiengeschichte und Identitätstransmission bei Indischen Nerlanders mit Hilfe computerunterstützter Inhaltsanalyse. Canterbury: Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing, University of Kent at Canterbury, 1996, viii + 218 pp. [Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing Monograph 12.] - Freek Colombijn, Thomas Psota, Waldgeister und Reisseelen; Die Revitalisierung von Ritualen zur Erhaltung der komplementären Produktion in SüdwestSumatra. Berlin: Reimer, 1996, 203 + 15 pp. [Berner Sumatraforschungen.] - Christine Dobbin, Ann Maxwell Hill, Merchants and migrants; Ethnicity and trade among Yunannese Chinese in Southeast Asia. New Haven: Yale University Southeast Asia Studies, 1998, vii + 178 pp. [Yale Southeast Asia Studies Monograph 47.] - Aone van Engelenhoven, Peter Bellwood, The Austronesians; Historical and comparative perspectives. Canberra: Department of Anthropology, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, 1995, viii + 359 pp., James J. Fox, Darrell Tryon (eds. - Aone van Engelenhoven, Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies of languages in Maluku, Part II. Jakarta: Badan Penyelenggara Seri NUSA and Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya, 1995, xii + 112 pp. [NUSA

  10. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    C, Mattis J, Prakash R, Diester I, Goshen I, Thompson K R, Deisseroth K 2010 Molecular and cellular approaches for diversifying and extending optogenetics Cell 141 154-65 [18] Zhang F, Gradinaru V, Adamantidis A R, Durand R, Airan R D, de Lecea L and Deisseroth K 2010 Optogenetic interrogation of neural circuits: technology for probing mammalian brain structures Nat. Protoc. 5 439-56 [19] Wells J, Kao C, Mariappan K, Albea J, Duco Jansen E, Konrad P and Mahadevan-Jansen A 2005 Optical stimulation of neural tissue in vivo Opt. Lett. 30 504-6 [20] Izzo A D, Richter C P, Jansen E D and Walsh J T Jr 2006 Laser stimulation of the auditory nerve Lasers Surg. Med. 38 745-53 [21] Richter C P, Izzo A D, Wells J, Jansen E D and Walsh J T Jr 2010 Neural stimulation with optical radiation Laser Photonics Rev. available at doi:10.1002/lpor.200900044 [22] Nikolenko V, Peterka D S and Yuste R 2010 A portable laser photostimulation and imaging microscope J. Neural Eng. 7 045001 [23] Golan L, Reutsky I, Farah N and Shoham S 2009 Design and characteristics of holographic neural photo-stimulation systems J. Neural Eng. 6 066004 [24] Losavio B E, Iyer V, Patel S and Saggau P 2010 Acousto-optical laser scanning for multi-site photo-stimulation of single neurons in vitro J. Neural Eng. 7 045002 [25] Duemani Reddy G, Kelleher K, Fink R and Saggau P 2008 Three-dimensional random access multiphoton microscopy for functional imaging of neuronal activity Nat. Neurosci. 11 713-20 [26] Grewe B F, Langer D, Kasper H, Kampa B M and Helmchen F 2010 High-speed in vivo calcium imaging reveals neuronal network activity with near-millisecond precision Nat. Methods 7 399-405 [27] Pikov V, Arakaki X, Harrington M, Fraser S E and Siegel P H 2010 Modulation of neuronal activity and plasma membrane propertiess with low-power millimeter waves in organotypic cortical slices J. Neural Eng. 7 045003 [28] Liang S et al 2009 Temperature-dependent activation of neurons by continuous near-infrared laser Cell