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Sample records for jwst primary mirror

  1. Electronic speckle pattern interferometric testing of JWST primary mirror segment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Chaney, David M.; Saif, Babak N.

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) was required to meet NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 06 requirements in the summer of 2006. These TRL06 requirements included verifying all mirror technology systems level readiness in simulated end-to-end operating conditions. In order to support the aggressive development and technology readiness schedule for the JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA), a novel approach was implemented to verify the nanometer surface figure distortion effects on an in-process non-polished beryllium mirror surface. At the time that the TRL06 requirements needed to be met, a polished mirror segment had not yet been produced that could have utilized the baselined interferometric optical test station. The only JWST mirror segment available was a finished machined segment with an acid-etched optical surface. Therefore an Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometer (ESPI) was used in coordination with additional metrology techniques to perform interferometric level optical testing on a non-optical surface. An accelerated, rigorous certification program was quickly developed for the ESPI to be used with the unfinished optical surface of the primary mirror segment. The ESPI was quickly implemented into the PMSA test program and optical testing was very successful in quantifying the nanometer level surface figure deformation changes in the PMSA due to assembly, thermal cycling, vibration, and acoustic testing. As a result of the successful testing, the PMSA passed all NASA TRL06 readiness requirements.

  2. Measuring segmented primary mirror WFE in the presence of vibration and thermal drift on the light-weighted JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Dziak, Kenneth J.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene

    2012-09-01

    The light-weighted design of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) of the James Webb Telescope (JWST) leads to additional sensitivity to vibration from the ground - an important consideration to the measurement uncertainty of the wavefront error (WFE) in the primary mirror. Furthermore, segmentation of the primary mirror leads to rigid-body movements of segment areas in the WFE. The ground vibrations are minimized with modifications to the test facility, and by the architecture of the equipment supporting the load. Additional special test equipment (including strategically placed isolators, tunable mass dampers, and cryogenic magnetic dampers) mitigates the vibration and the response sensitivity before reaching the telescope. A multi-wavelength interferometer is designed and operated to accommodate the predicted residual vibration. Thermal drift also adds to the measurement variation. Test results of test equipment components, measurement theory, and finite element analysis combine to predict the test uncertainty in the future measurement of the primary mirror. The vibration input to the finite element model comes from accelerometer measurements of the facility with the environmental control pumps operating. One of the isolators have been built and tested to validate the dynamic performance. A preliminary model of the load support equipment and the OTE with the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is complete. The performance of the add-on dampers have been established in previous applications. And operation of the multi-wavelength interferometer was demonstrated on a scaled hardware version of the JWST in an environment with vibration and thermal drift.

  3. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  4. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C.; Hadaway, J.; Olczak, G.; Cosentino, J.; Johnston, J.; Whitman, T.; Connolly, M.; Chaney, D.; Knight, J.; Telfer, R.

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  5. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  6. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  7. Alignment test results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope mirrors in the cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the Science Instrument (SI) detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  8. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), The First Light Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Scheduled to begin its 10 year mission after 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will search for the first luminous objects of the Universe to help answer fundamental questions about how the Universe came to look like it does today. At 6.5 meters in diameter, JWST will be the world s largest space telescope. This talk reviews science objectives for JWST and how they drive the JWST architecture, e.g. aperture, wavelength range and operating temperature. Additionally, the talk provides an overview of the JWST primary mirror technology development and fabrication status.

  9. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  10. LSST primary/tertiary monolithic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, J.; Gressler, W.; Liang, M.; Neill, D.; Araujo-Hauck, C.; Andrew, J.; Angeli, G.; Cho, M.; Claver, C.; Daruich, F.; Gessner, C.; Hileman, E.; Krabbendam, V.; Muller, G.; Poczulp, G.; Repp, R.; Wiecha, O.; Xin, B.; Kenagy, K.; Martin, H. M.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    At the core of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) three-mirror optical design is the primary/tertiary (M1M3) mirror that combines these two large mirrors onto one monolithic substrate. The M1M3 mirror was spin cast and polished at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab at The University of Arizona (formerly SOML, now the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab at the University of Arizona (RFCML)). Final acceptance of the mirror occurred during the year 2015 and the mirror is now in storage while the mirror cell assembly is being fabricated. The M1M3 mirror will be tested at RFCML after integration with its mirror cell before being shipped to Chile.

  11. Primary mirror segment fabrication for CELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Terry S.; Nelson, Jerry E.; Sommargren, Gary E.

    2000-07-01

    The primary mirror of the proposed California Extremely Large Telescope is a 30-meter diameter mosaic of hexagonal segments. An initial design calls for about a thousand segments with a hexagon side length of 0.5 meters, a primary-mirror focal ratio of 1.5, and a segment surface quality of about 20 nanometers rms. We describe concepts for fabricating these segments.

  12. James Webb Space Telescope Primary Mirror Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Paul; Gallagher, B.; Chaney, D.; Brown, B.

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope has a segmented primary mirror consisting of 18 hexagonal beryllium primary mirror segment assemblies (PMSA) that have a total collecting area greater than 25 square meters. The PMSAs are designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures (39 K) and to be actively controlled to co-phase the segments. This paper discusses the processes and testing utilized in the manufacture of these mirrors including the critical cryogenic testing performed at the XRCF facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The manufacturing team is headed by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp (BATC) with support from Brush Wellman for beryllium blank fabrication, Axsys Technologies for the precision machining, L3-Tinsley for the mirror polishing, and QCI for the reflective coating application.

  13. Studying the spectral properties of Active Galactic Nuclei in the JWST era

    CERN Document Server

    Nakos, Th; Alonso-Herrero, A; Labiano, A

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), due to launch in 2014, shall provide an unprecedented wealth of information in the near and mid-infrared wavelengths, thanks to its high-sensitivity instruments and its 6.5 m primary mirror, the largest ever launched into space. NIRSpec and MIRI, the two spectrographs onboard JWST, will play a key role in the study of the spectral features of Active Galactic Nuclei in the 0.6-28 micron wavelength range. This talk aims at presenting an overview of the possibilities provided by these two instruments, in order to prepare the astronomical community for the JWST era.

  14. Transiting Exoplanets with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S; Valenti, J A

    2008-01-01

    The era of exoplanet characterization is upon us. For a subset of exoplanets -- the transiting planets -- physical properties can be measured, including mass, radius, and atmosphere characteristics. Indeed, measuring the atmospheres of a further subset of transiting planets, the hot Jupiters, is now routine with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will continue Spitzer's legacy with its large mirror size and precise thermal stability. JWST is poised for the significant achievement of identifying habitable planets around bright M through G stars--rocky planets lacking extensive gas envelopes, with water vapor and signs of chemical disequilibrium in their atmospheres. Favorable transiting planet systems, are, however, anticipated to be rare and their atmosphere observations will require tens to hundreds of hours of JWST time per planet. We review what is known about the physical characteristics of transiting planets, summarize lessons learned from Spitzer high-contrast exoplanet m...

  15. Primary mirror assemblies for large space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    In this report are considered the basic problems which relate to developemnt, manufacture, experimental trying out, and usage of primary mirrors (PM) of the large space telescopes intended to perform distant sounding of the Earth. Attention is concentrated on development of weight-reduced passive mirrors which ensure more reliable operation of the telescope as a whole. In the report we expressed the opinion that it is quite possible to manufacture a passive weight-reduced PM if its diameter is equal approximately to 3 m. Materials which may be used for the manufacturing of PM are beryllium and silicon carbide, physical and mechanical parameters of which are the most preferable ones. But it should be taken into consideration that this is the glass ceramic of CO115M brand which has been mastered by the industry of Russia in the greatest extent. It was confirmed that parameters of this material remain unchanged during a long period of time. Constructions of the PM, made of glass ceramic, as well as constructions of holders intended to fix the mirror, are presented in this report. A holder is used first of all to prevent lowering of a PM surface quality after a mirror has been removed from a machine and fixed in a primary mirror assembly (PMA). At present two-layer construction of a PM is preferable. This construction consists of thick base including weight reduction structure, which is in a radius which is optimum from the standpoint of deformation of a mirror operating surface. In the process of manufacture a mirror is deprived of its weight with the use of special pneumatic off-loading elements. PMA is erected in vertical plane by means of using an interferometric inspection system. In the end of this report we expressed the views on an approach to engineering of a PM by taking into account potentialities both of space ships and of carrier rockets.

  16. Large Telescope Segmented Primary Mirror Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rud, Mayer

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a broadband (white light) point source, located at the telescope Cassegrain focus, which generates a cone of light limited by the hole in the secondary mirror (SM). It propagates to the aspheric null-mirror, which is optimized to make all the reflected rays to be normal to the primary mirror (PM) upon reflection. PM retro-reflects the rays back through the system for wavefront analysis. The point source and the wavefront analysis subsystems are all located behind the PM. The PM phasing is absolute (white light) and does not involve the SM. A relatively small, aspheric null-mirror located near the PM center of curvature has been designed to deliver the high level of optical wavefront correction. The phasing of the segments is absolute due to the use of a broadband source. The segmented PM is optically aligned independently and separately from the SM alignment. The separation of the PM segments alignment from the PM to the SM, and other telescope optics alignments, may be a significant advantage, eliminating the errors coupling. The point source of this concept is fully cooperative, unlike a star or laser-generated guide-star, providing the necessary brightness for the optimal S/N ratio, the spectral content, and the stable on-axis position. This concept can be implemented in the lab for the PM initial alignment, or made to be a permanent feature of the space-based or groundbased telescope.

  17. Calibration results using highly aberrated images for aligning the JWST instruments to the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Acton, D. Scott; Gallagher, Ben B.; Knight, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Jurling, Alden S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project is an international collaboration led by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD. JWST is NASA's flagship observatory that will operate nearly a million miles away from Earth at the L2 Lagrange point. JWST's optical design is a three-mirror anastigmat with four main optical components; 1) the eighteen Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA), 2) a single Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA), 3) an Aft-Optics Subsystem (AOS) consisting of a Tertiary Mirror and Fine Steering Mirror, and 4) an Integrated Science Instrument Module consisting of the various instruments for JWST. JWST's optical system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of alignment capability and risk with the PMSAs and SMA having rigid body motion available on-orbit just for alignment purposes. However, the Aft-Optics Subsystem (AOS) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are essentially fixed optical subsystems within JWST, and therefore the cryogenic alignment of the AOS to the ISIM is critical to the optical performance and mission success of JWST. In support of this cryogenic alignment of the AOS to ISIM, an array of fiber optic sources, known as the AOS Source Plate Assembly (ASPA), are placed near the intermediate image location of JWST (between the secondary and tertiary mirrors) during thermal vacuum ground-test operations. The AOS produces images of the ASPA fiber optic sources at the JWST focal surface location, where they are captured by the various science instruments. In this manner, the AOS provides an optical yardstick by which the instruments within ISIM can evaluate their relative positions to and the alignment of the AOS to ISIM can be quantified. However, since the ASPA is located at the intermediate image location of the JWST three-mirror anastigmat design, the images of these fiber optic sources produced by the AOS are highly aberrated with approximately 2-3μm RMS wavefront error consisting

  18. LUTE primary mirror materials and design study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Greg

    1993-02-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) Primary Mirror Materials and Design Study is to investigate the feasibility of the LUTE telescope primary mirror. A systematic approach to accomplish this key goal was taken by first understanding the optical, thermal, and structural requirements and then deriving the critical primary mirror-level requirements for ground testing, launch, and lunar operations. After summarizing the results in those requirements which drove the selection of material and the design for the primary mirror are discussed. Most important of these are the optical design which was assumed to be the MSFC baseline (i.e. 3 mirror optical system), telescope wavefront error (WFE) allocations, the telescope weight budget, and the LUTE operational temperature ranges. Mechanical load levels, reflectance and microroughness issues, and options for the LUTE metering structure were discussed and an outline for the LUTE telescope sub-system design specification was initiated. The primary mirror analysis and results are presented. The six material substrate candidates are discussed and four distinct mirror geometries which are considered are shown. With these materials and configurations together with varying the location of the mirror support points, a total of 42 possible primary mirror designs resulted. The polishability of each substrate candidate was investigated and a usage history of 0.5 meter and larger precision cryogenic mirrors (the operational low end LUTE temperature of 60 K is the reason we feel a survey of cryogenic mirrors is appropriate) that were flown or tested are presented.

  19. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  20. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  1. Rigid ultralight primary mirror segments for space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2000-10-01

    The development of ultra-light fibrous substrate mirrors allows serious contemplation of large multi-mirror space telescopes using rigid segments. Mirrors made of silica and alumina fibers have a small coefficient of thermal expansion and a density competitive with inflatable structures. Furthermore, they are without the imagery problems caused by non parabolic figures, gaseous expansion and contraction, tidal distortion of large gas filled structures, leaks, and long lived transient mirror perturbations caused by intentional pointing and tracking movements, micrometeor and space debris impacts, and mechanical vibrations. Fibrous substrate primary mirrors also have logistical advantages, since segments can be fabricated in orbit from small amounts of dense raw materials. One space shuttle flight, lifting about half its payload capacity, is adequate to transport all the material necessary to fabricate substrates for a one hundred meter telescope whose primary mirror consists of 12,086 hexagonal segments, each having a diameter of 1 meter and an area of 0.6495 square meters.

  2. Large Space Optics: From Hubble to JWST and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    If necessity truly is the mother of invention, then advances in lightweight space mirror technology have been driven by launch vehicle mass and volume constraints. In the late 1970 s, at the start of Hubble development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 3 to 4 meter monolithic primary mirrors with masses of 6000 to 10,000 kg - clearly too massive for the planned space shuttle 25,000 kg capability to LEO. Necessity led Hubble to a different solution. Launch vehicle mass constraints (and cost) resulted in the development of a 2.4 meter lightweight eggcrate mirror. At 810 kg (180 kg/m2), this mirror was approximately 7.4% of HST s total 11,110 kg mass. And, the total observatory structure at 4.3 m x 13.2 m fit snuggly inside the space shuttle 4.6 m x 18.3 m payload bay. In the early 1990 s, at the start of JWST development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 8 meter class monolithic primary mirrors (16,000 to 23,000 kg) and 10 meter segmented mirrors (14,400 kg). Unfortunately, launch vehicles were still constrained to 4.5 meter payloads and 25,000 kg to LEO or 6,600 kg to L2. Furthermore, science now demanded a space telescope with 6 to 8 meter aperture operating at L2. Mirror technology was identified as a critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996 (1). These studies identified two significant architectural constraints: segmentation and areal density. Because the launch vehicle fairing payload dynamic envelop diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. And, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density of 20 kg/m2. At the inception of

  3. Misalignment Induced Aberrations of JWST: Isolating Low Order Primary Figure Residuals from Misalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Iris AO, Inc. 2680 Bancroft Way Berkeley, CA 04704 8...aberration theory. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nodal Aberration Theory, James Webb Space Telescope, Misalignment, Segmented , Mirror, Adaptive Optics, Coma...NOT field quadratic K. P. Thompson, “Description of the third-order optical aberrations of near-circular pupil optical systems without symmetry,” J

  4. The 8.2 metre primary mirrors of the VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, P.; Enard, D.; Merkle, F.; Noethe, L.; Wilson, R. N.

    1990-08-01

    The Very Large Telescope (VLT) presently being developed at ESO is described in terms of technological advances which make its use both technically effective and feasible. The VLT capitalizes on advances in materials, polishing techniques, and mirror support systems. The VLT consists of four 8-m alt-az telescopes and a 2-m auxiliary telescope in a single-dish configuration with Zerodur meniscus mirrors passively supported on a lateral system. A discussion of the tradeoffs between glass and metal mirrors is presented, and computerized polishing is described in relation to optical specifications. The mirror is supported with 150 axial and 60 lateral supports with electromechanical actuators to modulate applied force. The active optics concept is employed via the flexibility of the primary mirror, which generates elastomechanical deformations and the position and orientation of the secondary mirror.

  5. Active thermal figure control for the TOPS II primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Roger; Kang, Tae; Cuerden, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Stahl, Phil

    2007-09-01

    TOPS (Telescope to Observe Planetary Systems) is the first coronagraphic telescope concept designed specifically to take advantage of Guyon's method of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization PIAA).1 The TOPS primary mirror may incorporates active figure control to help achieve the desired wavefront control to approximately 1 angstrom RMS accurate across the spectral bandwidth. Direct correction of the primary figure avoids the need for a separate small deformable mirror. Because of Fresnel propagation, correction at a separate surface can introduce serious chromatic errors unless it is precisely conjugated to the primary. Active primary control also reduces complexity and mass and increases system throughput, and will likely enable a full system test to the 10-10 level in the 1 g environment before launch. We plan to use thermal actuators with no mechanical disturbance, using radiative heating or cooling fingers distributed inside the cells of a honeycomb mirror. The glass would have very small but finite coefficient of expansion of ~ 5x10 -8/C. Low order modes would be controlled by front-to-back gradients and high order modes by local rib expansion and contraction. Finite element models indicate that for a mirror with n cells up to n Zernike modes can be corrected to better than 90% fidelity, with still higher accuracy for the lower modes. An initial demonstration has been made with a borosilicate honeycomb mirror. Interferometric measurements show a single cell influence function with 300 nm stroke and ~5 minute time constant.

  6. Thermally Actuated Primary Mirror for Space Exoplanet Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, J. R.; Kang, T.; Cuerden, B.; Stahl, P.; Guyon, O.

    2007-05-01

    Figure correction by thermal actuation of telescope primary mirrors will be valuable for space telescopes aimed at very high contrast imaging. It is planned that the primary mirror of TOPS (Telescope to Observe Planetary Systems) will be made with this technology. TOPS will use phase induced intensity apodization (PIAA, Guyon et al, 2003-2007) to obtain very high suppression of diffracted light at very close inner working angle. TOPS II, a scaled-up version with a 2 m primary would readily detect earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars, provided low order wavefront errors are very accurately controlled. This is best done at the primary, to avoid propagation effects. The correction concept relies on the low but finite thermal expansion of honeycomb mirrors made from fused silica, a material commonly used for precision lightweight space optics. The mirror will be figured for the highest accuracy passive figure. The residual low order errors with likely few nm amplitude will be sensed on-orbit and nulled out by slightly varying the temperature of the back faceplate and individual rib elements. Resistive heating will be balanced in a servo control loop against radiative loss to cold fingers inserted in each honeycomb cell. Preliminary finite element models indicate that, for a mirror with n cells, up to n Zernike modes can be corrected to better than 90% fidelity, with still higher accuracy for the lower modes. For a honeycomb test mirror of borosilicate glass interferometric measurements show a single cell influence function with 300 nm stroke and 5 minute time constant is readily achieved. As the next step, it is planned that full actuation of all cells of a prototype mirror will be undertaken at MSFC, leading toward a 2 m flight demonstrator.

  7. Design and Optimization of the SPOT Primary Mirror Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinoff, Jason G.; Michaels, Gregory J.

    2005-01-01

    The 3m Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) will utilize a single ring of 0.86111 point-to-point hexagonal mirror segments. The f2.85 spherical mirror blanks will be fabricated by the same replication process used for mass-produced commercial telescope mirrors. Diffraction-limited phasing will require segment-to-segment radius of curvature (ROC) variation of approx.1 micron. Low-cost, replicated segment ROC variations are estimated to be almost 1 mm, necessitating a method for segment ROC adjustment & matching. A mechanical architecture has been designed that allows segment ROC to be adjusted up to 400 microns while introducing a minimum figure error, allowing segment-to-segment ROC matching. A key feature of the architecture is the unique back profile of the mirror segments. The back profile of the mirror was developed with shape optimization in MSC.Nastran(TradeMark) using optical performance response equations written with SigFit. A candidate back profile was generated which minimized ROC-adjustment-induced surface error while meeting the constraints imposed by the fabrication method. Keywords: optimization, radius of curvature, Pyrex spherical mirror, Sigfit

  8. Designing the primary mirror support for the E-ELT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, J.R.; Heijmans, J.A.C.; Breeje, R. de; Hazelebach, R.L.M.; Vreugd, J. de; Crowcombe, W.E.; Naron, D.J.; Fritz, E.C.; Borghi, G.; Navarro, R.; Sillari, L.; Sambenedetto, E.; Eder, J.; Kamphues, F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Described is the M1 segment support, as designed by TNO in the period 2015- 2016. The design has significantly changed and improved compared to the earlier designs. During the period 2009-2010 prototypes for the primary mirror support of the E-ELT have been developed. These have been extensively tes

  9. Design and finite element analysis of lightmass silicon carbide primary mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuan-yuan; ZHANG Yu-min; HAN Jie-cai; ZHANG Jian-han; YAO Wang; ZHOU Yu-feng

    2006-01-01

    Primary mirror is one of the key components in the space remote sensing system. To minimize the mass of the mirror without compromising its stiffness and decrease the deformation of the mirror surface at the different temperatures are the mainly two objects in the development of the primary mirror. Silicon carbide (SiC),the most promising optical material,was used as the material of the primary mirror with triangle lightmass structure in a Cassegrain system. By using finite element method,the properties of the SiC mirror were compared with that of the traditional Be mirror and fused silica mirror. The results of static,dynamic and thermo-mechanical analysis indicate that the deformation of the mirror surface caused by temperature field is much bigger than that caused by gravity field. The SiC mirror has the best overall properties,and the SiC material is much suitable for the primary mirror.

  10. Mechanical blind gap measurement tool for alignment of the JWST Optical Telescope Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, Till

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a novel gap gauge tool that is used to provide an independent check of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) primary mirror alignment. Making accurate measurements of the mechanical gaps between the OTE mirror segments is needed to verify that the segments were properly aligned relative to each other throughout the integration and test of the 6.6 meter telescope. The gap between the Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA) is a sensitive indicator of the relative clocking and decenter. Further, the gap measurements are completely independent of all the other measurements use in the alignment process (e.g. laser trackers and laser radar). The gap measurement is a challenge, however, that required a new approach. Commercial gap measurements tools were investigated; however no suitable solution is available. The challenge of this measurement is due to the required 0.1 mm accuracy, the close spacing of the mirrors segments (approximately 3-9mm), the acute angle between the segment sides (approximately 4 degrees), and the difficult access to the blind gap. Several techniques were considered and tested before selecting the gauge presented here. This paper presents the theory, construction and calibration of the JWST gap gauge that is being used to measure and verify alignment of the OTE primary mirror segments.

  11. Surface Figure Metrology for CELT Primary Mirror Segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommargren, G; Phillion, D; Seppala, L; Lerner, S

    2001-02-27

    The University of California and California Institute of Technology are currently studying the feasibility of building a 30-m segmented ground based optical telescope called the California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT). The early ideas for this telescope were first described by Nelson and Mast and more recently refined by Nelson. In parallel, concepts for the fabrication of the primary segments were proposed by Mast, Nelson and Sommargren where high risk technologies were identified. One of these was the surface figure metrology needed for fabricating the aspheric mirror segments. This report addresses the advanced interferometry that will be needed to achieve 15nm rms accuracy for mirror segments with aspheric departures as large as 35mm peak-to-valley. For reasons of cost, size, measurement consistency and ease of operation we believe it is desirable to have a single interferometer that can be universally applied to each and every mirror segment. Such an instrument is described in this report.

  12. Thermal characteristics of a classical solar telescope primary mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Banyal, Ravinder K

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed thermal and structural analysis of a 2m class solar telescope mirror which is subjected to a varying heat load at an observatory site. A 3-dimensional heat transfer model of the mirror takes into account the heating caused by a smooth and gradual increase of the solar flux during the day-time observations and cooling resulting from the exponentially decaying ambient temperature at night. The thermal and structural response of two competing materials for optical telescopes, namely Silicon Carbide -best known for excellent heat conductivity and Zerodur -preferred for its extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, is investigated in detail. The insight gained from these simulations will provide a valuable input for devising an efficient and stable thermal control system for the primary mirror.

  13. Optimization of mirror therapy to excite ipsilateral primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadoush, Hikmat; Mano, Hirofumi; Sunagawa, Toru; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Ochi, Mitsu

    2013-01-01

    Mirror illusion therapy (mirror therapy) is based on the experimental substrate of a visual illusion of active hand movement to excite ipsilateral primary motor cortex (iM1). We tested whether iM1 excitability could be modulated by enabling or disabling vision of the active hand during mirror therapy. Motor cortical activations of healthy right-handed participants were identified by magnetoencephalography. Participants performed voluntary index finger extension of their dominant and non-dominant hands, separately, while viewing mirror reflection images of their active hand superimposed upon their hidden inactive hand. This was performed either with vision of the active hand (uncovered viewing condition) or without vision of the active hand (covered viewing condition). In the covered viewing condition, the iM1could be excited in all participants (n = 10) and this excitation did not differ whether the active hand was the dominant or non-dominant hand. However, in the uncovered viewing condition, dominant and non-dominant hands were able to excite iM1 only in some participants (n = 4 and n = 7, respectively). Moreover, the participants' responses to the illusion validation questionnaire revealed that the covered viewing condition could cause clearer visual illusion for the active hand than the uncovered viewing condition. Disabling vision of the active hand during mirror therapy was more effective to excite iM1 responses by creating more immersive visual illusion of the active hand.

  14. A Research on the Primary Mirror Manipulator of Large Segmented-mirror Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, H.

    2012-09-01

    Since Galileo firstly used the telescope to observe the sky 400 years ago, the aperture of the telescope has become larger and larger to observe the deeper universe, and the segmented-mirror telescope is becoming more and more popular with increasing aperture. In the early 21st century, a series of segmented-mirror telescopes have been constructed including the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) of China. LAMOST is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope, and the dimension of the primary mirror is about 6.7 m× 6 m, which is composed of 37 hexagonal sub-mirrors. However, a problem about the mirror installation appears with the increasing aperture. If there are hundreds of sub-mirrors in the telescope, it is a challenging job to mount and dismount them to the truss. This problem is discussed in this paper and a manipulator for the primary mirror of LAMOST is designed to perform the mount and dismount work. In chapter 1, all the segmented-mirror telescopes in the world are introduced and how the sub-mirrors of these telescopes are installed has been investigated. After comparing with the serial and the parallel robot, a serial robot manipulator proposal, which has several redundant degrees of freedom (DOFs), has been chosen from a series of design proposals. In chapter 2, the theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of the design proposal, which includes the forward kinematics and the inverse kinematics. Firstly the D-H coordinate is built according to the structure of the manipulator, so it is possible to obtain the end-effector position and orientation from the individual joint motion thanks to the forward kinematics. Because of the redundant DOFs of the manipulator, the inverse kinematics solution can be a very trick task, and the result may not be only, therefore a kind of simulation is carried out to get the numerical solution using ADAMS (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System). In the dynamics analysis the

  15. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Rauscher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST’s four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a “Detector Degradation Failure Review Board” (DD-FRB to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB “Executive Summaries” that: (1 determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2 defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  16. Lightweight design and finite element analysis of primary mirror for the space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Li, Weiyan; Lv, Qunbo; Liu, Yangyang; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-09-01

    In order to satisfy the strict requirements of the lightweight ratios and high dimensional stability for space mirror, the design method of lightweight structure and the flexible supporting structure of the primary mirror is proposed. Subsequently, the surface deformations of two different lightweight structures for primary mirror are discussed for analyzing the influence of the mirror weight on its surface. Finally, the finite element models for primary mirror assembly are built for calculating the surface deformation caused by different gravity orientations and various thermal environments. It is proved that the weight, stiffness and surface accuracy of the structure design for primary mirror can meet the engineering requirement.

  17. Fabrication of the LSST monolithic primary-tertiary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuell, Michael T.; Martin, Hubert M.; Burge, James H.; Ketelsen, Dean A.; Law, Kevin; Gressler, William J.; Zhao, Chunyu

    2012-09-01

    As previously reported (at the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation conference of 2010 in San Diego1), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) utilizes a three-mirror design in which the primary (M1) and tertiary (M3) mirrors are two concentric aspheric surfaces on one monolithic substrate. The substrate material is Ohara E6 borosilicate glass, in a honeycomb sandwich configuration, currently in production at The University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. We will provide an update to the status of the mirrors and metrology systems, which have advanced from concepts to hardware in the past two years. In addition to the normal requirements for smooth surfaces of the appropriate prescriptions, the alignment of the two surfaces must be accurately measured and controlled in the production lab, reducing the degrees of freedom needed to be controlled in the telescope. The surface specification is described as a structure function, related to seeing in excellent conditions. Both the pointing and centration of the two optical axes are important parameters, in addition to the axial spacing of the two vertices. This paper details the manufacturing process and metrology systems for each surface, including the alignment of the two surfaces. M1 is a hyperboloid and can utilize a standard Offner null corrector, whereas M3 is an oblate ellipsoid, so it has positive spherical aberration. The null corrector is a phase-etched computer-generated hologram (CGH) between the mirror surface and the center-of-curvature. Laser trackers are relied upon to measure the alignment and spacing as well as rough-surface metrology during looseabrasive grinding.

  18. The W. M. Keck Telescope segmented primary mirror active control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jared, R.C.; Arthur, A.A.; Andreae, S.; Biocca, A.; Cohen, R.W.; Fuertes, J.M.; Franck, J.; Gabor, G.; Llacer, J.; Mast, T.; Meng, J.; Merrick, T.; Minor, R.; Nelson, J.; Orayani, M.; Salz, P.; Schaefer, B.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-01

    The ten meter diameter primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope is a mosaic of thirty-six hexagonal mirrors. An active control system stabilizes the primary mirror. The active control system uses 168 measurements of the relative positions of adjacent mirror segments and 3 measurements of the primary mirror position in the telescope structure to control the 108 degrees of freedom needed to stabilize the figure and position of the primary mirror. The components of the active control system are relative position sensors, electronics, computers, actuators that position the mirrors, and software. The software algorithms control the primary mirror, perform star image stacking, emulate the segments, store and fit calibration data, and locate hardware defects. We give an overview of the active control system, its functional requirements and test measurements. 12 refs.

  19. Final design of the LSST primary/tertiary mirror cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Douglas R.; Muller, Gary; Hileman, Ed; DeVries, Joe; Araujo, Constanza; Gressler, William J.; Lotz, Paul J.; Mills, Dave; Sebag, Jacques; Thomas, Sandrine; Warner, Mike; Wiecha, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) primary/tertiary (M1M3) mirror cell assembly supports both on-telescope operations and off-telescope mirror coating. This assembly consists of the cast borosilicate M1M3 monolith mirror, the mirror support systems, the thermal control system, a stray light baffle ring, a laser tracker interface and the supporting steel structure. During observing the M1M3 mirror is actively supported by pneumatic figure control actuators and positioned by a hexapod. When the active system is not operating the mirror is supported by a separate passive wire rope isolator system. The center of the mirror cell supports a laser tracker which measures the relative position of the camera and secondary mirror for alignment by their hexapods. The mirror cell structure height of 2 meters provides ample internal clearance for installation and maintenance of mirror support and thermal control systems. The mirror cell also functions as the bottom of the vacuum chamber during coating. The M1M3 mirror has been completed and is in storage. The mirror cell structure is presently under construction by CAID Industries. The figure control actuators, hexapod and thermal control system are under developed and will be integrated into the mirror cell assembly by LSST personnel. The entire integrated M1M3 mirror cell assembly will the tested at the Richard F Caris Mirror Lab in Tucson, AZ (formerly Steward Observatory Mirror Lab).

  20. Design and Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Silicon Carbide Primary Mirror Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuan-yuan; ZHANG Yu-min; HAN Jie-cai

    2006-01-01

    Based on the principle that the thermal expansion coefficient of the support structure should match that of the mirror, three schemes of primary mirror assembly were designed. Of them, the first is fused silica mirror plus 4J32 flexible support plus ZTC4 support back plate, the second K9 mirror plus 4J45 flexible support plus ZTC4 support back plate, and the third SiC mirror plus SiC rigid support back plate. A coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of the three primary mirror assemblies was made with finite element method. The results show that the SiC assembly is the best of all schemes in terms of their combination properties due to its elimination of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials. The analytical results on the cryogenic property of the SiC primary mirror assembly show a higher surface finish of the SiC mirror even under the cryogenic condition.

  1. Lenses for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Harald; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Repp, Andrew; Atek, Hakim; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier; Edge, Alastair

    2016-08-01

    JWST will dramatically advance our knowledge and understanding of the first generations of galaxies at z>10, their role in the re-ionization of the Universe, and the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the complexity and diversity of galaxies at the current epoch. As demonstrated by HST legacy projects like CLASH and the Hubble Frontier Fields, gravitational amplification by massive galaxy clusters can significantly extend the depth of the required observations. However, for JWST, reducing any diffuse background light will be just as crucial. We here propose Spitzer/IRAC observations of six massive cluster lenses, specifically selected as candidates for observation with JWST. By (a) quantifying the amount of intra-cluster light and (b) enabling us to improve our current lens models, the data resulting from the requested observations will be instrumental for the final selection of cluster targets that maximize the scientific returns of deep JWST observations.

  2. Mirroring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    and metaphorical value of mirroring for creativity theory across two different research fields — neuroscience and learning. We engage in a mutual (possibly creative) exploration of mirroring from ‘mirror neurons’ to mirroring in social learning theory. One of the most fascinating aspects of mirroring......Most definitions of creativity emphasise originality. The creative product is recognised as distinct from other products and the creative person as someone who stands out from the crowd. What tend to be overlooked are acts of mirroring as a crucial element of the creative process. The human ability...... to empathise and socialise is partly due to another, more fundamental ability to duplicate the stance of the other (see also Chapter 13). Through mirroring, we attune to other people and thus create resonance and preparedness for mutual creative exploration. In this chapter, we investigate the object...

  3. Highly Adaptive Primary Mirror Having Embedded Actuators, Sensors, and Neural Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Xinetics has demonstrated the technology required to fabricate a self-compensating highly adaptive silicon carbide primary mirror system having embedded actuators,...

  4. Preparing for JWST wavefront sensing and control operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Acton, D. Scott; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Knight, J. Scott; Lallo, Matthew D.; Allen, Marsha; Baggett, Wayne; Barker, Elizabeth; Comeau, Thomas; Coppock, Eric; Dean, Bruce H.; Hartig, George; Hayden, William L.; Jordan, Margaret; Jurling, Alden; Kulp, Trey; Long, Joseph; McElwain, Michael W.; Meza, Luis; Nelan, Edmund P.; Soummer, Remi; Stansberry, John; Stark, Christopher; Telfer, Randal; Welsh, Andria L.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Zimmerman, Neil T.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescopes segmented primary and deployable secondary mirrors will be actively con- trolled to achieve optical alignment through a complex series of steps that will extend across several months during the observatory's commissioning. This process will require an intricate interplay between individual wavefront sensing and control tasks, instrument-level checkout and commissioning, and observatory-level calibrations, which involves many subsystems across both the observatory and the ground system. Furthermore, commissioning will often exercise observatory capabilities under atypical circumstances, such as fine guiding with unstacked or defocused images, or planning targeted observations in the presence of substantial time-variable offsets to the telescope line of sight. Coordination for this process across the JWST partnership has been conducted through the Wavefront Sensing and Control Operations Working Group. We describe at a high level the activities of this group and the resulting detailed commissioning operations plans, supporting software tools development, and ongoing preparations activities at the Science and Operations Center. For each major step in JWST's wavefront sensing and control, we also explain the changes and additions that were needed to turn an initial operations concept into a flight-ready plan with proven tools. These efforts are leading to a robust and well-tested process and preparing the team for an efficient and successful commissioning of JWSTs active telescope.

  5. Results from bonding of the SALT primary mirror edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, Ockert J.; Love, Jonathan; Gajjar, Hitesh

    2016-07-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope has till recently operated without active closed loop control of its Primary Mirror. The reason for this was that there were no suitable edge sensor system available on the market. Recently a system became available and SALT form Fogale Nanotech. The system consist of a sensor, cables and control electronics. The system was still under development and SALT was responsible for the integration of the sensors before deployment on the Telescope. Several issues still had to be addressed. One of these issues was the integration of the sensors at an appropriate production rate. The sensors was supplied as flexible pc boards with different types making up the transmitters and receivers. These flexible boards were bonded to ClearCeram Z L-Brackets before the appropriate connectors were installed. This paper describes the process used to integrate and test the sensors.

  6. Control of the California Extremely Large Telescope primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Chanan, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    The current design concept for the California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) includes 1080 segments in the primary mirror, with the out-of-plane degrees of freedom actively controlled. We construct the control matrix for this active control system, and describe its singular modes and sensor noise propagation. Data from the Keck telescopes are used to generate realistic estimates of the control system contributions to the CELT wavefront error and wavefront gradient error. Based on these estimates, control system noise will not significantly degrade either seeing-limited or diffraction-limited observations. The use of supplemental wavefront information for real-time control is therefore not necessary. We also comment briefly on control system bandwidth requirements and limitations.

  7. NIRCam: Development and Testing of the JWST Near-Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Thomas; Beichman, Charles; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Jaffe, Daniel; Kelly, Douglas; Krist, John; Rieke, Marcia; Smith, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Its high sensitivity, high spatial resolution images over the 0.6 - 5 microns wavelength region will be essential for making significant findings in many science areas as well as for aligning the JWST primary mirror segments and telescope. The NIRCam engineering test unit was recently assembled and has undergone successful cryogenic testing. The NIRCam collimator and camera optics and their mountings are also progressing, with a brass-board system demonstrating relatively low wavefront error across a wide field of view. The flight model?s long-wavelength Si grisms have been fabricated, and its coronagraph masks are now being made. Both the short (0.6 - 2.3 microns) and long (2.4 - 5.0 microns) wavelength flight detectors show good performance and are undergoing final assembly and testing. The flight model subsystems should all be completed later this year through early 2011, and NIRCam will be cryogenically tested in the first half of 2011 before delivery to the JWST integrated science instrument module (ISIM).

  8. Designing the primary mirror support for the E-ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijenhuis, Jan; Heijmans, Jeroen; den Breeje, Remco; Hazelebach, René; de Vreugd, Jan; Crowcombe, Will; Naron, Daniel; Fritz, Erik; Borghi, Guiseppe; Navarro, Ramon; Sillari, Luca; Sambenedetto, Enrico; Eder, Josef; Kamphues, Fred

    2016-08-01

    Described is the M1 segment support, as designed by TNO in the period 2015-2016. The design has significantly changed and improved compared to the earlier designs. During the period 2009-2010 prototypes for the primary mirror support of the E-ELT have been developed. These have been extensively tested by ESO. Design improvement were found to be necessary, especially in the field of manufacturability and maintainability. Furthermore, the technical performance had to improve in specific areas as well. This has evolved into a new specifications which have resulted in a new design for the segment support structure. The design rules that have led to the prototype design have been maintained but the implementation has been much improved. Also considerable improvement has been obtained with respect to the dynamic behavior. Accessibility and visibility on all parts and subsystems has changed such that everything is now clearly visible. Despite the increased performance no mass increase has been recorded meaning that more efficient use has been made of the material. The active means to influence the segment shape by use of the warping harness has been completely redesigned. A very important quality that has been achieved is simplicity. Hence a minimum amount of components is used. Reliability and safety are other aspects that have been greatly improved compared to the prototypes. The design for the M1 segment support provides a solution that not only performs to specification but one that can be operated in a telescope environment, all 798 of them.

  9. The first aluminum coating of the 3700mm primary mirror of the Devasthal Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheemireddy, Krishna Reddy; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Pant, Jayshreekar; Omar, Amitesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Uddin, Wahab; Kumar, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    Initially the primary mirror of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope is uncoated polished zerodur glass supplied by Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory, Russia/Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems, Belgium. In order to do the aluminium coating on the primary mirror the coating plant including washing unit is installed near the telescope (extension building of telescope) by Hind High Vacuum (HHV) Bangalore, India. Magnetron sputtering technique is used for the coating. Several coating trials are done before the primary mirror coating; samples are tested for reflectivity, uniformity, adhesivity and finally commissioned. The primary mirror is cleaned, coated by ARIES. We present here a brief description of the coating plant installation, Mirror cleaning and coating procedures and the testing results of the samples.

  10. Active thermal control for the 1.8-m primary mirror of the solar telescope CLST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Yuntao; Yao, Benxi; Wang, Zhiyong; Rao, Changhui

    2016-07-01

    The 1.8-m primary mirror of solar telescope is heated by the solar radiation and introduce harmful mirror seeing degrading the imaging quality. For the Chinese Large Solar Telescope (CLST), the thermal requirement based on the quantitative evaluation on mirror seeing effect shows that the temperature rise on mirror surface should be within 1 kelvin. To meet the requirement, an active thermal control system design for the CLST primary mirror is proposed, and realized on the subscale prototype of the CLST. The experimental results show that the temperature on the mirror surface is well controlled. The average and maximum thermal controlled error are less than 0.3 and 0.7 kelvins respectively, which completely meets the requirements.

  11. JWST and Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is on track for a launch in 2013. The author reviews the status and progress on the key hardware. The first primary mirror segments are already at MSFC for cryogenic tests, the mid IR instrument (MIRI) has already had successful tests of the engineering model, and the detectors are showing excellent performance. The author also describes the scientific objectives of the mission, with emphasis on the predicted capabilities for observing planets by the transit technique and through direct imaging. Recent direct observations of planets by HST and by adaptive optics from the ground have shown that, under favorable circumstances, much can be learned.

  12. Hyperbola-parabola primary mirror in Cassegrain optical antenna to improve transmission efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Lu; Yang, HuaJun; Jiang, Ping; Mao, Shengqian; Caiyang, Weinan

    2015-08-20

    An optical model with a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror added in the Cassegrain optical antenna, which can effectively improve the transmission efficiency, is proposed in this paper. The optimum parameters of a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror and a secondary mirror for the optical antenna system have been designed and analyzed in detail. The parabola-hyperbola primary structure optical antenna is obtained to improve the transmission efficiency of 10.60% in theory, and the simulation efficiency changed 9.359%. For different deflection angles to the receiving antenna with the emit antenna, the coupling efficiency curve of the optical antenna has been obtained.

  13. WebbPSF for JWST and WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph D.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Brooks, Keira

    2017-01-01

    Modeling a telescope's point spread function accurately is key to predicting its performance and extracting information from observations. WebbPSF is a flexible Python-based PSF simulation tool for JWST and WFIRST, developed at STScI. The WebbPSF-WFIRST module implements a model for the proposed Wide Field Instrument, as well as a proof-of-concept model for the Coronagraph Instrument. Since its announcement and public release at the Winter 2016 AAS, WebbPSF-WFIRST has been enhanced with the Cycle 6 design updates to the wide field instrument model. Additionally, the JupyterHub-based WFIRST Tools Server effort at STScI has provided access to these tools for dozens of users without the overhead of installing the software locally. For JWST, the optical models have been updated based on the latest test data and metrology for the instruments and the telescope flight hardware, including as-built mirror surface figures, variation between different field points, and updated optical budgets for in flight performance. WebbPSF has been checked against instrument test data from previous campaigns, and analysis of the PSF images taken during the JWST CV3 cryo-vac test campaign is currently underway.

  14. The study of 700mm-diameter primary mirror based on topology optimization and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; He, Xiaoying; Jing, Juanjuan; Feng, Lei; Zhou, Jinsong; Wang, Wei; Li, Yacan; Wei, Lidong

    2016-10-01

    The primary mirror is an important optical component of space camera. Its performance related to the optical image quality, and the weight directly affects the whole camera weight. The traditional design of primary mirror relies on much experience, lacking of precise theory, and many design parameters obtained by empirical formulas, thus the performance of the result is unstable. For this study, a primary mirror made of SiC with the diameter of 700mm was conceptual designed to get the optimized structure. Then sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine the optimum thickness of the back muscles. Finally, the optimum primary mirror fully satisfied the required was completed, with outstanding mechanical performance and light weight. A comparison between the optimum primary and traditional primary was performed and the results showed that the optimum primary has higher lightweight ratio increased by 5%, higher modal frequency increased by 81Hz.The maximum deformation under gravity reduced by 48nm, PV of the mirror surface reduced by 8.1nm and RMS reduced by 3.1nm. All the results indicated that the optimization method in the paper is reasonable and effective, which gives a reference to the primary mirror design in the future.

  15. Importance of tip sensing for active control system of 30-m RIT primary mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yichun Dai; Zhong Liu; Zhenyu Jin

    2009-01-01

    The active control of 30-m ring interferometric telescope(RIT)needs edge sensing and tip sensing when its primary mirror is composed by trapezoid-shaped segments,and the imaging performance of the RIT is determined by the accuracy of these two detecting approaches.Considering the detecting accuracy available in current segmented telescope active control systems,the effect of these detecting approaches on the surface error of the RIT primary mirror is calculated from the point of error propagation.The corresponding effect on imaging performance(modulation transfer functions(MTFs)and point spread functions(PSFs)at several typical wavelengths)of the RIT primary mirror is also simulated.The results show that tip sensing is very important for increasing the active control quality of the RIT primary mirror under the present techniques.

  16. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  17. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: primary mirror characterization by deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo

    2015-09-01

    In 2014 the ASTRI Collaboration, led by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, has constructed an end-to-end prototype of a dual-mirror imaging air Cherenkov telescope, proposed for the small size class of telescopes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, has been installed at the observing station located at Serra La Nave (Italy). In this project the Brera Astronomical Observatory was responsible for the production and the testing of the primary mirror. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope's primary mirror has an aperture of ~ 4 m, a polynomial design, and consists of 18 individual hexagonal facets. These characteristics require the production and testing of panels with a typical size of ~1 m vertex-to-vertex and with an aspheric component of up to several millimetres. The mirror segments were produced assembling a sandwich of thin glass foils bent at room temperature to reach the desired shape. For the characterization of the mirrors we developed an ad-hoc deflectometry facility that works as an inverse Ronchi test in combination with a ray-tracing code. In this contribution we report the results of the deflectometric measurements performed on the primary mirror segments of the ASTRI SST-2M dual mirror telescope. The expected point spread function and the contributions to the degradation of the image quality are studied.

  18. Non-redundant Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) and segment phasing with JWST-NIRISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lafrenière, David; Ford, K. E. Saavik; McKernan, Barry; Cheetham, Anthony; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Lloyd, James P.; Ireland, Michael J.; Doyon, René; Beaulieu, Mathilde; Martel, André; Koekemoer, Anton; Martinache, Frantz; Teuben, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Aperture Masked Interferometry (AMI) mode on JWST-NIRISS is implemented as a 7-hole, 15% throughput, non-redundant mask (NRM) that operates with 5-8% bandwidth filters at 3.8, 4.3, and 4.8 microns. We present refined estimates of AMI's expected point-source contrast, using realizations of noise matched to JWST pointing requirements, NIRISS detector noise, and Rev-V JWST wavefront error models for the telescope and instrument. We describe our point-source binary data reduction algorithm, which we use as a standardized method to compare different observational strategies. For a 7.5 magnitude star we report a 10-a detection at between 8.7 and 9.2 magnitudes of contrast between 100 mas to 400 mas respectively, using closure phases and squared visibilities in the absence of bad pixels, but with various other noise sources. With 3% of the pixels unusable, the expected contrast drops by about 0.5 magnitudes. AMI should be able to reach targets as bright as M=5. There will be significant overlap between Gemini-GPI and ESO-SPHERE targets and AMI's search space, and a complementarity with NIRCam's coronagraph. We also illustrate synthesis imaging with AMI, demonstrating an imaging dynamic range of 25 at 100 mas scales. We tailor existing radio interferometric methods to retrieve a faint bar across a bright nucleus, and explain the similarities to synthesis imaging at radio wavelengths. Modest contrast observations of dusty accretion flows around AGNs will be feasible for NIRISS AMI. We show our early results of image-plane deconvolution as well. Finally, we report progress on an NRM-inspired approach to mitigate mission-level risk associated with JWST's specialized wavefront sensing hardware. By combining narrow band and medium band Nyquist-sampled images taken with a science camera we can sense JWST primary mirror segment tip-tilt to lOmas, and piston to a few nm. We can sense inter-segment piston errors of up to 5 coherence lengths of the broadest bandpass filter used

  19. A cryogenic liquid-mirror telescope on the moon to study the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Angel, Roger; Borra, Ermanno F; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Foing, Bernard; Hickson, Paul; Josset, Jean-Luc; Ma, Ki Bui; Seddiki, Omar; Sivanandam, Suresh; Thibault, Simon; van Susante, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility and scientific potential of zenith observing liquid mirror telescopes having 20 to 100 m diameters located on the moon. They would carry out deep infrared surveys to study the distant universe and follow up discoveries made with the 6 m James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), with more detailed images and spectroscopic studies. They could detect objects 100 times fainter than JWST, observing the first, high-red shift stars in the early universe and their assembly into galaxies. We explored the scientific opportunities, key technologies and optimum location of such telescopes. We have demonstrated critical technologies. For example, the primary mirror would necessitate a high-reflectivity liquid that does not evaporate in the lunar vacuum and remains liquid at less than 100K: We have made a crucial demonstration by successfully coating an ionic liquid that has negligible vapor pressure. We also successfully experimented with a liquid mirror spinning on a superconducting bearing, as w...

  20. Origin of the Universe: From the First Stars to Planets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, protoplanetary systems, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. We will review the motivations for JWST's science goals in the context of recent Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope observations and review the status of the JWST Observatory.

  1. New and improved technology for manufacture of GMT primary mirror segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Wook; Burge, James H.; Davis, Jonathan M.; Martin, Hubert M.; Tuell, Michael T.; Graves, Logan R.; West, Steve C.

    2016-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) primary mirror consists of seven 8.4 m light-weight honeycomb mirrors that are being manufactured at the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab (RFCML), University of Arizona. In order to manufacture the largest and most aspheric astronomical mirrors various high precision fabrication technologies have been developed, researched and implemented at the RFCML. The unique 8.4 m (in mirror diameter) capacity fabrication facilities are fully equipped with large optical generator (LOG), large polishing machine (LPM), stressed lap, rigid conformal lap (RC lap) and their process simulation/optimization intelligence called MATRIX. While the core capability and key manufacturing technologies have been well demonstrated by completing the first GMT off-axis segment, there have been significant hardware and software level improvements in order to improve and enhance the GMT primary mirror manufacturing efficiency. The new and improved manufacturing technology plays a key role to realize GMT, the next generation extremely large telescope enabling new science and discoveries, with high fabrication efficiency and confidence.

  2. Solar System Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  3. Phase-Retrieval Uncertainty Estimation and Algorithm Comparison for the JWST-ISIM Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval, the process of determining the exitpupil wavefront of an optical instrument from image-plane intensity measurements, is the baseline methodology for characterizing the wavefront for the suite of science instruments (SIs) in the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST is a large, infrared space telescope with a 6.5-meter diameter primary mirror. JWST is currently NASA's flagship mission and will be the premier space observatory of the next decade. ISIM contains four optical benches with nine unique instruments, including redundancies. ISIM was characterized at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD in a series of cryogenic vacuum tests using a telescope simulator. During these tests, phase-retrieval algorithms were used to characterize the instruments. The objective of this paper is to describe the Monte-Carlo simulations that were used to establish uncertainties (i.e., error bars) for the wavefronts of the various instruments in ISIM. Multiple retrieval algorithms were used in the analysis of ISIM phase-retrieval focus-sweep data, including an iterativetransform algorithm and a nonlinear optimization algorithm. These algorithms emphasize the recovery of numerous optical parameters, including low-order wavefront composition described by Zernike polynomial terms and high-order wavefront described by a point-by-point map, location of instrument best focus, focal ratio, exit-pupil amplitude, the morphology of any extended object, and optical jitter. The secondary objective of this paper is to report on the relative accuracies of these algorithms for the ISIM instrument tests, and a comparison of their computational complexity and their performance on central and graphical processing unit clusters. From a phase-retrieval perspective, the ISIM test campaign includes a variety of source illumination bandwidths, various image-plane sampling criteria above and below the Nyquist- Shannon

  4. Asymmetric activation of the primary motor cortex during observation of a mirror reflection of a hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Tominaga

    Full Text Available Mirror therapy is an effective technique for pain relief and motor function recovery. It has been demonstrated that magnetic 20-Hz activity is induced in the primary motor cortex (M1 after median nerve stimulation and that the amount of the stimulus-induced 20-Hz activity is decreased when the M1 is activated. In the present study, we investigated how the image or the mirror reflection of a hand holding a pencil modulates the stimulus-induced 20-Hz activity in the M1. Neuromagnetic brain activity was recorded from 13 healthy right-handed subjects while they were either viewing directly their hand holding a pencil or viewing a mirror reflection of their hand holding a pencil. The 20-Hz activity in the left or the right M1 was examined after the right or the left median nerve stimulation, respectively, and the suppression of the stimulus-induced 20-Hz in the M1 by viewing directly one hand holding a pencil or by viewing the mirror image of the hand holding a pencil was assumed to indicate the activation of the M1. The results indicated that the M1 innervating the dominant hand was suppressed either by viewing directly the dominant hand holding a pencil or by viewing the mirror image of the non-dominant hand holding a pencil. On the other hand, the M1 innervating the non-dominant hand was activated by viewing the mirror image of the dominant hand holding a pencil, but was not activated by viewing directly the non-dominant hand holding a pencil. The M1 innervating either the dominant or the non-dominant hand, however, was not activated by viewing the hand on the side ipsilateral to the M1 examined or the mirror image of the hand on the side contralateral to the M1 exaimined. Such activation of the M1 might induce some therapeutic effects of mirror therapy.

  5. Design and analysis of isostatic mounts on a spaceborne lightweight primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, M. Y.

    2013-09-01

    The paper is aimed at obtaining the optimum isostatic mount configuration for a ZERODUR® primary mirror with a predesigned lightweight configuration on the back for a space Cassegrain telescope. The finite element analysis and Zernike polynomial fitting based on the Taguchi method are applied to the whole optimization process. Under the integrated optomechanical analysis, three isostatic mounts are bonded to the center of gravity of the mirror. Geometrical control factors and levels have been selected to minimize the optical aberrations under self-weight loading. The optimum isostatic mount with the least induced astigmatism value is finally attained under the Taguchi method.

  6. Augmented Method to Improve Thermal Data for the Figure Drift Thermal Distortion Predictions of the JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang C.; Carnahan, Timothy M.; Cohen, Lester M.; Congedo, Cherie B.; Eisenhower, Michael J.; Ousley, Wes; Weaver, Andrew; Yang, Kan

    2017-01-01

    The JWST Optical Telescope Element (OTE) assembly is the largest optically stable infrared-optimized telescope currently being manufactured and assembled, and is scheduled for launch in 2018. The JWST OTE, including the 18 segment primary mirror, secondary mirror, and the Aft Optics Subsystem (AOS) are designed to be passively cooled and operate near 45K. These optical elements are supported by a complex composite backplane structure. As a part of the structural distortion model validation efforts, a series of tests are planned during the cryogenic vacuum test of the fully integrated flight hardware at NASA JSC Chamber A. The successful ends to the thermal-distortion phases are heavily dependent on the accurate temperature knowledge of the OTE structural members. However, the current temperature sensor allocations during the cryo-vac test may not have sufficient fidelity to provide accurate knowledge of the temperature distributions within the composite structure. A method based on an inverse distance relationship among the sensors and thermal model nodes was developed to improve the thermal data provided for the nanometer scale WaveFront Error (WFE) predictions. The Linear Distance Weighted Interpolation (LDWI) method was developed to augment the thermal model predictions based on the sparse sensor information. This paper will encompass the development of the LDWI method using the test data from the earlier pathfinder cryo-vac tests, and the results of the notional and as tested WFE predictions from the structural finite element model cases to characterize the accuracies of this LDWI method.

  7. Observing Dark Stars with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Ilie, Cosmin; Valluri, Monica; Iliev, Ilian T; Shapiro, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We study the capability of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to detect Supermassive Dark Stars (SMDS). If the first stars are powered by dark matter heating in triaxial dark matter haloes, they may grow to be very large and very bright, visible in deep imaging with JWST and even Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We use HST surveys to place bounds on the numbers of SMDSs that may be detected in future JWST imaging surveys. We showed that SMDS in the mass range $10^6-10^7 M_\\odot$ are bright enough to be detected in all the wavelength bands of the NIRCam on JWST . If SMDSs exist at z ~10, 12, and 14, they will be detectable as J-band, H-band, or K-band dropouts, respectively. With a total survey area of 150 arcmin^2 (assuming a multi-year deep parallel survey with JWST), we find that typically the number of $10^6 M_\\odot$ SMDSs found as H or K-band dropouts is ~10^5\\fsmds, where the fraction of early DM haloes hosting DS is likely to be small, \\fsmds10 from SMDSs would be possible with spectroscopy: the SMDS (w...

  8. The panels for primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the Active Surface System for the new Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchiroli, G.; Fiocchi, F.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Pisanu, T.; Roda, J.; Vargiu, G.

    In this paper we will describe the panels for the primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the active surface system that will be provided on the Sardinia Radio Telescope. The panels for the primary and secondary mirror have been designed to allow an operating frequency up to 100 GHz. The active surface system will be used to overcome the effect of gravity deformation on the antenna gain and to re-shape the primary mirror in a parabolic form, in order to avoid large phase error contribution on the gain for the highest frequencies placed in the primary focus.

  9. Integrated opto-mechanical optimization analysis of large-aperture primary mirror's support position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ding; Bo, Qi; Jiang, Bian

    2016-10-01

    Large mirror's support position plays a very important role in optical system's wave-front error. This paper took a Φ1.2m diameter primary mirror as an example and introduced the method of integrated opto-mechanical optimization analysis, then structure's parametric model in Proe, finite element's parametric model in Patran, structure analysis in Nastran and opto-mechanical coupling analysis in Sigfit were integrated as a fully automatic process in Isight by use of command streams and result documents produced by these soft wares. After the process was established and verified, automatic gradient searches of primary mirror's optimal support position were conducted using optimizer embedded in Isight. The optimization objective is the minimum of surface error's RMS and the optimization variables are support positions. New searches can easily be conducted repeatedly after mirror's model is modified in the structure parameter document. Because of the search process is fully automatic, manpower and computing time are greatly saved. This example also provides a good reference for problems in opto-mechanical fields.

  10. An Automated SVD for Alignment and Control of James Webb Space Telescope Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Sharam; Howard, Joseph M.; Aronstein, David L.; Ha, Kong; Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope. The alignment of the segmented primary and secondary mirrors in the wavefront sensing and control process involves a series of actuators to control the six degrees-of-freedom motion on each surface in addition to the radius of curvature. The control matrix developed from the alignment parameters is over-determined and singular value decomposition (SVD) method is used to solve it in the least square sense. An automated SVD scheme has been developed to identify the most contributing modes in a typical alignment process and reduce the impact of error-prone modes from the control process.

  11. Mirror therapy in lower limb amputees--a look beyond primary motor cortex reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, S; Kasprian, G; Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Essmeister, M; Sycha, T; Auff, E; Prayer, D

    2011-11-01

    Phantom pain in upper limb amputees is associated with the extent of reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Mirror visual feedback therapy has been shown to improve phantom pain. We investigated the extent of cortical reorganization in lower limb amputees and changes in neural activity induced by mirror therapy. Eight lower limb amputees underwent 12 sessions of MVFT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before the first and after the last MVFT session. FMRI sessions consisted of two runs in which subjects were instructed to perform repetitive movement of the healthy and phantom ankle. Before MVFT, the mean phantom pain intensity was 4.6 ± 3.1 on a visual analog scale and decreased to 1.8 ± 1.7 (p = 0.04). We did not observe a consistent pattern of cortical activation in primary sensorimotor areas during phantom limb movements. Following MVFT, increased activity was obtained in the right orbitofrontal cortex during phantom ankle movements. Comparison of cortical activity during movements of the phantom ankle and the intact ankle showed significantly higher activity in the left inferior frontal cortex (pars triangularis). These results question the known association between phantom pain and primary sensorimotor reorganization and propose reorganizational changes involving multiple cortical areas in lower limb amputees. Finally, reduction of phantom pain after mirror visual feedback therapy was associated with increased prefrontal cortical activity during phantom ankle movements. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Mirror therapy in lower limb amputees. A look beyond primary motor cortex reorganization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, S.; Essmeister, M.; Sycha, T.; Auff, E. [Vienna Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neurology; Kasprian, G.; Furtner, J.; Schoepf, V.; Prayer, D. [Vienna Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2011-11-15

    Phantom pain in upper limb amputees is associated with the extent of reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Mirror visual feedback therapy has been shown to improve phantom pain. We investigated the extent of cortical reorganization in lower limb amputees and changes in neural activity induced by mirror therapy. Eight lower limb amputees underwent 12 sessions of MVFT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before the first and after the last MVFT session. FMRI sessions consisted of two runs in which subjects were instructed to perform repetitive movement of the healthy and phantom ankle. Before MVFT, the mean phantom pain intensity was 4.6 {+-} 3.1 on a visual analog scale and decreased to 1.8 {+-} 1.7 (p = 0.04). We did not observe a consistent pattern of cortical activation in primary sensorimotor areas during phantom limb movements. Following MVFT, increased activity was obtained in the right orbitofrontal cortex during phantom ankle movements. Comparison of cortical activity during movements of the phantom ankle and the intact ankle showed significantly higher activity in the left inferior frontal cortex (pars triangularis). These results question the known association between phantom pain and primary sensorimotor reorganization and propose reorganizational changes involving multiple cortical areas in lower limb amputees. Finally, reduction of phantom pain after mirror visual feedback therapy was associated with increased prefrontal cortical activity during phantom ankle movements. (orig.)

  13. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  14. The ``One Archive'' for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G.; Kyprianou, M.; Levay, K.; Sienkewicz, M.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Swam, M.; Bushouse, H.; Greenfield, P.; Kidwell, R.; Wolfe, D.; Gardner, L.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Swade, D.; McLean, B.; Abney, F.; Alexov, A.; Binegar, S.; Aloisi, A.; Slowinski, S.; Gousoulin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The next generation for the Space Telescope Science Institute data management system is gearing up to provide a suite of archive system services supporting the operation of the James Webb Space Telescope. We are now completing the initial stage of integration and testing for the preliminary ground system builds of the JWST Science Operations Center which includes multiple components of the Data Management Subsystem (DMS). The vision for astronomical science and research with the JWST archive introduces both solutions to formal mission requirements and innovation derived from our existing mission systems along with the collective shared experience of our global user community. We are building upon the success of the Hubble Space Telescope archive systems, standards developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance, and collaborations with our archive data center partners. In proceeding forward, the “one archive” architectural model presented here is designed to balance the objectives for this new and exciting mission. The STScI JWST archive will deliver high quality calibrated science data products, support multi-mission data discovery and analysis, and provide an infrastructure which supports bridges to highly valued community tools and services.

  15. Preparing the Public for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Jirdeh, Hussein; Meinke, Bonnie K.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public, to educators and students, and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing E/PO programs: for example, simulated scientifically inspired but aesthetic JWST scenes, illustrating the differences between JWST and previous missions; partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; educational materials in vast networks of schools through products like the Star Witness News.

  16. Progress by the JWST Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    The JWST Science Working Group recently published a comprehensive, top-level review of JWST science in the journal Space Science Reviews (Gardner et al. 2006, SSR, 123, 485). That review paper gives details of the 4 JWST science themes, and describes the design of the observatory and ground system. Since publication, the SWG, working with members of the astronomical community, has continued to develop the science case for JWST, giving more details in a series of white papers. The white paper topics include first light, galaxy surveys, AGN, supernovae, stellar populations, and exoplanets. The white papers are in various stages of completion. In this poster, I will review recent progress.

  17. SALT: Active control of the primary mirror with inductive edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Hitesh; Menzies, John; Buckley, David; Coetzee, Chris; Bester, Deon; Strydom, Ockert; Love, Jonathan; Browne, Keith

    2016-08-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a 10-m class 91-segment fixed altitude telescope located at Sutherland, South Africa. The segment alignment is maintained by inductively coupled sensors mounted on Sitall brackets beneath the segments. An extensive period of testing in environmental chambers and on the telescope has been conducted to establish the stability of the sensors and their response to temperature and humidity variations in the telescope chamber. We present some of the test results, including a demonstration of the ability of the sensors to maintain the alignment of the primary mirror over a period of 6 days.

  18. Software framework for the upcoming MMT Observatory primary mirror re-aluminization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Duane; Clark, Dusty; Porter, Dallan

    2014-07-01

    Details of the software framework for the upcoming in-situ re-aluminization of the 6.5m MMT Observatory (MMTO) primary mirror are presented. This framework includes: 1) a centralized key-value store and data structure server for data exchange between software modules, 2) a newly developed hardware-software interface for faster data sampling and better hardware control, 3) automated control algorithms that are based upon empirical testing, modeling, and simulation of the aluminization process, 4) re-engineered graphical user interfaces (GUI's) that use state-of-the-art web technologies, and 5) redundant relational databases for data logging. Redesign of the software framework has several objectives: 1) automated process control to provide more consistent and uniform mirror coatings, 2) optional manual control of the aluminization process, 3) modular design to allow flexibility in process control and software implementation, 4) faster data sampling and logging rates to better characterize the approximately 100-second aluminization event, and 5) synchronized "real-time" web application GUI's to provide all users with exactly the same data. The framework has been implemented as four modules interconnected by a data store/server. The four modules are integrated into two Linux system services that start automatically at boot-time and remain running at all times. Performance of the software framework is assessed through extensive testing within 2.0 meter and smaller coating chambers at the Sunnyside Test Facility. The redesigned software framework helps ensure that a better performing and longer lasting coating will be achieved during the re-aluminization of the MMTO primary mirror.

  19. AGN studies with JWST/MIRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K.

    2015-01-01

    The forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will revolutionize galaxy evolution studies from the epoch of reionisation to the present day. In particular, a new era will be open for mid-IR astronomy, as the JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) will improve by an order of magnitude the sensitivit

  20. Spitzer/JWST Cross Calibration: IRAC Observations of Potential Calibrators for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Sean J.; Gordon, Karl D.; Lowrance, Patrick; Ingalls, James G.; Glaccum, William J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; E Krick, Jessica; Laine, Seppo J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hora, Joseph L.; Bohlin, Ralph

    2017-06-01

    We present observations at 3.6 and 4.5 microns using IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope of a set of main sequence A stars and white dwarfs that are potential calibrators across the JWST instrument suite. The stars range from brightnesses of 4.4 to 15 mag in K band. The calibration observations use a similar redundancy to the observing strategy for the IRAC primary calibrators (Reach et al. 2005) and the photometry is obtained using identical methods and instrumental photometric corrections as those applied to the IRAC primary calibrators (Carey et al. 2009). The resulting photometry is then compared to the predictions based on spectra from the CALSPEC Calibration Database (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/observatory/crds/calspec.html) and the IRAC bandpasses. These observations are part of an ongoing collaboration between IPAC and STScI investigating absolute calibration in the infrared.

  1. SALT segmented primary mirror: commissioning capacitive edge sensing system and performance comparison with inductive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buous, Sebastien; Menzies, John; Gajjar, Hitesh

    2008-07-01

    The SAMS (Segment Alignment Measurement System) is a capacitance-based edge sensing solution for the active alignment of the 10m SALT segmented primary mirror. Commissioning and calibrating the system has been an ongoing task in an attempt to counteract the unfavourable response of the sensors to high humidity conditions and high dust levels. Several solutions were implemented and tested including real-time feedback systems and the application of corrective functions. In parallel with the continuing efforts to improve the performance of the capacitive sensors, we have also been testing a prototype inductive sensor developed by Fogale Nanotech that is of a very similar flexible plate construction. In this paper we present the results obtained and performance gains achieved thus far with the capacitive edge-sensing system as well as a performance comparison of the Fogale inductive sensor to the capacitive edge sensor.

  2. Metrology requirements for the serial production of ELT primary mirror segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Paul C. T.; Gray, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The manufacture of the next generation of large astronomical telescopes, the extremely large telescopes (ELT), requires the rapid manufacture of greater than 500 1.44m hexagonal segments for the primary mirror of each telescope. Both leading projects, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), have set highly demanding technical requirements for each fabricated segment. These technical requirements, when combined with the anticipated construction schedule for each telescope, suggest that more than one optical fabricator will be involved in the delivery of the primary mirror segments in order to meet the project schedule. For one supplier, the technical specification is challenging and requires highly consistent control of metrology in close coordination with the polishing technologies used in order to optimize production rates. For production using multiple suppliers, however the supply chain is structured, consistent control of metrology along the supply chain will be required. This requires a broader pattern of independent verification than is the case of a single supplier. This paper outlines the metrology requirements for a single supplier throughout all stages of the fabrication process. We identify and outline those areas where metrology accuracy and duration have a significant impact on production efficiency. We use the challenging ESO E-ELT technical specification as an example of our treatment, including actual process data. We further develop this model for the case of a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers. Here, we emphasize the need to control metrology throughout the supply chain in order to optimize net production efficiency.

  3. A space imaging concept based on a 4m structured spun-cast borosilicate monolithic primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, S. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Bauman, S.; Cuerden, B.; Granger, Z.; Olbert, B. H.

    2010-07-01

    Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) tasked The University of Arizona Steward Observatory (UASO) to conduct an engineering study to examine the feasibility of creating a 4m space telescope based on mature borosilicate technology developed at the UASO for ground-based telescopes. UASO has completed this study and concluded that existing launch vehicles can deliver a 4m monolithic telescope system to a 500 km circular orbit and provide reliable imagery at NIIRS 7-8. An analysis of such an imager based on a lightweight, high-performance, structured 4m primary mirror cast from borosilicate glass is described. The relatively high CTE of this glass is used to advantage by maintaining mirror shape quality with a thermal figuring method. Placed in a 290 K thermal shroud (similar to the Hubble Space Telescope), the orbit averaged figure surface error is 6nm rms when earth-looking. Space-looking optical performance shows that a similar thermal conditioning scheme combined with a 270 K shroud achieves primary mirror distortion of 10 nm rms surface. Analysis shows that a 3-point bipod mount will provide launch survivability with ample margin. The primary mirror naturally maintains its shape at 1g allowing excellent end-to-end pre-launch testing with e.g. the LOTIS 6.5m Collimator. The telescope includes simple systems to measure and correct mirror shape and alignment errors incorporating technologies already proven on the LOTIS Collimator. We have sketched a notional earth-looking 4m telescope concept combined with a wide field TMA concept into a DELTA IV or ATLAS 552 EELV fairing. We have combined an initial analysis of launch and space performance of a special light-weighted honeycomb borosilicate mirror (areal density 95 kg/m2) with public domain information on the existing launch vehicles.

  4. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 4; Overview and Introduction of Matlab Based Toolkits used to Interface with Optical Design Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written in Matlab, which interface with optical design software (CodeV, OSLO, and Zemax) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  5. The design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Li, Xiaojin; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Hongqiao

    2014-09-01

    Active support system is a low-frequency wavefront error correction system, which is often used to correct the mirror deformation resulting from gravity, temperature, wind load, manufacture, installation and other factors. In addition, the active support technology can improve the efficiency of grinding and polishing by adjusting the surface shape in the process of manufacturing large mirrors. This article describes the design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror. The support system consists of 37 axial pneumatic actuators. And in order to change the shape of thin primary mirror we need to precisely control the 37 pneumatic actuators. These 37 pneumatic actuators are divided into six regions. Each region is designed with a control circuit board to realize force closed-loop control for the pneumatic actuators, and all control panels are connected to the PC by CAN bus. The control panels have to support: receive commands from the host PC; control the actuators; periodically return result of control. The whole control system is composed by hardware and control algorithm and communication program.

  6. Double arch mirror study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  7. Design and fabrication of CGH for 600mm diameter SiC primary mirror surface figure testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhihai; Ma, Zhen; Fan, Xuewu; Zou, Gangyi

    2016-09-01

    Computer-generated hologram (CGH) is an effective way to compensate wavefront aberration in null test of aspheric surfaces and freeform surfaces. Our strategies of CGH design for 600mm diameter SiC primary mirror surface figure testing are presented, and an experiment demonstrating the compensation test results of CGH is reported. We design a CGH including two sections on the same substrate in order to align the CGH to the incident wavefront: main section for compensating wavefront in null test, alignment section for adjusting the relative position between CGH and interferometer. In order to isolate different orders of diffraction, we used power carrier to make different orders of diffraction come to focus at different position along the axis to avoid ghost reflections. We measured the 600mm diameter SiC primary mirror using this CGH, and the surface test result is 0.033λ rms.

  8. Design of a prototype primary mirror segment positioning actuator for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorell, Kenneth R.; Aubrun, Jean-Noël; Clappier, Robert R.; Miller, Scott W.; Sirota, Mark

    2006-06-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is a collaborative project between the California Institute of Technology (CIT), the University of California (UC), the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), and the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA). In order for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to achieve the required optical performance, each of its 738 primary mirror segments must be positioned relative to adjacent segments with nanometer-level accuracy. Three in plane degrees of freedom are controlled via a passive Segment Support Assembly which is described in another paper presented at this conference (paper 6273-45). The remaining three out of plane degrees of freedom, tip, tilt, and piston, are controlled via three actuators for each segment. Because of its size and the shear number of actuators, TMT will require an actuator design, departing from that used on the Keck telescopes, its successful predecessor. Sensitivity to wind loads and structural vibrations, the large dynamic range, low operating power, and extremely reliable operation, all achieved at an affordable unit cost, are the most demanding design requirements. This paper describes a concept that successfully meets the TMT requirements, along with analysis and performance predictions. The actuator concept is based on a prototype actuator developed for the California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) project. It relies on techniques that achieve the required accuracy while providing a substantial amount of vibration attenuation and damping. A development plan consisting of a series of prototype actuators is envisioned to verify cost, reliability, and performance before mass production is initiated. The first prototype (P I) of this development plan is now being built and should complete initial testing by the end of 2 nd QTR 06.

  9. Mirror-image duplication of the primary axis and heart in Xenopus embryos by the overexpression of Msx-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Solursh, M

    1995-10-01

    The Msx-1 gene (formerly known as Hox-7) is a member of a discrete subclass of homeobox-containing genes. Examination of the expression pattern of Msx-1 in murine and avian embryos suggests that this gene may be involved in the regionalization of the medio-lateral axis during earlier development. We have examined the possible functions of Xenopus Msx-1 during early Xenopus embryonic development by overexpression of the Msx-1 gene. Overexpression of Msx-1 causes a left-right mirror-image duplication of primary axial structures, including notochord, neural tube, somites, suckers, and foregut. The embryonic developing heart is also mirror-image duplicated, including looping directions and polarity. These results indicate that Msx-1 may be involved in the mesoderm formation as well as left-right patterning in the early Xenopus embryonic development.

  10. Design of an interferometric system for piston measurements in segmented primary mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, Josep; Laguarta, Ferran; Pizarro, Carlos; Tomas, Nuria; Pinto, Agusti

    2000-10-01

    Recently, telescopes with segmented primary mirrors are becoming increasingly popular due to their ability of achieving large apertures without the inconveniences caused by the fabrication and handling of monolithic surfaces with 8m (or over) in diameter. The difference in position of each pair of adjacent segments along the local normal of their interface (called piston hereafter), however, needs to be precisely measured in order to provide a diffraction- limited image. If a system yielding the nanometric accuracy required in piston measurements worked in daylight hours, the resultant saving in observation time would be an important advance on a majority of the state-of-the-art piston measurement systems. An interferometric piston measurement instrument accomplishing such objectives has been designed starting from the usual Michelson configuration at the CD6 (Terrassa, Spain), and its final test has been carried out in the test workbench of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC, Canary Islands, Spain). Its optical layout relies on projecting the reference arm of the interferometer onto one of the segments of the pair considered, along the direction of the local normal to the surface while the measurement arm is projected onto the interface which divides the pair of segments considered. The field of view and its illumination are calculated to be equivalent in both segments. The lateral shift of the fringes in both interferograms determines the piston error present. A combination of monochromatic and white light is used, in order to remove the (lambda) /2 phase ambiguities present in piston measurements without losing the required resolution in the measurement. In this paper, the optical design of this interferometric piston measurement instrument will be presented. The particular configuration used in the interferometer, the implementation of an imaging system allowing to see both the interface of the segments and the interference fringes, the effect of the

  11. Key Exoplanets in the Era of JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha; Mandell, Avi; Lewis, Nikole K.; Pontoppidan, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In 2018, exoplanet science will enter a new era with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). With JWST's observing power, several studies have sought to characterize how the instruments will perform and what atmospheric spectral features could theoretically be detected using transmission spectroscopy. With just two years left until launch, it is imperative that the exoplanet community begins to digest and integrate these studies into their observing plans and strategies. In order to encourage this and to allow all members of the community access to JWST simulations, we present here an open source tool for creating observation simulations of all observatory-supported time-series spectroscopy modes. We describe our tool, PandExo and use it to calculate the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for every confirmed planetary system with Jhours are needed to attain a SNR of 5 on key molecular absorption bands of H2O, CH4, and CO. We end by determining the number of planets (hot Jupiters, warm Neptunes, super-Earths, etc.) that are currently attainable with JWST.

  12. Relationship between activity in human primary motor cortex during action observation and the mirror neuron system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Kilner

    Full Text Available The attenuation of the beta cortical oscillations during action observation has been interpreted as evidence of a mirror neuron system (MNS in humans. Here we investigated the modulation of beta cortical oscillations with the viewpoint of an observed action. We asked subjects to observe videos of an actor making a variety of arm movements. We show that when subjects were observing arm movements there was a significant modulation of beta oscillations overlying left and right sensorimotor cortices. This pattern of attenuation was driven by the side of the screen on which the observed movement occurred and not by the hand that was observed moving. These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties.

  13. Emerging Technologies and Outreach with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Kenney, Jessica; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), NASA’s next great observatory launching in October 2018, required a dozen new technologies to develop. How will we maintain the prestige and cultural impact of Hubble as the torch passes to Webb? Emerging technologies such as augmented and virtual reality bring the viewer into the data and the concept in previously unimaginable immersive detail. Adoption of mobile devices has expanded access to information for wide swaths of the public. Software like Worldwide Telescope to hardware like the Occulus Rift are providing new avenues for learning. If we develop materials properly tailored to this medium, we can reach more diverse audiences than ever before. STScI is pioneering some tools related to JWST for showcasing at AAS, and in local events, which I highlight here.

  14. Status of the JWST Science Instrument Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) system consists of five sensors (4 science): Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS), Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), Near InfraRed Camera (NIRCam), Near InfraRed Spectrograph (NIRSpec); and nine instrument support systems: Optical metering structure system, Electrical Harness System; Harness Radiator System, ISIM Electronics Compartment, ISIM Remote Services Unit, Cryogenic Thermal Control System, Command and Data Handling System, Flight Software System, Operations Scripts System.

  15. Exoplanets and debris disk imaging with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2017-06-01

    Dramatic progress in exoplanetary systems imaging has occurred since the first generation of space coronagraphs on HST (NICMOS, STIS, ACS). While HST remains at forefront of both exoplanetary and circumstellar disk science, ground-based instruments have improved by three orders of magnitudes over the past decade. JWST will extend the current state of the art with a larger set of superior coronagraphs and greater sensitivity across more than a factor of 10 in wavelength, making it extraordinarily capable for detailed imaging characterization of planets and disks. We will address specific questions about nearby exoplanetary systems, while also optimizing observing strategies across the breadth of JWST’s high-contrast imaging modes, as follows: (a) Deep, multi-wavelength observations of selected nearby stars hosting known debris disks & planets. We will use the NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs across the full range of JWST wavelengths, and perhaps MIRI MRS spatially resolved spectroscopy. Each comprehensive dataset will support a variety of investigations addressing both disk characterization and exoplanet detection & characterization. (b) Characterization of Planetary Systems around Cool M Stars. We will observe young and dusty M dwarfs, to complement observations of the closer but older M dwarf samples under consideration by other GTO groups. JWST observations will dramatically exceed HST images in their ability to address questions about the properties of dust rings, while the more favorable contrast ratios of planets relative to M dwarf hosts will enable sensitivity to relatively low mass planetary companions.

  16. Observer's Interface for JWST Observation Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Miranda; Douglas, Robert; Moriarty, Christopher; Roman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In support of the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, various teams at STScI (the Space Telescope Science Institute) have collaborated on how to re-structure the view of a an observing program within the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT) to accommodate for the differences between HST and JWST. For HST APT programs, the structure is visit-dominant, and there is one generic form for entering observing information that spans all instruments with their required fields and options. This can result in sometimes showing irrelevant fields to the user for a given observing goal. Also, the generation of mosaicked observations in HST requires the user to manually calculate the position of each tile within the mosaic, accounting for positional offsets and the roll of the telescope, which is a time consuming process. Now, for JWST programs in APT, the description of the observations has been segregated by instrument and mode into discrete observing templates. Each template's form allows instrument specific choices and displays of relevant information. APT will manually manage the number of visits needed to perform the observation. This is particularly useful for mosaics and dithering with JWST. For example, users will select how they would like a mosaic to be tiled at the observation level, and the visits are automatically created. In this, visits have been re-structured to be purely informational; all editing is done at the observation level. These options and concepts are illustrated to future users via the corresponding poster.

  17. JWST science instrument pupil alignment measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubalak, Dave; Sullivan, Joe; Ohl, Ray; Antonille, Scott; Beaton, Alexander; Coulter, Phillip; Hartig, George; Kelly, Doug; Lee, David; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Schweiger, Paul; Telfer, Randal; Te Plate, Maurice; Wells, Martyn

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy ( 40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI), including a guider. OSIM is a full field, cryogenic, optical simulator of the JWST OTE. It is the "Master Tool" for verifying the cryogenic alignment and optical performance of ISIM by providing simulated point source/star images to each of the four Science Instruments in ISIM. Included in OSIM is a Pupil Imaging Module (PIM) - a large format CCD used for measuring pupil alignment. Located at a virtual stop location within OSIM, the PIM records superimposed shadow images of pupil alignment reference (PAR) targets located in the OSIM and SI pupils. The OSIM Pupil Imaging Module was described by Brent Bos, et al, at SPIE in 2011 prior to ISIM testing. We have recently completed the third and final ISIM cryogenic performance verification test before ISIM was integrated with the OTE. In this paper, we describe PIM implementation, performance, and measurement results.

  18. Design of a white-light interferometric measuring system for co-phasing the primary mirror segments of the next generation of ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Helun; Xian, Hao; Jiang, Wenhan; Rao, Changhui; Wang, Shengqian

    2007-12-01

    With the increase of telescope size, the manufacture of monolithic primaries becomes increasingly difficult. Instead, the use of segmented mirrors, where many individual mirrors (the segments) work together to provide good image quality and an aperture equivalent to that of a large monolithic mirror, is considered a more appropriate strategy. But, with the introduction of large telescope mirror comprised of many individual segments, the problem of insuring a smooth continuous mirror surface (co-phased mirrors) becomes critical. One of the main problems arising in the co-phasing of the segmented mirrors telescope is the problem of measurements of the vertical displacements between the individual segments (piston errors). Because of such mirrors to exhibit diffraction-limited performance, a phasing process is required in order to guarantee that the segments have to be positioned with an accuracy of a fraction of a wavelength of the incoming light.The measurements become especially complicated when the piston error is in order of wavelength fractions. To meet the performance capabilities, a novel method for phasing the segmented mirrors optical system is described. The phasing method is based on a high-aperture Michelson interferometer. The use of an interferometric technique allows the measurement of segment misalignment during daytime with high accuracy, which is a major design guideline. The innovation introduced in the optical design of the interferometer is the simultaneous use of both monochromatic and white-light sources that allows the system to measure the piston error with an uncertainty of 6nm in 50µm range. The description about the expected monochromatic and white-light illumination interferograms and the feasibility of the phasing method are presented here.

  19. Comparing and Contrasting Detectors: JWST NIR vs HST WFC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    In many ways, WFC3s IR channel is a good indicator for what to expect with JWST. There are some differences, most of which should be beneficial in JWST- JWSTs lower operating temperature will freeze out charge traps that would affect WFC3. Benefits should include lower dark current, lower persistence, and better reciprocity- JWSTs more recent HgCdTe process has lower defect density. The benefits are as described above- JWST uses better indium barriers. The benefits should include fewer RC type pixels. One area where more study might be beneficial is stability. The detector electronics play a significant role in determining how stable a detector system is(v.s. bias drifts and photometry). JWSTs SIDECARs are completely WFC3s Ball electronics- Studies comparing the bias and photometric stability of WFC3 and JWST might be useful to informing data acquisition and calibration strategies for JWST.

  20. CHARACTERIZING TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES WITH JWST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Luther, Kyle, E-mail: tom.greene@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We explore how well spectra from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with atmospheres that are clear, cloudy, or of high mean molecular weight (HMMW). Next we simulate the λ = 1–11 μm transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single-transit or single-eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}) can be constrained. We find that λ = 1–2.5 μm transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar-composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or HMMW atmospheres will often require full 1–11 μm spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high F{sub p} and high F{sub p}/F{sub *}. Strong temperature inversions in the solar-composition hot-Jupiter atmosphere should be detectable with 1–2.5+ μm emission spectra, and 1–5+ μm emission spectra will constrain the temperature–pressure profiles of warm planets. Transmission spectra over 1–5+ μm will constrain [Fe/H] values to better than 0.5 dex for the clear atmospheres of the hot and warm planets studied. Carbon-to-oxygen ratios can be constrained to better than a factor of 2 in some systems. We expect that these results will provide useful predictions of the scientific value of single-event JWST spectra until its on-orbit performance is known.

  1. Status of the JWST sunshield and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, J.; Flynn, J.; Cohen, A.; Lynch, R.; Cooper, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the development, manufacture and integration of the James Webb Space Telescope's sunshield and spacecraft. Both of these JWST elements have completed design and development testing. This paper will review basic architecture and roles of these systems. Also to be presented is the current state of manufacture, assembly integration and test. This paper will conclude with a look at the road ahead for each subsystem prior to integration with the integrated telescope and instrument elements at Northrop Grumman's Space Park facility in late 2017.

  2. Characterizing transiting exoplanet atmospheres with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Thomas P; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J; Lustig-Yeager, Jacob; Luther, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    We explore how well James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) spectra will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with clear, cloudy, or high mean molecular weight atmospheres. Next we simulate the $\\lambda = 1 - 11$ $\\mu$m transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single transit and eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH$_4$, CO, CO$_2$, H$_2$O, NH$_3$) can be constrained. We find that $\\lambda = 1 - 2.5$ $\\mu$m transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or high mean molecular weight atmospheres will often require full $1 - 11$ $\\mu$m spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high $F_p$ and high $F_p/F_*$. Strong t...

  3. Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Table 3.1: Summary of reflecting telescope configurations. Name Primary Secondary - Tertiary Correction Newtonian Paraboloid None/flat None...Spherical (has coma) Gregorian Paraboloid Ellipsoidal None Spherical (has coma) Classic Cassegrain Paraboloid Hyperboloid None Spherical (has coma) Schmidt...The sphere that best matches the paraboloidal curvature near the optical axis can be defined as, (s + RoC)2 + x 2 = RoC 2 or re-arranging, s = -RoC

  4. A Retrieval Architecture for JWST Observations of Directly Imaged Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alex

    2017-06-01

    I present a new modeling and retrieval code for atmospheres of directly imaged exoplanets designed for use on JWST observations, extending my previous work on transiting planets. I perform example retrievals of temperature-pressure profiles, common molecular abundances, and basic cloud properties on existing lower-resolution spectra and on simulated JWST data using forward model emission spectra for planned NIRISS and NIRCam targets. From these results, I estimate the expected return on prospective JWST observations in information-theoretic terms using the mutual information metric.

  5. Cryogenic Thermal Distortion Model Validation for the JWST ISIM Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John; Cofie, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope consisting of an Optical telescope element (OTE), Integrated science instrument module (ISIM), a Spacecraft, and a Sunshield. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) consists of the JWST science instruments (NIRCam, MIRI, NIRSpec), a fine guidance sensor (FGS), the ISIM Structure, and thermal and electrical subsystems. JWST's instruments are designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the instruments and telescope operate at cryogenic temperatures (approximately 35 K for the instruments).

  6. Application of a white-light interferometric measuring system as co-phasing the segmented primary mirrors of the high-aperture telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Helun; Li, Huaqiang; Xian, Hao; Huang, Jian; Wang, Shengqian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-03-01

    For the optical system of the telescope, with the increase in telescope size, the manufacture of monolithic primary becomes increasingly difficult. Instead, the use of segmented mirrors, where many individual mirrors (the segments) work together to provide an image quality and an aperture equivalent to that of a large monolithic mirror, is considered a more appropriate strategy. But with the introduction of the large telescope mirror comprised of many individual segments, the problem of insuring a smooth continuous mirror surface (co-phased mirrors) becomes critical. One of the main problems is the measurement of the vertical displacement between the individual segments (piston error), for such mirrors, the segment vertical misalignment (piston error) between the segments must be reduced to a small fraction of the wavelength (Michelson interferometer. The use of an interferometric technique allows the measuring of segment misalignment during the daytime with high accuracy, which is a major design guideline. The innovation introduced in the optical design of the interferometer is the simultaneous use of monochromatic light and multiwavelength combination white-light source in a direct method for improving the central fringe identification in the white-light interferometric phasing system. With theoretic analysis, we find that this multiwavelength combination technique can greatly increase the visibility difference between the central fringe and its adjacent side fringes, and thus it offers an increased signal resolution. So make the central fringe identification become easier, and enhance the measure precision of the segment phasing error. Consequently, it is suitable for high-precision measurement purpose and application in the segment piston error phasing system. The description about the expected interferograms and the feasibility of the phasing method are presented here.

  7. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  8. Advanced Mirror Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project matures critical technologies required to enable ultra-stable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets.

  9. Day-time local phasing of neighbouring segments of the E-ELT primary mirror, based simultaneous multi-λ shearing interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, S.; Falldorf, C.; Klattenhoff, R.; Cheffot, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the context of the segmented primary mirror of the E-ELT, the ability to measure the phasing state of neighbouring segments during day-time represents a way to mitigate the risk of potentially time consuming on-sky phasing after segment replacement. This paper presents the concept of a local phasing sensor based on simultaneous multi-wavelength shearing interferometry, as well as experimental results obtained on the ESO M1 test facility.

  10. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zult, Tjerk; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and

  11. Co-phasing primary mirror segments of an optical space telescope using a long stroke Zernike WFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kate; Wallace, J. K.; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Static Zernike phase-contrast plates have been used extensively in microscopy for half a century and, more recently, in optical telescopes for wavefront sensing. A dynamic Zernike wavefront sensor (WFS) with four phase shifts, for reducing error due to spurious light and eliminating other asynchronous noise, has been proposed for use in adaptive optics. Here, we propose adapting this method for co-phasing the primary mirror of a segmented space telescope. In order to extend the dynamic range of the WFS, which has a maximum range of +/ - λ/2, a phase- contrast plate with multiple steps, both positive and negative, has been developed such that errors as large as +/ - 10λ can be sensed. The manufacturing tolerances have been incorporated into simulations, which demonstrate that performance impacts are minimal. We show that the addition of this small optical plate along with a high precision linear translation stage at the prime focus of a telescope and pupil viewing capability can provide extremely accurate segment phasing with a simple white-light fringe fitting algorithm and a closed-loop controller. The original focal-plane geometry of a centro-symmetric phase shifting element is replaced with a much less constrained shape, such as a slot. Also, a dedicated pupil imager is not strictly required; an existing pupil sampler such as a Shack-Hartmann (SH) WFS can be used just as effectively, allowing simultaneous detection of wavefront errors using both intensity and spot positions on the SH-WFS. This could lead to an efficient synergy between Zernike and SH-WFS, enabling segment phasing in conjunction with high-dynamic range sensing.

  12. Design of a prototype position actuator for the primary mirror segments of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, A.; Morante, E.; Viera, T.; Núñez, M.; Reyes, M.

    2010-07-01

    European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) based in 984 primary mirror segments achieving required optical performance; they must position relatively to adjacent segments with relative nanometer accuracy. CESA designed M1 Position Actuators (PACT) to comply with demanding performance requirements of EELT. Three PACT are located under each segment controlling three out of the plane degrees of freedom (tip, tilt, piston). To achieve a high linear accuracy in long operational displacements, PACT uses two stages in series. First stage based on Voice Coil Actuator (VCA) to achieve high accuracies in very short travel ranges, while second stage based on Brushless DC Motor (BLDC) provides large stroke ranges and allows positioning the first stage closer to the demanded position. A BLDC motor is used achieving a continuous smoothly movement compared to sudden jumps of a stepper. A gear box attached to the motor allows a high reduction of power consumption and provides a great challenge for sizing. PACT space envelope was reduced by means of two flat springs fixed to VCA. Its main characteristic is a low linear axial stiffness. To achieve best performance for PACT, sensors have been included in both stages. A rotary encoder is included in BLDC stage to close position/velocity control loop. An incremental optical encoder measures PACT travel range with relative nanometer accuracy and used to close the position loop of the whole actuator movement. For this purpose, four different optical sensors with different gratings will be evaluated. Control strategy show different internal closed loops that work together to achieve required performance.

  13. Design Trade Study for a 4-Meter Off-Axis Primary Mirror Substrate and Mount for the Habitable-Zone Exoplanet Direct Imaging Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William R.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2017-01-01

    An extensive trade study was conducted to evaluate primary mirror substrate design architectures for the HabEx mission baseline 4-meter off-axis telescope. The study’s purpose is not to produce a final design, but rather to established a design methodology for matching the mirror’s properties (mass and stiffness) with the mission’s optical performance specifications (static dynamic wavefront error, WFE). The study systematically compares the effect of proven design elements (closed-back vs. open-back vs. partial-back; meniscus vs. flat back vs. shaped back; etc.), which can be implemented with proven space mirror materials (ULE and Zerodur), on static and dynamic WFE. Additionally, the study compares static and dynamic WFE of each substrate point design integrated onto three and six point mounts.

  14. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zult, Tjerk; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and short-inter

  15. Advanced cryogenic thermal switches for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, David; Beres, Matthew; Stouffer, Charles; Rodriguez, Jose

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes two cryogenic thermal switches (CTSWs) under development for instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first thermal switch was designed to extend the life of the solid H2 dewar for the 6 K Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) while the second thermal switch is needed for contamination and over-temperature control of three 35 K instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). In both cases, differential thermal expansion (DTE) between two materials having differing CTE values is the process that underpins the thermal switching. The patented DTE-CTSW design utilizes two metallic end-pieces, one cup-shaped and the other disc-shaped (both MIRI end-pieces are Al while ISIM uses an Al/Invar cup and an Al disc), joined by an axially centered Ultem rod, which creates a narrow, flat gap between the cup (rim) and disc. A heater is bonded to the rod center. Upon cooling one or both end-pieces, the rod contracts relative to the end-pieces and the gap closes, turning the CTSW ON. When the rod heater is turned on, the rod expands relative to the end-pieces and the gap opens, turning the CTSW OFF. During testing from 6-35 K, ON conductances of 0.3-12 W/K and OFF resistances greater than 2500 K/W were measured. Of particular importance at 6 K was the Al oxide layer, which was found to significantly decrease DTE-CTSW ON conductance when the mating surfaces were bare Al. When the mating surfaces were gold-plated, the adverse impact of the oxide layer was mitigated. This paper will describe both efforts from design through model correlation.

  16. NEOs in the mid-infrared: from Spitzer to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2016-10-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) account for a surprisingly large fraction of the Spitzer observing time devoted to Solar System science. As a community, we should think of ways to repeat that success with JWST. JWST is planning an open Early Release Science Program, with the expected deadline for letters of intent in early 2017. We can't wait for next year's DPS to develop ideas. The time is now!In order to stir up the discussion, we will present ideas for NEO observing programs that are well adapted to JWST's capabilities and limitations, based on our recent PASP paper (Thomas et al., 2016). Obvious measurement objectives would include* size and albedo from thermal continuum (MIRI photometry)* thermal inertia for objects with well-known shape and spin state (MIRI)* taxonomy through reflection spectroscopy and emission spectroscopy in the NIR and MIR; NIR colors for faint objects.In all cases, JWST's sensitivity will allow us to go deeper than currently possible by at least an order of magnitude. Meter-sized NEOs similar to 2009 BD or 2011 MD are easy targets for MIRI spectrophotometry!The following limitations must be kept in mind, however: JWST's large size makes it slow to move. Most problematic for NEOs is probably the resulting 'speed limit': non-sidereal tracking is supported up to a rate of 30 mas/s, NEOs can easily move faster than that (ways to relax this constraint are under discussion). The average slew to a new target is budgeted to take 30 min, effectively ruling out programs many-target programs like ExploreNEOs or NEOSurvey (see D. Trilling's paper). Additionally, JWST will only observe close to quadrature, translating to large solar phase angles for NEO observations; this is familiar from other space-based IR facilities.

  17. Focus Groups for Solar System Investigations with the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Dean C.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Stansberry, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Sonneborn, George; Lunine, Jonathan; Rivkin, Andrew; Woodward, Charles; Norwood, Jim; Villanueva, Geronimo; Thomas, Cristina; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Tiscareno, Matthew; Kestay, Laszlo; Nixon, Conor; Parker, Alex

    2014-11-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will make it NASA’s premier space-based facility for infrared astronomy. This 6.5-meter telescope, which is optimized for observations in the near and mid infrared, will be equipped with four state-of-the-art instruments that include imaging, spectroscopy, and coronagraphy. These instruments, along with the telescope’s moving target capabilities, will enable the infrared study of solar system objects with unprecedented detail. A new white paper (Norwood et al., 2014) provides a general overview of JWST observatory and instrument capabilities for Solar System science, and updates and expands upon an earlier study by Lunine et al. (2010). In order to fully realize the potential of JWST for Solar System observations, we have recently organized 10 focus groups to explore various science use cases in more detail on topics including: Asteroids, Comets, Giant Planets, Mars, Near Earth Objects, Occultations, Rings, Satellites, Titan, and Trans-Neptunian Objects. The findings from these groups will help guide the project as it develops and implements planning tools, observing templates, the data pipeline and archives so that they enable a broad range of Solar System Science investigations. The purpose of this presentation is to raise awareness of the JWST Solar System planning, and to invite participation of DPS members with our Focus Groups and other pre-launch activities.References:Lunine, J., Hammel, H., Schaller, E., Sonneborn, G., Orton, G., Rieke, G., and Rieke, M. 2010, JWST Planetary Observations within the Solar System, http://www.stsci.edu/jwst/doc-archive/white-papers.Norwood, J., Hammel, H., Milam, S.,Stansberry, J., Lunine, J., Chanover, N., Hines, D., Sonneborn, G., Tiscareno, M., Brown, M. and Ferruit, P., 2014, ArXiv e-prints, 1403.6845.

  18. Einstein's Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  19. The JWST science instrument payload: mission context and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. It is a cryogenic infrared space observatory with a 25 m2 aperture (6 m class) telescope that will achieve diffraction limited angular resolution at a wavelength of 2 um. The science instrument payload includes four passively cooled near-infrared instruments providing broad- and narrow-band imagery, coronography, as well as multi-object and integral-field spectroscopy over the 0.6 Construction, integration and verification testing is underway in all areas of the program. The JWST is on schedule for launch during 2018.

  20. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  1. Chiral mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plum, Eric, E-mail: erp@orc.soton.ac.uk [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zheludev, Nikolay I., E-mail: niz@orc.soton.ac.uk [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); The Photonics Institute and Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637378 (Singapore)

    2015-06-01

    Mirrors are used in telescopes, microscopes, photo cameras, lasers, satellite dishes, and everywhere else, where redirection of electromagnetic radiation is required making them arguably the most important optical component. While conventional isotropic mirrors will reflect linear polarizations without change, the handedness of circularly polarized waves is reversed upon reflection. Here, we demonstrate a type of mirror reflecting one circular polarization without changing its handedness, while absorbing the other. The polarization-preserving mirror consists of a planar metasurface with a subwavelength pattern that cannot be superimposed with its mirror image without being lifted out of its plane, and a conventional mirror spaced by a fraction of the wavelength from the metasurface. Such mirrors enable circularly polarized lasers and Fabry-Pérot cavities with enhanced tunability, gyroscopic applications, polarization-sensitive detectors of electromagnetic waves, and can be used to enhance spectroscopies of chiral media.

  2. JWST observations of stellar occultations by solar system bodies and rings

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Sanz, P; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Stansberry, J; Lin, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-W; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th; Ortiz, J L; Braga-Ribas, F; Bosh, A; Duffard, R; Lellouch, E; Tancredi, G; Young, L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  3. Planning JWST NIRSpec MSA spectroscopy using NIRCam pre-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kassin, Susan A.; Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Reid, I. N.; Blair, William P.; Keyes, Charles D.; Soderblom, D. R.; Peña-Guerrero, Maria A.

    2016-07-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the work-horse spectrograph at 1-5microns for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). A showcase observing mode of NIRSpec is the multi-object spectroscopy with the Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs), which consist of a quarter million tiny configurable shutters that are 0. ''20×0. ''46 in size. The NIRSpec MSA shutters can be opened in adjacent rows to create flexible and positionable spectroscopy slits on prime science targets of interest. Because of the very small shutter width, the NIRSpec MSA spectral data quality will benefit significantly from accurate astrometric knowledge of the positions of planned science sources. Images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have the optimal relative astrometric accuracy for planning NIRSpec observations of 5-10 milli-arcseconds (mas). However, some science fields of interest might have no HST images, galactic fields can have moderate proper motions at the 5mas level or greater, and extragalactic images with HST may have inadequate source information at NIRSpec wavelengths beyond 2 microns. Thus, optimal NIRSpec spectroscopy planning may require pre-imaging observations with the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on JWST to accurately establish source positions for alignment with the NIRSpec MSAs. We describe operational philosophies and programmatic considerations for acquiring JWST NIRCam pre-image observations for NIRSpec MSA spectroscopic planning within the same JWST observing Cycle.

  4. Magic Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  5. Mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Voisin, Claire

    1999-01-01

    This is the English translation of Professor Voisin's book reflecting the discovery of the mirror symmetry phenomenon. The first chapter is devoted to the geometry of Calabi-Yau manifolds, and the second describes, as motivation, the ideas from quantum field theory that led to the discovery of mirror symmetry. The other chapters deal with more specialized aspects of the subject: the work of Candelas, de la Ossa, Greene, and Parkes, based on the fact that under the mirror symmetry hypothesis, the variation of Hodge structure of a Calabi-Yau threefold determines the Gromov-Witten invariants of its mirror; Batyrev's construction, which exhibits the mirror symmetry phenomenon between hypersurfaces of toric Fano varieties, after a combinatorial classification of the latter; the mathematical construction of the Gromov-Witten potential, and the proof of its crucial property (that it satisfies the WDVV equation), which makes it possible to construct a flat connection underlying a variation of Hodge structure in the ...

  6. Two NIRCam channels are Better than One: How JWST Can Do More Science with NIRCam's Short-Wavelength Dispersed Hartmann Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Schlawin, Everett; Leisenring, Jarron; Greene, Tom; Walker, Lisa May; Fraine, Jonathan; Kelly, Doug; Misselt, Karl; Line, Michael; Stansberry, John; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) offers unprecedented sensitivity, stability, and wavelength coverage for transiting exoplanet studies, opening up new avenues for measuring atmospheric abundances, structure, and temperature profiles. Taking full advantage of JWST spectroscopy of planets from 0.6um to 28um, however, will require many observations with a combination of the NIRISS, NIRCam, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. In this white paper, we discuss a new NIRCam mode (not yet approved or implemented) that can reduce the number of necessary observations to cover the 1.0um to 5.0um wavelength range. Even though NIRCam was designed primarily as an imager, it also includes several grisms for phasing and aligning JWST's 18 hexagonal mirror segments. NIRCam's long-wavelength channel includes grisms that cover 2.4um to 5.0um with a resolving power of R = 1200 - 1550 using two separate configurations. The long-wavelength grisms have already been approved for science operations, including wide field and single obj...

  7. Lightweight and mounting design for primary mirror in space camera%空间反射镜的轻量化及支撑设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪达; 陈永和; 史婷婷; 刘晓华; 傅雨田

    2014-01-01

    The large space remote sensing instrument has high requirements for heating and mechanical characteristics, as well as strict limitation in weight, to adapt to severe launching and working environment. Thus the mirror and supporting system is stringent in weight, rigidity and environmental flexibility. The paper analyzed, designed and demonstrated the parameters of a Φ620 mm remote sensing mirror and its mounting structure. The central mounting system was served to meet the light weight and rigidity requirements compared with the other mounting methods. Radical weight -reduction slot morphology was developed in accordance with equal strength principle. The partial contact stress would increase as temperature changed. A flexible material was utilized to solve the problem, which would mitigate the structure effect to optical mirror. The results show that the weight of mirror is 15 kg and mounting accessory is 3.5 kg, with the weight reduction rate of 71.2%. The first mode is 420 Hz;The profile accuracy of mirror is 0.03 λRMS. The technical parameters are stable and satisfied with the optical system requirements under various tests. The primary mirror project is implemented in the space and attains the expected goal.%大型空间遥感仪器为适应苛刻的发射和工作环境,通常要求具有很高的热、力学性能,并且对重量有严格限制。这对大口径反射镜及其支撑结构的质量、刚度和环境适应性提出了很高的要求。针对某型号Φ620 mm口径光学遥感仪器的主镜及支撑结构进行了详细的分析计算、设计和试验验证。通过对比多种支撑方式的不同特性,选择了符合仪器要求的质量轻、刚度高的中心支撑;并利用等强度原理设计了放射状轻量化形式;在支撑环节上,利用柔性材料解决了因温度变化产生的局部接触应力增加的问题,有效减小了结构对光学镜面的影响。经测试反射镜重15.2 kg,轻量化率71.2%

  8. Titan Science with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Adamkovics, Mate; Bezard, Bruno; Bjoraker, Gordon L; Cornet, Thomas; Hayes, Alexander G; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lemmon, Mark T; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Teanby, Nicholas A; Turtle, Elizabeth P; West, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018, is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) but with a significantly larger aperture (6.5 m) and advanced instrumentation focusing on infrared science (0.6-28.0 $\\mu$m ). In this paper we examine the potential for scientific investigation of Titan using JWST, primarily with three of the four instruments: NIRSpec, NIRCam and MIRI, noting that science with NIRISS will be complementary. Five core scientific themes are identified: (i) surface (ii) tropospheric clouds (iii) tropospheric gases (iv) stratospheric composition and (v) stratospheric hazes. We discuss each theme in depth, including the scientific purpose, capabilities and limitations of the instrument suite, and suggested observing schemes. We pay particular attention to saturation, which is a problem for all three instruments, but may be alleviated for NIRCam through use of selecting small sub-arrays of the detectors - sufficient to encompass Titan, but with significantly fas...

  9. Two NIRCam Channels are Better than One: How JWST Can Do More Science with NIRCam’s Short-wavelength Dispersed Hartmann Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, E.; Rieke, M.; Leisenring, J.; Walker, L. M.; Fraine, J.; Kelly, D.; Misselt, K.; Greene, T.; Line, M.; Lewis, N.; Stansberry, J.

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) offers unprecedented sensitivity, stability, and wavelength coverage for transiting exoplanet studies, opening up new avenues for measuring atmospheric abundances, structure, and temperature profiles. Taking full advantage of JWST spectroscopy of planets from 0.6 to 28 μm, however, will require many observations with a combination of the NIRISS, NIRCam, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. In this white paper, we discuss a new NIRCam mode (not yet approved or implemented) that can reduce the number of necessary observations to cover the 1.0-5.0 μm wavelength range. Even though NIRCam was designed primarily as an imager, it also includes several grisms for phasing and aligning JWST’s 18 hexagonal mirror segments. NIRCam’s long-wavelength channel includes grisms that cover 2.4-5.0 μm with a resolving power of R = 1200-1550 using two separate configurations. The long-wavelength grisms have already been approved for science operations, including wide field and single object (time series) slitless spectroscopy. We propose a new mode that will simultaneously measure spectra for science targets in the 1.0-2.0 μm range using NIRCam’s short-wavelength channel. This mode, if approved, would take advantage of NIRCam’s Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS), which produces 10 spatially separated spectra per source at R ˜ 300. We discuss the added benefit of the DHS in constraining abundances in exoplanet atmospheres as well as its ability to observe the brightest systems. The DHS essentially comes for free (at no time cost) with any NIRCam long-wavelength grism observation, but the detector integration parameters have to be selected to ensure that the long-wavelength grism observations do not saturate and that JWST data volume downlink constraints are not violated. Combining both of NIRCam’s channels will maximize the science potential of JWST, which is a limited life observatory.

  10. Synergy with HST and JWST Data Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gretchen; Space Telescope Data Management Team

    2014-01-01

    The data processing and archive systems for the JWST will contain a petabyte of science data and the best news is that users will have fast access to the latest calibrations through a variety of new services. With a synergistic approach currently underway with the STScI science operations between the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope data management subsystems (DMS), operational verification is right around the corner. Next year the HST archive will provide scientists on-demand fully calibrated data products via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), which takes advantage of an upgraded DMS. This enhanced system, developed jointly with the JWST DMS is based on a new CONDOR distributed processing system capable of reprocessing data using a prioritization queue which runs in the background. A Calibration Reference Data System manages the latest optimal configuration for each scientific instrument pipeline. Science users will be able to search and discover the growing MAST archive calibrated datasets from these missions along with the other multiple mission holdings both local to MAST and available through the Virtual Observatory. JWST data systems will build upon the successes and lessons learned from the HST legacy and move us forward into the next generation of multi-wavelength archive research.

  11. Astrophysics in the Next Decade: JWST and Concurrent Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Thronson, Harley A; Tielens, Alexander; The James Webb Space Telescope and Concurrent Facilities

    2009-01-01

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), planned for operation in about five years, will have the capability to investigate – and answer – some of the most challenging questions in astronomy. Although motivated and designed to study the very early Universe, the performance of the observatory’s instruments over a very wide wavelength range will allow the world’s scientific community unequaled ability to study cosmic phenomena as diverse as small bodies in the Solar System and the formation of galaxies. As part of preparation to use JWST, a conference was held in Tucson, Arizona in 2007 that brought together astronomers from around the world to discuss the mission, other major facilities that will operate in the coming decade, and major scientific goals for them. This book is a compilation of those presentations by some of the leading researchers from all branches of astronomy. This book also includes a "pre-history" of JWST, describing the lengthy process and some of the key individuals that initiat...

  12. Improving JWST Coronagraphic Performance with Accurate Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorkom, Kyle; Pueyo, Laurent; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; JWST Coronagraphs Working Group

    2016-06-01

    The coronagraphs on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable high-contrast observations of faint objects at small separations from bright hosts, such as circumstellar disks, exoplanets, and quasar disks. Despite attenuation by the coronagraphic mask, bright speckles in the host’s point spread function (PSF) remain, effectively washing out the signal from the faint companion. Suppression of these bright speckles is typically accomplished by repeating the observation with a star that lacks a faint companion, creating a reference PSF that can be subtracted from the science image to reveal any faint objects. Before this reference PSF can be subtracted, however, the science and reference images must be aligned precisely, typically to 1/20 of a pixel. Here, we present several such algorithms for performing image registration on JWST coronagraphic images. Using both simulated and pre-flight test data (taken in cryovacuum), we assess (1) the accuracy of each algorithm at recovering misaligned scenes and (2) the impact of image registration on achievable contrast. Proper image registration, combined with post-processing techniques such as KLIP or LOCI, will greatly improve the performance of the JWST coronagraphs.

  13. Simulating Exoplanet Transit and Eclipse Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a nearly ideal machine for acquiring the transmission and emission spectra of transiting exoplanets over its large wavelength range 0.7 - 28 microns. The NIRSpec, NIRCam, nTFI, and MIRI instruments will have spectroscopic capabilities that span spectral resolutions from 20 - 3000 and can cover up to 2 - 3 octaves in wavelength simultaneously. This will allow observing multiple molecular features at once, facilitating the separation of atmospheric temperature and abundance effects on spectra. Many transiting planets will also be able to be observed with both transmission and eclipse spectroscopy, providing further insights and constraints on planetary thermal structures and energy transport. Simulated JWST spectra of planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include current best estimates of actual instrument throughput, resolution, spectral range, systematic noise, and random noise terms. They show that JWST will be able to determine the atmospheric parameters of a wide variety of planets, often when observing only one or a few transit or eclipse event sequences. The thermal emissions of rocky super-Earths will also be quickly detectable via mid-IR eclipse observations if such planets are found around nearby M star hosts beforehand.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The 6.5-m aperture James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool for studying and advancing numerous areas of astrophysics. Its Fine Guidance Sensor, Near-Infrared Camera, Near-Infrared Spectrograph, and Mid-Infrared Instrument will be capable of making very sensitive, high angular resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations spanning 0.7 - 28 ?m wavelength. These capabilities are very well suited for probing the conditions of star formation in the distant and local Universe. Indeed, JWST has been designed to detect first light objects as well as to study the fine details of jets, disks, chemistry, envelopes, and the central cores of nearby protostars. We will be able to use its cameras, coronagraphs, and spectrographs (including multi-object and integral field capabilities) to study many aspects of star forming regions throughout the galaxy, the Local Group, and more distant regions. I will describe the basic JWST scientific capabilities and illustrate a few ways how they can be applied to star formation issues and conditions with a focus on Galactic regions.

  15. Characterizing Transiting Planets with JWST Spectra: Simulations and Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom; Line, Michael; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    There are now well over a thousand confirmed exoplanets, ranging from hot to cold and large to small worlds. JWST spectra will provide much more detailed information on the molecular constituents, chemical compositions, and thermal properties of the atmospheres of transiting planets than is now known. We explore this by modeling clear, cloudy,and high mean molecular weight atmospheres of typical hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets and then simulating their JWST transmission and emission spectra. These simulations were performed for several JWST instrument modes over 1 - 11 microns and incorporate realistic signal and noise components. We then performed state-of the art retrievals to determine how well temperatures and abundances (CO, CO2, H2O, NH3) will be constrained and over what pressures for these different planet types. Using these results, we appraise what instrument modes will be most useful for determining what properties of the different planets, and we assess how well we can constrain their compositions, CO ratios, and temperature profiles.

  16. Mirror neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal...

  17. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for JWST, II: Design and Build

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, G S; Goodson, G B; Rieke, G H; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Amiaux, J; Aricha-Yanguas, Ana; Azzolini, Ruyman; Banks, Kimberly; Barrado-Navascues, D; Belenguer-Davila, T; Bloemmart, J A D L; Bouchet, Patrice; Brandl, B R; Colina, L; Detre, Ors; Diaz-Catala, Eva; Eccleston, Paul; Friedman, Scott D; Garcia-Marin, Macarena; Guedel, Manuel; Glasse, Alistair; Glauser, Adrian M; Greene, T P; Groezinger, Uli; Grundy, Tim; Hastings, Peter; Henning, Th; Hofferbert, Ralph; Hunter, Faye; Jessen, N C; Justtanont, K; Karnik, Avinash R; Khorrami, Mori A; Krause, Oliver; Labiano, Alvaro; Lagage, P -O; Langer, Ulrich; Lemke, Dietrich; Lim, Tanya; Lorenzo-Alvarez, Jose; Mazy, Emmanuel; McGowan, Norman; Meixner, M E; Morris, Nigel; Morrison, Jane E; Mueller, Friedrich; Norgaard-Nielson, H -U; Olofsson, Goeran; O'Sullivan, Brian; Pel, J -W; Penanen, Konstantin; Petach, M B; Pye, J P; Ray, T P; Renotte, Etienne; Renouf, Ian; Ressler, M E; Samara-Ratna, Piyal; Scheithauer, Silvia; Schneider, Analyn; Shaughnessy, Bryan; Stevenson, Tim; Sukhatme, Kalyani; Swinyard, Bruce; Sykes, Jon; Thatcher, John; Tikkanen, Tuomo; van Dishoeck, E F; Waelkens, C; Walker, Helen; Wells, Martyn; Zhender, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) provides measurements over the wavelength range 5 to 28.5 microns. MIRI has, within a single 'package', four key scientific functions: photometric imaging, coronagraphy, single-source low-spectral resolving power (R ~ 100) spectroscopy, and medium-resolving power (R ~ 1500 to 3500) integral field spectroscopy. An associated cooler system maintains MIRI at its operating temperature of < 6.7 K. This paper describes the driving principles behind the design of MIRI, the primary design parameters, and their realization in terms of the 'as-built' instrument. It also describes the test program that led to delivery of the tested and calibrated Flight Model to NASA in 2012, and the confirmation after delivery of the key interface requirements.

  18. In-focus phase retrieval using JWST-NIRISS's non-redundant mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Gamper, Noah; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) contains a 7-hole non-redundant mask (NRM) in its pupil. NIRISS's Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) mode is useful both for science as well as wavefront sensing. In-focus science detector NRM and full pupil images of unresolved stars can be used to measure the wavefront without any dedicated wavefront sensing hardware or any moving mirrors. Using routine science operational sequences, these images can be taken before or after any science visit. NRM fringe phases constrain Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval to disambiguate the algorithm's two-fold degeneracy. We summarize how consecutive masked and unmasked exposures provide enough information to reconstruct a wavefront with up to ˜1-2 rms radians of error. We present our latest progress on using this approach on laboratory experiments, and discuss those results in the context of contingency for JWST segment phasing. We discuss extending our method to ground-based AO systems and future space telescopes.

  19. 能动主镜的风载变形研究%Wind Loading Distortion Analysis of an Active Primary Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚平; 张学军; 张雨东

    2011-01-01

    One of the critical considerations for large telescopes is primary mirror distortions caused by wind load. In thin-mirror active optic systems such as Subaru Telescope, the fixed-point Force Feedback (FFB) algorithm is used to suppress wind load. The concept of pressure mode is brought up and the majority information of distortions caused by wind is extracted. The FFB algorithm based on pressure mode is studied and the following conclusions are drawn: aberrations caused by wind consist mainly of piston, tilt, astigmatism and defocus; with equal coefficients pressure modes of piston and tilts produce larger aberrations and push more forces on fixed points; the FFB algorithm based on pressure mode can suppress mirror deformations introduced by wind.%风载引起的主镜变形是大口径望远镜必须考虑的问题.针对类似于Subaru望远镜的薄镜面能动光学系统,采用固定点力反馈控制方法对风载进行校正,本文引入了压强模式的概念,提取出风载产生的镜面变形的大部分信息,并据此对固定点力反馈控制方法进行了研究,得到如下结论:风载产生的镜面变形主要是平移、倾斜、像散和离焦等低阶像差;相同系数的情况下,平移和倾斜压强模式可以产生更大的镜面变形,对固定支撑点产生更大的力;基于压强模式的固定点力反馈控制方法对风载有较好的校正效果.

  20. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  1. Mirror, mirror on the wall

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    RICH 2, one of the two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment, is being prepared to join the other detector elements ready for the first proton-proton collisions at LHC. The mirrors of the RICH2 detector are meticulously assembled in a clean room.In a large dark room, men in white move around an immense structure some 7 metres high, 10 metres wide and nearly 2.5 metres deep. Apparently effortlessly, they are installing the two large high-precision spherical mirrors. These mirrors will focus Cherenkov light, created by the charged particles that will traverse this detector, onto the photon detectors. Each spherical mirror wall is made up of facets like a fly's eye. Twenty-eight individual thin glass mirrors will all point to the same point in space to within a few micro-radians. The development of these mirrors has been technically demanding : Ideally they should be massless, sturdy, precise and have high reflectivity. In practice, though not massless, they are made from a mere 6 mm thin gl...

  2. The Impact of JWST Broadband Filter Choice on Photometric Redshift Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.;

    2016-01-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6–5.0 μm and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at λ 5.0 μm. In this work we analyze ...

  3. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  4. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  5. Exoplanets with JWST: degeneracy, systematics and how to avoid them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, Joanna K.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Kendrew, Sarah; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The high sensitivity and broad wavelength coverage of the James Webb Space Telescope will transform the field of exoplanet transit spectroscopy. Transit spectra are inferred from minute, wavelength-dependent variations in the depth of a transit or eclipse as the planet passes in front of or is obscured by its star, and the spectra contain information about the composition, structure and cloudiness of exoplanet atmospheres. Atmospheric retrieval is the preferred technique for extracting information from these spectra, but the process can be confused by astrophysical and instrumental systematic noise. We present results of retrieval tests based on synthetic, noisy JWST spectra, for clear and cloudy planets and active and inactive stars. We find that the ability to correct for stellar activity is likely to be a limiting factor for cloudy planets, as the effects of unocculted star spots may mimic the presence of a scattering slope due to clouds. We discuss the pros and cons of the available JWST instrument combinations for transit spectroscopy, and consider the effect of clouds and aerosols on the spectra. Aerosol high in a planet's atmosphere obscures molecular absorption features in transmission, reducing the information content of spectra in wavelength regions where the cloud is optically thick. We discuss the usefulness of particular wavelength regions for identifying the presence of cloud, and suggest strategies for solving the highly-degenerate retrieval problem for these objects.

  6. Unique Spectroscopy and Imaging of Mars with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, Geronimo L; Clancy, Todd R; Encrenaz, Therese; Fouchet, Thierry; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A; Mumma, Michael J; Novak, Robert E; Smith, Michael D; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Wolff, Michael J; Ferruit, Pierre; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we summarize the main capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for performing observations of Mars. The distinctive vantage point of JWST at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) will allow sampling the full observable disk, permitting the study of short-term phenomena, diurnal processes (across the East-West axis) and latitudinal processes between the hemispheres (including seasonal effects) with excellent spatial resolutions (0.07 arcsec at 2 {\\mu}m). Spectroscopic observations will be achievable in the 0.7-5 {\\mu}m spectral region with NIRSpec at a maximum resolving power of 2700, and with 8000 in the 1-1.25 {\\mu}m range. Imaging will be attainable with NIRCam at 4.3 {\\mu}m and with two narrow filters near 2 {\\mu}m, while the nightside will be accessible with several filters in the 0.5 to 2 {\\mu}m. Such a powerful suite of instruments will be a major asset for the exploration and characterization of Mars. Some science cases include the mapping of the water D/H ratio, investigatio...

  7. Bringing the Science of JWST to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background, particularly in the area of spectroscopy. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. Webbtelescope.org, the public hub for scientific information related to JWST, is now open. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing outreach programs: for example, partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; partnering with musicians and artists to link science and art. Augmented reality apps showcase NASA’s telescopes in a format usable by anyone with a smartphone, and visuals from increasingly affordable 3D VR technologies.

  8. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  9. Observing Planetary Rings with JWST: Science Justification and Observation Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; de Pater, Imke; Hamilton, Douglas P; Hedman, Matthew M; Nicholson, Philip D; Showalter, Mark R; Tamayo, Daniel; Verbiscer, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    The rings that adorn the four giant planets are of prime importance as accessible natural laboratories for disk processes, as clues to the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and as shapers as well as detectors of their planetary environments. The retinue of small moons accompanying all known ring systems are intimately connected as both sources and products, as well as shepherds and perturbers, of the rings. Leading sources of data on ring systems include spacecraft such as Cassini and Voyager, but also space telescopes such as Hubble and Spitzer as well as ground-based telescopes. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being prepared for launch in 2018 to begin a planned five-year mission. JWST will have the capability to observe solar system objects as close as Mars. Although most of the hardware is already designed and under construction if not completed, work continues on the development of operations guidelines and software and the completion of calibration tasks. The purpose of this white pape...

  10. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data acquire

  11. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data

  12. Segmented mirror control system hardware for CELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Terry S.; Nelson, Jerry E.

    2000-07-01

    The primary mirror of the proposed California Extremely Large Telescope is a 30-meter diameter mosaic of hexagonal segments. The primary mirror active control will be achieved using four systems: sensors, actuators, processor, and alignment camera. We describe here the basic requirements of sensors and actuators, sketch a sensor design, and indicate interesting actuator alternatives.

  13. Mirror monochromator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankos, Marian [Electron Optica, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Shadman, Khashayar [Electron Optica, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-12-02

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing a mirror electron monochromator (MirrorChrom) attachment to new and retrofitted electron microscopes (EMs) for improving the energy resolution of the EM from the characteristic range of 0.2-0.5 eV to the range of 10-50 meV. This improvement will enhance the characterization of materials by imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the monochromator will refine the energy spectra characterizing materials, as obtained from transmission EMs [TEMs] fitted with electron spectrometers, and it will increase the spatial resolution of the images of materials taken with scanning EMs (SEMs) operated at low voltages. EOI’s MirrorChrom technology utilizes a magnetic prism to simultaneously deflect the electron beam off the axis of the microscope column by 90° and disperse the electrons in proportional to their energies into a module with an electron mirror and a knife-edge. The knife-edge cuts off the tails of the energy distribution to reduce the energy spread of the electrons that are reflected, and subsequently deflected, back into the microscope column. The knife-edge is less prone to contamination, and thereby charging, than the conventional slits used in existing monochromators, which improves the reliability and stability of the module. The overall design of the MirrorChrom exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in order to maintain the beam brightness – a parameter that impacts how well the electron beam can be focused downstream onto a sample. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate monochromator architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between energy resolution and beam current to achieve the optimum design for three particular applications with market potential: increasing the spatial resolution of low voltage SEMs, increasing the energy resolution of low voltage TEMs (beam energy of 5-20 keV), and increasing the energy resolution of conventional TEMs (beam

  14. Mirror systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The physics of VUV and x-ray reflection is reviewed. The main functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are stated briefly and include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image of the source, focusing, and collimation. Methods of fabrication of optical surfaces are described. Types of imperfections are discussed, including, aberrations, surface figure inaccuracy, roughness, and degradation due to use. Calculation of the photon beam thermal load, including computer modelling, is considered. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  15. NASA 3D Models: James Webb Space Telescope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The project is working to a 2018 launch date. The JWST will...

  16. Extrasolar Planets Observed with JWST and the ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, L. Drake

    2010-01-01

    The advent of cryogenic space-borne infrared observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope has lead to a revolution in the study of planets and planetary systems orbiting sun-like stars. Already Spitzer has characterized the emergent infrared spectra of close-in giant exoplanets using transit and eclipse techniques. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to extend these studies to superEarth exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars in the near solar neighborhood. The forthcoming ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will playa key role in these studies, being especially valuable for spectroscopy at higher spectral resolving powers where large photon fluxes are needed. The culmination of this work within the next two decades will be the detection and spectral characterization of the major molecular constituents in the atmosphere of a habitable superEarth orbiting a nearby lower main sequence star.

  17. JWST tunable filter imager: etalon prototype test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touahri, D.; Cameron, P.; Evans, C.; Greenberg, E.; Rowlands, N.; Scott, A.; Doyon, R.; Beaulieu, M.; Djazovski, O.

    2008-07-01

    We present the prototyping results and laboratory characterization of a narrow band Fabry-Perot etalon flight model which is one of the wavelength selecting elements of the Tunable Filter Imager. The latter is a part of the Fine Guidance Sensor which represents the Canadian contribution to NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The unique design of this etalon provides the JWST observatory with the ability to image at 30 Kelvin, a 2.2'x2.2' portion of its field of view in a narrow spectral bandwidth of R~100 at any wavelength ranging between 1.6 and 4.9 μm (with a gap in coverage between 2.5 and 3.2 μm). Extensive testing has resulted in better understanding of the thermal properties of the piezoelectric transducers used as an actuation system for the etalon gap tuning. Good throughput, spectral resolution and contrast have been demonstrated for the full wavelength range.

  18. Design of a rapidly cooled cryogenic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Ron; Hsu, Ike

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a rapidly cooled beryllium cryogenic mirror, which is the primary mirror in the four-element optical system for the Long Wavelength Infrared Advanced Technology Seeker. The mirror is shown to meet the requirement of five minutes for cooling to cryogenic operating temperature; it also maintains its optical figure and vacuum integrity and meets the nuclear specification. Results of a detailed thermal analysis on the mirror showed that, using nitrogen gas at 80 K as coolant, the front face of the mirror can be cooled from an initial temperature of 300 K to less than 90 K within five minutes. In a vacuum chamber, using liquid nitrogen as coolant, the mirror can be cooled to 80 K within 1.5 min. The mirror is well thermally insulated, so that it can be maintained at less than its operating temperature for a long time without active cooling.

  19. Observing Outer Planet Satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science Justification and Observational Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  20. Observing outer planet satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science justification and observational requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  1. Exploring JWST's Capability to Constrain Habitability on Simulated Terrestrial TESS Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Luke; Britt, Amber; Batalha, Natasha; Schwieterman, Edward; Arney, Giada; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Mandell, Avi; Planetary Systems Laboratory; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2017-01-01

    In the following, we have worked to develop a flexible "observability" scale of biologically relevant molecules in the atmospheres of newly discovered exoplanets for the instruments aboard NASA's next flagship mission, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We sought to create such a scale in order to provide the community with a tool with which to optimize target selection for JWST observations based on detections of the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey (TESS). Current literature has laid the groundwork for defining both biologically relevant molecules as well as what characteristics would make a new world "habitable", but it has so far lacked a cohesive analysis of JWST's capabilities to observe these molecules in exoplanet atmospheres and thereby constrain habitability. In developing our Observability Scale, we utilized a range of hypothetical planets (over planetary radii and stellar insolation) and generated three self-consistent atmospheric models (of dierent molecular compositions) for each of our simulated planets. With these planets and their corresponding atmospheres, we utilized the most accurate JWST instrument simulator, created specically to process transiting exoplanet spectra. Through careful analysis of these simulated outputs, we were able to determine the relevant parameters that effected JWST's ability to constrain each individual molecular bands with statistical accuracy and therefore generate a scale based on those key parameters. As a preliminary test of our Observability Scale, we have also applied it to the list of TESS candidate stars in order to determine JWST's observational capabilities for any soon-to-be-detected planet in those solar systems.

  2. High Precision Metrology on the Ultra-Lightweight W 50.8 cm f/1.25 Parabolic SHARPI Primary Mirror using a CGH Null Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonille, Scott

    2004-01-01

    For potential use on the SHARPI mission, Eastman Kodak has delivered a 50.8cm CA f/1.25 ultra-lightweight UV parabolic mirror with a surface figure error requirement of 6nm RMS. We address the challenges involved in verifying and mapping the surface error of this large lightweight mirror to +/-3nm using a diffractive CGH null lens. Of main concern is removal of large systematic errors resulting from surface deflections of the mirror due to gravity as well as smaller contributions from system misalignment and reference optic errors. We present our efforts to characterize these errors and remove their wavefront error contribution in post-processing as well as minimizing the uncertainty these calculations introduce. Data from Kodak and preliminary measurements from NASA Goddard will be included.

  3. Lightweight Metal Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossett, E.; Winslow, P.

    1984-01-01

    Two "eggcrate" halves brazed together. Lightweight flat mirrors fabricated by machining pockets in two plates of beryllium and brazing machined halves together. Mirror less than half weight of same mirror made by previous design.

  4. Status of the JWST/MIRI Focal Plane System and Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Goodson, G. B.; Khorrami, M. A.; Larson, M. E.; Mahoney, J. C.; Sukhatme, K. G.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is a multipurpose imager, coronagraph, and spectrometer for the James Webb Space Telescope. It provides wavelength coverage from 5 through 28 microns and is an integral contributor to all four of JWST's primary science themes. MIRI is being developed as a partnership between NASA and ESA, with JPL providing the Focal Plane System (FPS, consisting of the detectors, control electronics, and flight software) and the cooler, and a consortium of European astronomical institutes providing the optical bench and structure. The flight FPS is being prepared for delivery to the European Consortium for its integration into the optical bench, while the cooler is nearing its Critical Design Review. We describe the capabilities of the FPS and cooler, present test results and the predicted sensitivity performance of the FPS, and update the current status of each these systems. The research described in this poster was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Deep IRAC Imaging Lensing Galaxy Clusters for JWST 'First Light' Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haojing; Conselice, Christopher; Windhorst, Rogier; Cohen, Seth; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Zitrin, Adi; Broadhurst, Tom; Frye, Brenda; Driver, Simon; Robotham, Aaron; Hopkins, Andrew; Wyithe, Staurt; Jansen, Rolf; Hathi, Nimish; Mechtley, Matthew; Ryan, Russell; Rutkowski, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-08-01

    JWST has a key goal to search for First Light objects beyond z>10. Our 110-hr JWST GTO program, 'Webb Medium-Deep Fields' (WMDF), will target both blank and lensed fields to probe both the bright and the faint ends of the galaxy luminosity function at z > 10. While a number of well studied lensing clusters exist, not all of them are optimal for the JWST search of First Light objects, either because of their low Ecliptic latitudes (and hence high Zodiacal background) or because of their strong intra-cluster light (ICL) at the critical curve regions corresponding to the redshifts of interest. For this reason, our WMDF candidate lensing targets will include some recently discovered, high-mass (log[M/Msun] ~ 15) galaxy clusters, which we choose either because of their high Ecliptic latitude (beta > 40 deg) or because of their extreme compactness that minimizes the impact of the ICL. As part of our effort to collect ancillary data for these new systems to finalize the target list, we propose IRAC observations for 13 of them that are lacking sufficient data. These 3.6/4.5um data will be critical for our guaranteed JWST program: (1) they will greatly facilitate the modeling of the straylight that JWST will suffer in 1--5 um (the key range to search for z>10--20 objects), a problem that has recently been identified. If left untreated, such straylight components would severely hamper the detection of faint sources in a lensing field. The JWST observations alone would be difficult to separate the ICL from the straylight at the level needed. (2) the new 3.6/4.5um data will best match our deep optical imaging and spectroscopy at HST, Gemini, LBT and MMT. We will derive accurate photometric redshifts for any lensed background galaxies (at znote that these data will be highly valuable for the study of these clusters themselves before the JWST mission.

  6. Bayesian Approach for Reliability Assessment of Sunshield Deployment on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskiy, Mark P.; Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis D.

    2013-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications, for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a Bayesian approach for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This approach was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the observatory's telescope and science instruments. In order to collect the prior information on deployable systems, detailed studies of "heritage information", were conducted extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Spacecraft Operational Anomaly and Reporting System (SOARS) data were then used to estimate the parameters of the conjugative beta prior distribution for anomaly and failure occurrence, as the most consistent set of available data and that could be matched to launch histories. This allows for an emperical Bayesian prediction for the risk of an anomaly occurrence of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, using prior deployment data and test information.

  7. Predicting the High Redshift Galaxy Population for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Zoey; Benson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will be launched in Oct 2018 with the goal of observing galaxies in the redshift range of z = 10 - 15. As redshift increases, the age of the Universe decreases, allowing us to study objects formed only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. This will provide a valuable opportunity to test and improve current galaxy formation theory by comparing predictions for mass, luminosity, and number density to the observed data. We have made testable predictions with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model Galacticus. The code uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to determine viable sets of model parameters that match current astronomical data. The resulting constrained model was then set to match the specifications of the JWST Ultra Deep Field Imaging Survey. Predictions utilizing up to 100 viable parameter sets were calculated, allowing us to assess the uncertainty in current theoretical expectations. We predict that the planned UDF will be able to observe a significant number of objects past redshift z > 9 but nothing at redshift z > 11. In order to detect these faint objects at redshifts z = 11-15 we need to increase exposure time by at least a factor of 1.66.

  8. Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program: Evaluation of Transiting Exoplanet WASP-63b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Brian; Cubillos, Patricio; Bruno, Giovanni; Lewis, Nikole K.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Wakeford, Hannah; Blecic, Jasmina; Burrows, Adam Seth; Deming, Drake; Heng, Kevin; Line, Michael R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Transiting Exoplanet Early Release Science Community (Stevenson et al. 2016)

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ``A Preparatory Program to Identify the Single Best Transiting Exoplanet for JWST Early Release Science" for WASP-63b, one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. A large collaboration of transiting exoplanet scientists identified a set of ``community targets" which meet a certain set of criteria for ecliptic latitude, period, host star brightness, well constrained orbital parameters, and strength of spectroscopic features. WASP-63b was one of the targets identified as a potential candidate for the ERS program. It is presented as an inflated planet with a large signal. It will be accessible to JWST approximately six months after the planned start of Cycle 1/ERS in April 2019 making it an ideal candidate should there be any delays in the JWST timetable. Here, we observe WASP-63b to evaluate its suitability as the best target to test the capabilities of JWST. Ideally, a clear atmosphere will be best suited for bench marking the instruments ability to detect spectroscopic features. We can use the strength of the water absorption feature at 1.4 μm as a way to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes. The results of atmospheric retrieval are presented along with a discussion on the suitability of WASP-63b as the best target to be observed during the ERS Program.

  9. LIDAR Metrology for Prescription Characterization and Alignment of Large Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eegholm, B.; Eichhorn, W.; von Handorf, R.; Hayden, J.; Ohl, R.; Wenzel, G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the use of LIDAR, or "laser radar," (LR) as a fast, accurate, and non-contact tool for the measurement of the radius of curvature (RoC) of large mirrors. We report the results of a demonstration of this concept using a commercial laser radar system. We measured the RoC of a 1.4m x 1m spherical mirror with a nominal RoC of 4.6 m with a manufacturing tolerance of 4600mm +/- 6mm. The prescription of the mirror is related to its role as ground support equipment used in the test of part of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The RoC of such a large mirror is not easily measured without contacting the surface. From a position near the center of curvature of the mirror, the LIDAR scanned the mirror surface, sampling it with 1 point per 3.5 sq cm. The measurement consisted of 3983 points and lasted only a few minutes. The laser radar uses the LIDAR signal to provide range, and encoder information from angular azimuth and elevation rotation stages provide the spherical coordinates of a given point. A best-fit to a sphere of the measured points was performed. The resulting RoC was within 20 ppm of the nominal RoC, also showing good agreement with the results of a laser tracker-based, contact metrology. This paper also discusses parameters such as test alignment, scan density, and optical surface type, as well as future possible application for full prescription characterization of aspherical mirrors, including radius, conic, off-axis distance, and aperture.

  10. Wavefront Reconstruction and Mirror Surface Optimizationfor Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    correction. A DM has a reflective surface with actuators along the back struc- ture that apply forces causing the mirror surface to adapt to a desired shape...actuators. The actuators cause forces along the back of the mirror structure and the mirror surface deflects to form the conjugate shape of the wavefront...optical axis of the primary mirror. The interferometer and null corrector are mounted to remove the 81 Interferometer Null corrector Hexapod ❋✐❣✉r

  11. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  12. Cryo-vacuum testing of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (SPIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Vila, M. Begona; Van Campen, Julie; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Comber, Brian J.; Fatig, Curtis C.; Glasse, Alistair C. H.; Glazer, Stuart D.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Mann, Steven D.; Martel, Andre R.; Novo-Gradac, Kevin J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Penanen, Konstantin; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Zak, Dean; Zhou, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In late 2015/early 2016, a major cryo-vacuum test was carried out for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This test comprised the final cryo-certification and calibration test of the ISIM, after its ambient environmental test program (vibration, acoustics, EMI/EMC), and before its delivery for integration with the rest of the JWST observatory. Over the 108-day period of the round-the-clock test program, the full complement of ISIM flight instruments, structure, harness radiator, and electronics were put through a comprehensive program of thermal, optical, electrical, and operational tests. The test verified the health and excellent performance of the instruments and ISIM systems, proving the ISIM element's readiness for integration with the telescope. We report here on the context, goals, setup, execution, and key results for this critical JWST milestone.

  13. Emulating JWST Exoplanet Transit Observations in a Testbed laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touli, D.; Beichman, C. A.; Vasisht, G.; Smith, R.; Krist, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transit technique is used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets. The combination of transit and radial velocity (RV) measurements gives information about a planet's radius and mass, respectively, leading to an estimate of the planet's density (Borucki et al. 2011) and therefore to its composition and evolutionary history. Transit spectroscopy can provide information on atmospheric composition and structure (Fortney et al. 2013). Spectroscopic observations of individual planets have revealed atomic and molecular species such as H2O, CO2 and CH4 in atmospheres of planets orbiting bright stars, e.g. Deming et al. (2013). The transit observations require extremely precise photometry. For instance, Jupiter transit results to a 1% brightness decrease of a solar type star while the Earth causes only a 0.0084% decrease (84 ppm). Spectroscopic measurements require still greater precision ppm. The Precision Projector Laboratory (PPL) is a collaboration between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) to characterize and validate detectors through emulation of science images. At PPL we have developed a testbed to project simulated spectra and other images onto a HgCdTe array in order to assess precision photometry for transits, weak lensing etc. for Explorer concepts like JWST, WFIRST, EUCLID. In our controlled laboratory experiment, the goal is to demonstrate ability to extract weak transit spectra as expected for NIRCam, NIRIS and NIRSpec. Two lamps of variable intensity, along with spectral line and photometric simulation masks emulate the signals from a star-only, from a planet-only and finally, from a combination of a planet + star. Three masks have been used to simulate spectra in monochromatic light. These masks, which are fabricated at JPL, have a length of 1000 pixels and widths of 2 pixels, 10 pixels and 1 pixel to correspond respectively to the noted above JWST instruments. From many-hour long observing

  14. JWST NIRCam WFSS Ice Feature Spectroscopy in Nearby Molecular Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Laurie; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Meyer, Michael; Greene, Thomas P.; JWST NIRCam Science Team

    2017-06-01

    In molecular clouds above a few magnitudes of total visual extinction, some components of the molecular gas freeze out on the surfaces of dust grains. These ice mantles around dust grains are the site of complex surface chemistry that leads to the formation of simple organic molecules in these mantles. The icy surfaces also facilitate the coaggulation of the dust particles, setting the stage for grain growth and ultimately the formation of planetary bodies.As part of the JWST NIRCam GTO program, we plan to observe a selection of small molecular cores using the wide field grism spectroscopy mode of NIRCam.This poster presents the results of a preliminary study of several candidate molecular cores using UKIRT, Spitzer IRAC, IRTF SpeX, Keck MOSFIRE and Subaru MOIRCS data.After the prelimary studies we have selected three molecular cores in different evolutionary stages for the GTO program: B68, a quiescent molecular core, LDN 694-2, a collapsing pre-stellar core, and B335, a protostellar core. All these cores are seen against a dense background of stars in the inner Galaxy and offer the opportunity for spatially well resolved mapping of the ice feature distribution. We will obtain slitless grism spectroscopy in six filters covering the features of H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and the XCN feature. Simulations using aXeSIM have shown that spectrum overlap will occur in a fraction of the spectra, but will not be a prohibitive problem.Our poster will discuss the details of observations planned out in the APT system.

  15. Cortical mechanisms of mirror therapy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Holly E; Borrelli, Mimi R; Borchert, Robin J; Bradbury, David; Ward, Nick S

    2015-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a new form of stroke rehabilitation that uses the mirror reflection of the unaffected hand in place of the affected hand to augment movement training. The mechanism of mirror therapy is not known but is thought to involve changes in cerebral organization. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure changes in cortical activity during mirror training after stroke. In particular, we examined movement-related changes in the power of cortical oscillations in the beta (15-30 Hz) frequency range, known to be involved in movement. Ten stroke patients with upper limb paresis and 13 healthy controls were recorded using MEG while performing bimanual hand movements in 2 different conditions. In one, subjects looked directly at their affected hand (or dominant hand in controls), and in the other, they looked at a mirror reflection of their unaffected hand in place of their affected hand. The movement-related beta desynchronization was calculated in both primary motor cortices. Movement-related beta desynchronization was symmetrical during bilateral movement and unaltered by the mirror condition in controls. In the patients, movement-related beta desynchronization was generally smaller than in controls, but greater in contralesional compared to ipsilesional motor cortex. This initial asymmetry in movement-related beta desynchronization between hemispheres was made more symmetrical by the presence of the mirror. Mirror therapy could potentially aid stroke rehabilitation by normalizing an asymmetrical pattern of movement-related beta desynchronization in primary motor cortices during bilateral movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Astrochemistry with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Merín, B.; Brandl, B.; Böker, T.; Greene, T.; Meixner, M.; Ressler, M.; Rieke, G.; Waelkens, C.; Wright, G.; Miri Team

    JWST-MIRI will have imaging and medium resolution (λ/Δλ ≍ 2000-3000) integral field spectroscopy with orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and/or spatial resolution compared with existing facilities. It will be a prime facility for astrochemical studies of gases and solids in a wide variety of objects in the next decade. 1. Introduction Mid-infrared spectroscopy is becoming a powerful tool in astrochemistry, with studies of molecules and sources that are highly complementary to those at millimeter wavelengths. Molecules without permanent dipole moments such CH4, C2H2 and CO2 can only be observed through their vibration-rotation transitions. Space-based missions open up the possibility to study molecules which are abundant in ouw own atmosphere, in particular H2O. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons have their most prominent features at mid-infrared wavelengths, and the pure rotational transitions of the dominant molecule in the universe, H2, also occur in this band. Solid-state material is uniquely probed in the mid-infrared, including characteric bands of ices, silicates, oxides, carbides, carbonates and sulfides. The wealth of mid-infrared spectroscopy has been demonstrated by results from the ISO satellite (see van Dishoeck & Tielens 2001, van Dishoeck 2004 for reviews), by pioneering ground-based studies (Lacy et al. 1989, Evans et al. 1990) and most recently by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Targets include molecular clouds, PDRs, shocks, deeply embedded young stellar objects, UC HII regions, protoplanetary disks, planetary atmospheres, comets, evolved stars and even entire galaxies. In addition to an inventory of gaseous and solid-state material, the lines and line ratios provide powerful diagnostics of temperatures, densities, UV field, elemental abundances, etc. Systematic variations in features from region to region allow the physical and chemical processes to be traced. The MidInfraRed Instrument (MIRI) on board the 6m James Webb Space

  17. Prospects for Habitable World Detections Using James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake

    2010-01-01

    Doppler and transit surveys are finding extrasolar planets of ever smaller mass and radius, and are now sampling the domain of superEarths. Recent results from the Doppler surveys suggest that discovery of a transiting superEarth in the habitable zone of a lower main sequence star may be possible. We evaluate the prospects for an all-sky transit survey targeted to the brightest stars I that would find the most favorable cases for photometric and spectroscopic characterization using the James Webb Space Telescope. We use the proposed Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) as representative of an all-sky survey. We couple the simulated TESS yield to a sensitivity model for the MIRI and NIRSpec instruments on JWST. Our sensitivity model includes all currently known and anticipated sources of random and systematic error for these instruments. We focus on the TESS planets with radii between Earth and Neptune. Our simulations consider secondary eclipse filter photometry using JWST/MIRI, comparing the 11- and 15- micron bands to measure carbon dioxide absorption in superEarths, as well as JWST!NIRSpec spectroscopy of water absorption from 1.7-3.0 microns, and carbon dioxide absorption at 4.3 microns. We find that JWST will be capable of characterizing dozens of TESS superEarths with temperatures above the habitable range, using both MIRI and NIRspec. We project that TESS will discover about eight nearby habitable transiting superEarths, all orbiting lower main sequence stars. The principal sources of uncertainty in the prospects for JWST characterization of habitable superEarths are superEarth frequency and the nature of superEarth atmospheres. Based on our estimates of these uncertainties, we project that JWST will be able to measure the temperature, and identify molecular absorptions (water, carbon dioxide) in one to four nearby habitable TESS superEarths orbiting lower main sequence stars.

  18. The JWST North Ecliptic Pole Survey Field for Time-domain Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rolf A.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Ashby, Matthew; Ashcraft, Teresa; Cohen, Seth H.; Condon, James J.; Conselice, Christopher; Ferrara, Andrea; Frye, Brenda L.; Grogin, Norman A.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Joshi, Bhavin; Kim, Duho; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mechtley, Matt; Milam, Stefanie N.; Rodney, Steven A.; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Willmer, Christopher; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Yan, Haojing

    2017-01-01

    The JWST North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) Survey field is located within JWST's northern Continuous Viewing Zone, will span ˜14‧ in diameter (˜10‧ with NIRISS coverage) and will be roughly circular in shape (initially sampled during Cycle 1 at 4 distinct orientations with JWST/NIRCam's 4.4‧×2.2‧ FoV —the JWST “windmill”) and will have NIRISS slitless grism spectroscopy taken in parallel, overlapping an alternate NIRCam orientation. This is the only region in the sky where JWST can observe a clean extragalactic deep survey field (free of bright foreground stars and with low Galactic foreground extinction AV) at arbitrary cadence or at arbitrary orientation. This will crucially enable a wide range of new and exciting time-domain science, including high redshift transient searches and monitoring (e.g., SNe), variability studies from Active Galactic Nuclei to brown dwarf atmospheres, as well as proper motions of extreme scattered Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Objects, and of nearby Galactic brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, and ultracool white dwarfs. We therefore welcome and encourage follow-up through GO programs of the initial GTO observations to realize its potential as a JWST time-domain community field. The JWST NEP Survey field was selected from an analysis of WISE 3.4+4.6 micron, 2MASS JHKs, and SDSS ugriz source counts and of Galactic foreground extinction, and is one of very few such ˜10‧ fields that are devoid of sources brighter than mAB = 16 mag. We have secured deep (mAB ˜ 26 mag) wide-field (˜23‧×25‧) Ugrz images of this field and its surroundings with LBT/LBC. We also expect that deep MMT/MMIRS YJHK images, deep 8-12 GHz VLA radio observations (pending), and possibly HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS ultraviolet-visible images will be available before JWST launches in Oct 2018.

  19. Habitable worlds with JWST: transit spectroscopy of the TRAPPIST-1 system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, J. K.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of three Earth-sized, potentially habitable planets around a nearby cool star, TRAPPIST-1, has provided three key targets for the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Depending on their atmospheric characteristics and precise orbit configurations, it is possible that any of the three planets may be in the liquid water habitable zone, meaning that they may be capable of supporting life. We find that present-day Earth levels of ozone, if present, would be detectable if JWST observes 60 transits for innermost planet 1b and 30 transits for 1c and 1d.

  20. Habitable worlds with JWST: transit spectroscopy of the TRAPPIST-1 system?

    CERN Document Server

    Barstow, Joanna K

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of three Earth-sized, potentially habitable planets around a nearby cool star, TRAPPIST-1, has provided three key targets for the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Depending on their atmospheric characteristics and precise orbit configurations, it is possible that any of the three planets may be in the liquid water habitable zone, meaning that they may be capable of supporting life. We find that present-day Earth levels of ozone, if present, would be detectable if JWST observes 60 transits for innermost planet 1b and 30 transits for 1c and 1d.

  1. Mirror Neurons and Mirror-Touch Synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkovski, Omer; Katzin, Naama; Salti, Moti

    2016-05-30

    Since mirror neurons were introduced to the neuroscientific community more than 20 years ago, they have become an elegant and intuitive account for different cognitive mechanisms (e.g., empathy, goal understanding) and conditions (e.g., autism spectrum disorders). Recently, mirror neurons were suggested to be the mechanism underlying a specific type of synesthesia. Mirror-touch synesthesia is a phenomenon in which individuals experience somatosensory sensations when seeing someone else being touched. Appealing as it is, careful delineation is required when applying this mechanism. Using the mirror-touch synesthesia case, we put forward theoretical and methodological issues that should be addressed before relying on the mirror-neurons account. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Durable solar mirror films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  3. The Molecular Universe as seen by JWST-MIRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wright, G.; Rieke, G.

    2011-05-01

    The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI, Wright et al. 2003) on board the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be the next major mid-infrared facility in space. It combines a high sensitivity with medium resolution spectroscopy and subarcsec imaging. This makes it one of the prime facilities for astrochemical studies in the next decade. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a very powerful astrochemical tool. Molecules without permanent dipoles such as CH_4, C_2H_2 and CO_2 can only be observed through their vibration-rotation transitions while atmospheric species, in particular H_2O, require space-based facilities. PAH and solid-state material have prominent features in the mid-infrared, and the pure rotational transitions of the dominant molecule in the universe, H_2, also occur in this band. The wealth of mid-infrared spectroscopy has been demonstrated by results from the ISO satellite (see van Dishoeck 2004 for a review), pioneering ground-based studies and most recently by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The targeted sources are extremely diverse and include objects in the local and distant universe. Variations in features allow both qualitative and quantitative studies of physical and chemical processes. MIRI consists of an imager (including low resolution (R=λ/Δλ≈100) spectroscopy and coronography) and a medium resolution spectrometer (R=2000-3000) operating in the 5-28μm wavelength range using 1024x1024 pixel Si:As arrays. The spectrometer uses four IFUs with fields ranging from 3.5 to 7 arcsec. MIRIs sensitivity, orders of magnitude higher compared to Spitzer and 8-m class ground-based telescopes, spatial and spectral resolution make it particularly well suited for studying gases and solids in disks around young stars and in the nuclei of (starburst) galaxies. The sensitive low resolution spectrometer will be ideal to characterize exoplanet atmospheres. MIRI is built in partnership by a European Consortium and the US. The MIRI flight model (FM) is now fully

  4. The Mirror Oscilloscpoe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, B.

    2003-01-01

    This project is about designing and realizing an oscilloscope based on a laser beam reflected by two mirrors. The ¿Mirror Oscilloscope¿ uses two voice-coils actuators with mounted mirrors to reflect laser light, such that an image of a harmonic signal is projected on a projection screen. For trackin

  5. Effects of a mirror-induced visual illusion on a reaching task in stroke patients: implications for mirror therapy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles, Ruud W; Michielsen, Marian E; Bussmann, Johannes B J; Stam, Henk J; Hurkmans, Henri L; Heijnen, Iris; de Groot, Danielle; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2014-09-01

    Although most mirror therapy studies have shown improved motor performance in stroke patients, the optimal mirror training protocol still remains unclear. To study the relative contribution of a mirror in training a reaching task and of unilateral and bimanual training with a mirror. A total of 93 stroke patients at least 6 months poststroke were instructed to perform a reaching task as fast and as fluently as possible. They performed 70 practice trials after being randomly allocated to 1 of 5 experimental groups: training with (1) the paretic arm with direct view (Paretic-No Mirror), (2) the nonparetic arm with direct view (Nonparetic-No Mirror), (3) the nonparetic arm with mirror reflection (Nonparetic Mirror), (4) both sides and with a nontransparent screen preventing visual control of paretic side (Bilateral-Screen), and (5) both sides with mirror reflection of the nonparetic arm (Bilateral-Mirror). As baseline and follow-up, patients performed 6 trials using only their paretic side. Primary outcome measure was the movement time. We found the largest intervention effect in the Paretic-No Mirror condition. However, the Nonparetic-Mirror condition was not significantly different from the Paretic-No Mirror condition, while the Unaffected-No Mirror condition had significantly less improvement than the Paretic-No Mirror condition. In addition, movement time improved significantly less in the bimanual conditions and there was no difference between both bimanual conditions or between both mirror conditions. The present study confirms that using a mirror reflection can facilitate motor learning. In this task, bimanual movement using mirror training was less effective than unilateral training. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Optimum Design of Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuanyuan; ZHANG Yumin; HAN Jiecai; ZHANG Jianhan; YAO Wang; ZHOU Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    According to the design requirement and on the basis of the principle that the thermal expansion coefficient of the support structure should match with that of the mirror, a lightweight silicon carbide primary mirror assembly was designed. Finite element analysis combined with the parameter-optimized method was used during the design. Lightweight cell and rigid rib structure were used for the mirror assembly. The static, dynamic and thermal properties of the primary mirror assembly were analyzed. It is shown that after optimization, the lightweight ratio of the silicon carbide mirror is 52.5%, and the rigidity of the silicon carbide structure is high enough to support the required mirror. When temperature changes, the deformation of the mirror surface is in proportion to the temperature difference.

  7. The emotional tunes and the role of mirror neurons: From primary relationship mother-child relation to rehabilitation and therapeutic music therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania La Porta

    2016-05-01

    His research has been forming the basis of the theoretical and methodological focus of music therapy to psychodynamic. The ability to reproduce the relational process characterized by affective attunements in a rehabilitation setting - music therapy where there are dis-evolution, as in the case of patients with Alzheimer's disease, you can reactivate capacity affective and relational residual strengthening in the subject 'personal and social identity mortified by the disease. Role within that path is done by a very peculiar type of neurons, mirror neurons, the subject of study in recent years by the neurosciences, whose characteristic would be to get excited is when a person performs a certain action, both when it is another to do it before his eyes.

  8. Lessons from Coronagraphic Imaging with HST that may apply to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major capabilities offered by JWST is coronagraphic imaging from space, covering the near through mid-IR and optimized for study of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems. Planning for JWST has resulted in expectations for instrument performance, observation strategies and data reduction approaches. HST with 20 years of coronagraphic imaging offers some experience which may be useful to those planning for JWST. 1) Real astronomical sources do not necessarily conform to expectations. Debris disks may be accompanied by more distant material, and some systems may be conspicuous in scattered light when offering only modest IR excesses. Proto-planetary disks are not constantly illuminated, and thus a single epoch observation of the source may not be sufficient to reveal everything about it. 2) The early expectation with NICMOS was that shallow, 2-roll observations would reveal a wealth of debris disks imaged in scattered light, and that only a limited set of PSF observations would be required. Instead, building up a library of spatially resolved disks in scattered light has proven to require alternate observing strategies, is still on-going, and has taken far longer than expected. 3) A wealth of coronagraphic options with an instrument may not be scientifically informative, unless there is a similar time investment in acquisition of calibration data in support of the science observations. 4) Finally, no one anticipated what can be gleaned from coronagraphic imaging. We should expect similar, unexpected, and ultimately revolutionary discoveries with JWST.

  9. Recovering the Properties of High-redshift Galaxies with Different JWST Broadband Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations of the bulk of distant galaxies at the epoch of reionization. The recovery of their properties, such as age, color excess , specific star formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass, will mostly rely on spectral energy distrib...

  10. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  11. 温度和支撑方式对1.2m SiC主镜面形的影响分析%Study on the Influence of Temperature and Support Style to the 1.2m Sic Primary Mirror Surface Figure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王富国

    2011-01-01

    A 1. 2 m SiC primary mirror FEA model was built to analyze temperature and support style effects on the large aperture SiC primary mirror, which was applied to the ground based on telescope. With the primary mirror in passive support and free expansion, influences of steady state temperature field, axial direction temperature gradient, radial direction temperature gradient, and internal-external temperature gradient to primary mirror surface figure were analyzed. The result indicates that the influences of the support style are not obvious, whether passive support or free expansion, and the primary mirror surface figure is big with temperature gradient. When achieving heat balance, the influence of the support style is obvious only when the primary mirror free expand, and the temperature influence is small, surface figure RMS<0. 02nm/°C. If the primary mirror adopts flexibility or floating support style, the large aperture SiC primary mirror ean be applied to the ground based telescope.%为了研究温度和支撑方式对大口径SiC主镜用于地基望远镜的影响,基于1.2 m SiC主镜建立了有限元模型,分析了主镜在被动支撑和自由膨胀时,恒定温度场,轴向温度梯度,径向温度梯度和内外温差等对主镜面形的影响.结果表明,存在温度梯度时,支撑方式影响不明显,无论是被动支撑还是自由膨胀,镜面面形均很大.在达到热平衡后,即稳态温度场下,支撑方式的影响明显,只有在主镜自由膨胀时,温度对主镜面形的影响比较小,镜面的RMS<0.02 nm/℃.因此如果主镜采用柔性支撑或浮动支撑方式,大口径SiC主镜可以应用在地基望远镜中.

  12. The lightweight structure design of a CFRP mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiaoteng; Xu, Liang; Ma, Zhen; Xie, Yongjie; Luo, Yao; Wang, Yongjie; Pang, Zhihai

    2016-10-01

    The advantage of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) is obvious as a common space material for low density, low thermal expansion coefficient and high specific stiffness characteristics, it is the ideal material choice for space optical reflector. Mirror structure with honeycomb can achieve high rates of lightweight, as well as high specific stiffness. For Φ300mm CFRP mirror, accounting of the actual process properties of CFRP, mirror panels laminated based on thermal stability design, honeycomb fabricated using one innovative inlaying-grafting design method. Finally, lightweight structure design of the CFRP primary mirror completed, the thermal stability result of the Φ300mm CFRP mirror achieved is 10nm°C.

  13. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pulliam, Elias Noel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  14. Mirror Technology Roadmap for NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    There are several possible approaches to designing exoplanet missions: (1) Coronagraphs (2) Interferometers (3) Starshades Wavefront sensing and control is the central concern, not mirror size (1) Starlight suppression with deformable mirrors (2) Thermal and structural stability (3) Metrology for sensing and control Diffraction-limited optical primary mirrors 4-m or larger are needed to detect Earthlike planets (1) Surface figure similar to HST required (2) Smaller primary mirrors can be used with aggressive coronagraph designs, but the stability tolerances become the driving concern (3) Stability tolerances of coronagraphs are greatly reduced when larger primaries are used in conjunction with 8th-order masks Long term vision for large telescope development includes space-based segmented-mirror telescopes using actively-controlled glass segments or silicon carbide hybrid-mirror designs

  15. Do mirror glasses have the same effect on brain activity as a mirror box? Evidence from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Christopher; Rance, Mariela; Kirsch, Pinar; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Foell, Jens; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Diers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Since its original proposal, mirror therapy has been established as a successful neurorehabilitative intervention in several neurological disorders to recover motor function or to relieve pain. Mirror therapy seems to operate by reactivating the contralesional representation of the non-mirrored limb in primary motor- and somatosensory cortex. However, mirror boxes have some limitations which prompted the use of additional mirror visual feedback devices. The present study evaluated the utility of mirror glasses compared to a mirror box. We also tested the hypothesis that increased interhemispheric communication between the motor hand areas is the mechanism by which mirror visual feedback recruits the representation of the non-mirrored limb. Therefore, mirror illusion capacity and brain activations were measured in a within-subject design during both mirror visual feedback conditions in counterbalanced order with 20 healthy subjects inside a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Furthermore, we analyzed task-dependent functional connectivity between motor hand representations using psychophysiological interaction analysis during both mirror tasks. Neither the subjective quality of mirror illusions nor the patterns of functional brain activation differed between the mirror tasks. The sensorimotor representation of the non-mirrored hand was recruited in both mirror tasks. However, a significant increase in interhemispheric connectivity between the hand areas was only observed in the mirror glasses condition, suggesting different mechanisms for the recruitment of the representation of the non-mirrored hand in the two mirror tasks. We conclude that the mirror glasses might be a promising alternative to the mirror box, as they induce similar patterns of brain activation. Moreover, the mirror glasses can be easy applied in therapy and research. We want to emphasize that the neuronal mechanisms for the recruitment of the affected limb representation might differ depending on

  16. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  17. Manufacturing of Lightweight Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrication of the lightweight mirror is one of the key techniques for many large optical systems. CAD,CAM and CNC technologies are adopted in designing and manufacturing such mirrors in CIOMP. Better working efficiency and higher lightweight grade have been achieved. The results show that mirrors up to 70% weight reduction and 0.02λ(rms.) surface accuracy or better can be obtained.

  18. Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd [Leybold Optics GmbH, Siemensstr. 88, D-63755 Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-09-26

    One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

  19. Observing transiting planets with JWST -- Prime targets and their synthetic spectral observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mollière, Paul; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Min, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable astronomers to obtain exoplanet spectra of unprecedented precision. Especially the MIRI instrument may shed light on the nature of the cloud particles obscuring planetary transmission spectra in the optical and near-infrared. We provide self-consistent atmospheric models and synthetic JWST observations for prime exoplanet targets in order to identify spectral regions of interest and estimate the number of transits needed to distinguish between model setups. We select targets which span a wide range in planetary temperature and surface gravity, ranging from super-Earths to giant planets, and have a high expected SNR. For all targets we vary the enrichment, C/O ratio, presence of optical absorbers (TiO/VO) and cloud treatment. We calculate atmospheric structures and emission and transmission spectra for all targets and use a radiometric model to obtain simulated observations. We analyze JWST's ability to distinguish between various scenarios. We find that in very cloud...

  20. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchetto, M; Venot, O; Lagage, P -O; Tinetti, G

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in October 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionise the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parametrized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation bi...

  1. An Update on Simulating Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Coronagraphic PSFs for JWST (and WFIRST too!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Long, Joseph D.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Van Gorkom, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    Simulated point spread functions (PSFs) are an essential tool in preparing for future space telescopes, supporting pre-launch science simulations, observation planning, and analysis software development. The open-source Python package WebbPSF provides simulated PSFs for all of JWST's instruments and observing modes. We present the latest updates to WebbPSF based on both updated models ofthe assembled telescope optics and recent cryo-test data for the science instruments. Outputs from this latest version of WebbPSF will support the JWST Exposure Time Calculator and the first calls for proposals in the year ahead, among many other uses by the community. Furthermore, the same toolkit also now provides support for simulating PSFs for both the WFI and CGI instruments planned for WFIRST.

  2. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Bean, Jacob L; Beichman, Charles; Fraine, Jonathan; Kilpatrick, Brian M; Krick, J E; Lothringer, Joshua D; Mandell, Avi M; Valenti, Jeff A; Agol, Eric; Angerhausen, Daniel; Barstow, Joanna K; Birkmann, Stephan M; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B; Crouzet, Nicolas; Cubillos, Patricio E; Curry, S M; Dalba, Paul A; de Wit, Julien; Deming, Drake; Desert, Jean-Michel; Doyon, Rene; Dragomir, Diana; Ehrenreich, David; Fortney, Jonathan J; Munoz, Antonio Garcia; Gibson, Neale P; Gizis, John E; Greene, Thomas P; Harrington, Joseph; Heng, Kevin; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza M -R; Knutson, Heather; Kreidberg, Laura; Lafreniere, David; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Line, Michael R; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline V; Rocchetto, Marco; Schlawin, Everett; Shkolnik, Evgenya L; Shporer, Avi; Sing, David K; Todorov, Kamen O; Tucker, Gregory S; Wakeford, Hannah R

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science due to its capability for continuous, long-duration observations and its larger collecting area, spectral coverage, and spectral resolution compared to existing space-based facilities. However, it is unclear precisely how well JWST will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. In this article, we describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful future transiting exoplanet characterization programs. We propose a multi-pronged approach wherein one aspect of the program focuses on observing transits of a single target with all of the recommended observing modes to identify and understand potential systematics, compare transmission spectra at overlapping and neighboring wavelength regions...

  3. Observing Resolved Stellar Populations with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, K. M.; Beck, T. L.; Karakla, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) mode through the Micro-Shutter Array (MSA). Each MSA quadrant is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST's sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec's full wavelength coverage over 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario of spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. This use case and others, including a deep galaxy survey and observations of Galactic HII regions, are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  4. The mirror box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gene; Mathieson, Don

    2001-11-01

    The mirror box is an old standby in magic shows and an impressive demonstration of the law of reflection for the physics instructor. The box creates the illusion of an object floating in space by the use of a plane mirror.

  5. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; "Enabling Transiting Exoplanet Science with JWST" workshop attendees

    2016-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science; however, it is unclear precisely how well it will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. We will describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) Cycle 1 program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful transiting exoplanet characterization programs in later cycles. We will also present a list of "community targets" that are well suited to achieving these goals. Since most of the community targets do not have well-characterized atmospheres, we have initiated a preparatory HST + Spitzer observing program to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes within their atmospheres. Measurable spectroscopic features are needed to establish the optimal resolution and wavelength regions for exoplanet characterization. We will present preliminary results from this preparatory observing program and discuss their implications on the pending JWST ERS proposal deadline in mid-2017.

  6. Follow-up and characterization of the TESS exoplanets with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Forveille, T.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.; Albert, L.; Malo, L.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Santerne, A.; Author2, J.-P.; Author3, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA TESS mission will deliver hundreds of transiting exoplanet candidates orbiting bright stars. The spectrometers SOPHIE at OHP and SPIRou at CFHT will be ideal to obtain radial velocities of these candidates, confirm their nature, and derive the planets' masses. These measurements will be crucial to deliver the best targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST. Here, we calculate the required observing time with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST for each of the TESS targets in order to prepare follow-up observations. To infer their potential for JWST, we restrict the calculations to the case of transmission spectroscopy with NIRISS. The radial velocity follow-up of the giant planets (R_p > 4 R_E) could be achieved with SOPHIE, with a median observing time of 3.47 hours per target, and a total observing time of 305 hours that includes the 80% most favorable cases. Several small planets (R_p R_E) could also be confirmed, but most of them would require an unrealistic time investment. On the other hand, SPIRou is ideally suited to the follow-up of the small planets, with a median observing time of 2.65 hours per target, and a median observing time of 4.70 hours for the terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (R_p R_E, S programs with SOPHIE and SPIRou before the first planet candidates are delivered by TESS.

  7. The Planning Process for Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, D. M.; Shyrokov, A.; Pontoppidan, K.; Soderblom, D. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Kassin, S. A.; Gilbert, K.; Blair, W. P.; Muzerolle, J.; Tumlinson, J.; Keyes, C. D.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; LeBlanc, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a powerful multi-object spectroscopy mode using four configurable Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). The contiguous MSA shutters can be opened to form slits on astronomical targets, for simultaneous spectroscopy of up to 100 sources per exposure. The NIRSpec MSA shutters are in a fixed grid pattern, and careful analysis in the observation planning process will be crucial for optimal definition of science exposures. Our goal is to maximize the number of astronomical science sources observed in the fewest number of MSA slit configurations. We are developing algorithms in the NIRSpec MSA Planning Tool (MPT) to improve the quality of planned observations using several common science observing strategies as test use cases. For example, the needs for planning extremely deep exposures on a small number of JWST discovered z > 10 galaxy candidates will differ significantly from the requirements for planning spectral observations on a representative sample of stars from a galactic star cluster catalog. In this poster, we present a high level overview of our plans to develop and optimize the MPT for the JWST NIRSpec multi-object spectroscopy mode.

  8. ZERODUR for stress mirror polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Stress mirror polishing is considered as one of several polishing technologies for the generation of the aspherical shaped primary mirror segments of the thirty meter telescope (TMT). For stress mirror polishing it is essential to precisely know the elastic response of glass ceramic substrate materials under a given deformation load. In the past it was experimentally shown that glass ceramics do not respond instantaneously to loading and unloading conditions, this effect was called "delayed elasticity." Recently SCHOTT has shown that it is possible to use a model to predict the characteristic thermal expansion behaviour of individual ZERODUR® batches for a given temperature profile. A similar approach will be used to predict the delayed elastic behavior of ZERODUR® under time dependent loads. In this presentation the delayed elasticity effect of ZERODUR® is reviewed. The delayed elastic response of the material to load conditions is shown and discussed. First results of a model approach based on experimental results and tools that have been built up for the modelling of the delayed elasticity effect of ZERODUR® will be presented.

  9. Space Mirror Alignment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  10. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The "Curriculum Vitae": An Imperfect Mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Curriculum vitae for college faculty can be ambiguous and even misleading: they can obscure an individual's primary teaching and instructional achievements, tell less than they appear to, and convey an unintended message. Faculty should evaluate the clarity and force with which their vitae express their accomplishments and mirror their abilities.…

  12. [(18)F]AV-1451 binding in vivo mirrors the expected distribution of TDP-43 pathology in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Jones, W R; Cope, Thomas E; Jones, P Simon; Passamonti, Luca; Hong, Young T; Fryer, Tim D; Arnold, Robert; Allinson, Kieren S J; Coles, Jonathan P; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Patterson, Karalyn; O'Brien, John T; Rowe, James B

    2017-09-14

    Semantic dementia, including the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), is strongly associated with TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) type C pathology. It provides a useful model in which to test the specificity of in vivo binding of the putative tau ligand [(18)F]AV-1451, which is elevated in frontotemporal lobar degeneration tauopathies. Seven patients (five with svPPA and two with 'right' semantic dementia) and 12 healthy controls underwent positron emission tomography brain imaging with [(18)F]AV-1451. Two independent preprocessing methods were used. For both methods, all patients had clearly elevated binding potential (BPND (non-displaceable binding potential)) in temporal lobes, lateralising according to their clinical syndrome and evident in raw images. Region of interest analyses confirmed that BPND was significantly increased in temporal regions, insula and fusiform gyrus, consistent with those areas known to be most affected in semantic dementia. Hierarchical cluster analysis, based on the distribution of [(18)F]AV-1451 binding potential, separated semantic dementia from controls with 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. [(18)F]AV-1451 binds in vivo regions that are likely to contain TDP-43 and not significant tau pathology. While this suggests a non-tau target for [(18)F]AV-1451, the pathological regions in semantic dementia do not normally contain significant levels of recently proposed 'off target' binding sites for [(18)F]AV-1451, such as neuronal monoamine oxidase or neuromelanin. Postmortem and longitudinal data will be useful to assess the utility of [(18)F]AV-1451 to differentiate and track different types of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Minimal Mirror Twin Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Harigaya, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    In a Mirror Twin World with a maximally symmetric Higgs sector the little hierarchy of the Standard Model can be significantly mitigated, perhaps displacing the cutoff scale above the LHC reach. We show that consistency with observations requires that the Z2 parity exchanging the Standard Model with its mirror be broken in the Yukawa couplings. A minimal such effective field theory, with this sole Z2 breaking, can generate the Z2 breaking in the Higgs sector necessary for the Twin Higgs mechanism, and has constrained and correlated signals in invisible Higgs decays, direct Dark Matter Detection and Dark Radiation, all within reach of foreseen experiments. For dark matter, both mirror neutrons and a variety of self-interacting mirror atoms are considered. Neutrino mass signals and the effects of a possible additional Z2 breaking from the vacuum expectation values of B-L breaking fields are also discussed.

  14. The Athena Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Athena mission (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) requires lightweight X-ray Wolter optics with a high angular resolution and large effective area. For achieving an effective area of 2 m^2 (at 1 keV) and an angular resolution of below 5 arcsec, the Silicon Pore Optics technology was developed by ESA together with a consortium of European industry. Silicon Pore Optics are made of commercial Si wafers using process technology adapted from the semiconductor industry. We present the current design of the Athena mirror concentrating on the technology development status of the Silicon Pore Optics, ranging from the manufacturing of single mirror plates towards complete focusing mirror modules and their integration into the mirror structure.

  15. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  16. Manufacturing parabolic mirrors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The photo shows the construction of a vertical centrifuge mounted on an air cushion, with a precision of 1/10000 during rotation, used for the manufacture of very high=precision parabolic mirrors. (See Annual Report 1974.)

  17. The obsidian mirror The obsidian mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Socorro Reis Amorin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The author James Norman is an American who has always lived in Mexico during the summer. He seems to love Mexican - Indian traditions and he is well acquainted with the pre-historic culture as it is shown in his book: "The Obsidian Mirror". "The Obsidian Mirror" is a mysterious story about an archeologist: Quigley that lives in a small village in Mexico-San Marcos. He is searching for antiques that belong to some tribes of pre-historic Indians in order to find out their mysteries. Quigley becomes so engaged in his work that his mind has reached a stage that is impossible to separate between Quigley the archeologist, and Quigley as an ancient Indian. The culture, the myth, the sensation of Omen - characteristics of the Indians are within himself. As a result, Quigley acts sometimes as a real Indian. The author James Norman is an American who has always lived in Mexico during the summer. He seems to love Mexican - Indian traditions and he is well acquainted with the pre-historic culture as it is shown in his book: "The Obsidian Mirror". "The Obsidian Mirror" is a mysterious story about an archeologist: Quigley that lives in a small village in Mexico-San Marcos. He is searching for antiques that belong to some tribes of pre-historic Indians in order to find out their mysteries. Quigley becomes so engaged in his work that his mind has reached a stage that is impossible to separate between Quigley the archeologist, and Quigley as an ancient Indian. The culture, the myth, the sensation of Omen - characteristics of the Indians are within himself. As a result, Quigley acts sometimes as a real Indian.

  18. Mirror contamination in space I: mirror modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, J. M.; Snel, R.; van Harten, G.; Rietjens, J. H. H.; Aben, I.

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive model that can be employed to describe and correct for degradation of (scan) mirrors and diffusers in satellite instruments that suffer from changing optical Ultraviolet to visible (UV-VIS) properties during their operational lifetime. As trend studies become more important, so does the importance of understanding and correcting for this degradation. This is the case not only with respect to the transmission of the optical components, but also with respect to wavelength, polarisation, or scan-angle effects. Our hypothesis is that mirrors in flight suffer from the deposition of a thin absorbing layer of contaminant, which slowly builds up over time. We describe this with the Mueller matrix formalism and Fresnel equations for thin multi-layer contamination films. Special care is taken to avoid the confusion often present in earlier publications concerning the Mueller matrix calculus with out-of-plane reflections. The method can be applied to any UV-VIS satellite instrument. We illustrate and verify our approach to the optical behaviour of the multiple scan mirrors of SCIAMACHY (onboard ENVISAT).

  19. Benefits and limitations of imaging multiples: Mirror migration

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-07-01

    The benefits and limitations of imaging multiples are reviewed for mirror migration. Synthetic and field data examples are used to characterize the effectiveness of migrating multiples relative to primary imaging.

  20. A Low Cost High Specific Stiffness Mirror Substrate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary purpose of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate a new technology for manufacturing an ultra-low-cost precision optical telescope mirror which can...

  1. Observations of Transiting Exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (PASP), December 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Beichman, Charles; Knutson, Heather; Smith, Roger; Dressing, Courtney; Latham, David; Deming, Drake; Lunine, Jonathan; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Beichman, Charles; Sing, David; Kempton, Eliza; Ricker, George; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Bouwman, Jeroen; Crossfield, Ian; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Fortney, Jonathan; Albert, Loïc; Doyon, René; Rieke, Marcia; Rieke, George; Clampin, Mark; Greenhouse, Matt; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hines, Dean; Keyes, Tony; Lee, Janice; McCullough, Peter; Robberto, Massimo; Stansberry, John; Valenti, Jeff; Deroo, Pieter D; Mandell, Avi; Ressler, Michael E; Shporer, Avi; Swain, Mark; Vasisht, Gautam; Carey, Sean; Krick, Jessica; Birkmann, Stephan; Ferruit, Pierre; Giardino, Giovanna; Greene, Tom; Howell, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes a workshop held on March, 2014, on the potential of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to revolutionize our knowledge of the physical properties of exoplanets through transit observations. JWST's unique combination of high sensitivity and broad wavelength coverage will enable the accurate measurement of transits with high signal-to-noise. Most importantly, JWST spectroscopy will investigate planetary atmospheres to determine atomic and molecular compositions, to probe vertical and horizontal structure, and to follow dynamical evolution, i.e. exoplanet weather. JWST will sample a diverse population of planets of varying masses and densities in a wide variety of environments characterized by a range of host star masses and metallicities, orbital semi-major axes and eccentricities. A broad program of exoplanet science could use a substantial fraction of the overall JWST mission.

  2. AN IMAGE-PLANE ALGORITHM FOR JWST'S NON-REDUNDANT APERTURE MASK DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. [Johns Hopkins University Department of Physics and Astronomy 3400 North Charles, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lacour, Sylvestre [LESIA, CNRS/UMR-8109, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-01-10

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilities and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90%-95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 μm. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of closure phase, σ{sub CP} (a proxy for binary point source contrast). If σ{sub CP} < 10{sup –4} radians—a contrast ratio of 10 mag—young accreting gas giant planets (e.g., in the nearby Taurus star-forming region) could be imaged with JWST NIRISS. We show the feasibility of using NIRISS' NRM with the sub-Nyquist sampled F277W, which would enable some exoplanet chemistry characterization. In the presence of small piston errors, the dominant sources of closure phase error (depending on pixel sampling, and filter bandwidth) are flat field errors and unmodeled variations in intra-pixel sensitivity. The in-flight stability of NIRISS will determine how well these errors can be calibrated by observing a point source. Our results help develop efficient observing strategies for space-based NRM.

  3. Unveiling the First Black Holes With JWST:Multi-wavelength Spectral Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pacucci, Fabio; Ferrara, Andrea; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Ricarte, Angelo; Zackrisson, Erik; Cappelluti, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Growing supermassive black holes (∼ {10}9 {M}ȯ ) that power luminous z> 6 quasars from light seeds—the remnants of the first stars—within a Gyr of the Big Bang poses a timing challenge. The formation of massive black hole seeds via direct collapse with initial masses ∼ {10}4{--}{10}5 {M}ȯ alleviates this problem. Viable direct-collapse black hole formation sites, the satellite halos of star-forming galaxies, merge and acquire stars to produce a new, transient class of high-redshift objects, obese black hole galaxies (OBGs). The accretion luminosity outshines that of the stars in OBGs. We predict the multi-wavelength energy output of OBGs and growing Pop III remnants at z = 9 for standard and slim disk accretion, as well as high and low metallicities of the associated stellar population. We derive robust selection criteria for OBGs—a pre-selection to eliminate blue sources, followed by color–color cuts ([{F}090W-{F}220W]> 0;-0.3< [{F}200W-{F}444W]< 0.3) and the ratio of X-ray flux to rest-frame optical flux ({F}X/{F}444W\\gg 1). Our cuts sift out OBGs from other bright, high- and low-redshift contaminants in the infrared. OBGs with predicted {M}{AB}< 25 are unambiguously detectable by the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), on the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For parameters explored here, growing Pop III remnants with predicted {M}{AB}< 30 will likely be undetectable by JWST. We demonstrate that JWST has the power to discriminate between initial seeding mechanisms.

  4. Phase and Pupil Amplitude Recovery for JWST Space-Optics Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, B. H.; Zielinski, T. P.; Smith, J. S.; Bolcar, M. R.; Aronstein, D. L.; Fienup, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the phase and pupil amplitude recovery for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam). It includes views of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the NIRCam, examples of Phase Retrieval Data, Ghost Irradiance, Pupil Amplitude Estimation, Amplitude Retrieval, Initial Plate Scale Estimation using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs lambda, Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs. number of Images, Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs Rotation (clocking), and Typical Phase Retrieval Results Also included is information about the phase retrieval approach, Non-Linear Optimization (NLO) Optimized Diversity Functions, and Least Square Error vs. Starting Pupil Amplitude.

  5. High contrast imaging with the JWST-NIRSpec Integral Field Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ygouf, Marie; Beichman, Charles A.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Roellig, Thomas L.; NIRCam GTO

    2017-06-01

    With its integral field unit, the near-infrared spectrograph NIRSpec on JWST will allow to measure high-resolution spectra into the 3-5 μm range with an increased sensitivity over ground-based systems. This capability will considerably extend our knowledge of brown dwarfs and bright exoplanets at large separations from their host star. But because there is not any coronagraph on NIRSpec, the performance in term of contrast at close separation will be extremely limited. In this communication, we explore possibilities to further push this limitation by comparing different observing strategies and associated post-processing techniques.

  6. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Bean, Jacob L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Fraine, Jonathan; Kilpatrick, Brian M.; Krick, J. E.; Lothringer, Joshua D.; Mandell, Avi M.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Agol, Eric; Angerhausen, Daniel; Barstow, Joanna K.; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Burrows, Adam; Charbonneau, David; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Greene, Thomas P.; Line, Michael R.; Wakeford, Hanna R.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science, due to a combination of its capability for continuous, long duration observations and its larger collecting area, spectral coverage, and spectral resolution compared to existing space-based facilities. However, it is unclear precisely how well JWST will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. In this article, we describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) Cycle 1 program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful transiting exoplanet characterization programs in later cycles. We propose a multi-pronged approach wherein one aspect of the program focuses on observing transits of a single target with all of the recommended observing modes to identify and understand potential systematics, compare transmission spectra at overlapping and neighboring wavelength regions, confirm throughputs, and determine overall performances. In our search for transiting exoplanets that are well suited to achieving these goals, we identify 12 objects (dubbed community targets'') that meet our defined criteria. Currently, the most favorable target is WASP-62b because of its large predicted signal size, relatively bright host star, and location in JWST's continuous viewing zone. Since most of the community targets do not have well-characterized atmospheres, we recommend initiating preparatory observing programs to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes within their atmospheres. Measurable spectroscopic features are needed to establish the optimal resolution and wavelength regions for exoplanet characterization. Other initiatives from our proposed ERS program include testing the instrument brightness limits and performing phase-curve observations. The latter are a unique challenge

  7. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Bean, Jacob L.; Beichman, Charles; Fraine, Jonathan; Kilpatrick, Brian M.; Krick, J. E.; Lothringer, Joshua D.; Mandell, Avi M.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Agol, Eric; Angerhausen, Daniel; Barstow, Joanna K.; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Burrows, Adam; Charbonneau, David; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Crouzet, Nicolas; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Curry, S. M.; Dalba, Paul A.; de Wit, Julien; Deming, Drake; Désert, Jean-Michel; Doyon, René; Dragomir, Diana; Ehrenreich, David; Fortney, Jonathan J.; García Muñoz, Antonio; Gibson, Neale P.; Gizis, John E.; Greene, Thomas P.; Harrington, Joseph; Heng, Kevin; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Knutson, Heather; Kreidberg, Laura; Lafrenière, David; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Line, Michael R.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline V.; Rocchetto, Marco; Schlawin, Everett; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Shporer, Avi; Sing, David K.; Todorov, Kamen O.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Wakeford, Hannah R.

    2016-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science, due to a combination of its capability for continuous, long duration observations and its larger collecting area, spectral coverage, and spectral resolution compared to existing space-based facilities. However, it is unclear precisely how well JWST will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. In this article, we describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) Cycle 1 program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful transiting exoplanet characterization programs in later cycles. We propose a multi-pronged approach wherein one aspect of the program focuses on observing transits of a single target with all of the recommended observing modes to identify and understand potential systematics, compare transmission spectra at overlapping and neighboring wavelength regions, confirm throughputs, and determine overall performances. In our search for transiting exoplanets that are well suited to achieving these goals, we identify 12 objects (dubbed “community targets”) that meet our defined criteria. Currently, the most favorable target is WASP-62b because of its large predicted signal size, relatively bright host star, and location in JWST's continuous viewing zone. Since most of the community targets do not have well-characterized atmospheres, we recommend initiating preparatory observing programs to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes within their atmospheres. Measurable spectroscopic features are needed to establish the optimal resolution and wavelength regions for exoplanet characterization. Other initiatives from our proposed ERS program include testing the instrument brightness limits and performing phase-curve observations. The latter are a unique challenge

  8. White Light Focusing Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Sullivan, Michael; Chance, Mark; Abel, Don; Toomey, John; Hulbert, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The NSLS X28C white-light beamline is being outfitted with a focusing mirror in order to increase, as well as control, the x-ray intensity at the sample position. The new mirror is a 50 mm × 100 mm × 1100 mm single crystal silicon cylindrical 43.1mm radius substrate bendable to a toroid from infinite to 1200 m radius. The unique feature of this mirror system is the dual use of Indalloy 51 as both a mechanism for heat transfer and a buoyant support to negate the effects of gravity. The benefit of the liquid metal support is the ability to correct for minor slope errors that take the form of a parabola. A bobber mechanism is employed to displace the fluid under the mirror +/- 1.5 mm. This allows RMS slope error correction on the order of 2 urad. The unique mounting of the mirror ensures the contributions to slope error from errant mechanical stresses due to machining tolerances are virtually non-existent. After correction, the surface figure error (measured minus ideal) is <= 0.5 urad rms.

  9. Wavefront-Error Performance Characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Science Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES) test chamber. In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing, and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) F-number and pupil-distortion measurements made using a pseudo-nonredundant mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil geometry predictions as a function of SI and field point, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse translation diversity sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a sub-aperture is translated and/or rotated across the exit pupil of the system. Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also describes the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis of focus-sweep data, used to establish

  10. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11....... Torsional mirrors showed resonance frequencies in the range of 410 kHz - 667 kHz with Q values of 10 - 17. All measurements performed at atmospheric pressure. Both types of mechanical structures were deflected electrostatically at large angles (± 5°) more than 1011 times without breaking and without any...

  11. Unification with mirror fermions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantaphyllou George

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new framework unifying interactions in nature by introducing mirror fermions, explaining the hierarchy between the weak scale and the coupling unification scale, which is found to lie close to Planck energies. A novel process leading to the emergence of symmetry is proposed, which not only reduces the arbitrariness of the scenario proposed but is also followed by significant cosmological implications. Phenomenology includes the probability of detection of mirror fermions via the corresponding composite bosonic states and the relevant quantum corrections at the LHC.

  12. New and Better Near-Infrared Detectors for JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Linder, Don; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hill, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 m cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledynes improved barrier layer design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs(Rauscher et al. 2012a). The better indium barrier, together with other design changes, has improved the performance and reliability of JWSTs SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we measured the quantum yield as a function of photon energy,, and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies E (2.65.2) Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to. 2 m for NIRSpecs 5 m cutoff HgCdTe. Our measurements agree well with a previous measurement by McCullough et al. (2008) for. 1.3. For 1.3, we find a slower increase in with photon energy than McCullough et al. did. However, and as McCullough et al. note, their two state model of the yield process is not valid for large 1.

  13. The impact of JWST broad-band filter choice on photometric redshift estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Colina, L; Fèvre, O Le; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Pérez-González, P G; Pye, J; van der Werf, P; Ilbert, O; Grogin, N; Koekemoer, A

    2016-01-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6-5.0 {\\mu}m and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at {\\lambda}>5.0 {\\mu}m. In this work we analyse the impact of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broad-band filters (F070W to F770W), as well as having ancillary data at {\\lambda}=10, but the zphot quality significantly degrades at S/N<=5. Adding MIRI photometry with one magnitude brighter depth than the NIRCam depth allows for a redshift recovery of 83-99%, depending on SED type, and its effect is particularly noteworthy for galaxies with nebular emission. The vast majority of NIRCam galaxies with [F150W]=29 AB mag at z=7-10 will be detected with MIRI at [F560W, F770W]<28 mag if these sources are at least mildly evolved or have spectra with emission lines boosting the mid-infrared fluxes.

  14. The James Webb STEM Innovation Project: Bringing JWST to the Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Harris, J.; Ryer, H.; Taylor, J.; Bishop, M.

    2012-01-01

    Building awareness of a NASA mission prior to launch and connecting that mission to the education community can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach has developed the James Webb STEM innovation Project (SIP) - an interdisciplinary project that focuses on the engineering aspects and potential scientific discoveries of JWST, while incorporating elements of project-based learning. Students in participating schools will use skills from multiple subject areas to research an aspect of the JWST's design or potential science and create models, illustrated essays, or technology-based projects to demonstrate their learning. Student projects will be showcased during special events at select venues in the project states - thus allowing parents and community members to also be benefactors of the project. Currently, the SIP is being piloted in New York, California, and Maryland. In addition, we will be implementing the SIP in partnership with NASA Explorer Schools in the states of New Mexico, Michigan, Texas, Tennessee, and Iowa.

  15. An image-plane algorithm for JWST's non-redundant aperture mask data

    CERN Document Server

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilites and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90 - 95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 micron. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of...

  16. Smart co-phasing system for segmented mirror telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simar, Juan F.; Stockman, Yvan; Surdej, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Space observations of fainter and more distant astronomical objects constantly require telescope primary mirrors with a larger size. The diameter of monolithic primary mirrors is limited to 10 m because of manufacturing and logistics limitations. For space telescopes, monolithic primary mirrors are limited to less than 5 m due to fairing capacity. Segmented primary mirrors thus constitute an alternative solution to deal with the steadily increase of the primary mirror size. The optical path difference between the individual segments must be close to zero (few nm) in order to be diffraction limited over the full telescope aperture. In this paper a new system that may co-phase 7 segments at once with the light of a star and without artificial one is proposed. First the measuring methods and feedback system is explained, then the breadboard setup is presented and the results are analyzed and discussed, finally a comparison with Keck telescope is performed. This system can be adapted in order to be used in the co-phasing system of future segmented mirrors, its dynamic range starts from several hundred of microns till some tenths of nanometers

  17. Mirror neurons and mirror systems in monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2008-06-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that transform specific sensory information into a motor format. Mirror neurons have been originally discovered in the premotor and parietal cortex of the monkey. Subsequent neurophysiological (TMS, EEG, MEG) and brain imaging studies have shown that a mirror mechanism is also present in humans. According to its anatomical locations, mirror mechanism plays a role in action and intention understanding, imitation, speech, and emotion feeling.

  18. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  19. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  20. Derived Categories of BHK Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Favero, David

    2016-01-01

    We prove a derived analogue to the results of Borisov, Clarke, Kelly, and Shoemaker on the birationality of Berglund-Hubsch-Krawitz mirrors. Heavily bootstrapping off work of Seidel and Sheridan, we obtain Homological Mirror Symmetry for Berglund-Hubsch-Krawitz mirror pencils to hypersurfaces in projective space.

  1. Mirror image agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2014-10-01

    Gnosis is a modality-specific ability to access semantic knowledge of an object or stimulus in the presence of normal perception. Failure of this is agnosia or disorder of recognition. It can be highly selective within a mode. self-images are different from others as none has seen one's own image except in reflection. Failure to recognize this image can be labeled as mirror image agnosia or Prosopagnosia for reflected self-image. Whereas mirror agnosia is a well-recognized situation where the person while looking at reflected images of other objects in the mirror he imagines that the objects are in fact inside the mirror and not outside. Five patients, four females, and one male presented with failure to recognize reflected self-image, resulting in patients conversing with the image as a friend, fighting because the person in mirror is wearing her nose stud, suspecting the reflected self-image to be an intruder; but did not have prosopagnosia for others faces, non living objects on self and also apraxias except dressing apraxia in one patient. This phenomena is new to our knowledge. Mirror image agnosia is an unique phenomena which is seen in patients with parietal lobe atrophy without specificity to a category of dementing illness and seems to disappear as disease advances. Reflected self-images probably have a specific neural substrate that gets affected very early in posterior dementias specially the ones which predominantly affect the right side. At that phase most patients are mistaken as suffering from psychiatric disorder as cognition is moderately preserved. As disease becomes more widespread this symptom becomes masked. A high degree of suspicion and proper assessment might help physicians to recognize the organic cause of the symptom so that early therapeutic interventions can be initiated. Further assessment of the symptom with FMRI and PET scan is likely to solve the mystery of how brain handles reflected self-images. A new observation involving failure

  2. Mirror image agnosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gnosis is a modality-specific ability to access semantic knowledge of an object or stimulus in the presence of normal perception. Failure of this is agnosia or disorder of recognition. It can be highly selective within a mode. self-images are different from others as none has seen one′s own image except in reflection. Failure to recognize this image can be labeled as mirror image agnosia or Prosopagnosia for reflected self-image. Whereas mirror agnosia is a well-recognized situation where the person while looking at reflected images of other objects in the mirror he imagines that the objects are in fact inside the mirror and not outside. Material and Methods:: Five patients, four females, and one male presented with failure to recognize reflected self-image, resulting in patients conversing with the image as a friend, fighting because the person in mirror is wearing her nose stud, suspecting the reflected self-image to be an intruder; but did not have prosopagnosia for others faces, non living objects on self and also apraxias except dressing apraxia in one patient. This phenomena is new to our knowledge. Results: Mirror image agnosia is an unique phenomena which is seen in patients with parietal lobe atrophy without specificity to a category of dementing illness and seems to disappear as disease advances. Discussion: Reflected self-images probably have a specific neural substrate that gets affected very early in posterior dementias specially the ones which predominantly affect the right side. At that phase most patients are mistaken as suffering from psychiatric disorder as cognition is moderately preserved. As disease becomes more widespread this symptom becomes masked. A high degree of suspicion and proper assessment might help physicians to recognize the organic cause of the symptom so that early therapeutic interventions can be initiated. Further assessment of the symptom with FMRI and PET scan is likely to solve the mystery

  3. Properties of Zerodur mirror blanks for extremely large telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhring, Thorsten; Hartmann, Peter; Jedamzik, Ralf; Thomas, Armin; Lentes, Frank-Thomas

    2006-02-01

    SCHOTT produces the zero expansion glass ceramics material ZERODUR since 35 years. More than 250 ZERODUR mirror blanks were already delivered for the large segmented mirror telescopes KECK I, KECK II, HET, GTC, and LAMOST. Now several extremely large telescope (ELT) projects are in discussion, which are designed with even larger primary mirrors (TMT, OWL, EURO50, JELT, CFGT, GMT). These telescopes can be achieved also only by segmentation of the primary mirror. Based on the results of the recent production of segment blanks for the GTC project the general requirements of mirror blanks for future extremely large telescope projects have been evaluated. The specification regarding the material quality and blank geometry is discussed in detail. As the planned mass production of mirror blanks for ELT's will last for several years, economic factors are getting even more important for the success of the projects. SCHOTT is a global enterprise with a solid economical basis and therefore an ideal partner for the mirror blank delivery of extremely large telescopes.

  4. Verifying Mirror Technology for NGST with a Space-Qualified, Cryogenic 3.5 M Mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Angel, R P; Angel, Roger; Burge, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The lightweighting and surface accuracy targeted for NGST's 8 m primary mirror has been demonstrated in a 0.5 m prototype. Now a second, 2 m prototype weighing 40 kg in total is being fabricated at the University of Arizona under the NGST NMSD program. It will be tested in cryogenic operation in spring 1999. A third, advanced mirror system demonstrator (AMSD) is needed, the full size of an NGST segment, for flight qualification, including launch survival and extremely high reliability. The 3.5 m mirror, 1/6 the weight of HST's primary, would be made with a 2 mm thick glass face-sheet attached by adjustable screws to a carbon composite support. It would be figured as a fast telescope primary, and fully tested cryogenically to verify closed loop figure stability with simulated infrared starlight. If started in early 1999, this could be completed in 2001. Construction of the NGST mirror panels could then be undertaken on the basis of proven technology, and in time for a 2007 launch. With a diameter of 3.5 m and ...

  5. Bosonization and Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2016-01-01

    We study bosonization in 2+1 dimensions using mirror symmetry, a duality that relates pairs of supersymmetric theories. Upon breaking supersymmetry in a controlled way, we dynamically obtain the bosonization duality that equates the theory of a free Dirac fermion to QED3 with a single scalar boson. This duality may be used to demonstrate the bosonization duality relating an $O(2)$-symmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point to QED3 with a single Dirac fermion, Peskin-Dasgupta-Halperin duality, and the recently conjectured duality relating the theory of a free Dirac fermion to fermionic QED3 with a single flavor. Chern-Simons and BF couplings for both dynamical and background gauge fields play a central role in our approach. In the course of our study, we describe a chiral mirror pair that may be viewed as the minimal supersymmetric generalization of the two bosonization dualities.

  6. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  7. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  8. Mirror Principle, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Lian Bong H; Yau, S T

    1997-01-01

    We propose and study the following Mirror Principle: certain sequences of multiplicative equivariant characteristic classes on Kontsevich's stable map moduli spaces can be computed in terms of certain hypergeometric type classes. As applications, we compute the equivariant Euler classes of obstruction bundles induced by any concavex bundles -- including any direct sum of line bundles -- on $\\P^n$. This includes proving the formula of Candelas-de la Ossa-Green-Parkes hence completing the program of Candelas et al, Kontesevich, Manin, and Givental, to compute rigorously the instanton prepotential function for the quintic in $\\P^4$. We derive, among many other examples, the multiple cover formula for Gromov-Witten invariants of $\\P^1$, computed earlier by Morrison-Aspinwall and by Manin in different approaches. We also prove a formula for enumerating Euler classes which arise in the so-called local mirror symmetry for some noncompact Calabi-Yau manifolds. At the end we interprete an infinite dimensional transfor...

  9. Bosonization and mirror symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Shamit; Mulligan, Michael; Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2016-10-01

    We study bosonization in 2 +1 dimensions using mirror symmetry, a duality that relates pairs of supersymmetric theories. Upon breaking supersymmetry in a controlled way, we dynamically obtain the bosonization duality that equates the theory of a free Dirac fermion to QED3 with a single scalar boson. This duality may be used to demonstrate the bosonization duality relating an O (2 )-symmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point to QED3 with a single Dirac fermion, Peskin-Dasgupta-Halperin duality, and the recently conjectured duality relating the theory of a free Dirac fermion to fermionic QED3 with a single flavor. Chern-Simons and BF couplings for both dynamical and background gauge fields play a central role in our approach. In the course of our study, we describe a "chiral" mirror pair that may be viewed as the minimal supersymmetric generalization of the two bosonization dualities.

  10. News Note: Breakthrough in mirror control at SALT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The 91 segments of the SALT primary need to be kept precisely aligned in order to obtain the best images. As is well-known, the initial alignment process uses a type of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in an auxiliary tower to send feedback to control the mirror actuators. This note reveals the success of new edge-sensors that keep the mirrors in alignment for several days at a time without the need for Shack-Hartmann testing.

  11. Developing an instrument simulator: experience feedback from the JWST/NIRSpec and VLT/MUSE simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarno, Aurélien; Piqueras, Laure; Bacon, Roland; Ferruit, Pierre; Legros, Emeline; Pécontal-Rousset, Arlette; Gnata, Xavier; Streicher, Ole; Weilbacher, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL) has recently developed two instrument simulators for spectrographic instruments. They are based on Fourier optics, and model the whole chain of acquisition, taking into account both optical aberrations and diffraction effects, by propagating a wavefront through the instrument, according to the Fourier optics concept. One simulates the NIRSpec instrument, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for the future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The other one models the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, a second-generation integral-field spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The two simulators have been developed in different contexts (subcontracted versus developed internally), and for very different instruments (space-based versus ground-based), which strengthen the CRAL experience. This paper describes the lessons learned while developing these simulators: development methods, phasing with the project, points to focus on, getting data, interacting with scientists and users, etc.

  12. The infrared signatures of very small grains in the Universe seen by JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Pilleri, Paolo; Joblin, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The near- and mid-IR spectrum of many astronomical objects is dominated by emission bands due to UV-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and evaporating very small grains (eVSG). Previous studies with the ISO, Spitzer and AKARI space telescopes have shown that the spectral variations of these features are directly related to the local physical conditions that induce a photo-chemical evolution of the band carriers. Because of the limited sensitivity and spatial resolution, these studies have focused mainly on galactic star-forming regions. We discuss how the advent of JWST will allow to extend these studies to previously unresolved sources such as near-by galaxies, and how the analysis of the infrared signatures of PAHs and eVSGs can be used to determine their physical conditions and chemical composition.

  13. Model predictions and observed performance of JWST's cryogenic position metrology system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Sharon R.; Rhodes, David; DiAntonio, Andrew; Boland, John; Wells, Conrad; Gigliotti, Trevis; Johanning, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) cryogenic testing requires measurement systems that both obtain a very high degree of accuracy and can function in that environment. Close-range photogrammetry was identified as meeting those criteria. Testing the capability of a close-range photogrammetric system prior to its existence is a challenging problem. Computer simulation was chosen over building a scaled mock-up to allow for increased flexibility in testing various configurations. Extensive validation work was done to ensure that the actual as-built system meets accuracy and repeatability requirements. The simulated image data predicted the uncertainty in measurement to be within specification and this prediction was borne out experimentally. Uncertainty at all levels was verified experimentally to be <0.1 mm.

  14. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, W; Tomasiello, A; Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    We construct a class of symplectic non--Kaehler and complex non--Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten--dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)--structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  15. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  16. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  17. Deciphering the Hot Giant Atmospheres Orbiting Nearby Extrasolar Systems with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin Badhan, Mahmuda; Batalha, Natasha; Deming, Drake; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; HEBRARD, Eric; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Unique and exotic planets give us an opportunity to understand how planetary systems form and evolve over their lifetime, by placing our own planetary system in the context of the vastly different extrasolar systems that are being continually discovered by present space missions. With orbital separations that are less than one-tenth of the Mercury-Sun distance, these close-in planets provide us with valuable insights about the host stellar atmosphere and planetary atmospheres subjected to their enormous stellar insolation. Observed spectroscopic signatures reveal all spectrally active species in a planet, along with information about its thermal structure and dynamics, allowing us to characterize the planet's atmosphere. NASA's upcoming missions will give us the high-resolution spectra necessary to constrain the atmospheric properties with unprecedented accuracy. However, to interpret the observed signals from exoplanetary transit events with any certainty, we need reliable atmospheric retrieval tools that can model the expected observables adequately. In my work thus far, I have built a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) convergence scheme, with an analytical radiative equilibrium formulation for the thermal structures, within the NEMESIS atmospheric modeling tool, to allow sufficient (and efficient) exploration of the parameter space. I also augmented the opacity tables to improve the speed and reliability of retrieval models. I then utilized this upgraded version to infer the pressure-temperature (P-T) structures and volume-mixing ratios (VMRs) of major gas species in hot Jupiter dayside atmospheres, from their emission spectra. I have employed a parameterized thermal structure to retrieve plausible P-T profiles, along with altitude-invariant VMRs. Here I show my retrieval results on published datasets of HD189733b, and compare them with both medium and high spectral resolution JWST/NIRSPEC simulations. In preparation for the upcoming JWST mission, my current work

  18. The Galactic Center Seen Through the Precise, Multiplexed Eye of JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    The Galactic center harbors the closest supermassive black hole and contains warm, turbulent molecular clouds, dense stellar populations, and some of the most active star forming regions in the Milky Way. These unique conditions make the Galactic Center a compelling target for understanding how star formation varies with environment, how nuclear star clusters in galaxies evolve, and how supermassive black holes influence their surroundings. Detailed studies of the Galactic center have previously been conducted with ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics in pencil-beam studies. However, Galactic center studies can be dramatically expanded with JWST's combination of large fields-of-view (FOV) and high spatial resolution in the infrared. Of particular relevance for the Galactic Center are NIRCam's suite of narrow-band imaging filters and NIRSpec's IFU spectrograph. The narrow-band imaging should provide precise astrometry, rough spectral types, and emission line maps for ~50,000 stars within a 2' x 2' FOV, while follow up IFU spectroscopy will give precise types and radial velocities for the most interesting subsets of stars. Potential results include: (1) counting the intermediate age red and yellow supergiants that will give information about the recent star formation history; (2) measuring the initial mass function below 1 Msun and studying young stellar objects in known and new young star clusters; (3) using 3D dynamics to model the kinematic evolution of the entire nuclear cluster, find hypervelocity stars, and trace the orbits of gas features and clusters in the region. Galactic Center observations with JWST will give us a more complete picture of the gas, stars, black hole, and their interactions in this dynamic region.

  19. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Venot, O.; Lagage, P.-O.; Tinetti, G.

    2016-12-01

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  20. SCASim: A Flexible and Reusable Detector Simulator for the MIRI instrument of the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, S.; Morin, J.; Gastaud, R.; Azzollini, R.; Bouchet, P.; Chaintreuil, S.; Lahuis, F.; Littlejohns, O.; Nehme, C.; Pye, J.

    2012-09-01

    The JWST Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) operates in the 5-28μm wavelength range and can be configured for imaging, coronographic imaging, long-slit, low-resolution spectroscopy or medium resolution spectroscopy with an integral field unit. SCASim is one of a suite of simulators which operate together to simulate all the different modes of the instrument. These simulators are essential for the efficient operation of MIRI; allowing more accurate planning of MIRI observations on sky or during the pre-launch testing of the instrument. The data generated by the simulators are essential for testing the data pipeline software. The simulators not only need to reproduce the behaviour of the instrument faithfully, they also need to be adaptable so that information learned about the instrument during the pre-launch testing and in-orbit commissioning can be fed back into the simulation. SCASim simulates the behaviour of the MIRI detectors, taking into account cosmetic effects, quantum efficiency, shot noise, dark current, read noise, amplifier layout, cosmic ray hits, etc... The software has benefited from three major design choices. First, the development of a suite of MIRI simulators, rather than single simulator, has allowed MIRI simulators to be developed in parallel by different teams, with each simulator able to concentrate on one particular area. SCASim provides a facility common to all the other simulators and saves duplication of effort. Second, SCASim has a Python-based object-oriented design which makes it easier to adapt as new information about the instrument is learned during testing. Third, all simulator parameters are maintained in external files, rather than being hard coded in the software. These design choices have made SCASim highly reusable. In its present form it can be used to simulate any JWST detector, and it can be adapted for future instruments with similar, photon-counting detectors.

  1. Enhancing the mirror illusion with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jax, Steven A; Rosa-Leyra, Diana L; Coslett, H Branch

    2015-05-01

    Visual feedback has a strong impact on upper-extremity movement production. One compelling example of this phenomena is the mirror illusion (MI), which has been used as a treatment for post-stroke movement deficits (mirror therapy). Previous research indicates that the MI increases primary motor cortex excitability, and this change in excitability is strongly correlated with the mirror's effects on behavioral performance of neurologically-intact controls. Based on evidence that primary motor cortex excitability can also be increased using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we tested whether bilateral tDCS to the primary motor cortices (anode right-cathode left and anode left-cathode right) would modify the MI. We measured the MI using a previously-developed task in which participants make reaching movements with the unseen arm behind a mirror while viewing the reflection of the other arm. When an offset in the positions of the two limbs relative to the mirror is introduced, reaching errors of the unseen arm are biased by the reflected arm's position. We found that active tDCS in the anode right-cathode left montage increased the magnitude of the MI relative to sham tDCS and anode left-cathode right tDCS. We take these data as a promising indication that tDCS could improve the effect of mirror therapy in patients with hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A spectrum of shadowed mirroring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, Melissa C

    2012-04-01

    The central focus of this paper is to explore and extend Kohut's theory of maternal mirroring and to place it within the current context of psychoanalytic thinking. Kohut believed a child must experience "positive" mirroring from his or her mother in infancy and beyond to ensure development of a healthy self. Kohut alludes, however, to a possible situation in which the mother's face, metaphorically a mirror, can appear "faceless" to her child. From this I have inferred the concept of what I shall call "shadowed mirroring." Clinical and literary examples show that distorted, "shadowed" mirroring appears on a spectrum, with passive mirroring at one end and hostile (either verbal or nonverbal) mirroring on the other; some individuals experience both. I then consider how "shadowed mirroring," especially hostile mirroring, can be understood within the twin contexts of the overall mother-child relationship and present-day Intersubjective/Relational thinking that is both bidirectional and co-constructed. Shadowed mirroring can lead to severe personality dysfunction along the borderline-narcissistic range, as well as to difficulties in the areas of identity formation, failure of self-cohesiveness, and the blunting of certain humane qualities like empathy.

  3. Relating the "mirrorness" of mirror neurons to their origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, James M; Friston, Karl J

    2014-04-01

    Ever since their discovery, mirror neurons have generated much interest and debate. A commonly held view of mirror neuron function is that they transform "visual information into knowledge," thus enabling action understanding and non-verbal social communication between con-specifics (Rizzolatti & Craighero 2004). This functionality is thought to be so important that it has been argued that mirror neurons must be a result of selective pressure.

  4. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Spectroscopy of Anticipated TESS Planets and Selected Super-Earths Discovered from K2 and Ground-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana; Albert, Loic; Deming, Drake

    2017-01-01

    The 2018 launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), coupled with the 2017 launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), heralds a new era in Exoplanet Science, with TESS projected to detect over one thousand transiting sub-Neptune-sized planets (Ricker et al, 2014), and JWST offering unprecedented spectroscopic capabilities. Sullivan et al (2015) used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the properties of the planets that TESS is likely to detect, and published a catalog of 962 simulated TESS planets. Prior to TESS launch, the re-scoped Kepler K2 mission and ground-based surveys such as MEarth continue to seek nearby Earth-like exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf host stars. The exoplanet community will undoubtedly employ JWST for atmospheric characterization follow-up studies of promising exoplanets, but the targeted planets for these studies must be chosen wisely to maximize JWST science return. The goal of this project is to estimate the capabilities of JWST’s Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS)—operating with the GR700XD grism in Single Object Slitless Spectrography (SOSS) mode—during observations of exoplanets transiting their host stars. We compare results obtained for the simulated TESS planets, confirmed K2-discovered super-Earths, and exoplanets discovered using ground-based surveys. By determining the target planet characteristics that result in the most favorable JWST observing conditions, we can optimize the choice of target planets in future JWST follow-on atmospheric characterization studies.

  5. Wavefront-error performance characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) science instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-07-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES) test chamber. In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing, and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) f/# and pupil-distortion measurements made using a pseudo-nonredundant mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil-geometry predictions for each SI field point tested, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse-translation diversity (TTD) sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a subaperture is translated and/or rotated across the exit pupil of the system from one image to the next. Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM Element-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also gives an overview of the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis

  6. SXI Prototype mirror mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the work performed from June 1993 to January 1995. The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule.

  7. Look Into the Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏文虹

    2007-01-01

    Look into the mirror. Who is that girl I see, staring strange back at me? Is it a true myself or someone I have never known? Who am I? Why am I in this world? What am I going to do? So many times I questioned myself. I could never find a perfect answer. Why do I have to do such a lot of hard work? Why must I have so many exams? Why do I always read and read, write and write? Don't tell me it is the very life. Don't tell me these should be my happiness.

  8. Eavesdropping with a Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER LIM

    1994-01-01

    It was a custom in Yidu that on New Year’s Eve, people eavesdropped outside other people’s homes with a bronze mirror hidden in the bosom after reciting a rhyme to it. People believed that what they had heard would often fortell good or bad luck. A family named Zheng once lived in Yidu. The two sons of this family were both considered intellectuals, But the older son was eager to learn while the younger was lazy and sluggish. Their parents only liked the older son. Because of this, the old couple’s attitudes toward their two daughters-in-law were also

  9. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  10. Mirror symmetry II

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Brian R

    1997-01-01

    Mirror symmetry has undergone dramatic progress during the last five years. Tremendous insight has been gained on a number of key issues. This volume surveys these results. Some of the contributions in this work have appeared elsewhere, while others were written specifically for this collection. The areas covered are organized into 4 sections, and each presents papers by both physicists and mathematicians. This volume collects the most important developments that have taken place in mathematical physics since 1991. It is an essential reference tool for both mathematics and physics libraries and for students of physics and mathematics.

  11. Ronchi test for flat mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Engelfried, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: jurgen@ifisica.uaslp.mx; Morelos, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2005-11-11

    One of the RICHes in the velocity spectrometers of the proposed CKM experiment requires a flat mirror, situated in the high intensity kaon beam. To reduce the interaction background for the experiment, this mirror has to be as thin as possible. First glass prototypes were produced in Mexico. To test the surface quality of these prototypes, we extended the Ronchi method so flat mirrors can also be tested. We present the methods and report on results of our measurements.

  12. Focusing Mirror with Tunable Eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Stürmer, Moritz; Brunne, Jens; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    We present a new kind of varifocal mirror with independently adjustable curvatures in the major directions. For actuation we use two stacked piezo bending actuators with crossed in-plane polarization. This mirror can be used for example as an off-axis focusing device with tunable focal length and compensation for a variable angle of incidence or for coma correction. We demonstrate the prototype of such a mirror and characterize the mechanical deflection, as well as the focusing capabilities.

  13. Probing the dusty inhabitants of the Local Group Galaxies: JWST/MIRI colors of infrared stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Olivia; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies involves the life cycle of mass, metal enrichment and dust that JWST will probe. Detailed studies of nearby galaxies provides guidance for interpreting the more distant forming galaxies. JWST/MIRI will enable stellar population studies akin to work done with HST on the Local Group galaxies but over a new wavelength range. MIRI's imaging capability over nine photometric bands from 5 to 28 microns is particularly suited to survey stars with an infrared excess and to detangle the extinction or thermal emission from various species of dust. These dusty stellar populations include young stellar objects, evolved stars and supernovae that are bright in the infrared. Using the rich Spitzer-IRS spectroscopic dataset and spectral classifications from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE)-Spectroscopic survey of over a thousand objects in the Magellanic Clouds, we calculate the expected flux -densities and colors in the MIRI broadband filters for these prominent infrared sources. We uses these fluxes to illustrate what JWST will see in stellar population studies for other Local Group galaxies. JWST/MIRI observations of infrared sources in Local Group Galaxies will constrain the life cycle of galaxies through their dust emission. For example, how much of the interstellar dust is supplied by dying stars? Do the number of young stellar objects agree with star formation diagnostic for the galaxy? We discuss the locations of the post- and pre-main-sequence populations in MIRI color-color and color-magnitude space and examine which filters are best for identifying populations of sources. We connect these results to existing galaxies with HST data for instance Andromeda and M33.

  14. Mirror development for CTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Doro, M.; Brun, P.; Canestrari, R.; Chadwick, P.; Font, L.; Ghigo, M.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Pareschi, G.; Peyaud, B.; Seweryn, K.

    2009-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), currently in its early design phase, is a proposed new project for groundbased gamma-ray astronomy with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA is planned to consist of several tens of large Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with a combined reflective surface of up to 10,000 m2. The challenge for the future CTA array is to develop lightweight and cost efficient mirrors with high production rates, good longterm durability and adequate optical properties. The technologies currently under investigation comprise different methods of carbon fibre/epoxy based substrates, sandwich concepts with cold-slumped surfaces made of thin float glass and different structural materials like aluminum honeycomb, glass foam or PU foam inside, and aluminum sandwich structures with either diamond milled surfaces or reflective foils. The current status of the mirror development for CTA will be summarized together with investigations on the improvement of the reflective surfaces and their protection against degradation.

  15. Influence functions of a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L

    1997-04-01

    Thin shallow spherical shell theory is used to derive the general influence function, owing to uniform and/or discrete (actuators) loads, for a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror of uniform thickness with a central hole and supported at discrete points. Small elastic deformations are considered. No symmetry on the load distribution constrains the model. Explicit analytical expressions of the set of equations are given for calculating the influence functions. Results agree with the finite element analysis (FEA) to within 1%. When the FEA requires megabytes of RAM memory, the analytical method needs only kilobytes and typically runs 30 times faster. This is a crucial advantage for the iterative optimization of mirror supports such as large passive or active meniscus-shaped primary mirror supports or Cassegrain/Gregorian adaptive secondary actuator configurations. References are given on estimating the shear effects (thick mirror), the thickness variation effect, and the influence of the size of the support pads.

  16. Exploring for Galaxies in the First Billion Years with Hubble and Spitzer - Pathfinding for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Garth D.

    2017-01-01

    Hubble has revolutionized the field of distant galaxies through its deep imaging surveys, starting with the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) in 1995. That first deep survey revealed galaxies at redshift z~1-3 that provided insights into the development of the Hubble sequence. Each new HST instrument has explored new regimes, through the peak of star formation at z~2-3, just 2-3 billion years after the Big Bang, to our first datasets at a billion years at z~6, and then earlier to z~11. HST's survey capabilities were enhanced by 40X with ACS, and then similarly with the WFC3/IR, which opened up the first billion years to an unforeseen degree. I will discuss what we have learned from the remarkable HST and Spitzer imaging surveys (HUDF, GOODS, HUDF09/12 and CANDELS), as well as surveys of clusters like the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). Lensing clusters provide extraordinary opportunities for characterizing the faintest earliest galaxies, but also present extraordinary challenges. Together these surveys have resulted in the measurement of the volume density of galaxies in the first billion years down to astonishingly faint levels. The role of faint galaxies in reionizing the universe is still much-discussed, but there is no doubt that such galaxies contribute greatly to the UV ionizing flux, as shown by deep luminosity function studies. Together Hubble and Spitzer have also established the stellar-mass buildup over 97% of cosmic history. Yet some of the greatest surprises have come from the discovery of very luminous galaxies at z~8-11, around 400-650 million years after the Big Bang. Spectroscopic followup by Keck of some of these very rare, bright galaxies has confirmed redshifts from z~7 to z~9, and revealed, surprisingly, strong Lyα emission near the peak of reionization when the HI fraction in the IGM is high. The recent confirmation of a z=11.1 galaxy, just 400 million years after the Big Bang, by a combination of Hubble and Spitzer data, moved Hubble into JWST territory

  17. Polishing technique for beryllium mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Performance tests, accomplished by inserting entire X ray telescope and polished mirror into vacuum line 67 m long and taking photographs of an X ray resolution source, indicate that polishing increases mirror efficiency from 0.06 percent for X rays at 0.8 nm and increases resolution from 15 to 3.75 arc-seconds.

  18. Mirroring patients – or not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

    2015-01-01

    on studies of imitative behaviour within linguistics and psychology, we argue that interactional mirroring is an important aspect of displaying implicit mentalization. We aimed to explore if, and in that case how, mirroring is displayed by general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists in consultations...... with patients with depression. We wanted to see how implicit mentalizing unfolds in physician–patient interactions. Consultations were videorecorded and analysed within the framework of conversation analysis. GPs and psychiatrists differed substantially in their propensity to mirror body movements and verbal...... and acoustic features of speech. GPs mirrored their patients more than psychiatrists in all modalities and were more flexible in their interactional behaviour. Psychiatrists seemed more static, regardless of the emotionality displayed by patients. Implicitly mirroring and attuning to patients could signify...

  19. Resonance MEMS mirrors design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourani, S.

    2010-02-01

    Resonance MEMS mirrors are widely used today for many applications such as barcode scanners and personalprojectors. bTendo manufactures Personal Projection Engines on two types of mirrors: 1. Resonance mirrors for horizontal scanning 2. Linear mirrors for vertical scanning In this lecture we will discuss the "Energy Balance" and start-up conditions for resonance mirrors. We will derive the conditions for start-up as well as the predicted curve of θ(v): (see manuscript for equation) We will show simulation results in the time domain that prove the validity of the last equation. Finite element simulation could be used to calculate the comb capacitance and to predict the performance of a new structure.

  20. Shell Separation for Mirror Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. Optics replication uses reusable forms, called mandrels, to make telescope mirrors ready for final finishing. MSFC optical physicist Bill Jones monitors a device used to chill a mandrel, causing it to shrink and separate from the telescope mirror without deforming the mirror's precisely curved surface.

  1. Mirror man: a case of skilled deliberate mirror writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert D; De Lucia, Natascia; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Mirror writing is a striking behaviour that is common in children and can reemerge in adults following brain damage. Skilled deliberate mirror writing has also been reported, but only anecdotally. We provide the first quantitative study of skilled deliberate mirror writing. K.B. can write forward or backward, vertically upright or inverted, with the hands acting alone or simultaneously. K.B. is predominantly left handed, but writes habitually with his right hand. Of his writing formats, his left hand mirror writing is by far the most similar in style to his normal handwriting. When writing bimanually, he performs better when his two hands make mirror-symmetrical movements to write opposite scripts than if they move in the same direction to write similar scripts. He has no special facility for reading mirrored text. These features are consistent with prior anecdotal cases and support a motor basis for K.B.'s ability, according to which his skilled mirror writing results from the left hand execution of a low-level motor program for a right hand abductive writing action. Our methods offer a novel framework for investigating the sharing of motor representations across effectors.

  2. Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Curved mirrors of a proposed type would comprise lightweight sheets or films containing integral, biologically inspired actuators for controlling their surface figures. These mirrors could be useful in such applications as collection of solar energy, focusing of radio beams, and (provided sufficient precision could be achieved) imaging. These mirrors were originally intended for use in outer space, but it should also be possible to develop terrestrial versions. Several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles have described a variety of approaches to the design of curved, lightweight mirrors containing integral shape-control actuators. The primary distinction between the present approach and the prior approaches lies in the actuator design concept, which involves shapes and movements reminiscent of those of a variety of small, multi-armed animals. The shape and movement of an actuator of this type can also be characterized as reminiscent of that of an umbrella. This concept can be further characterized as a derivative of that of multifinger grippers, the fingers of which are bimorph bending actuators (see Figure 1). The fingers of such actuators can be strips containing any of a variety of materials that have been investigated for use as actuators, including such electroactive polymers as ionomeric polymer/metal composites (IPMCs), ferroelectric polymers, and grafted elastomers. A mirror according to this proposal would be made from a sheet of one of the actuator composites mentioned above. The design would involve many variables, including the pre-curvature and stiffness of the mirror sheet, the required precision of figure control, the required range of variation in focal length (see Figure 2), the required precision of figure control for imaging or non-imaging use, the bending and twisting moments needed to effect the required deformations, and voltage-tomoment coefficients of the actuators, and the voltages accordingly required for actuation. A typical design would call

  3. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  4. Slitless spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera (JWST NIRCam)

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Thomas P; Egami, Eiichi; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kelly, Douglas M; Leisenring, Jarron; Rieke, Marcia; Robberto, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Stansberry, John

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared camera (JWST NIRCam) has two 2.'2 $\\times$ 2.'2 fields of view that are capable of either imaging or spectroscopic observations. Either of two $R \\sim 1500$ grisms with orthogonal dispersion directions can be used for slitless spectroscopy over $\\lambda = 2.4 - 5.0$ $\\mu$m in each module, and shorter wavelength observations of the same fields can be obtained simultaneously. We present the latest predicted grism sensitivities, saturation limits, resolving power, and wavelength coverage values based on component measurements, instrument tests, and end-to-end modeling. Short wavelength (0.6 -- 2.3 $\\mu$m) imaging observations of the 2.4 -- 5.0 $\\mu$m spectroscopic field can be performed in one of several different filter bands, either in-focus or defocused via weak lenses internal to NIRCam. Alternatively, the possibility of 1.0 -- 2.0 $\\mu$m spectroscopy (simultaneously with 2.4 -- 5.0 $\\mu$m) using dispersed Hartmann sensors (DHSs) is being explored. The grisms, wea...

  5. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Dorner, Bernhard; Ferruit, Pierre; de Oliveira, Catarina Alves; Birkmann, Stephan M; Böker, Torsten; De Marchi, Guido; Gnata, Xavier; Köhler, Jess; Sirianni, Marco; Jakobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Context: The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject (MOS), long-slit, and integral field (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of $\\sim$9 $\\mathrm{arcmin}^2$. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main o...

  6. Metrology for Trending Alignment of the James Webb Space Telescope Before and After Ambient Environmental Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Ohl, Raymond G.; Berrier, Joshua; Gum, Jeffery; Hayden, Joseph; Khreishi, Manal; McLean, Kyle; Redman, Kevin; Sullivan, Joseph; Wenzel, Greg; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy. The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element which contains four science instruments (SIs). Prior to integration with the spacecraft, theJWST optical assembly is put through rigorous launch condition environmental testing. This work reports on the metrology operations conducted to determine any changes in subassembly alignment, including primary mirror segments with respect to each other, the secondary mirror to its support structure, the tertiary mirror assembly to the backplane of the telescope and ultimately to the ISIM.

  7. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  8. Tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1979-08-21

    This paper is largely devoted to tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), and briefly summarizes results of experiments in which field-reversal has been achieved. In the tandem experiment, high-energy, high-density plasmas (nearly identical to 2XIIB plasmas) are located at each end of a solenoid where plasma ions are electrostatically confined by the high positive poentials arising in the end plug plasma. End plug ions are magnetically confined, and electrons are electrostatically confined by the overall positive potential of the system. The field-reversed mirror reactor consists of several small field-reversed mirror plasmas linked together for economic reasons. In the LLL Beta II experiment, generation of a field-reversed plasma ring will be investigated using a high-energy plasma gun with a transverse radial magnetic field. This plasma will be further heated and sustained by injection of intense, high-energy neutral beams.

  9. A Novel Lateral Deployment Mechanism for Segmented Mirror/Solar Panel of Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesiya, Dignesh; Srinivas, A. R.; Shukla, Piyush

    2015-09-01

    Space telescopes require large aperture primary mirrors to capture High Definition (HD) ground image while orbiting around the Earth. Fairing Volume of launch vehicles is limited and thus the size of monolithic mirror is limited to fairing size and solar panels are arranged within a petal formation in order to provide a greater power to volume ratio. This generates need for deployable mirrors for space use. This brings out a method for designing new deployment mechanism for segmented mirror. Details of mechanism folding strategy, design of components, FE simulations, realization and Lab model validation results are discussed in order to demonstrate the design using prototype.

  10. MIRROR MOVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA. Momen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movement is an interesting but often overlooked neurological soft sign;these movements are described as simultaneous contralateral, involuntary, identical movements that accompany voluntary movements. This neurologic problem is very rarely seen in children; in familial cases there is a positive history of these movements in parents, diminishing with time. Here, we have presented the case of an 11-year old girl with mirror movements in her upper limbs which interfered with her hand writing. Her neurological examination revealed normal results. In this report, we have tried to explain some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms related to these abnormal movements.Keywords:Mirror Movements, Children, Soft neurologic sign

  11. Theta functions and mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This is a survey covering aspects of varied work of the authors with Mohammed Abouzaid, Paul Hacking, and Sean Keel. While theta functions are traditionally canonical sections of ample line bundles on abelian varieties, we motivate, using mirror symmetry, the idea that theta functions exist in much greater generality. This suggestion originates with the work of the late Andrei Tyurin. We outline how to construct theta functions on the degenerations of varieties constructed in previous work of the authors, and then explain applications of this construction to homological mirror symmetry and constructions of broad classes of mirror varieties.

  12. Edificio Daily Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams, Owen

    1963-07-01

    Full Text Available The building has 18 levels. The Press occupies the 4 basement floors. The ground floor is taken up with the entrance hall, and an indoor carriage way. A snack bar and the telephone operators are situated on the second floor. The production department and the medical services are located on the third storey, whilst the fourth is occupied by the offices and library. The fifth floor is the beginning of the higher section of the building. This floor and up to including the 11th floor are devoted to office space, except for the 10th storey, which contains the office apartments of the directors and the Council Chamber. Equipment related to various services of the building is housed on the 12th storey. Finally, this tall building constitutes a fine landmark in the London skyline. The Daily Mirror building is outstanding for the appropriate nature, the completeness and the quality of its installations, which thus provide the most widely read paper in the world with outstandingly efficient offices.Este edificio consta de 18 plantas. El cuerpo de Prensa se aloja en los cuatro sótanos; los vestíbulos de entrada y una calzada interior para vehículos se hallan en la planta baja; la primera alberga un snack-bar y centralita telefónica; la segunda, el departamento de producción y centro de asistencia médica, y la tercera, las oficinas y biblioteca principales. La cuarta planta señala el comienzo del bloque alto; esta planta, junto con las quinta, sexta, séptima, octava y décima, están dedicadas a oficinas. La novena contiene las oficinas-apartamentos de los directores y salas de Consejo, y la undécima, la maquinaria para las diversas instalaciones del edificio. La elevada torre constituye un grandioso hito de referencia en esta zona de Londres. El «Daily Mirror» se distingue por el acierto, número y perfección de sus instalaciones, que proporcionan, al periódico de mayor actualidad mundial, las más adecuadas y amplias oficinas modernas.

  13. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  14. Are mirror neurons the basis of speech perception? Evidence from five cases with damage to the purported human mirror system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalsky, Corianne; Love, Tracy; Driscoll, David; Anderson, Steven W; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons in macaque has led to a resurrection of motor theories of speech perception. Although the majority of lesion and functional imaging studies have associated perception with the temporal lobes, it has also been proposed that the 'human mirror system', which prominently includes Broca's area, is the neurophysiological substrate of speech perception. Although numerous studies have demonstrated a tight link between sensory and motor speech processes, few have directly assessed the critical prediction of mirror neuron theories of speech perception, namely that damage to the human mirror system should cause severe deficits in speech perception. The present study measured speech perception abilities of patients with lesions involving motor regions in the left posterior frontal lobe and/or inferior parietal lobule (i.e., the proposed human 'mirror system'). Performance was at or near ceiling in patients with fronto-parietal lesions. It is only when the lesion encroaches on auditory regions in the temporal lobe that perceptual deficits are evident. This suggests that 'mirror system' damage does not disrupt speech perception, but rather that auditory systems are the primary substrate for speech perception.

  15. The meter-class carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror and segmented mirror telescope at the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Christopher; Fernandez, Bautista; Bagnasco, John; Martinez, Ty; Romeo, Robert; Agrawal, Brij

    2015-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Center of Excellence for National Security at the Naval Postgraduate School has implemented a technology testing platform and array of facilities for next-generation space-based telescopes and imaging system development. The Segmented Mirror Telescope is a 3-meter, 6 segment telescope with actuators on its mirrors for system optical correction. Currently, investigation is being conducted in the use of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer structures for large monolithic optics. Advantages of this material include lower manufacturing costs, very low weight, and high durability and survivability compared to its glass counterparts. Design and testing has begun on a 1-meter, optical quality CFRP parabolic mirror for the purpose of injecting collimated laser light through the SMT primary and secondary mirrors as well as the following aft optics that include wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors. This paper will present the design, testing, and usage of this CFRP parabolic mirror and the current path moving forward with this ever-evolving technology.

  16. Tendency to Mirror-Image on a Visual Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotti, Nicholas C.

    1980-01-01

    Young children (153 normal preschool and primary graders, 19 cerebral palsied 5 to 15 year olds, and 16 learning disabled 7 to 12 year olds) were given a test of immediate visual memory which required selection of a geometric design from among six alternatives, including a mirror image and a rotation. (CL)

  17. Responder fast steering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-10-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  18. Tinbergen on mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology-the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible 'best explanation' for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of 'survival value', should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding-or another social cognitive function-by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories.

  19. Technique for measuring the three-dimensional shapes of telescope mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhou

    2016-09-01

    Telescope mirrors determine the imaging quality and the observation ability of the telescopes. Unfortunately, manufacturing highly accurate mirrors remains a bottleneck problem in space optics. One primary cause is the lack of a technique to robustly measure the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of mirrors for inverse engineering. After centuries of study, researchers developed different techniques for testing the quality of telescope mirrors and proposed different methods for measuring the 3-D shapes of mirrors. Among them, interferometers become popular in evaluating the surface errors of the manufactured mirrors. However, interferometers could not measure some important mirror parameters, e.g., paraxial radius, geometry dimension, and eccentric errors, directly and accurately although these parameters are essential for mirror manufacturing. For those methods that could measure these parameters, their measurement accuracies are far beyond satisfactory. We present a technique for robust measurement of the 3-D shapes of mirrors with single-shot projection. Experimental results show that this technique is significantly more robust than state-of-the-art techniques, which makes it feasible for commercial devices to measure the shapes of mirrors quantitatively and robustly.

  20. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: Overview and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, Marshall D; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field depende...

  1. A 4K x 4K HgCdTe astronomical camera enabled by the JWST NIR detector development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald N. B.; Luppino, Gerard; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Garnett, James D.; Loose, Markus; Zandian, Majid

    2004-09-01

    The ambitious science goals of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have driven spectacular advances in λco ~ 5um detector technology over the past five years. This paper reviews both the UH/RSC team"s Phase A development and evaluation of 2Kx2K arrays exceeding the detector requirements for JWST"s near infrared instruments and also the hardware integration of these into a 4Kx4K (16Mpxl) close packed mosaic focal plane array housed in an Ultra Low Background test facility. Both individual first generation 2Kx2K SCA"s and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes have been extensively characterized in the laboratory and, since September 2003, a NIR camera utilizing the 4Kx4K mosaic focal plane has been in use for nearly 100 nights at the UH 2.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea. Typical test results for the first generation 2Kx2K arrays and their integration into 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes are reported. Demonstration of the design concepts and both array and mosaic focal plane performance in actual hardware, as described here, has provided the foundation for design iterations leading to later generations of 2Kx2K arrays and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes. Four major technology developments leading to first generation hardware demonstrations of both 2Kx2K SCA"s and a 4Kx4K mosaic FPA are reviewed. These are: 1) improvement in test equipment and procedures to characterize the detectors against JWST requirements and goals, primarily at 37K but with the capability to test from 30K to 100K; 2) optimization of λc ~ 5 um MBE HgCdTe material on a CZT substrate for low dark current (goal of 0.003 e-/sec at 37K) with high quantum efficiency, low cross-talk and greatly reduced image persistence; 3) development of the 2Kx2K HAWAII-2RG multiplexer designed specifically to take full advantage of these detector characteristics for a wide range of astronomical applications (and fully compatible with an ASIC controller developed under the JWST Instrument Technology Development initiative) and 4) development of

  2. Advanced Mirror Material System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Peregrine will bring together recent laboratory developments and mature the technology so that complete mirror and telescope assemblies can be reliably and robustly...

  3. Autism: Lost in the Mirror?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Barry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When I began my training as an analyst I took up a placement in an early intervention centre for autistic pre-scholars. The school was run on the psychological principles of ABA and children were tutored on a reward system promoting positive behaviors. Whilst working there I noticed that a number of children had a particular fascination for their mirrored image. This fascination was pervasive and many children would do their work primarily for the reward of the mirror. Through the lens of psychoanalysis I found this very interesting and Lacan’s Mirror Phase immediately came to mind and with this it bore the question as to whether or not there was something in the Mirror Phase of development that had an impact on what we see as symptoms of Autism.

  4. Fast Picometer Mirror Mount Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a 6DOF controllable mirror mount with high dynamic range and fast tip/tilt capability for space based applications. It will enable the...

  5. Reflections on a Black Mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Michael R R

    2016-01-01

    A black mirror is an accelerated boundary that produces particles in an exact correspondence to an evaporating black hole. We investigate the spectral dynamics of the particle creation during the formation process.

  6. Dielectric Coatings for IACT Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Förster, A; Chadwick, P; Held, M

    2013-01-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy need mirror with high reflectance roughly in the wavelength between 300 and 550 nm. The current standard reflective layer of such mirrors is aluminum. Being permanently exposed to the environment they show a constant degradation over the years. New and improved dielectric coatings have been developed to enhance their resistance to environmental impact and to extend their possible lifetime. In addition, these customized coatings have an increased reflectance of over 95% and are designed to significantly lower the night-sky background contribution. The development of such coatings for mirrors with areas up to 2 m2 and low application temperatures to suite the composite materials used for the new mirror susbtrates of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the results of extensive durability tests are presented.

  7. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, B.; Giardino, G.; Ferruit, P.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Birkmann, S. M.; Böker, T.; De Marchi, G.; Gnata, X.; Köhler, J.; Sirianni, M.; Jakobsen, P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject spectroscopy (MOS), long-slit, and integral field unit (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of ~9 arcmin2. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main optical planes of the instrument. Results: The NIRSpec parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with high fidelity. The intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, rms) of the model, as measured from the extracted calibration spectra, is better than 1/10 of a pixel along the spatial direction and better than 1/20 of a resolution element in the spectral direction for all of the grating-based spectral modes. This is fully consistent with the corresponding allocation in the spatial and spectral calibration budgets of NIRSpec.

  8. The Impact of JWST Broadband Filter Choice on Photometric Redshift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.; Le Fèvre, O.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Pye, J.; van der Werf, P.; Ilbert, O.; Grogin, N.; Koekemoer, A.

    2016-12-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in the James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6-5.0 μm and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at λ \\gt 5.0 μ {{m}}. In this work we analyze the impact of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broadband filters (F070W to F770W), as well as having ancillary data at λ \\lt 0.6 μ {{m}}, on the derived photometric redshifts (z phot) of a total of 5921 real and simulated galaxies, with known input redshifts z = 0-10. We found that observations at λ \\lt 0.6 μ {{m}} are necessary to control the contamination of high-z samples by low-z interlopers. Adding MIRI (F560W and F770W) photometry to the NIRCam data mitigates the absence of ancillary observations at λ \\lt 0.6 μ {{m}} and improves the redshift estimation. At z = 7-10, accurate z phot can be obtained with the NIRCam broadbands alone when {{S}}/{{N}}≥slant 10, but the z phot quality significantly degrades at {{S}}/{{N}}≤slant 5. Adding MIRI photometry with 1 mag brighter depth than the NIRCam depth allows for a redshift recovery of 83%-99%, depending on spectral energy distribution type, and its effect is particularly noteworthy for galaxies with nebular emission. The vast majority of NIRCam galaxies with [F150W] = 29 AB mag at z = 7-10 will be detected with MIRI at [F560W, F770W] \\lt 28 mag if these sources are at least mildly evolved or have spectra with emission lines boosting the mid-infrared fluxes.

  9. Information Content Analysis for Selection of Optimal JWST Observing Modes for Transiting Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Line, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is nearing its launch date of 2018, and is expected to revolutionize our knowledge of exoplanet atmospheres. In order to specifically identify which observing modes will be most useful for characterizing a diverse range of exoplanetary atmospheres, we use an information content (IC) based approach commonly used in the studies of solar system atmospheres. We develop a system based upon these IC methods to trace the instrumental and atmospheric model phase space in order to identify which observing modes are best suited for particular classes of planets, focusing on transmission spectra. Specifically, the atmospheric parameter space we cover is T = 600-1800 K, C/O = 0.55-1, [M/H] = 1-100 × Solar for an R = 1.39 R J , M = 0.59 M J planet orbiting a WASP-62-like star. We also explore the influence of a simplified opaque gray cloud on the IC. We find that obtaining broader wavelength coverage over multiple modes is preferred over higher precision in a single mode given the same amount of observing time. Regardless of the planet temperature and composition, the best modes for constraining terminator temperatures, C/O ratios, and metallicity are NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. If the target’s host star is dim enough such that the NIRSpec prism is applicable, then it can be used instead of NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. Lastly, observations that use more than two modes should be carefully analyzed because sometimes the addition of a third mode results in no gain of information. In these cases, higher precision in the original two modes is favorable.

  10. Polymer glazing for silver mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidlinger, H H; Schissel, P

    1985-07-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation and modification of polymeric glazings to protect silver mirrors. The mirrors were made using Corning 7809 glass as a substrate onto which a thin silver film is deposited. The modified polymeric films are then cast from solution onto the silver. The mirrors were characterized by measuring the hemispherical reflectance and the specular reflectance at 660 nm and selected acceptance angles (7.5 mrad or 3.5 mrad). The mirrors were exposed to environmental degradation using accelerated weathering devices and outdoor exposure. Empirical evidence has demonstrated that polymethylmethacrylate is a stable polymer in a terrestrial environment, but the polymer does not provide adequate protection for the silver reflector. The crucial role in degradation played by ultraviolet (uv) light is shown by several experimental results. It has been demonstrated that uv stabilizers added to the polymer improve the weatherability of mirrors. The relative effectiveness of different stabilizers will be discussed in terms of the weathering modes, retention of optical properties, and effectiveness of the additives. The process for silver deposition influences the reflectance of silver mirrors, and the optical properties depend on subtle relationships between the metallization and the dielectric (polymeric) films that are in contact with the silver.

  11. Free Form Mirrors for Ultra Compact High Speed Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This task is to collaboratively design and fabricate the free-form WIRIS telescope primary mirror with our partner Zygo as a technology demonstration. Fabricating...

  12. A Low Cost Light Weight Polymer Derived Ceramic Telescope Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary purpose of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate a new technology for manufacturing an ultra-low-cost precision optical telescope mirror which can...

  13. ULE design considerations for a 3m class light weighted mirror blank for E-ELT M5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Andrew; Hobbs, Tom; Edwards, Mary; Arnold, Matthew; Sawyer, Kent

    2016-07-01

    It is expected that the next generation of large ground based astronomical telescopes will need large fast-steering/tip-tilt mirrors made of ultra-lightweight construction. These fast-steering mirrors are used to continuously correct for atmospheric disturbances and telescope vibrations. An example of this is the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) M5 lightweight mirror, which is part of the Tip-Tilt/Field-Stabilization Unit. The baseline design for the E-ELT M5 mirror, as presented in the E-ELT Construction Proposal, is a closed-back ULE mirror with a lightweight core using square core cells. Corning Incorporated (Corning) has a long history of manufacturing lightweight mirror blanks using ULE in a closed-back construction, going back to the 1960's, and includes the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror, Subaru Telescope secondary and tertiary mirrors, the Magellan I and II tertiary mirrors, and Kepler Space Telescope primary mirror, among many others. A parametric study of 1-meter class lightweight mirror designs showed that Corning's capability to seal a continuous back sheet to a light-weighted core structure provides superior mirror rigidity, in a near-zero thermal expansion material, relative to other existing technologies in this design space. Corning has investigated the parametric performance of several design characteristics for a 3-meter class lightweight mirror blank for the E-ELT M5. Finite Element Analysis was performed on several design scenarios to obtain weight, areal density, and first Eigen frequency. This paper presents an overview of Corning ULE and lightweight mirror manufacturing capabilities, the parametric performance of design characteristics for 1-meter class and 3-meter class lightweight mirrors, as well as the manufacturing advantages and disadvantages of those characteristics.

  14. Wavefront Compensation Segmented Mirror Sensing and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, David C.; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andrew; Bradford, Charles M.; Woody, David; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The primary mirror of very large submillimeter-wave telescopes will necessarily be segmented into many separate mirror panels. These panels must be continuously co-phased to keep the telescope wavefront error less than a small fraction of a wavelength, to ten microns RMS (root mean square) or less. This performance must be maintained continuously across the full aperture of the telescope, in all pointing conditions, and in a variable thermal environment. A wavefront compensation segmented mirror sensing and control system, consisting of optical edge sensors, Wavefront Compensation Estimator/Controller Soft ware, and segment position actuators is proposed. Optical edge sensors are placed two per each segment-to-segment edge to continuously measure changes in segment state. Segment position actuators (three per segment) are used to move the panels. A computer control system uses the edge sensor measurements to estimate the state of all of the segments and to predict the wavefront error; segment actuator commands are computed that minimize the wavefront error. Translational or rotational motions of one segment relative to the other cause lateral displacement of the light beam, which is measured by the imaging sensor. For high accuracy, the collimator uses a shaped mask, such as one or more slits, so that the light beam forms a pattern on the sensor that permits sensing accuracy of better than 0.1 micron in two axes: in the z or local surface normal direction, and in the y direction parallel to the mirror surface and perpendicular to the beam direction. Using a co-aligned pair of sensors, with the location of the detector and collimated light source interchanged, four degrees of freedom can be sensed: transverse x and y displacements, as well as two bending angles (pitch and yaw). In this approach, each optical edge sensor head has a collimator and an imager, placing one sensor head on each side of a segment gap, with two parallel light beams crossing the gap. Two sets

  15. Corrosion resistant solar mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medwick, Paul A.; Abbott, Edward E.

    2016-07-19

    A reflective article includes a transparent substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface. A base coat is formed over at least a portion of the second major surface. A primary reflective coating having at least one metallic layer is formed over at least a portion of the base coat. A protective coating is formed over at least a portion of the primary reflective coating. The article further includes a solar cell and an anode, with the solar cell connected to the metallic layer and the anode.

  16. Detection of atmospheric Cherenkov radiation using solar heliostat mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, R A

    1996-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy region between 20 and 250 GeV is largely unexplored. Ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov detectors offer a possible way to explore this region, but large Cherenkov photon collection areas are needed to achieve low energy thresholds. This paper discusses the development of a Cherenkov detector using the heliostat mirrors of a solar power plant as the primary collector. As part of this development, we built a prototype detector consisting of four heliostat mirrors and used it to record atmospheric Cherenkov radiation produced in extensive air showers created by cosmic ray particles.

  17. Alignment Mirror Mechanisms for Space Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin M.; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes an optical Alignment Mirror Mechanism (AMM), and discusses its control scheme. The mirror's angular positioning accuracy requirement is +/- 0.2 arc-sec. This requires the mirror's linear positioning actuators to have a positioning accuracy of +/- 109 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are +/- 35 nm linear positioning capability at the actuator, which translates into +/- 0.07 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy.

  18. Design Study of an 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper will review a recent NASA MSFC preliminary study that demonstrated the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. The study started with the unique capabilities of the Ares V vehicle and examined the feasibility of launching a large aperture low cost low risk telescope based on a conventional ground based glass primary mirror. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN & C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing, mass budget and system cost. The study telescope was an on-axis three-mirror anastigmatic design with a fine steering mirror. The observatory has a 100 arc-minute (8.4 X 12 arc-minutes) of diffraction limited field of view at a wavelength les than 500 nm. The study assumed that the primary mirror would be fabricated from an existing Schott Zerodur residual VLT blank edged to 6.2 meters, 175 mm thick at the edge with a mass of 11,000 kg. The entire mass budget for the observatory including primary mirror, structure, light baffle tube, instruments, space craft, avionics, etc. is less than 40,000 kg - a 33% mass margin on the Ares V's 60,000 kg Sun-Earth L2 capability. An 8 meter class observatory would have a total mass of less than 60,000 kg of which the primary mirror is the largest contributor.

  19. Engineering the Future: Cell 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), explaining the development using a systems engineering methodology. Included are slides showing the organizational chart, the JWST Science Goals, the size of the primary mirror, and full scale mockups of the JSWT. Also included is a review of the JWST Optical Telescope Requirements, a review of the preliminary design and analysis, the technology development required to create the JWST, with particular interest in the specific mirror technology that was required, and views of the mirror manufacturing process. Several slides review the process of verification and validation by testing and analysis, including a diagram of the Cryogenic Test Facility at Marshall, and views of the primary mirror while being tested in the cryogenic facility.

  20. Material characteristics of CLEARCERAM-Z HS for use in large diameter mirror blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Takayuki; Goto, Naoyuki; Hoffman, Brion; Kawashima, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Kazuharu; Suzuki, Kaito

    2010-07-01

    There is growing interest within the Astronomical community in the development and use of very large aperture telescopes which will incorporate the latest advancements in optical materials. Two of the most notable of these large size telescope projects, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), will use mirror segments in the actively controlled primary mirrors. In this paper we present the results of a material characteristics study on Ohara CLEARCERAM®-Z HS large diameter blanks which includes data on the CTE, CTE uniformity, residual stress and internal quality targeting potential use in the TMT Primary Mirror Segment Banks.

  1. The spectral calibration of JWST/NIRSpec: results from the recent cryo-vacuum campaign (ISIM-CV3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Luetzgendorf, Nora; Ferruit, Pierre; Dorner, Bernhard; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Boeker, Torsten; Rawle, Tim; Sirianni, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The NIRSpec instrument of JWST can be operated in multi-object (MOS), long-slit, and integral field mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable mini-slits for object selection, covering a field of view of 9 square-arcminute. We have developed a procedure to optimize a parametric model of the instrument that provides the basis for the extraction of wavelength calibrated spectra from NIRSpec data, from any of the apertures and for all the modes. Here, we summarize the steps undertaken to optimize the instrument model parameters using the data acquired during the latest cryo-vacuum campaign of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module, recently carried out at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The calibrated parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with an intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, RMS) ~ 1/10 of a pixel in spatial and spectral direction for all the modes. The overall wavelength calibration accuracy (RMS) of the model as measured on the extracted spectra is better than 1/20 of a resolution element for all of the grating-based spectral modes and at the level of 1/14 of a resolution element for the prism. These results are well within the allocations for the model in the overall spatial and spectral calibration budget of NIRSpec.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Cryo-Vacuum (CV) Test at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda M.

    2014-01-01

    JWST ISIM has entered into its system-level testing program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In December 2013, ISIM successfully completed the first in a series of three cryo-vacuum tests, which included two flight science instruments. Since then, there have been full-fledged efforts towards the CV2 test scheduled to finish at the end of 2014. The complexity of the mission has generated challenging requirements that demand highly reliable system performance and capabilities from the Space Environment Simulator (SES) vacuum chamber. In order to satisfy the program requirements, GSFC had to develop unique structural and thermal hardware to test ISIM. Most noteworthy is a helium shroud structure and cooling system built in order to achieve operational temperatures below 20K (-253C). This paper: (1) provides an overview of the integrated mechanical and thermal facility systems required to achieve the objectives of JWST ISIM testing, (2) communicates the performance and challenges of the SES during the first ISIM test, and (3) summarizes the action plan to improve the system prior to the next test.

  3. A new HST/Herschel deep field at the North Ecliptic Pole: preparing the way for JWST, SPICA and Euclid

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, Stephen; Burgarella, Denis; Clements, Dave; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Goto, Tomo; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hopwood, Rosalind; Hwang, Narae; Inami, Hanae; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Seong Jin; Krumpe, Mirko; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Malkan, Matt; Matsuhara, Hideo; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; Pearson, Chris; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Vaccari, Mattia; Valtchanov, Ivan; van der Werf, Paul; Wada, Takehiko; White, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    We propose a co-ordinated multi-observatory survey at the North Ecliptic Pole. This field is the natural extragalactic deep field location for most space observatories (e.g. containing the deepest Planck, WISE and eROSITA data), is in the continuous viewing zones for e.g. Herschel, HST, JWST, and is a natural high-visibility field for the L2 halo orbit of SPICA with deep and wide-field legacy surveys already planned. The field is also a likely deep survey location for the forthcoming Euclid mission. It is already a multi-wavelength legacy field in its own right (e.g. AKARI, LOFAR, SCUBA-2): the outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage in this field and nowhere else enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field, by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN hot dust. We argue from the science needs of Euclid and JWST, and from the comparative multiwavelength depths, that the logical ...

  4. More questions for mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Emma

    2013-09-01

    The mirror neuron system is widely held to provide direct access to the motor goals of others. This paper critically investigates this idea, focusing on the so-called 'intentional worry'. I explore two answers to the intentional worry: first that the worry is premised on too limited an understanding of mirror neuron behaviour (Sections 2 and 3), second that the appeal made to mirror neurons can be refined in such a way as to avoid the worry (Section 4). I argue that the first response requires an account of the mechanism by which small-scale gestures are supposedly mapped to larger chains of actions but that none of the extant accounts of this mechanism are plausible. Section 4 then briefly examines refinements of the mirror neuron-mindreading hypothesis which avoid the intentional worry. I conclude that these refinements may well be plausible but that they undermine many of the claims standardly made for mirror neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metamaterial mirrors in optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Esfandyarpour, Majid

    2014-06-22

    The phase reversal that occurs when light is reflected from a metallic mirror produces a standing wave with reduced intensity near the reflective surface. This effect is highly undesirable in optoelectronic devices that use metal films as both electrical contacts and optical mirrors, because it dictates a minimum spacing between the metal and the underlying active semiconductor layers, therefore posing a fundamental limit to the overall thickness of the device. Here, we show that this challenge can be circumvented by using a metamaterial mirror whose reflection phase is tunable from that of a perfect electric mirror († = €) to that of a perfect magnetic mirror († = 0). This tunability in reflection phase can also be exploited to optimize the standing wave profile in planar devices to maximize light-matter interaction. Specifically, we show that light absorption and photocurrent generation in a sub-100 nm active semiconductor layer of a model solar cell can be enhanced by ∼20% over a broad spectral band. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  6. Eigenmodes of misaligned unstable optical resonators with circular mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, M S

    1992-03-20

    It is shown numerically that the diffractive transverse (Fox-Li) eigenmodes supported by an unstable cavity with tilted end mirrors can be computed by expanding these modes in terms of the fully aligned (aberration-free) eigenmodes of the same cavity. Circular mirror resonators are considered in which the aligned cavity eigenmodes can be decomposed into different azimuthal components. The biorthogonality property of the aligned cavity eigenmodes is used to obtain the coefficients in the modal expansion of the misaligned modes. Results are given for two different resonators: a conventional hard-edge unstable cavity with a small tilt of the output coupler and one that uses a graded reflectivity output mirror with a small tilt of the primary mirror. It is shown that the series expansion of the misaligned modes in terms of the aligned modes converges, and the converged eigenvalues are virtually identical to those computed by using the Prony method. Symmetry considerations and other new insights into the effects of a mirror tilt on the modes of a resonator are also discussed.

  7. The accretion/ejection paradigm in young stellar objects: from HST and Herschel to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, Linda

    2012-07-01

    Stellar jets and molecular outflows are observed in association with young accreting stars and are believed to play a key role in the star formation process. In this talk I will show how current and future space missions are of crucial importance to investigate the origin of stellar jets and their link to the accretion process. Thanks to its high angular (˜0.1") resolution, HST has been the first telescope allowing us to investigate the jet physics at optical/UV wavelengths down to the heart of the launching mechanism. We recently analysed a datacube of the jet emitted by the T Tauri star DG Tau obtaining spatio-kinematical maps of the hot atomic gas in the jet and of its physical conditions (Maurri et al., submitted). These data confirm the predictions of theoretical models including the fact that jets may extract the excess angular momentum from the system. In the last two years Herschel has further improved our comprehension of the ejection process observing the far infrared counterpart of fast and collimated atomic jets. PACS and HIFI observations, acquired within the GASPS (GAS in Protoplanetary Systems) Open Time Key Project (PI: B. Dent), show that T Tauri stars driving optical jets are also associated with a warm gas component emitting not only atomic ([OI], [CII]) but also molecular (high-J CO, H_2O, OH) lines. The comparison with Class 0 outflows highlights a clear evolutionary trend: the emission associated with evolved Class I/II sources is fainter and more compact and the estimated mass loss rates and lines cooling are one to two orders of magnitudes lower (Podio et al., to be submitted). The arrival of JWST will fill-in the gap between HST and Herschel opening a new window in the near and mid-infrared range at unprecedented angular resolution (down to 0.03"). This will allow resolving the emission in both atomic (e.g., [FeII]) and molecular (e.g., H_2) lines and understanding if the molecular gas is entrained by the atomic jet or launched with it

  8. Topological recursion and mirror curves

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We study the constant contributions to the free energies obtained through the topological recursion applied to the complex curves mirror to toric Calabi-Yau threefolds. We show that the recursion reproduces precisely the corresponding Gromov-Witten invariants, which can be encoded in powers of the MacMahon function. As a result, we extend the scope of the "remodeling conjecture" to the full free energies, including the constant contributions. In the process we study how the pair of pants decomposition of the mirror curves plays an important role in the topological recursion. We also show that the free energies are not, strictly speaking, symplectic invariants, and that the recursive construction of the free energies does not commute with certain limits of mirror curves.

  9. Metrology of IXO Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Wing

    2011-01-01

    For future x-ray astrophysics mission that demands optics with large throughput and excellent angular resolution, many telescope concepts build around assembling thin mirror segments in a Wolter I geometry, such as that originally proposed for the International X-ray Observatory. The arc-second resolution requirement posts unique challenges not just for fabrication, mounting but also for metrology of these mirror segments. In this paper, we shall discuss the metrology of these segments using normal incidence metrological method with interferometers and null lenses. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems we are currently using, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring near-cylindrical mirror segments and the stability of the measurements.

  10. Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch N.J.

    2005-10-19

    Because of their engineering simplicity, high-β, and steady-state operation, mirror machines and related open-trap machines such as gas dynamic traps, are an attractive concept for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. In these open-trap machines, the confinement occurs by means of magnetic mirroring, without the magnetic field lines closing upon themselves within the region of particle confinement. Unfortunately, these concepts have not achieved to date very spectacular laboratory results, and their reactor prospects are dimmed by the prospect of a low Q-factor, the ratio of fusion power produced to auxiliary power. Nonetheless, because of its engineering promise, over the years numerous improvements have been proposed to enhance the reactor prospects of mirror fusion, such as tandem designs, end-plugging, and electric potential barriers.

  11. Harmonic Distortion in CMOS Current Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1998-01-01

    One of the origins of harmonic distortion in CMOS current mirrors is the inevitable mismatch between the MOS transistors involved. In this paper we examine both single current mirrors and complementary class AB current mirrors and develop an analytical model for the mismatch induced harmonic...... distortion. This analytical model is verified through simulations and is used for a discussion of the impact of mismatch on harmonic distortion properties of CMOS current mirrors. It is found that distortion levels somewhat below 1% can be attained by carefully matching the mirror transistors but ultra low...... distortion is not achievable with CMOS current mirrors...

  12. Composite single crystal silicon scan mirror substrates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Single crystal silicon is a desirable mirror substrate for scan mirrors in space telescopes. As diameters of mirrors become larger, existing manufacturing...

  13. Deformable mirror with thermal actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, Gleb; Loktev, Mikhail

    2002-05-01

    Low-cost adaptive optics is applied in lasers, scientific instrumentation, ultrafast sciences, and ophthalmology. These applications demand that the deformable mirrors used be simple, inexpensive, reliable, and efficient. We report a novel type of ultralow-cost deformable mirror with thermal actuators. The device has a response time of ~5 s , an actuator stroke of ~6mum , and temporal stability of ~lambda/10 rms in the visible range and can be used for correction of rather large aberrations with slow-changing amplitude.

  14. NASA CONNECT: Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe' is the last of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe', students will learn how algebra is used to explore the universe.

  15. Lightweight ZERODUR: Validation of Mirror Performance and Mirror Modeling Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Tony; Stahl, H. Philip; Westerhoff, Thomas; Valente, Martin; Brooks, Thomas; Eng, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming spaceborne missions, both moderate and large in scale, require extreme dimensional stability while relying both upon established lightweight mirror materials, and also upon accurate modeling methods to predict performance under varying boundary conditions. We describe tests, recently performed at NASA's XRCF chambers and laboratories in Huntsville Alabama, during which a 1.2 m diameter, f/1.2988% lightweighted SCHOTT lightweighted ZERODUR(TradeMark) mirror was tested for thermal stability under static loads in steps down to 230K. Test results are compared to model predictions, based upon recently published data on ZERODUR(TradeMark). In addition to monitoring the mirror surface for thermal perturbations in XRCF Thermal Vacuum tests, static load gravity deformations have been measured and compared to model predictions. Also the Modal Response(dynamic disturbance) was measured and compared to model. We will discuss the fabrication approach and optomechanical design of the ZERODUR(TradeMark) mirror substrate by SCHOTT, its optical preparation for test by Arizona Optical Systems (AOS). Summarize the outcome of NASA's XRCF tests and model validations

  16. Status of mirror segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H. M.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Loeff, A.; Lutz, R. D.; Merrill, C.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Tuell, M. T.; Weinberger, S. N.; West, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    The Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab at the University of Arizona is responsible for production of the eight 8.4 m segments for the primary mirror of the Giant Magellan Telescope, including one spare off-axis segment. We report on the successful casting of Segment 4, the center segment. Prior to generating the optical surface of Segment 2, we carried out a major upgrade of our 8.4 m Large Optical Generator. The upgrade includes new hardware and software to improve accuracy, safety, reliability and ease of use. We are currently carrying out an upgrade of our 8.4 m polishing machine that includes improved orbital polishing capabilities. We added and modified several components of the optical tests during the manufacture of Segment 1, and we have continued to improve the systems in preparation for Segments 2-8. We completed two projects that were prior commitments before GMT Segment 2: casting and polishing the combined primary and tertiary mirrors for the LSST, and casting and generating a 6.5 m mirror for the Tokyo Atacama Observatory.

  17. Timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror effects measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Andrea; Heyes, Cecilia; Becchio, Cristina; Bird, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    The human mirror system has been the subject of much research over the past two decades, but little is known about the timecourse of mirror responses. In addition, it is unclear whether mirror and counter-mirror effects follow the same timecourse. We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror responses in the human brain. Experiment 1 demonstrated that mirror responses can be measured from around 200 ms after observed action onset. Experiment 2 demonstrated significant effects of counter-mirror sensorimotor training at all timepoints at which a mirror response was found in Experiment 1 (i.e. from 200 ms onward), indicating that mirror and counter-mirror responses follow the same timecourse. By suggesting similarly direct routes for mirror and counter-mirror responses, these results support the associative account of mirror neuron origins whereby mirror responses arise as a result of correlated sensorimotor experience during development. More generally, they contribute to theorizing regarding mirror neuron function by providing some constraints on how quickly mirror responses can influence social cognition. PMID:23709352

  18. [The ontogeny of the mirror neuron system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2014-06-01

    Abstract Humans utilize the mirror neuron system to understand and predict others' actions. However, the ontogeny of the mirror neuron system remains unknown. Whether mirror neuron function is an innate trait or whether mirror neurons acquire their sensorimotor matching properties ontogenetically remains to be clarified. In this paper, I review the ontogenetic theory of the mirror neuron system. I then discuss the functioning of the mirror neuron system in the context of social cognitive abilities, which are unique to humans. Recently, some researchers argue that it is too early to interpret the function of mirror neurons as an understanding of the underlying psychological states of others. They imply that such functioning would require inferential cognitive processes that are known to involve areas outside the mirror neuron system. Filling in this missing link may be the key to elucidating the unique ability of humans to understand others' actions.

  19. MIRROR THERAPY: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishath Najiha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidences on mirror box therapy for the management of various musculoskeletal conditions. A systemic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy. The included journal articles were reviewed and assessed for its significance. Fifty one studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: 24 studies focussed on mirror therapy after stroke, thirteen studies focussed on mirror therapy after an amputation, three studies focussed on mirror therapy with complex regional pain syndrome patients, two studies on mirror therapy for cerebral palsy and one study focussed on mirror therapy after a fracture. The articles reviewed showed a trend that mirror therapy is effective in stroke, phantom limb pain, complex regional pain syndrome, cerebral palsy and fracture rehabilitation.

  20. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  1. Tiny Mirrors Make TV Magic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仲言

    1994-01-01

    By mounting thousands of miniature mirrors atop a silicon chip, a Texas Instruments engineer has crafted a TV display technology that can produce brighter and larger pictures than ever before. Since their invention, televisions have relied on cathode-ray tubes for their displays. These generate images by spraying electrons onto the back of

  2. Motor function improvement with mirror therapy in stroke patients: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aguilera Eguía

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Stroke comprises several conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function. A large percentage of individuals who survive stroke will have limb motor sequelae. Aim To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in patients with stroke and answer the following question: In stroke subjects, can mirror therapy improve motor function? Method We analyzed the article "Mirror therapy for improving motor function after stroke," Cochrane Systematic Review [Thieme 20121]. Results Mirror therapy may increase motor function between the second and sixth week of intervention, with a standardized mean difference (SMD of 0.61 (95% CI 0.22-1.00. Conclusion Despite methodological limitations of the primary studies included in the systematic review, we found that mirror therapy is a reasonable adjunct to standard therapy by physiotherapists.

  3. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project: overview and year four accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  4. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project: Overview and Year 4 Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  5. Initial Mirror Coalignment (IOT test program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Scott

    A series of 25 arcsec slews is executed in a spiral pattern about the LWRS aperture to try to find light in all four channels for the first time. This will be done as a single time-tag exposure. The primary data source is the detector counters. The default detector mask must be loaded prior to executing this program. This is followed by a one day interval to calculate the mirror movements required to co-align the channels to an accuracy of 25 arcsec. Finally, the target is recentered in the LWRS aperture. Then two series of linear slews are done, first in the X direction then in the Y direction. Each of these consists of 7 dwells separated by six slews, with each slew 5 arcsec in size. This will locate the edge of the slit to an accuracy of about 5 arcsec. A separate time-tag exposure will be taken during each of these linear slew sequences.

  6. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  7. The Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror: A Magnetic Mirror Concept Game Changer Magnet Mirror Status Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, T; Cohen, R; Correll, D; Fowler, K; Post, D; Berk, H; Horton, W; Hooper, E B; Fisch, N; Hassam, A; Baldwin, D; Pearlstein, D; Logan, G; Turner, B; Moir, R; Molvik, A; Ryutov, D; Ivanov, A A; Kesner, J; Cohen, B; McLean, H; Tamano, T; Tang, X Z; Imai, T

    2008-10-24

    Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT

  8. Lightweight C/SiC mirrors for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Chang-rui; Cao, Ying-bin; Zhou, Xin-gui

    2006-02-01

    Challenges in high resolution space telescopes have led to the desire to create large primary mirror apertures. Ceramic mirrors and complex structures are becoming more important for high precision lightweight optical applications in adverse environments. Carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) has shown great potential to be used as mirror substrate. This material has a high stiffness to weight ratio, dimensional stability from ambient to cryo temperatures, and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion as well. These properties make C/SiC very attractive for a variety of applications in precision optical structures, especially when considering space-borne application. In this paper, lightweight C/SiC mirror prepared for a scan mirror of a high resolution camera is presented. The manufacturing of C/SiC mirror starts with a porous rigid felt made of short chopped carbon fibers. The fibers are molded with phenolic resin under pressure to form a carbon fiber reinforced plastic blank, followed by a pyrolization process by which the phenolic resin reacts to a carbon matrix. The C/C-felt can be machined by standard computer controlled milling techniques to any virtual shape. This is one of the most significant advantages of this material, as it drastically reduces the making costs and enables the manufacture of truly ultra-lightweight mirrors, reflectors and structures. Upon completion of milling, the C/C-felt preform is mounted in a high-temperature furnace together with silicon and heated under vacuum condition to 1500°C at which the silicon changes into liquid phase. Subsequently, the molten silicon is infiltrated into the porous preform under capillary forces to react with carbon matrix and the surfaces of the carbon fibers to form a density C/SiC substrate. The C/SiC material retains the preform shape to within a tight tolerance after sintering means the ceramization process is a nearly net shaping process. Reactive melt infiltrated C/SiC, followed by

  9. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror mov...

  10. Through the looking-glass: mirror reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Molinaro, Nicola; Carreiras, Manuel

    2011-02-14

    At early stages of object identification we process correctly oriented and mirrored versions of an object similarly. However, in letter and word perception, such tolerance to mirror reversals is harmful for efficient reading. Do readers successfully develop blindness mechanisms for mirror-letters and words? We conducted two masked priming experiments while recording participants' electrophysiological brain responses to briefly presented primes including mirror-letters (Experiment 1) or to shortly presented mirror-words (Experiment 2). Results showed that the human visual word recognition system is not totally blind to mirror-letters and mirror-words, since the early stages of processing mirror-letters and mirror-words produced effects on target word recognition that were highly similar to the effects produced by identical primes (N250 component). In a posterior stage of processing (N400 epoch), the effect of mirror-letters and mirror-words was different from the effect of identical primes, even though reversed primes still elicited N400 priming effects different from unrelated primes. These results demonstrate that readers perceive mirror-letters and words as correct at initial stages of word recognition, and that the visual word recognition system's neural representation is grounded on basic principles that govern object perception.

  11. Light Weight Silicon Mirrors for Space Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Vincent T.; Hill, Peter C.; Hagopian, John G.; Strojay, Carl R.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Each mirror is a monolithic structure from a single crystal of silicon. The mirrors are light weighted after the optical surface is ground and polished. Mirrors made during the initial phase of this work were typically 1/50 lambda or better (RMS at 633 n m)

  12. The mirror neuron system : New frontiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keysers, Christian; Fadiga, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of mirror neurons, much effort has been invested into Studying their location and properties in the human brain. Here we review these original findings and introduce the Main topics of this special issue of Social Neuroscience. What does the mirror system code? How is the mirror

  13. The manufacturing and metrology of off-axis mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, Karlheinz; Rascher, Rolf; Küpper, Lutz; Liebl, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Especially in the area of the large mirror manufacturing only a few manufacturers are capable to produce optical surfaces of high quality. Therefore a deterministic process should be developed in the project IFasO. In the field of telescope optics off-axis optical systems are becoming increasingly important. These systems try to avoid an obstructing of the incoming light by moving the secondary mirror out of the primary mirror's optical axis. This advantage leads to an increasing market for this type of optical surface. Until now off-axis mirrors were difficult or almost impossible to produce. With the processes developed in IFasO, high quality mirrors become possible. For this reason, this paper describes the manufacturing of off-axis surfaces and its problems. The mirror production used in the project IFasO is based on the specific design of the CNC center developed by the company Optotech. This center UPG2000 is capable of grinding, polishing, sagitta measurement and interferometric measurement in one mounting of the specimen. Usually a large optics has to be transported during their manufacturing after every individual process step. There is always a risk of damage of the specimen. The exact orientation of the surface relatively to the tool position is also required. This takes a huge amount of time and makes up most of the production time. In this presentation the use of UPG2000 and the next steps within the process development are described. In the current status the manufacturing of large off-axis elements with a PV < λ/10 rms is reproducible.

  14. High-precision cryogenic wheel mechanisms of the JWST/MIRI instrument: performance of the flight models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, O.; Müller, F.; Birkmann, S.; Böhm, A.; Ebert, M.; Grözinger, U.; Henning, Th.; Hofferbert, R.; Huber, A.; Lemke, D.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Scheithauer, S.; Gross, T.; Fischer, T.; Luichtel, G.; Merkle, H.; Übele, M.; Wieland, H.-U.; Amiaux, J.; Jager, R.; Glauser, A.; Parr-Burman, P.; Sykes, J.

    2010-07-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) aboard JWST is equipped with one filter wheel and two dichroic-grating wheel mechanisms to reconfigure the instrument between observing modes such as broad/narrow-band imaging, coronagraphy and low/medium resolution spectroscopy. Key requirements for the three mechanisms with up to 18 optical elements on the wheel include: (1) reliable operation at T = 7 K, (2) high positional accuracy of 4 arcsec, (3) low power dissipation, (4) high vibration capability, (5) functionality at 7 K ball bearing, a central torque motor for actuation, a ratchet system with monolithic CuBe flexural pivots for precise and powerless positioning and a magnetoresistive position sensor has been implemented. We report here the final performance and lessons-learnt from the successful acceptance test program of the MIRI wheel mechanism flight models. The mechanisms have been meanwhile integrated into the flight model of the MIRI instrument, ready for launch in 2014 by an Ariane 5 rocket.

  15. Wavefront alignment research of segmented mirror synthetic aperture optical (SAO) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; An, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Hao

    2010-05-01

    Wavefront control technology and imaging experiment are introduced for a segmented mirror SAO system with deformable sub-mirrors. This system is a RC style with 300mm aperture, 4.5 F#, +/-0.4°FOV, 0.45~0.75μm wave band, and diffraction-limit design MTF. The primary mirror is composed by three sub-mirrors, with parabolic shape, and each deformable sub-mirror has 19 actuators to control and keep the surface shape, and 5 actuators to align sub-mirrors location in 5 degree of freedom. Interferometer is used to feed back and control exit wavefront error, and base on measurement and finite element analysis, location and quanitity of actuators are optimized, making the surface shape and misadjustment errors interact and compensate each other, and the synthetic system exit pupil wavefront error is controlled. The integrated exit pupil wavefront errors are gotten by ZYGO interferometer, and central FOV is 0.077λRMS, and edge FOV is 0.093λRMS. At the end, an imaging experiment is executed, and good results are obtained, which proves, the deformable sub-mirrors have the ability to meliorate alignment and the latter can retroact the former, and this relationship iterate make system exit pupil wavefront error convergence and improve segmented mirror SAO system imaging ability.

  16. ATLAST ULE mirror segment performance analytical predictions based on thermally induced distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhower, Michael J.; Cohen, Lester M.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Matthews, Gary W.; Nissen, Joel A.; Park, Sang C.; Peabody, Hume L.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for a 9.2 m aperture space-borne observatory operating across the UV/Optical/NIR spectra. The primary mirror for ATLAST is a segmented architecture with pico-meter class wavefront stability. Due to its extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expansion, a leading candidate for the primary mirror substrate is Corning's ULE® titania-silicate glass. The ATLAST ULE® mirror substrates will be maintained at `room temperature' during on orbit flight operations minimizing the need for compensation of mirror deformation between the manufacturing temperature and the operational temperatures. This approach requires active thermal management to maintain operational temperature while on orbit. Furthermore, the active thermal control must be sufficiently stable to prevent time-varying thermally induced distortions in the mirror substrates. This paper describes a conceptual thermal management system for the ATLAST 9.2 m segmented mirror architecture that maintains the wavefront stability to less than 10 pico-meters/10 minutes RMS. Thermal and finite element models, analytical techniques, accuracies involved in solving the mirror figure errors, and early findings from the thermal and thermal-distortion analyses are presented.

  17. Mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space: design and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Laslandes, Marie; Ferrari, Marc; Hourtoule, Claire; Singer, Christian; Devilliers, Christophe; Lopez, Celine; Chazallet, Frederic; 10.1117/1.OE.52.9.091803

    2013-01-01

    The need for both high quality images and lightweight structures is one of the main drivers in space telescope design. An efficient wavefront control system will become mandatory in future large observatories, retaining performance while relaxing specifications in the global system's stability. We present the mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space project, which aims to demonstrate the applicability of active optics for future space instrumentation. It has led to the development of a 24-actuator, 90-mm-diameter active mirror, able to compensate for large lightweight primary mirror deformations in the telescope's exit pupil. The correcting system has been designed for expected wavefront errors from 3-m-class lightweight primary mirrors, while also taking into account constraints for space use. Finite element analysis allowed an optimization of the system in order to achieve a precision of correction better than 10 nm rms. A dedicated testbed has been designed to fully characterize the...

  18. Steps toward increasing Q in mirror systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.

    1979-08-20

    Experiments such as the 2XIIB experiment at Livermore have established the ability of mirror systems to confine high temperature, high density plasmas at central beta values exceeding unity. Given these results the next tasks for the mirror approach are to explore means for increasing the energy gain factor Q and to scale up the plasma volume, both of these requirements deriving from economic constraints. This report discusses means for increasng Q, including recent improvements in the tandem mirror concept and design studies of the field-reversed mirror in the context of upcoming and proposed scaled-up mirror experiments.

  19. [Phantom limb pain syndrome: therapeutic approach using mirror therapy in a Geriatric Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González García, Paloma; Manzano Hernández, M Pilar; Muñoz Tomás, M Teresa; Martín Hernández, Carlos; Forcano García, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of mirror visual feedback was initially introduced to alleviate phantom pain by restoring motor function through plastic changes in the human primary motor cortex. It is a promising novel technique that gives a new perspective to neurological rehabilitation. Using this therapy, the mirror neuron system is activated and decrease the activity of those systems that perceive protopathic pain, making somatosensory cortex reorganization possible. This paper reports the results of the mirror therapy in three patients with phantom limb pain after recent lower limb amputation, showing its analgesic effects and its benefits as a comprehensive rehabilitation instrument for lower limb amputee geriatric patients.

  20. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  1. Mirror neurons: their implications for group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Victor L

    2010-10-01

    Recently discovered mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the brain register the actions and intentions of both the organism and others in the environment. As such, they may play a significant role in social behavior and groups. This paper considers the potential implications of mirror neurons and related neural networks for group therapists, proposing that mirror neurons and mirror systems provide "hard-wired" support for the group therapist's belief in the centrality of relationships in the treatment process and exploring their value in accounting for group-as-a-whole phenomena. Mirror neurons further confirm the holistic, social nature of perception, action, and intention as distinct from a stimulus-response behaviorism. The implications of mirror neurons and mirroring processes for the group therapist role, interventions, and training are also discussed.

  2. Illusion-related brain activations: a new virtual reality mirror box system for use during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Martin; Kamping, Sandra; Kirsch, Pinar; Rance, Mariela; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Joerg; Fuchs, Xaver; Bach, Felix; Maaß, Heiko; Cakmak, Hüseyin; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-12

    Extended viewing of movements of one's intact limb in a mirror as well as motor imagery have been shown to decrease pain in persons with phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome and to increase the movement ability in hemiparesis following stroke. In addition, mirrored movements differentially activate sensorimotor cortex in amputees with and without phantom limb pain. However, using a so-called mirror box has technical limitations, some of which can be overcome by virtual reality applications. We developed a virtual reality mirror box application and evaluated its comparability to a classical mirror box setup. We applied both paradigms to 20 healthy controls and analyzed vividness and authenticity of the illusion as well as brain activation patterns. In both conditions, subjects reported similar intensities for the sensation that movements of the virtual left hand felt as if they were executed by their own left hand. We found activation in the primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the actual movement, with stronger activation for the virtual reality 'mirror box' compared to the classical mirror box condition, as well as activation in the primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the mirrored/virtual movement. We conclude that a virtual reality application of the mirror box is viable and that it might be useful for future research.

  3. Improved cylindrical mirror energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study has been carried out of the electron-optical properties of improved design of the cylindrical mirror energy analyzer. Both external and internal electrodes of the analyzer are divided into three isolated parts, whereby the potentials on the individual parts can be regulated independently from each other. In symmetric operating mode at identical potentials on the side parts of the electrodes, a significant increase has been obtained in resolving power and light-gathering power of the analyzer compared to the standard design of the cylindrical mirror. In asymmetric operating mode, which is implemented in a linear potential distribution on the external electrode, the conditions have been found under which the linear dispersion of the analyzer increases several times.

  4. Spectral Theory and Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in string theory have revealed a surprising connection between spectral theory and local mirror symmetry: it has been found that the quantization of mirror curves to toric Calabi-Yau threefolds leads to trace class operators, whose spectral properties are conjecturally encoded in the enumerative geometry of the Calabi-Yau. This leads to a new, infinite family of solvable spectral problems: the Fredholm determinants of these operators can be found explicitly in terms of Gromov-Witten invariants and their refinements; their spectrum is encoded in exact quantization conditions, and turns out to be determined by the vanishing of a quantum theta function. Conversely, the spectral theory of these operators provides a non-perturbative definition of topological string theory on toric Calabi-Yau threefolds. In particular, their integral kernels lead to matrix integral representations of the topological string partition function, which explain some number-theoretic properties of the periods. In this...

  5. An alignment and integration technique for mirror segment pairs on the Constellation-X telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Owens, Scott; Lehan, John; Olsen, Larry; Saha, Timo; Wallace, Tom; Zhang, Will

    2007-09-01

    We present the concepts behind the current alignment and integration technique for a Constellation-X primary-secondary mirror segment pair prior to an x-ray beam line test. We examine the effects of a passive mount on thin glass x-ray mirror segments, and the issues of mount shape and environment on alignment. We also investigate how bonding and transfer to a permanent housing affects the quality of the final image.

  6. Output characteristics of right angle cone mirror cavity laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongqi Li; Zuhai Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The anti-misalignment stability and output characteristics of the right angle cone cavity laser are experimentally studied. When the misalignment angle of the cone mirror turns to 46.8 minutes, the single-pulse output energy of the plano-cone cavity laser decreases 24% and the near-field beam patterns have little change; as for the beam directional stability, when the measuring place stands 3.12 m in front of the output mirror, the near-field beam patterns of the plano-cone laser are located at the primary places until the misalignment angle of the cone mirror turns to 18 minutes. These results show that the plano-cone cavity laser has better performances in comparison with the plano-concave cavity laser. The analytical results of the mode instrument are also obtained, which show that the near-field beam intensity distribution of the plano-cone mirror cavity laser is near to the plane wave.

  7. Mirror agnosia and the mirrored-self misidentification delusion: a hypnotic analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Michael H; Cox, Rochelle E; Barnier, Amanda J; Langdon, Robyn; Coltheart, Max

    2012-05-01

    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's reflection in the mirror is a stranger. Current theories suggest that one pathway to the delusion is mirror agnosia (a deficit in which patients are unable to use mirror knowledge when interacting with mirrors). This study examined whether a hypnotic suggestion for mirror agnosia can recreate features of the delusion. Ten high hypnotisable participants were given either a suggestion to not understand mirrors or to see the mirror as a window. Participants were asked to look into a mirror and describe what they saw. Participants were tested on their understanding of mirrors and received a series of challenges. Participants then received a detailed postexperimental inquiry. Three of five participants given the suggestion to not understand mirrors reported seeing a stranger and maintained this belief when challenged. These participants also showed signs of mirror agnosia. No participants given the suggestion to see a window reported seeing a stranger. Results indicate that a hypnotic suggestion for mirror agnosia can be used to recreate the mirrored-self misidentification delusion. Factors influencing the effectiveness of hypnotic analogues of psychopathology, such as participants' expectations and interpretations, are discussed.

  8. Mirror Metrology Using Nano-Probe Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Hong, Maoling; Byron, Glenn; McClelland, Ryan; Chan, Kai-Wing

    2012-01-01

    Thin, lightweight mirrors are needed for future x-ray space telescopes in order to increase x-ray collecting area while maintaining a reduced mass and volume capable of being launched on existing rockets. However, it is very difficult to determine the undistorted shape of such thin mirrors because the mounting of the mirror during measurement causes distortion. Traditional kinematic mounts have insufficient supports to control the distortion to measurable levels and prevent the mirror from vibrating during measurement. Over-constrained mounts (non-kinematic) result in an unknown force state causing mirror distortion that cannot be determined or analytically removed. In order to measure flexible mirrors, it is necessary to over-constrain the mirror. Over-constraint causes unknown distortions to be applied to the mirror. Even if a kinematic constraint system can be used, necessary imperfections in the kinematic assumption can lead to an unknown force state capable of distorting the mirror. Previously, thicker, stiffer, and heavier mirrors were used to achieve low optical figure distortion. These mirrors could be measured to an acceptable level of precision using traditional kinematic mounts. As lighter weight precision optics have developed, systems such as the whiffle tree or hydraulic supports have been used to provide additional mounting supports while maintaining the kinematic assumption. The purpose of this invention is to over-constrain a mirror for optical measurement without causing unacceptable or unknown distortions. The invention uses force gauges capable of measuring 1/10,000 of a Newton attached to nano-actuators to support a thin x-ray optic with known and controlled forces to allow for figure measurement and knowledge of the undeformed mirror figure. The mirror is hung from strings such that it is minimally distorted and in a known force state. However, the hanging mirror cannot be measured because it is both swinging and vibrating. In order to

  9. Mirror-Symmetric Matrices and Their Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国林; 冯正和

    2002-01-01

    The well-known centrosymmetric matrices correctly reflect mirror-symmetry with no component or only one component on the mirror plane. Mirror-symmetric matrices defined in this paper can represent mirror-symmetric structures with various components on the mirror plane. Some basic properties of mirror-symmetric matrices were studied and applied to interconnection analysis. A generalized odd/even-mode decomposition scheme was developed based on the mirror reflection relationship for mirror-symmetric multiconductor transmission lines (MTLs). The per-unit-length (PUL) impedance matrix Z and admittance matrix Y can be divided into odd-mode and even-mode PUL matrices. Thus the order of the MTL system is reduced from n to k and k+p, where p(≥0)is the conductor number on the mirror plane. The analysis of mirror-symmetric matrices is related to the theory of symmetric group, which is the most effective tool for the study of symmetry.

  10. Preservation of Thermal Control Specular Gold Baffle Surface on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MonteedeGarcia, Kristina; Patel, Jignasha; Perry, Radford, III

    2010-01-01

    Extremely tight thermal control property degradation allowances on the vapor-deposited, gold-coated IEC baffle surface, made necessary by the cryogenic JWST Observatory operations, dictate tight contamination requirements on adjacent surfaces. Theoretical degradation in emittance with contaminant thickness was calculated. Maximum allowable source outgassing rates were calculated using worst case view factors from source to baffle surface. Tight requirements pushed the team to change the design of the adjacent surfaces to minimize the outgassing sources

  11. Reflectivity-modulated grating-mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The invention relates to vertical cavity lasers (VCL) incorporating a reflectivity-modulated grating mirror (1) for modulating the laser output. A cavity is formed by a bottom mirror (4), an active region (3), and an outcoupling top grating mirror (1) formed by a periodic refractive index grating...... to the oscillation axis. A modulated voltage (91) is applied in reverse bias between the n- and p-doped layers to modulate the refractive index of the electrooptic material layer (12) and thereby the reflectivity spectrum of the grating mirror (1). The reflectivity of the grating mirror (1) can be modulated between...... a reflectivity with little or no out coupling and a reflectivity with normal out coupling, wherein lasing in the VCL is supported at both the first and the second reflectivity. As the out coupling mirror modulates the output, the lasing does not need to be modulated, and the invention provides the advantage...

  12. Standard specification for silvered flat glass mirror

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the requirements for silvered flat glass mirrors of rectangular shape supplied as cut sizes, stock sheets or as lehr ends and to which no further processing (such as edgework or other fabrication) has been done. 1.2 This specification covers the quality requirements of silvered annealed monolithic clear and tinted flat glass mirrors up to 6 mm (¼ in.) thick. The mirrors are intended to be used indoors for mirror glazing, for components of decorative accessories or for similar uses. 1.3 This specification does not address safety glazing materials nor requirements for mirror applications. Consult model building codes and other applicable standards for safety glazing applications. 1.4 Mirrors covered in this specification are not intended for use in environments where high humidity or airborne corrosion promoters, or both, are consistently present (such as swimming pool areas, ocean-going vessels, chemical laboratories and other corrosive environments). 1.5 The dimensional val...

  13. Mirror Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Förster, A; Baba, H; Bähr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; De Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; MANDAT, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Michałowski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pareschi, G; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Pühlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; Van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wiśniewski, Ł; Wörnlein, A; Yoshida, T

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.

  14. Deformable mirrors development program at ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Brinkmann, Martin; Jakob, Gerd; Lilley, Paul; Casali, Mark; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Kasper, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, adaptive optics has become essential in different fields of research including medicine and industrial applications. With this new need, the market of deformable mirrors has expanded a lot allowing new technologies and actuation principles to be developed. Several E-ELT instruments have identified the need for post focal deformable mirrors but with the increasing size of the telescopes the requirements on the deformable mirrors become more demanding. A simple scaling up of existing technologies from few hundred actuators to thousands of actuators will not be sufficient to satisfy the future needs of ESO. To bridge the gap between available deformable mirrors and the future needs for the E-ELT, ESO started a development program for deformable mirror technologies. The requirements and the path to get the deformable mirrors for post focal adaptive optics systems for the E-ELT is presented.

  15. Mirror QCD and Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Pasechnik, Roman; Teryaev, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    An analog of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) sector known as mirror QCD (mQCD) can affect the cosmological evolution and help in resolving the Cosmological Constant problem. In this work, we explore an intriguing possibility for a compensation of the negative QCD vacuum contribution to the ground state energy density of the universe by means of a positive contribution from the chromomagnetic gluon condensate in mQCD. The trace anomaly compensation condition and the form of the mQCD coupling constant in the infrared limit have been proposed by analysing a partial non-perturbative solution of the Einstein--Yang-Mills equations of motion.

  16. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  17. Inhomogeneous interface laser mirror coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, A M

    1979-09-01

    Methods of improving the durability of thin-film laser mirror coatings for 10.6 microm using thorium fluoride, zinc selenide, and zinc sulfide materials have been investigated. The largest improvement in film durability was obtained by using inhomogeneous interface fabrication for all the dielectric-dielectric interfaces and by incorporating cerium fluoride protective overcoating material into the film design. Experimental results are given for enhanced reflectors, polarization-selective coatings, and buried-grating aperture-sharing coatings designed for high-power laser applications.

  18. Mirror averaging with sparsity priors

    CERN Document Server

    Dalalyan, Arnak

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of aggregating the elements of a (possibly infinite) dictionary for building a decision procedure, that aims at minimizing a given criterion. Along with the dictionary, an independent identically distributed training sample is available, on which the performance of a given procedure can be tested. In a fairly general set-up, we establish an oracle inequality for the Mirror Averaging aggregate based on any prior distribution. This oracle inequality is applied in the context of sparse coding for different problems of statistics and machine learning such as regression, density estimation and binary classification.

  19. Transport phenomena in stochastic magnetic mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Malyshkin, Leonid; Kulsrud, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Parallel thermal conduction along stochastic magnetic field lines may be reduced because the heat conducting electrons become trapped and detrapped between regions of strong magnetic field (magnetic mirrors). The problem reduces to a simple but realistic model for diffusion of mono-energetic electrons based on the fact that when there is a reduction of diffusion, it is controlled by a subset of the mirrors, the principle mirrors. The diffusion reduction can be considered as equivalent to an e...

  20. Pulse compression by use of deformable mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeek, E; Maginnis, K; Backus, S; Russek, U; Murnane, M; Mourou, G; Kapteyn, H; Vdovin, G

    1999-04-01

    An electrostatically deformable, gold-coated, silicon nitride membrane mirror was used as a phase modulator to compress pulses from 92 to 15 fs. Both an iterative genetic algorithm and single-step dispersion compensation based on frequency-resolved optical gating calibration of the mirror were used to compress pulses to within 10% of the transform limit. Frequency-resolved optical gating was used to characterize the pulses and to test the range of the deformable-mirror-based compressor.

  1. Mirrored Light Field Video Camera Adapter

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Dorian; Dansereau, Donald G.; Martin, Steve; Corke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the design of a custom mirror-based light field camera adapter that is cheap, simple in construction, and accessible. Mirrors of different shape and orientation reflect the scene into an upwards-facing camera to create an array of virtual cameras with overlapping field of view at specified depths, and deliver video frame rate light fields. We describe the design, construction, decoding and calibration processes of our mirror-based light field camera adapter in preparation ...

  2. MIRROR THERAPY: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Aishath Najiha; Jagatheesan Alagesan; Vandana J Rathod; Poongundran Paranthaman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidences on mirror box therapy for the management of various musculoskeletal conditions. A systemic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy. The included journal articles were reviewed and assessed for its significance. Fifty one studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: 24 studies focussed on mirror therapy after stroke, thirteen studies focusse...

  3. Optical illusion alters M1 excitability after mirror therapy: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, C H; Ringer, T; Blessin, J; Seidel, G; Grieshammer, S; Lange, R; Hamzei, F

    2012-11-01

    The contralesional primary motor cortex (M1) has been suggested to be involved in the motor recovery after mirror therapy, but whether the ipsilesional M1 is influenced by the contralesional M1 via transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) is still unclear. The present study investigated the change of IHI as well as the intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation of both M1 induced by training in a mirror with the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In this 2 × 2 factorial design (time × group), healthy subjects exercised standardized motor skills with their right hand on four consecutive days. Either a mirror (mirror group) or a board (control group) was positioned between their hands. Before and after training TMS was applied along with training tests of both hands. Tests were the same motor skills exercised daily by both groups. Tests of the untrained left hand improved significantly more in the mirror group than in the control group after training (P = 0.02) and showed a close correlation with an increase of intracortical inhibition of M1(left). IHI did not show any difference between investigation time points and groups. The present study confirms the previous suggestion of the involvement of the "contralesional" left-side (ipsilateral to the hand behind the mirror) M1 after mirror therapy, which is not mediated by IHI. Even with the same motor skill training (both groups performed same motor skills) but with different visual information, different networks are involved in training-induced plasticity.

  4. Status of NIF mirror technologies for completion of the NIF facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J

    2008-08-07

    The 1600 mirrors required for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are now coated with the last optics currently being installed. The combined surface area of the NIF mirrors is almost 450 square meters, roughly 3.4 times greater than the surface area of the two Keck primary mirrors. Additionally, the power handling specification of NIF mirrors is 19 orders of magnitude greater than that of the Keck mirrors. The NIF laser will be at least 40x greater energy than the previous LLNL fusion laser called NOVA. To manufacture these mirrors, a number of new technologies (electrolytic in-situ dressing, ion figuring, source stabilization) were used that were not available for previous fusion laser optics. Post deposition technologies designed to increase laser resistance (off-line laser conditioning, solarization, air knives) have also been utilized. This paper summarizes the differences in technologies used to manufacture NIF mirrors from those used for previous fusion lasers and examines potential future technologies that would enable higher fluence operations and extend lifetimes.

  5. Four decades of ZERODUR mirror substrates for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhring, Thorsten; Jedamzik, Ralf; Westerhoff, Thomas; Hartmann, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Initiated in 1968 by the first order of Max-Planck-Institute in Heidelberg successful history of ZERODUR(R) continues now since 40 years. ZERODUR(R) zero expansion glass ceramic from SCHOTT has been the material of choice in astronomy for decades, thanks to its special properties such as its extremely high thermal and mechanical stability. Today most of the major modern optical telescopes of the 4 m class and of the 8 m to 10 m class are equipped with ZERODUR(R) . For the future several Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) projects are in development, which are designed with even larger primary mirrors ranging from 30 m to 42 m. Also here ZERODUR(R) is under consideration. A historical review, prominent examples of astronomical projects with glass ceramic mirror substrates, and an outlook to the future is given in this paper.

  6. Single Crystal Silicon Mirrors for Spaceflight Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a well understood process for manufacturing visible quality SCSi mirrors. Areas of research include stress relief, figure, finish, and light weighting...

  7. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Dixit, Puneet Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh; Singh, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand. PMID:26019431

  8. Analytic solution for a quartic electron mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straton, Jack C., E-mail: straton@pdx.edu

    2015-01-15

    A converging electron mirror can be used to compensate for spherical and chromatic aberrations in an electron microscope. This paper presents an analytical solution to a diode (two-electrode) electrostatic mirror including the next term beyond the known hyperbolic shape. The latter is a solution of the Laplace equation to second order in the variables perpendicular to and along the mirror's radius (z{sup 2}−r{sup 2}/2) to which we add a quartic term (kλz{sup 4}). The analytical solution is found in terms of Jacobi cosine-amplitude functions. We find that a mirror less concave than the hyperbolic profile is more sensitive to changes in mirror voltages and the contrary holds for the mirror more concave than the hyperbolic profile. - Highlights: • We find the analytical solution for electron mirrors whose curvature has z4 dependence added to the usual z{sup 2} – r{sup 2}/2 terms. • The resulting Jacobi cosine-amplitude function reduces to the well-known cosh solution in the limit where the new term is 0. • This quartic term gives a mirror designer additional flexibility for eliminating spherical and chromatic aberrations. • The possibility of using these analytical results to approximately model spherical tetrode mirrors close to axis is noted.

  9. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  10. Double curvature mirrors for linear concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Tamir; Ackler, Harold; Finot, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Skyline Solar's medium concentration photovoltaic system uses quasi-parabolic mirrors and one axis tracking. Improvements in levelized cost of energy can be achieved by effective management of non-uniformity of the flux line on the panels. To reduce non uniformity of the flux line due to mirror to mirror gaps, Skyline developed a dual curvature mirror that stretches the flux line along the panel. Extensive modeling and experiments have been conducted to analyze the impact of this new design and to optimize the design.

  11. The uncanny mirror: a re-framing of mirror self-experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Philippe; Zahavi, Dan

    2011-06-01

    Mirror self-experience is re-casted away from the cognitivist interpretation that has dominated discussions on the issue since the establishment of the mirror mark test. Ideas formulated by Merleau-Ponty on mirror self-experience point to the profoundly unsettling encounter with one's specular double. These ideas, together with developmental evidence are re-visited to provide a new, psychologically and phenomenologically more valid account of mirror self-experience: an experience associated with deep wariness.

  12. One mirror beam steering: determination of steering mirror parameters from image pointing direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben B.; Granger, Zachary A.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models are used to establish the exact path of a beam reflected by a plane mirror in terms of the mirror geometry descriptors. In particular, the mirror geometry descriptors (tilt angles) are determined as functions of the beam path in image space. This is also useful for determining scan patterns when the mirror is used as a scanning device. These formulations are readily adaptable to commercially available ray tracing programs.

  13. Design and optimization for main support structure of a large-area off-axis three-mirror space camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Xiaoxue; Ma, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    To ensure excellent dynamic and static performance of large-area, off-axis three-mirror anastigmat (TMA)-space cameras, and to realize a lighter weight for the entire system, a truss support structure design is applied in this study. In contrast to traditional methods, this paper adopts topology optimization based on the solid isotropic materials with penalization method on the truss structure design. Through reasonable object function and constraint choice, optimal topology results that have concerned the effect of gravity in the X, Y, and Z axis are achieved. Subsequently, the initial truss structure is designed based on the results and manufacturing technology. Moreover, to reduce the random vibration response of the secondary mirror and fold mirror without mechanical performance decline of the whole truss, a weighted optimization of truss size is proposed and the final truss structure is achieved. Finite element analysis and experiments have confirmed the reliability of the design and optimization method. The designed truss-structure camera maintains excellent static performance with the relative optical axis angle between the primary mirror and corresponding mirrors (secondary mirror and fold mirror) being less than 5.3 in. Dynamic performances, such as random and sinusoidal vibration responses, also met the requirements that the acceleration RMS value for mount points of the fold mirror should be less than 20 g and the primary frequency reached 97.2 Hz.

  14. Neurodegeneration and mirror image agnosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normal Percept with abnormal meaning (Agnosias has been described from nineteenth century onwards. Later literature became abundant with information on the spectrum of Prosopagnosias. However, selective difficulty in identifying reflected self images with relatively better cognitive functions leads to problems in differentiating it from non-organic psychosis. Aim: In the present study, we investigated patients with dementia who showed difficulty in identifying reflected self images while they were being tested for problems in gnosis with reference to identification of reflected objects, animals, relatives, and themselves and correlate with neuropsychological and radiological parameters. Patients and Methods: Five such patients were identified and tested with a 45 cm × 45 cm mirror kept at 30-cm distance straight ahead of them. Results: Mirror image agnosia is seen in patients with moderate stage posterior dementias who showed neuropsychological and radiological evidence of right parietal dysfunction. Conclusion: Interpretation of reflected self images perception in real time probably involves distinct data-linking circuits in the right parietal lobe, which may get disrupted early in the course of the disease.

  15. FAME: freeform active mirror experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Agócs, Tibor; Miller, Chris; Black, Martin; Farkas, Szigfrid; Lemared, Sabri; Bettonvil, Felix; Montgomery, David; Marcos, Michel; Jaskó, Attila; van Duffelen, Farian; Challita, Zalpha; Fok, Sandy; Kiaeerad, Fatemeh; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2016-07-01

    FAME is a four-year project and part of the OPTICON/FP7 program that is aimed at providing a breakthrough component for future compact, wide field, high resolution imagers or spectrographs, based on both Freeform technology, and the flexibility and versatility of active systems. Due to the opening of a new parameter space in optical design, Freeform Optics are a revolution in imaging systems for a broad range of applications from high tech cameras to astronomy, via earth observation systems, drones and defense. Freeform mirrors are defined by a non-rotational symmetry of the surface shape, and the fact that the surface shape cannot be simply described by conicoids extensions, or off-axis conicoids. An extreme freeform surface is a significantly challenging optical surface, especially for UV/VIS/NIR diffraction limited instruments. The aim of the FAME effort is to use an extreme freeform mirror with standard optics in order to propose an integrated system solution for use in future instruments. The work done so far concentrated on identification of compact, fast, widefield optical designs working in the visible, with diffraction limited performance; optimization of the number of required actuators and their layout; the design of an active array to manipulate the face sheet, as well as the actuator design. In this paper we present the status of the demonstrator development, with focus on the different building blocks: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, the active array, a highly controllable thermal actuator array, and the metrology and control system.

  16. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain).

  17. Neurodegeneration and Mirror Image Agnosia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal Percept with abnormal meaning (Agnosias) has been described from nineteenth century onwards. Later literature became abundant with information on the spectrum of Prosopagnosias. However, selective difficulty in identifying reflected self images with relatively better cognitive functions leads to problems in differentiating it from non-organic psychosis. Aim: In the present study, we investigated patients with dementia who showed difficulty in identifying reflected self images while they were being tested for problems in gnosis with reference to identification of reflected objects, animals, relatives, and themselves and correlate with neuropsychological and radiological parameters. Patients and Methods: Five such patients were identified and tested with a 45 cm × 45 cm mirror kept at 30-cm distance straight ahead of them. Results: Mirror image agnosia is seen in patients with moderate stage posterior dementias who showed neuropsychological and radiological evidence of right parietal dysfunction. Conclusion: Interpretation of reflected self images perception in real time probably involves distinct data-linking circuits in the right parietal lobe, which may get disrupted early in the course of the disease. PMID:25317393

  18. Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.

    2008-06-01

    Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic "flying mirror", which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of ≈4-6×1019 cm-3. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are ˜55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3×107 photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

  19. Electrochromic Mirrors With Variable Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucke, Friedrich G. K.

    1986-09-01

    Unstructured electrochromic mirrors with variable reflectance have been developed on the basis of hydrogen tungsten bronzes. The characteristic compounds of these devices are (1) solid ion-conducting layers ("electrolytes") resulting in only few micrometer thick all-solid-state systems, which can be enclosed between the substrate and a second glass plate and are thus protected from the environment, (2) integrated reflecting metal layers, and (3) hydrogen-storing electrochromic layers. Two basically different constructions are feasible. In "diffusion-driven" devices the bronze is formed (decomposed) by the chemical reaction x/2 H2+ W03⇔HxW03, in "field-driven" systems an electrochemical bronze formation (decomposition), x H + W03+ x e HxW03, takes place. The modes of construction are presented and compared, the electrochemistry of the thin layer cells involved is discussed, the prop-erties of devices according to the state of development are reported, and possible applications, e.g. as glare-free, inside and outside, automotive rear view mirrors with adjustable reflectance, are briefly described.

  20. Development of Stacked Core Technology for the Fabrication of Deep Lightweight UV Quality Space Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steve; Abplanalp, Cal; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ITT Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept mirror was completed at ITT Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. The parameters and test results of this concept mirror will be shown. The scale-up process will be discussed and the technology development path to a 4m mirror system by 2018 will also be outlined.

  1. Mirror particles and mirror matter: 50 years of speculations and searches

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    2006-01-01

    This text has been prepared for the talk at the ``ITEP Meeting on the future of heavy flavor physics'', Moscow, ITEP, July 24-25, 2006 (http://www.itep.ru/eng/bellemeeting). It describes emergence and evolution of concept of ``mirror particles'' and ``mirror matter'' and presents a concise guide to the ``mirror-land''.

  2. Mirror Observation of Finger Action Enhances Activity in Anterior Intraparietal Sulcus: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions related to visual information processing during mirror image movement observation. Thirteen healthy subjects performed a finger-thumb opposition task with the left and right hands separately, with or without access to mirror observation. In the mirror condition, one hand was reflected in a mirror placed above the abdomen in the MRI scanner. In the masked mirror condition, subjects performed the same task but with the mirror obscured. In both conditions, the other hand was held at rest behind the mirror. A between-task comparison (mirror versus masked mirror) revealed significant activation in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIP) while performing all tasks, regardless of which hand was used. The right aIP was significantly activated while moving the right hand. In contrast, in the left aIP, a small number of voxels showed a tendency toward activation during both left and right hand movement. The enhancement of ipsilateral aIP activity by the mirror image observation of finger action suggests that bimodal aIP neurons can be activated by visual information. We propose that activation in the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand can be induced by information passing through the ventral premotor area from the aIP. PMID:25792898

  3. Mirror observation of finger action enhances activity in anterior intraparietal sulcus: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions related to visual information processing during mirror image movement observation. Thirteen healthy subjects performed a finger-thumb opposition task with the left and right hands separately, with or without access to mirror observation. In the mirror condition, one hand was reflected in a mirror placed above the abdomen in the MRI scanner. In the masked mirror condition, subjects performed the same task but with the mirror obscured. In both conditions, the other hand was held at rest behind the mirror. A between-task comparison (mirror versus masked mirror) revealed significant activation in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIP) while performing all tasks, regardless of which hand was used. The right aIP was significantly activated while moving the right hand. In contrast, in the left aIP, a small number of voxels showed a tendency toward activation during both left and right hand movement. The enhancement of ipsilateral aIP activity by the mirror image observation of finger action suggests that bimodal aIP neurons can be activated by visual information. We propose that activation in the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand can be induced by information passing through the ventral premotor area from the aIP.

  4. Development and Acceptance Testing of the Dual Wheel Mechanism for the Tunable Filter Imager Cryogenic Instrument on the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Martin; Ahmad, Zakir

    2010-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will carry four scientific instruments, one of which is the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI), which is an instrument within the Fine Guidance Sensor. The Dual Wheel (DW) mechanism is being designed, built and tested by COM DEV Ltd. under contract from the Canadian Space Agency. The DW mechanism includes a pupil wheel (PW) holding seven coronagraphic masks and two calibration elements and a filter wheel (FW) holding nine blocking filters. The DW mechanism must operate at both room temperature and at 35K. Successful operation at 35K comprises positioning each optical element with the required repeatability, for several thousand occasions over the five year mission. The paper discusses the results of testing geared motors and bearings at the cryogenic temperature. In particular bearing retainer design and PGM-HT material, the effects of temperature gradients across bearings and the problems associated with cooling mechanisms down to cryogenic temperatures. The results of additional bearing tests are described that were employed to investigate an abnormally high initial torque experienced at cryogenic temperatures. The findings of these tests, was that the bearing retainer and the ball/race system could be adversely affected by the large temperature change from room temperature to cryogenic temperature and also the temperature gradient across the bearing. The DW mechanism is now performing successfully at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperature. The life testing of the mechanism is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2010.

  5. Towards Precise Constraints on the Chemical Compositions and Thermal Structures of Giant Exoplanets with a JWST GTO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jacob; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2017-06-01

    The chemical compositions and thermal structures of close-in planets are two of the major questions raised over the last 15+ years of exoplanet atmospheric characterization. These are fundamental questions in their own right, and answering them also has the potential to improve our understanding of the planets in the Solar System. JWST offers the opportunity to make a major advance on these topics by revealing a more complete and accurate inventory of the chemical species in exoplanet atmospheres and by precisely measuring atmospheric temperatures over a broad range of pressures. I will describe how we plan to use an Interdisciplinary Scientist GTO program to determine the compositions and thermal structures of transiting, hot giant exoplanets using dayside thermal emission measurements obtained at secondary eclipse. Our composition measurements are focused on determining absolute molecular abundances as a tracer of atmospheric metallicity and the abundance ratio of carbon to oxygen. The targets in our program have a range of masses and irradiation, which will enable us to test theories of how atmospheric metallicity varies with planet mass and how thermal structures respond to different levels of stellar forcing.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  7. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  8. SynLam(TM) Primary Mirror Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), has developed sandwich core composite material (SynLam(TM)) and related fabrication technology to address the drawbacks of...

  9. Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Frederick Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a precise, diffraction- limited, ultra-lightweight, composite- material (matrix/fiber) paraboloidal telescope mirror has been devised. Unlike the traditional process of fabrication of heavier glass-based mirrors, this process involves a minimum of manual steps and subjective judgment. Instead, this process involves objectively controllable, repeatable steps; hence, this process is better suited for mass production. Other processes that have been investigated for fabrication of precise composite-material lightweight mirrors have resulted in print-through of fiber patterns onto reflecting surfaces, and have not provided adequate structural support for maintenance of stable, diffraction-limited surface figures. In contrast, this process does not result in print-through of the fiber pattern onto the reflecting surface and does provide a lightweight, rigid structure capable of maintaining a diffraction-limited surface figure in the face of changing temperature, humidity, and air pressure. The process consists mainly of the following steps: 1. A precise glass mandrel is fabricated by conventional optical grinding and polishing. 2. The mandrel is coated with a release agent and covered with layers of a carbon- fiber composite material. 3. The outer surface of the outer layer of the carbon-fiber composite material is coated with a surfactant chosen to provide for the proper flow of an epoxy resin to be applied subsequently. 4. The mandrel as thus covered is mounted on a temperature-controlled spin table. 5. The table is heated to a suitable temperature and spun at a suitable speed as the epoxy resin is poured onto the coated carbon-fiber composite material. 6. The surface figure of the optic is monitored and adjusted by use of traditional Ronchi, Focault, and interferometric optical measurement techniques while the speed of rotation and the temperature are adjusted to obtain the desired figure. The proper selection of surfactant, speed or rotation

  10. LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov detector mirrors

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In a large dark room, men in white move around an immense structure some 7 m high, 10 m wide and nearly 2.5 m deep. Apparently effortlessly, they are installing the two large high-precision spherical mirrors. These mirrors will focus Cherenkov light, created by the charged particles that will traverse this detector, onto the photon detectors.

  11. Evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1982-03-09

    We discuss the evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept from the original conceptual reactor design (1977) through the first application of the thermal barrier concept to a reactor design (1979) to the beginning of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (1982).

  12. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  13. The Mirror Neuron System and Action Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, Giovanni; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Riggio, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Mirror neurons, first described in the rostral part of monkey ventral premotor cortex (area F5), discharge both when the animal performs a goal-directed hand action and when it observes another individual performing the same or a similar action. More recently, in the same area mirror neurons responding to the observation of mouth actions have been…

  14. Where do mirror neurons come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-03-01

    Debates about the evolution of the 'mirror neuron system' imply that it is an adaptation for action understanding. Alternatively, mirror neurons may be a byproduct of associative learning. Here I argue that the adaptation and associative hypotheses both offer plausible accounts of the origin of mirror neurons, but the associative hypothesis has three advantages. First, it provides a straightforward, testable explanation for the differences between monkeys and humans that have led some researchers to question the existence of a mirror neuron system. Second, it is consistent with emerging evidence that mirror neurons contribute to a range of social cognitive functions, but do not play a dominant, specialised role in action understanding. Finally, the associative hypothesis is supported by recent data showing that, even in adulthood, the mirror neuron system can be transformed by sensorimotor learning. The associative account implies that mirror neurons come from sensorimotor experience, and that much of this experience is obtained through interaction with others. Therefore, if the associative account is correct, the mirror neuron system is a product, as well as a process, of social interaction. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Unbroken Mirror Neurons in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Decety, Jean; Yang, Chia-Yen; Liu, Ji-Lin; Cheng, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Background: The "broken mirror" theory of autism, which proposes that a dysfunction of the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is responsible for the core social and cognitive deficits in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), has received considerable attention despite weak empirical evidence. Methods: In this electroencephalographic…

  16. Do mirror neurons subserve action understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Gregory

    2013-04-12

    Mirror neurons were once widely believed to support action understanding via motor simulation of the observed actions. Recent evidence regarding the functional properties of mirror neurons in monkeys as well as much neuropsychological evidence in humans has shown that this is not the case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mirror matter and primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Nicole F.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    1998-01-01

    A consequence of the evaporation of primordial black holes in the early universe may be the generation of mirror matter. This would have implications with regard to dark matter, and the number of light particle species in equilibrium at the time of big bang nucleosynthesis. The possibilities for the production of mirror matter by this mechanism are explored.

  18. Unbroken Mirror Neurons in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Decety, Jean; Yang, Chia-Yen; Liu, Ji-Lin; Cheng, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Background: The "broken mirror" theory of autism, which proposes that a dysfunction of the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is responsible for the core social and cognitive deficits in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), has received considerable attention despite weak empirical evidence. Methods: In this electroencephalographic…

  19. The Mirror Neuron System and Action Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, Giovanni; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Riggio, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Mirror neurons, first described in the rostral part of monkey ventral premotor cortex (area F5), discharge both when the animal performs a goal-directed hand action and when it observes another individual performing the same or a similar action. More recently, in the same area mirror neurons responding to the observation of mouth actions have been…

  20. Affective multimodal mirror: sensing and eliciting laughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melder, W.A.; Truong, K.P.; Uyl, M. den; Leeuwen, D.A. van; Neerincx, M.A.; Loos, L.R.; Stock Plum, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multimodal affective mirror that senses and elicits laughter. Currently, the mirror contains a vocal and a facial affect-sensing module, a component that fuses the output of these two modules to achieve a user-state assessment, a user state transition model, and a compone

  1. Mirror neurons through the lens of epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Pier F; Tramacere, Antonella; Simpson, Elizabeth A; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    The consensus view in mirror neuron research is that mirror neurons comprise a uniform, stable execution-observation matching system. In this opinion article, we argue that, in light of recent evidence, this is at best an incomplete and oversimplified view of mirror neurons, where activity is actually variable and more plastic than previously theorized. We propose an epigenetic account for understanding developmental changes in sensorimotor systems, including variations in mirror neuron activity. Although associative and genetic accounts fail to consider the complexity of genetic and nongenetic interactions, we propose a new evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) perspective, which predicts that environmental differences early in development should produce variations in mirror neuron response patterns, tuning them to the social environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mirror neurons and their clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Cattaneo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    One of the most exciting events in neurosciences over the past few years has been the discovery of a mechanism that unifies action perception and action execution. The essence of this 'mirror' mechanism is as follows: whenever individuals observe an action being done by someone else, a set of neurons that code for that action is activated in the observers' motor system. Since the observers are aware of the outcome of their motor acts, they also understand what the other individual is doing without the need for intermediate cognitive mediation. In this Review, after discussing the most pertinent data concerning the mirror mechanism, we examine the clinical relevance of this mechanism. We first discuss the relationship between mirror mechanism impairment and some core symptoms of autism. We then outline the theoretical principles of neurorehabilitation strategies based on the mirror mechanism. We conclude by examining the relationship between the mirror mechanism and some features of the environmental dependency syndromes.

  3. Cryostable lightweight frit bonded silicon mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, F.; McCarter, D.; Tangedahl, M.; Content, D.

    The excellent polishability, low density and relatively high stiffness of silicon make it an attractive candidate for optical applications that require superior performance. Assembly of silicon details by means of glass frit bonding permits significant light weighting thus enhancing the benefit of silicon mirrors. To demonstrate the performance potential, a small lightweight glass frit bonded silicon mirror was fabricated and tested for cryoability. The test mirror was 12.5cm in diameter with a 60cm spherical radius and a maximum thickness, at the perimeter, of 2.5cm. A machined silicon core was used to stiffen the two face sheets of the silicon sandwich. These three elements were assembled, by glass frit bonding, to form the substrate that was polished. The experimental evaluation in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, demonstrated cryostability performance significantly better than required by the mirror specification. Key WordsCryostable, Lightweight, Silicon, Frit Bond, Spherical, Mirror

  4. DAMA annual modulation and mirror Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerulli, R.; Cappella, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Villar, P. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Bernabei, R.; Belli, P. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Incicchitti, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Addazi, A.; Berezhiani, Z. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Universita di L' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Coppito, AQ (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    The DAMA experiment using ultra low background NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators has measured an annual modulation effect in the keV region which satisfies all the peculiarities of an effect induced by Dark Matter particles. In this paper we analyze this annual modulation effect in terms of mirror Dark Matter, an exact duplicate of ordinary matter from parallel hidden sector, which chemical composition is dominated by mirror helium while it can also contain significant fractions of heavier elements as Carbon and Oxygen. Dark mirror atoms are considered to interact with the target nuclei in the detector via Rutherford-like scattering induced by kinetic mixing between mirror and ordinary photons, both being massless. In the present analysis we consider various possible scenarios for the mirror matter chemical composition. For all the scenarios, the relevant ranges for the kinetic mixing parameter have been obtained taking also into account various existing uncertainties in nuclear and particle physics quantities. (orig.)

  5. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  6. DAMA annual modulation and mirror Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerulli, R.; Villar, P.; Cappella, F.; Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Incicchitti, A.; Addazi, A.; Berezhiani, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The DAMA experiment using ultra low background NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators has measured an annual modulation effect in the keV region which satisfies all the peculiarities of an effect induced by Dark Matter particles. In this paper we analyze this annual modulation effect in terms of mirror Dark Matter, an exact duplicate of ordinary matter from parallel hidden sector, which chemical composition is dominated by mirror helium while it can also contain significant fractions of heavier elements as Carbon and Oxygen. Dark mirror atoms are considered to interact with the target nuclei in the detector via Rutherford-like scattering induced by kinetic mixing between mirror and ordinary photons, both being massless. In the present analysis we consider various possible scenarios for the mirror matter chemical composition. For all the scenarios, the relevant ranges for the kinetic mixing parameter have been obtained taking also into account various existing uncertainties in nuclear and particle physics quantities.

  7. Mirror-image-induced magnetic modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Shi, Lei; Tuzer, Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Quidant, Romain; Meseguer, Francisco

    2013-01-22

    Reflection in a mirror changes the handedness of the real world, and right-handed objects turn left-handed and vice versa (M. Gardner, The Ambidextrous Universe, Penguin Books, 1964). Also, we learn from electromagnetism textbooks that a flat metallic mirror transforms an electric charge into a virtual opposite charge. Consequently, the mirror image of a magnet is another parallel virtual magnet as the mirror image changes both the charge sign and the curl handedness. Here we report the dramatic modification in the optical response of a silicon nanocavity induced by the interaction with its image through a flat metallic mirror. The system of real and virtual dipoles can be interpreted as an effective magnetic dipole responsible for a strong enhancement of the cavity scattering cross section.

  8. [Motion control of moving mirror based on fixed-mirror adjustment in FTIR spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-bing; Xu, Xian-ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-qiu; Li, Jun-wei

    2012-08-01

    The performance of the uniform motion of the moving mirror, which is the only constant motion part in FTIR spectrometer, and the performance of the alignment of the fixed mirror play a key role in FTIR spectrometer, and affect the interference effect and the quality of the spectrogram and may restrict the precision and resolution of the instrument directly. The present article focuses on the research on the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. In order to improve the FTIR spectrometer, the maglev support system was designed for the moving mirror and the phase detection technology was adopted to adjust the tilt angle between the moving mirror and the fixed mirror. This paper also introduces an improved fuzzy PID control algorithm to get the accurate speed of the moving mirror and realize the control strategy from both hardware design and algorithm. The results show that the development of the moving mirror motion control system gets sufficient accuracy and real-time, which can ensure the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror.

  9. Toward a large lightweight mirror for AO: development of a 1m Ni coated CFRP mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. J.; Doel, A. P.; Brooks, D.; Strangwood, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present our recent developments towards the construction of a large, thin, single-piece mirror for adaptive optics (AO). Our current research program aims to have completed fabrication and testing of a 1m diameter, nickel coated carbon-fibre reinforced cyanate ester resin mirror by the last quarter of 2009. This composite mirror material is being developed to provide a lightweight and robust alternative to thin glass shell mirrors, with the challenge of future large deformable mirrors such as the 2.5m M4 on the E-ELT in mind. A detailed analysis of the material properties of test mirror samples is being performed at the University of Birmingham (UK), the first results of which are discussed and presented here. We discuss the project progress achieved so far, including fabrication of the 1m flat moulds for the replication process, manufacturing and testing methods for 20 cm diameter sample mirrors and system simulations.

  10. Mirror neurons: from origin to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey; Catmur, Caroline; Press, Clare; Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    This article argues that mirror neurons originate in sensorimotor associative learning and therefore a new approach is needed to investigate their functions. Mirror neurons were discovered about 20 years ago in the monkey brain, and there is now evidence that they are also present in the human brain. The intriguing feature of many mirror neurons is that they fire not only when the animal is performing an action, such as grasping an object using a power grip, but also when the animal passively observes a similar action performed by another agent. It is widely believed that mirror neurons are a genetic adaptation for action understanding; that they were designed by evolution to fulfill a specific socio-cognitive function. In contrast, we argue that mirror neurons are forged by domain-general processes of associative learning in the course of individual development, and, although they may have psychological functions, they do not necessarily have a specific evolutionary purpose or adaptive function. The evidence supporting this view shows that (1) mirror neurons do not consistently encode action "goals"; (2) the contingency- and context-sensitive nature of associative learning explains the full range of mirror neuron properties; (3) human infants receive enough sensorimotor experience to support associative learning of mirror neurons ("wealth of the stimulus"); and (4) mirror neurons can be changed in radical ways by sensorimotor training. The associative account implies that reliable information about the function of mirror neurons can be obtained only by research based on developmental history, system-level theory, and careful experimentation.

  11. Archetypal-Imaging and Mirror-Gazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni B. Caputo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject’s unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for “imaging of the unconscious”. Future researches have been proposed.

  12. Archetypal-imaging and mirror-gazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Giovanni B

    2014-03-01

    Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one's own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject's unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for "imaging of the unconscious". Future researches have been proposed.

  13. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  14. Development of the fast steering secondary mirror assembly of GMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungho; Cho, Myung K.; Park, Chan; Han, Jeong-Yeol; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yoon, Yang-noh; Song, Je Heon; Park, Byeong-Gon; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Won Hyun; Jun, Youra; Yang, Ho-Soon; Moon, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang Jin; Kim, Ho-Sang; Lee, Kyoung-Don; Bernier, Robert; Alongi, Chris; Rakich, Andrew; Gardner, Paul; Dettmann, Lee; Rosenthal, Wylie

    2016-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be featured with two Gregorian secondary mirrors, an adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) and a fast-steering secondary mirror (FSM). The FSM has an effective diameter of 3.2 m and built as seven 1.1 m diameter circular segments, which are conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4m segments of the primary. Each FSM segment contains a tip-tilt capability for fine co-alignment of the telescope sub-apertures and fast guiding to attenuate telescope wind shake and mount control jitter. This tip-tilt capability thus enhances performance of the telescope in the seeing limited observation mode. As the first stage of the FSM development, Phase 0 study was conducted to develop a program plan detailing the design and manufacturing process for the seven FSM segments. The FSM development plan has been matured through an internal review by the GMTO-KASI team in May 2016 and fully assessed by an external review in June 2016. In this paper, we present the technical aspects of the FSM development plan.

  15. Black Hole Entropy, Marginal Stability and Mirror Symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspinwall, Paul S.; Maloney, Alexander; Simons, Aaron

    2006-10-06

    We consider the superconformal quantum mechanics associated to BPS black holes in type IIB Calabi-Yau compactifications. This quantum mechanics describes the dynamics of D-branes in the near-horizon attractor geometry of the black hole. In many cases, the black hole entropy can be found by counting the number of chiral primaries in this quantum mechanics. Both the attractor mechanism and notions of marginal stability play important roles in generating the large number of microstates required to explain this entropy. We compute the microscopic entropy explicitly in a few different cases, where the theory reduces to quantum mechanics on the moduli space of special Lagrangians. Under certain assumptions, the problem may be solved by implementing mirror symmetry as three T-dualities: this is essentially the mirror of a calculation by Gaiotto, Strominger and Yin. In some simple cases, the calculation may be done in greater generality without resorting to conjectures about mirror symmetry. For example, the K3 x T{sub 2} case may be studied precisely using the Fourier-Mukai transform.

  16. Mirror neurons: functions, mechanisms and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztop, Erhan; Kawato, Mitsuo; Arbib, Michael A

    2013-04-12

    Mirror neurons for manipulation fire both when the animal manipulates an object in a specific way and when it sees another animal (or the experimenter) perform an action that is more or less similar. Such neurons were originally found in macaque monkeys, in the ventral premotor cortex, area F5 and later also in the inferior parietal lobule. Recent neuroimaging data indicate that the adult human brain is endowed with a "mirror neuron system," putatively containing mirror neurons and other neurons, for matching the observation and execution of actions. Mirror neurons may serve action recognition in monkeys as well as humans, whereas their putative role in imitation and language may be realized in human but not in monkey. This article shows the important role of computational models in providing sufficient and causal explanations for the observed phenomena involving mirror systems and the learning processes which form them, and underlines the need for additional circuitry to lift up the monkey mirror neuron circuit to sustain the posited cognitive functions attributed to the human mirror neuron system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser cleaning of ITER's diagnostic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A.; Doerner, R.

    2012-10-01

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We report on laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150 - 420 nm thick. A 1.06 μm Nd laser system provided 220 ns pulses at 8 kHz with typical power densities of 1-2 J/cm^2. The laser beam was fiber optically coupled to a scanner suitable for tokamak applications. The efficacy of mirror cleaning was assessed with a new technique that combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements [1]. The method is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber. Excellent restoration of reflectivity for the carbon coated Mo mirrors was observed after laser scanning under vacuum conditions. For the beryllium coated mirrors restoration of reflectivity has so far been incomplete and modeling indicates that a shorter duration laser pulse is needed. No damage of the molybdenum mirror substrates was observed.[4pt][1] C.H. Skinner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. at press.

  18. Study of Lightweight Ni-Co Alloy Mirrors Obtained by Electroforming Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ruth; Muntele, Iulia; Muntele, Claudiu; Zimmerman, Robert; Ila, Daryush; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One contribution in reducing the costs of optics in space can be provided by production of ultralight mirrors. The decrease in the weight of the primary mirror of a telescope is anticipated to lead to the possibility of increasing the size of the telescopes, therefore increasing the amount and distance from which information is received. An electroplating process of ultralight replica mirrors from nickel sulfamate solution will be described. Based on an experimental setup with cylindrical symmetry, flat mirrors with a diameter of 7 inches and thickness of 1.5 mm are made from a Ni-Co alloy. The composition of the resulting deposit is analyzed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). In order to resolve Ni and Co, 10 MeV nitrogen ions are used as projectiles in the RBS measurements. Solution parameters monitored during the deposition process using optical absorption and polarography will be correlated with the final concentration of Ni and Co in the deposit. Bath parameters like temperature, current density, agitation level and acidity are chosen at certain values and maintained constant from one sample to another throughout the deposition process. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain mirrors with near zero stress, and predetermined composition and hardness. This study is an intermediate step in obtaining through the same process, but with a larger scale setup, ultralight large aperture replica mirrors.

  19. Mirror coating and cleaning methodology to maintain the optical performance of the GTC telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril-Abril, M.; Nuñez-Castaín, A.; Rodríguez-García, L. A.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the strategy to optimize GTC telescope's optical performance in terms of reflectivity and scattering by means of a suitable combination of mirror coating, CO2 and in-situ cleaning. According to our experience, a monthly CO2 cleaning was established, except during sporadic dust episodes, when a shorter weekly period is much more appropriate. Trends of the main optical parameters were recorded and analyzed to identify possible causes for the variation of the mirrors performance. As the total reflectivity stems from the combination of three optical surfaces, we set thresholds for the individual components and used these to select the mirrors that have to be replaced and cleaned. We also compared historical data about total reflectivity with optical OSIRIS zeropoints evolution and established a nonlinear relation, that is applicable in the periods where direct measurements on the mirror surface are not feasible. In this line, we are working on an innovative method to estimate the reflectivity for a segmented mirror based on the zeropoints measurement for the individual segments obtained by un-stacking the primary mirror under a controlled pattern.

  20. Thermo-optically driven adaptive mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Felix; Lüthy, Willy

    2006-02-01

    The ideal adaptive optical mirror combines large aperture with high spatial and temporal resolution and a phase shift of at least 2π. Further, a simple low-cost solution is preferred. No adaptive system can perfectly fulfill all these requirements. We present a system that has the potential to reach this goal with the exception of high temporal resolution. But even with a moderate temporal resolution of one second such a system can find practical applications. For example as a laser resonator mirror that allows to modify the intensity distribution of the emission, or to correct slowly varying aberrations of optical systems. Two possible mechanisms can be used to change the optical path length of the adaptive mirror: thermal expansion of the mirror substrate or the thermally induced change of the refractive index (thermal dispersion) of a medium in front of the mirror. Both mechanisms have been shown to lead to promising results. In both cases heating was performed by irradiation of light in the active medium. The thermal dispersion based adaptive mirror is built with a thin layer of a liquid in front of a mirror. To allow a modification of the refractive index by irradiation with a diode laser at 808 nm, a suitable absorber is dissolved in the water. With chopped irradiation a resolution of 3.8 Hz at 30 % contrast is measured. This mirror has been used in a laser resonator to modify the output distribution of the laser. The thermal expansion based adaptive mirror is built with a thin layer of a silicon elastomer with a gold coated front side. We present a preparation method to produce thin films of Sylgard on sapphire. With an irradiated intensity of only 370 mW/cm2 surface modulations of up to 350 nm are obtained. With a test pattern a resolution of 1.6 line-pairs per millimeter at 30 % contrast is measured. The temporal resolution is better than one second.

  1. Exclusive lower extremity mirror movements and diastematomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Smyth, Matthew D; Dure, Leon S; Oakes, W Jerry

    2004-01-01

    Mirror movements usually seen in the Klippel-Feil syndrome are most commonly appreciated in the upper extremities. Lower extremity involvement is seen rarely and when observed, is found in conjunction with upper extremity mirror movements. We report what we believe to be the first case of mirror movements found exclusively in the lower extremities in a female patient presenting with tethered cord syndrome. Our hopes are that this report will help elucidate mechanisms involved with these anomalous movements, as currently there is no commonly accepted etiology.

  2. What we know currently about mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, J M; Lemon, R N

    2013-12-02

    Mirror neurons were discovered over twenty years ago in the ventral premotor region F5 of the macaque monkey. Since their discovery much has been written about these neurons, both in the scientific literature and in the popular press. They have been proposed to be the neuronal substrate underlying a vast array of different functions. Indeed so much has been written about mirror neurons that last year they were referred to, rightly or wrongly, as "The most hyped concept in neuroscience". Here we try to cut through some of this hyperbole and review what is currently known (and not known) about mirror neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fine alignment of a large segmented mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Thomas William (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for aligning a segmented mirror includes a source of radiation directed along a first axis to the segmented mirror and a beamsplitter removably inserted along the first axis for redirecting radiation from the first axis to a second axis, substantially perpendicular to the first axis. An imaging array is positioned along the second axis for imaging the redirected radiation, and a knife-edge configured for cutting the redirected radiation is serially positioned to occlude and not occlude the redirected radiation, effectively providing a variable radiation pattern detected by the imaging array for aligning the segmented mirror.

  4. Fiber ring laser with a feedback mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitan, H; Bohr, H; Pedersen, C F

    2005-12-20

    We describe the spectral and power features of a ytterbium-doped double-clad photonic crystal fiber laser that is operated in a ring configuration with an external mirror that feeds back only one of its two output beams. We compare the operation of the laser with and without an external feedback mirror. We find that the feedback mirror reduces significantly the spectral and power fluctuations. It is also responsible for an interesting spectral phenomenon: The laser frequency is drifting periodically over 9 nm at a rate of 2 nm/s from a short wavelength to a longer wavelength and vice versa.

  5. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

  6. EFFECT OF MIRROR THERAPY ON HEMIPARETIC UPPER EXTREMITY IN SUBACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshini Rajappan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes for chronic disability. Only 5 to 20% of stroke survivors attain complete functional recovery of their affected upper extremity. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mirror therapy on hemiparetic upper extremity motor recovery and functions in patients with subacute stroke. Methods: A total of 30 participants were selected for the study. They were randomly assigned to Mirror Therapy Group (MTG and Sham Mirror Therapy Group (SMTG with fifteen participants in each group. All the participants equally took part in conventional stroke rehabilitation program 5 days a week for 4 weeks. In addition to the conventional stroke rehabilitation program, MTG participated in 30 minutes of mirror therapy and SMTG received 30 minutes of sham mirror therapy for the affected hemiparetic upper limb. The participants were measured for upper extremity motor recovery and functions by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-UE and Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI scales respectively. Results: Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Mann Whitney U test were used to statistically analyze the data. Spearman correlational technique was used to analyze the relationship between upper limb functions and motor recovery of hand. Based on Wilcoxon signed ranks test, the results were highly significant (p<0.05. On the basis of Mann Whitney U test, Mirror therapy group showed high significance (p<0.05 than sham mirror therapy group. The Spearman’s rho value was 0.65 which indicated moderate to maximum positive correlation between the two variables and the alpha level was set at 0.01. Conclusion: This study concludes that incorporating mirror therapy in subacute stroke rehabilitation program improves the hemiparetic upper extremity motor recovery and its functions and also motor recovery of hand can directly influence the upper limb functions.

  7. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Katie L Hodgin; Graham, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    AbstractPrevious research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. Few studies, however, have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size infl...

  8. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgin, Katie L.; Graham, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highl...

  9. EMC Testing on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) - A Summary of the EMC Test Campaign for the Science Payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft/observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  10. Dynamic analysis and control of mirror segment actuators for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvoet, G.; Breeje, R. den; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Hazelebach, R.L.M.; Doelman, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Segmented primary mirror telescopes require dedicated piston-tip-tilt actuators for optimal optical performance. Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO) has developed various prototypes of such actuators, in particular for the E-ELT. This paper presents the dynamics analysis

  11. Development of grazing incidence multilayer mirrors for hard X-ray focusing telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Peter H.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Platonov, Yuriy Y.

    1997-01-01

    We are developing depth-graded, multilayer-coated mirrors for astrophysical hard X-ray focusing telescopes. In this paper, we discuss the primary technical challenges associated with the multilayer coatings, and report on progress to date. We have sputtered constant d-spacing and depth-graded W...

  12. High performance control of mirror segment actuators for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvoet, G.; Breeje, R. de; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Hazelebach, R.L.M.; Doelman, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Segmented primary mirror telescopes require dedicated piston-tip-tilt actuators for optimal optical performance. TNO has developed various prototypes of such actuators, in particular for the E-ELT. In this paper the control results of a specific two-stage prototype will be presented.

  13. Dynamic analysis and control of mirror segment actuators for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvoet, G.; Breeje, R. den; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Hazelebach, R.L.M.; Doelman, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Segmented primary mirror telescopes require dedicated piston-tip-tilt actuators for optimal optical performance. Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO) has developed various prototypes of such actuators, in particular for the E-ELT. This paper presents the dynamics analysis a

  14. Optical design of off-axis Cassegrain telescope using freeform surface at the secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Suryakant; Gupta, Amit; Singh, Ganga Sharan

    2015-02-01

    Freeform surfaces enable imaginative optics by providing abundant degrees of freedom for an optical designer as compared to spherical surfaces. An off-axis two-mirror-based telescope design is presented, in which the primary mirror is a concave prolate spheroid and the secondary mirror is freeform surface-based. The off-axis configuration is employed here for removing the central obscuration problem which otherwise limits the central maxima in the point spread function. In this proposed design, an extended X-Y polynomial is used as a surface descriptor for the off-axis segment of the secondary mirror. The coefficients of this extended polynomial are directly related to the Seidel aberrations, and are thus optimized here for a better control of asymmetric optical aberrations at various field points. For this design, the aperture stop is located 500 mm before the primary mirror and the entrance pupil diameter is kept as 80 mm. The effective focal length is 439 mm and covers a full field of view of 2 deg. The image quality obtained here is near diffraction limited which can be inferred from metrics such as the spot diagram and modulation transfer function.

  15. Corning 7972 ULE material for segmented and large monolithic mirror blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Robert; Edwards, Mary J.; VanBrocklin, Randy; Wells, Bruce

    2006-06-01

    Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE ®) glass has been and continues to be a significant material for astronomical applications. With a nominal composition of 7 wt. %TiO II in SiO II, Corning Code 7972 ULE ® has a mean room temperature coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 0 +/- 30 ppb/°C with a typical CTE range of less than 15 ppb/°C, properties vital to the manufacture of high resolution optics requiring extreme thermal stability. Combined with lightweighting techniques developed at Corning during the past 30 years, ULE ® has been successfully employed for numerous monolithic and lightweight mirror applications including the 2.4 meter Hubble Space Telescope lightweight primary mirror, the Airborne Laser (ABL) primary mirrors, and most recently the Discovery Channel Telescope 4 meter mirror blank. ULE ® maintains its strong candidacy for future ELT applications. Recent challenges in mirror surface specifications and the development of alternative material choices calls for a comparison with ULE ®. The objective of this article is to review ULE ® properties and manufacturing capabilities, and to compare relevant material properties to those of alternative material options, thus allowing designers to properly execute material selection. Finally, recent development efforts directed toward improving ULE ® will be discussed.

  16. The ontogenetic origins of mirror neurons: evidence from 'tool-use' and 'audiovisual' mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard

    2012-10-23

    Since their discovery, mirror neurons--units in the macaque brain that discharge both during action observation and execution--have attracted considerable interest. Whether mirror neurons are an innate endowment or acquire their sensorimotor matching properties ontogenetically has been the subject of intense debate. It is widely believed that these units are an innate trait; that we are born with a set of mature mirror neurons because their matching properties conveyed upon our ancestors an evolutionary advantage. However, an alternative view is that mirror neurons acquire their matching properties during ontogeny, through correlated experience of observing and performing actions. The present article re-examines frequently overlooked neurophysiological reports of 'tool-use' and 'audiovisual' mirror neurons within the context of this debate. It is argued that these findings represent compelling evidence that mirror neurons are a product of sensorimotor experience, and not an innate endowment.

  17. Mirror Observation of Finger Action Enhances Activity in Anterior Intraparietal Sulcus: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Numata, Kenji; Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions rela...

  18. Mirror Illumination and Spillover Measurements of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Patricio; Dunner, Rolando; Wollack, Ed; Jerez-Hanckes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) is a 6 m telescope designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) simultaneously at 145 GHz, 220GHz and 280GHz, The receiver in ACT, the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera, features 1000 TES bolometers in each band, The detector performance depends critically on the total optical loading, requiring the spmover contributions from the optics to be minimal. This inspired the use of a cold Lyot stop to limit the illumination of the primary and the use of guard rings surrounding the primary and secondary reflectors. Here, we present a direct measurement of the illumination aperture for both reflectors and of the attenuation level outside the main optical path. We used a 145 GHz, 1 m W source and a chopper wheel to produce a time-varying signal with a broad heam proflle, We sampled the response of the camera for different locations of the source, placed in front and beside the primary and secondary mirrors. The aperture of the primary was measured to be 5,72 plus or minus 0,17m in diameter (95 plus or minus 3% of its geometrical size), while the aperture of the secondary yielded 2 plus or minus 0.12m in diameter. Both apertures are consistent with the optical design. Comparing to previous measurements of the beam solid angle from planet observations, we estimate an optical efficiency of 72.3 plus or minus 4,8%. We found that the attenuation outside the primary aperture was -16 plus or minus 2dB, which is below the theoretical expectations, and -22 plus or minus 1 dB outside the secondary aperture, which is consistent with simulations. These results motivated the extension of the baffles surrounding the secondary mirror, with the following reduction in detector optical loading from 2,24 pW to 188pW.

  19. The neuronal correlates of mirror therapy: an fMRI study on mirror induced visual illusions in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Marian E; Smits, Marion; Ribbers, Gerard M; Stam, Henk J; van der Geest, Jos N; Bussmann, Johannes B J; Selles, Ruud W

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the neuronal basis for the effects of mirror therapy in patients with stroke. 22 patients with stroke participated in this study. The authors used functional MRI to investigate neuronal activation patterns in two experiments. In the unimanual experiment, patients moved their unaffected hand, either while observing it directly (no-mirror condition) or while observing its mirror reflection (mirror condition). In the bimanual experiment, patients moved both hands, either while observing the affected hand directly (no-mirror condition) or while observing the mirror reflection of the unaffected hand in place of the affected hand (mirror condition). A two-factorial analysis with movement (activity vs rest) and mirror (mirror vs no mirror) as main factors was performed to assess neuronal activity resultant of the mirror illusion. Data on 18 participants were suitable for analysis. Results showed a significant interaction effect of movement×mirror during the bimanual experiment. Activated regions were the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex (pmirror illusion in patients with stroke, the authors showed that during bimanual movement, the mirror illusion increases activity in the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex, areas associated with awareness of the self and spatial attention. By increasing awareness of the affected limb, the mirror illusion might reduce learnt non-use. The fact that the authors did not observe mirror-related activity in areas of the motor or mirror neuron system questions popular theories that attribute the clinical effects of mirror therapy to these systems.

  20. Driver ASICs for Advanced Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program leverages on our extensive expertise in developing high-performance driver ASICs for deformable mirror systems and seeks to expand the capacities of the...

  1. Lightweight composite mirrors for telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight, steady and stiff mirrors are necessary to decrease cost of telescopes such as IXO and GenX used in special NASA missions. Low-density materials are...

  2. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a plan to build a prototype small stroke, high precision deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution...

  3. Polishing X-ray Mirror Mandrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. The process allows fabricating precisely shaped mandrels to be used and reused as masters for replicating high-quality mirrors. MSFC's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) has grinding and polishing equipment ranging from conventional spindles to custom-designed polishers. These capabilities allow us to grind precisely and polish a variety of optical devices, including x-ray mirror mandrels. This image shows Charlie Griffith polishing the half-meter mandrel at SOMTC.

  4. Collimated Magnetron Sputter Deposition for Mirror Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickery, A.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2008-01-01

    At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence that a collimat......At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence...... that a collimation of the sputtered particles is an efficient way to suppress the interfacial roughness of the produced multilayer. We present two different types of collimation optimized for the production of low roughness curved mirrors and flat mirrors, respectively....

  5. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal we describe a plan to build a deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution imaging. The prototype DM will be...

  6. Cosmological Signals of a Mirror Twin Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel; Trott, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmology of the minimal model of neutral naturalness, the mirror Twin Higgs. The softly-broken mirror symmetry relating the Standard Model to its twin counterpart leads to significant dark radiation in tension with BBN and CMB observations. We quantify this tension and illustrate how it can be mitigated in several simple scenarios that alter the relative energy densities of the two sectors while respecting the softly-broken mirror symmetry. In particular, we consider both the out-of-equilibrium decay of a new scalar as well as reheating in a toy model of twinned inflation, Twinflation. In both cases the dilution of energy density in the twin sector does not merely reconcile the existence of a mirror Twin Higgs with cosmological constraints, but predicts contributions to cosmological observables that may be probed in current and future CMB experiments. This raises the prospect of discovering evidence of neutral naturalness through cosmology rather than colliders.

  7. Auditory–vocal mirroring in songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mirror neurons are theorized to serve as a neural substrate for spoken language in humans, but the existence and functions of auditory–vocal mirror neurons in the human brain remain largely matters of speculation. Songbirds resemble humans in their capacity for vocal learning and depend on their learned songs to facilitate courtship and individual recognition. Recent neurophysiological studies have detected putative auditory–vocal mirror neurons in a sensorimotor region of the songbird's brain that plays an important role in expressive and receptive aspects of vocal communication. This review discusses the auditory and motor-related properties of these cells, considers their potential role on song learning and communication in relation to classical studies of birdsong, and points to the circuit and developmental mechanisms that may give rise to auditory–vocal mirroring in the songbird's brain. PMID:24778375

  8. The mirror mechanism: recent findings and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Fogassi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Mirror neurons are a specific type of visuomotor neuron that discharge both when a monkey executes a motor act and when it observes a similar motor act performed by another individual. In this article, we review first the basic properties of these neurons. We then describe visual features recently investigated which indicate that, besides encoding the goal of motor acts, mirror neurons are modulated by location in space of the observed motor acts, by the perspective from which the others' motor acts are seen, and by the value associated with the object on which others' motor acts are performed. In the last part of this article, we discuss the role of the mirror mechanism in planning actions and in understanding the intention underlying the others' motor acts. We also review some human studies suggesting that motor intention in humans may rely, as in the monkey, on the mirror mechanism.

  9. Reflections on mirror neurons and speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Andrew J; Hickok, Gregory S; Holt, Lori L

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons, a class of neurons that respond when a monkey performs an action and also when the monkey observes others producing the same action, has promoted a renaissance for the Motor Theory (MT) of speech perception. This is because mirror neurons seem to accomplish the same kind of one to one mapping between perception and action that MT theorizes to be the basis of human speech communication. However, this seeming correspondence is superficial, and there are theoretical and empirical reasons to temper enthusiasm about the explanatory role mirror neurons might have for speech perception. In fact, rather than providing support for MT, mirror neurons are actually inconsistent with the central tenets of MT.

  10. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks;(1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  11. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity configurat......We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity...... configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...

  12. Multilayer active shell mirrors for space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, John; Jackson, Kathryn; Pellegrino, Sergio; Redding, David; Wallace, J. Kent; Bradford, Samuel Case; Barbee, Troy

    2016-07-01

    A novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) substrates and replication techniques has been developed. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the design serving various functions. Nanolaminate metal films are used to provide a high quality reflective front surface. A backing layer of thin active material is implemented to provide the surface-parallel actuation scheme. Printed electronics are used to create a custom electrode pattern and flexible routing layer. Mirrors of this design are thin ( 100 μm PV) down to sub-micron precision. The system has been validated against several traditional techniques including photogrammetry and interferometry. The mirror performance has been characterized using this system, as well as closed-loop figure correction experiments on 150 mm dia. prototypes. The mirrors have demonstrated post-correction figure accuracies of 200 nm RMS (two dead actuators limiting performance).

  13. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  14. Ultra-Lightweight Hybrid Structured Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MMCC is proposing herewith a hybrid structured mirror that combines the advantages of SiC membrane and magnesium graphite composite. The significance of magnesium...

  15. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  16. Supersymmetric defect models and mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d NN = 4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d NN = 2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of NN = 4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  17. Supersymmetric Defect Models and Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d N=4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d N=2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of N=4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  18. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  19. Reflective Properties of a Parabolic Mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Gordon P.

    1991-01-01

    An incident light ray parallel to the optical axis of a parabolic mirror will be reflected at the focal point and vice versa. Presents a mathematical proof that uses calculus, algebra, and geometry to prove this reflective property. (MDH)

  20. Mirror aneurysms : a reflection on natural history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, Irene; Torner, James; Huston III, John; Rajput, Michele L.; Wiebers, David O.; Jones, Lyell K.; Brown, Robert D.; Groen, Rob

    2012-01-01

    OBJECT: Investigators conducting the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, sought to evaluate predictors of future hemorrhage in patients who had unruptured mirror aneurysms. These paired aneurysms in bilateral arterial positions mi

  1. Spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Hagopian, John; DeMarco, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) project is an internal research and development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goals of the program are to develop a robust and cost effective way to manufacture spherical mirror segments and demonstrate a new wavefront sensing approach for continuous phasing across the segmented primary. This paper focuses on the fabrication of the mirror segments. Significant cost savings were achieved through the design, since it allowed the mirror segments to be cast rather than machined from a glass blank. Casting was followed by conventional figuring at Goddard Space Flight Center. After polishing, the mirror segments were mounted to their composite assemblies. QED Technologies used magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) for the final figuring. The MRF process polished the mirrors while they were mounted to their composite assemblies. Each assembly included several magnetic invar plugs that extended to within an inch of the face of the mirror. As part of this project, the interaction between the MRF magnetic field and invar plugs was evaluated. By properly selecting the polishing conditions, MRF was able to significantly improve the figure of the mounted segments. The final MRF figuring demonstrates that mirrors, in the mounted configuration, can be polished and tested to specification. There are significant process capability advantes due to polishing and testing the optics in their final, end-use assembled state.

  2. Authors’ response: mirror neurons: tests and testability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catmur, Caroline; Press, Clare; Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey; Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    Commentators have tended to focus on the conceptual framework of our article, the contrast between genetic and associative accounts of mirror neurons, and to challenge it with additional possibilities rather than empirical data. This makes the empirically focused comments especially valuable. The mirror neuron debate is replete with ideas; what it needs now are system-level theories and careful experiments – tests and testability.

  3. Anomalous Mirror Symmetry Generated by Optical Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokichi Sugihara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new concept of mirror symmetry, called “anomalous mirror symmetry”, which is physically impossible but can be perceived by human vision systems because of optical illusion. This symmetry is characterized geometrically and a method for creating cylindrical surfaces that create this symmetry is constructed. Examples of solid objects constructed by a 3D printer are also shown.

  4. On horizonless temperature with an accelerating mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Michael R. R.; Yelshibekov, Khalykbek; Ong, Yen Chin

    2017-03-01

    A new solution of a unitary moving mirror is found to produce finite energy and emit thermal radiation despite the absence of an acceleration horizon. In the limit that the mirror approaches the speed of light, the model corresponds to a black hole formed from the collapse of a null shell. For speeds less than light, the black hole correspondence, if it exists, is that of a remnant.

  5. On Horizonless Temperature with an Accelerating Mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Michael R R; Ong, Yen Chin

    2016-01-01

    A new solution of a unitary moving mirror is found to produce finite energy and emit thermal radiation despite the absence of an acceleration horizon. In the limit that the mirror approaches the speed of light, the model corresponds to a black hole formed from the collapse of a null shell. For speeds less than light, the black hole correspondence, if it exists, is that of a remnant.

  6. Action observation: Inferring intentions without mirror neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Kilner, James M

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand.......A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand....

  7. Cryogenic Test Results of Hextek Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, James; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Hogue, William

    2004-01-01

    A 250 mm diameter lightweight borosilicate mirror has been interferometrically tested from room-temperature down to 30 K at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The minor blank was manufactured by Hextek Corporation using a high-temperature gas fusion process and was then polished at MSFC. It is a sandwich-type mirror consisting of a thin face-sheet (approx.1.5 mm thick), a core structure (20 mm thick, approx.43 mm diameter cells, & 0.5-1.2 mm thick walls), and a thin back-sheet (3 mm thick). The mirror has a 2500 mm spherical radius-of- curvature @/lo). The areal density is 14 kg/sq m. The mirror was tested in the 1 m x 2 m chamber using an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (PI) from ADE Phase Shift Technologies. The mirror was tested twice. The first test measured the change in surface figure from ambient to 30 K and the repeatability of the change. An attempt was then made by QED Technologies to cryo-figure the mirror using magnetorheological finishing. The second test measured the effectiveness of the cryo- figuring. This paper will describe the test goals, the test instrumentation, and the test results for these cryogenic tests.

  8. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future UV/Optical telescopes will require increasingly large apertures to answer the questions raised by HST, JWST, Planck and Hershel, and to complement the = 30-m...

  9. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  10. Mirror, mirror on the wall, how does my brain recognize my image at all?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Butler

    Full Text Available For decades researchers have used mirrors to study self-recognition. However, attempts to identify neural processes underlying this ability have used photographs instead. Here we used event related potentials (ERPs to compare self-face recognition in photographs versus mirrors and found distinct neural signatures. Measures of visual self-recognition are therefore not independent of the medium employed.

  11. Integration of Mirror Design with Suspension System using NASA's New Mirror Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold,William R., Sr.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication are making very large space based telescopes possible. In many applications, only monolithic mirrors can meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass, and then available payload shroud sizes limit near term designs to 4 meter class mirrors. Practical 8 meter class and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds, if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors, lower mass and larger mirrors, present the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large of a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system handling both operational and launch loads. This paper shows how the suspension system and mirror blank need to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass.

  12. 光电系统中铍反射镜的发展与应用%Development and application of beryllium mirrors in optical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊; 许永森; 刘福贺

    2014-01-01

    The material properties and processing method of beryllium mirrors are reviewed and their applica -tions and development are also proposed .Firstly, the material properties of beryllium mirrors widely used in present and the current state-of-the-art of mirror substrate production , machining , grinding , nickel plating , polishing are introduced .Then , the latest application of the beryllium and beryllium-aluminum in the JWST ( the James Webb Space Telescope ) and the F-9120 high altitude dual band ( EO/IR) tactical reconnaissance sensor are given .Finally , the future developments and application of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum for optical systems are discussed .%综述了光电系统中铍反射镜常用材料的特性、加工方法、发展现状及最新应用。首先,介绍了目前国外铍反射镜常用材料的性能,铍反射镜基底制备、机械加工和光学加工等方面的发展现状。然后,以詹姆斯韦伯太空望远镜和F-9120航空远距离可见/红外双波段侦察相机为例,重点介绍了铍以及铍铝合金在空间和航空光电系统的反射镜及光机支撑结构上的最新应用。最后,对铍和铍铝合金在光电系统中的未来发展和应用前景提出了展望。

  13. The Mirror Program: Preparing Women for the Postoperative Mastectomy Mirror-Viewing Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freysteinson, Wyona M; Deutsch, Amy S; Davin, Karen; Lewis, Carol; Sisk, Angela; Sweeney, Lilian; Wuest, Linda; Cesario, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    Preparing women for the experiences they will endure during the breast cancer trajectory improves psychological outcomes and quality of life. Women have found that it may be difficult to view themselves in a mirror after having a mastectomy. Supporting women who have had a mastectomy in mirror-viewing and body image is a relatively new yet important intervention in oncology nursing. The feasibility of a preoperative mirror program given by oncology nurse navigators to women who were scheduled for a mastectomy was examined in this randomized control study. Pre- and postoperative data on anxiety, body image, depression, emotional well-being, and mirror use were collected from intervention participants (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 9). This article illustrates the development of the mirror program and the results of the feasibility trial, and provides a discussion with implications for future research. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mirrored, imagined and executed movements differentially activate sensorimotor cortex in amputees with and without phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Martin; Christmann, Christoph; Koeppe, Caroline; Ruf, Matthias; Flor, Herta

    2010-05-01

    Extended viewing of movements of the intact hand in a mirror as well as motor imagery has been shown to decrease pain in phantom pain patients. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural correlates of mirrored, imagined and executed hand movements in 14 upper extremity amputees - 7 with phantom limb pain (PLP) and 7 without phantom limb pain (non-PLP) and 9 healthy controls (HC). Executed movement activated the contralateral sensorimotor area in all three groups but ipsilateral cortex was only activated in the non-PLP and HC group. Mirrored movements activated the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the hand seen in the mirror in the non-PLP and the HC but not in the PLP. Imagined movement activated the supplementary motor area in all groups and the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex in the non-PLP and HC but not in the PLP. Mirror- and movement-related activation in the bilateral sensorimotor cortex in the mirror movement condition and activation in the sensorimotor cortex ipsilateral to the moved hand in the executed movement condition were significantly negatively correlated with the magnitude of phantom limb pain in the amputee group. Further research must identify the causal mechanisms related to mirror treatment, imagined movements or movements of the other hand and associated changes in pain perception.

  15. Optomechanical design software for segmented mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Juan

    2016-08-01

    The software package presented in this paper, still under development, was born to help analyzing the influence of the many parameters involved in the design of a large segmented mirror telescope. In summary, it is a set of tools which were added to a common framework as they were needed. Great emphasis has been made on the graphical presentation, as scientific visualization nowadays cannot be conceived without the use of a helpful 3d environment, showing the analyzed system as close to reality as possible. Use of third party software packages is limited to ANSYS, which should be available in the system only if the FEM results are needed. Among the various functionalities of the software, the next ones are worth mentioning here: automatic 3d model construction of a segmented mirror from a set of parameters, geometric ray tracing, automatic 3d model construction of a telescope structure around the defined mirrors from a set of parameters, segmented mirror human access assessment, analysis of integration tolerances, assessment of segments collision, structural deformation under gravity and thermal variation, mirror support system analysis including warping harness mechanisms, etc.

  16. Some Implications of Neutron Mirror Neutron Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Nussinov, S

    2005-01-01

    We comment on a recently discussed possibility of oscillations between neutrons and degenerate mirror neutrons in the context of mirror models for particles and forces. It has been noted by Bento and Berezhiani that if these oscillations occurred at a rate of $\\tau^{-1}_{NN'}\\sim sec^{-1}$, it would help explain putative super GKZ cosmic ray events provided the temperature of the mirror radiation is $\\sim 0.3-0.4$ times that of familiar cosmic microwave background radiation. We discuss how such oscillation time scales can be realized in mirror models and find that the simplest nonsupersymmetric model for this idea requires the existence of a low mass (30-3000 GeV) color triplet scalar or vector boson. A supersymmetric model, where this constraint can be avoided is severely constrained by the requirement of maintaining a cooler mirror sector. We also find that the reheat temperature after inflation in generic models that give fast $n-n'$ oscillation be less than about 100 GeV in order to maintain the required ...

  17. Mirror therapy for phantom limb pain: brain changes and the role of body representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foell, J; Bekrater-Bodmann, R; Diers, M; Flor, H

    2014-05-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a common consequence of amputation and is difficult to treat. Mirror therapy (MT), a procedure utilizing the visual recreation of movement of a lost limb by moving the intact limb in front of a mirror, has been shown to be effective in reducing PLP. However, the neural correlates of this effect are not known. We investigated the effects of daily mirror training over 4 weeks in 13 chronic PLP patients after unilateral arm amputation. Eleven participants performed hand and lip movements during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurement before and after MT. The location of neural activity in primary somatosensory cortex during these tasks was used to assess brain changes related to treatment. The treatment caused a significant reduction of PLP (average decrease of 27%). Treatment effects were predicted by a telescopic distortion of the phantom, with those patients who experienced a telescope profiting less from treatment. fMRI data analyses revealed a relationship between change in pain after MT and a reversal of dysfunctional cortical reorganization in primary somatosensory cortex. Pain reduction after mirror training was also related to a decrease of activity in the inferior parietal cortex (IPC). Experienced body appearance seems to be an important predictor of mirror treatment effectiveness. Maladaptive changes in cortical organization are reversed during mirror treatment, which also alters activity in the IPC, a region involved in painful perceptions and in the perceived relatedness to an observed limb. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Hodgin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPrevious research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. Few studies, however, have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly-valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally-healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body-size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred and sixty-seven students (51% male enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their transportation choices at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants’ choice of floor climbing method (stairs or elevator was recorded and they were administered an internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror (OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.96, males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13 – 0.85, those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71

  19. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, Katie L; Graham, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one's personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their "transportation choices" at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants' choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.99), those

  20. VLT beryllium secondary mirror no. 1: performance review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel, Marc

    1998-08-01

    The four Very Large Telescope secondary mirrors are 1.2-m Beryllium lightweight convex mirrors. REOSC has been selected for the design and manufacturing of the optics and of their supporting system. The first mirror unit has been delivered in September, 1997. Operating from visible to near infrared, the mirror defines the telescope aperture stop and may be chopped during observation. The optical requirements are tight and a high stiffness, low weight and inertia are requested as well. Using beryllium is a technical challenge for such a large optic manufacturing, in particular regarding its stability. The requirements and design are presented, we review the mirror manufacturing steps: blank production, machining, grinding, Nickel plating, polishing, integration and testing. The optical quality control method, a problem for large convex mirrors control, is detailed. The results of acceptance testing of mirror No. 1 are summarized, we present conclusions about the mirror figure stability. The status of the three additional mirrors manufacturing is presented to conclude.