WorldWideScience

Sample records for jwst detectors developed

  1. A 4K x 4K HgCdTe astronomical camera enabled by the JWST NIR detector development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald N. B.; Luppino, Gerard; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Garnett, James D.; Loose, Markus; Zandian, Majid

    2004-09-01

    The ambitious science goals of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have driven spectacular advances in λco ~ 5um detector technology over the past five years. This paper reviews both the UH/RSC team"s Phase A development and evaluation of 2Kx2K arrays exceeding the detector requirements for JWST"s near infrared instruments and also the hardware integration of these into a 4Kx4K (16Mpxl) close packed mosaic focal plane array housed in an Ultra Low Background test facility. Both individual first generation 2Kx2K SCA"s and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes have been extensively characterized in the laboratory and, since September 2003, a NIR camera utilizing the 4Kx4K mosaic focal plane has been in use for nearly 100 nights at the UH 2.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea. Typical test results for the first generation 2Kx2K arrays and their integration into 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes are reported. Demonstration of the design concepts and both array and mosaic focal plane performance in actual hardware, as described here, has provided the foundation for design iterations leading to later generations of 2Kx2K arrays and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes. Four major technology developments leading to first generation hardware demonstrations of both 2Kx2K SCA"s and a 4Kx4K mosaic FPA are reviewed. These are: 1) improvement in test equipment and procedures to characterize the detectors against JWST requirements and goals, primarily at 37K but with the capability to test from 30K to 100K; 2) optimization of λc ~ 5 um MBE HgCdTe material on a CZT substrate for low dark current (goal of 0.003 e-/sec at 37K) with high quantum efficiency, low cross-talk and greatly reduced image persistence; 3) development of the 2Kx2K HAWAII-2RG multiplexer designed specifically to take full advantage of these detector characteristics for a wide range of astronomical applications (and fully compatible with an ASIC controller developed under the JWST Instrument Technology Development initiative) and 4) development of

  2. Comparing and Contrasting Detectors: JWST NIR vs HST WFC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    In many ways, WFC3s IR channel is a good indicator for what to expect with JWST. There are some differences, most of which should be beneficial in JWST- JWSTs lower operating temperature will freeze out charge traps that would affect WFC3. Benefits should include lower dark current, lower persistence, and better reciprocity- JWSTs more recent HgCdTe process has lower defect density. The benefits are as described above- JWST uses better indium barriers. The benefits should include fewer RC type pixels. One area where more study might be beneficial is stability. The detector electronics play a significant role in determining how stable a detector system is(v.s. bias drifts and photometry). JWSTs SIDECARs are completely WFC3s Ball electronics- Studies comparing the bias and photometric stability of WFC3 and JWST might be useful to informing data acquisition and calibration strategies for JWST.

  3. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  4. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Rauscher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST’s four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a “Detector Degradation Failure Review Board” (DD-FRB to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB “Executive Summaries” that: (1 determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2 defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  5. SCASim: A Flexible and Reusable Detector Simulator for the MIRI instrument of the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, S.; Morin, J.; Gastaud, R.; Azzollini, R.; Bouchet, P.; Chaintreuil, S.; Lahuis, F.; Littlejohns, O.; Nehme, C.; Pye, J.

    2012-09-01

    The JWST Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) operates in the 5-28μm wavelength range and can be configured for imaging, coronographic imaging, long-slit, low-resolution spectroscopy or medium resolution spectroscopy with an integral field unit. SCASim is one of a suite of simulators which operate together to simulate all the different modes of the instrument. These simulators are essential for the efficient operation of MIRI; allowing more accurate planning of MIRI observations on sky or during the pre-launch testing of the instrument. The data generated by the simulators are essential for testing the data pipeline software. The simulators not only need to reproduce the behaviour of the instrument faithfully, they also need to be adaptable so that information learned about the instrument during the pre-launch testing and in-orbit commissioning can be fed back into the simulation. SCASim simulates the behaviour of the MIRI detectors, taking into account cosmetic effects, quantum efficiency, shot noise, dark current, read noise, amplifier layout, cosmic ray hits, etc... The software has benefited from three major design choices. First, the development of a suite of MIRI simulators, rather than single simulator, has allowed MIRI simulators to be developed in parallel by different teams, with each simulator able to concentrate on one particular area. SCASim provides a facility common to all the other simulators and saves duplication of effort. Second, SCASim has a Python-based object-oriented design which makes it easier to adapt as new information about the instrument is learned during testing. Third, all simulator parameters are maintained in external files, rather than being hard coded in the software. These design choices have made SCASim highly reusable. In its present form it can be used to simulate any JWST detector, and it can be adapted for future instruments with similar, photon-counting detectors.

  6. NIRCam: Development and Testing of the JWST Near-Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Thomas; Beichman, Charles; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Jaffe, Daniel; Kelly, Douglas; Krist, John; Rieke, Marcia; Smith, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Its high sensitivity, high spatial resolution images over the 0.6 - 5 microns wavelength region will be essential for making significant findings in many science areas as well as for aligning the JWST primary mirror segments and telescope. The NIRCam engineering test unit was recently assembled and has undergone successful cryogenic testing. The NIRCam collimator and camera optics and their mountings are also progressing, with a brass-board system demonstrating relatively low wavefront error across a wide field of view. The flight model?s long-wavelength Si grisms have been fabricated, and its coronagraph masks are now being made. Both the short (0.6 - 2.3 microns) and long (2.4 - 5.0 microns) wavelength flight detectors show good performance and are undergoing final assembly and testing. The flight model subsystems should all be completed later this year through early 2011, and NIRCam will be cryogenically tested in the first half of 2011 before delivery to the JWST integrated science instrument module (ISIM).

  7. New and Better Near-Infrared Detectors for JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Linder, Don; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hill, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 m cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledynes improved barrier layer design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs(Rauscher et al. 2012a). The better indium barrier, together with other design changes, has improved the performance and reliability of JWSTs SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we measured the quantum yield as a function of photon energy,, and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies E (2.65.2) Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to. 2 m for NIRSpecs 5 m cutoff HgCdTe. Our measurements agree well with a previous measurement by McCullough et al. (2008) for. 1.3. For 1.3, we find a slower increase in with photon energy than McCullough et al. did. However, and as McCullough et al. note, their two state model of the yield process is not valid for large 1.

  8. Developing an instrument simulator: experience feedback from the JWST/NIRSpec and VLT/MUSE simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarno, Aurélien; Piqueras, Laure; Bacon, Roland; Ferruit, Pierre; Legros, Emeline; Pécontal-Rousset, Arlette; Gnata, Xavier; Streicher, Ole; Weilbacher, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL) has recently developed two instrument simulators for spectrographic instruments. They are based on Fourier optics, and model the whole chain of acquisition, taking into account both optical aberrations and diffraction effects, by propagating a wavefront through the instrument, according to the Fourier optics concept. One simulates the NIRSpec instrument, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for the future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The other one models the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, a second-generation integral-field spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The two simulators have been developed in different contexts (subcontracted versus developed internally), and for very different instruments (space-based versus ground-based), which strengthen the CRAL experience. This paper describes the lessons learned while developing these simulators: development methods, phasing with the project, points to focus on, getting data, interacting with scientists and users, etc.

  9. Progress by the JWST Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    The JWST Science Working Group recently published a comprehensive, top-level review of JWST science in the journal Space Science Reviews (Gardner et al. 2006, SSR, 123, 485). That review paper gives details of the 4 JWST science themes, and describes the design of the observatory and ground system. Since publication, the SWG, working with members of the astronomical community, has continued to develop the science case for JWST, giving more details in a series of white papers. The white paper topics include first light, galaxy surveys, AGN, supernovae, stellar populations, and exoplanets. The white papers are in various stages of completion. In this poster, I will review recent progress.

  10. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), The First Light Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Scheduled to begin its 10 year mission after 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will search for the first luminous objects of the Universe to help answer fundamental questions about how the Universe came to look like it does today. At 6.5 meters in diameter, JWST will be the world s largest space telescope. This talk reviews science objectives for JWST and how they drive the JWST architecture, e.g. aperture, wavelength range and operating temperature. Additionally, the talk provides an overview of the JWST primary mirror technology development and fabrication status.

  11. Development of Portable Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  12. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  13. Lenses for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Harald; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Repp, Andrew; Atek, Hakim; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier; Edge, Alastair

    2016-08-01

    JWST will dramatically advance our knowledge and understanding of the first generations of galaxies at z>10, their role in the re-ionization of the Universe, and the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the complexity and diversity of galaxies at the current epoch. As demonstrated by HST legacy projects like CLASH and the Hubble Frontier Fields, gravitational amplification by massive galaxy clusters can significantly extend the depth of the required observations. However, for JWST, reducing any diffuse background light will be just as crucial. We here propose Spitzer/IRAC observations of six massive cluster lenses, specifically selected as candidates for observation with JWST. By (a) quantifying the amount of intra-cluster light and (b) enabling us to improve our current lens models, the data resulting from the requested observations will be instrumental for the final selection of cluster targets that maximize the scientific returns of deep JWST observations.

  14. The ``One Archive'' for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G.; Kyprianou, M.; Levay, K.; Sienkewicz, M.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Swam, M.; Bushouse, H.; Greenfield, P.; Kidwell, R.; Wolfe, D.; Gardner, L.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Swade, D.; McLean, B.; Abney, F.; Alexov, A.; Binegar, S.; Aloisi, A.; Slowinski, S.; Gousoulin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The next generation for the Space Telescope Science Institute data management system is gearing up to provide a suite of archive system services supporting the operation of the James Webb Space Telescope. We are now completing the initial stage of integration and testing for the preliminary ground system builds of the JWST Science Operations Center which includes multiple components of the Data Management Subsystem (DMS). The vision for astronomical science and research with the JWST archive introduces both solutions to formal mission requirements and innovation derived from our existing mission systems along with the collective shared experience of our global user community. We are building upon the success of the Hubble Space Telescope archive systems, standards developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance, and collaborations with our archive data center partners. In proceeding forward, the “one archive” architectural model presented here is designed to balance the objectives for this new and exciting mission. The STScI JWST archive will deliver high quality calibrated science data products, support multi-mission data discovery and analysis, and provide an infrastructure which supports bridges to highly valued community tools and services.

  15. Transiting Exoplanets with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S; Valenti, J A

    2008-01-01

    The era of exoplanet characterization is upon us. For a subset of exoplanets -- the transiting planets -- physical properties can be measured, including mass, radius, and atmosphere characteristics. Indeed, measuring the atmospheres of a further subset of transiting planets, the hot Jupiters, is now routine with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will continue Spitzer's legacy with its large mirror size and precise thermal stability. JWST is poised for the significant achievement of identifying habitable planets around bright M through G stars--rocky planets lacking extensive gas envelopes, with water vapor and signs of chemical disequilibrium in their atmospheres. Favorable transiting planet systems, are, however, anticipated to be rare and their atmosphere observations will require tens to hundreds of hours of JWST time per planet. We review what is known about the physical characteristics of transiting planets, summarize lessons learned from Spitzer high-contrast exoplanet m...

  16. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  17. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  18. JWST observations of stellar occultations by solar system bodies and rings

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Sanz, P; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Stansberry, J; Lin, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-W; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th; Ortiz, J L; Braga-Ribas, F; Bosh, A; Duffard, R; Lellouch, E; Tancredi, G; Young, L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  19. Observing Planetary Rings with JWST: Science Justification and Observation Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; de Pater, Imke; Hamilton, Douglas P; Hedman, Matthew M; Nicholson, Philip D; Showalter, Mark R; Tamayo, Daniel; Verbiscer, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    The rings that adorn the four giant planets are of prime importance as accessible natural laboratories for disk processes, as clues to the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and as shapers as well as detectors of their planetary environments. The retinue of small moons accompanying all known ring systems are intimately connected as both sources and products, as well as shepherds and perturbers, of the rings. Leading sources of data on ring systems include spacecraft such as Cassini and Voyager, but also space telescopes such as Hubble and Spitzer as well as ground-based telescopes. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being prepared for launch in 2018 to begin a planned five-year mission. JWST will have the capability to observe solar system objects as close as Mars. Although most of the hardware is already designed and under construction if not completed, work continues on the development of operations guidelines and software and the completion of calibration tasks. The purpose of this white pape...

  20. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  1. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  2. Development and Acceptance Testing of the Dual Wheel Mechanism for the Tunable Filter Imager Cryogenic Instrument on the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Martin; Ahmad, Zakir

    2010-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will carry four scientific instruments, one of which is the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI), which is an instrument within the Fine Guidance Sensor. The Dual Wheel (DW) mechanism is being designed, built and tested by COM DEV Ltd. under contract from the Canadian Space Agency. The DW mechanism includes a pupil wheel (PW) holding seven coronagraphic masks and two calibration elements and a filter wheel (FW) holding nine blocking filters. The DW mechanism must operate at both room temperature and at 35K. Successful operation at 35K comprises positioning each optical element with the required repeatability, for several thousand occasions over the five year mission. The paper discusses the results of testing geared motors and bearings at the cryogenic temperature. In particular bearing retainer design and PGM-HT material, the effects of temperature gradients across bearings and the problems associated with cooling mechanisms down to cryogenic temperatures. The results of additional bearing tests are described that were employed to investigate an abnormally high initial torque experienced at cryogenic temperatures. The findings of these tests, was that the bearing retainer and the ball/race system could be adversely affected by the large temperature change from room temperature to cryogenic temperature and also the temperature gradient across the bearing. The DW mechanism is now performing successfully at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperature. The life testing of the mechanism is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2010.

  3. Emerging Technologies and Outreach with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Kenney, Jessica; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), NASA’s next great observatory launching in October 2018, required a dozen new technologies to develop. How will we maintain the prestige and cultural impact of Hubble as the torch passes to Webb? Emerging technologies such as augmented and virtual reality bring the viewer into the data and the concept in previously unimaginable immersive detail. Adoption of mobile devices has expanded access to information for wide swaths of the public. Software like Worldwide Telescope to hardware like the Occulus Rift are providing new avenues for learning. If we develop materials properly tailored to this medium, we can reach more diverse audiences than ever before. STScI is pioneering some tools related to JWST for showcasing at AAS, and in local events, which I highlight here.

  4. Solar System Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  5. Development of Silicon Multi-strip Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TanJilian; JinGenming; WangHongwei; YuanXiaohua; DuanLiming; LiSonglin; LuZiwei; XuHushan; NingBaojun; TianDayu; WangWei; ZhangLu

    2003-01-01

    Position sensitive detector is very important for nuclear physics experiment. There several techniques can be used to fabricate position sensitive detector, for example, Si-surface barrier method, diffusion method, ion implantation and planar process etc. Among all the techniques mentioned above planar process is the best one. We have developed batch of position sensitive detector -- silicon multi-strip detector by using planar process.

  6. WebbPSF for JWST and WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph D.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Brooks, Keira

    2017-01-01

    Modeling a telescope's point spread function accurately is key to predicting its performance and extracting information from observations. WebbPSF is a flexible Python-based PSF simulation tool for JWST and WFIRST, developed at STScI. The WebbPSF-WFIRST module implements a model for the proposed Wide Field Instrument, as well as a proof-of-concept model for the Coronagraph Instrument. Since its announcement and public release at the Winter 2016 AAS, WebbPSF-WFIRST has been enhanced with the Cycle 6 design updates to the wide field instrument model. Additionally, the JupyterHub-based WFIRST Tools Server effort at STScI has provided access to these tools for dozens of users without the overhead of installing the software locally. For JWST, the optical models have been updated based on the latest test data and metrology for the instruments and the telescope flight hardware, including as-built mirror surface figures, variation between different field points, and updated optical budgets for in flight performance. WebbPSF has been checked against instrument test data from previous campaigns, and analysis of the PSF images taken during the JWST CV3 cryo-vac test campaign is currently underway.

  7. Observing Dark Stars with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Ilie, Cosmin; Valluri, Monica; Iliev, Ilian T; Shapiro, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We study the capability of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to detect Supermassive Dark Stars (SMDS). If the first stars are powered by dark matter heating in triaxial dark matter haloes, they may grow to be very large and very bright, visible in deep imaging with JWST and even Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We use HST surveys to place bounds on the numbers of SMDSs that may be detected in future JWST imaging surveys. We showed that SMDS in the mass range $10^6-10^7 M_\\odot$ are bright enough to be detected in all the wavelength bands of the NIRCam on JWST . If SMDSs exist at z ~10, 12, and 14, they will be detectable as J-band, H-band, or K-band dropouts, respectively. With a total survey area of 150 arcmin^2 (assuming a multi-year deep parallel survey with JWST), we find that typically the number of $10^6 M_\\odot$ SMDSs found as H or K-band dropouts is ~10^5\\fsmds, where the fraction of early DM haloes hosting DS is likely to be small, \\fsmds10 from SMDSs would be possible with spectroscopy: the SMDS (w...

  8. Micromegas detector developments for MIMAC

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer-Ribas, E; Calvet, D; Colas, P; Druillole, F; Giomataris, Y; Iguaz, F J; Mols, J P; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Mayet, F; Richer, J P; Santos, D; Golabek, C; Lebreton, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the MIMAC project is to detect non-baryonic Dark Matter with a directional TPC. The recent Micromegas efforts towards building a large size detector will be described, in particular the characterization measurements of a prototype detector of 10 $\\times$ 10 cm$^2$ with a 2 dimensional readout plane. Track reconstruction with alpha particles will be shown.

  9. Development of innovative silicon radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, JuanPablo

    Silicon radiation detectors fabricated at the IMB-CNM (CSIC) Clean Room facilities using the most innovative techniques in detector technology are presented in this thesis. TCAD simulation comprises an important part in this work as becomes an essential tool to achieve exhaustive performance information of modelled detectors prior their fabrication and subsequent electrical characterization. Radiation tolerance is also investigated in this work using TCAD simulations through the potential and electric field distributions, leakage current and capacitance characteristics and the response of the detectors to the pass of different particles for charge collection efficiencies. Silicon detectors investigated in this thesis were developed for specific projects but also for applications in experiments which can benefit from their improved characteristics, as described in Chapter 1. Double-sided double type columns 3D (3D-DDTC) detectors have been developed under the NEWATLASPIXEL project in the framework of the CERN ...

  10. Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolut...

  11. Status of the JWST sunshield and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, J.; Flynn, J.; Cohen, A.; Lynch, R.; Cooper, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the development, manufacture and integration of the James Webb Space Telescope's sunshield and spacecraft. Both of these JWST elements have completed design and development testing. This paper will review basic architecture and roles of these systems. Also to be presented is the current state of manufacture, assembly integration and test. This paper will conclude with a look at the road ahead for each subsystem prior to integration with the integrated telescope and instrument elements at Northrop Grumman's Space Park facility in late 2017.

  12. Recent Developments in Detector Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Brau, James E

    2010-01-01

    This review provides an overview of many recent advances in detector technologies for particle physics experiments. Challenges for new technologies include increasing spatial and temporal sensitivity, speed, and radiation hardness while minimizing power and cost. Applications are directed at several future collider experiments, including the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade (sLHC), the linear collider, and the super high luminosity B factory, as well as neutrino and other fixed target experiments, and direct dark matter searches. Furthermore, particle physics has moved into space, with significant contributions of detector technology, and new challenges for future efforts.

  13. Development of planar detectors with active edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povoli, M., E-mail: povoli@disi.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Giacomini, G.; Vianello, E.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    We report on the first batch of planar active edge sensors fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Trento, Italy) on the way to the development of full 3D detectors with active edges. The main design and technological aspects are reported, along with selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures.

  14. Development of ALICE microstrip detectors at IRST

    CERN Document Server

    Boscardin, M; Dalla Betta, Gian Franco; Gregori, P; Rachevskaia, I; Zorzi, N

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of double-sided, AC-coupled, microstrip detectors oriented to the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE). The main design and processing issues are presented, together with some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and related test structures. (3 refs).

  15. Handheld Concealed Weapons Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Enforcement, Edward M. Carapezza, Donald Spector, Eds., Proc. SPIE 2938, 110 - 119 (1997). 3. Franklin Felber, Norbert Wild, Scott Nunan , Dennis Breuner... Nunan , D. Breuner, and F. Doft, "Handheld Ultrasound Concealed-Weapons Detector," in Enforcement and Security Technologies, A. Trent DePersia, J. J

  16. NEOs in the mid-infrared: from Spitzer to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2016-10-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) account for a surprisingly large fraction of the Spitzer observing time devoted to Solar System science. As a community, we should think of ways to repeat that success with JWST. JWST is planning an open Early Release Science Program, with the expected deadline for letters of intent in early 2017. We can't wait for next year's DPS to develop ideas. The time is now!In order to stir up the discussion, we will present ideas for NEO observing programs that are well adapted to JWST's capabilities and limitations, based on our recent PASP paper (Thomas et al., 2016). Obvious measurement objectives would include* size and albedo from thermal continuum (MIRI photometry)* thermal inertia for objects with well-known shape and spin state (MIRI)* taxonomy through reflection spectroscopy and emission spectroscopy in the NIR and MIR; NIR colors for faint objects.In all cases, JWST's sensitivity will allow us to go deeper than currently possible by at least an order of magnitude. Meter-sized NEOs similar to 2009 BD or 2011 MD are easy targets for MIRI spectrophotometry!The following limitations must be kept in mind, however: JWST's large size makes it slow to move. Most problematic for NEOs is probably the resulting 'speed limit': non-sidereal tracking is supported up to a rate of 30 mas/s, NEOs can easily move faster than that (ways to relax this constraint are under discussion). The average slew to a new target is budgeted to take 30 min, effectively ruling out programs many-target programs like ExploreNEOs or NEOSurvey (see D. Trilling's paper). Additionally, JWST will only observe close to quadrature, translating to large solar phase angles for NEO observations; this is familiar from other space-based IR facilities.

  17. Focus Groups for Solar System Investigations with the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Dean C.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Stansberry, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Sonneborn, George; Lunine, Jonathan; Rivkin, Andrew; Woodward, Charles; Norwood, Jim; Villanueva, Geronimo; Thomas, Cristina; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Tiscareno, Matthew; Kestay, Laszlo; Nixon, Conor; Parker, Alex

    2014-11-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will make it NASA’s premier space-based facility for infrared astronomy. This 6.5-meter telescope, which is optimized for observations in the near and mid infrared, will be equipped with four state-of-the-art instruments that include imaging, spectroscopy, and coronagraphy. These instruments, along with the telescope’s moving target capabilities, will enable the infrared study of solar system objects with unprecedented detail. A new white paper (Norwood et al., 2014) provides a general overview of JWST observatory and instrument capabilities for Solar System science, and updates and expands upon an earlier study by Lunine et al. (2010). In order to fully realize the potential of JWST for Solar System observations, we have recently organized 10 focus groups to explore various science use cases in more detail on topics including: Asteroids, Comets, Giant Planets, Mars, Near Earth Objects, Occultations, Rings, Satellites, Titan, and Trans-Neptunian Objects. The findings from these groups will help guide the project as it develops and implements planning tools, observing templates, the data pipeline and archives so that they enable a broad range of Solar System Science investigations. The purpose of this presentation is to raise awareness of the JWST Solar System planning, and to invite participation of DPS members with our Focus Groups and other pre-launch activities.References:Lunine, J., Hammel, H., Schaller, E., Sonneborn, G., Orton, G., Rieke, G., and Rieke, M. 2010, JWST Planetary Observations within the Solar System, http://www.stsci.edu/jwst/doc-archive/white-papers.Norwood, J., Hammel, H., Milam, S.,Stansberry, J., Lunine, J., Chanover, N., Hines, D., Sonneborn, G., Tiscareno, M., Brown, M. and Ferruit, P., 2014, ArXiv e-prints, 1403.6845.

  18. Titan Science with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Adamkovics, Mate; Bezard, Bruno; Bjoraker, Gordon L; Cornet, Thomas; Hayes, Alexander G; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lemmon, Mark T; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Teanby, Nicholas A; Turtle, Elizabeth P; West, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018, is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) but with a significantly larger aperture (6.5 m) and advanced instrumentation focusing on infrared science (0.6-28.0 $\\mu$m ). In this paper we examine the potential for scientific investigation of Titan using JWST, primarily with three of the four instruments: NIRSpec, NIRCam and MIRI, noting that science with NIRISS will be complementary. Five core scientific themes are identified: (i) surface (ii) tropospheric clouds (iii) tropospheric gases (iv) stratospheric composition and (v) stratospheric hazes. We discuss each theme in depth, including the scientific purpose, capabilities and limitations of the instrument suite, and suggested observing schemes. We pay particular attention to saturation, which is a problem for all three instruments, but may be alleviated for NIRCam through use of selecting small sub-arrays of the detectors - sufficient to encompass Titan, but with significantly fas...

  19. JWST and Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is on track for a launch in 2013. The author reviews the status and progress on the key hardware. The first primary mirror segments are already at MSFC for cryogenic tests, the mid IR instrument (MIRI) has already had successful tests of the engineering model, and the detectors are showing excellent performance. The author also describes the scientific objectives of the mission, with emphasis on the predicted capabilities for observing planets by the transit technique and through direct imaging. Recent direct observations of planets by HST and by adaptive optics from the ground have shown that, under favorable circumstances, much can be learned.

  20. Development of a plasma panel muon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, D. S.; Ball, R.; Beene, J. R.; Benhammou, Y.; Chapman, J. W.; Dai, T.; Etzion, E.; Friedman, P. S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Silver, Y.; Varner, R. L.; Weaverdyck, C.; White, S.; Zhou, B.

    2011-10-01

    A radiation detector technology based on plasma display panels (PDPs), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays, is being investigated. Emerging from this well-established television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micro-pattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally a fast, high-resolution detector comprised of an array of plasma discharge cells, operating in a hermetically sealed gas mixture. We report on the PPS development effort, including proof-of-principle results of laboratory signal observations.

  1. MCP detector development for WSO-UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Barnstedt, Jürgen; Elsener, Hans-Rudolf; Ganz, Philipp; Hermanutz, Stephan; Kalkuhl, Christoph; Kappelmann, Norbert; Pfeifer, Marc; Schaadt, Daniel; Schanz, Thomas; Tanirah, Omar; Werner, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    The spectrographs of WSO-UV cover the wavelength range of 102 - 310 nm. The essential requirements for the associated detectors are high quantum effciency, solar blindness, and single photon detection. To achieve this, we develop a microchannel plate detector in a sealed tube. We plan to use cesium activated gallium nitride as semitransparent photocathode, a stack of two microchannel plates and a cross strip anode with advanced readout electronics. Challenges are the degradation of the photocathode under atmospheric conditions and the sealing process. We present the detector concept, details of the transfer and sealing processes under UHV, and the current status.

  2. Preparing the Public for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Jirdeh, Hussein; Meinke, Bonnie K.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public, to educators and students, and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing E/PO programs: for example, simulated scientifically inspired but aesthetic JWST scenes, illustrating the differences between JWST and previous missions; partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; educational materials in vast networks of schools through products like the Star Witness News.

  3. Development of Large Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, Vuk [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-12-09

    This project aims at developing large cryogenic semiconductor detectors for applications in particle physics and more broadly. We have developed a 150 mm diameter, 43 mm thick, Si-based detector that measures ionization released in an interaction of a particle inside the silicon crystal of high purity, operated at 30 mK temperature. We demonstrated that such a detector can be used to measure recoil energies on the keV scale, and that its stable operation can be maintained indefinitely. Detectors of this type could therefore be used in the fields of direct dark matter searches, coherent neutrino scattering measurements, X-ray observations, as well as in broader applications such as homeland security.

  4. Development of floating strip micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan

    2014-04-28

    Micromegas are high-rate capable, high-resolution micro-pattern gaseous detectors. Square meter sized resistive strip Micromegas are foreseen as replacement of the currently used precision tracking detectors in the Small Wheel, which is part of the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The replacement is necessary to ensure tracking and triggering performance of the muon spectrometer after the luminosity increase of the Large Hadron Collider beyond its design value of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} around 2020. In this thesis a novel discharge tolerant floating strip Micromegas detector is presented and described. By individually powering copper anode strips, the effects of a discharge are confined to a small region of the detector. This reduces the impact of discharges on the efficiency by three orders of magnitude, compared to a standard Micromegas. The physics of the detector is studied and discussed in detail. Several detectors are developed: A 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas with exchangeable SMD capacitors and resistors allows for an optimization of the floating strip principle. The discharge behavior is investigated on this device in depth. The microscopic structure of discharges is quantitatively explained by a detailed detector simulation. A 48 x 50 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas is studied in high energy pion beams. Its homogeneity with respect to pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution is investigated. The good performance in high-rate background environments is demonstrated in cosmic muon tracking measurements with a 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas under lateral irradiation with 550 kHz 20 MeV proton beams. A floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is developed for ion tracking without limitations from multiple scattering in imaging applications during medical ion therapy. Highly efficient tracking of 20 MeV protons at particle rates of 550 kHz is possible. The reconstruction of the

  5. AGN studies with JWST/MIRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K.

    2015-01-01

    The forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will revolutionize galaxy evolution studies from the epoch of reionisation to the present day. In particular, a new era will be open for mid-IR astronomy, as the JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) will improve by an order of magnitude the sensitivit

  6. Development of superconducting tunnel junction radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, Masaki; Kishimoto, Maki; Ukibe, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Kurakado, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Kenji; Maehata, Keisuke

    1998-07-01

    Study on development of high energy resolution X-ray detector using superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) for radiation detection was conducted for 5 years under cooperation of University of Tokyo group and Kyushu University group by Quantum measurement research group of Advanced fundamental research center of JAERI. As the energy resolution of STJ could be obtained better results than that of Si semiconductor detector told to be actually best at present, this study aimed to actualize an X-ray detector usable for the experimental field and to elucidate radiation detection mechanism due to STJ. The STJ element used for this study was the one developed by Kurakado group of Nippon Steel Corp. As a results, some technical problems were almost resolved, which made some trouble when using the STJ element to detection element of X-ray spectrometer. In order to make the X-ray detector better, it is essential to manufacture a STJ element and develop serial junction type STJ element on the base of optimization of the element structure and selection and single crystallization of new superconducting materials such as Ta and others, activating the research results. (G.K.)

  7. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  8. Exploring JWST's Capability to Constrain Habitability on Simulated Terrestrial TESS Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Luke; Britt, Amber; Batalha, Natasha; Schwieterman, Edward; Arney, Giada; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Mandell, Avi; Planetary Systems Laboratory; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2017-01-01

    In the following, we have worked to develop a flexible "observability" scale of biologically relevant molecules in the atmospheres of newly discovered exoplanets for the instruments aboard NASA's next flagship mission, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We sought to create such a scale in order to provide the community with a tool with which to optimize target selection for JWST observations based on detections of the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey (TESS). Current literature has laid the groundwork for defining both biologically relevant molecules as well as what characteristics would make a new world "habitable", but it has so far lacked a cohesive analysis of JWST's capabilities to observe these molecules in exoplanet atmospheres and thereby constrain habitability. In developing our Observability Scale, we utilized a range of hypothetical planets (over planetary radii and stellar insolation) and generated three self-consistent atmospheric models (of dierent molecular compositions) for each of our simulated planets. With these planets and their corresponding atmospheres, we utilized the most accurate JWST instrument simulator, created specically to process transiting exoplanet spectra. Through careful analysis of these simulated outputs, we were able to determine the relevant parameters that effected JWST's ability to constrain each individual molecular bands with statistical accuracy and therefore generate a scale based on those key parameters. As a preliminary test of our Observability Scale, we have also applied it to the list of TESS candidate stars in order to determine JWST's observational capabilities for any soon-to-be-detected planet in those solar systems.

  9. AIM cryocooler developments for HOT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Withopf, A.; Rosenhagen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Significantly increased FPA temperatures for both Mid Wave and Long Wave IR detectors, i.e. HOT detectors, which have been developed in recent years are now leaving the development phase and are entering real application. HOT detectors allowing to push size weight and power (SWaP) of Integrated Detectors Cooler Assemblies (IDCA's) to a new level. Key component mainly driving achievable weight, volume and power consumption is the cryocooler. AIM cryocooler developments are focused on compact, lightweight linear cryocoolers driven by compact and high efficient digital cooler drive electronics (DCE) to also achieve highest MTTF targets. This technology is using moving magnet driving mechanisms and dual or single piston compressors. Whereas SX030 which was presented at SPIE in 2012 consuming less 3 WDC to operate a typical IDCA at 140K, next smaller cooler SX020 is designed to provide sufficient cooling power at detector temperature above 160K. The cooler weight of less than 200g and a total compressor length of 60mm makes it an ideal solution for all applications with limited weight and power budget, like in handheld applications. For operating a typical 640x512, 15μm MW IR detector the power consumption will be less than 1.5WDC. MTTF for the cooler will be in excess of 30,000h and thus achieving low maintenance cost also in 24/7 applications. The SX020 compressor is based on a single piston design with integrated passive balancer in a new design achieves very low exported vibration in the order of 100mN in the compressor axis. AIM is using a modular approach, allowing the chose between 5 different compressor types for one common Stirling expander. The 6mm expander with a total length of 74mm is now available in a new design that fits into standard dewar bores originally designed for rotary coolers. Also available is a 9mm coldfinger in both versions. In development is an ultra-short expander with around 35mm total length to achieve highest compactness. Technical

  10. Development of the RICH detectors in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Easo, S

    2003-01-01

    For particle identification, LHCb plans to use two RICH detectors, one covering the charged particle momentum range 1-65 GeV/c using aerogel and C//4F//1//0 radiators and the other covering up to 150 Ge V/c using CF//4 radiator. Hybrid photo diodes (HPD) with 80 mm photocathode diameter are being developed to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs encapsulate silicon pixel anodes bump bonded to binary readout chips processed using 0.25 mum CMOS technology. Results obtained with prototype radiators and HPDs in test beams will be presented and the design and development of these RICH detectors will be reviewed.

  11. Recent detector developments at SINTEF (industrial presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby Avset, Berit; Evensen, Lars; Uri Jensen, Geir; Mo, Sjur; Kari Schjølberg-Henriksen; Westgaard, Trond

    1998-02-01

    Results from SINTEF's research on radiation hardness of silicon detectors, thin silicon detectors, silicon drift devices, reach-through avalanche photodiodes, and detectors with thin dead layers are presented.

  12. New Detector Development for X-ray Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to continue our detector development program in X-ray astronomy. Under our current grant we are developing a new type of active pixel detector. The...

  13. Trends and new developments in gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Almost one century ago the method of particle detection with gaseous detectors was invented. Since then they have been exploited successfully in many experiments using a wide variety of different applications. The development is still going on today. The underlying working principles are today well understood and with the help of modern simulation techniques, new configurations can be easily examined and optimized before a first experimental test. Traditional wire chamber ensembles demonstrate that they are still up to date and are well prepared to meet also the challenges of LHC. Applications will be discussed using TPCs in high multiplicity environments with standard Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) as readout as well as drift tubes in a muon spectrometer for a Large Hardron Collider (LHC) experiment. Triggered by the evolving printed circuit technology, a new generation of gaseous detectors with very high position resolution and rate capability has emerged. Two representatives (MICROMEGAS, GEM) have ...

  14. Development of Interconnect Technologies for Particle Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Mani [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-01-29

    This final report covers the three years of this grant, for the funding period 9/1/2010 - 8/31/2013. The project consisted of generic detector R&D work at UC Davis, with an emphasis on developing interconnect technologies for applications in HEP. Much of the work is done at our Facility for Interconnect Technologies (FIT) at UC Davis. FIT was established using ARRA funds, with further studies supported by this grant. Besides generic R&D work at UC Davis, FIT is engaged in providing bump bonding help to several DOE supported detector R&D efforts. Some of the developmental work was also supported by funding from other sources: continuing CMS project funds and the Linear Collider R&D funds. The latter program is now terminated. The three year program saw a good deal of progress on several fronts, which are reported here.

  15. Developing and evaluating new micropattern gas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, Marco; Ropelewski, Leszek; Wotschack, Joerg

    Micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) were introduced in the late 1980s in order to overcome the limited rate capability of traditional proportional counters. Thanks to their microscopic electrode structures, MPGDs are faster and more precise than the previous gas detectors and soon gained popularity. Two of the most successful MPGDs are the gas electron multiplier (GEM) and the micro-mesh gaseous structure (Micromegas). In this thesis I present the features of GEMs and Micromegas, some of their current applications and the research and development that I have done on these technologies. My activity covered two main topics: the test and enhancement of single-mask GEMs for large-area applications and the study of spark-tolerant Micromegas for the upgrade of the ATLAS Small Wheels.

  16. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given.

  17. Gas detectors recent developments and future perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Thirty years after the invention of the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber, and twenty from the first Vienna Wire Chamber Conference, the interest and research efforts devoted to gas detectors are still conspicuous, as demonstrated by the number of papers submitted to this Conference. Innovative and performing devices have been perfected overt the years, used in experiments, and still developed today . Introduced ten years ago, the Micro-Strip Gas Chamber appears to fulfill the needs of high luminosity trackers progress in this field will be reported, followed by a discussion on discharge problems encountered and possible solutions. Recent and potentially more powerful devices such as the micro-gap, narrow-gap and micro-dot chambers will be described. A new generation of detectors exploiting av alanche multiplication in narrow gaps has emerged recently, namely MICROMEGAS, CAT (Compteur à trous) and the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM); whilst still in their infancy, they have promising performa nces with increased...

  18. Synergy with HST and JWST Data Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gretchen; Space Telescope Data Management Team

    2014-01-01

    The data processing and archive systems for the JWST will contain a petabyte of science data and the best news is that users will have fast access to the latest calibrations through a variety of new services. With a synergistic approach currently underway with the STScI science operations between the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope data management subsystems (DMS), operational verification is right around the corner. Next year the HST archive will provide scientists on-demand fully calibrated data products via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), which takes advantage of an upgraded DMS. This enhanced system, developed jointly with the JWST DMS is based on a new CONDOR distributed processing system capable of reprocessing data using a prioritization queue which runs in the background. A Calibration Reference Data System manages the latest optimal configuration for each scientific instrument pipeline. Science users will be able to search and discover the growing MAST archive calibrated datasets from these missions along with the other multiple mission holdings both local to MAST and available through the Virtual Observatory. JWST data systems will build upon the successes and lessons learned from the HST legacy and move us forward into the next generation of multi-wavelength archive research.

  19. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-10-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant progress toward this longwave (LW) goal.Warm-Spitzer has pioneered passive cooling to below 30 K in space, enabling the JWST mission.II. CurrentNASA's proposed NEOcam mission selected HgCdTe with a 10.6 micron cutoff because it promises natural Zodiacal background limited sensitivity with modest cooling (40 K). Teledyne Imaging Systems (TIS) is producing megapixel arrays with excellent performance (McMurtry, Lee, Dorn et al. (2013)) for this mission.III. FutureModest cooling requirements (circa 30 K) coupled with megapixel arrays and LW sensitivity in the thermal IR make HgCdTe attractive for many infrared instruments. For instance, the spectral signature of a terrestrial planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a nearby star will be the deep and wide absorption by CO_2 centered at 15 microns (Seager and Deming, 2010). LW instruments can enhance Solar System missions, such as exploration of the Enceladus geysers (Spencer, Buratti et al. 2006). Passive cooling will be adequate for these missions. Modern ground-based observatories will benefit from infrared capability out to the N band (7.5-13.6 microns). The required detector temperatures (30-40 K) are easily achievable using commercially available mechanical cryo-coolers (refrigerators).IV. Progress to dateTIS is developing megapixel HgCdTe arrays sensitive out to 15 microns under the direction of the University of Rochester. As a first step, we have produced arrays with a 13 micron cutoff. The initial measurements indicate very promising performance. We will present the

  20. Development, prototyping and characterization of double sided silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkar, Anita; Singh, Arvind; Aggarwal, Bharti; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Murali Krishna, L. V.; Das, D.

    2016-10-01

    Double sided DC-coupled silicon strip detectors with geometry of 65 mm×65 mm have been developed in India for nuclear physics experiments. The detectors have 64 P+ strips on the front side and 64 N+ strips on the backside with a pitch of 0.9 mm. These detectors were fabricated using a twelve mask layer process involving double sided wafer processing technology. Semiconductor process and device simulations were carried out in order to theoretically estimate the impact of important design and process parameters on the breakdown voltage of detectors. The performance of the first lot of prototype detectors has been studied using static characterization tests and using an alpha source. The characterization results demonstrate that the detectors have low leakage currents and good uniformity over the detector area of about 40 cm2. Overview of the detector design, fabrication process, simulation results and initial characterization results of the detectors are presented in this paper.

  1. Development of SOI pixel detector in Cracow

    CERN Document Server

    Bugiel, Szymon; Glab, Sebastian; Idzik, Marek; Moron, Jakub; Kapusta, Piotr Julian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new monolithic Silicon-On-Insulator pixel sensor in $200~nm$ SOI CMOS technology. The main application of the proposed pixel detector is the spectroscopy, but it can also be used for the minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracking in particle physics experiments. For this reason few different versions of pixel cells are developed: a source-follower based pixel for tracking, a low noise pixel with preamplifier for spectroscopy, and a self-triggering pixel for time and amplitude measurements. In addition the design of a Successive Approximation Register Analog-to-Digital Converter (SAR ADC) is also presented. A 10-bit SAR ADC is developed for spectroscopic measurements and a lower resolution 6-bit SAR ADC is integrated in the pixel matrix as a column ADC, for tracking applications.

  2. Development of dual-band barrier detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plis, Elena; Myers, Stephen A.; Ramirez, David A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of dual-band InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattices (T2SL) detectors with barrier designs at SK Infrared. Over the past five years, we demonstrated mid-wave/long-wave (MW/LWIR, cut-off wavelengths are 5 μm and 10.0 μm), and LW/LWIR (cut-off wavelengths are 9 μm and 11.0 μm) detectors with nBn and pBp designs. Recent results include a high performance bias-selectable long/long-wavelength infrared photodetector based on T2SL with a pBp barrier architecture. The two channels 50% cut-off wavelengths were ~ 9.2 μm and ~ 12 μm at 77 K. The "blue" and "red" LWIR absorbers demonstrated saturated QE values of 34 % and 28 %, respectively, measured in a backside illuminated configuration with a ~ 35 μm thick layer of residual GaSb substrate. Bulk-limited dark current levels were ~ 2.6 x 10-7 A/cm2 at + 100 mV and ~ 8.3 x 10-4 A/cm2 at - 200 mV for the "blue" and "red" channels, respectively.

  3. Development of large-area CZT detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl C.; Westergaard, Niels J.; Jonasson, Per; van Pamelen, Mike A.; Reglero, Victor; Eyles, Christopher J.; Neubert, Torsten

    1999-10-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT x-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed.

  4. Sensitivity of a new-developed neutron detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Tai-Ping; ZHU Xue-Bin; YANG Hong-Qiong; YANG Jian-Lun; YANG Gao-Zhao; LI Lin-Bo; SONG Xian-Cai

    2005-01-01

    We develop a kind of neutron detector, which consists of a polyethylene thin film and two PIN semiconductors connected face-to-face. The detector is insensitive to γ-rays. Its sensitivity to neutron has been calculated with MCNP program and calibrated by experiments, and the results indicate that the neutron sensitivity of the compensation detector will vary with polyethylene converter. The compensation PIN detector can be employed to measure pulse neutron in neutron and gamma mixture radiation field.

  5. Emulating JWST Exoplanet Transit Observations in a Testbed laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touli, D.; Beichman, C. A.; Vasisht, G.; Smith, R.; Krist, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transit technique is used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets. The combination of transit and radial velocity (RV) measurements gives information about a planet's radius and mass, respectively, leading to an estimate of the planet's density (Borucki et al. 2011) and therefore to its composition and evolutionary history. Transit spectroscopy can provide information on atmospheric composition and structure (Fortney et al. 2013). Spectroscopic observations of individual planets have revealed atomic and molecular species such as H2O, CO2 and CH4 in atmospheres of planets orbiting bright stars, e.g. Deming et al. (2013). The transit observations require extremely precise photometry. For instance, Jupiter transit results to a 1% brightness decrease of a solar type star while the Earth causes only a 0.0084% decrease (84 ppm). Spectroscopic measurements require still greater precision ppm. The Precision Projector Laboratory (PPL) is a collaboration between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) to characterize and validate detectors through emulation of science images. At PPL we have developed a testbed to project simulated spectra and other images onto a HgCdTe array in order to assess precision photometry for transits, weak lensing etc. for Explorer concepts like JWST, WFIRST, EUCLID. In our controlled laboratory experiment, the goal is to demonstrate ability to extract weak transit spectra as expected for NIRCam, NIRIS and NIRSpec. Two lamps of variable intensity, along with spectral line and photometric simulation masks emulate the signals from a star-only, from a planet-only and finally, from a combination of a planet + star. Three masks have been used to simulate spectra in monochromatic light. These masks, which are fabricated at JPL, have a length of 1000 pixels and widths of 2 pixels, 10 pixels and 1 pixel to correspond respectively to the noted above JWST instruments. From many-hour long observing

  6. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  7. Signal development in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuz, Marko

    2001-01-01

    This work provides a detailed study of signal formation in silicon detectors, with the emphasis on detectors with high concentration of irradiation induced defects in the lattice. These defects give rise to deep energy levels in the band gap. As a consequence, the current induced by charge motion in silicon detectors is signifcantly altered. Within the framework of the study a new experimental method, Charge correction method, based on transient current technique (TCT) was proposed for determination of effective electron and hole trapping times in irradiated silicon detectors. Effective carrier trapping times were determined in numerous silicon pad detectors irradiated with neutrons, pions and protons. Studied detectors were fabricated on oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon wafers with different bulk resistivities. Measured effective carrier trapping times were found to be inversely proportional to fuence and increase with temperature. No dependence on silicon resistivity and oxygen concentration was observ...

  8. Calibration results using highly aberrated images for aligning the JWST instruments to the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Acton, D. Scott; Gallagher, Ben B.; Knight, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Jurling, Alden S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-07-01

    mostly of 3rd-order astigmatism and coma. This is because the elliptical tertiary mirror of the AOS is used off of its ideal foci locations without the compensating wavefront effects of the JWST primary and secondary mirrors. Therefore, the PSFs created are highly asymmetric with relatively complex structure and the centroid and encircled energy analyses traditionally used to locate images are not sufficient for ensuring the AOS to ISIM alignment. A novel approach combining phase retrieval and spatial metrology was developed to both locate the images with respect to the AOS and provide calibration information for eventual AOS to ISIM alignment verification. During final JWST OTE and ISIM (OTIS) testing, only a single thru-focus image will be collected by the instruments. Therefore, tools and processes were developed to perform single-image phase retrieval on these highly aberrated images such that any single image of the ASPA source can provide calibrated knowledge of the instruments' position relative to the AOS. This paper discusses the results of the methodology, hardware, and calibration performed to ensure that the AOS and ISIM are aligned within their respective tolerances at JWST OTIS testing.

  9. Key Exoplanets in the Era of JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha; Mandell, Avi; Lewis, Nikole K.; Pontoppidan, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In 2018, exoplanet science will enter a new era with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). With JWST's observing power, several studies have sought to characterize how the instruments will perform and what atmospheric spectral features could theoretically be detected using transmission spectroscopy. With just two years left until launch, it is imperative that the exoplanet community begins to digest and integrate these studies into their observing plans and strategies. In order to encourage this and to allow all members of the community access to JWST simulations, we present here an open source tool for creating observation simulations of all observatory-supported time-series spectroscopy modes. We describe our tool, PandExo and use it to calculate the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for every confirmed planetary system with Jhours are needed to attain a SNR of 5 on key molecular absorption bands of H2O, CH4, and CO. We end by determining the number of planets (hot Jupiters, warm Neptunes, super-Earths, etc.) that are currently attainable with JWST.

  10. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Ratcliff, B.

    1988-10-01

    We present recent progress on the construction and testing of the first drift boxes and single electron detectors as they come from the production line. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Ring Imaging technique in the SLD experiment at SLAC. Various experimental results are presented, including single electron pulse height measurements as a function of gas gain, detector gating capability, uniformity of response across the wire plane, charge division performance of a single electron signal, average pulse shape and its comparison with predicted shape, and cross-talk. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R; Ben-Moshe, M; Benhammou, Y; Bensimon, R; Chapman, J W; Etzion, E; Ferretti, C; Friedman, P S; Levin, D S; Silver, Y; Varner, R L; Weaverdyck, C; Wetzel, R; Zhou, B; Anderson, T; McKinny, K; Bentefour, E H

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of a radiation detector based on plasma display panel technology. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a variant of micropattern gas radiation detectors. PPS components are non-reactive and intrinsically radiation-hard materials, such as glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated risetimes and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

  12. RD50 Collaboration overview: Development of new radiation hard detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, S., E-mail: susanne.kuehn@cern.ch

    2016-07-11

    Silicon sensors are widely used as tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This results in several specific requirements like radiation hardness and granularity. Therefore research for highly performing silicon detectors is required. The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for application in high luminosity collider experiments. Extensive research is ongoing in different fields since 2001. The collaboration investigates both defect and material characterization, detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. The report gives selected results of the collaboration and places an emphasis on the development of new structures, namely 3D devices, CMOS sensors in HV technology and low gain avalanche detectors. - Highlights: • The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for high luminosity collider experiments. • The collaboration investigates defect, material and detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. • Results of measured data of n-in-p type sensors allow recommendations for silicon tracking detectors at the HL-LHC. • The charge multiplication effect was investigated to allow its exploitation and resulted in new structures like LGAD sensors. • New sensor types like slim and active edge sensors, 3D detectors, and lately HVCMOS devices were developed in the active collaboration.

  13. Advanced cryogenic thermal switches for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, David; Beres, Matthew; Stouffer, Charles; Rodriguez, Jose

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes two cryogenic thermal switches (CTSWs) under development for instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first thermal switch was designed to extend the life of the solid H2 dewar for the 6 K Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) while the second thermal switch is needed for contamination and over-temperature control of three 35 K instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). In both cases, differential thermal expansion (DTE) between two materials having differing CTE values is the process that underpins the thermal switching. The patented DTE-CTSW design utilizes two metallic end-pieces, one cup-shaped and the other disc-shaped (both MIRI end-pieces are Al while ISIM uses an Al/Invar cup and an Al disc), joined by an axially centered Ultem rod, which creates a narrow, flat gap between the cup (rim) and disc. A heater is bonded to the rod center. Upon cooling one or both end-pieces, the rod contracts relative to the end-pieces and the gap closes, turning the CTSW ON. When the rod heater is turned on, the rod expands relative to the end-pieces and the gap opens, turning the CTSW OFF. During testing from 6-35 K, ON conductances of 0.3-12 W/K and OFF resistances greater than 2500 K/W were measured. Of particular importance at 6 K was the Al oxide layer, which was found to significantly decrease DTE-CTSW ON conductance when the mating surfaces were bare Al. When the mating surfaces were gold-plated, the adverse impact of the oxide layer was mitigated. This paper will describe both efforts from design through model correlation.

  14. Progress in the Development of Plasma Panel Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Robert; Benhammou, Yan; Moshe, Meny Ben; Chapman, J Wehrley; Dai, Tiesheng; Etzion, Erez; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Silver, Yiftah; Sherman, Guy; Varner, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; White, Steve; Yu, J; Zhou, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays, are being investigated for their utility as radiation detectors called Plasma Panel Sensors (PPS). The PPS a novel variant of a micropattern radiation detector, is intended to be a fast, high resolution detector comprised of an array of plasma discharge cells operating in a hermetically sealed gas mixture. We report on the PPS development effort, including recent laboratory measurements.

  15. Development of a Scintillating Fibre Detector for HERA-B

    CERN Document Server

    Dreis, H B; Hildebrandt, M; Schmidt, B; Sponsel, A; Ziegler, M

    1998-01-01

    A fibre detector with multianode PM readout for high rate applications was developed for the HERA-B spectometer to cover the area near the beampipe. Such a detector has to operate at particle rates up to 2*10**4 mm**(-2) s**(-1) and has to tolerate a radiation dosis up to 1 Mrad/y. The light output of test detectors with different scintillating fibres was measured as well as the light transport through clear fibres to the PM as a function of radiation dosis and different conditions of irradiation. The geometry of the detector is described and results for a full size prototype are presented.

  16. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    OpenAIRE

    Golshani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled X-ray detectors, incoming photons ionize inert gas and create electron and ions which can be collected at a thin wire anode inside of the chamber. The advantage of this type of detector is the possibi...

  17. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled X-ray detectors, incoming photons ionize inert gas and create electron and ions which can be collected at a thin wire anode inside of the chamber. The advantage of this type of detector is the possibi...

  18. Bismuth tri-iodide radiation detector development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Sasmit S.

    Bismuth tri-iodide is an attractive material for room temperature radiation detection. BiI3 demonstrates a number of properties that are apt for semiconductor radiation detection, especially gamma ray spectroscopy. The high atomic number (ZBi = 83 and ZI = 53) and the relatively high density (5.78 g/cm3) cause the material to have good photon stopping power, while the large band-gap (1.67 eV ) allows it to function as a room temperature radiation detector without any cooling mechanism. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of BiI3 radiation detectors. For the purpose of this research detectors were fabricated by cutting BiI3 crystal boules, followed by mechanical and chemical surface treatments. Detectors with various electrode geometries enabling single polarity charge sensing were fabricated. The electrical characteristics and the radiation response of the detectors were measured. The radiation response measurement was performed at room temperature using a 241Am alpha particle source and a 241Am sealed gamma-ray source. The spectral resolutions of the detectors varied from 2.09% - 6.1% for 59.5 keV gamma-rays and between 26% - 40% for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. Charge carrier properties such as the electron and hole mobility and lifetime were also estimated. The electron mobility for an ultrapure BiI 3 detector was estimated to be approximately 433 cm 2/Vs while that for antimony doped BiI3 was estimated to be around 956 cm2/Vs and the mobility-lifetime product for electrons was estimated to be around 5.44 x 10-4 cm 2/V. Detector simulation was performed using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP5. A Matlab script which incorporates charge carrier trapping and statistical variation was written to generate a gamma-ray spectrum from the simulated energy deposition spectra. Measured and simulated spectra were compared to extract the charge carrier mobility-lifetime products, which for electrons and holes were estimated to be 5 x 10-3 cm2/V and 1.3 x

  19. RD50 Collaboration overview: Development of new radiation hard detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon sensors are widely used as tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This results in several specific requirements like radiation hardness and granularity. Therefore research for highly performing silicon detectors is required. The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for application in high luminosity collider experiments. Extensive research is ongoing in different fields since 2001. The collaboration investigates both defect and material characterization, detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. The report gives selected results of the collaboration and places an emphasis on the development of new structures, namely 3D devices, CMOS sensors in HV technology and low gain avalanche detectors.

  20. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golshani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled X

  1. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golshani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled X

  2. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golshani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled

  3. Status of the JWST Science Instrument Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) system consists of five sensors (4 science): Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS), Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), Near InfraRed Camera (NIRCam), Near InfraRed Spectrograph (NIRSpec); and nine instrument support systems: Optical metering structure system, Electrical Harness System; Harness Radiator System, ISIM Electronics Compartment, ISIM Remote Services Unit, Cryogenic Thermal Control System, Command and Data Handling System, Flight Software System, Operations Scripts System.

  4. Exoplanets and debris disk imaging with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2017-06-01

    Dramatic progress in exoplanetary systems imaging has occurred since the first generation of space coronagraphs on HST (NICMOS, STIS, ACS). While HST remains at forefront of both exoplanetary and circumstellar disk science, ground-based instruments have improved by three orders of magnitudes over the past decade. JWST will extend the current state of the art with a larger set of superior coronagraphs and greater sensitivity across more than a factor of 10 in wavelength, making it extraordinarily capable for detailed imaging characterization of planets and disks. We will address specific questions about nearby exoplanetary systems, while also optimizing observing strategies across the breadth of JWST’s high-contrast imaging modes, as follows: (a) Deep, multi-wavelength observations of selected nearby stars hosting known debris disks & planets. We will use the NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs across the full range of JWST wavelengths, and perhaps MIRI MRS spatially resolved spectroscopy. Each comprehensive dataset will support a variety of investigations addressing both disk characterization and exoplanet detection & characterization. (b) Characterization of Planetary Systems around Cool M Stars. We will observe young and dusty M dwarfs, to complement observations of the closer but older M dwarf samples under consideration by other GTO groups. JWST observations will dramatically exceed HST images in their ability to address questions about the properties of dust rings, while the more favorable contrast ratios of planets relative to M dwarf hosts will enable sensitivity to relatively low mass planetary companions.

  5. Observer's Interface for JWST Observation Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Miranda; Douglas, Robert; Moriarty, Christopher; Roman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In support of the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, various teams at STScI (the Space Telescope Science Institute) have collaborated on how to re-structure the view of a an observing program within the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT) to accommodate for the differences between HST and JWST. For HST APT programs, the structure is visit-dominant, and there is one generic form for entering observing information that spans all instruments with their required fields and options. This can result in sometimes showing irrelevant fields to the user for a given observing goal. Also, the generation of mosaicked observations in HST requires the user to manually calculate the position of each tile within the mosaic, accounting for positional offsets and the roll of the telescope, which is a time consuming process. Now, for JWST programs in APT, the description of the observations has been segregated by instrument and mode into discrete observing templates. Each template's form allows instrument specific choices and displays of relevant information. APT will manually manage the number of visits needed to perform the observation. This is particularly useful for mosaics and dithering with JWST. For example, users will select how they would like a mosaic to be tiled at the observation level, and the visits are automatically created. In this, visits have been re-structured to be purely informational; all editing is done at the observation level. These options and concepts are illustrated to future users via the corresponding poster.

  6. JWST science instrument pupil alignment measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubalak, Dave; Sullivan, Joe; Ohl, Ray; Antonille, Scott; Beaton, Alexander; Coulter, Phillip; Hartig, George; Kelly, Doug; Lee, David; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Schweiger, Paul; Telfer, Randal; Te Plate, Maurice; Wells, Martyn

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy ( 40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI), including a guider. OSIM is a full field, cryogenic, optical simulator of the JWST OTE. It is the "Master Tool" for verifying the cryogenic alignment and optical performance of ISIM by providing simulated point source/star images to each of the four Science Instruments in ISIM. Included in OSIM is a Pupil Imaging Module (PIM) - a large format CCD used for measuring pupil alignment. Located at a virtual stop location within OSIM, the PIM records superimposed shadow images of pupil alignment reference (PAR) targets located in the OSIM and SI pupils. The OSIM Pupil Imaging Module was described by Brent Bos, et al, at SPIE in 2011 prior to ISIM testing. We have recently completed the third and final ISIM cryogenic performance verification test before ISIM was integrated with the OTE. In this paper, we describe PIM implementation, performance, and measurement results.

  7. Large Space Optics: From Hubble to JWST and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    If necessity truly is the mother of invention, then advances in lightweight space mirror technology have been driven by launch vehicle mass and volume constraints. In the late 1970 s, at the start of Hubble development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 3 to 4 meter monolithic primary mirrors with masses of 6000 to 10,000 kg - clearly too massive for the planned space shuttle 25,000 kg capability to LEO. Necessity led Hubble to a different solution. Launch vehicle mass constraints (and cost) resulted in the development of a 2.4 meter lightweight eggcrate mirror. At 810 kg (180 kg/m2), this mirror was approximately 7.4% of HST s total 11,110 kg mass. And, the total observatory structure at 4.3 m x 13.2 m fit snuggly inside the space shuttle 4.6 m x 18.3 m payload bay. In the early 1990 s, at the start of JWST development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 8 meter class monolithic primary mirrors (16,000 to 23,000 kg) and 10 meter segmented mirrors (14,400 kg). Unfortunately, launch vehicles were still constrained to 4.5 meter payloads and 25,000 kg to LEO or 6,600 kg to L2. Furthermore, science now demanded a space telescope with 6 to 8 meter aperture operating at L2. Mirror technology was identified as a critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996 (1). These studies identified two significant architectural constraints: segmentation and areal density. Because the launch vehicle fairing payload dynamic envelop diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. And, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density of 20 kg/m2. At the inception of

  8. Preparing for JWST wavefront sensing and control operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Acton, D. Scott; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Knight, J. Scott; Lallo, Matthew D.; Allen, Marsha; Baggett, Wayne; Barker, Elizabeth; Comeau, Thomas; Coppock, Eric; Dean, Bruce H.; Hartig, George; Hayden, William L.; Jordan, Margaret; Jurling, Alden; Kulp, Trey; Long, Joseph; McElwain, Michael W.; Meza, Luis; Nelan, Edmund P.; Soummer, Remi; Stansberry, John; Stark, Christopher; Telfer, Randal; Welsh, Andria L.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Zimmerman, Neil T.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescopes segmented primary and deployable secondary mirrors will be actively con- trolled to achieve optical alignment through a complex series of steps that will extend across several months during the observatory's commissioning. This process will require an intricate interplay between individual wavefront sensing and control tasks, instrument-level checkout and commissioning, and observatory-level calibrations, which involves many subsystems across both the observatory and the ground system. Furthermore, commissioning will often exercise observatory capabilities under atypical circumstances, such as fine guiding with unstacked or defocused images, or planning targeted observations in the presence of substantial time-variable offsets to the telescope line of sight. Coordination for this process across the JWST partnership has been conducted through the Wavefront Sensing and Control Operations Working Group. We describe at a high level the activities of this group and the resulting detailed commissioning operations plans, supporting software tools development, and ongoing preparations activities at the Science and Operations Center. For each major step in JWST's wavefront sensing and control, we also explain the changes and additions that were needed to turn an initial operations concept into a flight-ready plan with proven tools. These efforts are leading to a robust and well-tested process and preparing the team for an efficient and successful commissioning of JWSTs active telescope.

  9. Sensor development for the CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bölla, G; Horisberger, R P; Kaufmann, R; Rohe, T; Roy, A

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will contain a pixel detector which provides in its final configuration three space points per track close to the interaction point of the colliding beams. Because of the harsh radiation environment of the LHC, the technical realization of the pixel detector is extremely challenging. The readout chip as the most damageable part of the system is believed to survive a particle fluence of 6x10 sup 1 sup 4 n sub e sub q /cm sup 2 (All fluences are normalized to 1 MeV neutrons and therefore all components of the hybrid pixel detector have to perform well up to at least this fluence. As this requires a partially depleted operation of the silicon sensors after irradiation-induced type inversion of the substrate, an ''n in n'' concept has been chosen. In order to perform IV-tests on wafer level and to hold accidentally unconnected pixels close to ground potential, a resistive path between the pixe...

  10. Digital Acquisition Development for Fast Neutron Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagren, T.; Mosby, S.; Mona Collaboration; Lansce P-27 Team

    2015-10-01

    The use of the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) at FRIB requires a thorough understanding of how neutrons propagate through the array. This leads to the increasing importance of accuracy in detector response simulations, particularly in the case of FRIB's higher beam energies. An upcoming experiment at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Lab will benchmark neutron propagation through the MoNA array and provide a more complete validation of the simulation software. LANSCE also hosts the Chi-Nu experiment, which seeks to measure fission output neutrons using the high-intensity neutron beams there. In both experiments, the instantaneous rate on the detectors involved is expected to be very high, due to the LANSCE/WNR beam structure. Therefore, waveform digitizers with on-board processing are required in order for the experiments to succeed. These digitizers provide on-board timing algorithms using FPGA firmware, and several tests were preformed in order to determine what the optimal timing filter settings were for a variety of detectors, including the plastic and liquid scintillators to be used in MoNA and Chi-Nu respectively. This work will inform the execution of the MoNA and Chi-Nu experiments at LANSCE. The details of the methods used and results will be presented. Supported by funding through Los Alamos National Lab and NSF Grant PHY-1506402.

  11. Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors Technologies

    CERN Multimedia

    Richer, J; Santos, D; Barsuk, S; Hamar, G; Shah, M K; Catanesi, M G; Colaleo, A; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Berardi, V; Bagliesi, M; Menon, G; Richter, R; Lahonde-hamdoun, C; Dris, M; Chechik, R; Ochi, A; Hartjes, F; Lopes, I M; Deshpande, A; Franz, A; Dabrowski, W; Fiutowski, T A; Ferreira, A; Bastos de oliveira, C A; Miller, B W; Monrabal-capilla, F; Liubarsky, I; Plazas de pinzon, M C; Tsarfati, T; Voss, B J R; Carmona martinez, J M; Stocchi, A; Dinu, N; Semeniouk, I; Giebels, B; Marton, K; De leo, R; De lucia, E; Alviggi, M; Bellerive, A; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Derre, J; Giomataris, I; Peyaud, A; Schune, P; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Charles, G; Wang, W; Markou, A; Arazi, L; Cibinetto, G; Edo, Y; Neves, F F; Solovov, V; Stoll, S; Sampsonidis, D; Mindur, B; Zielinska, A Z; Sauli, F; Calapez de albuquerque veloso, J F; Kahlaoui, N; Sharma, A; Bilevych, Y; Zenker, K; Cebrian guajardo, S V; Luzon marco, G M; Dalmaz, A E; Geffroy, N A; Guillaudin, O J H; Cornebise, P; Lounis, A; Bruel, P J; Laszlo, A; Mukerjee, K; Nappi, E; Nuzzo, S V; Bencivenni, G; Tessarotto, F; Levorato, S; Dixit, M S; Riallot, M; Jeanneau, F; Nizery, F G; Maltezos, S; Kyriakis, A; Lyashenko, A; Van der graaf, H; Ferreira marques, R; Alexa, C; Liyanage, N; Dehmelt, K; Hemmick, T K; Polychronakos, V; Cisbani, E; Garibaldi, F; Koperny, S Z; Mora mas, F; Das neves dias carramate, L F; Munoz-vidal, J; Gutierrez, R; Van stenis, M; Resnati, F; Lupberger, M; Desch, K K; Soyk, D; Adloff, C J; Chefdeville, M; Vouters, G; Ranieri, A; Lami, S; Shekhtman, L; Dolgov, A; Bamberger, A; Landgraf, U; Kortner, O; Ferrero, A; Attie, D M; Bakas, G; Tsigaridas, S; Surrow, B; Gnanvo, K A K; Feege, N M; Woody, C L; Bhattacharya, S; Capogni, M; Hohlmann, M; Veenhof, R J; Tapan, I; Dangendorf, V; Monteiro bernades, C M; Castro serrato, H F; De oliveira, R; Ropelewski, L; Behnke, T; Peltier, F; Boudry, V; Radicioni, E; Lai, A; Shemyakina, E; Giganon, A E; Titov, M; Aune, S; Galan lacarra, J A; Papakrivopoulos, I; Komai, H; Van bakel, N A; Tchepel, V; Repond, J O; Li, Y; Kourkoumelis, C; Tzamarias, S; Majumdar, N; Kowalski, T; Da rocha azevedo, C D; Sorel, M; Serra diaz cano, L; Alvarez puerta, V; Trabelsi, A; Riegler, W; Ketzer, B F; Rosemann, C G; Herrera munoz, D C; Drancourt, C; Mayet, F; Geerebaert, Y; Fodor, Z P; De robertis, G; Felici, G; Scribano memoria, A; Cecchi, R; Dalla torre, S; Gregori, M; Buzulutskov, A; Schwegler, P; Sanchez nieto, F J; Colas, P M A; Gros, M; Neyret, D; Zito, M; Ferrer ribas, E; Breskin, A; Martoiu, V S; Purschke, M L; Loomba, D; Gasik, P J; Petridou, C; Kordas, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Bucciantonio, M; Bhopatkar, V S; Biagi, S F; Ji, X; Kanaki, K; Zavazieva, D; Capeans garrido, M D M; Schindler, H; Kaminski, J; Krautscheid, T; Lippmann, C; Arora, R; Dafni, T; Garcia irastorza, I; Puill, V; Wicek, F B; Burmistrov, L; Singh, K P; Pugliese, G; Kroha, H; Kunne, F; Alexopoulos, T; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Bettoni, D; Heijhoff, K; Xiao, Z; Tzanakos, G; Leisos, A; Frullani, S; Toledo alarcon, J F; Sahin, O; Kalkan, Y; Giboni, K; Krieger, C; Gaglione, R; Breton, D R; Bhattacharyya, S; Abbrescia, M; Erriquez, O; Paticchio, V; Cardini, A; Aloisio, A; Turini, N; Bressan, A; Tikhonov, Y; Schumacher, M; Simon, F R; Nowak, S; Herlant, S; Chaus, A; Fanourakis, G; Bressler, S; Homma, Y; Timmermans, J; Fonte, P; Underwood, D G; Azmoun, B; Fassouliotis, D; Wiacek, P; Esteve bosch, R; Dos santos covita, D; Monteiro da silva, A L; Yahlali haddou, N; Marques ferreira dos santos, J; Domingues amaro, F

    The proposed R&D collaboration, RD51, aims at facilitating the development of advanced gas-avalanche detector technologies and associated electronic-readout systems, for applications in basic and applied research. Advances in particle physics have always been enabled by parallel advances in radiation-detector technology. Radiation detection and imaging with gas-avalanche detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget, have been playing an important role in many fields. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications such as medical imaging, material science, and security inspection. While extensively employed at the LHC, RHIC, and other advanced HEP experiments, present gaseous detectors (wire-chambers, drift-tubes, resistive-plate chambers and others) have limitations which may prevent their use in future experiments. Present tec...

  12. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  13. Status of the JWST/MIRI Focal Plane System and Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Goodson, G. B.; Khorrami, M. A.; Larson, M. E.; Mahoney, J. C.; Sukhatme, K. G.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is a multipurpose imager, coronagraph, and spectrometer for the James Webb Space Telescope. It provides wavelength coverage from 5 through 28 microns and is an integral contributor to all four of JWST's primary science themes. MIRI is being developed as a partnership between NASA and ESA, with JPL providing the Focal Plane System (FPS, consisting of the detectors, control electronics, and flight software) and the cooler, and a consortium of European astronomical institutes providing the optical bench and structure. The flight FPS is being prepared for delivery to the European Consortium for its integration into the optical bench, while the cooler is nearing its Critical Design Review. We describe the capabilities of the FPS and cooler, present test results and the predicted sensitivity performance of the FPS, and update the current status of each these systems. The research described in this poster was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. NICADD scientists develop detector technology for International Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Scientist at the Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) are celebrating the successful run of a prototype subdetector for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC)." (1 page)

  15. Development of a Detector Control System for the ATLAS Pixel detector in the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, N.; Karagounis, M.; Kersten, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2016-11-01

    The upgrade of the LHC to the HL-LHC requires a new ITk detector. The innermost part of this new tracker is a pixel detector. The University of Wuppertal is developing a new DCS to monitor and control this new pixel detector. The current concept envisions three parallel paths of the DCS. The first path, called security path, is hardwired and provides an interlock system to guarantee the safety of the detector and human beings. The second path is a control path. This path is used to supervise the entire detector. The control path has its own communication lines independent from the regular data readout for reliable operation. The third path is for diagnostics and provides information on demand. It is merged with the regular data readout and provides the highest granularity and most detailed information. To reduce the material budget, a serial power scheme is the baseline for the pixel modules. A new ASIC used in the control path is in development at Wuppertal for this serial power chain. A prototype exists already and a proof of principle was demonstrated. Development and research is ongoing to guarantee the correct operation of the new ASIC in the harsh environment of the HL-LHC. The concept for the new DCS will be presented in this paper. A focus will be made on the development of the DCS chip, used for monitoring and control of pixel modules in a serial power chain.

  16. Trends in research and development for future detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cattai, Ariella

    2013-01-01

    Development of novel detector concepts has always played a major role in supporting and enabling scientific research. In the forthcoming phase of high energy physics (HEP), the design and development of new detectors and detector concepts will be even more important than it was in the past owing to the harsh environmental conditions and the challenging requests imposed by the physicists' needs for: improved spatial and time resolution, innovative functions, acquisition speed, radiation tolerance, minimal power consumption, robustness and reliability, minimal material and more. This overview addresses the challenges that upgrades and future projects in HEP will impose in terms of novel technologies and stresses the detectors' potential and limitations in attempting to achieve the scientific goals. In addition the increasingly strong dependence on large-scale industrial production and industrial development, especially in the area of integrated electronics, sensors and large complex systems will be addressed.

  17. CZT Detector Development for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Alfred, III; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Bose, R.; Burger, A.; Dowkonnt, P.; Groza, M.; Simburger, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has proven itself as an excellent material for detection of hard X-rays. Advances in crystal growth have increased the quality and size of available single CZT crystals. We report on our ongoing development and characterization of CZT detector systems. With our dedicated class-100 cleanroom, we fabricate detectors using CZT crystals from different manufactures. Using photolithography and e-beam evaporation, we can produce detectors with different contact designs (pixellated, strip, monolithic, steering grid), contact dimensions (down to 50 microns), and contact materials (In, Ti, Au, etc.) . In addition, we develop ASIC readouts for various CZT detector applications, including our characterization of the detectors. We measure I-V and C-V curves for the detectors as well as their spectroscopic performance. We compare measured results with those from detailed modelling and simulations. The CZT detector systems can then be optimized for applications such as X-ray imaging and polarimetry with satellite or balloon-borne instruments.

  18. Epitaxial silicon semiconductor detectors, past developments, future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruhn, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the main physical characteristics of epitaxial silicon as it relates to detector development is presented. As examples of applications results are presented on (1) epitaxial silicon avalanche diodes (ESAD); signal-to-noise, non-linear aspects of the avalanche gain mechanism, gain-bandwidth product, (2) ultrathin epitaxial silicon surface barrier (ESSB) detectors, response to heavy ions, (3) an all-epitaxial silicon diode (ESD), response to heavy ions, charge transport and charge defect. Future prospects of epitaxial silicon as it relates to new detector designs are summarized.

  19. Epitaxial silicon semiconductor detectors: past developments, future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruhn, C.R.

    1977-02-01

    A review of the main physical characteristics of epitaxial silicon as it relates to detector development is presented. As examples of applications results are presented on (1) epitaxial silicon avalanche diodes (ESAD); signal-to-noise, non-linear aspects of the avalanche gain mechanism, gain-bandwidth product, (2) ultrathin epitaxial silicon surface barrier (ESSB) detectors, response to heavy ions, (3) an all-epitaxial silicon diode (ESD), response to heavy ions, charge transport and charge defect. Future prospects of epitaxial silicon as it relates to new detector designs are summarized.

  20. Innovative applications and developments of micro-pattern gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Study of nature and the world around us has been a primary motivation for scientists and researchers for centuries. Advanced methods in the study of elementary particles have led to even greater discoveries in recent years. "Innovative Applications and Developments of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors" focuses on the analysis and use of various gas detection systems, providing a detailed description of some of the most commonly used gas detectors and the science behind them. From early detectors to modern tools and techniques, this book will be of particular use to practitioners and researchers in chemical engineering and materials science, in addition to students and academicians concentrating in the field.

  1. Development and Prototyping of the PROSPECT Antineutrino Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeford, Kelley; Prospect Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will make the most precise measurement of the 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum as well as search for sterile neutrinos using a segmented Li-loaded liquid scintillator neutrino detector. Several prototype detectors of increasing size, complexity, and fidelity have been constructed and tested as part of the PROSPECT detector development program. The challenges to overcome include the efficient rejection of cosmogenic background and collection of optical photons in a compact volume. Design choices regarding segment structure and layout, calibration source deployment, and optical collection methods are discussed. Results from the most recent multi-segment prototype, PROSPECT-50, will also be shown.

  2. CHARACTERIZING TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES WITH JWST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Luther, Kyle, E-mail: tom.greene@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We explore how well spectra from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with atmospheres that are clear, cloudy, or of high mean molecular weight (HMMW). Next we simulate the λ = 1–11 μm transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single-transit or single-eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}) can be constrained. We find that λ = 1–2.5 μm transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar-composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or HMMW atmospheres will often require full 1–11 μm spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high F{sub p} and high F{sub p}/F{sub *}. Strong temperature inversions in the solar-composition hot-Jupiter atmosphere should be detectable with 1–2.5+ μm emission spectra, and 1–5+ μm emission spectra will constrain the temperature–pressure profiles of warm planets. Transmission spectra over 1–5+ μm will constrain [Fe/H] values to better than 0.5 dex for the clear atmospheres of the hot and warm planets studied. Carbon-to-oxygen ratios can be constrained to better than a factor of 2 in some systems. We expect that these results will provide useful predictions of the scientific value of single-event JWST spectra until its on-orbit performance is known.

  3. Infrastructure for Detector Research and Development towards the International Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, M; Kulis, Sz; Przyborowski, D; Swientek, K; Bamberger, A; Köhli, M; Lupberger, M; Renz, U; Schumacher, M; Zwerger, Andreas; Calderone, A; Cussans, D G; Heath, H F; Mandry, S; Page, R F; Velthuis, J J; Attié, D; Calvet, D; Colas, P; Coppolani, X; Degerli, Y; Delagnes, E; Gelin, M; Giomataris, I; Lutz, P; Orsini, F; Rialot, M; Senée, F; Wang, W; Alozy, J; Apostolakis, J; Aspell, P; Bergsma, F; Campbell, M; Formenti, F; Santos, H Franca; Garcia, E Garcia; de Gaspari, M; Giudice, P -A; Grefe, Ch; Grichine, V; Hauschild, M; Ivantchenko, V; Kehrli, A; Kloukinas, K; Linssen, L; Cudie, X Llopart; Marchioro, A; Musa, L; Ribon, A; Trampitsch, G; Uzhinskiy, V; Anduze, M; Beyer, E; Bonnemaison, A; Boudry, V; Brient, J -C; Cauchois, A; Clerc, C; Cornat, R; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Jauffret, C; Jeans, D; Karar, A; Mathieu, A; de Freitas, P Mora; Musat, G; Rougé, A; Ruan, M; Vanel, J -C; Videau, H; Besson, A; de Masi, G Claus R; Doziere, G; Dulinski, W; Goffe, M; Himmi, A; Hu-Guo, Ch; Morel, F; Valin, I; Winter, M; Bonis, J; Callier, S; Cornebise, P; Dulucq, F; Giannelli, M Faucci; Fleury, J; Guilhem, G; Martin-Chassard, G; de la Taille, Ch; Pöschl, R; Raux, L; Seguin-Moreau, N; Wicek, F; Benyamna, M; Bonnard, J; Cârloganu, C; Fehr, F; Gay, P; Mannen, S; Royer, L; Charpy, A; Da Silva, W; David, J; Dhellot, M; Imbault, D; Ghislain, P; Kapusta, F; Pham, T Hung; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sefri, R; Dzahini, D; Giraud, J; Grondin, D; Hostachy, J -Y; Morin, L; Bassignana, D; Pellegrini, G; Lozano, M; Quirion, D; Fernandez, M; Jaramillo, R; Munoz, F J; Vila, I; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Kodys, P; Kvasnicka, P; Aplin, S; Bachynska, O; Behnke, T; Behr, J; Dehmelt, K; Engels, J; Gadow, K; Gaede, F; Garutti, E; Göttlicher, P; Gregor, I -M; Haas, T; Henschel, H; Koetz, U; Lange, W; Libov, V; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mnich, J; Muhl, C; Ohlerich, M; Potylitsina-Kube, N; Prahl, V; Reinecke, M; Roloff, P; Rosemann, Ch; Rubinski, Igor; Schade, P; Schuwalov, S; Sefkow, F; Terwort, M; Volkenborn, R; Kalliopuska, J; Mehtaelae, P; Orava, R; van Remortel, N; Cvach, J; Janata, M; Kvasnicka, J; Marcisovsky, M; Polak, I; Sicho, P; Smolik, J; Vrba, V; Zalesak, J; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Friedl, M; Haensel, S; Irmler, C; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Valentan, M; Piemontese, L; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Bulgheroni, A; Jastrzab, M; Caccia, M; Re, V; Ratti, L; Traversi, G; Dewulf, J -P; Janssen, X; De Lentdecker, G; Yang, Y; Bryngemark, L; Christiansen, P; Gross, P; Jönsson, L; Ljunggren, M; Lundberg, B; Mjörnmark, U; Oskarsson, A; Richert, T; Stenlund, E; Österman, L; Rummel, S; Richter, R; Andricek, L; Ninkovich, J; Koffmane, Ch; Moser, H -G; Boisvert, V; Green, B; Green, M G; Misiejuk, A; Wu, T; Bilevych, Y; Carballo, V M Blanco; Chefdeville, M; de Nooij, L; Fransen, M; Hartjes, F; van der Graaf, H; Timmermans, J; Abramowicz, H; Ben-Hamu, Y; Jikhleb, I; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Levy, I; Sadeh, I; Schwartz, R; Stern, A; Goodrick, M J; Hommels, L B A; Ward, R Shaw D R; Daniluk, W; Kielar, E; Kotula, J; Moszczynski, A; Oliwa, K; Pawlik, B; Wierba, W; Zawiejski, L; Bailey, D S; Kelly, M; Eigen, G; Brezina, Ch; Desch, K; Furletova, J; Kaminski, J; Killenberg, M; Köckner, F; Krautscheid, T; Krüger, H; Reuen, L; Wienemann, P; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Bartsch, V; Postranecky, M; Warren, M; Wing, M; Corrin, E; Haas, D; Pohl, M; Diener, R; Fischer, P; Peric, I; Kaukher, A; Schäfer, O; Schröder, H; Wurth, R; Zarnecki, A F

    2012-01-01

    The EUDET-project was launched to create an infrastructure for developing and testing new and advanced detector technologies to be used at a future linear collider. The aim was to make possible experimentation and analysis of data for institutes, which otherwise could not be realized due to lack of resources. The infrastructure comprised an analysis and software network, and instrumentation infrastructures for tracking detectors as well as for calorimetry.

  4. Working towards coordination of detector development in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    AIDA-2020 collaboration

    2015-01-01

    AIDA-2020, the largest EU-funded detector R&D project, kicked off at the beginning of June with a meeting at CERN (see here). The aim of the project is to advance detector technologies beyond current limits by sharing the high-quality infrastructure provided by 52 partners from 19 countries.   Knowledge exchange between the various groups who are involved in developing innovative technological solutions for the next generation of detectors is the emphasis of the AIDA-2020 EU-funded project, which started on 1 May and will run for four years. AIDA-2020 is the successor to AIDA, a four-year EU-funded programme that concluded at the end of January 2015, which successfully coordinated a joint European effort in detector R&D and significantly improved various key European research infrastructures, enabling advanced detector development for the high-energy physics community. Highlights of AIDA’s networking activities were the development of generic toolkits for detector description ...

  5. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sugathan; A Jhingan; K S Golda; T Varughese; S Venkataramanan; N Saneesh; V V Satyanarayana; S K Suman; J Antony; Ruby Shanti; K Singh; S K Saini; A Gupta; A Kothari; P Barua; Rajesh Kumar; J Zacharias; R P Singh; B R Behera; S K Mandal; I M Govil; R K Bhowmik

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics and performance of the newly commissioned neutron detector array at IUAC are described. The array consists of 100 BC501 liquid scintillators mounted in a semispherical geometry and are kept at a distance of 175 cm from the reaction point. Each detector is a 5″ × 5″ cylindrical cell coupled to 5″ diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT). Signal processing is realized using custom-designed home-made integrated electronic modules which perform neutron–gamma discrimination using zero cross timing and time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Compact custom-built high voltage power supply developed using DC–DC converters are used to bias the detector. The neutrons are recorded in coincidence with fission fragments which are detected using multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1m diameter SS target chamber. The detectors and electronics have been tested off-line using radioactive sources and the results are presented.

  6. Characterizing transiting exoplanet atmospheres with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Thomas P; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J; Lustig-Yeager, Jacob; Luther, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    We explore how well James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) spectra will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with clear, cloudy, or high mean molecular weight atmospheres. Next we simulate the $\\lambda = 1 - 11$ $\\mu$m transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single transit and eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH$_4$, CO, CO$_2$, H$_2$O, NH$_3$) can be constrained. We find that $\\lambda = 1 - 2.5$ $\\mu$m transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or high mean molecular weight atmospheres will often require full $1 - 11$ $\\mu$m spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high $F_p$ and high $F_p/F_*$. Strong t...

  7. Development of detector technologies for neutron beta decay measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Ha; Cude-Woods, Chris; Young, Albert; Los Alamos UCN Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    In the past year we have developed two detector technologies for neutron beta decay measurements. The first is designed specifically to detect the recoil proton from neutron decay. In particular, the PERKEO III experiments planned for the Institut Laue Langevin require detectors with active area greater than about 600 cm2 area to achieve the targeted statistical sensitivity. We have developed an implementation of transmission foil detectors utilizing free standing foils of roughly 100 nm thickness and 700 cm2 area, coated with LiF converting crystal. These foils are placed in an accelerating electric field geometry to first accelerate the protons to 30 kV and then convert them to an electron shower which can be detected with conventional semiconductor or scintillator detectors. We've also begun development of technology that is designed to detect charged particles from neutron-capture reaction on 10B. The UCNtau experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratories requires non-magnetic neutron sensors that can be used to measure the density of neutrons in a magnetic trap. We are employing a multilayer surface detector recently developed at Los Alamos for the UCN flux monitoring, adapting it for a compact, 1 cm2 detector and ultralow dark rates. The detector consists of 10B on ZnS scintillating sheet that will be adhered to both faces of an acrylic plate with scintillating optical fibers embedded into it. The optical fibers will be coupled to 2, Hamamatsu micro-PMTs for coincident detection of a neutron event.

  8. Research and Development in Micromegas Detector for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Iakovidis, Georgios

    My candidacy as a Ph.D student begun officially on September 2010. It was at the time that the MAMMA collaboration performed R&D on micromegas detectors transforming them spark resistant. This was done by adding a foil of resistive strips on top of the readout strips. Joining the collaboration I started to be active in the test beam periods dedicating time to understand the detector behaviour. In parallel I developed simulation procedures to understand further the detector and finally describe the physical processes taking place when a charged particle traverses the detector. Moreover, the unexplored at that time μTPC method was studied. In late 2011 the micromegas technology was a candidate for the ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade to which I dedicated most of my time in order satisfy the requirements and prove that the detector will work in the ATLAS environment including the magnetic field conditions. Most of the work at that time was dedicated to understand the spatial resolution of the detector an...

  9. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  10. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  11. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, Robert A. [Constellation Technology Corporation, 7887 Bryan Dairy Road, Suite 100, Largo, FL 33777 (United States)], E-mail: austin@contech.com

    2007-08-21

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas (Z=54), moderate densities ({approx}0.3-0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  12. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert A.

    2007-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas ( Z=54), moderate densities (˜0.3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  13. A Retrieval Architecture for JWST Observations of Directly Imaged Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alex

    2017-06-01

    I present a new modeling and retrieval code for atmospheres of directly imaged exoplanets designed for use on JWST observations, extending my previous work on transiting planets. I perform example retrievals of temperature-pressure profiles, common molecular abundances, and basic cloud properties on existing lower-resolution spectra and on simulated JWST data using forward model emission spectra for planned NIRISS and NIRCam targets. From these results, I estimate the expected return on prospective JWST observations in information-theoretic terms using the mutual information metric.

  14. Cryogenic Thermal Distortion Model Validation for the JWST ISIM Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John; Cofie, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope consisting of an Optical telescope element (OTE), Integrated science instrument module (ISIM), a Spacecraft, and a Sunshield. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) consists of the JWST science instruments (NIRCam, MIRI, NIRSpec), a fine guidance sensor (FGS), the ISIM Structure, and thermal and electrical subsystems. JWST's instruments are designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the instruments and telescope operate at cryogenic temperatures (approximately 35 K for the instruments).

  15. Pixel detector system development at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, J.; Horswell, I.; Gimenez, E. N.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-10-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors consisting of an array of silicon photodiodes bump-bonded to CMOS read-out chips provide high signal-to-noise ratio and high dynamic range compared to CCD-based detectors and Image Plates. These detector features are important for SAXS experiments where a wide range of intensities are present in the images. For time resolved SAXS experiments, high frame rates are compulsory. The latest CMOS read-out chip developed by the MEDIPIX collaboration provides high frame rate and continuous acquisition mode. A read-out system for an array of MEDIPIX3 sensors is under development at Diamond Light Source. This system will support a full resolution frame rate of 1 kHz at a pixel counter depth of 12-bit and a frame rate of 30 kHz at a counter depth of 1 bit. Details concerning system design and MEDIPIX sensors characterization are presented.

  16. NIR Detector Signal Chain Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this proposal are twofold: 1) develop a suite of flight software tools for utilizing the advanced capabilities inherent in the guide-mode features...

  17. Non-redundant Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) and segment phasing with JWST-NIRISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lafrenière, David; Ford, K. E. Saavik; McKernan, Barry; Cheetham, Anthony; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Lloyd, James P.; Ireland, Michael J.; Doyon, René; Beaulieu, Mathilde; Martel, André; Koekemoer, Anton; Martinache, Frantz; Teuben, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Aperture Masked Interferometry (AMI) mode on JWST-NIRISS is implemented as a 7-hole, 15% throughput, non-redundant mask (NRM) that operates with 5-8% bandwidth filters at 3.8, 4.3, and 4.8 microns. We present refined estimates of AMI's expected point-source contrast, using realizations of noise matched to JWST pointing requirements, NIRISS detector noise, and Rev-V JWST wavefront error models for the telescope and instrument. We describe our point-source binary data reduction algorithm, which we use as a standardized method to compare different observational strategies. For a 7.5 magnitude star we report a 10-a detection at between 8.7 and 9.2 magnitudes of contrast between 100 mas to 400 mas respectively, using closure phases and squared visibilities in the absence of bad pixels, but with various other noise sources. With 3% of the pixels unusable, the expected contrast drops by about 0.5 magnitudes. AMI should be able to reach targets as bright as M=5. There will be significant overlap between Gemini-GPI and ESO-SPHERE targets and AMI's search space, and a complementarity with NIRCam's coronagraph. We also illustrate synthesis imaging with AMI, demonstrating an imaging dynamic range of 25 at 100 mas scales. We tailor existing radio interferometric methods to retrieve a faint bar across a bright nucleus, and explain the similarities to synthesis imaging at radio wavelengths. Modest contrast observations of dusty accretion flows around AGNs will be feasible for NIRISS AMI. We show our early results of image-plane deconvolution as well. Finally, we report progress on an NRM-inspired approach to mitigate mission-level risk associated with JWST's specialized wavefront sensing hardware. By combining narrow band and medium band Nyquist-sampled images taken with a science camera we can sense JWST primary mirror segment tip-tilt to lOmas, and piston to a few nm. We can sense inter-segment piston errors of up to 5 coherence lengths of the broadest bandpass filter used

  18. Development of Hybrid and Monolithic Silicon Micropattern Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Beker, H; Snoeys, W; Campbell, M; Lemeilleur, F; Ropotar, I

    2002-01-01

    %RD-19 \\\\ \\\\ In a collaborative effort between particle physics institutes and microelectronics industry we are undertaking the development of true 2-dimensional semiconductor particle detectors with on-chip signal processing and information extraction: the so-called micropattern detector. This detector is able to cope in a robust way with high multiplicity events at high rates, while allowing for a longer detector lifetime under irradiation and a thinner sensitive depletion region. Therefore, it will be ideally suited for the complicated events in the LHC p-p collider experiments. Following a $^{\\prime}$stepping stone$^{\\prime}$ approach several telescopes of pixel planes, totalling now 600 cm$^{2}$ with \\(>\\)~1~M elements have been used in the WA97, NA50 and NA57 lead ion experiments. This new technology has facilitated the tracking considerably (see Fig.1). Not only Si but also GaAs and possibly diamond matrices can be connected to the readout matrix. Tests with GaAs pixel detectors with the RD-19 readout ...

  19. Development of ring imaging Cherenkov detectors for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    John, M J J

    2001-01-01

    This thesis reports on work done as part of the development of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors of the LHCb experiment. The context of this work is set out in Chapter 1, which includes an overview of the physics of CP violation, followed by a discussion of other experiments that study B physics. LHCb itself is then described, with particular emphasis on its RICH detectors, and the photon detectors to be used therein. The work done by the author to ensure an adequate shielding of the photon detectors in the two RICH detectors from the magnetic fields produced by the LHCb dipole is then presented. A candidate photodetector for the RICH is the Pixel HPD. The author's contribution to the upgrade of the HPD test system to operate at the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40MHz is the subject of the following section. This system was used to investigate and optimise a method of minimising the threshold distribution of the Pixel HPD's encapsulated readout chip. The final chapter of the thesis concerns the aerogel...

  20. Developments of a 2D Position Sensitive Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Li-Chao; Wang, Xiao-Hu; Liu, Rong-Guang; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Xu, Hong; Yang, Gui-An; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), one project of the 12th five-year-plan scheme of China, is under construction in Guangdong province. Three neutron spectrometers will be installed at the first phase of the project, where two-dimensional position sensitive thermal neutron detectors are required. Before the construction of the neutron detector, a prototype of two-dimensional 200 mmx200 mm Multi-wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) with the flowing gas of Ar/CO2 (90/10) has been constructed and tested with the 55Fe X-Ray using part of the electronics in 2009, which showed a good performance. Following the test in 2009, the neutron detector has been constructed with the complete electronics and filled with the 6atm.3He + 2.5atm.C3H8 gas mixture in 2010. The neutron detector has been primarily tested with an Am/Be source. In this paper, some new developments of the neutron detector including the design of the high pressure chamber, the optimization of the gas purifying system and the gas filling process will ...

  1. Development of a polymer based fiberoptic magnetostrictive metal detector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen Jong; Wang, Wei Chih

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new metal detector using a fiberoptic magnetostriction sensor. The metal sensor uses a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a newly developed ferromagnetic polymer as the magnetostrictive sensing material. This polymeric magnetostrictive fiberoptic metal sensor is simple to fabricate, small in size, and resistant to RF interference (which is common in typical electromagnetic type metal detectors). Metal detection is based on disruption of the magnetic flux density across the magnetostriction sensor. In this paper, characteristics of the material being sensed and magnetic properties of the ferromagnetic polymers will be discussed.

  2. Recent developments in silicon radiation detectors at IRST

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto; Dalla Betta, Gian Franco

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years, the Institute for Research, Science and Technology (IRST) has been involved in a research program, supported by the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), aimed at setting up the technological capabilities for the production of double-sided silicon detectors for high energy physics experiments. We report on the most relevant achievements of this R&D activity, with emphasis on some recent results from the development of detectors oriented to ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus) experiments at LHC. (14 refs).

  3. Detector developments for the hypernuclear programme at PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, P; Lorente, A Sanchez; Majos, S Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    The technical design of the PANDA experiment at the future FAIR facility next to GSI is progressing. At the proposed anti-proton storage ring the spectroscopy of double Lambda hypernuclei is one of the four main topics which will be addressed by the Collaboration. The hypernuclear experiments require (i) a dedicated internal target, (ii) an active secondary target of alternating silicon and absorber material layers, (iii) high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and (iv) a good particle identification system for low momentum kaons. All systems need to operate in the presence of a high magnetic field and a large hadronic background. The status of the detector developments for this programme is summarized.

  4. Some recent developments in nuclear charged particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzer, H.

    1980-08-01

    The latest developments of large-area, position sensitive gas-filled ionization chambers are described. Multi-wire-proportional chambers as position-sensing and parallel-plate-avalanche counters as time-sensing detectors at low pressure (5 torr) have proven to be useful and reliable instruments in heavy ion physics. Gas (proportional) scintillation counters, used mainly for x-ray spectroscopy, have recently been applied as particle detectors. Finally, a brief description of a large plastic scintillator spectrometer, the Plastic Ball, is given and some of the first test and calibration data are shown.

  5. Micromegas detector developments for Dark Matter directional detection with MIMAC

    CERN Document Server

    Iguaz, F J; Calvet, D; Colas, P; Druillole, F; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Giomataris, I; Mols, J P; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Mayet, F; Richer, J P; Santos, D; Golabek, C; Lebreton, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the MIMAC project is to detect non-baryonic Dark Matter with a directional TPC using a high precision Micromegas readout plane. We will describe in detail the recent developments done with bulk Micromegas detectors as well as the characterisation measurements performed in an Argon(95%)-Isobutane(5%) mixture. Track measurements with alpha particles will be shown.

  6. Micromegas detector developments for Dark Matter directional detection with MIMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguaz, F J; Attie, D; Calvet, D; Colas, P; Druillole, F; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Giomataris, I; Mols, J P; Papaevangelou, T [CEA/DSM/IRFU, CEA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Pancin, J [GANIL, Bvd H. Becquerel, Caen (France); Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Mayet, F; Richer, J P; Santos, D, E-mail: esther.ferrer.ribas@cea.fr [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble (France)

    2011-07-15

    The aim of the MIMAC project is to detect non-baryonic Dark Matter with a directional TPC using a high precision Micromegas readout plane. We will describe in detail the recent developments done with bulk Micromegas detectors as well as the characterisation measurements performed in an Argon(95%)-Isobutane(5%) mixture. Track measurements with alpha particles will be shown.

  7. CZT Detector and HXI Development at CASS/UCSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Richard E.; Tomsick, John A.; Matteson, James L.; Pelling, Michael R.; Suchy, Slawomir

    2006-06-01

    The scientific goals and concept design of the Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) for MIRAX are presented to set the context for a discussion of the status of the HXI development. Emphasis is placed upon the RENA ASIC performance, the detector module upgrades, and a planned high altitude balloon flight to validate the HXI design and performance in a near-space environment.

  8. Development of Microstrip Silicon Detectors for Star and ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, L; Coffin, J P; Guillaume, G; Guthneck, L; Higueret, S; Hundt, F; Kühn, C E; Lutz, Jean Robert; Pozdniakov, S; Rami, F; Tarchini, A; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Erazmus, B; Germain, M; Giliberto, S; Martin, L; Le Moal, C; Roy, C; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Turchetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The physics program of STAR and ALICE at ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders, RHIC and LHC respectively, requires very good tracking capabilities. Some specific quark gluon plasma signatures, based on strange matter measurements implies quite a good secondary vertex reconstruction.For this purpose, the inner trackers of both experiments are composed of high-granularity silicon detectors. The current status of the development of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors is presented in this work.The global performance for tracking purpose adn particle identification are first reviewed. Then tests of the detectors and of the associated readout electronics are described. In-beam measurements of noise, spatial resolution, efficiency and charge matching capability, as well as radiation hardness, are examined.

  9. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Naimuddin, Md; Blazey, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rukalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P

    2015-01-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantageous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  10. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    Ahigh resolution(σ< 2 μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. EUDET was a coordinated detector R&D programme for the future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 μm or 10 μmand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  11. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md. [Delhi U.; Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Boi, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Erdelyi, B. [Northern Illinois U.; Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois U.; Krider, J. [Northern Illinois U.; Rukalin, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois U.; Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Fordt, R. [Fermilab; Sellberg, G. [Fermilab; Rauch, J. E. [Fermilab; Roman, M. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Wilson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-02-04

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  12. Development of a wide-range tritium-concentration detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, F.; Zhe, L.; Shicheng, L.; Jiangfeng, S.; Deli, L. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2015-03-15

    According to the requirements of the tritium related systems of the TBM (Test Blanket Module) for monitoring the on-line tritium concentration, a wide-range tritium-concentration detector has been developed to measure the tritium concentration in the range of 10{sup 4} Bq/ml - 5*10{sup 8} Bq/ml. This detector is combined with a low-memory helium ionization chamber. The weak current signal collected in the ionization chamber is converted to the voltage signal by an I-V converter. The minimum weak current which the detector could be measured is 10{sup -14} A. The performance of the background current and the current response linearity of the prototype have been tested. The test result indicates that the linear response of the current signal of the prototype without connecting the ionization chamber is good. The linear correlation coefficient is R{sup 2} = 0.998.

  13. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  14. High-dose neutron detector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-14

    The development of advanced sustainable nuclear fuel cycles relying on used nuclear fuel is one of the key programs pursued by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to minimize waste generation, limit proliferation risk and maximize energy production using nuclear energy. Safeguarding of advanced nuclear fuel cycles is essential to ensure the safety and security of the nuclear material. Current non-destructive assay (NDA) systems typically employ fission chambers or 3He-based tubes for the measurement of used fuel. Fission chambers are capable of withstanding the high gamma-ray backgrounds; however, they provide very low detection efficiency on the order of 0.01%. To benefit from the additional information provided by correlated neutron counting [1] higher detection efficiencies are required. 3He-based designs allow for higher detection efficiencies; however, at the expense of slow signal rise time characteristics and higher sensitivity to the gamma-ray backgrounds. It is therefore desirable to evaluate and develop technologies with potential to exceed performance parameters of standard fission chamber-based or 3He-based detection systems currently used in the NDA instrumentation.

  15. Progress in cooled IR detectors and new developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Vuillermet, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Cooled IR detectors are produced at mass production level at Sofradir for years based on its mature and proven HgCdTe technology. However, following the market needs, a lot of progress have been made and allow Sofradir to offer new product designs mainly dealing with the simplification of the detector use as well as reliability improvements. In addition to the conventional technologies used at mass production level, the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) approach has been under investigation for several years to prepare both the very large array fabrication and the new (3rd) generation developments. CEA-Leti, in cooperation with Sofradir, obtained very good results on 4-inches wafer size which confirms the mastering of this growth process. Very high qualities FPAs (1280×1024), with pitches as small as 15μm, were demonstrated as well as bicolor and dual band FPAs which use more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures. A very new development at CEA-Leti concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with HgCdTe which presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors: extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low flux applications and fast detectors. The cooled IR detector field is progressing very rapidly and new developments will offer a lot of system simplification and enhancements.

  16. Development trends in IR detector coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, M.; Rühlich, I.; Wiedmann, Th.; Rosenhagen, C.

    2009-05-01

    For different IR application specific cooler requirements are needed to achieve best performance on system level. Handheld applications require coolers with highest efficiency and lowest weight. For application with continuous operation, i.e. border surveillance or homeland security, a very high MTTF is mandatory. Space applications additionally require extremely high reliability. In other application like fighter aircraft sufficient cooling capacity even at extreme high reject temperatures has to be provided. Meeting all this requirements within one cooler design is technically not feasible. Therefore, different coolers designs like integral rotary, split rotary or split linear are being employed. The use of flexure bearings supporting the driving mechanism has generated a new sub-group for the linear coolers; also, the coolers may either use a motor with moving magnet or with moving coil. AIM has mainly focussed on long life linear cooler technology and therefore developed a series of moving magnet flexure bearing compressors which meets MTTF's exceeding 20,000h (up to 50,000h with a Pulse-Tube coldfinger). These compressors have a full flexure bearing support on both sides of the driving mechanism. Cooler designs are being compared in regard to characteristic figures as described above.

  17. An Update on Simulating Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Coronagraphic PSFs for JWST (and WFIRST too!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Long, Joseph D.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Van Gorkom, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    Simulated point spread functions (PSFs) are an essential tool in preparing for future space telescopes, supporting pre-launch science simulations, observation planning, and analysis software development. The open-source Python package WebbPSF provides simulated PSFs for all of JWST's instruments and observing modes. We present the latest updates to WebbPSF based on both updated models ofthe assembled telescope optics and recent cryo-test data for the science instruments. Outputs from this latest version of WebbPSF will support the JWST Exposure Time Calculator and the first calls for proposals in the year ahead, among many other uses by the community. Furthermore, the same toolkit also now provides support for simulating PSFs for both the WFI and CGI instruments planned for WFIRST.

  18. Observing Resolved Stellar Populations with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, K. M.; Beck, T. L.; Karakla, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) mode through the Micro-Shutter Array (MSA). Each MSA quadrant is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST's sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec's full wavelength coverage over 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario of spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. This use case and others, including a deep galaxy survey and observations of Galactic HII regions, are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  19. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C.; Hadaway, J.; Olczak, G.; Cosentino, J.; Johnston, J.; Whitman, T.; Connolly, M.; Chaney, D.; Knight, J.; Telfer, R.

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  20. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  1. The Planning Process for Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, D. M.; Shyrokov, A.; Pontoppidan, K.; Soderblom, D. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Kassin, S. A.; Gilbert, K.; Blair, W. P.; Muzerolle, J.; Tumlinson, J.; Keyes, C. D.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; LeBlanc, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a powerful multi-object spectroscopy mode using four configurable Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). The contiguous MSA shutters can be opened to form slits on astronomical targets, for simultaneous spectroscopy of up to 100 sources per exposure. The NIRSpec MSA shutters are in a fixed grid pattern, and careful analysis in the observation planning process will be crucial for optimal definition of science exposures. Our goal is to maximize the number of astronomical science sources observed in the fewest number of MSA slit configurations. We are developing algorithms in the NIRSpec MSA Planning Tool (MPT) to improve the quality of planned observations using several common science observing strategies as test use cases. For example, the needs for planning extremely deep exposures on a small number of JWST discovered z > 10 galaxy candidates will differ significantly from the requirements for planning spectral observations on a representative sample of stars from a galactic star cluster catalog. In this poster, we present a high level overview of our plans to develop and optimize the MPT for the JWST NIRSpec multi-object spectroscopy mode.

  2. Electronic speckle pattern interferometric testing of JWST primary mirror segment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Chaney, David M.; Saif, Babak N.

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) was required to meet NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 06 requirements in the summer of 2006. These TRL06 requirements included verifying all mirror technology systems level readiness in simulated end-to-end operating conditions. In order to support the aggressive development and technology readiness schedule for the JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA), a novel approach was implemented to verify the nanometer surface figure distortion effects on an in-process non-polished beryllium mirror surface. At the time that the TRL06 requirements needed to be met, a polished mirror segment had not yet been produced that could have utilized the baselined interferometric optical test station. The only JWST mirror segment available was a finished machined segment with an acid-etched optical surface. Therefore an Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometer (ESPI) was used in coordination with additional metrology techniques to perform interferometric level optical testing on a non-optical surface. An accelerated, rigorous certification program was quickly developed for the ESPI to be used with the unfinished optical surface of the primary mirror segment. The ESPI was quickly implemented into the PMSA test program and optical testing was very successful in quantifying the nanometer level surface figure deformation changes in the PMSA due to assembly, thermal cycling, vibration, and acoustic testing. As a result of the successful testing, the PMSA passed all NASA TRL06 readiness requirements.

  3. Updates on Software development for a RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Lendacky, Andrew; Goodwill, Justin

    2017-01-01

    The CLAS12 detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is undergoing an upgrade. One of the improvements is the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector to improve particle identification in the 3-8 GeV/c momentum range. Approximately 400 multi anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are going to be used to detect Cherenkov Radiation in the single photoelectron spectra (SPS). Software development for slow control as well as online monitoring is under development. I will be presenting my work on the development of a java based programs for a monitor and explain its interaction with a Mysql database where the MAPMTs information is stored as well as the techniques used to visualize Cherenkov rings.

  4. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  5. An introduction to the IAAT ultraviolet MCP detector development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanutz, S.; Barnstedt, J.; Diebold, S.; Elsener, H. R.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Pfeifer, M.; Schanz, T.; Werner, K.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of ultraviolet light is the key to understand high temperature processes in the universe like hot plasma, accretion processes or illuminated protoplanetary discs around UV sources. Furthermore these observation contribute to major cosmological questions, like the distribution of baryonic matter or the formation of the milky way, as pointed out by Gomez de Castro et al.1 Driven by the idea to participate in the Russian World Space Observatory we started to develop a position sensitive micro channel plate detector (MCP) for spectroscopy in the range of 160nm to 300 nm. Although we are not part of this project we still build a MCP detector prototype. In this paper we will present the general design of the detector and mainly focus on the aspect of our photocathode, while the electronics will be explained in more detail in the paper Characterisation of low power readout electronics for a UV microchannel plate detector with cross-strip readout" (Paper number 9144-116) by Marc Pfeifer.

  6. Development of a gaseous photon detector for Cherenkov imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Elena; Dalla Torre, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the R&D activity aiming at a novel micro pattern gaseous photon detector based on the THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The goal application of the novel photon detector is the detection of single photon in Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) counters. The THGEM principle is derived from the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) one, even if the material, the production technology and the size scale are different: a THGEM is a Circuit Printed Board (PCB) coated with thin copper layers on both faces, with holes obtained by drilling. Part of the THGEM features are similar to those of the GEMs, but a number of characteristics aspects result substantially different: in fact, if the geometrical parameters can be scaled from the GEM ones, the parameters related to the electrons multiplication, which is a microscopic physical phenomenon, do not. This is why, before starting the photon detector development, we have performed a systematic study of the THGEM multiplier. A photon detector is forme...

  7. GEM detector development for CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, A.K., E-mail: anand@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Prakash, A. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Chattopadhyay, S.; Ganti, M.S.; Singaraju, R.; Saini, J. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Singh, B.K. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Viyogi, Y.P. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2013-08-01

    A GEM-based detector system is being developed at VECC, Kolkata, to be used for muon tracking in the proposed Compressed Baryonic Experiment (CBM) at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI, Darmstadt. We have built and successfully tested several multi-GEM prototypes with radioactive sources and cosmic muons. We report the details of the R and D at VECC in terms of fabrication, assembly and the subsequent tests of the prototype chambers.

  8. Silicon detector technology development in India for the participation in international experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Topkar; S Praveenkumar; Bharti Aggarwal; S K Kataria; M D Ghodgaonkar

    2007-12-01

    A specific research and development program has been carried out by BARC in India to develop the technology for large area silicon strip detectors for application in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. These strip detectors will be used as pre-shower detector in the CMS experiment at LHC, CERN for 0/ rejection. The fabrication technology to produce silicon strip detectors with very good uniformity over a large area of ∼ 40 cm2, low leakage currents of the order of 10 nA/cm2 per strip and high breakdown voltage of >500 V has been developed by BARC. The production of detectors is already under way to deliver 1000 detector modules for the CMS and 90% production is completed. In this paper, research and development work carried out to develop the detector fabrication technology is briefly described. The performance of the silicon strip detectors produced in India is presented. The present status of the detector technology is discussed.

  9. Development of a new first-aid biochemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingfei; Liao, Haiyang; Su, Shilin; Ding, Hao; Liu, Suquan

    2016-10-01

    The traditional biochemical detector exhibits poor adaptability, inconvenient carrying and slow detection, which can't meet the needs of first-aid under field condition like natural or man-made disasters etc. Therefore a scheme of first-aid biochemical detector based on MOMES Micro Spectrometer, UV LED and Photodiode was proposed. An optical detection structure combined continuous spectrum sweep with fixed wavelength measurement was designed, which adopted mobile detection optical path consisting of Micro Spectrometer and Halogen Lamp to detect Chloride (Cl-), Creatinine (Cre), Glucose (Glu), Hemoglobin (Hb). The UV LED and Photodiode were designed to detect Potassium (K-), Carbon dioxide (CO2), Sodium (Na+). According to the field diagnosis and treatment requirements, we designed the embedded control hardware circuit and software system, the prototype of first-aid biochemical detector was developed and the clinical trials were conducted. Experimental results show that the sample's absorbance repeatability is less than 2%, the max coefficient of variation (CV) in the batch repeatability test of all 7 biochemical parameters in blood samples is 4.68%, less than the clinical requirements 10%, the correlation coefficient (R2) in the clinical contrast test with AU5800 is almost greater than 0.97. To sum up, the prototype meets the requirements of clinical application.

  10. Detector module development for the CBM Silicon Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The central detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR, the Silicon Tracking System (STS), is being designed to reconstruct hundreds of charged particles produced at rates up to 10 MHz in interactions of ion beams of up to 45 AGeV projectile energies with nuclear targets. The building block of the tracking system is a module suitable for a low-mass detector construction. In a module, the basic functional unit of the STS, radiation tolerant microstrip sensors are read out through low-mass multi-line cables with self-triggering front-end electronics located at the periphery of the system. Light-weight carbon fibre support structures will carry 10 of such modules and build up the STS stations. In the presentation, the concept of the detector module construction is presented. Quality assurance tests under development for the module components (double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, stacked polyimide microcables, front-end ASICs and boards) and the assembled structures are discussed.

  11. Detector Development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  12. Development of edgeless TSV X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarajlić, M.; Zhang, J.; Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Fritzsch, T.; Wilke, M.; Zoschke, K.; Graafsma, H.

    2016-02-01

    We report about the activity and progress on the development of TSV edgeless detectors at DESY. One part of the development is Through Silicon Via (TSV) technology for the Medipix3RX readout chip (ROC). TSV technology is a concept of connecting readout chips to readout electronics. Instead of wire-bonding which introduces a large dead area, TSV enables connection through the ROC itself. By replacing wire-bonding with TSV, the dead space between detector modules will be reduced from around 7 mm to only 1.6 mm. The thickness of the wafer will be 200 μ m, with a via diameter of 60 μ m. Inside of the via, a 5 μ m thick copper layer will be used as a conducting layer. On the back side of the chip a Redistribution Layer (RDL) will be deposited. For the RDL structure, 5 μ m thick copper with 40 μ m wide conductive lines will be used. Bump bonding of the sensor plus ROC assembly to ceramic readout board will be optimized in terms of material and bonding temperature. The second part of the project is the development of the edgeless sensor units using active edge sensor technology. Active edge sensors have been simulated with Synopsys TCAD for different polarities including p-on-n, p-on-p, n-on-p and n-on-n with p-spray or p-stop for different thicknesses from 150 μ m to 500 μ m. Results show that the bending of the electric field close to the active edge is leading to image distortion on the sensor edge. In addition, the current design of active-edge sensors shows very poor radiation hardness. We are currently working on the development of a radiation hard active-edge sensor with optimized imaging quality. The final goal of this development is to make Large Area Medipix Detector (LAMBDA) with TSV edgeless units.

  13. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McIntyre, Justin I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131mXe – 0.12 mBq/m3 (0.12 mBq/m3); 133Xe – 0.18 mBq/m3 (0.21 mBq/m3); 133mXe – 0.07 mBq/m3 (0.15 mBq/m3); 135Xe – 0.45 mBq/m3 (0.67 mBq/m3). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131mXe and 133mXe, but similar for 133Xe and 135Xe. Another important factor is the amount of “memory effect” or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is

  14. Bayesian Approach for Reliability Assessment of Sunshield Deployment on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskiy, Mark P.; Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis D.

    2013-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications, for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a Bayesian approach for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This approach was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the observatory's telescope and science instruments. In order to collect the prior information on deployable systems, detailed studies of "heritage information", were conducted extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Spacecraft Operational Anomaly and Reporting System (SOARS) data were then used to estimate the parameters of the conjugative beta prior distribution for anomaly and failure occurrence, as the most consistent set of available data and that could be matched to launch histories. This allows for an emperical Bayesian prediction for the risk of an anomaly occurrence of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, using prior deployment data and test information.

  15. The JWST science instrument payload: mission context and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. It is a cryogenic infrared space observatory with a 25 m2 aperture (6 m class) telescope that will achieve diffraction limited angular resolution at a wavelength of 2 um. The science instrument payload includes four passively cooled near-infrared instruments providing broad- and narrow-band imagery, coronography, as well as multi-object and integral-field spectroscopy over the 0.6 Construction, integration and verification testing is underway in all areas of the program. The JWST is on schedule for launch during 2018.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Detector Development for Plant Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Stolin, A; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Reid, C D; Majewski, S

    2010-01-01

    There are opportunities for the development of new tools to advance plant biology research through the use of radionuclides. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Duke University, West Virginia University and the University of Maryland are collaborating on the development of radionuclide imaging technologies to facilitate plant biology research. Biological research into optimizing plant productivity under various environmental constraints, biofuel and carbon sequestration research are areas that could potentially benefit from new imaging technologies. Using 11CO2 tracers, the investigators at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory / Duke University Phytotron are currently researching the dynamical responses of plants to environmental changes forecasted from increasing greenhouse trace gases involved in global change. The biological research primary focus is to investigate the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nutrients limitation on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in plants. We report here on preliminary results of 11CO2 plant imaging experiments involving barley plants using Jefferson Lab dual planar positron emission tomography detectors to image 11CO2 in live barley plants. New detector designs will be developed based on the preliminary studies reported here and further planned.

  17. Design and Lessons Learned on the Development of a Cryogenic Pupil Select Mechanism Used in the Testing and Calibration of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alissa; Capon, Thomas; Guzek, Jeffrey; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Koca, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Calibration and testing of the instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being performed by the use of a cryogenic, full-field, optical simulator that was constructed for this purpose. The Pupil Select Mechanism (PSM) assembly is one of several mechanisms and optical elements that compose the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator, or OSIM. The PSM allows for several optical elements to be inserted into the optical plane of OSIM, introducing a variety of aberrations, distortions, obscurations, and other calibration states into the pupil plane. The following discussion focuses on the details of the design evolution, analysis, build, and test of this mechanism along with the challenges associated with creating a sub arc-minute positioning mechanism operating in an extreme cryogenic environment. In addition, difficult challenges in the control system design will be discussed including the incorporation of closed-loop feedback control into a system that was designed to operate in an open-loop fashion.

  18. Spitzer/JWST Cross Calibration: IRAC Observations of Potential Calibrators for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Sean J.; Gordon, Karl D.; Lowrance, Patrick; Ingalls, James G.; Glaccum, William J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; E Krick, Jessica; Laine, Seppo J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hora, Joseph L.; Bohlin, Ralph

    2017-06-01

    We present observations at 3.6 and 4.5 microns using IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope of a set of main sequence A stars and white dwarfs that are potential calibrators across the JWST instrument suite. The stars range from brightnesses of 4.4 to 15 mag in K band. The calibration observations use a similar redundancy to the observing strategy for the IRAC primary calibrators (Reach et al. 2005) and the photometry is obtained using identical methods and instrumental photometric corrections as those applied to the IRAC primary calibrators (Carey et al. 2009). The resulting photometry is then compared to the predictions based on spectra from the CALSPEC Calibration Database (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/observatory/crds/calspec.html) and the IRAC bandpasses. These observations are part of an ongoing collaboration between IPAC and STScI investigating absolute calibration in the infrared.

  19. Development of a 13-in. Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector (HAPD) for a next generation water Cherenkov detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)]. E-mail: nakkan@hep.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kusaka, A. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kakuno, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Abe, T. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Shiozawa, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida city, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kyushima, H. [Electron Tube Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 314-5 Simokanzo, Iwata City 438-0193, Shizuoka (Japan); Suyama, M. [Electron Tube Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 314-5 Simokanzo, Iwata City 438-0193, Shizuoka (Japan); Kawai, Y. [Electron Tube Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 314-5 Simokanzo, Iwata City 438-0193, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 13-in. Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector (HAPD) for photosensors in next generation water Cherenkov type detectors. We study the performance of the HAPD and the results show good time resolution better than {sigma}=1ns, good sensitivity for single photon detection, wide dynamic range, and good uniformity on the photocathode. The HAPD is also expected to be less expensive than large PMTs because of its simpler structure without dynodes.

  20. Development of a Focusing DIRC Detector for Particle Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Alan J. [University of Cincinnati

    2014-03-16

    We have constructed a prototype Direct Ring Imaging ` Cerenkov (DIRC) detector in our optics lab to study its performance for identifying pions and kaons. This type of detector will be used for the Belle II experiment now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. To test our prototype, we have constructed a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) that is able to trigger on and reconstruct cosmic ray tracks. We require that the tracks traverse the DIRC detector and study the resulting detector response.

  1. Development of Mirror Coatings for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Reid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The first detections of gravitational waves, GW150914 and GW151226, were associated with the coalescence of stellar mass black holes, heralding the opening of an entirely new way to observe the Universe. Many decades of development were invested to achieve the sensitivities required to observe gravitational waves, with peak strains associated with GW150914 at the level of 10−21. Gravitational wave detectors currently operate as modified Michelson interferometers, where thermal noise associated with the highly reflective mirror coatings sets a critical limit to the sensitivity of current and future instruments. This article presents an overview of the mirror coating development relevant to gravitational wave detection and the prospective for future developments in the field.

  2. Status of detector development for the European XFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Sztuk-Dambietz, Jolanta; Koch, Andreas; Kuster, Markus; Turcato, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL.EU) will provide as-yet-unrivaled peak brilliance and ultra-short pulses of spatially coherent X-rays with a pulse length of less than 100 fs in the energy range between 0.25 and 25 keV. The high radiation intensity and ultra-short pulse duration will open a window for novel scientific techniques and will allow to explore new phenomena in biology, chemistry, material science, as well as matter at high energy density, atomic, ion and molecular physics. The variety of scientific applications and especially the unique XFEL.EU time structure require adequate instrumentation to be developed in order to exploit the full potential of the light source. To make optimal use of the unprecedented capabilities of the European XFEL and master these vast technological challenges, the European XFEL GmbH has started a detector R&D program. The technology concepts of the detector system presently under development are complementary in their performance and will cover the require...

  3. Recent developments in X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moy, J P

    2000-01-01

    The replacement of the radiographic film in medical imaging has been the driving force in X-ray imaging developments. It requires a approx 40 cm wide detector to cover all examinations, an equivalent noise level of 1-5 X-ray quanta per pixel, and spatial resolution in the range 100-150 mu m. The need for entirely electronic imaging equipments has fostered the development of many X-ray detectors, most of them based on an array of amorphous silicon pixels, which is the only technology capable to achieve such large areas. Essentially, two concepts have been implemented: - intermediate conversion of X-rays to light by a scintillator, detected by an array of light sensitive pixels, comprising a photodiode and a switching device, either a TFT or a diode. - conversion into electron-hole pairs in a photoconductor, collected by an array of electrodes and switches. In both cases, charge amplifiers read the generated charges line by line. Scintillator and photoconductor-based systems are now close to production. They ac...

  4. Development of a fast multi-line x-ray CT detector for NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T.; Nachtrab, F.; Schlechter, T.; Neubauer, H.; Mühlbauer, J.; Schröpfer, S.; Ernst, J.; Firsching, M.; Schweiger, T.; Oberst, M.; Meyer, A.; Uhlmann, N.

    2015-04-01

    Typical X-ray detectors for non-destructive testing (NDT) are line detectors or area detectors, like e.g. flat panel detectors. Multi-line detectors are currently only available in medical Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. Compared to flat panel detectors, line and multi-line detectors can achieve much higher frame rates. This allows time-resolved 3D CT scans of an object under investigation. Also, an improved image quality can be achieved due to reduced scattered radiation from object and detector themselves. Another benefit of line and multi-line detectors is that very wide detectors can be assembled easily, while flat panel detectors are usually limited to an imaging field with a size of approx. 40 × 40 cm2 at maximum. The big disadvantage of line detectors is the limited number of object slices that can be scanned simultaneously. This leads to long scan times for large objects. Volume scans with a multi-line detector are much faster, but with almost similar image quality. Due to the promising properties of multi-line detectors their application outside of medical CT would also be very interesting for NDT. However, medical CT multi-line detectors are optimized for the scanning of human bodies. Many non-medical applications require higher spatial resolutions and/or higher X-ray energies. For those non-medical applications we are developing a fast multi-line X-ray detector.In the scope of this work, we present the current state of the development of the novel detector, which includes several outstanding properties like an adjustable curved design for variable focus-detector-distances, conserving nearly uniform perpendicular irradiation over the entire detector width. Basis of the detector is a specifically designed, radiation hard CMOS imaging sensor with a pixel pitch of 200 μ m. Each pixel has an automatic in-pixel gain adjustment, which allows for both: a very high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. The final detector is planned to have 256 lines of

  5. Planning JWST NIRSpec MSA spectroscopy using NIRCam pre-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kassin, Susan A.; Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Reid, I. N.; Blair, William P.; Keyes, Charles D.; Soderblom, D. R.; Peña-Guerrero, Maria A.

    2016-07-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the work-horse spectrograph at 1-5microns for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). A showcase observing mode of NIRSpec is the multi-object spectroscopy with the Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs), which consist of a quarter million tiny configurable shutters that are 0. ''20×0. ''46 in size. The NIRSpec MSA shutters can be opened in adjacent rows to create flexible and positionable spectroscopy slits on prime science targets of interest. Because of the very small shutter width, the NIRSpec MSA spectral data quality will benefit significantly from accurate astrometric knowledge of the positions of planned science sources. Images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have the optimal relative astrometric accuracy for planning NIRSpec observations of 5-10 milli-arcseconds (mas). However, some science fields of interest might have no HST images, galactic fields can have moderate proper motions at the 5mas level or greater, and extragalactic images with HST may have inadequate source information at NIRSpec wavelengths beyond 2 microns. Thus, optimal NIRSpec spectroscopy planning may require pre-imaging observations with the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on JWST to accurately establish source positions for alignment with the NIRSpec MSAs. We describe operational philosophies and programmatic considerations for acquiring JWST NIRCam pre-image observations for NIRSpec MSA spectroscopic planning within the same JWST observing Cycle.

  6. Development of a TPC for an ILC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Diener, R

    2012-01-01

    The ILD concept, one of two proposed detector concepts for the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), foresees a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracking detector. The LCTPC (Linear Collider TPC) collaboration pursues R&D to develop such a TPC based on the best state-of-the-art technology. After tests with smaller prototypes, the current efforts focus on studies using a large prototype with a diameter of 770 mm and a length of 610 mm. This prototype can accommodate seven read-out modules of a size comparable to the ones that would be used in the final TPC. Several prototypes of modules using Micromegas or GEM structures as gas amplification were constructed and tested. Besides the traditional pad read-out, a pixel read-out based on the TimePix chip is studied in these tests with up to 8 TimePix chips on a board. The current status and future plans of the R&D are presented.

  7. Recent results on the development of radiation-hard diamond detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, J S; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Dabrowski, W; Da Graca, J; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jamieson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Polesello, P; Prawer, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Somalwar, S V; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle detectors made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have radiation hardness greatly exceeding that of silicon- based detectors. The CERN-based RD42 Collaboration has developed and tested CVD diamond microstrip and pixel detectors with an eye to their application in the intense radiation environment near the interaction region of hadron colliders. This paper presents recent results from tests of these detectors. (4 refs).

  8. AN IMAGE-PLANE ALGORITHM FOR JWST'S NON-REDUNDANT APERTURE MASK DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. [Johns Hopkins University Department of Physics and Astronomy 3400 North Charles, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lacour, Sylvestre [LESIA, CNRS/UMR-8109, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-01-10

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilities and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90%-95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 μm. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of closure phase, σ{sub CP} (a proxy for binary point source contrast). If σ{sub CP} < 10{sup –4} radians—a contrast ratio of 10 mag—young accreting gas giant planets (e.g., in the nearby Taurus star-forming region) could be imaged with JWST NIRISS. We show the feasibility of using NIRISS' NRM with the sub-Nyquist sampled F277W, which would enable some exoplanet chemistry characterization. In the presence of small piston errors, the dominant sources of closure phase error (depending on pixel sampling, and filter bandwidth) are flat field errors and unmodeled variations in intra-pixel sensitivity. The in-flight stability of NIRISS will determine how well these errors can be calibrated by observing a point source. Our results help develop efficient observing strategies for space-based NRM.

  9. GEM detectors development for radiation environment: neutron tests and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, Maryna; Jednoróg, Sławomir; Malinowski, Karol; Czarski, Tomasz; Ziółkowski, Adam; Bieńkowska, Barbara; Prokopowicz, Rafał; Łaszyńska, Ewa; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, Ewa; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech; Wojeński, Andrzej; Krawczyk, Rafał D.; Linczuk, Paweł; Potrykus, Paweł; Bajdel, Barcel

    2016-09-01

    One of the requests from the ongoing ITER-Like Wall Project is to have diagnostics for Soft X-Ray (SXR) monitoring in tokamak. Such diagnostics should be focused on tungsten emission measurements, as an increased attention is currently paid to tungsten due to a fact that it became a main candidate for the plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactor. In addition, such diagnostics should be able to withstand harsh radiation environment at tokamak during its operation. The presented work is related to the development of such diagnostics based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. More specifically, an influence of neutron radiation on performance of the GEM detectors is studied both experimentally and through computer simulations. The neutron induced radioactivity (after neutron source exposure) was found to be not pronounced comparing to an impact of other secondary neutron reaction products (during the exposure).

  10. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Bruce [Fermilab

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  11. Development of mercuric iodide detectors for XAS and XRD measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, W.K.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Penner-Hakn, J.E.; Roe, A.L.; Hodgson, K.O.; Beyerle, A.

    1985-07-01

    A prototype element for an energy dispersive detector (EDD) array was constructed using a Mercuric Iodide detector. Both detector and front end FET could be thermoelectrically cooled. Tested at SSRL, the detector had 250 eV electronic noise and 315 eV resolution at 5.9 keV. K line fluorescence spectra were collected for selected elements between Cl (2622 eV) and Zn (8638 eV). Count rate capability to 60,000 cps was demonstrated. Several detector parameters were measured, including energy linearity, resolution vs. shaping time, and detector dead time. An EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) spectrum was recorded and compared to simultaneously collected transmission data.

  12. Development of CVD diamond detectors for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Ryde, S. J. S.; Oliver, K.

    2014-11-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods for the manufacture of diamonds could lead to detectors for high-resolution radiotherapy dosimetry that are cheaper and more reproducible than detectors based on natural diamonds. In this work two prototype designs (Diamond Detectors Ltd, Poole) of CVD diamond detectors were considered. The detectors were encapsulated in a water-proof housing in a form-factor that would be suitable for dosimetry measurements in water, as well as solid material phantoms. Stability of the dosimeter over time, the dose-response, dose-rate response and angular-response were examined. The study demonstrated that the detector behaviour conformed with theory in terms of the dose-rate response and had acceptable properties for use in the clinic.

  13. Comparative NIR Detector Characterization for NGST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matthew (Technical Monitor); Figer, Donald

    2004-01-01

    List of publications for final perfomance report are: Detectors for the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrometer Rauscher, B.J., Strada, P., Regan, M.W., Figer, D.F., Jakobsen, P., Moseley, H.S., & Boeker, T. 2004, SPIE Detectors for the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrometer Rauscher, B.J., Strada, P., Regan, M.W., Figer, D.F., Jakobsen, P., Moseley, H.S., & Boeker, T. 2004, AAS, 203, 124.07 Independent Testing of JWST Detector Prototypes Figer, D.F., Rauscher, B. J., Regan, M. W., Morse, E., Balleza, J., Bergeron, L., & Stockman, H. S. 2003 , SPIE, 5 167 The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory and the NGST Detector Program Figer, D.F., Agronin, M., Balleza, J., Barkhouser, R., Bergeron, L., Greene, G. R., McCandliss, S. R., Rauscher, B. J., Reeves, T., Regan, M. W., Sharma, U., Stockman, H. S. 2003, SPIE, 4850,981 Intra-Pixel Sensitivity in NIR Detectors for NGST Sharma, U., Figer, D.F., Sivaramakrishnan, A., Agronin, M., Balleza, J., Barkhouser, R., Bergeron, L., Greene, G. R., McCandliss, S. R., Rauscher, B. J., Reeves, T., Regan, M. W., Stockman, H. S. 2003, SPIE, 4850,1001 NIRCAM Image Simulations for NGST Wavefiont SensinglPS A. Sivaramakrishnan, D. Figer, H. Bushouse, H. S. Stockman (STScI),C. Ohara , D. Redding (JPL), M. Im (IPAC), & J. Offenberg (Raytheon) 2003, SPIE, 4850,388 Ultra-Low Background Operation of Near-Infrared Detectors for NGS Rauscher, B. J., Figer, D. F., Agronin, M., Balleza, J., Barkhouser, R., Bergeron, L., Greene, G. R., McCandliss, S. R., Reeves, T., Regan, M. W., Sharma, U., Stockman, H. S. 2003, SPIE, 4850,962 The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory and the JWST Detector Program Figer, D.F. et a1.2003, AAS201, #131.05

  14. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  15. Development of a fast gaseous detector: 'Micromegas'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barouch, G. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bay, A. [Lausanne University, IPN, BSP, 1015 Dorigny (Switzerland); Bouchigny, S. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Charpak, G. [CERN/LHC, Geneva (Switzerland); Derre, J. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Didierjean, F. [EURISYS Mesures, 1 Chemin de la roseraie, Lingolsheim, 67834 Tanneries Cedex (France); Faivre, J.-C. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Giomataris, Y. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kochowski, C. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kunne, F. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Le Goff, J.-M. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lehar, F. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lemoigne, Y. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Loucatos, S. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lugol, J.-C. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Magnon, A. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Mayer, B. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Perroud, J.-P. [Lausanne University, IPN, BSP, 1015 Dorigny (Switzerland); Platchkov, S. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Puill, G. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rebourgeard, Ph. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Terrien, Y. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Thers, D. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Zaccone, H. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    1999-02-21

    Several 15x15 cm{sup 2} gaseous Micromegas chambers (MICROMEsh GAseous Structure) which consist of a conversion gap and an amplification gap separated by a thin grid have been extensively tested in low-intensity 10 GeV/c pion beam and high-intensity (up to 5x10{sup 5} Hz/mm{sup 2}) 100 GeV/c muon beam. The detector behaviour has been studied with respect to many parameters: conversion gaps of 1 and 3 mm, amplification gaps of 50 and 10 {mu}m, an external magnetic field and many different filling gases. So far no effect of the magnetic field up to 1.3 T has been observed. The gas mixture argon + cyclohexane appears to be very suitable with gains above 10{sup 5} and a full-efficiency plateau of 50 V at 340 V. With a conversion gap as small as 1 mm and an electronics with a threshold at 5000 electrons the efficiency reaches 96%. With the addition of CF{sub 4} a time resolution of 5 ns (RMS) has been obtained. A spatial resolution better than 60 {mu}m has been observed with anode strips of 317 {mu}m pitch and was explained by transverse diffusion in the gas. Simulations show that with a pitch of 100 {mu}m and the appropriate gas a resolution of 10 {mu}m is within reach. This development leads to a new generation of cheap position-sensitive detectors which would permit high-precision tracking or vertexing close to the interaction region, in very high-rate environments.

  16. Development of Self-TOF neutron detector and its application to concrete and iron shielding experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, M; Nunomiya, T; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T; Shibata, T

    2002-01-01

    A new type detector, called 'Self-TOF detector', has been developed for high energy neutron spectrometry behind a shield. The detector consists of a veto counter, a set of radiators with 20 thin detectors, a start counter and a stop counter of nine segments. The measurement of the detector response function for high energy neutrons and the concrete and iron shielding experiments were done at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. By using the response functions, neutron spectra behind shield were obtained by unfolding and the results were compared with the LAHET Code System (LCS).

  17. Neutron beam applications - Development of one dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Kang, Hee Dong; Kim, Wan; Moon, Myung Kook [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    This research is sponsored and supported by KAERI as a part of {sup D}evelopment of One Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector{sup .} To apply residual stress measurement and small angle neutron scattering the one dimensional position sensitive neutron detectors which have wide window and good position resolution were designed and fabricated. The detection area are 200 mm x 100, 120 mm x 80 mm. The thermal neutron detection efficiency are about 60%. The spatial resolution of the detector are less than 2mm. The characteristics of the detectors were studied. Using the detector we could get neutron diffraction patterns from some samples. 19 refs., 103 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  18. Developments on RICH detectors; Les developpements sur les detecteurs RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-12-31

    The RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which is dedicated to Cherenkov radiation detection is described. An improvement made by replacing photo sensible vapor with solid photocathode is studied. A RICH detector prototype with a CsI photocathode has been built in Saclay and used with Saturne. The first results are presented. (A.C.) 13 refs.

  19. Detector Modeling and CMB Polarimetry Technology Development at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Withington, Stafford; Saklatvala, George

    2007-01-01

    Pixel size limits the resolution in the focal plane. This should be accounted for in optical design. Alternatively, this reduces the effective number of independent detectors. Polarization and scattering are intrinsically related, and both are more severe at low pnambda. Future work: Quantification of the pixel cross-coupling- calculate a theoretical covariance matrix to predict performance of future detector arrays.

  20. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei; LI Ling; ZHENG HongLou; XU WenLan; XIONG DaYuan

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWlP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  1. The Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    BALOUZA, Samah

    2014-01-01

    This work is aimed to study the electron transparency in 3-D woven mesh that is used in micromegas detector. The importance of calculating the transparency is because it is enter in the gain calibration of the detector. The simulation tool is COMSOL Multiphysics in which it is solved the differential equations by Finite Element Method.

  2. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWIP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  3. Development of a detector control system for the serially powered ATLAS pixel detector at the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puellen, Lukas

    2015-02-10

    In the years around 2020 the LHC will be upgraded to the HL-LHC. In terms of this upgrade, the ATLAS detector will also be upgraded. This also includes the pixel detector, the innermost of the sub-detectors in ATLAS. Thereby the powering concept of the pixel detector will be changed to reduce the material budget of the detector. From individual powering of each detector module, the concept changes to serial powering, where all modules of a powering group are connected in series. This change makes the development of a new detector control system (DCS) mandatory. Therefore, a new concept for the ATLAS pixel DCS is being developed at the University of Wuppertal. This concept is split into three paths: a safety path, a control path, and a diagnostics path. The safety path is a hard wired interlock system. The concept of this system will not differ significantly, compared to the interlock system of the current detector. The diagnostics path is embedded into the optical data read-out of the detector and will be used for detector tuning with high precision and granularity. The control path supervises the detector and provides a user interface to the hardware components. A concept for this path, including a prototype and proof-of-principle studies, has been developed in terms of this thesis. The control path consists of the DCS network, a read-out and controlling topology created by two types of ASICs: the DCS controller and the DCS chip. These ASICs measure and control all values, necessary for a safe detector operation in situ. This reduces the number of required cables and hence the material budget of the system. For the communication between these ASICs, two very fault tolerant bus protocols have been chosen: CAN bus carries data from the DCS computers, outside of the detector, to the DCS controllers at the edge of the pixel detector. For the communication between the DCS controller and the DCS chip, which is located close to each detector module, an enhanced I2C

  4. Plasma Processes : Plasma sprayed alumina coatings for radiation detector development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mary Alex; V Balagi; K R Prasad; K P Sreekumar; P V Ananthapadmanabhan

    2000-11-01

    Conventional design of radiation detectors uses sintered ceramic insulating modules. The major drawback of these ceramic components is their inherent brittleness. Ion chambers, in which these ceramic spacers are replaced by metallic components with plasma spray coated alumina, have been developed in our Research Centre. These components act as thin spacers that have good mechanical strength as well as high electrical insulation and replace alumina insulators with the same dimensions. As a result, the design of the beam loss monitor ion chamber for CAT could be simplified by coating the outer surface of the HT electrode with alumina. One of the chambers developed for isotope calibrator for brachytherapy gamma sources has its outer aluminium electrode (60 mm dia × 220 mm long) coated with 250 thick alumina (97%) + titania (3%). In view of potential applications in neutron-sensitive ion chambers used in reactor control instrumentation, studies were carried out on alumina 100 to 500 thick coatings on copper, aluminium and SS components. The electrical insulation varied from 108 ohms to 1012 ohms for coating thicknesses above 200 . The porosity in the coating resulted in some fall in electrical insulation due to moisture absorption. An improvement could be achieved by providing the ceramic surface with moisture-repellent silicone oil coating. Irradiation at Apsara reactor core location showed that the coating on aluminium was found to be unaffected after exposure to 1017 nvt fluence.

  5. Semiconductor Detector Developments for High Energy Space Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Meuris, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The rise of high energy astrophysics and solar physics in the 20th century is linked to the development of space telescopes; since the 1960s they have given access to the X-ray and gamma-ray sky, revealing the most violent phenomena in the Universe. Research and developments in imaging concepts and sensing materials haven't stopped since yet to improve the sensitivity of the X-ray and gamma-ray observatories. The paper proposes an overview of instrument realizations and focuses on the innovative detection techniques and technologies for applications from 0.1 keV to 10 MeV energy range. Solid-state detectors are prominent solutions for space instrumentation because of their excellent imaging and spectroscopic capabilities with limited volume and power resources. Various detection concepts based on semiconductors (Compton camera, Cd(Zn)Te pixel hybrids, DePFET active pixel sensors) are under design or fabrication for the near-future missions like Astro-H, BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter. New technologies on sensing ...

  6. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    A high resolution (σ∼2μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. The telescope consists of six monolithic active pixel sensor planes (Mimosa26) with a pixel pitch of 18.4 \\mu m and thinned down to 50 \\mu m. The excellent resolution, readout rate and DAQ integration capabilities made the telescope a primary test beam tool for many groups including several CERN based experiments. Within the European detector infrastructure project AIDA the test beam telescope is being further extended in terms of cooling and powering infrastructure, read-out speed, area of acceptance, and precision. In order to provide a system optimized for the different requirements by the user community a combination of various state-of-the-art pixel technologies is foreseen. Furthermore, new central dead-time-free trigger logic unit (TLU) has been developed to provide LHC-speed response with one-trigger-per-particle operating mode and a synchronous clock for all conn...

  7. The development of a silicon multiplicity detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Kraner, H.W.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Sondericker, J.; Stephani, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Barrette, J.; Hall, J.; Mark, S.K.; Pruneau, C.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolfe, D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States); Borenstein, S.R. [York College-CUNY, Jamaica, NY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The physics program and the design criteria for a Silicon Pad Detector at RHIC are reviewed. An end cap double sided readout detector configuration for RHIC is presented. Its performance as an on-line and off-line centrality tagging device is studied by means of simulations with Fritiof as the event generator. The results of an in-beam test of a prototype double-sided Si-detector are presented. Good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained with front junction and the resistive back side readout. Good separation between one and two minimum-ionizing particle signals is achieved.

  8. The development of a silicon multiplicity detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Kraner, H.W.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Sondericker, J.; Stephani, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Barrette, J.; Hall, J.; Mark, S.K.; Pruneau, C.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolfe, D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States); Borenstein, S.R. [York College-CUNY, Jamaica, NY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The physics program and the design criteria for a Silicon Pad Detector at RHIC are reviewed. An end cap double sided readout detector configuration for RHIC is presented. Its performance as an on-line and off-line centrality tagging device is studied by means of simulations with Fritiof as the event generator. The results of an in-beam test of a prototype double-sided Si-detector are presented. Good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained with front junction and the resistive back side readout. Good separation between one and two minimum-ionizing particle signals is achieved.

  9. Developments in semiconductor detector technology and new applications -- symposium summary

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, T

    1999-01-01

    Most traditional silicon-based detectors have advanced close to their intrinsic limits and optimization of the front-end electronics has become most crucial in improving performance for specific applications. CdZnTe and CdTe, the most promising in the hard X-ray band, are now finding real commercial applications. Si drift-type detectors are among the few silicon-based detectors whose merits have not been fully exploited. When they are used as photodiodes and combined with new high-Z, high light-yield scintillators (eg. GSO), we can expect a break-through in MeV gamma-ray detection.

  10. Technology of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecka, Iwona; Panas, Andrzej; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Kozłowski, Roman; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecki, Maciej; Zaborowski, Michał

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the technology of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE). The developed technology enables the fabrication of both planar and epiplanar p+-ν-n+ detector structures with an active area of up to 50 cm2. The starting material for epiplanar structures are silicon wafers with a high-resistivity n-type epitaxial layer ( ν layer - ρ < 3 kΩcm) deposited on a highly doped n+-type substrate (ρ< 0,02Ωcm) developed and fabricated at the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology. Active layer thickness of the epiplanar detectors (νlayer) may range from 10 μm to 150 μm. Imported silicon with min. 5 kΩcm resistivity is used to fabricate planar detectors. Active layer thickness of the planar detectors (ν) layer) may range from 200 μm to 1 mm. This technology enables the fabrication of both discrete and multi-junction detectors (monolithic detector arrays), such as single-sided strip detectors (epiplanar and planar) and double-sided strip detectors (planar). Examples of process diagrams for fabrication of the epiplanar and planar detectors are presented in the paper, and selected technological processes are discussed.

  11. Development of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors for NIKA

    CERN Document Server

    Roesch, M; Bideaud, A; Boudou, N; Calvo, M; Cruciani, A; Doyle, S; Leduc, H G; Monfardini, A; Swenson, L; Leclercq, S; Mauskopf, P; Schuster, K F

    2012-01-01

    Lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors(LEKIDs) have recently shown considerable promise as direct absorption mm-wavelength detectors for astronomical applications. One major research thrust within the N\\'eel Iram Kids Array (NIKA) collaboration has been to investigate the suitability of these detectors for deployment at the 30-meter IRAM telescope located on Pico Veleta in Spain. Compared to microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID), using quarter wavelength resonators, the resonant circuit of a LEKID consists of a discrete inductance and capacitance coupled to a feedline. A high and constant current density distribution in the inductive part of these resonators makes them very sensitive. Due to only one metal layer on a silicon substrate, the fabrication is relatively easy. In order to optimize the LEKIDs for this application, we have recently probed a wide variety of individual resonator and array parameters through simulation and physical testing. This included determining the optimal feed-line co...

  12. Research and Development for a Gadolinium Doped Water Cherenkov Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Renshaw, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The proposed introduction of a soluble gadolinium (Gd) compound into water Cherenkov detectors can result in a high efficiency for the detection of free neutrons capturing on the Gd. The delayed 8 MeV gamma cascades produced by these captures, in coincidence with a prompt positron signal, serve to uniquely identify electron antineutrinos interacting via inverse beta decay. Such coincidence detection can reduce backgrounds, allowing a large Gd-enhanced water Cherenkov detector to make the first observation of supernova relic neutrinos and high precision measurements of Japan's reactor antineutrino flux, while still allowing for all current physics studies to be continued. Now, a dedicated Gd test facility is operating in the Kamioka Mine. This new facility houses everything needed to successfully operate a Gd doped water Cherenkov detector. Successful running of this facility will demonstrate that adding Gd salt to SK is both safe for the detector and is capable of delivering the expected physics benefits.

  13. Multiplicity-Vertex Detector Electronics Development for Heavy-Ion Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S. [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the electronics work performed to date for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. The detector consists of approximately 34,000 channels of both silicon strips and silicon pads. The per-channel signal processing chain consists of a pre-amplifier gain stage, a current mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64 deep analog memory (simultaneous read/write), an analog correlator, and a 10-bit microsecs ADC. The system controller or Heap Manager, supplies all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Prototype performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 mu nwell CMOS process used for fabrication.

  14. Astrophysics in the Next Decade: JWST and Concurrent Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Thronson, Harley A; Tielens, Alexander; The James Webb Space Telescope and Concurrent Facilities

    2009-01-01

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), planned for operation in about five years, will have the capability to investigate – and answer – some of the most challenging questions in astronomy. Although motivated and designed to study the very early Universe, the performance of the observatory’s instruments over a very wide wavelength range will allow the world’s scientific community unequaled ability to study cosmic phenomena as diverse as small bodies in the Solar System and the formation of galaxies. As part of preparation to use JWST, a conference was held in Tucson, Arizona in 2007 that brought together astronomers from around the world to discuss the mission, other major facilities that will operate in the coming decade, and major scientific goals for them. This book is a compilation of those presentations by some of the leading researchers from all branches of astronomy. This book also includes a "pre-history" of JWST, describing the lengthy process and some of the key individuals that initiat...

  15. Improving JWST Coronagraphic Performance with Accurate Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorkom, Kyle; Pueyo, Laurent; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; JWST Coronagraphs Working Group

    2016-06-01

    The coronagraphs on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable high-contrast observations of faint objects at small separations from bright hosts, such as circumstellar disks, exoplanets, and quasar disks. Despite attenuation by the coronagraphic mask, bright speckles in the host’s point spread function (PSF) remain, effectively washing out the signal from the faint companion. Suppression of these bright speckles is typically accomplished by repeating the observation with a star that lacks a faint companion, creating a reference PSF that can be subtracted from the science image to reveal any faint objects. Before this reference PSF can be subtracted, however, the science and reference images must be aligned precisely, typically to 1/20 of a pixel. Here, we present several such algorithms for performing image registration on JWST coronagraphic images. Using both simulated and pre-flight test data (taken in cryovacuum), we assess (1) the accuracy of each algorithm at recovering misaligned scenes and (2) the impact of image registration on achievable contrast. Proper image registration, combined with post-processing techniques such as KLIP or LOCI, will greatly improve the performance of the JWST coronagraphs.

  16. Simulating Exoplanet Transit and Eclipse Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a nearly ideal machine for acquiring the transmission and emission spectra of transiting exoplanets over its large wavelength range 0.7 - 28 microns. The NIRSpec, NIRCam, nTFI, and MIRI instruments will have spectroscopic capabilities that span spectral resolutions from 20 - 3000 and can cover up to 2 - 3 octaves in wavelength simultaneously. This will allow observing multiple molecular features at once, facilitating the separation of atmospheric temperature and abundance effects on spectra. Many transiting planets will also be able to be observed with both transmission and eclipse spectroscopy, providing further insights and constraints on planetary thermal structures and energy transport. Simulated JWST spectra of planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include current best estimates of actual instrument throughput, resolution, spectral range, systematic noise, and random noise terms. They show that JWST will be able to determine the atmospheric parameters of a wide variety of planets, often when observing only one or a few transit or eclipse event sequences. The thermal emissions of rocky super-Earths will also be quickly detectable via mid-IR eclipse observations if such planets are found around nearby M star hosts beforehand.

  17. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The 6.5-m aperture James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool for studying and advancing numerous areas of astrophysics. Its Fine Guidance Sensor, Near-Infrared Camera, Near-Infrared Spectrograph, and Mid-Infrared Instrument will be capable of making very sensitive, high angular resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations spanning 0.7 - 28 ?m wavelength. These capabilities are very well suited for probing the conditions of star formation in the distant and local Universe. Indeed, JWST has been designed to detect first light objects as well as to study the fine details of jets, disks, chemistry, envelopes, and the central cores of nearby protostars. We will be able to use its cameras, coronagraphs, and spectrographs (including multi-object and integral field capabilities) to study many aspects of star forming regions throughout the galaxy, the Local Group, and more distant regions. I will describe the basic JWST scientific capabilities and illustrate a few ways how they can be applied to star formation issues and conditions with a focus on Galactic regions.

  18. Characterizing Transiting Planets with JWST Spectra: Simulations and Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom; Line, Michael; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    There are now well over a thousand confirmed exoplanets, ranging from hot to cold and large to small worlds. JWST spectra will provide much more detailed information on the molecular constituents, chemical compositions, and thermal properties of the atmospheres of transiting planets than is now known. We explore this by modeling clear, cloudy,and high mean molecular weight atmospheres of typical hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets and then simulating their JWST transmission and emission spectra. These simulations were performed for several JWST instrument modes over 1 - 11 microns and incorporate realistic signal and noise components. We then performed state-of the art retrievals to determine how well temperatures and abundances (CO, CO2, H2O, NH3) will be constrained and over what pressures for these different planet types. Using these results, we appraise what instrument modes will be most useful for determining what properties of the different planets, and we assess how well we can constrain their compositions, CO ratios, and temperature profiles.

  19. Development of compact particle detectors for space based instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, Lindsey; Grove, Andrew; Mohler, Jacob; Sisson, Caleb; Roth, Alex; Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are new photon-detectors which have been increasingly used in particle physics. Their small size, good single photon resolution, simple readout, and immunity to magnetic fields offers benefits compared to traditional photomultipliers. LYSO and CeBr3 crystals are relatively new scintillators with high stopping power, very good light yield and fast decay time. The response of these detectors to low energy gamma rays will be presented. NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium.

  20. Origin of the Universe: From the First Stars to Planets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, protoplanetary systems, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. We will review the motivations for JWST's science goals in the context of recent Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope observations and review the status of the JWST Observatory.

  1. Development of Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Bellunato, T; Matteuzzi, C

    2003-01-01

    The work described in this thesis has been carried out in the framework of the development program of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors of the LHCb experiment. LHCb will operate at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and it will perform a wide range of measurements in the b-hadrons realm. The extensive study of CP violation and rare decays in the b-hadron system are the main goals of the experiment. An introduction to CP violation in hadronic interactions is given in chapter 1. The high b-b bar production cross section at the LHC energy will provide an unprecedented amount of data which will give LHCb a unique opportunity for precision tests on a large set of physics channels as well as a promising discovery potential for sources of CP violation arising from physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment is designed in such a way to optimally match the kinematic structure of events where a pair of b quarks is produced in the collision between to 7 GeV protons. Chapter 2 is devoted to an overview o...

  2. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Perrey, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    A high resolution ($\\sigma 2 \\sim \\mu$) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. The telescope consists of six sensor planes using Mimosa26 MAPS with a pixel pitch of $18.4 \\mu$ and thinned down to $50 \\mu$. The excellent resolution, readout rate and DAQ integration capabilities made the telescope a primary test beam tool for many groups including several CERN based experiments. Within the new European detector infrastructure project AIDA the test beam telescope will be further extended in terms of cooling infrastructure, readout speed and precision. In order to provide a system optimized for the different requirements by the user community, a combination of various pixel technologies is foreseen. In this report the design of this even more flexible telescope with three different pixel technologies (TimePix, Mimosa, ATLAS FE-I4) will be presented. First test beam results with the HitOR signal provided by the FE-I4 integrated into the trigger...

  3. Development of Type-II superlattice VLWIR detectors in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Jumpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), requires the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity up to the very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to exhibit performance that is theoretically predicted to be higher than that of HgCdTe additionally the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal, which is to realize the FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we first fabricated the 320 × 256 (QVGA format) InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, and the large-format 640 × 512 (VGA format) T2SL FPA is followed because the other missions, using an infrared imager, require the large-format FPA. The noise-equivalent delta temperature measured with F1.4 optics was 0.15 K for QVGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K. It was 0.35 K for VGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K, but there is non-uniformity, and further improvements are necessary to achieve high performance FPAs.

  4. Long term biological developments in water Cherenkov detector media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Filevich, A., E-mail: filevich@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pizarro, R.; Ibanez, J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bauleo, P. [Fort Collins, CO (United States); Rodriguez Martino, J. [Pierre Auger Observatory, Malarguee, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2011-12-11

    Fourteen years ago, studies on bacteria growing in clean water were made in order to assess the hazard imposed by a possible expansion of bacteria population in the water tanks of the Pierre Auger Observatory Cherenkov detectors. In 1999 TANGO Array, a reduced-size unitary cell, composed of four water Cherenkov detectors, was constructed at the TANDAR campus of the Atomic Energy Commission, in Buenos Aires, to be used as a working model of the proposed surface array. TANGO Array ran for one year observing energy, intensity, and arrival directions of cosmic rays at sea level. Nine years after it was decommissioned, the water tanks configuring the Cherenkov detectors are still kept closed. In May 2009 water and liner samples from these tanks were collected to determine eventual long term bacteria growth in the internal detector environment, which is very similar to those of the detectors installed in the Malarguee Site. In the present note we report the results of the bacteriological study performed on the samples obtained from the TANGO Array detector tanks. Cultivable, long time surviving, bacterial species were identified, both in the water mass and on the liner surface, and the light transmission in water at the relevant Cherenkov wavelength was studied. An upper limit of possible interferences caused by bacteria is estimated.

  5. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  6. Development of GaAs Detectors for Physics at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Chu, Zhonghua; Krais, R; Rente, C; Syben, O; Tenbusch, F; Toporowsky, M; Xiao, Wenjiang; Cavallini, A; Fiori, F; Edwards, M; Geppert, R; Goppert, R; Haberla, C; Hornung, M F; Irsigler, R; Rogalla, M; Beaumont, S; Raine, C; Skillicorn, I; Margelevicius, J; Meshkinis, S; Smetana, S; Jones, B; Santana, J; Sloan, T; Zdansky, K; Alexiev, D; Donnelly, I J; Canali, C; Chiossi, C; Nava, F; Pavan, P; Kubasta, J; Tomiak, Z; Tchmil, V; Tchountonov, A; Tsioupa, I; Dogru, M; Gray, R; Hou, Yuqian; Manolopoulos, S; Walsh, S; Aizenshtadt, G; Budnitsky, D L; Gossen, A; Khludkov, S; Koretskaya, O B; Okaevitch, L; Potapov, A; Stepanov, V E; Tolbanov, O; Tyagev, A; Matulionis, A; Pozela, J; Kavaliauskiene, G; Kazukauskas, V; Kiliulis, R; Rinkevicius, V; Slenys, S; Storasta, J V

    2002-01-01

    % RD-8 Development of GaAs Detectors for Physics at the LHC \\\\ \\\\The aims of the collaboration are to investigate the available material options, performance and limitations of simple pad, pixel and microstrip GaAs detectors for minimum ionising particles with radiation hardness and speed which are competitive with silicon detectors. This new technology was originally developed within our university laboratories but now benefits from increasing industrial interest and collaboration in detector fabrication. Initial steps have also been taken towards the fabrication of GaAs preamplifiers to match the detectors in radiation hardness. The programme of work aims to construct a demonstration detector module for an LHC forward tracker based on GaAs.

  7. The James Webb STEM Innovation Project: Bringing JWST to the Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Harris, J.; Ryer, H.; Taylor, J.; Bishop, M.

    2012-01-01

    Building awareness of a NASA mission prior to launch and connecting that mission to the education community can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach has developed the James Webb STEM innovation Project (SIP) - an interdisciplinary project that focuses on the engineering aspects and potential scientific discoveries of JWST, while incorporating elements of project-based learning. Students in participating schools will use skills from multiple subject areas to research an aspect of the JWST's design or potential science and create models, illustrated essays, or technology-based projects to demonstrate their learning. Student projects will be showcased during special events at select venues in the project states - thus allowing parents and community members to also be benefactors of the project. Currently, the SIP is being piloted in New York, California, and Maryland. In addition, we will be implementing the SIP in partnership with NASA Explorer Schools in the states of New Mexico, Michigan, Texas, Tennessee, and Iowa.

  8. An image-plane algorithm for JWST's non-redundant aperture mask data

    CERN Document Server

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilites and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90 - 95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 micron. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of...

  9. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E [Univ. of Oregon

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  10. Modern trends in the development of position sensitive neutron detectors for condensed matter research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A V Belushkin

    2008-10-01

    Different types of neutron scattering experiment for the study of condensed matter properties pose specific and often contradictory requirements for detector characteristics. There is no single type of detector which satisfies all the criteria. Therefore, compromise is inevitable and some of the characteristics are trade off in favour of others. Present report gives an overview of detector systems presently operating at the leading neutron scattering facilities as well as some development work around the globe.

  11. Development of hybrid gas detectors for monitoring neutrons induced from the large intensity proton linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, G. S.; Lee, G. S.; Ahn, S. H. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-05-15

    Design of a hybrid gaseous detector for slow neutrons. Construction of the hybrid gaseous detector and tests with a {sup 52}Cf isotope and the MC-50 cyclotron. Designs, constructions, and tests for hybrid scintillators using various neutron sensitive materials (2{sup nd} year). Application to development of detectors for high energy physics (2{sup nd} year). Practical R and Ds for applications to medical and industrial purposes (3{sup rd} year)

  12. Development of a microstrip-based neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Desai; A M Shaikh; V Radhakrishna; K Rajanna

    2004-08-01

    A gas-filled microstrip detector for thermal neutrons has been built and successfully tested in our laboratory. The detector has an active area of 20 mm × 15 mm and consists of alternate anodes and cathodes of widths 12 m and 300 m respectively. The anode to cathode gap is 150 m and the pitch is 612 m. A high resistance, meandering type horizontal strip connects the anodes at one end and aids in position sensing by charge division method. The detector is tested with gas mixtures 3He+Kr (1 : 2) and 3He+CF4 (2 : 1) at pressure of 3 atmospheres and using a Pu-Be neutron source. The pulse height spectrum shows energy resolution of ∼ 8% (FWHM) for the 764 keV peak at anode voltage of 525 V for 3He+Kr and ∼ 15% at anode voltage of 800 V for 3He+CF4. Gas gains up to 6.3 × 103 and 3.6 × 103 are obtained respectively with these gas mixtures. The overall efficiency of the detector along the sensitive length is tested by exposing the active area to neutrons and recording the position spectrum. The detector shows fairly uniform efficiency (∼ 45\\%) over the active length.

  13. DAQ Hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment was extended by about 12 million pixels with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented by employing newly designed read-out hardware, which supports the full detector bandwidth even for calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  14. Development of Kinetic Inductance Detectors for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlis, Alyssa; Aguirre, James E.; Stevenson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An instrument with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at far-infrared wavelengths could contribute significantly to several currently unanswered questions in astrophysics. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a spectroscopic experiment at far-infrared wavelengths using kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). KIDs have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. Specifically, the approach we take uses lumped-element KIDs, which consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements combined to form a microresonator. The inductive element serves as a direct radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels, along with results from a prototype detector array.

  15. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Naday, S.; Gruner, S.; Siddons, P.; Arthur, J.; Wehlitz, R.; Padmore, H.

    2001-07-14

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments.

  16. The development of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, N.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2004-01-01

    There are several applications and fundamental research areas which require the detection of VUV light at cryogenic temperatures. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested special designs of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes able to operate at low temperatures: sealed gaseous detectors with MgF2 windows and windowless detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated, that both primary and secondary (due to the avalanche multiplication inside liquids) scintillation lights could be recorded by photosensitive gaseous detectors. The results of this work may allow one to significantly improve the operation of some noble liquid gas TPCs.

  17. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  18. The Development of Intelligent Detector for Train Longitudinal Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN E; MO Yimin; NIU Wei

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a new kind of train impact detecting system that detect the train impact through detecting the train running acceleration, proposes that uniting the train running acceleration and the change rate of acceleration to token the train impact. The detector takes the portable computer as platform of data processing, utilizes the database technology to process data, making instrument Pc true, and improving the data processing ability of the instrument. The detector can show the train running acceleration on-line and real-timely, indicating the train impact situation directly,and uses the method that the software and hardware unifies to strengthen the system anti-jamming ability. At present, this detector has been tryout in some locomotive depots, each design function and the performance index conforms to request of the scene; the anti-jamming ability is strong, the monitor precision is reasonable, the detector can carry out the on-line examination to the train impact and monitoring the train running condition.

  19. The Impact of JWST Broadband Filter Choice on Photometric Redshift Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.;

    2016-01-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6–5.0 μm and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at λ 5.0 μm. In this work we analyze ...

  20. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  1. Two NIRCam Channels are Better than One: How JWST Can Do More Science with NIRCam’s Short-wavelength Dispersed Hartmann Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, E.; Rieke, M.; Leisenring, J.; Walker, L. M.; Fraine, J.; Kelly, D.; Misselt, K.; Greene, T.; Line, M.; Lewis, N.; Stansberry, J.

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) offers unprecedented sensitivity, stability, and wavelength coverage for transiting exoplanet studies, opening up new avenues for measuring atmospheric abundances, structure, and temperature profiles. Taking full advantage of JWST spectroscopy of planets from 0.6 to 28 μm, however, will require many observations with a combination of the NIRISS, NIRCam, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. In this white paper, we discuss a new NIRCam mode (not yet approved or implemented) that can reduce the number of necessary observations to cover the 1.0-5.0 μm wavelength range. Even though NIRCam was designed primarily as an imager, it also includes several grisms for phasing and aligning JWST’s 18 hexagonal mirror segments. NIRCam’s long-wavelength channel includes grisms that cover 2.4-5.0 μm with a resolving power of R = 1200-1550 using two separate configurations. The long-wavelength grisms have already been approved for science operations, including wide field and single object (time series) slitless spectroscopy. We propose a new mode that will simultaneously measure spectra for science targets in the 1.0-2.0 μm range using NIRCam’s short-wavelength channel. This mode, if approved, would take advantage of NIRCam’s Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS), which produces 10 spatially separated spectra per source at R ˜ 300. We discuss the added benefit of the DHS in constraining abundances in exoplanet atmospheres as well as its ability to observe the brightest systems. The DHS essentially comes for free (at no time cost) with any NIRCam long-wavelength grism observation, but the detector integration parameters have to be selected to ensure that the long-wavelength grism observations do not saturate and that JWST data volume downlink constraints are not violated. Combining both of NIRCam’s channels will maximize the science potential of JWST, which is a limited life observatory.

  2. DAQ hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has been extended by about 12 million pixels thanks to the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented along with newly designed read-out hardware to support high bandwidth for data readout and calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  3. Development and operation of laser machined MicroWell Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pitts, W K; Belolipetskiy, S V; Crain, M; Hutchins, J B; Matos, S; Walsh, K M; Solberg, K

    1999-01-01

    Arrays of 100 mu m diameter cylindrical wells were laser micromachined on a 200 micrometer Cartesian grid, producing MicroWell Detectors (MWD). The substrate was 125 mu m thick polyimide foil, more than twice as thick as a typical GEM or WELL detector. An advantage of the laser micromachining process is that the wells are produced with nearly vertical sidewalls, in contrast to the sloping sidewalls characteristic of conventional chemical etching processes. With the steeper sidewall, active elements may be more closely packed than is possible with wet etching techniques. Thicker substrates can be patterned, increasing the length of the charge multiplication region and reducing the internal capacitance per unit element. A series of prototypes have been produced and tested in a counting gas composed of 85% argon and 15% carbon dioxide, with a maximum measured gas gain of approximately 12 000.

  4. Development of in-situ Space Debris Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Waldemar; Romberg, O.; Wiedemann, C.; Drolshagen, G.; Vörsmann, P.

    2014-11-01

    Due to high relative velocities, collisions of spacecraft in orbit with Space Debris (SD) or Micrometeoroids (MM) can lead to payload degradation, anomalies as well as failures in spacecraft operation, or even loss of mission. Flux models and impact risk assessment tools, such as MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) or ORDEM (Orbital Debris Engineering Model), and ESABASE2 or BUMPER II are used to analyse mission risk associated with these hazards. Validation of flux models is based on measured data. Currently, as most of the SD and MM objects are too small (millimeter down to micron sized) for ground-based observations (e.g. radar, optical), the only available data for model validation is based upon retrieved hardware investigations e.g. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). Since existing data sets are insufficient, further in-situ experimental investigation of the SD and MM populations are required. This paper provides an overview and assessment of existing and planned SD and MM impact detectors. The detection area of the described detectors is too small to adequately provide the missing data sets. Therefore an innovative detection concept is proposed that utilises existing spacecraft components for detection purposes. In general, solar panels of a spacecraft provide a large area that can be utilised for in-situ impact detection. By using this method on several spacecraft in different orbits the detection area can be increased significantly and allow the detection of SD and MM objects with diameters as low as 100 μm. The design of the detector is based on damage equations from HST and EURECA solar panels. An extensive investigation of those panels was performed by ESA and is summarized within this paper. Furthermore, an estimate of the expected sensitivity of the patented detector concept as well as examples for its implementation into large and small

  5. More than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatouli, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android devices. This project concerns the development of the v2.1 of the application which is meant to enhance the capacity of tracking quickly and reliably parts of the detector and its paper model. It recognises different parts of it and displays labels explaining its structure. Additionally, visualisation of the collisions can also be shown on the top of the camera image. More Than ALICE aims to increase the public awareness of the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an Augmented Reality (AR) interface to track the detector during underground visits or its paper model which can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat. For those without access to either the detector or the paper model, the app provides the virtual model of the detector where the users can explore and understand the different parts of the detector and see real-time collisions.

  6. More Than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ouellette, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android built in the Unity Engine. This project concerns the development of the second edition of the application, which is meant to completely succeed the original version built in 2014. The purpose of the application is to describe the various components of the ALICE detector and to overlay live collisions to increase public awareness for the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an augmented reality (AR) interface via the Vuforia SDK to track images of the ALICE detector or components of the paper model of ALICE that can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat office. For those without access to either images of the detector or the detector model, the app provides a virtual detector model (VR) that contains the same functionality as the augmented reality.

  7. Maintenance and development of the NA61/SHINE Detector Control System (DCS)

    CERN Document Server

    Brylinski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the summary of my CERN Summer Student project. The main goal of my stay was the development of some parts of Detector Control System responsible for gas parameters, atmospheric conditions and drift velocity measurements.

  8. DOE seeks applicants to develop next-generation nuclear detectors. (Sensors)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "DOE's Division of High Energy Physics seeks grant applications for development of advanced detectors in the areas of high energy physics experiments, which includes accelerator-based and non-accelerator based experiments" (1/2 page).

  9. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  10. Development of pixel detectors for the IBL and HL-LHC ATLAS experiment upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Baselga Bacardit, Marta

    2016-03-18

    This thesis presents the development of advanced silicon technology detectors fabricated at CNM-Barcelona for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. The pixel size of the tracking silicon detectors for the upgrade of the HL-LHC will have to decrease in size in order to enhance the resolution in position for the measurements and they need to have lower occupancy for the electronics. The future experiments at CERN will cope with fuences up to 2 x 10^^16 neq/cm2, and the smaller 3D silicon detectors will have less trapping of the electron-holes generated in the bulk leading to a better performance under high radiation environment. This thesis studies silicon detectors fabricated at CNM-Barcelona applied to HEP experiments with two different kinds of novel technologies: 3D and Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD). The 3D detectors make it possible to reduce the size of the depleted region inside the detector and to work at lower voltages, whereas the LGAD detectors have an intrinsic gain which increases the collec...

  11. Exoplanets with JWST: degeneracy, systematics and how to avoid them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, Joanna K.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Kendrew, Sarah; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The high sensitivity and broad wavelength coverage of the James Webb Space Telescope will transform the field of exoplanet transit spectroscopy. Transit spectra are inferred from minute, wavelength-dependent variations in the depth of a transit or eclipse as the planet passes in front of or is obscured by its star, and the spectra contain information about the composition, structure and cloudiness of exoplanet atmospheres. Atmospheric retrieval is the preferred technique for extracting information from these spectra, but the process can be confused by astrophysical and instrumental systematic noise. We present results of retrieval tests based on synthetic, noisy JWST spectra, for clear and cloudy planets and active and inactive stars. We find that the ability to correct for stellar activity is likely to be a limiting factor for cloudy planets, as the effects of unocculted star spots may mimic the presence of a scattering slope due to clouds. We discuss the pros and cons of the available JWST instrument combinations for transit spectroscopy, and consider the effect of clouds and aerosols on the spectra. Aerosol high in a planet's atmosphere obscures molecular absorption features in transmission, reducing the information content of spectra in wavelength regions where the cloud is optically thick. We discuss the usefulness of particular wavelength regions for identifying the presence of cloud, and suggest strategies for solving the highly-degenerate retrieval problem for these objects.

  12. Unique Spectroscopy and Imaging of Mars with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, Geronimo L; Clancy, Todd R; Encrenaz, Therese; Fouchet, Thierry; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A; Mumma, Michael J; Novak, Robert E; Smith, Michael D; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Wolff, Michael J; Ferruit, Pierre; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we summarize the main capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for performing observations of Mars. The distinctive vantage point of JWST at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) will allow sampling the full observable disk, permitting the study of short-term phenomena, diurnal processes (across the East-West axis) and latitudinal processes between the hemispheres (including seasonal effects) with excellent spatial resolutions (0.07 arcsec at 2 {\\mu}m). Spectroscopic observations will be achievable in the 0.7-5 {\\mu}m spectral region with NIRSpec at a maximum resolving power of 2700, and with 8000 in the 1-1.25 {\\mu}m range. Imaging will be attainable with NIRCam at 4.3 {\\mu}m and with two narrow filters near 2 {\\mu}m, while the nightside will be accessible with several filters in the 0.5 to 2 {\\mu}m. Such a powerful suite of instruments will be a major asset for the exploration and characterization of Mars. Some science cases include the mapping of the water D/H ratio, investigatio...

  13. Bringing the Science of JWST to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background, particularly in the area of spectroscopy. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. Webbtelescope.org, the public hub for scientific information related to JWST, is now open. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing outreach programs: for example, partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; partnering with musicians and artists to link science and art. Augmented reality apps showcase NASA’s telescopes in a format usable by anyone with a smartphone, and visuals from increasingly affordable 3D VR technologies.

  14. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  15. Development of a compact photon detector for ANKE at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Hejny, V; Chernyshev, V; Büscher, M; Hoek, M; Koch, H R; Löhner, H; Machner, H; Magiera, A; Novotny, R; Roemer, K; Ströher, H; Wronska, A

    2002-01-01

    Recent improvements in the performance of PbWO sub 4 , a high-density inorganic scintillator, offer the possibility to design very compact, large-acceptance electromagnetic calorimeters with excellent timing and good energy resolution, applicable also for photon energies below 1 GeV. Such a detection system is planned to be built for the internal magnetic spectrometer ANKE (Apparatus for Studies of Nucleon and Kaon Ejectiles) at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY) Juelich. The limited space and stray magnetic fields of ANKE place severe boundary conditions, which have to be taken into account for detector layout and the choice of photo sensors.

  16. Silicon Sensor and Detector Developments for the CMS Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessandro, Raffaello

    2011-01-01

    CMS started a campaign to identify the future silicon sensor technology baseline for a new Tracker for the high-luminosity phase of LHC, coupled to a new effective way of providing tracking information to the experiment trigger. To this end a large variety of 6'' wafers was acquired in different thicknesses and technologies at HPK and new detector module designs were investigated. Detector thicknesses ranging from 50$\\mu$m to 300$\\mu$m are under investigation on float zone, magnetic Czochralski and epitaxial material both in n-in-p and p-in-n versions. P-stop and p-spray are explored as isolation technology for the n-in-p type sensors as well as the feasibility of double metal routing on 6'' wafers. Each wafer contains different structures to answer different questions, e.g. influence of geometry, Lorentz angle, radiation tolerance, annealing behaviour, validation of read-out schemes. Dedicated process test-structures, as well as diodes, mini-sensors, long and very short strip sensors and real pixel sensors ...

  17. Design and Development of an Ultrasonic Motion Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zungeru, A M

    2013-01-01

    The ultrasonic motion detector devices emit ultrasonic sound energy into an area of interest (monitored area), and this further reacts to a change in the reflected energy pattern. The system uses a technique that is based on a frequency shift in reflected energy to detect a movement or change in position (motion). In this system, ultrasonic sound is transmitted from the transmitting device which is normally in the form of energy. The transmitted sound utilizes air as its medium and this travel in a wave type motion. The wave is reflected back from the surroundings in the room/hallway and the device hears a pitch characteristic of the protected environment. In this system, the wave pattern is disturbed and reflected back more quickly, thus increasing the pitch and signaling an alarm whenever motion is detected. The main contribution of this work is the design of a circuit that can sense motion through movement of anything, a low cost and portable motion detector, and the design of a circuit that can be used to...

  18. Detector module development for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Olga [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The central detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR, the Silicon Tracking System (STS), is designed to reconstruct hundreds of charged particle tracks produced at rates up to 10 MHz in interactions of ion beams of up to 45 AGeV projectile energies with nuclear targets. The building block of the tracking system is a module suitable for a low-mass detector construction. In a module, the basic functional unit of the STS, radiation tolerant microstrip sensors are read out through low-mass multi-line cables with self-triggering front-end electronics located at the periphery of the system. Light-weight carbon fibre support structures will carry 10 of such modules and build up the STS stations. The performance of module prototypes has been evaluated, resembling the structure of the intended STS module. The shown prototypes comprise a full-size CBM05 sensor and two 128-channel read-out cables attached to the read-out pads on either side of the sensor. The cables end in connector boards interfacing to two front-end boards each hosting one n-XYTER chip.

  19. Detection systems for mass spectrometry imaging: a perspective on novel developments with a focus on active pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, JH; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Instrumental developments for imaging and individual particle detection for biomolecular mass spectrometry (imaging) and fundamental atomic and molecular physics studies are reviewed. Ion-counting detectors, array detection systems and highmass detectors for mass spectrometry (imaging) are treated.

  20. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: yamaguti@phy.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Suzaki, F. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [RI Center, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Miyazawa, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Morimoto, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kuboki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Momota, S. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Nagae, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  1. Development of CZT detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A., III; Guo, Q.; Matteson, J.; Groza, M.; Beilicke, M.; Burger, A.; de Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is the detector material of choice for the detection of X-rays in the 10 keV-1MeV energy band with excellent spatial and energy resolutions and without cryogenic cooling. In this contribution, we report on recent results of the CZT detector development program and several astrophysical experiments which make use of CZT detectors. In the first part of the paper, we discuss the performance of pixel and cross-strip CZT detectors read out with an ASIC developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our pixel detectors achieve some of the best energy resolutions reported in the literature. Cross-strip detectors are found to give an inferior performance and we investigate the reason for this performance difference. We also present results from a precision measurement of the effect of a steering grid on multi-pixel events obtained with a 200 micrometer collimator. In the second part of the paper, we describe the design and performance of the hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur. The polarimeter uses a 14 cm long scintillator scatterer, surrounded by an assembly of 32 2-5 mm thick CZT detectors. We discuss the sensitivity of the polarimeter to measure the linear polarization of 10 keV-80 keV X-rays on short and long balloon flights and results from testing the polarimeter in the laboratory.

  2. In-focus phase retrieval using JWST-NIRISS's non-redundant mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Gamper, Noah; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) contains a 7-hole non-redundant mask (NRM) in its pupil. NIRISS's Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) mode is useful both for science as well as wavefront sensing. In-focus science detector NRM and full pupil images of unresolved stars can be used to measure the wavefront without any dedicated wavefront sensing hardware or any moving mirrors. Using routine science operational sequences, these images can be taken before or after any science visit. NRM fringe phases constrain Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval to disambiguate the algorithm's two-fold degeneracy. We summarize how consecutive masked and unmasked exposures provide enough information to reconstruct a wavefront with up to ˜1-2 rms radians of error. We present our latest progress on using this approach on laboratory experiments, and discuss those results in the context of contingency for JWST segment phasing. We discuss extending our method to ground-based AO systems and future space telescopes.

  3. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Dorner, Bernhard; Ferruit, Pierre; de Oliveira, Catarina Alves; Birkmann, Stephan M; Böker, Torsten; De Marchi, Guido; Gnata, Xavier; Köhler, Jess; Sirianni, Marco; Jakobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Context: The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject (MOS), long-slit, and integral field (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of $\\sim$9 $\\mathrm{arcmin}^2$. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main o...

  4. Status of development of gamma-ray detector response function code or GAMDRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fusheng; Han, Xiaogang

    2012-07-01

    The need for an accurate representation of the detector response functions (DRFs) for sodium iodide (NaI), bismuth germinate (BGO), etc., arises in the oilwell logging business, especially important for spectral logging tools such as a geochemical logging tool. While Monte Carlo models predict the photon spectra incidents on these detectors, the DRFs are used to generate the pulse-height spectra. A Monte Carlo-based γ-ray detector response function code (GAMDRF) was developed to meet the requirements based on complete photon physics.

  5. Advances in the development of encapsulants for mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y.J.; Bradley, J. G.; Albee, A. L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in the development of protective impermeable encapsulants with high transparency to ultra-low-energy X-rays for use on HgI_2 X-ray detectors are reported. Various X-ray fluorescence spectra from coated detectors are presented. The X-ray absorption in the encapsulants has been analyzed using characteristic radiation from various elements. Results suggest that low-energy cutoffs for the detectors are not determined solely by the encapsulating coatings presently employed but are also in...

  6. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, J.; Ley, J.-L.; Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Létang, J. M.; Magne, M.; Mathez, H.; Maxim, V.; Montarou, G.; Morel, C.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  7. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  8. Development of a simple detector response function generation program: The CEARDRFs code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiaxin, E-mail: jwang3@ncsu.edu [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Wang Zhijian; Peeples, Johanna [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Yu Huawei [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); College of Geo-Resources and Information, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266555 (China); Gardner, Robin P. [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    A simple Monte Carlo program named CEARDRFs has been developed to generate very accurate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors. It utilizes relatively rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport, and accounts for two phenomena that have rarely been treated: scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part of the DRF. It has been proven that these physics and treatments work well for 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 Double-Prime and 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 Double-Prime cylindrical NaI detector in CEAR's previous work. Now this approach has been expanded to cover more scintillation detectors with various common shapes and sizes. Benchmark experiments of 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Double-Prime cylindrical BGO detector and 2 Multiplication-Sign 4 Multiplication-Sign 16 Double-Prime rectangular NaI detector have been carried out at CEAR with various radiactive sources. The simulation results of CEARDRFs have also been compared with MCNP5 calculations. The benchmark and comparison show that CEARDRFs can generate very accurate DRFs (more accurate than MCNP5) at a very fast speed (hundred times faster than MCNP5). The use of this program can significantly increase the accuracy of applications relying on detector spectroscopy like prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence analysis, oil well logging and homeland security. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CEARDRF has been developed to generate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generated DRFs are very accurate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulation speed is hundreds of times faster than MCNP5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It utilizes rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It also accounts for scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part.

  9. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  10. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  11. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  12. Development of a simple detector response function generation program: the CEARDRFs code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaxin; Wang, Zhijian; Peeples, Johanna; Yu, Huawei; Gardner, Robin P

    2012-07-01

    A simple Monte Carlo program named CEARDRFs has been developed to generate very accurate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors. It utilizes relatively rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport, and accounts for two phenomena that have rarely been treated: scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part of the DRF. It has been proven that these physics and treatments work well for 3×3″ and 6×6″ cylindrical NaI detector in CEAR's previous work. Now this approach has been expanded to cover more scintillation detectors with various common shapes and sizes. Benchmark experiments of 2×2″ cylindrical BGO detector and 2×4×16″ rectangular NaI detector have been carried out at CEAR with various radiactive sources. The simulation results of CEARDRFs have also been compared with MCNP5 calculations. The benchmark and comparison show that CEARDRFs can generate very accurate DRFs (more accurate than MCNP5) at a very fast speed (hundred times faster than MCNP5). The use of this program can significantly increase the accuracy of applications relying on detector spectroscopy like prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence analysis, oil well logging and homeland security. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Studying the spectral properties of Active Galactic Nuclei in the JWST era

    CERN Document Server

    Nakos, Th; Alonso-Herrero, A; Labiano, A

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), due to launch in 2014, shall provide an unprecedented wealth of information in the near and mid-infrared wavelengths, thanks to its high-sensitivity instruments and its 6.5 m primary mirror, the largest ever launched into space. NIRSpec and MIRI, the two spectrographs onboard JWST, will play a key role in the study of the spectral features of Active Galactic Nuclei in the 0.6-28 micron wavelength range. This talk aims at presenting an overview of the possibilities provided by these two instruments, in order to prepare the astronomical community for the JWST era.

  14. Imaging detector development for nuclear astrophysics using pixelated CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, J. M.; Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Llopis, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of focusing telescopes in the energy range of lines of astrophysical interest (i.e., of energies around 1 MeV) should allow to reach unprecedented sensitivities, essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. Our research and development activities aim to study a detector suited for the focal plane of a γ-ray telescope mission. A CdTe/CdZnTe detector operating at room temperature, that combines high detection efficiency with good spatial and spectral resolution is being studied in recent years as a focal plane detector, with the interesting option of also operating as a Compton telescope monitor. We present the current status of the design and development of a γ-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range, for nuclear astrophysics, consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors with increasing thicknesses. We have developed an initial prototype based on CdTe ohmic detector. The detector has 11×11 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 1 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. Each pixel is stud bonded to a fanout board and routed to an front end ASIC to measure pulse height and rise time information for each incident γ-ray photon. First measurements of a 133Ba and 241Am source are reported here.

  15. Imaging detector development for nuclear astrophysics using pixelated CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, J.M., E-mail: alvarez@ieec.uab.e [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Galvez, J.L.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Llopis, M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M. [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    The concept of focusing telescopes in the energy range of lines of astrophysical interest (i.e., of energies around 1 MeV) should allow to reach unprecedented sensitivities, essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. Our research and development activities aim to study a detector suited for the focal plane of a {gamma}-ray telescope mission. A CdTe/CdZnTe detector operating at room temperature, that combines high detection efficiency with good spatial and spectral resolution is being studied in recent years as a focal plane detector, with the interesting option of also operating as a Compton telescope monitor. We present the current status of the design and development of a {gamma}-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range, for nuclear astrophysics, consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors with increasing thicknesses. We have developed an initial prototype based on CdTe ohmic detector. The detector has 11x11 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 1 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. Each pixel is stud bonded to a fanout board and routed to an front end ASIC to measure pulse height and rise time information for each incident {gamma}-ray photon. First measurements of a {sup 133}Ba and {sup 241}Am source are reported here.

  16. Development and characterization of the lead iodide semiconductor detector; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao do detector semicondutor de iodeto de chumbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Icimone Braga de

    2001-07-01

    A methodology for purification and growth of PbI{sub 2} crystal as well as for its characterization as a room temperature radiation detector was developed in this work. Commercial salts were purified using the zone refining method and, for the purified material growth, the Bridgman method was used. To calculate the purification efficiency, studies of the decrease impurities concentrations were made in the salts and in three sections of the materials purified, using the neutron activation analysis technique. The results showed that the impurities segregate preferentially in the ingot final section. A significant decrease of the impurities concentration in function of the purification pass number was observed. The grown crystals presented good crystalline quality according to the results of the X-ray diffraction analysis. To evaluate the crystal as a semiconductor detector, measurements of dark leakage current, resistivity and the response of ({sup 241}Am) alpha particle and ({sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs) gamma rays were carried out. The radiation response is strongly dependent on the crystals purity. The crystals purified with 500 passes exhibited energy resolution of 10% for {sup 241} Am alpha particle and the gamma rays resolution was compatible with the literature. The photosensibility of the PbI{sub 2} crystal found in the wavelength from 400 to 600 nm range suggests an another application at this crystal as a photodetector to be coupled to scintillators. (author)

  17. Development of Radiation Hard Radiation Detectors, Differences between Czochralski Silicon and Float Zone Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Tuominen, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop radiation hard silicon detectors. Radiation detectors made ofsilicon are cost effective and have excellent position resolution. Therefore, they are widely used fortrack finding and particle analysis in large high-energy physics experiments. Silicon detectors willalso be used in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment that is being built at the LHC (LargeHadron Collider) accelerator at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research). This work wasdone in the CMS programme of Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP).Exposure of the silicon material to particle radiation causes irreversible defects that deteriorate theperformance of the silicon detectors. In HIP CMS Programme, our approach was to improve theradiation hardness of the silicon material with increased oxygen concentration in silicon material. Westudied two different methods: diffusion oxygenation of Float Zone silicon and use of high resistivityCzochralski silicon.We processed, characterised, tested in a parti...

  18. Recent advances in the development of semiconductor detectors for very high luminosity colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    For the luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the SLHC, the tracking systems of the LHC experiments need to be replaced. A main concern is the extreme radiation hardness requirement up to $1 x 10^{16} cm^{-2}$ 1 MeV neutron equivalent. This paper describes an extract of recent results on radiation hardening technologies developed within the RD50 Collaboration (http://www.cern.ch/rd50) [1] for the tracker upgrades. Silicon detectors have been designed and produced on n- and p-type wafers made by Float Zone, epitaxy and Czochralski technology. Their charge collection efficiency after proton, neutron and mixed irradiation has been studied. Novel detector concepts, as 3D detectors, have been designed, produced and studied as well. Radiation induced microscopic disorder has been also investigated and correlated with the performance degradation of irradiated detectors.

  19. Development of a scintillator detector set with counter and data acquisition for flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, F E D

    2002-01-01

    A portable counter with data acquisition system for flow measurements was developed, using the pulse velocity technique. This consists in determining the tracer transit time mixed homogeneously to the liquid or gas pipelines. The counter comprises: (a) two CsI(Tl) crystals solid state detectors, associated with Si PIN photodiodes, with compatible sensitivity to the injected radiotracers activities; (b) amplification units; (c) analogue-to-digital interface, which processes and displays the detectors counting separately and in real time, but in a same temporal axis, via a computer screen and (d) 30-m coaxial cables for signals transmission from each detector to the processing unit. Experiments were carried out for the detector and associated electronic characterizations. The equipment showed to be suitable for flow measurements in an industrial plant, in the real situation.

  20. Development of hybrid photon detectors with integrated silicon pixel readout for the RICH counters of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Formenti, F; Gys, Thierry; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Snoeys, W; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    We report on the ongoing work towards a hybrid photon detector with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The photon detector is based $9 on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a fast, binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The $9 performance of a half-scale prototype is presented, together with the developments and tests of a full-scale tube with large active area. Specific requirements for pixel front-end and readout electronics in LHCb are outlined, and $9 recent results obtained from pixel chips applicable to hybrid photon detector design are summarized.

  1. Development of one-coordinate gaseous detector for wide angle diffraction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Aulchenko, V M; Sharafutdinov, M R; Shekhtman, L I; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zhulanov, V V

    2008-01-01

    A one-coordinate gaseous detector of soft X-ray photons for wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies is being developed. The detector operates in counting mode and is based on multi-stage Gas Electron Multiplier(GEM). Full size detector is assembled and has 67 degrees aperture with 350mm distance to the source, readout multi-strip structure with 2048 strips at 0.2mm pitch and is partially equipped with readout electronics in the central part. Main parameters of the detector have been measured with 8keV X-ray beam at VEPP-3 synchrotron ring. Spatial resolution of 470 um (FWHM) has been demonstrated that will allow to distinguish diffraction spots at 0.1 degrees.

  2. Development of noise-suppressed detector for single ion hit system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Takuro; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Tamotsu; Hirao, Toshio; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A noise-suppressed detector for single ion detection has been developed, and combined with the heavy ion microbeam apparatus. This detector consists of a pair of micro channel plates (MCP`s) and a very thin carbon foil. The detection signal is formed by the coincidence of the signals from these MCP`s, so that this detector and the coincidence measurement unit can reduce miscounting in the circuit. The detection efficiency for 15 MeV heavy ions was evaluated to be comparable to that of a silicon surface-barrier detector (SSD) and the miscounting rate was 4 orders lower than the noise rate of a single MCP. The rise time of the detection signal was also estimated. (author)

  3. Development of a high-speed single-photon pixellated detector for visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Mac Raighne, Aaron; Mathot, Serge; McPhate, Jason; Vallerga, John; Jarron, Pierre; Brownlee, Colin; O’Shea, Val

    2009-01-01

    We present the development of a high-speed, single-photon counting, Hybrid Photo Detector (HPD). The HPD consists of a vacuum tube, containing the detector assembly, sealed with a transparent optical input window. Photons incident on the photocathode eject a photoelectron into a large electric field, which accelerates the incident electron onto a silicon detector. The silicon detector is bump bonded to a Medipix readout chip. This set-up allows for the detection and readout of low incident photon intensities at rates that are otherwise unattainable with current camera technology. Reported is the fabrication of the camera that brings together a range of sophisticated design and fabrication techniques and the expected theoretical imaging performance. Applications to cellular and molecular microscopy are also described in which single-photon-counting abilities at high frame rates are crucial

  4. Development of detector and physics analysis tools for PANDA experiments at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, B. J.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.; Jadhav, Manoj; Varma, Raghava; Schwarz, C.; Orth, H.; Schmitt, L.; Peters, K.

    2012-07-01

    The PANDA collaboration at FAIR facility will address a rich variety of physics programs for studies of strong interaction and perturbative QCD. In India, initiatives have been taken up for the design and construction of some components of the PANDA detector. A silicon photo multiplier based scintillation detector is being planned to be built in India in collaboration with GSI, Darmstadt. Simulation studies and R&D work are being carried out in designing this detector which can provide a fast trigger signal for the PANDA experiments. The other component of the PANDA detector which the Indian group is interested to develop is luminosity monitor detector(LMD). Currently two possible solutions are being considered for LMD: (i)a double sided silicon micro strip detector and (ii) radiation hard Gallium Nitride(GaN)/Diamond sensors with a pitch of 50 μm. Simulations are being carried out. The analysis tools of vertex and kinematic fitting have been developed within the software framework of Pandaroot. The vertex fitting for the primary and secondary vertex based on kinematic constraints have been implemented for the full decay tree reconstruction. Simulation studies have been performed using a few benchmark channels to evaluate the performance of these methods.

  5. Development of alpha spectroscopy method with solid state nuclear track detector using aluminium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwaikat, N., E-mail: ndwaikat@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    This work presents the development of alpha spectroscopy method with Solid-state nuclear track detectors using aluminum thin films. The resolution of this method is high, and it is able to discriminate between alpha particles at different incident energy. It can measure the exact number of alpha particles at specific energy without needing a calibration of alpha track diameter versus alpha energy. This method was tested by using Cf-252 alpha standard source at energies 5.11 MeV, 3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV, which produced by the variation of detector -standard source distance. On front side, two detectors were covered with two Aluminum thin films and the third detector was kept uncovered. The thickness of Aluminum thin films was selected carefully (using SRIM 2013) such that one of the films will block the lower two alpha particles (3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV) and the alpha particles at higher energy (5.11 MeV) can penetrate the film and reach the detectors surface. The second thin film will block alpha particles at lower energy of 2.7 MeV and allow alpha particles at higher two energies (5.11 MeV and 3.86 MeV) to penetrate and produce tracks. For uncovered detector, alpha particles at three different energies can produce tracks on it. For quality assurance and accuracy, the detectors were mounted on thick enough copper substrates to block exposure from the backside. The tracks on the first detector are due to alpha particles at energy of 5.11 MeV. The difference between the tracks number on the first detector and the tracks number on the second detector is due to alpha particles at energy of 3.8 MeV. Finally, by subtracting the tracks number on the second detector from the tracks number on the third detector (uncovered), we can find the tracks number due to alpha particles at energy 2.7 MeV. After knowing the efficiency calibration factor, we can exactly calculate the activity of standard source. (Author)

  6. Extrasolar Planets Observed with JWST and the ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, L. Drake

    2010-01-01

    The advent of cryogenic space-borne infrared observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope has lead to a revolution in the study of planets and planetary systems orbiting sun-like stars. Already Spitzer has characterized the emergent infrared spectra of close-in giant exoplanets using transit and eclipse techniques. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to extend these studies to superEarth exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars in the near solar neighborhood. The forthcoming ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will playa key role in these studies, being especially valuable for spectroscopy at higher spectral resolving powers where large photon fluxes are needed. The culmination of this work within the next two decades will be the detection and spectral characterization of the major molecular constituents in the atmosphere of a habitable superEarth orbiting a nearby lower main sequence star.

  7. JWST tunable filter imager: etalon prototype test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touahri, D.; Cameron, P.; Evans, C.; Greenberg, E.; Rowlands, N.; Scott, A.; Doyon, R.; Beaulieu, M.; Djazovski, O.

    2008-07-01

    We present the prototyping results and laboratory characterization of a narrow band Fabry-Perot etalon flight model which is one of the wavelength selecting elements of the Tunable Filter Imager. The latter is a part of the Fine Guidance Sensor which represents the Canadian contribution to NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The unique design of this etalon provides the JWST observatory with the ability to image at 30 Kelvin, a 2.2'x2.2' portion of its field of view in a narrow spectral bandwidth of R~100 at any wavelength ranging between 1.6 and 4.9 μm (with a gap in coverage between 2.5 and 3.2 μm). Extensive testing has resulted in better understanding of the thermal properties of the piezoelectric transducers used as an actuation system for the etalon gap tuning. Good throughput, spectral resolution and contrast have been demonstrated for the full wavelength range.

  8. Observing Outer Planet Satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science Justification and Observational Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  9. Observing outer planet satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science justification and observational requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  10. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasolonjatovo, A.H.D.; Shiomi, T.; Kim, E.; Nakamura, T. E-mail: nakamura@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp; Nunomiya, T.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-10-21

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather good agreement with the fluence-to-dose conversion factor given by ICRP 74. This detector will be useful as a wide-energy range neutron monitor.

  11. Design and development of hard x-ray imaging detector using scintillator and Si photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, S. K.; Naik, Amisha P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Acharya, Y. B.; Patel, A. R.; Ladiya, T.; Devashrayee, Niranjan M.

    2016-07-01

    There are various astrophysical phenomena which are of great importance and interest such as stellar explosions, Gamma ray bursts etc. There is also a growing interest in exploring the celestial sources in hard X-rays. High sensitive instruments are essential to perform the detailed studies of these cosmic accelerators and explosions. Hard X-ray imaging detectors having high absorption efficiency and mm spatial resolution are the key requirements to locate the generation of these astrophysical phenomenon. We hereby present a detector module which consists of a single CsI scintillation detector of size 15 x 15 x 3 mm3. The photon readout is done using an array of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPM is a new development in the field of photon detection and can be described as 2D array of small (hundreds of μm2) avalanche photodiodes. We have achieved a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm with our initial setup. By using the array of these detector modules, we can build the detector with a large sensitive area with a very high spatial resolution. This paper presents the experimental details for single detector module using CsI (Tl) scintillator and SiPM and also presents the preliminary results of energy and position measurement. The GEANT4 simulation has also been carried out for the same geometry.

  12. Development of NbTiN-Al direct antenna coupled kinetic inductance detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankwarden, Y.J.Y.; Endo, A.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Bruijn, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a coplanar waveguide (CPW) Kinetic Inductance Detector consisting of Al and NbTiN, coupled at its shorted end to a planar antenna. To suppress the odd mode due to direct coupling to sky radiation by the KID we have also developed freestanding metal air bridges

  13. Development of Application-specific Integrated Circuit for Detector Signal Readout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hai-feng; WAN; Yu-qing; TIAN; Hua-yang

    2013-01-01

    In general,the development of nuclear electronics was mainly promoted by nuclear physics,high energy physics and other disciplines.As nuclear physics research developed,the requirement of detection equipment which contained a large number of detectors gave birth to nuclear electronics ASIC(application-specific integrated circuit).The institutions such as European Organization for Nuclear

  14. Augmented Method to Improve Thermal Data for the Figure Drift Thermal Distortion Predictions of the JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang C.; Carnahan, Timothy M.; Cohen, Lester M.; Congedo, Cherie B.; Eisenhower, Michael J.; Ousley, Wes; Weaver, Andrew; Yang, Kan

    2017-01-01

    The JWST Optical Telescope Element (OTE) assembly is the largest optically stable infrared-optimized telescope currently being manufactured and assembled, and is scheduled for launch in 2018. The JWST OTE, including the 18 segment primary mirror, secondary mirror, and the Aft Optics Subsystem (AOS) are designed to be passively cooled and operate near 45K. These optical elements are supported by a complex composite backplane structure. As a part of the structural distortion model validation efforts, a series of tests are planned during the cryogenic vacuum test of the fully integrated flight hardware at NASA JSC Chamber A. The successful ends to the thermal-distortion phases are heavily dependent on the accurate temperature knowledge of the OTE structural members. However, the current temperature sensor allocations during the cryo-vac test may not have sufficient fidelity to provide accurate knowledge of the temperature distributions within the composite structure. A method based on an inverse distance relationship among the sensors and thermal model nodes was developed to improve the thermal data provided for the nanometer scale WaveFront Error (WFE) predictions. The Linear Distance Weighted Interpolation (LDWI) method was developed to augment the thermal model predictions based on the sparse sensor information. This paper will encompass the development of the LDWI method using the test data from the earlier pathfinder cryo-vac tests, and the results of the notional and as tested WFE predictions from the structural finite element model cases to characterize the accuracies of this LDWI method.

  15. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios-Ce-doped Gd3Al2.6Ga2.4O12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI detectors with the two

  16. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kobayashi, Takahiro [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiology, Daiyukai General Hospital, Ichinomiya (Japan); Yeol Yeom, Jung [Kumoh National institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Morishita, Yuki [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki [Furukawa Corporation, Ichihara (Japan); Kamada, Kei [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Tohoku (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios—Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2.6}Ga{sub 2.4}O{sub 12} (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm{sup 3} (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These

  17. Development of analog solid-state photo-detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina, E-mail: giuseppina.bisogni@pi.infn.it; Morrocchi, Matteo

    2016-02-11

    Solid-state photo-detectors are one of the main innovations of past century in the field of sensors. First produced in the early forties with the invention of the p–n junction in silicon and the study of its optical properties, photo-detectors received a major boost in the sixties when the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode was developed and successfully used in several applications. The development of devices with internal gain, avalanche photodiodes (APD) first and then Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, named single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), leads to a substantial improvement in sensitivity and allowed single photon detection. Later on, thousands of SPADs have been assembled in arrays of few millimeters squared (named SiPM, silicon photo-multiplier) with single photon resolution. The high internal gain of SiPMs, together with other features peculiar of the silicon technology like compactness, speed and compatibility with magnetic fields, promoted SiPMs as the principal photo-detector competitor of photomultipliers in many applications from radiation detection to medical imaging. This paper provides a review of the properties of analog solid-state photo-detectors. Particular emphasis is given to latest advances on Positron Emission Tomography instrumentation boosted by the adoption of the silicon photo-detectors as an alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Special attention is dedicated to the SiPMs, which are playing a key role in the development of innovative scanners.

  18. Development of radiation tolerant semiconductor detectors for the Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, M; Al-Ajili, A A; Alfieri, G; Allport, P P; Artuso, M; Assouak, S; Avset, B S; Barabash, L; Barcz, A; Bates, R; Biagi, S F; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blue, A; Blumenau, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bondarenko, G B; Borchi, E; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Bowcock, T J V; Brodbeck, T J; Broz, J; Bruzzi, M; Brzozowski, A; Buda, M; Buhmann, P; Buttar, C; Campabadal, F; Campbell, D; Candelori, A; Casse, G; Cavallini, A; Charron, S; Chilingarov, A; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Coluccia, R; Contarato, D; Coutinho, J; Creanza, D; Cunningham, W; Betta, G F D; Dawson, I; de Boer, Wim; De Palma, M; Demina, R; Dervan, P; Dittongo, S; Dolezal, Z; Dolgolenko, A; Eberlein, T; Eremin, V; Fall, C; Fasolo, F; Fizzotti, F; Fleta, C; Focardi, E; Forton, E; Fretwurst, E; García, C; García-Navarro, J E; Gaubas, E; Genest, M H; Gill, K A; Giolo, K; Glaser, M; Gössling, C; Golovine, V; Sevilla, S G; Gorelov, I; Goss, J; Bates, A G; Grégoire, G; Gregori, P; Grigoriev, E; Grillo, A A; Groza, A; Guskov, J; Haddad, L; Härkönen, J; Hauler, F; Hoeferkamp, M; Honniger, F; Horazdovsky, T; Horisberger, Roland Paul; Horn, M; Houdayer, A; Hourahine, B; Hughes, G; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Irmscher, K; Ivanov, A; Jarasiunas, K; Johansen, K M H; Jones, B K; Jones, R; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kalinina, E; Kaminski, P; Karpenko, A; Karpov, A; Kazlauskiene, V; Kazukauskas, V; Khivrich, V; Khomenkov, V; Kierstead, J A; Klaiber Lodewigs, J; Klingenberg, R; Kodys, P; Kohout, Z; Korjenevski, S; Koski, M; Kozlowski, R; Kozodaev, M; Kramberger, G; Krasel, O; Kuznetsov, A; Kwan, S; Lagomarsino, S; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lastovetsky, V F; Latino, G; Lazanu, S; Lazanu, I; Lebedev, A; Lebel, C; Leinonen, K; Leroy, C; Li Z; Lindström, G; Linhart, V; Litovchenko, A P; Litovchenko, P G; Lo Giudice, A; Lozano, M; Luczynski, Z; Luukka, P; Macchiolo, A; Makarenko, L F; Mandic, I; Manfredotti, C; Manna, N; Garcia, S Mi; Marunko, S; Mathieson, K; Melone, J; Menichelli, D; Messineo, A; Metcalfe, J; Miglio, S; Mikuz, M; Miyamoto, J; Monakhov, E; Moscatelli, F; Naoumov, D; Nossarzhevska, E; Nysten, J; Olivero, P; OShea, V; Palviainen, T; Paolini, C; Parkes, C; Passeri, D; Pein, U; Pellegrini, G; Perera, L; Petasecca, M; Piemonte, C; Pignatel, G U; Pinho, N; Pintilie, I; Pintilie, L; Polivtsev, L; Polozov, P; Popa, A; Popule, J; Pospísil, S; Pozza, A; Radicci, V; Rafí, J M; Rando, R; Röder, R; Rohe, T; Ronchin, S; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruzin, A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sakalauskas, S; Scaringella, M; Schiavulli, L; Schnetzer, S; Schumm, B; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Segneri, G; Seidel, S; Seiden, A; Sellberg, G; Sellin, P J; Sentenac, D; Shipsey, I; Sícho, P; Sloan, T; Solar, M; Son, S; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spencer, N; Stahl, J; Stolze, D; Stone, R; Storasta, J; Strokan, N; Sudzius, M; Surma, B; Suvorov, A; Svensson, B G; Tipton, P; Tomasek, M; Tsvetkov, A; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Tuuva, T; Tylchin, M; Uebersee, H; Uher, J; Ullán, M; Vaitkus, J V; Velthuis, J; Verbitskaya, E; Vrba, V; Wagner, G; Wilhelm, I; Worm, S; Wright, V; Wunstorf, R; Yiuri, Y; Zabierowski, P; Zaluzhny, A; Zavrtanik, M; Zen, M; Zhukov, V; Zorzi, N

    2005-01-01

    The envisaged upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN towards the Super-LHC (SLHC) with a 10 times increased luminosity of 10challenges for the tracking detectors of the SLHC experiments. Unprecedented high radiation levels and track densities and a reduced bunch crossing time in the order of 10ns as well as the need for cost effective detectors have called for an intensive R&D program. The CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" is working on the development of semiconductor sensors matching the requirements of the SLHC. Sensors based on defect engineered silicon like Czochralski, epitaxial and oxygen enriched silicon have been developed. With 3D, Semi-3D and thin detectors new detector concepts have been evaluated and a study on the use of standard and oxygen enriched p-type silicon detectors revealed a promising approach for radiation tolerant cost effective devices. These and other most recent advancements of the RD50 ...

  19. Development of analog solid-state photo-detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Morrocchi, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state photo-detectors are one of the main innovations of past century in the field of sensors. First produced in the early forties with the invention of the p-n junction in silicon and the study of its optical properties, photo-detectors received a major boost in the sixties when the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode was developed and successfully used in several applications. The development of devices with internal gain, avalanche photodiodes (APD) first and then Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, named single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), leads to a substantial improvement in sensitivity and allowed single photon detection. Later on, thousands of SPADs have been assembled in arrays of few millimeters squared (named SiPM, silicon photo-multiplier) with single photon resolution. The high internal gain of SiPMs, together with other features peculiar of the silicon technology like compactness, speed and compatibility with magnetic fields, promoted SiPMs as the principal photo-detector competitor of photomultipliers in many applications from radiation detection to medical imaging. This paper provides a review of the properties of analog solid-state photo-detectors. Particular emphasis is given to latest advances on Positron Emission Tomography instrumentation boosted by the adoption of the silicon photo-detectors as an alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Special attention is dedicated to the SiPMs, which are playing a key role in the development of innovative scanners.

  20. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  1. Development of the ProtoEXIST2 advanced CZT detector plane

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Branden; Hong, JaeSub; Grindlay, Jonathan; Burke, Michael; Barthelmy, Scott; Baker, Robert; Harrison, Fiona; Mao, Peter; Cook, William

    2011-01-01

    The ProtoEXIST program was conceived for the development of a highly scalable detector plane architecture utilizing pixilated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for eventual deployment in a large scale (1-4 m2 active area) coded aperture X-ray telescope. Development is now underway for ProtoEXIST2, which ultimately will be comprised of a closely tiled 8×8 array of 19.9 mm × 19.9 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystals, analogous to ProtoEXIST1, but will now utilize the NuASIC which accommodates the direct bon...

  2. Development of Advanced Gaseous Detectors for Muon Tracking and Triggering in Collider Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Liang; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhu, Junjie

    High luminosity and high energy collider experiments impose big challenges to conventional gaseous detectors used for muon tracking and triggering. Stringent requirements, in terms of time and spatial resolutions, rate capabilities etc. are expected. In the context of ATLAS muon upgrade project, we present extensive researches and developments of advanced gas detectors for precision muon tracking and triggering in high rate environments. Particularly, this dissertation focuses on the studies of Micro-mesh Gaseous structure (Micromegas), thin gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) and small strip Thin Gap multi-wire Chambers (sTGC). In this dissertation, we first present a novel method, based on thermally bonding micro-meshes to anodes, to construct Micromegas detectors. Without employing the traditional photo-lithography process, it is a convenient alternative to build Micromegas. Both experimental and simulation studies of basic performance parameters of thermo-bonded Micromegas will be reported. Development...

  3. Development of neutron detectors and neutron radiography at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh

    2008-10-01

    Design and development of neutron detectors and R&D work in neutron radiography (NR) for non-destructive evaluation are important parts of the neutron beam and allied research programme of Solid State Physics Division (SSPD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). The detectors fabricated in the division not only meet the in-house requirement of neutron spectrometers but also the need of other divisions in BARC, Department of Atomic Energy units and some universities and research institutes in India and abroad for a variety of applications. The NR facility set up by SSPD at Apsara reactor has been used for a variety of applications in nuclear, aerospace, defense and metallurgical industries. The work done in the development of neutron detectors and neutron radiography is reported in this article.

  4. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-07-02

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  5. Testing, installation and development of hardware and software components for the forward pixel detector of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Florez Bustos, Carlos Andres

    2007-01-01

    The LHC (Large Hadron Collider) will be the particle accelerator with the highest collision energy ever. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the two largest experiments at the LHC. A main goal of CMS is to elucidate the electroweak symmetry breaking and determine if the Higgs mechanism is responsible for it. The pixel detector in CMS is the closest detector to the interaction point and is part of the tracker system. This thesis presents four different projects related to the forward pixel detector, performed as part of the testing and development of its hardware and software components. It presents the methods, implementation and results for the data acquisition and installation of the detector control system at the Meson Test Beam Facility of Fermilab for the beam test of the detector; the study of the C.A.E.N power supply and the multi service cable; the layout of the test stands for the assembly of the half-disk and half-service cylinder and the development of a software interface to the data acquisition...

  6. Development of an angled Si-PM-based detector unit for positron emission mammography (PEM) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) systems have higher sensitivity than clinical whole body PET systems because they have a smaller ring diameter. However, the spatial resolution of PEM systems is not high enough to detect early stage breast cancer. To solve this problem, we developed a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) based detector unit for the development of a PEM system. Since a Si-PM's channel is small, Si-PM can resolve small scintillator pixels to improve the spatial resolution. Also Si-PM based detectors have inherently high timing resolution and are able to reduce the random coincidence events by reducing the time window. We used 1.5×1.9×15 mm LGSO scintillation pixels and arranged them in an 8×24 matrix to form scintillator blocks. Four scintillator blocks were optically coupled to Si-PM arrays with an angled light guide to form a detector unit. Since the light guide has angles of 5.625°, we can arrange 64 scintillator blocks in a nearly circular shape (a regular 64-sided polygon) using 16 detector units. We clearly resolved the pixels of the scintillator blocks in a 2-dimensional position histogram where the averages of the peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) were 3.7±0.3 and 5.7±0.8 in the transverse and axial directions, respectively. The average energy resolution was 14.2±2.1% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). By including the temperature dependent gain control electronics, the photo-peak channel shifts were controlled within ±1.5% with the temperature from 23 °C to 28 °C. With these results, in addition to the potential high timing performance of Si-PM based detectors, our developed detector unit is promising for the development of a high-resolution PEM system.

  7. Development of Low-Noise High Value Chromium Silicide Resistors for Cryogenic Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Babu, Sachi; Monroy, Carlos; Darren, C.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely high sensitivity detectors, such as silicon bolometers are required in many NASA missions for detection of photons from the x-ray to the far infrared regions. Typically, these detectors are cooled to well below the liquid helium (LHe) temperature (4.2 K) to achieve the maximum detection performance. As photoconductors, they are generally operated with a load resistor and a pre-set bias voltage, which is then coupled to the input gate of a source-follower Field Effect Transistor (FET) circuit. It is imperative that the detector system signal to noise performance be limited by the noise of the detector and not by the noise of the external components. The load resistor value is selected to optimize the detector performance. These two criteria tend to be contradictory in that these detectors require load resistors in the hundreds of megaohms, which leads to a higher Johnson noise. Additionally, the physical size of the resistor must be small for device integration as required by such missions as the NASA High Resolution Airborne Wide-Band Camera (HAWC) instrument and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC) for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We have designed, fabricated and characterized thin film resistors using a CrSi/TiW/Al metal system on optical quality quartz substrates. The resistor values range from 100 megaohms to over 650 megaohms and are Johnson noise limited at LHe temperatures. The resistor film is sputtered with a sheet resistance ranging from 300 ohms to 1600 ohms and the processing sequence developed for these devices allows for chemically fine tuning the sheet resistance in-situ. The wafer fabrication process was of sufficiently high yield (>80%) providing clusters of good resistors for integrated multiple detector channels, a very important feature in the assembly of these two instruments.

  8. The spectral calibration of JWST/NIRSpec: results from the recent cryo-vacuum campaign (ISIM-CV3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Luetzgendorf, Nora; Ferruit, Pierre; Dorner, Bernhard; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Boeker, Torsten; Rawle, Tim; Sirianni, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The NIRSpec instrument of JWST can be operated in multi-object (MOS), long-slit, and integral field mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable mini-slits for object selection, covering a field of view of 9 square-arcminute. We have developed a procedure to optimize a parametric model of the instrument that provides the basis for the extraction of wavelength calibrated spectra from NIRSpec data, from any of the apertures and for all the modes. Here, we summarize the steps undertaken to optimize the instrument model parameters using the data acquired during the latest cryo-vacuum campaign of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module, recently carried out at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The calibrated parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with an intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, RMS) ~ 1/10 of a pixel in spatial and spectral direction for all the modes. The overall wavelength calibration accuracy (RMS) of the model as measured on the extracted spectra is better than 1/20 of a resolution element for all of the grating-based spectral modes and at the level of 1/14 of a resolution element for the prism. These results are well within the allocations for the model in the overall spatial and spectral calibration budget of NIRSpec.

  9. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Cryo-Vacuum (CV) Test at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda M.

    2014-01-01

    JWST ISIM has entered into its system-level testing program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In December 2013, ISIM successfully completed the first in a series of three cryo-vacuum tests, which included two flight science instruments. Since then, there have been full-fledged efforts towards the CV2 test scheduled to finish at the end of 2014. The complexity of the mission has generated challenging requirements that demand highly reliable system performance and capabilities from the Space Environment Simulator (SES) vacuum chamber. In order to satisfy the program requirements, GSFC had to develop unique structural and thermal hardware to test ISIM. Most noteworthy is a helium shroud structure and cooling system built in order to achieve operational temperatures below 20K (-253C). This paper: (1) provides an overview of the integrated mechanical and thermal facility systems required to achieve the objectives of JWST ISIM testing, (2) communicates the performance and challenges of the SES during the first ISIM test, and (3) summarizes the action plan to improve the system prior to the next test.

  10. Development of 10B-Based 3He Replacement Neutron Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Hilliard, Donald B.

    2011-12-01

    Radiation portal monitors (RPM) are currently deployed at United States border crossings to passively inspect vehicles and persons for any emission of neutrons and/or gamma rays, which may indicate the presence of unshielded nuclear materials. The RPM module contains an organic scintillator with 3He proportional counters to detect gamma rays and thermalized neutrons, respectively. The supply of 3He is rapidly dwindling, requiring alternative detectors to provide the same function and performance. Our alternative approach is one consisting of a thinly-coated 10B flat-panel ionization chamber neutron detector that can be deployed as a direct drop-in replacement for current RPM 3He detectors. The uniqueness of our approach in providing a large-area detector is in the simplicity of construction, scalability of the unit cell detector, ease of adaptability to a variety of applications and low cost. Currently, Rapiscan Laboratories and Helicon Thin Film Systems have designed and developed an operational 100 cm2 multi-layer prototype 10BB-based ionization chamber.

  11. 32-element beta detector developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecki, Maciej; Yakushev, Alexander; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Kłos, Helena; Panas, Andrzej; Słysz, Wojciech; Stolarski, Maciej; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecka, Iwona; Zaborowski, Michał

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the design, technology and parameters of a new .silicon detector for detection of electrons (below named as beta detector) developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE). The detector will be used for research on transactinide elements at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (GSI). The detector consists of a monolithic 32-element array with an active area diameter of 90 mm and a thickness of 0.9 mm. The starting material is a high-resistivity ν silicon wafer (5 kΩcm resistivity). 32 planar p+-ν junctions are formed by boron diffusion on the top side of the wafer. On the bottom side, an n+ region, which forms a common cathode, is formed on the entire surface by phosphorus diffusion. The array is mounted on a special epoxy-glass laminate substrate, copper-clad on both sides. Two model detectors have been fabricated and studied. Very good electrical parameters have been achieved. For the first array, with supply voltage VR = 20 V, the minimum dark current was 8 nA, the maximum dark current 97.1 nA, and the average dark current 25.1 nA. For the second array, it was 11.5 nA, 378.8 nA and 40.0 nA respectively.

  12. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rasolonjatovo, A H D; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Nunomiya, T; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-01-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather ...

  13. Development of a CT scanner based on the Medipix family of detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.; Ronaldson, J. Paul; Opie, Alex M. T.

    2010-09-01

    Photon counting detectors are of growing importance in medical imaging because they enable routine measurement of photon energy. Detectors such as Medipix2 and Medipix3 record the energy of incident photons with minimal loss of spatial resolution. Their use is being investigated for both pre-clinical and clinical applications of X-ray CT. The Medipix3 detector has 256 x 256 55 μm pixels and a silicon or cadmium telluride detector layer, giving a spatial resolution comparable to mammographic film. Each Medipix pixel can be seen as an individual spectral detector. The logic circuits for each pixel (some 1300 transistors) can analyze incoming events at megahertz rates, comparing the charge of the electron-hole cloud with preset levels, giving a resolution of about 2 keV across the range of 8 - 140 keV. A prototype CT scanner has been developed for laboratory animals and excised specimens. Applications under investigation include: K-edge imaging: Using spectral information to measure heavy elements (e.g., preparations of iodine, barium, and gadolinium) and Soft tissue contrast: Dual energy systems have shown that image contrast for soft tissue can be improved, e.g., distinguishing between iron and calcium within vascular plaques.

  14. Development of carbon fiber staves for the strip part of the PANDA micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quagli, Tommaso; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Fracassi, Vincenzo; Grunwald, Dirk; Rosenthal, Eberhard [ZEA-1, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    PANDA is a key experiment of the future FAIR facility, under construction in Darmstadt, Germany. It will study the collisions between an antiproton beam and a fixed proton or nuclear target. The Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) is the innermost detector of the apparatus and is composed of four concentric barrels and six forward disks, instrumented with silicon hybrid pixel detectors and double-sided silicon microstrip detectors; its main task is the identification of primary and secondary vertices. The central requirements include high spatial and time resolution, trigger-less readout with high rate capability, good radiation tolerance and low material budget. Because of the compact layout of the system, its integration poses significant challenges. The detectors in the strip barrels will be supported by a composite structure of carbon fiber and carbon foam; a water-based cooling system embedded in the mechanical supports will be used to remove the excess heat from the readout electronics. In this contribution the design of the barrel stave and the ongoing development of some hardware components related to its integration will be presented.

  15. Design, development and performance study of six-gap glass MRPC detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, M.M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Mondal, N.K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India)

    2016-12-15

    The multigap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs) are gas ionization detectors with multiple gas sub-gaps made of resistive electrodes. The high voltage (HV) is applied on the outer surfaces of outermost resistive plates only, while the interior plates are left electrically floating. The presence of multiple narrow sub-gaps with high electric field results in faster signals on the outer electrodes, thus improving the detector's time resolution. Due to their excellent performance and relatively low cost, the MRPC detector has found potential application in time-of-flight (TOF) systems. Here we present the design, fabrication, optimization of the operating parameters such as the HV, the gas mixture composition, and, performance of six-gap glass MRPC detectors of area 27 cm x 27 cm, which are developed in order to find application as trigger detectors, in TOF measurement etc. The design has been optimized with unique spacers and blockers to ensure a proper gas flow through the narrow sub-gaps, which are 250 μm wide. The gas mixture consisting of R134A, Isobutane and SF{sub 6}, and the fraction of each constituting gases has been optimized after studying the MRPC performance for a set of different concentrations. The counting efficiency of the MRPC is about 95% at 17.9 kV. At the same operating voltage, the time resolution, after correcting for the walk effect, is found to be about 219 ps. (orig.)

  16. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Catherine N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anticoincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anti-coincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  17. Application of the S3M and Mcnpx Codes in Particle Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Márius; Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Strašík, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Semiconductor detectors can be used to detect neutrons if they are covered by a conversion layer. Some neutrons transfer their kinetic energy to hydrogen via elastic nuclear scattering in the conversion layer, and protons are produced as recoils. These protons enter the sensitive volume of the detector and are detected. In the process of detector development, Monte Carlo computer codes are necessary to simulate the detection process. This paper presents the main features of the S3M code (SRIM Supporting Software Modules) and shows its application potential. Examples are given for the neutron detectors with a conversion layer and for CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond detectors for beam-condition monitors at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). Special attention is paid to the S3M statistical modules that can be of interest also for other application areas like beam transport, accelerators, ion therapy, etc. The results are generated by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) simulations used to optimize the thickness of the HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer.

  18. Design, development and performance study of six-gap glass MRPC detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, Moon Moon; Satyanarayana, B; Shinde, R R

    2015-01-01

    The Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) are gas ionization detectors with multiple gas sub-gaps made of highly resistive electrodes. The high voltage (HV) is applied on the outer surfaces of outermost resistive plates only, while the interior plates are left electrically floating. The presence of multiple narrow sub-gaps with high electric field results in faster signals on the outer electrodes, thus improving the detector's time resolution. Due to their excellent performance and relatively low cost, the MRPC detector has found potential application in Time-of-Flight (TOF) systems. Here we present the design, fabrication, optimization of the operating parameters such as the HV, the gas mixture composition, and, performance of six-gap glass MRPC detectors of area 27cm $\\times$ 27cm, which are developed in order to find application as trigger detectors, in TOF measurement etc. The design has been optimized with unique spacers and blockers to ensure a proper gas flow through the narrow sub-gaps, which are ...

  19. Design, development and performance study of six-gap glass MRPC detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M. M.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    The multigap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs) are gas ionization detectors with multiple gas sub-gaps made of resistive electrodes. The high voltage (HV) is applied on the outer surfaces of outermost resistive plates only, while the interior plates are left electrically floating. The presence of multiple narrow sub-gaps with high electric field results in faster signals on the outer electrodes, thus improving the detector's time resolution. Due to their excellent performance and relatively low cost, the MRPC detector has found potential application in time-of-flight (TOF) systems. Here we present the design, fabrication, optimization of the operating parameters such as the HV, the gas mixture composition, and, performance of six-gap glass MRPC detectors of area 27 cm × 27 cm, which are developed in order to find application as trigger detectors, in TOF measurement etc. The design has been optimized with unique spacers and blockers to ensure a proper gas flow through the narrow sub-gaps, which are 250 μm wide. The gas mixture consisting of R134A, Isobutane and SF6, and the fraction of each constituting gases has been optimized after studying the MRPC performance for a set of different concentrations. The counting efficiency of the MRPC is about 95% at 17.9 kV. At the same operating voltage, the time resolution, after correcting for the walk effect, is found to be about 219 ps.

  20. Development of an ASIC for CCD readout at the vertex detectors of the intrenational linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, P; Stefanov, K D; Woolliscroft, T

    2007-01-01

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification Collaboration is developing sensors and readout electronics suitable for the International Linear Collider vertex detector. In order to achieve high data rates the proposed detector utilises column parallel CCDs, each read out by a custom designed ASIC. The prototype chip (CPR2) has 250 channels of electronics, each with a preamplifier, 5-bit flash ADC, data sparsification logic for identification of significant data clusters, and local memory for storage of data awaiting readout. CPR2 also has hierarchical 2-level data multiplexing and intermediate data memory, enabling readout of the sparsified data via the 5-bit data output bus.

  1. Development of a 3D CZT detector prototype for Laue Lens telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Caroli, Ezio; Auricchio, Natalia; Del Sordo, Stefano; Abbene, Leonardo; Budtz-JøRgensen, Carl; Casini, Fabio; Curado da Silva, Rui M.; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Milano, Luciano; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Quadrini, Egidio M.; Stephen, John B.; Ubertini, Pietro; Zanichelli, Massimiliano; Zappettini, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a 3D position sensitive prototype suitable as focal plane detector for Laue lens telescope. The basic sensitive unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, (~19×8 mm2 area, 2.4 mm thick), irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode side is segmented in 64 strips, that divide the crystal in 8 independent sensor (pixel), each composed by one collecting strip and 7 (one in common) adjacent drift strips. The drift strips are biase...

  2. Developement of Hybrid Photo-detectors for the Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Seiko [Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-city, Kyoto (Japan); Nishimura, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Shoei; Kametani, Isao; Shiozawa, Masato; Suzuki, Yoichiro; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Nakahata, Masayuki; Hayato, Yoshinari; Haga, Yuto; Miura, Makoto [ICRR, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-sity, Chiba (Japan); Ichikawa, Atsuko; Ikeda, Motoyasu; Nakaya, Tsuyoshi; Minamino, Akihiro; Tateishi, Keiji [Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-city, Kyoto (Japan); Aihara, Hiroaki; Suda, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Masashi [University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Omura, Takayuki [Hamamatsu K.K., Sunayama-cho, 325-6, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu-city, Shizuoka (Japan); and others

    2014-08-15

    We are developing a hybrid photo detector (HPD) for the Hyper-Kamiokande Project. Eight-inch HPDs were prepared to evaluate their performance. Based on the results from these measurements, HPDs achieve a better performance such as single photon separation than conventional PMTs. A verification study lasting a few years in a water tank is planned in 2013 to check their feasibility.

  3. SCINTILLA A European project for the development of scintillation detectors and new technologies for nuclear security

    CERN Document Server

    Alemberti, A; Botta, E; De Vita, R; Fanchini, E; Firpo, G

    2014-01-01

    Europe monitors transits using radiation detectors to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The SCINTILLA project aims to develop a toolbox of innovative technologies designed to address different usage cases. This article will review the scope, approach, results of the first benchmark campaign and future plans of the SCINTILLA project.

  4. The development of drift-strip detectors based on CdZnTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gostilo, V.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan

    2002-01-01

    The design and technological development of a CdZnTe drift strip detector is described. The device is based on a monocrystal of dimensions 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) and has a pitch of 200 mum and a strip width of 100 mum. The strip length is 9.5 mm. The distribution of the leakage currents of the strips...

  5. BPM Electronics based on Compensated Diode Detectors – Results from development Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M; Steinhagen, RJ

    2012-01-01

    High resolution beam position monitor (BPM) electronics based on diode peak detectors is being developed for processing signals from button BPMs embedded into future LHC collimators. Its prototypes were measured in a laboratory as well as with beam signals from the collimator BPM installed on the SPS and with LHC BPMs. Results from these measurements are presented and discussed.

  6. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMoussa, A.; Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Saito, T.; Averin, S.; Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B.; Berger, G.; Kroth, U.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Gottwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal-semiconductor-metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3-6 pA/cm2). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 1011 protons/cm2.

  7. Development and characterisation of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Barnstedt, J

    2002-01-01

    We report on the development of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system. The detector concept is based on standard 25 mm diameter microchannel plate image intensifiers made by Proxitronic in Bensheim (Germany). Modifications applied to these image intensifiers are the use of three microchannel plates instead of two and a high resistance ceramics plate used instead of the standard phosphor output screen. A wedge and strip anode mounted directly behind the high resistance ceramics plate was used as a read out device. This wedge and strip anode picks up the image charge of electron clouds emerging from the microchannel plates. The charge pulses are fed into four charge amplifiers and subsequently into a digital position decoding electronics, achieving a position resolution of up to 1024x1024 pixels. Mounting the anode outside the detector tube is a new approach and has the great advantage of avoiding electrical feedthroughs from the anode so that the standard image intensifier fabrication process...

  8. Developing LAr Scintillation Light Collection Ideas in the Short Baseline Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szelc, A. M. [Manchester U.

    2016-02-08

    Scintillation light is becoming the most rapidly developing feature of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detectors due to its capability to enhance and expand their physics reach traditionally based on charge readout. The SBND detector, set to be built on the Booster Neutrino Beam Line at Fermilab, is in a unique position to test novel liquid argon scintillation light readout systems in a detector with physics neutrino events. The different ideas under consideration by the collaboration are described, including an array of PMTs detecting direct light, SiPM coupled lightguide bars and a setup which uses PMTs/SiPMS and wavelength shifter covered reflector foils, as well as their respective strengths and physics foci and the benchmarks used to compare them.

  9. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Fadeyev, V. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Fernández-Martínez, P. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); García, M. Fernández [Instituto de Física de Cantabria IFCA-CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain); Flores, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Galloway, Z. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Gallrapp, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hidalgo, S. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Liang, Z. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Merlos, A. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Moll, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Quirion, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Sadrozinski, H. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Stricker, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Vila, I. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria IFCA-CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain)

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n{sup ++}–p{sup +}–p structure, where the doping profile of the p{sup +} layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  10. Development of the EUV detector for the BepiColombo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Hikosaka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yamazaki, A.; Nozawa, H.

    An ultraviolet spectrometer, PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) that is loaded onto the Mercury Planetary Orbiter in the BepiColombo mission is under development. The instrument, basically consisting of two spectrophotometers (EUV: 50 150 nm, FUV: 145 330 nm) and one scanning mirror, aims at measuring emission lines from molecules, atoms and ions present in the tenuous atmosphere of Mercury. The detectors employ microchannel plates as 2-D photon-counting devices. In order to enhance the quantum detection efficiencies, the surface of the top microchannel plates of EUV detector is covered with photocathode. This method enables us to identify weak atmospheric signatures such as neon (73.5 nm) and argon (104.8 nm), which could not be detected with conventional detector systems. This paper presents measurements of the performance characteristics of potassium bromide and esium iodide photocathodes, which have been evaluated for use in the EUV channel.

  11. Development of Data Acquisition Methods for an FPGA-Based Photon Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambily, S.; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    MCP-based detectors are widely used in the ultraviolet (UV) region due to their low noise levels, high sensitivity and good spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a compact near-UV (NUV) detector for high-altitude balloon and space flights, using off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor, and optics. The detector is designed to be capable of working in the direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system. In this paper, we discuss various algorithms and methods used in both operating modes, as well as their implementation on the hardware.

  12. Development of 3D-DDTC pixel detectors for the ATLAS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco, E-mail: dallabe@disi.unitn.it [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and DISI, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Boscardin, Maurizio [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Darbo, Giovanni; Gemme, Claudia [INFN, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); La Rosa, Alessandro; Pernegger, Heinz [CERN-PH, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Piemonte, Claudio [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Povoli, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and DISI, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Ronchin, Sabina [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and DISI, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-04-21

    We report on the development of n-on-p, 3D Double-Side Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) pixel detectors fabricated at FBK-irst (Trento, Italy) and oriented to the ATLAS upgrade. The considered fabrication technology is simpler than that required for full 3D detectors with active edge, but the detector efficiency and radiation hardness critically depend on the columnar electrode overlap and should be carefully evaluated. The first assemblies of these sensors (featuring 2, 3, or 4 columns per pixel) with the ATLAS FEI3 read-out chip have been tested in laboratory. Selected results from the electrical and functional characterization with radioactive sources are discussed here.

  13. Development of 3D-DDTC pixel detectors for the ATLAS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Betta, G -F Dalla; Darbo, G; Gemme, C; La Rosa, A; Pernegger, H; Piemonte, C; Povoli, M; Ronchin, S; Zoboli, A; Zorzi, N

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of n-on-p, 3D Double-Side Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) pixel detectors fabricated at FBK-irst (Trento, Italy) and oriented to the ATLAS upgrade. The considered fabrication technology is simpler than that required for full 3D detectors with active edge, but the detector efficiency and radiation hardness critically depend on the columnar electrode overlap and should be carefully evaluated. The first assemblies of these sensors (featuring 2, 3, or 4 columns per pixel) with the ATLAS FEI3 read-out chip have been tested in laboratory. Selected results from the electrical and functional characterization with radioactive sources are here discussed.

  14. Development of Trigger and Readout Electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Liang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The present small wheel muon detector at ATLAS will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector to handle the increase in data rates and harsh radiation environment expected at the LHC. Resistive Micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers will be used to provide both trigger and tracking primitives. Muon segments found at NSW will be combined with the segments found at the Big Wheel to determine the muon transverse momentum at the first-level trigger. A new trigger and readout system is developed for the NSW detector. The new system has about 2.4 million trigger and readout channels and about 8,000 Front-End boards. The large number of input channels, short time available to prepare and transmit data, harsh radiation environment, and low power consumption all impose great challenges on the design. We will discuss the overall electronics design and studies with various ASICs and high-speed circuit board prototypes.

  15. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; García, M. Fernández; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  16. Development of a fast plastic scintillation detector with time resolution of less than 10 ps

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, J W; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Zhu, L H; Enomoto, A; Nagae, D; Nishimura, T; Omika, S; Ozawa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2016-01-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps ({\\sigma}) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3x1 cm2. It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than currently available TDC. Simultaneously measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for correction of time-walk effect.

  17. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A., E-mail: ali.benmoussa@stce.be [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Saito, T. [Department of Environment and Energy, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Yagiyama-Kasumi-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8577 (Japan); Averin, S. [Fryazino Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 141190 Square Vvedenski 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Berger, G. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Kroth, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Gottwald, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal–semiconductor–metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3–6 pA/cm{sup 2}). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Development of Trigger and Readout Electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Antrim, Daniel Joseph; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The present small wheel muon detector at ATLAS will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector to handle the increase in data rates and harsh radiation environment expected at the LHC. Resistive Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers will be used to provide both trigger and tracking primitives. Muon segments found at NSW will be combined with the segments found at the Big Wheel to determine the muon transverse momentum at the first-level trigger. A new trigger and readout system is developed for the NSW detector. The new system has about 2.4 million trigger and readout channels and about 8,000 frontend boards. The large number of input channels, short time available to prepare and transmit data, harsh radiation environment, and low power consumption all impose great challenges on the design. We will discuss the overall electronics design and studies with various ASIC and board prototypes.

  19. Recent Technological Developments on LGAD and iLGAD Detectors for Tracking and Timing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, G; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernandez-Martinez, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the last technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  20. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, B.; Giardino, G.; Ferruit, P.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Birkmann, S. M.; Böker, T.; De Marchi, G.; Gnata, X.; Köhler, J.; Sirianni, M.; Jakobsen, P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject spectroscopy (MOS), long-slit, and integral field unit (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of ~9 arcmin2. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main optical planes of the instrument. Results: The NIRSpec parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with high fidelity. The intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, rms) of the model, as measured from the extracted calibration spectra, is better than 1/10 of a pixel along the spatial direction and better than 1/20 of a resolution element in the spectral direction for all of the grating-based spectral modes. This is fully consistent with the corresponding allocation in the spatial and spectral calibration budgets of NIRSpec.

  1. Deep IRAC Imaging Lensing Galaxy Clusters for JWST 'First Light' Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haojing; Conselice, Christopher; Windhorst, Rogier; Cohen, Seth; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Zitrin, Adi; Broadhurst, Tom; Frye, Brenda; Driver, Simon; Robotham, Aaron; Hopkins, Andrew; Wyithe, Staurt; Jansen, Rolf; Hathi, Nimish; Mechtley, Matthew; Ryan, Russell; Rutkowski, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-08-01

    JWST has a key goal to search for First Light objects beyond z>10. Our 110-hr JWST GTO program, 'Webb Medium-Deep Fields' (WMDF), will target both blank and lensed fields to probe both the bright and the faint ends of the galaxy luminosity function at z > 10. While a number of well studied lensing clusters exist, not all of them are optimal for the JWST search of First Light objects, either because of their low Ecliptic latitudes (and hence high Zodiacal background) or because of their strong intra-cluster light (ICL) at the critical curve regions corresponding to the redshifts of interest. For this reason, our WMDF candidate lensing targets will include some recently discovered, high-mass (log[M/Msun] ~ 15) galaxy clusters, which we choose either because of their high Ecliptic latitude (beta > 40 deg) or because of their extreme compactness that minimizes the impact of the ICL. As part of our effort to collect ancillary data for these new systems to finalize the target list, we propose IRAC observations for 13 of them that are lacking sufficient data. These 3.6/4.5um data will be critical for our guaranteed JWST program: (1) they will greatly facilitate the modeling of the straylight that JWST will suffer in 1--5 um (the key range to search for z>10--20 objects), a problem that has recently been identified. If left untreated, such straylight components would severely hamper the detection of faint sources in a lensing field. The JWST observations alone would be difficult to separate the ICL from the straylight at the level needed. (2) the new 3.6/4.5um data will best match our deep optical imaging and spectroscopy at HST, Gemini, LBT and MMT. We will derive accurate photometric redshifts for any lensed background galaxies (at znote that these data will be highly valuable for the study of these clusters themselves before the JWST mission.

  2. Development of a Precision Amplifier for the Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Ki-Hyeon; Hong, Suk-Mo; Jeong, Seong-Hun; Jung, Young-Gyu; Kang, Bong-Koo; Lee, Hee-Seock; Wha Chung, Chin; Woo Lee, Wol

    2005-01-01

    A high gain trans-resistance amplfier has been developed for measuring the intensity of synchrotron radiation at Pohang Light Source(PLS). This amplifier built with discrete elements and operational amplifiers.It had the capability of measuring range from 1pA to 1 uA with good linearity. A microprocessor was also installed to interface the amplifier with the computer, and controlled the other sub-circuits. The various characteristics of amplifier such as linearity, sensitivity,stability, etc. have been investigated, and its experimental results carried out at the beam line are presented in this paper.

  3. Development of light-weight spherical mirrors for RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Metlica, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Glass-coated beryllium and carbon-fiber light-weight spherical mirrors, with radii of curvature of $\\sim$ 2700mm, have been successfully developed and tested as part of the LHCb RICH experimental programme. The low mass mirror is necessary to minimize the amount of material within the LHCb spectrometer acceptance, with a requirement of less than 2% of a radiation length. Both technologies are suitable for light-weight mirror applications. The R&D and characterization of the mirrors are reported.

  4. Development of the microstrip silicon detector for imaging of fast processes at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulchenko, V.; Pruuel, E.; Shekhtman, L.; Ten, K.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-02-01

    In situ imaging of explosions allows to study material properties under very high pressures and temperatures. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is a powerful tool for such studies because of its unique time structure. Flashes of X-rays from individual bunches in a storage ring are so short that an object under study does not move more than 1-10 μm during exposure. If a detector is able to store images synchronously with bunches of an SR source the time resolution of such method will be determined by the duration of SR flash from individual bunch. New beam line at the VEPP-4M storage ring will allow to get X-Ray flux from each bunch close to 106 photons/channel where channel area is 0.05×0.5 mm2 and average beam energy is about 30 keV. Bunches in the machine can be grouped into trains with 20 ns time gap. In order to meet these requirements a new detector development was started based on Si microstrip technology. The detector with a new dedicated front-end chip will be able to record images with maximum signal equivalent to 106 photons/channel, with signal to noise ratio of ∼103, spatial resolution of 50 μm and maximum frame rate of 50 MHz. The detector has to drive very high peak and average currents without affecting the front-end chip, therefore a specific design of Si sensor should be developed. The front-end chip has to provide signal measurements with the dynamic range of about 104 or more and recording of the signal to an analogue memory with the rate of 50 MHz. The concept of such detector is discussed in the paper. The results of the simulations of the main detector parameters and the results of the first measurements with the prototype sensors are presented.

  5. Detector Developments for the LHC CMS TOB Silicon Detector Modules and ATLAS TileCal Read-Out Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Poveda, J; Ferrer, A

    2005-01-01

    This Research Report is divided in two different parts corresponding to two different periods of time working in different collaborations. First, a general approach to the framework where this work is set is presented at the Introduction: the CERN laboratory near Geneva, the LHC accelerator and its two general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS. The first part of this report consists in the study of the performance of the silicon strip detectors specifically designed for the Tracker Outer Barrel (TOB) of the CMS Tracker detector. Results of the performance of CMS TOB silicon detector modules mounted on the first assembled double-sided rod at CERN are presented. These results are given in terms of noise, noise occupancies, signal to noise ratios and signal efficiencies. The detector signal efficiencies and noise occupancies are also shown as a function of threshold for a particular clustering algorithm. Signal efficiencies versus noise occupancy plots as a function of the threshold level, which could also be us...

  6. Development of a GNSS Volcano Ash Plume Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Palo, S. E.; Larson, K. M.; Naik, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), broadcast signals continuously from mid Earth orbit at a frequency near 1.5GHz. Of the four GNSS constellations, GPS and GLONASS are complete with more than 55 satellites in total. While GNSS signals are intended for navigation and timing, they have also proved to be useful for remote sensing applications. Reflections of the GNSS signals have been used to sense soil moisture, snow depth, and wind speed while refraction of the signals through the atmosphere has provided data on the electron density in the ionosphere as well as water vapor and temperature in the troposphere. Now analysis at the University of Colorado has shown that the attenuation of GNSS signals by volcanic ash plumes can be used to measure the presence and structure of the ash plume. This discovery is driving development of a distributed GNSS sensor network to complement existing optical and radar based ash plume monitoring systems. A GNSS based sensing system operating in L-band is unaffected by weather conditions or time of day. Additionally, the use of an existing signal source greatly reduces the per sensor cost and complexity compared to a radar system. However since any one measurement using this method provides only the total attenuation between the GNSS satellite and the receiver, full tomographic imaging of a plume requires a large number of sensors observing over a diversity of geometries. This presentation will provide an overview of the ongoing development of the GNSS sensor system. Evaluation of low priced commercial GNSS receivers will be discussed, as well as details on the inter sensor network. Based on analysis of existing GPS receivers near volcanic vents, the baseline configuration for an ash plume monitoring network is a 1km spaced ring of receivers 5km from the vent updating every 5 seconds. Preliminary data from field tests will be presented to show the suitability of the sensor system for this configuration near an active volcano.

  7. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-2 upgrade of the LHC is planned. This will result in a severe radiation dose and high particle rates for the multipurpose exeperiments because of a foreseen luminosity of ten times higher the LHC design luminosity. Several detector components will have to be upgraded in the experiments. In the ATLAS experiment the current inner detector will be replaced by an all silicon tracking detector aiming for high performance. The poster will present the development and the latest prototyping of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector. Its layout foresees low mass and modular double-sided structures for the barrel and forward region. Silicon sensors and readout electronics, so-called modules, are planned to be assembled double-sided on larger carbon-core structures. The modularity allows assembly and testing at multiple sites. Many components need to be developed and their prototyping towards full-size components is ongoing. New developments and test results will be presented....

  8. Predicting the High Redshift Galaxy Population for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Zoey; Benson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will be launched in Oct 2018 with the goal of observing galaxies in the redshift range of z = 10 - 15. As redshift increases, the age of the Universe decreases, allowing us to study objects formed only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. This will provide a valuable opportunity to test and improve current galaxy formation theory by comparing predictions for mass, luminosity, and number density to the observed data. We have made testable predictions with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model Galacticus. The code uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to determine viable sets of model parameters that match current astronomical data. The resulting constrained model was then set to match the specifications of the JWST Ultra Deep Field Imaging Survey. Predictions utilizing up to 100 viable parameter sets were calculated, allowing us to assess the uncertainty in current theoretical expectations. We predict that the planned UDF will be able to observe a significant number of objects past redshift z > 9 but nothing at redshift z > 11. In order to detect these faint objects at redshifts z = 11-15 we need to increase exposure time by at least a factor of 1.66.

  9. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-06-09

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse

  10. Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh...

  11. Development of 10μm pitch XBn detector for low SWaP MWIR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedy, Lior; Brumer, Maya; Klipstein, Philip; Nitzani, Michal; Avnon, Eran; Kodriano, Yaron; Lukomsky, Inna; Shtrichman, Itay

    2016-05-01

    Shrinking the pixel size in advanced infrared Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors allows either a reduction in the system size for the same number of pixels, or an increase in the pixel count for the same focal plane area. Smaller pitch and increased pixel count enables new applications such as long range surveillance, advanced Search and Track, missile warning, persistent surveillance, and infrared spectroscopy. In the last two decades SCD has followed this path of reducing the pixel size in InSb detectors for Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) applications, developing and manufacturing FPAs from 30μm down to 10μm pitch. The Blackbird InSb detector with 1920×1536/10μm format was introduced in 2013. Modern electro-optical systems are also designed towards a more compact, low power, and lower cost solution compared with traditional systems. In order to meet these requirements, detectors are being developed to work at Higher Operating Temperatures (HOT). In the last few years SCD has introduced 15μm pitch MWIR detectors based on the novel XBn-InAsSb technology, which enables outstanding electro-optical performance at temperatures as high as 150K. Two XBn FPA formats were developed and are now in production: 640×512/15μm and 1280×1024/15μm. Following the above trends, SCD is currently developing a 10μm XBn pixel, designed to operate at 150K with performance similar to the mature 15μm pixel. In this paper we present results from XBn FPA test devices, where the XBn array is flip-chip bonded to a Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) with a 10μm pitch. Test measurements in a laboratory Dewar at 150K demonstrate dark currents of 250fA, quantum efficiency greater than 70%, pixel operability of higher than 99.5%, and excellent array uniformity.

  12. Development of Si-based detectors for intermediate energy heavy-ion physics at a storage-ring accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J.; Jaworowski, J.; Leandersson, M.; El Bouanani, M. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan Lund, (Sweden). Department of Nuclear Physics; Jakobsson, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cosmic and Subatomic Physics; Romanski, J.; Westerberg, L.; Van Veldhuizen, E.J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); The Chicsi Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) compatible Si detectors are being developed by the CELSIUS Heavy lon Collaboration (CHIC) for measuring the energy and identity of Intermediate Mass Fragments (IMF) with Z {approx} 3 - 12 and energies of 0.7 - I 0 A MeV. Here we give an overview of the development of Si {delta}E-E detector telescopes and investigations on IMF identification based on the pulse shape from Si-detectors where the particles impinge on the rear-face of the detector. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Development of a high efficiency personal/environmental radon dosimeter using polycarbonate detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, M; Jafarizadeh, M; Baradaran, S; Zainali, Gh

    2006-12-01

    Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are widely used for the assessment of radon exposure. These methods are often applied in radon dosimetry for long periods of time. In this research work, we have developed a highly efficient method of personal/environmental radon dosimetry that is based upon the detection of alpha particles from radon daughters, (218)Po and (214)Po, using a polycarbonate detector (PC). The radon daughters are collected on the filter surface by passing a fixed flow of air through it and the PC detector, placed at a specified distance from the filter, is simultaneously exposed to alpha particles. After exposure, the latent tracks on the detector are made to appear by means of an electrochemical etching process; these are proportional to the radon dose. The air flow rate and the detector-filter distance are the major factors that can affect the performance of the dosimeter. The results obtained in our experimental investigations have shown that a distance of 1.5 cm between the detector and the filter, an absorber layer of Al with a thickness of 12 microm and an air flow rate of 4 l min(-1) offer the best design parameters for a high efficiency radon dosimeter. Then, the designed dosimeter was calibrated against different values of radon exposures and the obtained sensitivity was found to be 2.1 (tracks cm(-2)) (kBq h m(-3))(-1). The most important advantages of this method are that it is reliable, fast and convenient when used for radon dose assessment. In this paper, the optimized parameters of the dosimeter structure and its calibration procedure are presented and discussed.

  14. Development of a segmented n-type germanium detector, and its application to astronomical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.; Ryge, P.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive calculations and simulations have shown that the instrumental background in a coaxial germanium photon detector flown at balloon altitudes or in space, can be substantially reduced by segmenting the outer contact. The contact is divided into horizontal strips around the side of the detector, giving it many characteristics similar to that of a stack of planar detectors. By choosing different segment coincidence requirements in different energy ranges, one can obtain a factor of approx. 2 increase in sensitivity to spectral lines between 40 keV and 1 MeV, compared with an unsegmented detector. The reverse electrode configuration (using n-type germanium), with the p contact outside, is preferred for this application due to its thin dead layer and resistance to radiation damage in space. A small two segment n type detector is being developed to serve as a prototype for larger multisegment devices. Results of this development effort and of detector tests are presented.

  15. High-Dose Neutron Detector Development Using 10B Coated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    During FY16 the boron-lined parallel-plate technology was optimized to fully benefit from its fast timing characteristics in order to enhance its high count rate capability. To facilitate high count rate capability, a novel fast amplifier with timing and operating properties matched to the detector characteristics was developed and implemented in the 8” boron plate detector that was purchased from PDT. Each of the 6 sealed-cells was connected to a fast amplifier with corresponding List mode readout from each amplifier. The FY16 work focused on improvements in the boron-10 coating materials and procedures at PDT to significantly improve the neutron detection efficiency. An improvement in the efficiency of a factor of 1.5 was achieved without increasing the metal backing area for the boron coating. This improvement has allowed us to operate the detector in gamma-ray backgrounds that are four orders of magnitude higher than was previously possible while maintaining a relatively high counting efficiency for neutrons. This improvement in the gamma-ray rejection is a key factor in the development of the high dose neutron detector.

  16. Development of CdZnTe X-ray detectors at DSRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pamelen, M.A.J.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the development of CdZnTe X-ray detectors at the Danish Space Research Institute is presented. Initiated in the beginning of 1996, the main motivation at that time was to develop focal plane detectors for the novel type of hard X-ray telescopes, which are currently under study at D...... trapping has now little influence and the spectrum displays a pronounced Gaussian peak at 661 keV with a width (FWHM) of 6.9 keV. Also a small peak produced by CdTe escape events can now be observed. At the same time, no events have to be rejected....... at DSRI. With the advent of the Danish Micro Satellite program it was, however, recognised that this type of detector is very well suited for two proposed missions (eXCALIBur, AXO). The research at DSRI has so far been concentrated on the spectroscopic properties of the CZT detector. At DSRI we have...

  17. New Developments in the Position Sensitive Detectors Based on Microchannel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the latest developments in position sensitive photon counting detectors based on microchannel plates. Substantial improvement of the spatial resolution was achieved with introduction of new readout technology, namely crossed strip (XS) anode, and corresponding processing electronics. The spatial resolution of XS readout appeared to be as small as ~3-4 μm FWHM. Reduction of the total detector gain (down to 106 and potentially lower) without compromising the spatial accuracy allows detector operation at much higher local and global counting rates since the microchannel recharge time becomes smaller. Recent developments of novel microchannel plate technologies provide basis for substantial increase of the spectral sensitivity and quantum efficiency of MCP detectors. We have tested a number of new Silicon micromachined MCPs The new MCP technologies should allow deposition of completely new photocathode materials directly on the front surface of microchannel plates (opaque photocathodes). Opposite to standard glass MCPs new Silicon MCPs can sustain high temperatures (-800 C°) required for the photocathode deposition and activation processes.

  18. Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program: Evaluation of Transiting Exoplanet WASP-63b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Brian; Cubillos, Patricio; Bruno, Giovanni; Lewis, Nikole K.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Wakeford, Hannah; Blecic, Jasmina; Burrows, Adam Seth; Deming, Drake; Heng, Kevin; Line, Michael R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Transiting Exoplanet Early Release Science Community (Stevenson et al. 2016)

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ``A Preparatory Program to Identify the Single Best Transiting Exoplanet for JWST Early Release Science" for WASP-63b, one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. A large collaboration of transiting exoplanet scientists identified a set of ``community targets" which meet a certain set of criteria for ecliptic latitude, period, host star brightness, well constrained orbital parameters, and strength of spectroscopic features. WASP-63b was one of the targets identified as a potential candidate for the ERS program. It is presented as an inflated planet with a large signal. It will be accessible to JWST approximately six months after the planned start of Cycle 1/ERS in April 2019 making it an ideal candidate should there be any delays in the JWST timetable. Here, we observe WASP-63b to evaluate its suitability as the best target to test the capabilities of JWST. Ideally, a clear atmosphere will be best suited for bench marking the instruments ability to detect spectroscopic features. We can use the strength of the water absorption feature at 1.4 μm as a way to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes. The results of atmospheric retrieval are presented along with a discussion on the suitability of WASP-63b as the best target to be observed during the ERS Program.

  19. Development and tests of MCP based timing and multiplicity detector for MIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, G.; Kondratev, V.; Stolyarov, O.; Tulina, T.; Valiev, F.; Vinogradov, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present summary of technological developments and tests of the MCP based large area detector aimed at precise timing and charged particles multiplicity measurements. Results obtained in course of these developments of isochronous (simultaneity) precise signal readout, passive summation of 1 ns signals, fast (1 GHz) front-end electronics, miniature vacuum systems, etc. could be potentially interesting for a number of future applications in different fields.

  20. Exploring for Galaxies in the First Billion Years with Hubble and Spitzer - Pathfinding for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Garth D.

    2017-01-01

    Hubble has revolutionized the field of distant galaxies through its deep imaging surveys, starting with the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) in 1995. That first deep survey revealed galaxies at redshift z~1-3 that provided insights into the development of the Hubble sequence. Each new HST instrument has explored new regimes, through the peak of star formation at z~2-3, just 2-3 billion years after the Big Bang, to our first datasets at a billion years at z~6, and then earlier to z~11. HST's survey capabilities were enhanced by 40X with ACS, and then similarly with the WFC3/IR, which opened up the first billion years to an unforeseen degree. I will discuss what we have learned from the remarkable HST and Spitzer imaging surveys (HUDF, GOODS, HUDF09/12 and CANDELS), as well as surveys of clusters like the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). Lensing clusters provide extraordinary opportunities for characterizing the faintest earliest galaxies, but also present extraordinary challenges. Together these surveys have resulted in the measurement of the volume density of galaxies in the first billion years down to astonishingly faint levels. The role of faint galaxies in reionizing the universe is still much-discussed, but there is no doubt that such galaxies contribute greatly to the UV ionizing flux, as shown by deep luminosity function studies. Together Hubble and Spitzer have also established the stellar-mass buildup over 97% of cosmic history. Yet some of the greatest surprises have come from the discovery of very luminous galaxies at z~8-11, around 400-650 million years after the Big Bang. Spectroscopic followup by Keck of some of these very rare, bright galaxies has confirmed redshifts from z~7 to z~9, and revealed, surprisingly, strong Lyα emission near the peak of reionization when the HI fraction in the IGM is high. The recent confirmation of a z=11.1 galaxy, just 400 million years after the Big Bang, by a combination of Hubble and Spitzer data, moved Hubble into JWST territory

  1. Development of a low noise integrated readout electronic for pixel detectors in CMOS technology for a Compton camera

    OpenAIRE

    Hausmann, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors are very popular, particularly for their good energy resolution and their easy handling. Combined with a two dimensional spatial resolution such a detector is predestined to realise an active collimation in a Compton camera for medical applications. To measure the deposited energy in each channel (pixel), a self-triggering integrated electronic has been developed, which is directly bonded on top of the detector. The design of the low noise readout ele...

  2. Development of dual-layer GSO depth-of-interaction block detector using angled optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Satoshi, E-mail: okumura.satoshi@c.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University (Japan); Kato, Natsuki; Hamamura, Huka [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    A PET system for small animals requires a small detector ring to obtain high-spatial resolution images. However, when we use a relatively large size of photodetector such as a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT), the detector ring is arranged in a hexagonal- or octagonal-shape, and the PET system has large gaps between the block detectors. The large gaps produce image distortion, and the reconstruction algorithm is difficult. To solve these problems, we proposed to arrange two scintillator blocks on one PSPMT using two angled optical fiber-based image guides. We could set two scintillator blocks angled at 22.5° on a PSPMT so that these scintillator blocks are arranged in a nearly circular (hexadecagonal) shape with eight developed block detectors. We used Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillators with Ce concentrations of 1.5 mol% (decay time: 39 ns) and 0.4 mol% (decay time: 63 ns). Sizes of these GSO cells were 1.6×2.4×7.0 mm{sup 3} and 1.6×2.4×8.0 mm{sup 3} for 1.5 mol% Ce and 0.4 mol% Ce, respectively. These two types of GSO were arranged in an 11×15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector. Two GSO blocks and two optical fiber-based image guides were optically coupled to a 2-in. PSPMT (Hamamatsu Photonics H8500: 8×8 anodes). We measured the performances of the block detector with Cs-137 gamma photons (662-keV). We could resolve almost all pixels clearly in a two-dimensional position histogram. The average peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) of the two-dimensional position histogram along profiles were 2.6 and 4.8 in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. The energy resolution was 28.4% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The pulse shape spectra showed good separation with a P/V of 5.2. The developed block detector performed well and shows promise for the development of high-sensitivity and high-spatial resolution PET systems.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF WIRELESS TECHNIQUES IN DATA AND POWER TRANSMISSION APPLICATION FOR PARTICLE-PHYSICS DETECTORS

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, R; Dehos, C; De Lurgio, P; Djurcic, Z; Drake, G; Gonzales Gimenez, JL; Gustafsson, L; Kim, DW; Locci, E; Pfeiffer, U; Röhrich, D; Rydberg, D; Schöning, A; Siligaris, A; Soltveit, HK; Ullaland, K; Vincent, P; Vasquez, PR; Wiedner, D; Yang, S

    2017-01-01

    In the WADAPT project described in this Letter of Intent, we propose to develop wireless techniques for data and power transmission in particle-physics detectors. Wireless techniques have developed extremely fast over the last decade and are now mature for being considered as a promising alternative to cables and optical links that would revolutionize the detector design. The WADAPT consortium has been formed to identify the specific needs of different projects that might benefit from wireless techniques with the objective of providing a common platform for research and development in order to optimize effectiveness and cost. The proposed R&D will aim at designing and testing wireless demonstrators for large instrumentation systems.

  4. GEM detector development for tokamak plasma radiation diagnostics: SXR poloidal tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, Maryna; Malinowski, Karol; Ziółkowski, Adam; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, Ewa; Czarski, Tomasz; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech; Wojeński, Andrzej; Kolasiński, Piotr; Krawczyk, Rafał D.

    2015-09-01

    An increased attention to tungsten material is related to a fact that it became a main candidate for the plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactor. The proposed work refers to the studies of W influence on the plasma performances by developing new detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier GEM) technology for tomographic studies of tungsten transport in ITER-oriented tokamaks, e.g. WEST project. It presents current stage of design and developing of cylindrically bent SXR GEM detector construction for horizontal port implementation. Concept to overcome an influence of constraints on vertical port has been also presented. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer.

  5. Development of an X-ray detector using photodiodes; Desarrollo de un detector de rayos X usando fotodiodos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez G, J.; Azorin V, J. C.; Sosa A, M. A.; Ceron, P., E-mail: gonzalezgj2012@licifug.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Currently the radiation detectors for medical applications are very high value in the market and are difficult to access as training material. In the Sciences and Engineering Division of the Guanajuato University (Mexico) investigations are carried out related to ionizing radiations, especially with X-rays. To overcome the lack of materials has had to resort to borrowing equipment from other institutions, so its use and availability are intermittent. For these reasons is proposed to design and implement an X-ray detector for the use of the work group and the University. This work aims to build an X-ray semiconductor detector using inexpensive and affordable materials, is also proposed the use of a photodiode sensor and an Arduino analog-digital card and a LCD display showing the data. (Author)

  6. Development of Micromegas detectors for the CLAS12 experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Gabriel

    This thesis presents my work performed since 2010 to develop Micromegas detectors for the CLAS12 spectrometer that will be installed in the Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory (USA). The Micromegas are robust, fast and cheap gaseous detectors. Nevertheless, they must be adapted to the specific CLAS12 environment as there are many challenges to face : presence of a strong magnetic field, off-detector frontend electronics, high hadrons rate, necessity to curve the detectors, few space available. My PhD started by beam tests at CERN that allowed to evaluate the spark rate in CLAS12 Micromegas at a few Hertz. An important part of this document is therefore devoted to the study of several innovative methods to minimize the dead time induced by sparks. Thus, I have performed intensive tests on the optimization of the micromesh high voltage filter, with on Micromegas equipped with a GEM foild or on resistive Micromegas. The latter giving excellent results, full scale prototypes, one of which built by a company, have been...

  7. Development of arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors and readout ASIC for the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Bellotti, G.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Ficorella, F.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the development of new Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and readout electronics for the upgrade of the SIDDHARTA experiment. The detector is based on a SDDs array organized in a 4×2 format with each SDD square shaped with 64 mm2 (8×8) active area. The total active area of the array is therefore 32×16 mm2 while the total area of the detector (including 1 mm border dead area) is 34 × 18mm2. The SIDDHARTA apparatus requires 48 of these modules that are designed and manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The readout electronics is composed by CMOS preamplifiers (CUBEs) and by the new SFERA (SDDs Front-End Readout ASIC) circuit. SFERA is a 16-channels readout ASIC designed in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which features in each single readout channel a high order shaping amplifier (9th order Semi-Gaussian complex-conjugate poles) and a high efficiency pile-up rejection logic. The outputs of the channels are connected to an analog multiplexer for the external analog to digital conversion. An on-chip 12-bit SAR ADC is also included. Preliminary measurements of the detectors in the single SDD format are reported. Also measurements of low X-ray energies are reported in order to prove the possible extension to the soft X-ray range.

  8. Development and operation of tracking detectors in silicon technology for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Adeva, Bernardo

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It uses the energy density provided by the LHC to attempt to probe asymmetries between particles and antiparticles that can not be explained by the Standard Model, and thus provide evidence that would allow us to build a new model of fundamental physics. This thesis covers the author's work in the Silicon Tracker $(\\textit{ST})$ and VErtex LOcator $(\\textit{VELO})$ detectors of the LHCb experiment. The thesis explains the installation and commissioning of the $ST$, as well as the development of the slow control for the detector. The $ST$ is a silicon micro-strip detector which provides precise momentum measurements of ionizing particles coming from the collisions. The $ST$consists of two sub-detectors: the Tracker Turicensis $ (TT)$, located upstream of the 4 Tm dipole magnet covering the full acceptance of the experiment, and the Inner Tracker $(IT)$, which covers the region of highest particle density closest...

  9. Recent Developments in Transition-Edge Strip Detectors for Solar X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Adam J.; Deiker, Steven W.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Shing, Lawrence; Stern, Robert A.; Ullom, Joel N.; Vale, Leila R.

    2008-01-01

    LMSAL and NIST are developing position-sensitive x-ray strip detectors based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters optimized for solar physics. By combining high spectral (E/ delta E approximately equals 1600) and temporal (single photon delta t approximately equals 10 micro s) resolutions with imaging capabilities, these devices will be able to study high-temperature (>l0 MK) x-ray lines as never before. Diagnostics from these lines should provide significant new insight into the physics of both microflares and the early stages of flares. Previously, the large size of traditional TESs, along with the heat loads associated with wiring large arrays, presented obstacles to using these cryogenic detectors for solar missions. Implementing strip detector technology at small scales, however, addresses both issues: here, a line of substantially smaller effective pixels requires only two TESs, decreasing both the total array size and the wiring requirements for the same spatial resolution. Early results show energy resolutions of delta E(sub fwhm) approximately equals 30 eV and spatial resolutions of approximately 10-15 micron, suggesting the strip-detector concept is viable.

  10. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  11. Cryo-vacuum testing of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (SPIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Vila, M. Begona; Van Campen, Julie; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Comber, Brian J.; Fatig, Curtis C.; Glasse, Alistair C. H.; Glazer, Stuart D.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Mann, Steven D.; Martel, Andre R.; Novo-Gradac, Kevin J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Penanen, Konstantin; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Zak, Dean; Zhou, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In late 2015/early 2016, a major cryo-vacuum test was carried out for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This test comprised the final cryo-certification and calibration test of the ISIM, after its ambient environmental test program (vibration, acoustics, EMI/EMC), and before its delivery for integration with the rest of the JWST observatory. Over the 108-day period of the round-the-clock test program, the full complement of ISIM flight instruments, structure, harness radiator, and electronics were put through a comprehensive program of thermal, optical, electrical, and operational tests. The test verified the health and excellent performance of the instruments and ISIM systems, proving the ISIM element's readiness for integration with the telescope. We report here on the context, goals, setup, execution, and key results for this critical JWST milestone.

  12. Design and properties of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecki, Maciej; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; CieŻ, Michal; Grabiec, Piotr; Kozłowski, Roman; Kulawik, Jan; Panas, Andrzej; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecka, Iwona; Wielunski, Marek; Witek, Krzysztof; Yakushev, Alexander; Zaborowski, Michał

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the design of charged-particle detectors commissioned and developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE) in collaboration with foreign partners, used in international research on transactinide elements and to build personal radiation protection devices in Germany. Properties of these detectors and the results obtained using the devices are also presented. The design of the following epiplanar detector structures is discussed: ♢ 64-element chromatographic arrays for the COMPACT (Cryo On-line Multidetector for Physics And Chemistry of Transactinides) detection system used at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt (GSI) for research on Hassium, Copernicium and Flerovium, as well as elements 119 and 120, ♢ 2-element flow detectors for the COLD (Cryo On-Line Detector) system used for research on Copernicium and Flerovium at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, ♢ detectors for a radon exposimeter and sensors for a neutron dosimeter developed at the Institut für Strahlenschutz, Helmholtz Zentrum München. The design of planar detectors - single-sided and double-sided strip detectors for the Focal Plane Detector Box used at GSI for research on Flerovium and elements 119 and 120 is also discussed.

  13. Development of microwave kinetic inductance detectors and their readout system for LiteBIRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Mima, S.; Okamura, T.; Sato, N.; Tomaru, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Yuasa, T.; Watanabe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Primordial gravitational waves generated by inflation have produced an odd-parity pattern B-mode in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. LiteBIRD (Light satellite for the studies of B-mode polarization and Inflation from cosmic background Radiation Detection) aims at detecting this B-mode polarization precisely. It requires about 2000 detectors capable of detecting a frequency range from 50 GHz to 250 GHz with ultra low noise. Superconducting detectors are suitable for this requirement. We have fabricated and tested microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) and developed a new readout system. We have designed antenna-coupled MKIDs. Quasi-particles are created by incident radiation and are detected as a change of the surface impedance of a superconductor strip. This change of the surface impedance is translated into the change of the resonant frequency of a microwave signal transmitted through the resonator. We also have developed a new readout system for MKIDs. The newly developed readout system is not only able to read out the amplitude and the phase data with the homodyne detection for multi-channels, but also provides a unique feature of tracking the resonant frequency of the target resonator. This mechanism enables us to detect signals with a large dynamic range. We report on the recent R&D status of the developing MKIDs and on the read-out system for LiteBIRD.

  14. JWST NIRCam WFSS Ice Feature Spectroscopy in Nearby Molecular Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Laurie; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Meyer, Michael; Greene, Thomas P.; JWST NIRCam Science Team

    2017-06-01

    In molecular clouds above a few magnitudes of total visual extinction, some components of the molecular gas freeze out on the surfaces of dust grains. These ice mantles around dust grains are the site of complex surface chemistry that leads to the formation of simple organic molecules in these mantles. The icy surfaces also facilitate the coaggulation of the dust particles, setting the stage for grain growth and ultimately the formation of planetary bodies.As part of the JWST NIRCam GTO program, we plan to observe a selection of small molecular cores using the wide field grism spectroscopy mode of NIRCam.This poster presents the results of a preliminary study of several candidate molecular cores using UKIRT, Spitzer IRAC, IRTF SpeX, Keck MOSFIRE and Subaru MOIRCS data.After the prelimary studies we have selected three molecular cores in different evolutionary stages for the GTO program: B68, a quiescent molecular core, LDN 694-2, a collapsing pre-stellar core, and B335, a protostellar core. All these cores are seen against a dense background of stars in the inner Galaxy and offer the opportunity for spatially well resolved mapping of the ice feature distribution. We will obtain slitless grism spectroscopy in six filters covering the features of H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and the XCN feature. Simulations using aXeSIM have shown that spectrum overlap will occur in a fraction of the spectra, but will not be a prohibitive problem.Our poster will discuss the details of observations planned out in the APT system.

  15. Search for Physics beyond the Standard Model with the ATLAS detector and the development of radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, Yiftah

    We are investigating a radiation detector based on plasma display panel technology, the principal component of plasma television displays. This Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS) technology is a variant of micro-pattern gas radiation detectors. Based on the properties of existing plasma display panels, we expect eventually to be able to build a sealed array of plasma discharge gas cells to detect ionizing radiation with fast rise time of less than 10ns and high spatial resolution using a pixel pitch of less than 100 micrometer. In this thesis I shall describe our program of testing plasma display panels as detectors, including simulations, design and the first laboratory and beam studies that demonstrate the detection of cosmic ray muons, beta rays and medium energy protons. The ATLAS detector is used to search for high-mass resonances, in particular heavy neutral gauge bosons (Z') and excited states of Kaluza-Klein γ/Z bosons decaying to an electron-positron pair or a muon-antimuon pair. Results are presented based ...

  16. Astrochemistry with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Merín, B.; Brandl, B.; Böker, T.; Greene, T.; Meixner, M.; Ressler, M.; Rieke, G.; Waelkens, C.; Wright, G.; Miri Team

    JWST-MIRI will have imaging and medium resolution (λ/Δλ ≍ 2000-3000) integral field spectroscopy with orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and/or spatial resolution compared with existing facilities. It will be a prime facility for astrochemical studies of gases and solids in a wide variety of objects in the next decade. 1. Introduction Mid-infrared spectroscopy is becoming a powerful tool in astrochemistry, with studies of molecules and sources that are highly complementary to those at millimeter wavelengths. Molecules without permanent dipole moments such CH4, C2H2 and CO2 can only be observed through their vibration-rotation transitions. Space-based missions open up the possibility to study molecules which are abundant in ouw own atmosphere, in particular H2O. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons have their most prominent features at mid-infrared wavelengths, and the pure rotational transitions of the dominant molecule in the universe, H2, also occur in this band. Solid-state material is uniquely probed in the mid-infrared, including characteric bands of ices, silicates, oxides, carbides, carbonates and sulfides. The wealth of mid-infrared spectroscopy has been demonstrated by results from the ISO satellite (see van Dishoeck & Tielens 2001, van Dishoeck 2004 for reviews), by pioneering ground-based studies (Lacy et al. 1989, Evans et al. 1990) and most recently by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Targets include molecular clouds, PDRs, shocks, deeply embedded young stellar objects, UC HII regions, protoplanetary disks, planetary atmospheres, comets, evolved stars and even entire galaxies. In addition to an inventory of gaseous and solid-state material, the lines and line ratios provide powerful diagnostics of temperatures, densities, UV field, elemental abundances, etc. Systematic variations in features from region to region allow the physical and chemical processes to be traced. The MidInfraRed Instrument (MIRI) on board the 6m James Webb Space

  17. Prospects for Habitable World Detections Using James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake

    2010-01-01

    Doppler and transit surveys are finding extrasolar planets of ever smaller mass and radius, and are now sampling the domain of superEarths. Recent results from the Doppler surveys suggest that discovery of a transiting superEarth in the habitable zone of a lower main sequence star may be possible. We evaluate the prospects for an all-sky transit survey targeted to the brightest stars I that would find the most favorable cases for photometric and spectroscopic characterization using the James Webb Space Telescope. We use the proposed Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) as representative of an all-sky survey. We couple the simulated TESS yield to a sensitivity model for the MIRI and NIRSpec instruments on JWST. Our sensitivity model includes all currently known and anticipated sources of random and systematic error for these instruments. We focus on the TESS planets with radii between Earth and Neptune. Our simulations consider secondary eclipse filter photometry using JWST/MIRI, comparing the 11- and 15- micron bands to measure carbon dioxide absorption in superEarths, as well as JWST!NIRSpec spectroscopy of water absorption from 1.7-3.0 microns, and carbon dioxide absorption at 4.3 microns. We find that JWST will be capable of characterizing dozens of TESS superEarths with temperatures above the habitable range, using both MIRI and NIRspec. We project that TESS will discover about eight nearby habitable transiting superEarths, all orbiting lower main sequence stars. The principal sources of uncertainty in the prospects for JWST characterization of habitable superEarths are superEarth frequency and the nature of superEarth atmospheres. Based on our estimates of these uncertainties, we project that JWST will be able to measure the temperature, and identify molecular absorptions (water, carbon dioxide) in one to four nearby habitable TESS superEarths orbiting lower main sequence stars.

  18. Development and Studies of Novel Microfabricated Radiation Hard Scintillation Detectors With High Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Haguenauer, M; Jiguet, S; Renaud, P; Vico Triviño, N

    2011-01-01

    A new type of scintillation detector is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by coupling microfluidic channels filled with a liquid scintillator to photodetectors. Easy manipulation of liquid scintillators inside microfluidic devices allow their flushing, renewal, and exchange making the active medium intrinsically radiation hard. Prototype detectors have been fabricated by photostructuration of a radiation hard epoxy resin (SU-8) deposited on silicon wafers and coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) to read-out the scintillation light. They have been characterized by exciting the liquid scintillator in the 200 micrometers thick microchannels with electrons from a 90Sr yielding approximately 1 photoelectron per impinging Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP). These promising results demonstrate the concept of microfluidic scintillating detection and are very encouraging for future developments.

  19. Development of Wireless Techniques in Data and Power Transmission - Application for Particle Physics Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, R; Dehos, C; De Lurgio, P; Djurcic, Z; Drake, G; Gimenez, J L Gonzalez; Gustafsson, L; Kim, D W; Locci, E; Roehrich, D; Schoening, A; Siligaris, A; Soltveit, H K; Ullaland, K; Vincent, P; Wiednert, D; Yang, S

    2015-01-01

    Wireless techniques have developed extremely fast over the last decade and using them for data and power transmission in particle physics detectors is not science- fiction any more. During the last years several research groups have independently thought of making it a reality. Wireless techniques became a mature field for research and new developments might have impact on future particle physics experiments. The Instrumentation Frontier was set up as a part of the SnowMass 2013 Community Summer Study [1] to examine the instrumentation R&D for the particle physics research over the coming decades: {\\guillemotleft} To succeed we need to make technical and scientific innovation a priority in the field {\\guillemotright}. Wireless data transmission was identified as one of the innovations that could revolutionize the transmission of data out of the detector. Power delivery was another challenge mentioned in the same report. We propose a collaboration to identify the specific needs of different projects that m...

  20. Development of a novel 2D position-sensitive semiconductor detector concept

    CERN Document Server

    Bassignana, D; Jaramillo, R; Lozano, M; Munoz, F.J; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D; Vila, I

    2012-01-01

    A novel 2D position-sensitive semiconductor detector concept has been developed employing resistive electrodes in a single-sided silicon microstrip sensor. The resistive charge division method has been implemented reading out each strip at both ends, in order to get the second coordinate of an ionizing event along the strips length. Two generations of prototypes, with different layout, have been produced and characterized using a pulsed near infra-red laser. The feasibility of the resistive charge division method in silicon microstrip detectors has been demonstrated and the possibility of single-chip readout of the device has been investigated. Experimental data were compared with the theoretical expectations and the electrical simulation of the sensor equivalent circuit coupled to simple electronics readout circuits. The agreement between experimental and simulation results validates the developed simulation as a tool for the optimization of future sensor prototypes.

  1. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors.   In our FY12 IRAD “Strained Layer Superlattice Infrared Detector Array...

  2. Development of Charged.Particle Detector and Its Application in Shenzhou-5 Manned Spacecraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TanJilian; LuZiwei; ZhangJinxia; LiCunfan; WangZhusheng; BaoZhiqing; WangShijin; ZhuGuangwu; LiangJinbao; GaoPing

    2003-01-01

    The measuring and monitoring of the radiation environment of earth's space have very important significance for developing space science and application techniques. The measurement of space charged particle radiation includes mainly two aspects: (1) measurement of energy spectra and flux of protons and electrons; (2) identification of particle species lighter than Fe and measurement of energy spectra. Charged particle spectroscope consisting of semiconductor detectors was usually used for the measurements mentioned above.

  3. Fluorocarbon evaporative cooling developments for the ATLAS pixel and semiconductor tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Anderssen, E; Berry, S; Bonneau, P; Bosteels, Michel; Bouvier, P; Cragg, D; English, R; Godlewski, J; Górski, B; Grohmann, S; Hallewell, G D; Hayler, T; Ilie, S; Jones, T; Kadlec, J; Lindsay, S; Miller, W; Niinikoski, T O; Olcese, M; Olszowska, J; Payne, B; Pilling, A; Perrin, E; Sandaker, H; Seytre, J F; Thadome, J; Vacek, V

    1999-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients 2-5.103 Wm-2K-1 have been measured in a 3.6 mm I.D. heated tube dissipating 100 Watts - close to the full equivalent power (~110 W) of a barrel SCT detector "stave" - over a range of power dissipations and mass flows in the above fluids. Aspects of full-scale evaporative cooling circulator design for the ATLAS experiment are discussed, together with plans for future development.

  4. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-03-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber- optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the straininduced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection will be discussed.

  5. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-01-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the strain-induced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection will be discussed.

  6. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-01-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber–optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the strain-induced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection...

  7. Development of a scintillation detector with a photosensor based on matrices of silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanin, A. F.; Dzaparova, I. M.; Gorbacheva, E. A.; Kurenya, A. N.; Kochkarov, M. M.; Petkov, V. B.; Sergeev, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Scintillation detector with matrices of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) as multi-channel photosensors is under development. The use of SiPM matrices gives a possibility to do a snapshot of glowing track of charged particle traversing a scintillator. The snapshots of the events inside the scintillator were taken for the two SiPM matrices arrangements. The comparison characteristics of snapshots for these arrangements are presented.

  8. Development and characterisation of new high-rate muon drift tube detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, Bernhard

    2012-07-25

    With the increase of the LHC luminosity above the design value and the higher background counting rates, detectors in the ATLAS muon spectrometer have to be replaced because the limits of the radiation tolerance will be exceeded. Therefore drift tube chambers with 15 mm tube diameter were developed. The required construction accuracy was verified and the limits of the resolution and efficiency were determined in a muon beam and under gamma irradiation and compared to model expectations.

  9. Measuring the radiation field and radiation hard detectors at JET: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Edlington, T.; Angelone, M.; Bertalot, L.; Bolshakova, I.; Bonheure, G.; Brzozowski, J.; Coccorese, V.; Holyaka, R.; Kiptily, V.; Lengar, I.; Morgan, P.; Pillon, M.; Popovichev, S.; Prior, P.; Prokopowicz, R.; Quercia, A.; Rubel, M.; Santala, M.; Shevelev, A.; Syme, B.; Vagliasindi, G.; Villari, R.; Zoita, V. L.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2008-08-01

    Since in ITER the radiation field will be much more demanding than that of present day devices, research programmes at JET are aimed at developing radiation hard diagnostics and related components. Initially, significant efforts are devoted to determining the radiation field of both the plasma and in the immediate environment with better accuracy. New developments in MCNP calculations and dedicated measurements provide useful information about the radiation field in the Torus Hall, even during non-operational periods. The effect of using Beryllium in the near future for JET first wall, is being assessed. New materials for activation samples are under consideration and will be tested to improve the calibration accuracy of JET neutron diagnostics. The long-term goal of this work is to obtain spectrometric information from an appropriate combination of different materials. Several studies are under way to modify the radiation field at the detectors by using LiH or pure water as neutron filters, to alleviate the problem of the background in γ-ray measurements. A suite of radiation hard detectors for neutrons, magnetic field and charged particles are being developed. Super-heated fluid neutron detectors, used for yield and imaging, are being upgraded, in order to provide a broad-band spectrometric capability. Chemical vapour deposited diamond diodes are being qualified as counters and as spectrometers. Prototypes of Hall probes made of InSb have been installed on the machine and have provided some preliminary results. Si-on-insulator detectors are under development for use in neutral particle analysers and are currently being bench-tested. Some attention is being devoted to optical components, fibres and mirrors, and to investigating radiation hard electronics using reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

  10. The JWST North Ecliptic Pole Survey Field for Time-domain Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rolf A.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Ashby, Matthew; Ashcraft, Teresa; Cohen, Seth H.; Condon, James J.; Conselice, Christopher; Ferrara, Andrea; Frye, Brenda L.; Grogin, Norman A.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Joshi, Bhavin; Kim, Duho; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mechtley, Matt; Milam, Stefanie N.; Rodney, Steven A.; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Willmer, Christopher; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Yan, Haojing

    2017-01-01

    The JWST North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) Survey field is located within JWST's northern Continuous Viewing Zone, will span ˜14‧ in diameter (˜10‧ with NIRISS coverage) and will be roughly circular in shape (initially sampled during Cycle 1 at 4 distinct orientations with JWST/NIRCam's 4.4‧×2.2‧ FoV —the JWST “windmill”) and will have NIRISS slitless grism spectroscopy taken in parallel, overlapping an alternate NIRCam orientation. This is the only region in the sky where JWST can observe a clean extragalactic deep survey field (free of bright foreground stars and with low Galactic foreground extinction AV) at arbitrary cadence or at arbitrary orientation. This will crucially enable a wide range of new and exciting time-domain science, including high redshift transient searches and monitoring (e.g., SNe), variability studies from Active Galactic Nuclei to brown dwarf atmospheres, as well as proper motions of extreme scattered Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Objects, and of nearby Galactic brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, and ultracool white dwarfs. We therefore welcome and encourage follow-up through GO programs of the initial GTO observations to realize its potential as a JWST time-domain community field. The JWST NEP Survey field was selected from an analysis of WISE 3.4+4.6 micron, 2MASS JHKs, and SDSS ugriz source counts and of Galactic foreground extinction, and is one of very few such ˜10‧ fields that are devoid of sources brighter than mAB = 16 mag. We have secured deep (mAB ˜ 26 mag) wide-field (˜23‧×25‧) Ugrz images of this field and its surroundings with LBT/LBC. We also expect that deep MMT/MMIRS YJHK images, deep 8-12 GHz VLA radio observations (pending), and possibly HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS ultraviolet-visible images will be available before JWST launches in Oct 2018.

  11. Habitable worlds with JWST: transit spectroscopy of the TRAPPIST-1 system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, J. K.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of three Earth-sized, potentially habitable planets around a nearby cool star, TRAPPIST-1, has provided three key targets for the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Depending on their atmospheric characteristics and precise orbit configurations, it is possible that any of the three planets may be in the liquid water habitable zone, meaning that they may be capable of supporting life. We find that present-day Earth levels of ozone, if present, would be detectable if JWST observes 60 transits for innermost planet 1b and 30 transits for 1c and 1d.

  12. Habitable worlds with JWST: transit spectroscopy of the TRAPPIST-1 system?

    CERN Document Server

    Barstow, Joanna K

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of three Earth-sized, potentially habitable planets around a nearby cool star, TRAPPIST-1, has provided three key targets for the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Depending on their atmospheric characteristics and precise orbit configurations, it is possible that any of the three planets may be in the liquid water habitable zone, meaning that they may be capable of supporting life. We find that present-day Earth levels of ozone, if present, would be detectable if JWST observes 60 transits for innermost planet 1b and 30 transits for 1c and 1d.

  13. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  14. Development and characterization of a modular acquisition system for a 4D PET block detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcatili, Sara, E-mail: MarcatiliS@cardiff.ac.uk [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria G. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Collazuol, Gianmaria [INFN sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Ambrosi, Giovanni [INFN sezione di Perugia, I 06100 Perugia (Italy); Corsi, Francesco; Foresta, Maurizio; Marzocca, Cristoforo; Matarrese, Gianvito [Politecnico di Bari, I 70100 Bari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Bari, I 70100 Bari (Italy); Sportelli, Giancarlo; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER-BBN (Spain); Del Guerra, Alberto [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, I 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-11

    Next generation PET scanners should fulfill very high requirements in terms of spatial, energy and timing resolution. Modern scanner performances are inherently limited by the use of standard photomultiplier tubes. The use of Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) matrices is proposed for the construction of a 4D PET module based on LSO continuous crystals, which is envisaged to replace the standard PET block detector. The expected spatial resolution of the module for the photon hit position is below 1 mm, and it will perform at the same time, the Depth Of Interaction (DOI) calculation and the Time Of Flight (TOF) measurement. The use of large area multi-pixel Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors requires the development of a multichannel Digital Acquisition system (DAQ) as well as of a dedicated front-end in order not to degrade the intrinsic detector performances. We have developed a flexible and modular DAQ system for the read-out of two modules in time coincidence for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. The DAQ system is based on a previously developed custom front-end ASIC chip (BASIC) which allows to read-out SiPM matrices preserving their spectroscopy and timing capabilities. Here we describe the acquisition system architecture and its characterization measurements.

  15. Recent advancements in the development of radiation hard semiconductor detectors for S-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E; Al-Ajili, A A; Alfieri, G; Allport, P P; Artuso, M; Assouak, S; Avset, B S; Barabash, L; Barcz, A; Bates, R; Biagi, S F; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blue, A; Blumenau, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bondarenko, G B; Borchi, E; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Bowcock, T J V; Brodbeck, T J; Broz, J; Bruzzi, M; Brzozowski, A; Buda, M; Buhmann, P; Buttar, C; Campabadal, F; Campbell, D; Candelori, A; Casse, G; Cavallini, A; Charron, S; Chilingarov, A G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Coluccia, R; Contarato, D; Coutinho, J; Creanza, D; Cunningham, L; Dalla Betta, G F; Dawson, I; de Boer, Wim; De Palma, M; Demina, R; Dervan, P; Dittongo, S; Dolezal, Z; Dolgolenko, A; Eberlein, T; Eremin, V; Fall, C; Fasolo, F; Ferbel, T; Fizzotti, F; Fleta, C; Focardi, E; Forton, E; García, C; García-Navarro, J E; Gaubas, E; Genest, M H; Gill, K A; Giolo, K; Glaser, M; Gössling, C; Golovine, V; González-Sevilla, S; Gorelov,I; Goss, J; Gouldwell-Bates, A; Grégoire, G; Gregori, P; Grigoriev, E; Grillo, A A; Groza, A; Guskov, J; Haddad, L; Härkönen, J; Hauler, F; Hoeferkamp, M; Honniger, F; Horazdovsky, T; Horisberger, R P; Horn, M; Houdayer, A; Hourahine, B; Hughes, G; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Irmscher, K; Ivanov, A; Jarasiunas, K; Johansen, K M H; Jones, B K; Jones, R; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kalinina, E; Kaminski, P; Karpenko, A; Karpov, A; Kazlauskiene, V; Kazukauskas, V; Khivrich, V; Khomenkov, V P; Kierstead, J A; Klaiber Lodewigs, J M; Klingenberg, R; Kodys, P; Kohout, Z; Korjenevski, S; Koski, M; Kozlowski, R; Kozodaev, M; Kramberger, G; Krasel, O; Kuznetsov, A; Kwan, S; Lagomarsino, S; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lastovetsky, V F; Latino, G; Lazanu, I; Lazanu, S; Lebedev, A; Lebel, C; Leinonen, K; Leroy, C; Li, Z; Lindström, G; Linhart, V; Litovchenko, P G; Litovchenko, A P; Lo Giudice, A; Lozano, M; Luczynski, Z; Luukka, Panja; Macchiolo, A; Makarenko, L F; Mandic, I; Manfredotti, C; Manna, N; Martí i García, S; Marunko, S; Mathieson, K; Melone, J; Menichelli, D; Messineo, A; Metcalfe, J; Miglio, S; Mikuz, M; Miyamoto, J; Moll, M; Monakhov, E; Moscatelli, F; Naoumov, D; Nossarzhevska, E; Nysten, J; Olivero, P; O'Shea, V; Palviainen, T; Paolini, C; Parkes, C; Passeri, D; Pein, U; Pellegrini, G; Perera, L; Petasecca, M; Piemonte, C; Pignatel, G U; Pinho, N; Pintilie, I; Pintilie, L; Polivtsev, L; Polozov, P; Popa, A; Populea, J; Pospísil, S; Pozza, A; Radicci, V; Rafí, J M; Rando, R; Röder, R; Rohe, T; Ronchin, S; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruzin, A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sakalauskas, S; Scaringella, M; Schiavulli, L; Schnetzer, S; Schumm, B; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Segneri, G; Seidela, S; Seiden, A; Sellberg, G; Sellin, P J; Sentenac, D; Shipsey, I; Sícho, P; Sloan, T; Solar, M; Son, S; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spencer, N; Stahl, J; Stolze, D; Stone, R; Storasta, J; Strokan, N; Sudzius, M; Surma, B; Suvorov, A; Svensson, B G; Tipton, P; Tomasek, M; Tsvetkov, A; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Tuuva, T; Tylchin, M; Uebersee, H; Uher, J; Ullán, M; Vaitkus, J V; Velthuis, J; Verbitskaya, E; Vrba, V; Wagner, G; Wilhelm, I; Worm, S; Wright, V; Wunstorf, R; Yiuri, Y; Zabierowski, P; Zaluzhny, A; Zavrtanik, M; Zen, M; Zhukov, V; Zorzi, N

    2005-01-01

    The proposed luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (S-LHC) at CERN will demand the innermost layers of the vertex detectors to sustain fluences of about 1016 hadrons/cm2. Due to the high multiplicity of tracks, the required spatial resolution and the extremely harsh radiation field new detector concepts and semiconductor materials have to be explored for a possible solution of this challenge. The CERN RD50 collaboration “Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders” has started in 2002 an R&D program for the development of detector technologies that will fulfill the requirements of the S-LHC. Different strategies are followed by RD50 to improve the radiation tolerance. These include the development of defect engineered silicon like Czochralski, epitaxial and oxygen-enriched silicon and of other semiconductor materials like SiC and GaN as well as extensive studies of the microscopic defects responsible for the degradation of irradiated sensors. Furthe...

  16. Detector development for Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Yi, E-mail: yqiang@jlab.org

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  17. Development of a portable triple silicon detector telescope for beta spectroscopy and skin dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helt-Hansen, J

    2000-11-01

    It is now recognized that beta radiation can be a significant radiation problem for exposure of the skin. There is thus a need for a portable and rugged active beta dosemeter-spectrometer to carry out immediate measurements of doses and energies of beta particles even in the presence of photon radiation. The main objective of this report is to describe the development of such an instrument. A beta-spectrometer has been developed consisting of three silicon surface barrier detectors with the thickness: 50{mu}m/150{mu}m/7000{mu}m covered by a 2 {mu}m thick titanium window. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from 50 keV to 3.5 MeV. The spectrometer is characterized by a compact low weight design, achieved by digital signal processing beginning at an early stage in the signal chain. 255 channels are available for each of the three detectors. The spectrometer is controlled by a laptop computer, which also handles all subsequent data analysis. By use of coincidence/anti-coincidence considerations of the absorbed energy in the three detector elements, counts caused by electrons are separated from those originating from photons. The electron energy distribution is multiplied by a set of conversion coefficients to obtain the dose at 0.07 mm tissue. Monte Carlo calculations has been used to derive the conversion coefficients and to investigate the influence of noise and the design of detector assembly on the performance of the spectrometer. This report describes the development of the spectrometer and its mode of operation, followed by a description of the Monte Carlo calculations carried out to obtain the conversion coefficients. Finally is the capability of the telescope spectrometer to measure beta and photon spectra as well as beta dose rates in pure beta and mixed beta/photon radiation fields described. (au)

  18. Status of development of lightning detector for PLANET-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, M.; Teraguchi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetometer onboard Venus Express detected whistler mode waves whose source can be considered to be lightning discharge occurring well below the spacecraft orbit. However, there still remain some uncertainties to conclude finally such waves are originated by lightning discharge in the atmosphere. In order to identify the discharge phenomena in the atmosphere of Venus without any doubt, we plan to observe the lightning activity with high-speed optical detector onboard Planet-C, the Japanese Venus Climate Orbiter mission which will be launched in 2010 by JAXA. We are developing a new type of lightning detector, LAC (Lightning and Airglow Camera). Main difference from other equipments which have provided evidences of lightning existence in Venus is the high-speed sampling rate at 50kHz for each pixel, enabling us to distinguish the optical lightning flash from other pulsing noises. On the other hand, spatial resolution is not first priority as the first detector of Venus lightning. New type of APD (avalanche photo diode) array with a format of 8 x 8 is used and a narrow band interference filter at wavelength of 777.4 nm (OI) is selected for lightning measurement. The development is now at the stage for designing and manufacturing the flight model, based on the performance and environmental tolerance of the proto model. Especially, the algorithm for self- triggering is carefully improved in order to exclude false-trigger by other pulse-like noise.

  19. Development and Characterisation of a Radiation Hard Readout Chip for the LHCb Outer Tracker Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stange, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of charged particle tracks in the Outer Tracker detector of the LHCb experiment requires to measure the drift times of the straw tubes. A Time to Digital Converter (TDC) chip has been developed for this task. The chip integrates into the LHCb data acquisition schema and ful ls the requirements of the detector. The OTIS chip is manufactured in a commercial 0.25 µm CMOS process. A 32-channel TDC core drives the drift time measurement (25 ns measurement range, 390 ps nominal resolution) without introducing dead times. The resulting drift times are bu ered until a trigger decision arrives after the xed latency of 4 µs. In case of a trigger accept signal, the digital control core processes and transmits the corresponding data to the following data acquisition stage. Drift time measurement and data processing are independent from the detector occupancy. The digital control core of the OTIS chip has been developed within this doctoral thesis. It has been integrated into the TDC chip together wit...

  20. Time development and flux dependence of neutron-irradiation induced defects in silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zontar, D; Kramberger, G; Mikuz, M

    1999-01-01

    1x1 cm sup 2 silicon pad p sup + -n-n sup + detectors were irradiated with fast neutrons from the TRIGA research reactor in Ljubljana to fluences from 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 to 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. The observed time development of annealing of the full-depletion voltage (FDV) could be fitted by a constant and two exponentials. The characteristic time of the fast component is 4 h, independent of temperature in the interval 0-15 deg. C. A comparison of MESA and planar pad detectors shows a 20-30% lower FDV for the MESA. A search for a flux dependence of the radiation damage was performed in the range from 2x10 sup 8 to 5x10 sup 1 sup 5 n/cm sup 2 s and no systematic differences were observed.

  1. Development of a compact high resolution gamma-ray detector for E-CT applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Hongguang; MA Wenyan; ZENG Hui; WANG Zhaomin; XU Zizhong

    2007-01-01

    A compact gamma-ray detector with good spatial resolution for emission computed tomography (E-CT) applications has been developed. The detector is composed of NaI(T1) scintillation pixels array and Hamamastu R2486-05 PSPMT. Having a pixel size of 2 mm × 2 mm and an overall dimension of 48.2 mm × 48.2mm × 5 mm, it has 484 pixels in a 22×22 matrix. An average spatial resolution of 2.5mm (FWHM) was achieved. The slope of position linearity is constant within 10% in a range of 40mm. After corrections, the average value of differential non-linearity and absolute non-linearity were 0.16mm and 0.535mm respectively, and a 17% at FWHM of total energy resolution for 241Am was obtained.

  2. Development of acoustic devices for ultra-high energy neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K; Schwemmer, S

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach to instrument the large detector volumes needed for the detection of the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies (E > 1 EeV). We report on several studies investigating the feasibility of such an acoustic detector. High-precision lab measurements using laser and proton beams aiming at the verification of the thermo-acoustic model have been performed. Different types of acoustic sensors have been developed and characterized. An autonomous acoustic system, attached to the ANTARES prototype string "Line0", has been deployed and operated successfully at 2400 m depth, allowing for in-situ studies of the acoustic background in the Mediterranean Sea.

  3. FE-I4 Firmware Development and Integration with FELIX for the Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Amitabh; Sharma, Abhishek; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    CERN has planned a series of upgrades for the LHC. The last in this current series of planned upgrades is designated the HL-LHC. At the same time, the ATLAS Experiment will be extensively changed to meet the challenges of this upgrade (termed as the “Phase-II” upgrade). The Inner Detector will be completely rebuilt for the phase-II. The TRT, SCT and Pixel will be replaced by the all-silicon tracker, termed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). The read-out of this future ITk detector is an engineering challenge for the routing of services and quality of the data. This document describes the FPGA firmware development that integrates the GBT, Elink and Rx-Tx Cores for communication between the FE-I4 modules and the FELIX read-out system.

  4. Software development for studies of diffuse scattering using CCD-detectors and synchrotron radiation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paulmann, C; Bismayer, U

    2001-01-01

    A graphical-user-interface based software system was developed to cover advanced data processing requirements which arise from studies of diffuse scattering in disordered minerals using synchrotron radiation sources and CCD-detectors. The software includes interfaces to standard applications, procedures for numerical processing of large data sets, corrections for sample external scattering and detector-specific distortions, different scaling options to correct the data set against the varying primary beam intensity as well as procedures to reconstruct arbitrary slices in reciprocal space on a regular grid. The software system was successfully applied in studies of diffuse scattering in disordered REE-doped germanates, phase-transition studies of synthetic titanite and studies of the thermal recrystallization behaviour of radiation-damaged (metamict) minerals.

  5. Development and characterization of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohrs, Robert

    2008-09-15

    For the future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) a vertex detector of unprecedented performance is needed to fully exploit its physics potential. By incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted sensor substrate the DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) sensor combines radiation detection and in-pixel amplification. For the operation at a linear collider the excellent noise performance of DEPFET pixels allows building very thin detectors with a high spatial resolution and a low power consumption. With this thesis a prototype system consisting of a 64 x 128 pixels sensor, dedicated steering and readout ASICs and a data acquisition board has been developed and successfully operated in the laboratory and under realistic conditions in beam test environments at DESY and CERN. A DEPFET matrix has been successfully read out using the on-chip zero-suppression of the readout chip CURO 2. The results of the system characterization and beam test results are presented. (orig.)

  6. Development of superconducting Klystron cavity for the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, Vincenzo; de França, Enrique Klai

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities can be used in parametric transducers for Gravitational Wave antennas. The Mario Schenberg detector, which is being built by the GRAVITON group at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), basically consists of a resonant mass (ball) and a set of parametric transducers in order to monitor the fundamental modes of vibration. When coupled to the antenna, the transducer-sphere system will work as a mass-spring system. In this work the main task is the development of parametric transducers consisting of reentrant superconducting cavity with high performance to be implemented in the Mario Schenberg detector. Many geometries, materials and designs have been tested and compared to optimize parameters such as electric and mechanical Q-factor. The aim is the construction of a complete set of nine parametric transducers that, attached to the spherical antenna, will possibly reach the sensitivity $h$ $\\sim$ 10$^{-22}$ $Hz$$^{-1/2}$ in the near future.

  7. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector: recent progress and key issues

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, Yiftah; Beene, James R; Benhammou, Yan; Ben-Moshe, Meny; Chapman, J W; Dai, Tiesheng; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Guttman, Nir; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Ritt, S; Varner, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2012-01-01

    A radiation detector based on plasma display panel technology, which is the principal component of plasma television displays is presented. Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS) technology is a variant of micropattern gas radiation detectors. The PPS is conceived as an array of sealed plasma discharge gas cells which can be used for fast response (O(5ns) per pixel), high spatial resolution detection (pixel pitch can be less than 100 micrometer) of ionizing and minimum ionizing particles. The PPS is assembled from non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials: glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures. We report on the PPS development program, including simulations and design and the first laboratory studies which demonstrate the usage of plasma display panels in measurements of cosmic ray muons, as well as the expansion of experimental results on the detection of betas from radioactive sources.

  8. Development of Detector Systems for Internal and Fixed Target Heavy Ion Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Pavel

    2003-04-01

    This thesis deals with intermediate energy heavy ion reactions with the particular aim to study the nuclear matter equation of state which defines the relation between statistical parameters of a fermionic system. The development of equipment for two experiments, CA47 at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden and R16 at Kernfysisch Versneller Inst. (KVI), Groningen, The Netherlands, are described. CA47 contains the CHICSi detector, a modular, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-detector system, covering a solid angle of 3pi sr around the collision point. Together with two auxiliary detector systems CHICSi is placed at the cluster-jet target chamber of the CELSIUS storage ring. This thesis gives a technical overview of the detector and the development carried out in order to achieve the desired detection performance. Some laboratory and in-beam tests are described and the analysis of the first experimental results is discussed. The nuclear intensity interferometry experiment (R16) was performed in a dedicated beam-line of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron. Small-angle two-particle correlations were measured for the E/A = 61 MeV {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, {sup 124}Sn reactions, together with singles spectra. The experimental energy distributions of neutrons and light charged particles for the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al reaction have been analyzed with a Maxwellian multi-source prescription. These results, together with correlation function data, are used to extract information on the size of the emitting sources and their time evolution.

  9. Development of Detector Systems for Internal and Fixed Target Heavy Ion Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Pavel

    2003-04-01

    This thesis deals with intermediate energy heavy ion reactions with the particular aim to study the nuclear matter equation of state which defines the relation between statistical parameters of a fermionic system. The development of equipment for two experiments, CA47 at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden and R16 at Kernfysisch Versneller Inst. (KVI), Groningen, The Netherlands, are described. CA47 contains the CHICSi detector, a modular, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-detector system, covering a solid angle of 3pi sr around the collision point. Together with two auxiliary detector systems CHICSi is placed at the cluster-jet target chamber of the CELSIUS storage ring. This thesis gives a technical overview of the detector and the development carried out in order to achieve the desired detection performance. Some laboratory and in-beam tests are described and the analysis of the first experimental results is discussed. The nuclear intensity interferometry experiment (R16) was performed in a dedicated beam-line of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron. Small-angle two-particle correlations were measured for the E/A = 61 MeV {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, {sup 124}Sn reactions, together with singles spectra. The experimental energy distributions of neutrons and light charged particles for the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al reaction have been analyzed with a Maxwellian multi-source prescription. These results, together with correlation function data, are used to extract information on the size of the emitting sources and their time evolution.

  10. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-01

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd(2)SiO(5) (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. Development of a DAQ system for a plasma display panel-based X-ray detector (PXD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hakjae [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Sangheum [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan-si (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jungwon [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Dankook University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kisung, E-mail: kisung@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a novel plasma display panel (PDP)-based X-ray detector (PXD) was developed. The goal of this study is to develop a data acquisition system for use with the PXD as an imaging detector. Since the prototype detector does not have any barrier ribs or a switching device in a detector pixel, a novel pixelation scheme—the line-scan method—is developed for this new detector. To implement line scanning, a multichannel high-voltage switching circuit and a multichannel charge-acquisition circuit are developed. These two circuits are controlled by an FPGA-based digital signal processing board, from which the information about the charge and position of each pixel can be sent to a PC. FPGA-based baseline compensation and switching noise rejection algorithms are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The characteristic curve of the entire PXD system is acquired, and the correlation coefficients between the X-ray dose, and the signal intensity and the SNR were determined to be approximately 0.99 and 52.9, respectively. - Highlights: • We developed a data acquisition circuit for a novel X-ray imaging detector. • Line scan, noise rejection, and data transmission methods have been implemented by the FPGA. • The linearity and SNR of the proposed detector system have been measured quantitatively.

  12. Development and performance tests of NSTAR, a new type of compact neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczak, Iwona Agnieszka

    Development and performance of the NSTAR ("Neutron Sandwich Transmuter/Activation-gamma Radiator") are discussed, a neutron detector based on a new approach to Gd-loaded scintillators. This detector has high detection efficiency for neutrons, from thermal up to multi-MeV energies with practically zero energy threshold. The NSTAR operating principle is similar to that of Gd-loaded liquid scintillation detectors but avoids many of their disadvantages and hazards. The NSTAR scintillator has the dual function, both to thermalize fast neutrons and to generate responses to the dissipated neutron energy and the emission of associated delayed Gd neutron capture gamma-rays. Consequently, the NSTAR features a time dependent two-component response to neutrons, which consists of a prompt, energy dependent light flash followed by a delayed, energy independent signal. This characteristic response allows one to "tag" neutrons, distinguish them from gamma-rays, and to obtain neutron multiplicity information for multiple-neutron bursts. The detector modules consist of stacks of plastic scintillator slabs (Saint Gobain BC-408) alternating with thin Gd-loaded (0.5 wt.%) converter films (PDMS-SYLGARD 184). The stacks are viewed by fast photomultipliers (Philips XP2041) on one or both ends. The detector design combines high light output collection efficiency with large active volume. The NSTAR modules have been tested with neutrons produced by radioactive sources and a pulsed-beam neutron generator. Tests reveal an effective discrimination against gamma-rays, even in a high intensity background environment, when measurements are made relative to a reference signal. The NSTAR is capable of counting neutrons at rates of R ≤ 7 x 104 n/s with losses below 1% and can measure event by event two moments of the neutron multiplicity distribution. A detection efficiency of epsilon = (26 +/- 3)% was measured for DD-neutrons at an electronic threshold of Eth = 0.2 MeVee. The average neutron

  13. The Molecular Universe as seen by JWST-MIRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wright, G.; Rieke, G.

    2011-05-01

    The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI, Wright et al. 2003) on board the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be the next major mid-infrared facility in space. It combines a high sensitivity with medium resolution spectroscopy and subarcsec imaging. This makes it one of the prime facilities for astrochemical studies in the next decade. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a very powerful astrochemical tool. Molecules without permanent dipoles such as CH_4, C_2H_2 and CO_2 can only be observed through their vibration-rotation transitions while atmospheric species, in particular H_2O, require space-based facilities. PAH and solid-state material have prominent features in the mid-infrared, and the pure rotational transitions of the dominant molecule in the universe, H_2, also occur in this band. The wealth of mid-infrared spectroscopy has been demonstrated by results from the ISO satellite (see van Dishoeck 2004 for a review), pioneering ground-based studies and most recently by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The targeted sources are extremely diverse and include objects in the local and distant universe. Variations in features allow both qualitative and quantitative studies of physical and chemical processes. MIRI consists of an imager (including low resolution (R=λ/Δλ≈100) spectroscopy and coronography) and a medium resolution spectrometer (R=2000-3000) operating in the 5-28μm wavelength range using 1024x1024 pixel Si:As arrays. The spectrometer uses four IFUs with fields ranging from 3.5 to 7 arcsec. MIRIs sensitivity, orders of magnitude higher compared to Spitzer and 8-m class ground-based telescopes, spatial and spectral resolution make it particularly well suited for studying gases and solids in disks around young stars and in the nuclei of (starburst) galaxies. The sensitive low resolution spectrometer will be ideal to characterize exoplanet atmospheres. MIRI is built in partnership by a European Consortium and the US. The MIRI flight model (FM) is now fully

  14. A Data Acquisition and Monitoring System for the Detector Development Group at FZJ/ZEA-2

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The central institute of electronics (ZEA-2) in the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed the novel readout electronics JUDIDT to cope with high-rate data acquisition of the KWS-1 and KWS-2 detectors in the experimental Hall at the Forschungsreacktor Muenchen FRM-II in Garching, Muenchen. This electronics has been then modified and used also for the data-acquisition of a prototype for an ANGER Camera proposed for the planned European Spallation Source. To commission the electronics, software for the data acquisition and the data monitoring has been developed. In this report the software is described.

  15. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors fully adapted to the ILD Vertex Detector Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Dorokhov, Andrei; Goffe, Mathieu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are making steady progress towards the specifications of the ILD vertex detector. Recent developments are summarised, which show that these devices are close to comply with all major requirements, in particular the read-out speed needed to cope with the beam related background. This achievement is grounded on the double- sided ladder concept, which allows combining signals generated by a single particle in two different sensors, one devoted to spatial resolution and the other to time stamp, both assembled on the same mechanical support. The status of the development is overviewed as well as the plans to finalise it using an advanced CMOS process.

  16. In-laboratory development of an automatic track counting system for solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Sefa Kemal; Demiröz, Işık; Ulus, İzzet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an automatic track counting system was developed for solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Firstly the specifications of required hardware components were determined, and accordingly the CCD camera, microscope and stage motor table was supplied and integrated. The system was completed by developing parametric software with VB.Net language. Finally a set of test intended for radon activity concentration measurement was applied. According to the test results, the system was enabled for routine radon measurement. Whether the parameters of system are adjusted for another SSNTD application, it could be used for other fields of SSNTD like neutron dosimetry or heavy charged particle detection.

  17. Development of pyroelectric neutron source for calibration of neutrino and dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Ionidi, V. Y.; Gromov, M. B.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Klyuyev, A. S.; Kubankin, A. S.; Oleinik, A. N.; Shchagin, A. V.; Vokhmyanina, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    The laboratory experimental setup for development of pyroelectric neutron generator for calibration of neutrino and dark matter detectors for direct search of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) has been developed. The setup allows providing and controlling the neutrons generation process realized during d-d nuclear fusion. It is shown that the neutrons with energy 2.45 MeV can be generated starting from a level of electric potential generated by pyroelectric crystal about 30 kV, in contrast to the typical neutron tubes which need the applied outer high voltage level about 100 kV.

  18. Pixel Vertex Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel vertex detectors are THE instrument of choice for the tracking of charged particles close to the interaction point at the LHC. Hybrid pixel detectors, in which sensor and read-out IC are separate entities, constitute the present state of the art in detector technology. Three of the LHC detectors use vertex detectors based on this technology. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as ...

  19. Progress in the Development of CdZnTe Unipolar Detectors for Different Anode Geometries and Data Corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Ren

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available CdZnTe detectors have been under development for the past two decades, providing good stopping power for gamma rays, lightweight camera heads and improved energy resolution. However, the performance of this type of detector is limited primarily by incomplete charge collection problems resulting from charge carriers trapping. This paper is a review of the progress in the development of CdZnTe unipolar detectors with some data correction techniques for improving performance of the detectors. We will first briefly review the relevant theories. Thereafter, two aspects of the techniques for overcoming the hole trapping issue are summarized, including irradiation direction configuration and pulse shape correction methods. CdZnTe detectors of different geometries are discussed in detail, covering the principal of the electrode geometry design, the design and performance characteristics, some detector prototypes development and special correction techniques to improve the energy resolution. Finally, the state of art development of 3-D position sensing and Compton imaging technique are also discussed. Spectroscopic performance of CdZnTe semiconductor detector will be greatly improved even to approach the statistical limit on energy resolution with the combination of some of these techniques.

  20. Development of a multi-detector and a systematic imaging system on the AGLAE external beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, L., E-mail: laurent.pichon@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Moignard, B.; Lemasson, Q.; Pacheco, C. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Walter, P. [Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS-UMR 8220, Laboratoire d’archéologie moléculaire et structurale, LAMS, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-01-01

    The New AGLAE external beamline provides analytical data for the understanding of the structure of archaeological and artistic objects, their composition, properties, and changes over time. One of the objectives of this project is to design and set up a new non-invasive acquisition system increasing the quality of the X-ray spectra and reducing the beam current on sensitive materials from work of art. To that end, the surface and the number of PIXE detectors have been increased to implement a cluster of SDD detectors. This can also provide the possibility to accomplish large and/or fast maps on artifacts with a scanning of the beam on the sample. During the mapping, a multi-parameter system saves each event from X-ray, gamma and particle detectors, simultaneously with the X and Y positions of the beam on the sample. To process the data, different softwares have been developed or updated. A first example on a decorated medieval shard highlights the perspectives of the technique.

  1. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  2. Development of low-noise kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlis, Alyssa; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Bradford, Charles M.; McKenney, Christopher; Le Duc, Henry G.; Aguirre, James

    2017-01-01

    The star formation mechanisms at work in the early universe remain one of the major unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. Many spectral lines at far-infrared wavelengths (10 μm working to develop a detector system for a far-infrared balloon-borne spectroscopic experiment using kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), which have the potential to achieve high sensitivity, low noise levels, high multiplexing factor, and may enable future space missions. We describe the design, fabrication, and noise performance measurements of prototype detector devices targeting an optical noise equivalent power below 1 ×10-17 WHz - 1 / 2 with readout frequencies below 250 MHz. The devices consist of arrays of 45 lumped-element KID pixels patterned out of thin-film aluminum on silicon wafers. They are optically coupled to incident radiation with a set of feedhorns. We use an FPGA-based readout system to read out the response of all the pixels in the array simultaneously. This work was supported by a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  3. Development of a microtpc detector as a standard instrument for low energy neutron field characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Maire, D; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Lebreton, L; Mayet, F; Médard, J; Muraz, J-F; Richer, J-P; Riffard, Q; Santos, D

    2013-01-01

    In order to measure energy and fluence of neutron fields, with energy ranging from 8 keV to 1 MeV, a new primary standard is being developed at the IRSN (Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety). This project, micro-TPC (Micro Time Projection Chamber), carried out in collaboration with the LPSC, is based on the nucleus recoil detector principle. The measurement strategy requires track reconstruction of recoiling nuclei down to a few keV, which can be achieved with a low pressure gaseous detector using a micro-pattern gaseous detector. A gas mixture, mainly isobutane, is used as a n-p converter to detect neutrons into the detection volume. Then electrons, coming from the ionization of the gas by the proton recoil, are collected by the pixelised anode (2D projection). A self-triggered electronics is able to perform the anode readout at a 50 MHz frequency in order to give the third dimension of the track. Then the scattering angle is deduced from this track using algorithms. The charge collection leads ...

  4. Development of an ASIC for Si/CdTe detectors in a radioactive substance visualizing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harayama, Atsushi; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Sato, Goro; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2014-11-01

    We report on the recent development of a 64-channel analog front-end ASIC for a new gamma-ray imaging system designed to visualize radioactive substances. The imaging system employs a novel Compton camera which consists of silicon (Si) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors. The ASIC is intended for the readout of pixel/pad detectors utilizing Si/CdTe as detector materials, and covers a dynamic range up to 1.4 MeV. The readout chip consists of 64 identical signal channels and was implemented with X-FAB 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Each channel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a pole-zero cancellation circuit, a low-pass filter, a comparator, and a sample-hold circuit, along with a Wilkinson-type A-to-D converter. We observed an equivalent noise charge of 500 e- and a noise slope of 5 e-/pF (r.m.s.) with a power consumption of 2.1 mW per channel. The chip works well when connected to Schottky CdTe diodes, and delivers spectra with good energy resolution, such as 12 keV (FWHM) at 662 keV and 24 keV (FWHM) at 1.33 MeV.

  5. Development of an ASIC for Si/CdTe detectors in a radioactive substance visualizing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harayama, Atsushi, E-mail: harayama@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Sato, Goro [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Ikeda, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2014-11-21

    We report on the recent development of a 64-channel analog front-end ASIC for a new gamma-ray imaging system designed to visualize radioactive substances. The imaging system employs a novel Compton camera which consists of silicon (Si) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors. The ASIC is intended for the readout of pixel/pad detectors utilizing Si/CdTe as detector materials, and covers a dynamic range up to 1.4 MeV. The readout chip consists of 64 identical signal channels and was implemented with X-FAB 0.35μm CMOS technology. Each channel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a pole-zero cancellation circuit, a low-pass filter, a comparator, and a sample-hold circuit, along with a Wilkinson-type A-to-D converter. We observed an equivalent noise charge of ∼500 e{sup −} and a noise slope of ∼5 e{sup −}/pF (r.m.s.) with a power consumption of 2.1 mW per channel. The chip works well when connected to Schottky CdTe diodes, and delivers spectra with good energy resolution, such as ∼12 keV (FWHM) at 662 keV and ∼24 keV (FWHM) at 1.33 MeV.

  6. Recent Developments on the Silicon Drift Detector readout scheme for the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Bonazzola, G C; Bonvicini, V; Cavagnino, D; Cerello, P G; De Remigis, P; Falchieri, D; Gabrielli, A; Gandolfi, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández, R; Masetti, M; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F

    1999-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for LEB99, Snowmass, Colorado, 20-24 September 1999Recent developments of the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) readout system for the ALICE Experiment are presented. The foreseen readout system is based on 2 main units. The first unit consists of a low noise preamplifier, an analog memory which continuously samples the amplifier output, an A/D converter and a digital memory. When the trigger signal validates the analog data, the ADCs convert the samples into a digital form and store them into the digital memory. The second unit performs the zero suppression/data compression operations. In this paper the status of the design is presented, together with the test results of the A/D converter, the multi-event buffer and the compression unit prototype.Summary:In the Inner Tracker System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment the third and the fourth layer of the detectors are SDDs. These detectors provide the measurement of both the energy deposition and the bi-dimensional position of the track. In terms o...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH RATE HIGH RESOLUTION DETECTOR FOR EXAFS EXPERIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE GERONIMO,G.; O CONNOR,P.; BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.; LI,Z.; KUCZEWSKI,A.J.; SIDDONS,D.P.

    2002-11-10

    A new detector for EXAFS experiments is being developed. It is based on a multi-element Si sensor and dedicated readout ASICs. The sensor is composed of 384 pixels, each having 1 mm{sup 2} area, arranged in four quadrants of 12 x 8 elements, and wire-bonded to 32-channel front-end ASICs. Each channel implements low noise preamplification with self-adaptive continuous reset, high order shaper, band-gap referenced baseline stabilizer, one threshold comparator and two DAC adjustable window comparators, each followed by a 24-bit counter. Fabricated in 0.35{micro}m CMOS dissipates about 8mW per channel. First measurements show at room temperature a resolution of 14 rms electrons without the detector and of 40 rms electrons (340eV) with the detector connected and biased. Cooling at -35C a FWHM of 205eV (167eV from electronics) was measured at the Mn-K{alpha} line. A resolution of about 300eV was measured for rates approaching 100kcps/cm{sup 2} per channel, corresponding to an overall rate in excess of 10MHz/cm{sup 2}. A channel-to-channel threshold dispersion after DACs adjustment of 2.5 rms electrons was also measured.

  8. Development of a one-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector for tracking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Leigh Kent, IV

    Optical Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS processing, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. Because they are non-contact, they do not degrade over time from surface friction due to repetitive sliding motion associated with standard full contact sliding potentiometers. This results in long, reliable device lifetimes. In this work, an innovative PSD was developed to replace the linear hard contact potentiometer currently being used in a human-computer interface architecture. First, a basic lateral effect PSD was developed to provide real-time positioning of the mouthpiece used in the interface architecture which tracks along a single axis. During the course of this work, multiple device geometries were fabricated and analyzed resulting in a down selection of a final design. This final device design was then characterized in terms of resolution and responsivity and produced in larger quantities as initial prototypes for the test product integration. Finally, an electronic readout circuit was developed in order to interface the dual- line lateral effect PSD developed in this thesis with specifications required for product integration. To simplify position sensing, an innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using a linear photodiodes with back-to-back connections. This so- called Self-Balancing Position Sensitive Detector (SBPSD) requires significantly fewer processing steps than the basic lateral effect position sensitive detector discussed above and eliminates the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Prototype devices were fabricated in this work, and the performance characteristics of these devices were established paving the way for ultimate integration into the target product as well as additional applications.

  9. Lessons from Coronagraphic Imaging with HST that may apply to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major capabilities offered by JWST is coronagraphic imaging from space, covering the near through mid-IR and optimized for study of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems. Planning for JWST has resulted in expectations for instrument performance, observation strategies and data reduction approaches. HST with 20 years of coronagraphic imaging offers some experience which may be useful to those planning for JWST. 1) Real astronomical sources do not necessarily conform to expectations. Debris disks may be accompanied by more distant material, and some systems may be conspicuous in scattered light when offering only modest IR excesses. Proto-planetary disks are not constantly illuminated, and thus a single epoch observation of the source may not be sufficient to reveal everything about it. 2) The early expectation with NICMOS was that shallow, 2-roll observations would reveal a wealth of debris disks imaged in scattered light, and that only a limited set of PSF observations would be required. Instead, building up a library of spatially resolved disks in scattered light has proven to require alternate observing strategies, is still on-going, and has taken far longer than expected. 3) A wealth of coronagraphic options with an instrument may not be scientifically informative, unless there is a similar time investment in acquisition of calibration data in support of the science observations. 4) Finally, no one anticipated what can be gleaned from coronagraphic imaging. We should expect similar, unexpected, and ultimately revolutionary discoveries with JWST.

  10. Recovering the Properties of High-redshift Galaxies with Different JWST Broadband Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations of the bulk of distant galaxies at the epoch of reionization. The recovery of their properties, such as age, color excess , specific star formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass, will mostly rely on spectral energy distrib...

  11. Assembly and Commissioning of a Liquid Argon Detector and Development of a Slow Control System for the COHERENT Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaemingk, Michael; Cooper, Robert; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    COHERENT is a collaboration whose goal is to measure coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS). COHERENT plans to deploy a suite of detectors to measure the expected number-of-neutrons squared dependence of CEvNS at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One of these detectors is a liquid argon detector which can measure these low energy nuclear recoil interactions. Ensuring optimal functionality requires the development of a slow control system to monitor and control various aspects, such as the temperature and pressure, of these detectors. Electronics manufactured by Beckhoff, Digilent, and Arduino among others are being used to create these slow control systems. This poster will generally discuss the assembly and commissioning of this CENNS-10 liquid argon detector at Indiana University and will feature work on the slow control systems.

  12. Development and optimization progress with RICOR cryocoolers for HOT IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Amiram; Bar Haim, Zvi; Riabzev, Sergey; Segal, Victor; Filis, Avishai; Gover, Dan

    2016-05-01

    The world growth in research and development of High Operating Temperature (HOT) IR detectors impels the development and optimization of suitable cryocoolers. The current developments at RICOR, which include three different cryocooler models and two new controllers, are focused on the - oriented design process, meaning small Size, low Weight, low Power consumption, improved performance and lower production cost, providing proper cryocoolers for future hand held thermal imagers. This paper shows the progress made during development of "HOT" cryocooler prototypes, engineering pre-production series and qualified production series cryocoolers working at the FPA temperature range of 130 - 200K. The progress with development of electronic control modules providing minimized regulated power consumption is also shown. The progress in development of cryocoolers reliability is also reported in the paper.

  13. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha–beta–gamma imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ishibashi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi Chemical, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-06-11

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha–beta–gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and

  14. X-ray Hybrid CMOS Detectors : Recent progress in development and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Burrows, David N.

    2017-08-01

    PennState high energy astronomy laboratory has been working on the development and characterization of Hybrid CMOS Detectors (HCDs) for last few years in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS). HCDs are preferred over X-ray CCDs due to their higher and flexible read out rate, radiation hardness and low power which make them more suitable for next generation large area X-ray telescopic missions. An H2RG detector with 36 micron pixel pitch and 18 micron ROIC, has been selected for a sounding rocket flight in 2018. The H2RG detector provides ~2.5 % energy resolution at 5.9 keV and ~7 e- read noise when coupled to a cryo-SIDECAR. We could also detect a clear Oxygen line (~0.5 keV) from the detector implying a lower energy threshold of ~0.3 keV. Further improvement in the energy resolution and read noise is currently under progress. We have been working on the characterization of small pixel HCDs (12.5 micron pixel; smallest pixel HCDs developed so far) which is important for the development of next generation high resolution X-ray spectroscopic instrument based on HCDs. Event recognition in HCDs is another exciting prospect which have been successfully shown to work with a 64 X 64 pixel prototype SPEEDSTAR-EXD which use comparators at each pixel to read out only those pixels having detectable signal, thereby providing an order of magnitude improvement in the read out rate. Currently, we are working on the development of a large area SPEEDSTAR-EXD array for the development of a full fledged instrument. HCDs due to their fast read out, can also be explored as a large FOV instrument to study GRB afterglows and variability and spectroscopic study of other astrophysical transients. In this context, we are characterizing a Lobster-HCD system at multiple energies and multiple off-axis angles for future rocket or CubeSate experiments. In this presentation, I will briefly present these new developments and experiments with HCDs and the analysis techniques.

  15. Development and performance of a hand-held CZT detector for in-situ measurements at the emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Young Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Kim, Chang Jong; Lee, Wan No; Choi, Geun Sik; Kang, Mun Ja [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jin [SI Detection Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A hand-held detector for an emergency response was developed for nuclide identification and to estimate the information of the ambient dose rate in the scene of an accident as well as the radioactivity of the contaminants. To achieve this, the most suitable sensor was first selected as a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor and the signal processing unit from a sensor and the signal discrimination and storage unit were successfully manufactured on a printed circuit board. The performance of the developed signal processing unit was then evaluated to have an energy resolution of about 14 keV at 662 keV. The system control unit was also designed to operate the CZT detector, monitor the detector, battery, and interface status, and check and transmit the measured results of the ambient dose rate and radioactivity. In addition, a collimator, which can control the inner radius, and the airborne dust sampler, which consists of an air filter and charcoal filter, were developed and mounted to the developed CZT detector for the quick and efficient response of a nuclear accident. The hand-held CZT detector was developed to make the in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry and its performance was checked to have a good energy resolution. In addition, the collimator and the airborne dust sampler were developed and mounted to the developed CZT detector for a quick and efficient response to a nuclear accident.

  16. EMC Testing on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) - A Summary of the EMC Test Campaign for the Science Payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft/observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  17. Development of ultra-light pixelated ladders for an ILC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Chon-Sen, N; Claus, G; De Masi, R; Deveaux, M; Dulinski, W; Goffe, M; Goldstein, J; Gregor, I -M; Imhoff, Ch Hu-Guo M; Müntz, C; Nomerotski, A; Santos, C; Schrader, C; Specht, M; Stroth, J; Winter, M

    2010-01-01

    The development of ultra-light pixelated ladders is motivated by the requirements of the ILD vertex detector at ILC. This paper summarizes three projects related to system integration. The PLUME project tackles the issue of assembling double-sided ladders. The SERWIETE project deals with a more innovative concept and consists in making single-sided unsupported ladders embedded in an extra thin plastic enveloppe. AIDA, the last project, aims at building a framework reproducing the experimental running conditions where sets of ladders could be tested.

  18. Development of a Rubric to Assess Academic Writing Incorporating Plagiarism Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Razı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Similarity reports of plagiarism detectors should be approached with caution as they may not be sufficient to support allegations of plagiarism. This study developed a 50-item rubric to simplify and standardize evaluation of academic papers. In the spring semester of 2011-2012 academic year, 161 freshmen’s papers at the English Language Teaching Department of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey, were assessed using the rubric. Validity and reliability were established. The results indicated citation as a particularly problematic aspect, and indicated that fairer assessment could be achieved by using the rubric along with plagiarism detectors’ similarity results.

  19. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained.

  20. Design and development of a ferroelectric micro photo detector for the bionic eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang

    Driven by no effective therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age Related Macular Degeneration, artificial vision through the development of an artificial retina that can be implanted into the human eye, is being addressed by the Bionic Eye. This dissertation focuses on the study of a photoferroelectric micro photo detector as an implantable retinal prosthesis for vision restoration in patients with above disorders. This implant uses an electrical signal to trigger the appropriate ocular cells of the vision system without resorting to wiring or electrode implantation. The research work includes fabrication of photoferroelectric thin film micro detectors, characterization of these photoferroelectric micro devices as photovoltaic cells, and Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling of the photoferroelectrics and their device-neuron interface. A ferroelectric micro detector exhibiting the photovoltaic effect (PVE) directly adds electrical potential to the neuron membrane outer wall at the focal adhesion regions. The electrical potential then generates a retinal cell membrane potential deflection through a newly developed Direct-Electric-Field-Coupling (DEFC) model. This model is quite different from the traditional electric current model because instead of current directly working on the cell membrane, the PVE current is used to generate a localized high electric potential in the focal adhesion region by working together with the anisotropic high internal impedance of ferroelectric thin films. General electrodes and silicon photodetectors do not have such anisotropy and high impedance, and thus they cannot generate DEFC. This mechanism investigation is very valuable, because it clearly shows that our artificial retina works in a way that is totally different from the traditional current stimulation methods.

  1. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: three decades of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been considerable progress towards III-V antimonide-based low dimensional solids development and device design innovations. From a physics point of view, the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice is an extremely attractive proposition. Their development results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe FPAs at reasonable cost and theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type-II superlattice (T2SL) detectors compared to HgCdTe. Lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime are equal. Based on these promising results it is obvious now that the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology is competing with HgCdTe third generation detector technology with the potential advantage of standard III-V technology to be more competitive in costs and as a consequence series production pricing. Comments to the statement whether the superlattice IR photodetectors can outperform the "bulk" narrow gap HgCdTe detectors is one of the most important questions for the future of IR photodetectors presented by Rogalski at the April 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, Florida, are more credible today and are presented in this paper. It concerns the trade-offs between two most competing IR material technologies: InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices and HgCdTe ternary alloy system.

  2. Development of a transition radiation detector and reconstruction of photon conversions in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie

    2009-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. In addition, the usage of the TRD in the measurement of direct photons is investigated. CBM will be a fixed-target heavy-ion experiment, which investigates collisions in the beam energy range of 5-35 AGeV and aims to investigate the regime of high baryon densities where the phase transition is expected to be of first order. It will be a multipurpose experiment with the ability to measure leptons, hadrons, and photons. Therein, a TRD will provide the electron identification and - together with a Silicon Tracking System (STS) - the tracking of charged particles. In conjunction with a ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement, the TRD is to provide a sufficient electron identification for the measurements of charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. For the TRD, the required pion suppression is a factor of about 100 at 90% electron efficiency, and the position resolution has to be of the order of 300 to 500 um. Moreover, the material budget in terms of radiation length has to be kept at a minimum in order to minimize multiple scattering and conversions which would limit the precise measurement in following TRD stations and other detectors. The largest and up to now unrivaled challenge for the TRD design is that both (PID and tracking) have to be fulfilled in the context of very high particle rates (event rates of up to 10MHz are envisaged) and at the same time large charged-particle multiplicities of up to 600 per event in the CBM detector acceptance. Small prototypes of the TRD based on multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) with pad readout were developed and tested. The tracking performance and the electron-pion separation were determined for particle rates of up to 200 kHz/cm{sup 2}. The TRD layout and the detector

  3. Development of Portable Uranium Enrichment Measurement Apparatus With CdZnTe Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>A portable uranium enrichment measurement apparatus with CdZnTe detector manufactured by "eV Products" company was tested in this work. The apparatus consists of a co-planar grid detector based on

  4. Development of cryogenic Si detectors by CERN RD39 Collaboration for ultra radiation hardness in SLHC environment

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Anbinderis, P; Anbinderis, T; D’Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, M; Buontempo, S; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Dierlamm, A; Eremin, V; Gaubas, E; Gorbatenko, V; Grigoriev, E; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Hempel, O; Herzog, R; Härkönen, J; Ilyashenko, I; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Kalesinskas, V; Kapturauskas, J; Laiho, R; Luukka, P; Mandic, I; De Masi, R; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Niinikosky, T O; O’Shea, V; Pagano, S; Paul, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Pretzl, K; Rato-Mendes, P; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Sousa, P; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Verbitskaya, E; Vaitkus, J; Wobst, E; Zavrtanik, M

    2007-01-01

    There are two key approaches in our CERN RD 39 Collaboration efforts to obtain ultra-radiation-hard Si detectors: (1) use of the charge/current injection to manipulate the detector internal electric field in such a way that it can be depleted at a modest bias voltage at cryogenic temperature range (150 K), and (2) freezing out of the trapping centers that affects the CCE at cryogenic temperatures lower than that of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In our first approach, we have developed the advanced radiation hard detectors using charge or current injection, the current injected diodes (CID). In a CID, the electric field is controlled by injected current, which is limited by the space charge, yielding a nearly uniform electric field in the detector, independent of the radiation fluence. In our second approach, we have developed models of radiation-induced trapping levels and the physics of their freezing out at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Information Content Analysis for Selection of Optimal JWST Observing Modes for Transiting Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Line, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is nearing its launch date of 2018, and is expected to revolutionize our knowledge of exoplanet atmospheres. In order to specifically identify which observing modes will be most useful for characterizing a diverse range of exoplanetary atmospheres, we use an information content (IC) based approach commonly used in the studies of solar system atmospheres. We develop a system based upon these IC methods to trace the instrumental and atmospheric model phase space in order to identify which observing modes are best suited for particular classes of planets, focusing on transmission spectra. Specifically, the atmospheric parameter space we cover is T = 600-1800 K, C/O = 0.55-1, [M/H] = 1-100 × Solar for an R = 1.39 R J , M = 0.59 M J planet orbiting a WASP-62-like star. We also explore the influence of a simplified opaque gray cloud on the IC. We find that obtaining broader wavelength coverage over multiple modes is preferred over higher precision in a single mode given the same amount of observing time. Regardless of the planet temperature and composition, the best modes for constraining terminator temperatures, C/O ratios, and metallicity are NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. If the target’s host star is dim enough such that the NIRSpec prism is applicable, then it can be used instead of NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. Lastly, observations that use more than two modes should be carefully analyzed because sometimes the addition of a third mode results in no gain of information. In these cases, higher precision in the original two modes is favorable.

  6. X-ray detectors in axial computed tomography development; Sensori di radiazioni X negli sviluppi della tomografia assiale computerizzata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gislon, R.; Imperiali, F. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione

    1996-12-01

    The increase of potentially of axial computed tomography as a non destructive investigation method in industrial field is particularly tied to the development of the X-rays detectors. The transition from the first gas ionization detectors to the last semiconductor detectors has indeed dramatically increased the performances of tomographic systems. In this report, after a quick analysis of fundamental principles of tomography, the most significant parameters for a detector to be used in a tomographic system are reviewed. The examination of the principal kinds of detectors that have been up to now used, with their working schemes, allows to delineate their characteristics and so to compare them with the ideal detector sketched above. The necessity of using high definition arrays brings to put into evidence the inadequacy of both gas and liquid ionization detectors and also of those types of light conversion devices which utilize for signal amplification a photomultiplier tube. Systems based on charge coupled devices or on a light conversion obtained with semiconductor photodiode arrays are definitely to be preferred. The progress of the last years in microelectronic technologies has brought great improvements in this field.

  7. The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Hilary B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 1011 cmHz 1/2W-1 for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 1010 cmHz1/2W-1 . KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. SixNymembranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO3/Pt/Ti/SixNy/Si and SrRuO3/SixNy/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is ~380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom

  8. The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, H B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 10{sup 11} cmHz {sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1} for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 10{sup 10} cmHz{sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1}. KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. Si{sub x}N{sub y} membranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO{sub 3}/Pt/Ti/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si and SrRuO{sub 3}/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is {approximately}380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom electrode layers to Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si.

  9. Development of neutron/gamma generators and a polymer semiconductor detector for homeland security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael Joseph

    -energetic gamma generators that operate at low-acceleration energies and leverage neutron generator technologies. The dissertation focused on the experimental characterization of the generator performance and involved MCNPX simulations to evaluate and analyze the experimental results. The emission of the 11.7 MeV gamma-rays was observed to be slightly anisotropic and the gamma yield was measured to be 2.0*105 gamma/s-mA. The lanthanum hexaboride target suffered beam damage from a high power density beam; however, this may be overcome by sweeping the beam across a larger target area. The efficient detection of fast neutrons is vital to active interrogation techniques for the detection of both SNM and explosives. Novel organic semiconductors are air-stable, low-cost materials that demonstrate direct electronic particle detection. As part of the development of a pi-conjugated organic polymer for fast neutron detection, charge generation and collection properties were investigated. By devising a dual, thin-film detector test arrangement, charge collection was measured for high energy protons traversing the dual detector arrangement that allowed the creation of variable track lengths by tilting the detector. The results demonstrated that an increase in track length resulted in a decreased signal collection. This can be understood by assuming charge carrier transport along the track instead of along the field lines, which was made possible by the filling of traps. However, this charge collection mechanism may be insufficient to generate a useful signal. This dissertation has explored the viability of a new generation of radiation sources and detectors, where the newly developed ion source technologies and prototype generators will further enhance the capabilities of existing threat detection systems and promote the development of cutting-edge detection technologies.

  10. Performance and development for the Inner Detector Trigger algorithms at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Penc, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) Trigger algorithms being developed for running on the ATLAS High Level Trigger (HLT) processor farm during Run 2 of the LHC are presented. During the 2013-14 LHC long shutdown modifications are being carried out to the LHC accelerator to increase both the beam energy and luminosity. These modifications will pose significant challenges for the ID Trigger algorithms, both in terms execution time and physics performance. To meet these challenges, the ATLAS HLT software is being restructured to run as a more flexible single stage HLT, instead of two separate stages (Level2 and Event Filter) as in Run 1. This will reduce the overall data volume that needs to be requested by the HLT system, since data will no longer need to be requested for each of the two separate processing stages. Development of the ID Trigger algorithms for Run 2, currently expected to be ready for detector commissioning near the end of 2014, is progressing well and the current efforts towards op...

  11. Development of a simple test device for spindle error measurement using a position sensitive detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Lee, Hau-Wei

    2004-09-01

    A new spindle error measurement system has been developed in this paper. It employs a design development rotational fixture with a built-in laser diode and four batteries to replace a precision reference master ball or cylinder used in the traditional method. Two measuring devices with two position sensitive detectors (one is designed for the measurement of the compound X-axis and Y-axis errors and the other is designed with a lens for the measurement of the tilt angular errors) are fixed on the machine table to detect the laser point position from the laser diode in the rotational fixture. When the spindle rotates, the spindle error changes the direction of the laser beam. The laser beam is then divided into two separated beams by a beam splitter. The two separated beams are projected onto the two measuring devices and are detected by two position sensitive detectors, respectively. Thus, the compound motion errors and the tilt angular errors of the spindle can be obtained. Theoretical analysis and experimental tests are presented in this paper to separate the compound errors into two radial errors and tilt angular errors. This system is proposed as a new instrument and method for spindle metrology.

  12. Development of a 3D CZT detector prototype for Laue Lens telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroli, Ezio; Auricchio, Natalia; Del Sordo, Stefano; Abbene, Leonardo; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Casini, Fabio; Curado da Silva, Rui M.; Kuvvetlli, Irfan; Milano, Luciano; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Quadrini, Egidio M.; Stephen, John B.; Ubertini, Pietro; Zanichelli, Massimiliano; Zappettini, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of a 3D position sensitive prototype suitable as focal plane detector for Laue lens telescope. The basic sensitive unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, (~19×8 mm2 area, 2.4 mm thick), irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode side is segmented in 64 strips, that divide the crystal in 8 independent sensor (pixel), each composed by one collecting strip and 7 (one in common) adjacent drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider, whereas the anode strips are held at ground. Furthermore, the cathode is divided in 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the third interaction position coordinate. The 3D prototype will be made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed by one basic sensitive unit, bonded on a ceramic layer. The linear modules readout is provided by a custom front end electronics implementing a set of three RENA-3 for a total of 128 channels. The front-end electronics and the operating logics (in particular coincidence logics for polarisation measurements) are handled by a versatile and modular multi-parametric back end electronics developed using FPGA technology.

  13. Development of a Calibration System for Cryogenic Light Detectors in CUPID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Kolomensky, Yury; O'Donnell, Thomas; Schmidt, Benjamin; Cupid Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    If neutrino is a Majorana particle, it is possible to observe neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ), whose signature is a monochromatic line at the Q-value of the decay in the energy spectrum of the two electrons. Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment which aims to search for 0 νββ in 130Te with TeO2 bolometers, whose background is dominated by α particles from natural radioactivity in the detector material. CUPID (CUORE Upgrade with Particle IDentification) is the next generation experiment proposed to distinguish 0 νββ events from those of α particles with Cherenkov radiation. An important part of CUPID R&D is to design, build and characterize a calibration system that can generate a known amount of light and transport that light to the dilution refrigerator at mK temperatures. We describe the design, implementation and performance of a calibration system developed for bolometric light detectors. Preparation work includes researching and selecting a light source (LED). A transport system (optical fiber) was developed to direct the light to the coldest part of the dilution refrigerator. Additionally, the light yield attenuation of optical fiber at cryogenic temperatures was measured. This project is supported by National Science Foundation and UC-Berkeley.

  14. Development and performances of very long stripe-filters for a multispectral detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubier, David; Gimenez, Thierry; Mercier-Ythier, Renaud

    2002-01-01

    The development in the past few years of all-mirror telescopes has opened a wide new range of possibilities to instrument designers, with features like high compactness and outstanding optical quality over wide fields of view. However, this design imposes specific constraints on the focal plane: it can no longer accommodate glass beamsplitters and its size increases with the field of view. New CCD detectors with multiple long lines are well-suited to this application, but require a new filters strategy. This paper will detail what ours was in the particular case of a 78-mm long, 4-channel CCD. The choice of the stripe- filters concept was made on the basis of a performance versus cost analysis. Two kinds of assemblies were retained at this stage. The components manufactured by SAGEM-REOSC PRODUCTS in an initial development phase showed good spectral performance with high rejection over a very wide range of wavelengths. Some topics like local defects and straylight needed specific work. The paper focuses on the impact of the defects on the performances and the way they have been dealt with, and on the straylight design strategy with the results obtained in the different cases. In particular, it shows how the detector's design can be partially driven by the straylight requirements.

  15. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  16. Investigation of the physics potential and detector development for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlerich, Martin

    2010-02-15

    In this thesis, we investigate two rather separate topics - the precision measurement of the Higgs boson mass and of its coupling to the neutral gauge boson Z and the research and development of sensors for BEAMCAL, which is a sub-detector system of the ILC detector. We employ the Higgs-strahlung process for this purpose. A virtual Z boson is created in the e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, which emits a Higgs-boson while becoming on-shell. Using the so-called recoil technique, we determine the Higgs boson mass by reconstructing the Z boson momentum and using the center-of-mass energy of the colliding leptons. Monte-Carlo studies including a full detector simulation and a full event reconstruction were performed to simulate the impact of a realistic detector model on the precision of the Higgs boson mass and production cross-section measurement. Also, an analytical estimate of the influence of a given detector performance on the Higgs boson mass measurement uncertainty is given. We included a complete sample of background events predicted by the Standard Model, which may have a detector response similar to the signal events. A probabilistic method is used for the signal-background separation. Several other probabilistic methods were used to investigate and improve the measurement of the Higgs-strahlung cross-section and the Higgs boson mass from the recoil mass spectrum obtained after the signal-background separation. For a Higgs boson mass of 120 GeV, a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=250 GeV and an integrated luminosity of L=50 fb{sup -1}, a relative uncertainty of 10 % is obtained for the cross-section measurement, and a precision of 118 MeV for the Higgs boson mass. For a Higgs boson mass of 180 GeV and {radical}(s)=350 GeV, a statistics corresponding to L=50 fb{sup -1} is not sufficient to achieve the necessary significance of the recoil mass peak above the background. The BEAMCAL is a calorimeter in the very forward region, about 3 m away from the nominal

  17. Proposal to develop GaAs detectors for physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont, S P; Booth, C N; Buttar, C M; Carraresi, L; Colocci, M; Combley, F; D'Auria, S D; del Papa, C; Dogru, M; Edwards, M; Fiori, F; Francescato, A; Hou, Y; Lynch, J G; Lisowski, B; Matheson, J; Newett, S; Nuti, M; O'Shea, V; Pelfer, P G; Raine, P H; Sharp, P H; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smith, K M; Tartoni, N; ten Have, I; Turnbull, R M; Vanni, U; Vinattieri, A; Zichichi, Antonino; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    The present proposal first describes the results obtained using GaAs Schottky diode detectors which we have constructed, and the initial steps which we have taken towards the design of a GaAs preamplifier to match the detectors. We then propose a continuation of the programme of work towards a demonstration detector module for an LHC pre-shower tracker detector based on GaAs, within a time-scale of two years. The module will be compatible with the design of the proposed pre-shower tracker using silicon detectors (DRDC/P3), and should allow direct substitution for comparison purposes.

  18. Development and implementation of a new trigger and data acquisition system for the HADES detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Jan

    2012-11-16

    One of the crucial points of instrumentation in modern nuclear and particle physics is the setup of data acquisition systems (DAQ). In collisions of heavy ions, particles of special interest for research are often produced at very low rates resulting in the need for high event rates and a fast data acquisition. Additionally, the identification and precise tracking of particles requires fast and highly granular detectors. Both requirements result in very high data rates that have to be transported within the detector read-out system: Typical experiments produce data at rates of 200 to 1,000 MByte/s. The structure of the trigger and read-out systems of such experiments is quite similar: A central instance generates a signal that triggers read-out of all sub-systems. The signals from each detector system are then processed and digitized by front-end electronics before they are transported to a computing farm where data is analyzed and prepared for long-term storage. Some systems introduce additional steps (high level triggers) in this process to select only special types of events to reduce the amount of data to be processed later. The main focus of this work is put on the development of a new data acquisition system for the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer HADES located at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. Fully operational since 2002, its front-end electronics and data transport system were subject to a major upgrade program. The goal was an increase of the event rate capabilities by a factor of more than 20 to reach event rates of 20 kHz in heavy ion collisions and more than 50 kHz in light collision systems. The new electronics are based on FPGA-equipped platforms distributed throughout the detector. Data is transported over optical fibers to reduce the amount of electromagnetic noise induced in the sensitive front-end electronics. Besides the high data rates of up to 500 MByte/s at the design event rate of 20 kHz, the

  19. Mechanical design and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan T; Beall, James A; Choi, Steve K; Crowley, Kevin T; Devlin, Mark J; Duff, Shannon M; Gallardo, Patricio M; Henderson, Shawn W; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Simon, Sara M; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N; Vavagiakis, Eve M; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling ~5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at t...

  20. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Astromskas, V.; Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2016-07-01

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e- collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system.

  1. Development of the MICROMEGAS Detector for Measuring the Energy Spectrum of Alpha Particles by using a 241-Am Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Do Yoon; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting {\\alpha} particles emitted from an 241-Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of {\\alpha} particles from the 241-Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the {\\alpha} particle from the 241 Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the {\\alpha} particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for {\\alpha} particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that {\\alpha} particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGA...

  2. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki; Ikeno, Masahiro; Tanaka, Manobu; Uchida, Tomohisa

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In the present paper, we introduce the detector system and present several test measurements performed at NOBORU (BL10), J-PARC to demonstrate the capabilities of our prototype. We also discuss future improvements to the spatial resolution and rate performance.

  3. Development of MMRPC prototype for the NeuLAND detector of the R3B collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, U. Datta; Chakraborty, S.; Basu, P.; Basu, J.; Banerjee, P.; Bemmerer, D.; Bose, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Elekes, Z.; Kempe, M.; Leifels, Y.; Panja, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Rahaman, A.; Roy, S.; Simon, H.; Sobiella, M.; Stach, D.; Wagner, A.; Yakorev, D.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype of Multi-strip Multi-gap Resistive Plate chamber (MMRPC) with active area 40cm×20cm has been developed at SINP, Kolkata as a new Time-Of-Flight (TOF) system with timing resolution σtEn>200MeV) TOF system for the R3B collaboration at the FAIR facility. The design of the detector elements is as follows: a double stack MMRPC with float glass plates and two gas gaps of 0.3 mm per stack. The response of this MMRPC has been studied with cosmic muons and γ-rays from a standard radioactive source (60Co) in coincidence with fast inorganic scintillators at SINP laboratory. Recently, response of developed MMRPC has been studied using pulsed electron beam at ELBE, FZD. The details of the MMRPC construction , experimental set-up for investigation of its response and first results are presented.

  4. Development and a SEU Test of a TDC LSI for the ATLAS Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Emura, T

    2001-01-01

    A new TDC LSI (AMT-2) for the ATLAS Muon detector has been developed. The AMT-2 chip is a successor of the previous prototype chip (AMT-1). The design of the chip was polished up for aiming mass production of 20,000 chips in year 2002. Especially, power consumption of the chip was reduced to less than half of the previous chip by introducing newly developed LVDS receivers. The AMT-2 was processed in a 0.3 mu m CMOS Gate-Array technology. It achieved 300 ps timing resolution and includes several data buffers, trigger matching circuit, JTAG interface and so on. First SEU test by using a proton beam was recently performed. Although the test results are very preliminary at present stage, we get very low SEU rate safely used in ATLAS environment. (7 refs).

  5. Development of TOF-PET detectors based on the Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaldi, U.; Borghi, G.; Bucciantonio, M.; Kieffer, R.; Samarati, J.; Sauli, F.; Watts, D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the development, construction and preliminary results obtained with medium-size Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers prototypes designed to detect and localize 511 keV photons for Positron Emission Tomography imaging applications. The devices are intended for in-beam monitoring of the treatment plans throughout deep tumor therapy with hadron beams; emphasis is put on achieving coincidence time resolutions of few hundred ps, in order to exploit optimized reconstruction algorithm and reduce the heavy non-correlated background contributions distinctive of this operation. Using technologies developed for high energy physics experiments, the detectors can be built for covering large areas, thus leading the way to the conception of full-body PET systems at low cost.

  6. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, Tahereh; Pizzichemi, Marco; Stringhini, Gianluca; Auffray, Etiennette; Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino; Ferramacho, Luis; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, Carlos; Paganoni, Marco; Rolo, Manuel; Silva, Rui; Silveira, Miguel; Tavernier, Stefaan; Varela, Joao; Zorraquino, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm3 matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM.

  7. Development of large area, pico-second resolution photo-detectors and associated readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabas, H.; Oberla, E. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Attenkoffer, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bogdan, M.; Frisch, H. J. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Genat, J. F. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3/LPNHE, Paris 75252 (France); Northrop, R. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); May, E. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Varner, G. S. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wetstein, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photo-detectors described in this contribution incorporate a photo-cathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and electron secondary emitters materials. They may be used for biomedical imaging purposes, a remarkable opportunity to apply technologies developed in HEP having the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). If daisy-chained and coupled to fast transmission lines read at both ends, they could be implemented in very large dimensions. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test has demonstrated gains of the order of 105 to 106. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photo-detectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. A 6-channel readout ASIC has been designed in 130 nm CMOS technology and tested. As a result, fast analog sampling up to 17 GS/s has been obtained, the intrinsic analog bandwidth being presently under evaluation. The digitization in parallel of several cells in two microseconds allows getting off-chip digital data read at a maximum rate of 40 MHz. Digital Signal Processing of the sampled waveforms is expected achieving the timing and space resolutions obtained with digital oscilloscopes. (authors)

  8. Firmware development and testing of the ATLAS Pixel Detector / IBL ROD card

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration; Balbi, Gabriele; Bindi, Marcello; Chen, Shaw-pin; Falchieri, Davide; Flick, Tobias; Hauck, Scott Alan; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Kretz, Moritz; Kugel, Andreas; Lama, Luca; Travaglini, Riccardo; Wensing, Marius; ATLAS Pixel Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is reworking and upgrading systems during the current LHC shut down. In particular, the Pixel detector has inserted an additional inner layer called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The Readout-Driver card (ROD), the Back-of-Crate card (BOC), and the S-Link together form the essential frontend data path of the IBL’s off-detector DAQ system. The strategy for IBL ROD firmware development was three-fold: keeping as much of the Pixel ROD datapath firmware logic as possible, employing a complete new scheme of steering and calibration firmware and designing the overall system to prepare for a future unified code version integrating IBL and Pixel layers. Essential features such as data formatting, frontend-specific error handling, and calibration are added to the ROD data path. An IBL DAQ testbench using realistic frontend chip model was created to serve as an initial framework for full offline electronic system simulation. In this document, major firmware achievements concerning the IBL ROD data pat...

  9. Firmware development and testing of the ATLAS Pixel Detector / IBL ROD card

    CERN Document Server

    Balbi, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Gabrielli, A; Lama, L; Travaglini, R; Backhaus, M; Bindi, M; Chen, S-P; Flick, T; Kretz, M; Kugel, A; Wensing, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is reworking and upgrading systems during the current LHC shut down. In particular, the Pixel detector has inserted an additional inner layer called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The Readout-Driver card (ROD), the Back-of-Crate card (BOC), and the S-Link together form the essential frontend data path of the IBL’s off-detector DAQ system. The strategy for IBLROD firmware development was three-fold: keeping as much of the PixelROD datapath firmware logic as possible, employing a complete new scheme of steering and calibration firmware and designing the overall system to prepare for a future unified code version integrating IBL and Pixel layers. Essential features such as data formatting, frontend-specific error handling, and calibration are added to the ROD data path. An IBLDAQ testbench using realistic frontend chip model was created to serve as an initial framework for full offline electronic system simulation. In this document, major firmware achievements concerning the IBLROD data path im...

  10. Firmware development and testing of the ATLAS Pixel Detector / IBL ROD card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, A.; Backhaus, M.; Balbi, G.; Bindi, M.; Chen, S. P.; Falchieri, D.; Flick, T.; Hauck, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Kretz, M.; Kugel, A.; Lama, L.; Travaglini, R.; Wensing, M.

    2015-03-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is reworking and upgrading systems during the current LHC shut down. In particular, the Pixel detector has inserted an additional inner layer called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The Readout-Driver card (ROD), the Back-of-Crate card (BOC), and the S-Link together form the essential frontend data path of the IBL's off-detector DAQ system. The strategy for IBL ROD firmware development was three-fold: keeping as much of the Pixel ROD datapath firmware logic as possible, employing a complete new scheme of steering and calibration firmware, and designing the overall system to prepare for a future unified code version integrating IBL and Pixel layers. Essential features such as data formatting, frontend-specific error handling, and calibration are added to the ROD data path. An IBL DAQ test bench using a realistic front-end chip model was created to serve as an initial framework for full offline electronic system simulation. In this document, major firmware achievements concerning the IBL ROD data path implementation, test on the test bench and ROD prototypes, will be reported. Recent Pixel collaboration efforts focus on finalizing hardware and firmware tests for the IBL. The plan is to approach a complete IBL DAQ hardware-software installation by the end of 2014.

  11. Development of a bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN for the fast ice nucleus chamber FINCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Bundke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector is designed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN for their biological content. Biological material is identified via its auto-fluorescence (intrinsic fluorescence after irradiation with UV radiation. Ice nuclei are key substances for precipitation development via the Bergeron–Findeisen process. The level of scientific knowledge regarding origin and climatology (temporal and spatial distribution of IN is very low. Some biological material is known to be active as IN even at relatively high temperatures of up to –2°C (e.g. pseudomonas syringae bacteria. These biological IN could have a strong influence on the formation of clouds and precipitation. We have designed the new BIO IN sensor to analyze the abundance of IN of biological origin. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft ''HALO'' (High Altitude and LOng Range.

  12. Development of a Single Detector Ring Micro Crystal Element Scanner: QuickPET II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Miyaoka

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a single ring version of the micro crystal element scanner (MiCES and investigation of its spatial resolution imaging characteristics for mouse positron emission tomography (PET imaging. This single ring version of the MiCES system, referred to as QuickPET II, consists of 18 MiCE detector modules mounted as a single ring in a vertical gantry. The system has a 5.76-cm transverse field of view and a 1.98-cm axial field of view. In addition to the scanner and data acquisition system, we have developed an iterative reconstruction that includes a model of the system's detector response function. Evaluation images of line sources and mice have been acquired. Using filtered backprojection, the resolution for a reconstructed line source has been measured at 1.2 mm full width at half maximum. F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose mouse PET images are provided. The result shows that QuickPET II has the imaging characteristics to support high-resolution, static mouse PET studies using 18-F labeled compounds.

  13. Development of a single detector ring micro crystal element scanner: QuickPET II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Robert S; Janes, Marie L; Lee, Kisung; Park, Byungki; Kinahan, Paul E; Lewellen, Tom K

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a single ring version of the micro crystal element scanner (MiCES) and investigation of its spatial resolution imaging characteristics for mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This single ring version of the MiCES system, referred to as QuickPET II, consists of 18 MiCE detector modules mounted as a single ring in a vertical gantry. The system has a 5.76-cm transverse field of view and a 1.98-cm axial field of view. In addition to the scanner and data acquisition system, we have developed an iterative reconstruction that includes a model of the system's detector response function. Evaluation images of line sources and mice have been acquired. Using filtered backprojection, the resolution for a reconstructed line source has been measured at 1.2 mm full width at half maximum. F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose mouse PET images are provided. The result shows that QuickPET II has the imaging characteristics to support high-resolution, static mouse PET studies using 18-F labeled compounds.

  14. Development and characterization of high-resolution neutron pixel detectors based on Timepix read-out chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, F.; Zemlicka, J.; Jakubek, J.; Dudak, J.; Vavrik, D.; Köster, U.; Atkins, D.; Kaestner, A.; Soltes, J.; Viererbl, L.; Vacik, J.; Tomandl, I.

    2016-12-01

    Using a suitable isotope such as 6Li and 10B semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors can be successfully adapted for position sensitive detection of thermal and cold neutrons via conversion into energetic light ions. The adapted devices then typically provides spatial resolution at the level comparable to the pixel pitch (55 μm) and sensitive area of about few cm2. In this contribution, we describe further progress in neutron imaging performance based on the development of a large-area hybrid pixel detector providing practically continuous neutron sensitive area of 71 × 57 mm2. The measurements characterising the detector performance at the cold neutron imaging instrument ICON at PSI and high-flux imaging beam-line Neutrograph at ILL are presented. At both facilities, high-resolution high-contrast neutron radiography with the newly developed detector has been successfully applied for objects which imaging were previously difficult with hybrid pixel technology (such as various composite materials, objects of cultural heritage etc.). Further, a significant improvement in the spatial resolution of neutron radiography with hybrid semiconductor pixel detector based on the fast read-out Timepix-based detector is presented. The system is equipped with a thin planar 6LiF convertor operated effectively in the event-by-event mode enabling position sensitive detection with spatial resolution better than 10 μm.

  15. The development of a high count rate neutron flux monitoring channel using silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi Fard, Mehdi

    In this dissertation, a fast neutron flux-monitoring channel, which is based on the use of SiC semiconductor detectors is designed, modeled and experimentally evaluated as a power monitor for the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactors. A detailed mathematical model of the SiC diode detector and the electronic processing channel is developed using TRIM, MATLAB and PSpice simulation codes. The flux monitoring channel is tested at the OSU Research Reactor. The response of the SiC neutron-monitoring channel to neutrons is in close agreement to simulation results. Linearity of the channel response to thermal and fast neutron fluxes, pulse height spectrum of the channel, energy calibration of the channel and the detector degradation in a fast neutron flux are presented. Along with the model of the neutron monitoring channel, a Simulink model of the GT-MHR core has been developed to evaluate the power monitoring requirements for the GT-MHR that are most demanding for the SiC diode power monitoring system. The Simulink model is validated against a RELAP5 model of the GT-MHR. This dyanamic model is used to simulate reactor transients at the full power and at the start up, in order to identify the response time requirements of the GT-MHR. Based on the response time requirements that have been identified by the Simulink model and properties of the monitoring channel, several locations in the central reflector and the reactor cavity are identified to place the detector. The detector lifetime and dynamic range of the monitoring channel at the detector locations are calculated. The channel dynamic range in the GT-MHR central reflector covers four decades of the reactor power. However, the detector does not survive for a reactor refueling cycle in the central reflector. In the reactor cavity, the detector operates sufficiently long; however, the dynamic range of the channel is smaller than the dynamic range of the channel in the central reflector.

  16. Observing transiting planets with JWST -- Prime targets and their synthetic spectral observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mollière, Paul; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Min, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable astronomers to obtain exoplanet spectra of unprecedented precision. Especially the MIRI instrument may shed light on the nature of the cloud particles obscuring planetary transmission spectra in the optical and near-infrared. We provide self-consistent atmospheric models and synthetic JWST observations for prime exoplanet targets in order to identify spectral regions of interest and estimate the number of transits needed to distinguish between model setups. We select targets which span a wide range in planetary temperature and surface gravity, ranging from super-Earths to giant planets, and have a high expected SNR. For all targets we vary the enrichment, C/O ratio, presence of optical absorbers (TiO/VO) and cloud treatment. We calculate atmospheric structures and emission and transmission spectra for all targets and use a radiometric model to obtain simulated observations. We analyze JWST's ability to distinguish between various scenarios. We find that in very cloud...

  17. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchetto, M; Venot, O; Lagage, P -O; Tinetti, G

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in October 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionise the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parametrized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation bi...

  18. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Bean, Jacob L; Beichman, Charles; Fraine, Jonathan; Kilpatrick, Brian M; Krick, J E; Lothringer, Joshua D; Mandell, Avi M; Valenti, Jeff A; Agol, Eric; Angerhausen, Daniel; Barstow, Joanna K; Birkmann, Stephan M; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B; Crouzet, Nicolas; Cubillos, Patricio E; Curry, S M; Dalba, Paul A; de Wit, Julien; Deming, Drake; Desert, Jean-Michel; Doyon, Rene; Dragomir, Diana; Ehrenreich, David; Fortney, Jonathan J; Munoz, Antonio Garcia; Gibson, Neale P; Gizis, John E; Greene, Thomas P; Harrington, Joseph; Heng, Kevin; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza M -R; Knutson, Heather; Kreidberg, Laura; Lafreniere, David; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Line, Michael R; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline V; Rocchetto, Marco; Schlawin, Everett; Shkolnik, Evgenya L; Shporer, Avi; Sing, David K; Todorov, Kamen O; Tucker, Gregory S; Wakeford, Hannah R

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science due to its capability for continuous, long-duration observations and its larger collecting area, spectral coverage, and spectral resolution compared to existing space-based facilities. However, it is unclear precisely how well JWST will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. In this article, we describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful future transiting exoplanet characterization programs. We propose a multi-pronged approach wherein one aspect of the program focuses on observing transits of a single target with all of the recommended observing modes to identify and understand potential systematics, compare transmission spectra at overlapping and neighboring wavelength regions...

  19. Technology development of 3D detectors for high energy physics and medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, G

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the fabrication, characterisation and simulation of 3D semiconductor detectors. Due to their geometry, these detectors have more efficient charge collection properties than current silicon and gallium arsenide planar detectors. The unit cell of these detectors is hexagonal with a central anode surrounded by six cathode contacts. This geometry gives a uniform electric field with the maximum drift and depletion distance set by electrode spacing, 85m in this project, rather than detector thickness, as in the case of planar detectors (typically 100-300m). This results in lower applied biases (35-40 V in the work of this project) compared to >200 V in typical planar detectors. The reduction in bias offers the possibility of improved detector operation in the presence of bulk radiation damage as lower voltage reduces leakage current which limits the signal to noise ratio and hence the overall detector efficiency. In this work, 3D detectors realised in Si, GaAs and SiC have ...

  20. [Development of transXend detector and its application to low dose exposure CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    For practical energy-resolved computed tomography (CT), a transXend detector is proposed. The transXend detector consists of several segment detectors which are aligned along the direction of X-ray incidence. With response functions of segment detectors, the energy distribution of incident X-rays is obtained after unfolding process. Because the transXend detector measures X-rays as electric currents, it has no limit of counting rate: the number of X-rays in medical diagnosis ranges 10(6)-10(9)n/mm2/s, measuring energy of each X-ray is not practical at this stage. The operation principle and ways of application of the transXend detector are described. With defining narrow energy ranges in an unfolding process, effective atomic numbers are estimated with using white X-rays: the transXend detector can cut out quasi-monochromatic X-rays out of white X-rays. With the transXend detector with absorbers among the segment detectors, the directions of material thickness increment are shown different in the graph made of electric current ratios measured by the segment detectors. Using the current ratio graph, the thicknesses of the materials along the line X-rays passed are estimated. In other words, cancers marked by contrast agent can be detected with one transmission measurement, and possibly are measured and positioned by transmission measurements from two directions.

  1. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  2. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  3. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizheng@xtu.edu.cn [School of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Chen, Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  4. The COSINUS project: Development of new NaI-based cryogenic detectors for direct dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, A.; Angloher, G.; Gotti, C.; Hauff, D.; Maino, M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Pagnanini, L.; Pessina, G.; Petricca, F.; Pirro, S.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Seidel, W.

    2017-02-01

    The current results of direct dark matter searches are controversial. The long-standing dark-matter claim from the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration is excluded by null-results of several other experiments. However, a comparison of the results by experiments with different detector materials introduces model dependencies. The R&D project COSINUS (Cryogenic Observatory for SIgnatures seen in Next-generation Underground Searches) aims to develop cryogenic detectors based on (hygroscopic) sodium iodide (NaI). If successful, such detectors could be used in future experiments to investigate the origin of the annual modulation signal seen by the NaI-based scintillation detectors of the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. COSINUS detectors should be able to simultaneously detect phonons and scintillation light produced by a particle interaction inside the NaI crystal. This technique allows for an active suppression of β/γ backgrounds as well as detailed studies of a large variety of dark-matter models predicting nuclear interactions. For such kind of studies only moderate exposures of ≲ 100 kg-days are needed. In addition to the projected sensitivities of COSINUS detectors, we also show the result of first tests using (only mildly hygroscopic) caesium iodide (CsI) crystals as target material. For this measurement we achieved an energy threshold of ∼4.7 keV for nuclear recoils.

  5. Design and development of a low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Bechinger, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A cost-effective detector for hydrogen gas leaks will be needed in many hydrogen-fueled technologies of the future. The hydrogen-fueled automobile may require hydrogen leak sensors in several locations and their cost could be prohibitive if conventional sensor technology is used. This project is directed at the development of low-cost fiber-optic (FO) hydrogen gas detectors that could provide adequate sensitivity, response speeds and reliability in an automobile application. A new, faster sensor design was invented that relies upon the resonant absorption of light at a beveled facet on the end of the optical fiber. The resonance occurs when the incident light strikes the metal coated facet at an angle just above the critical angle for total internal reflection. The evanescent wave stimulates resonant absorption by free electrons in the metal to produce a so-called surface-plasmon (SP). An overcoat of thin tungsten oxide on top of the metal film is designed to provide an optical wave-guide for light at the surface plasmon resonance. The two layer coating produces a coupled resonance at the SP wavelength that is very sensitive to the optical constants of the tungsten oxide. When hydrogen reacts with the tungsten oxide the resonance frequency shifts and this shift is detected in the spectrum of the reflected light beam. The facets are angled at 45 degrees to the fiber axis so as to reflect the light back along the fiber with a doubling of the SP absorption from the double reflection. A facet perpendicular to the fiber axis produces a reflected signal that is not affected by hydrogen that is used to produce an internal reference signal for comparison to the resonance, hydrogen-sensitive signal. The ratio of these two signals cancels out noise due to variation in the transmittance of the optical fiber. A patent application has been filed for this new design and a small business partner has formed a CRADA with NREL to develop a commercial detector based upon it.

  6. Envelope Detector Development for BFSK signals in PIC18f4550

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Toledo de la Garza

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns demodulator-based Envelope Detector for recovery information in BFSK (Binary Frequency Shift Keying signal applied upon applications where time symbol synchronization is unknown. Its structure is characterized by 4 filters which are considered in the present article by FIR (Finite Impulse Response, these are unconditionally stables and are always implemented by the same generic difference equation. Towards validating the demodulator, the system is implemented on a Microchip PIC18F4550 interfaced to the PC through USB port, besides in order to manage the system’s operation, it is developed a Matlab application on PC that includes modulation frequency estimation by Fast Fourier Transform method, as well as sending and receiving the modulated and demodulated signals. The convolution between the input samples and the filter coefficients is made in the microcontroller by relying on two tables stored in memory which

  7. Development and performance of track reconstruction algorithms at the energy frontier with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, Louis-Guillaume; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ATLAS track reconstruction software is continuously evolving to match the demands from the increasing instantaneous luminosity of the LHC, as well as the increased center-of-mass energy. These conditions result in a higher abundance of events with dense track environments, such the core of jets or boosted tau leptons undergoing three-prong decays. These environments are characterised by charged particle separations on the order of the ATLAS inner detector sensor dimensions and are created by the decay of boosted objects. Significant upgrades were made to the track reconstruction software to cope with the expected conditions during LHC Run~2. In particular, new algorithms targeting dense environments were developed. These changes lead to a substantial reduction of reconstruction time while at the same time improving physics performance. The employed methods are presented and physics performance studies are shown, including a measurement of the fraction of lost tracks in jets with high transverse momentum.

  8. Development of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors for the W-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Paiella, A; Castellano, M G; Colantoni, I; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; de Bernardis, P; Masi, S; Presta, G

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detector (LEKID) array able to operate in the W-band (75-110 GHz) in order to perform ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and mm-wave astronomical observations. The W-band is close to optimal in terms of contamination of the CMB from Galactic synchrotron, free-free, and thermal interstellar dust. In this band, the atmosphere has very good transparency, allowing interesting ground-based observations with large (>30 m) telescopes, achieving high angular resolution (<0.4 arcmin). In this work we describe the startup measurements devoted to the optimization of a W-band camera/spectrometer prototype for large aperture telescopes like the 64 m SRT (Sardinia Radio Telescope). In the process of selecting the best superconducting film for the LEKID, we characterized a 40 nm thick Aluminum 2-pixel array. We measured the minimum frequency able to break CPs (i.e. $h\

  9. Development of front-end readout electronics for silicon strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Yi; Kong, Jie; Dong, Cheng-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Li; Li, Xiao-Gang

    2011-01-01

    A front-end readout electronics system has been developed for silicon strip detectors. The system uses an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) ATHED to realize multi-channel E&T measurement. The slow control of ASIC chips is achieved by parallel port and the timing control signals of ASIC chips are provided by the CPLD. The data acquisition is implemented with a PXI-DAQ card. The system software has a user-friendly GUI which uses LabWindows/CVI in Windows XP operating system. Test results showed that the energy resolution is about 1.22 % for alphas at 5.48 MeV and the maximum channel crosstalk of system is 4.6%. The performance of the system is very reliable and suitable for nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Development of ultra pure germanium epi layers for blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M.P.

    1991-05-01

    The main goals of this paper are: (1) To develop a low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) process that allows epitaxial growth at lower temperatures. Lower temperatures will allow the achievement of a sharp dopant profile at the substrate/epi-layer interface. Less out-diffusion from the substrate would allow the use of thinner epitaxial layers, which would lead to a larger depletion width in the photoactive region. LPCVD also avoids, to a great extent, gas-phase nucleation, which would cause Ge particulates to fall onto the wafer surface during growth. (2) To reduce high levels of oxygen and copper present at the wafer interface, as observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to achieve high-quality epitaxial layers, it is imperative that the substrate surface be of excellent quality. (3) To make and test detectors, after satisfactory epitaxial layers have been made.

  11. Development of an X-ray imaging system with SOI pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ryutaro; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Hirano, Keiichi; Kishimoto, Shunji; Hashimoto, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    An X-ray imaging system employing pixel sensors in silicon-on-insulator technology is currently under development. The system consists of an SOI pixel detector (INTPIX4) and a DAQ system based on a multi-purpose readout board (SEABAS2). To correct a bottleneck in the total throughput of the DAQ of the first prototype, parallel processing of the data taking and storing processes and a FIFO buffer were implemented for the new DAQ release. Due to these upgrades, the DAQ throughput was improved from 6 Hz (41 Mbps) to 90 Hz (613 Mbps). The first X-ray imaging system with the new DAQ software release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays for three-dimensional computerized tomography. The results of these tests are presented.

  12. Development and performance of track reconstruction algorithms at the energy frontier with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, Louis-Guillaume; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS track reconstruction code is continuously evolving to match the demands from the increasing instantaneous luminosity of LHC, as well as the increased centre-of-mass energy. With the increase in energy, events with dense environments, e.g. the cores of jets or boosted tau leptons, become much more abundant. These environments are characterised by charged particle separations on the order of ATLAS inner detector sensor dimensions and are created by the decay of boosted objects. Significant upgrades were made to the track reconstruction code to cope with the expected conditions during LHC Run 2. In particular, new algorithms targeting dense environments were developed. These changes lead to a substantial reduction of reconstruction time while at the same time improving physics performance. The employed methods are presented. In addition, physics performance studies are shown, e.g. a measurement of the fraction of lost tracks in jets with high transverse momentum.

  13. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  14. Transiting Exoplanet Studies and Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; "Enabling Transiting Exoplanet Science with JWST" workshop attendees

    2016-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science; however, it is unclear precisely how well it will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. We will describe a prefatory JWST Early Release Science (ERS) Cycle 1 program that focuses on testing specific observing modes to quickly give the community the data and experience it needs to plan more efficient and successful transiting exoplanet characterization programs in later cycles. We will also present a list of "community targets" that are well suited to achieving these goals. Since most of the community targets do not have well-characterized atmospheres, we have initiated a preparatory HST + Spitzer observing program to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes within their atmospheres. Measurable spectroscopic features are needed to establish the optimal resolution and wavelength regions for exoplanet characterization. We will present preliminary results from this preparatory observing program and discuss their implications on the pending JWST ERS proposal deadline in mid-2017.

  15. Follow-up and characterization of the TESS exoplanets with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Forveille, T.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.; Albert, L.; Malo, L.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Santerne, A.; Author2, J.-P.; Author3, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA TESS mission will deliver hundreds of transiting exoplanet candidates orbiting bright stars. The spectrometers SOPHIE at OHP and SPIRou at CFHT will be ideal to obtain radial velocities of these candidates, confirm their nature, and derive the planets' masses. These measurements will be crucial to deliver the best targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST. Here, we calculate the required observing time with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST for each of the TESS targets in order to prepare follow-up observations. To infer their potential for JWST, we restrict the calculations to the case of transmission spectroscopy with NIRISS. The radial velocity follow-up of the giant planets (R_p > 4 R_E) could be achieved with SOPHIE, with a median observing time of 3.47 hours per target, and a total observing time of 305 hours that includes the 80% most favorable cases. Several small planets (R_p R_E) could also be confirmed, but most of them would require an unrealistic time investment. On the other hand, SPIRou is ideally suited to the follow-up of the small planets, with a median observing time of 2.65 hours per target, and a median observing time of 4.70 hours for the terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (R_p R_E, S programs with SOPHIE and SPIRou before the first planet candidates are delivered by TESS.

  16. Development of ionizing radiations dosimetry by plastic detectors and films of radiography; Desenvolvimento de dosimetria de radiacoes ionizantes por detectores plasticos e filmes de radiografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levit, Vladimir; Santos, Ari S.; Louzada, Ana R.; Silveira, Cristina M.; Vaniel, Ana P. [Pelotas Univ., RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica e Geociencias]. E-mail: vlevit@ufpel.tche.br; Fedorov, Dmitri [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: fedorov@nucleo.inpe.br

    2000-07-01

    This work shows the development of an automatic and computerized system for detection and analysis of the ionizing radiation trace in solid detectors and one of the signals of this irradiation in radiography films with the main goal of improve the ionizing radiation detection methods. On the development of this method it was used a calibration source of {sup 252}Cf, which is a radionuclide with alpha decay and spontaneous fission and, by this reason, irradiates {alpha} and {gamma} particles and nuclear fragments. Solid detectors of makrofol ware used for the nuclear fragments and radiography films ware used for the detection of {alpha} and {gamma} particles. Those signals images reveled of the {alpha} and {gamma} particles and of the nuclear fragments traces ware analysed on a microscopy and recorded on computers. The computer system developed allows to capture those images from the microscope as computer files, the identification of nuclear fragments traces and the {alpha} and {gamma} particles signals and the separation of the objects of interest to do the counting and analysis of the size and the shape of those traces.

  17. RICOR Cryocoolers for HOT IR detectors from development to optimization for industrialized production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eli; Katz, Amiram; Bar Haim, Zvi; Nachman, Ilan; Riabzev, Sergey; Gover, Dan; Segal, Victor; Filis, Avishai

    2017-05-01

    The modern needs of the electro-optical market for small low-power and light-weight IR systems are impelling research and development of High Operating Temperature (HOT) IR detectors, requiring development of dedicated "HOT" cryocoolers. The development of cryocoolers with emphasis on the "SWAP3" configuration means small size, low weight, improved performance, low power consumption and low price, in order to optimize IDDCA for future hand held thermal sights. This paper will present the development and the progress made with the new "HOT" cryocooler, including customer data after the evaluation process, performances achieved using a common cold finger, test results update on a large series of production coolers, life and qualification test update and acoustic noise reduction. All the above mentioned information relates to the FPA temperature range of 130 - 200K for various cryocooler models based on rotary and linear design concepts. The paper will also review the progress with the latest development activities implemented in the cryocoolers and the electronic control modules in order to improve reliability and minimize regulated power consumption.

  18. Development of trigger scheme for the ICAL detector of India-based Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, S., E-mail: sudeshnadasgupta@tifr.res.in [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mondal, N.K.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M.N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Upadhya, S.S. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-06-21

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration has proposed to build a 50 kton magnetized Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector with the primary goal to study neutrino oscillations, employing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. Various aspects of a proposed trigger scheme for the ICAL detector are discussed. The associated chance trigger rates are calculated and the trigger efficiency of the scheme for the events of interest for the ICAL detector is determined. An approach toward the implementation of the scheme is also presented.

  19. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P.; Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.

    2016-02-01

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring.

  20. Aspects of suspension design for the development of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul

    The Institute for Gravitational Research in the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, Golm and the University of Cardiff has been actively involved in the research for the development of instruments and data analysis techniques to detect gravitational waves. This includes construction of a long ground based interferometer in Germany called GEO 600 (upgraded to GEO-HF) having an arm length 600 m and strong involvement in the larger detectors of the LIGO (Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory) project in USA having arm lengths of 4 km (Operated by MIT, Boston and CALTECH, Pasadena). An upgrade to LIGO called Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) is currently under construction with significant input from the University of Glasgow. Thermal noise is one of the most significant noise sources affecting the sensitivity of the detector at a range of frequencies. Thermal noise arises due to the random fluctuations of atoms and molecules in the materials of the test mass mirrors and suspension elements, and is related to mechanical loss in these materials. The work presented in chapter 3 of this thesis is devoted to the analysis of aspects of mechanical loss and thermal noise in the final stages of the GEO suspension. The work in chapter 4 focuses on the theory of photoelasticty and birefringence techniques. A study of mechanical and thermal stress induced in fused silica has been discussed in chapter 5 of this thesis. To understand the working of photoelastic techniques learned in chapter 4, a study of mechanical stress was undertaken by applying a load on the sample to induce temporary birefringence. A study of thermal stress in fused silica welds has also been presented in chapter 5.

  1. Development of a low noise readout ASIC for CZT detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J.; Deng, Z.; Wang, G.; Li, H.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-01

    A multi-channel readout ASIC for pixelated CZT detectors has been developed for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Each channel consists of a low noise dual-stage charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a CR-(RC)4 semi-Gaussian shaper and a class-AB output buffer. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of input PMOS transistor is optimized for 5 pF input capacitance and 1 μs peaking time using gm/ID design methodology. The gain can be adjusted from 100 mV/fC to 400 mV/fC and the peaking time can be adjusted from 1 μs to 4 μs. A 16-channel chip has been designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS technology. The test results show that the chip works well and fully satisfies the design specifications. The ENC was measured to be 72 e + 26 e/pF at 1 μs peaking time and 86 e + 20 e/pF at 4 μs peaking time. The non-uniformity of the channel gain and ENC was less than ±12% and ±11% respectively for 16 channels in one chip. The chip was also tested with a pixelated CZT detector at room temperature. The measured energy resolution at 59.5 keV photopeak of 241Am and 122 keV photopeak of 57Co were 4.5% FWHM and 2.8% FWHM for the central area pixels, respectively.

  2. Spectroscopic CZT detectors development for x- and gamma-ray imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Uslenghi, Michela; Alderighi, Monica; Casini, Fabio; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Mancini, Marcello; Monti, Serena; Bazzano, Angela; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Frutti, Massimo; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro; Guadalupi, Giuseppe M.; Sassi, Matteo; Negri, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    In the context of R&D studies financed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), a feasibility study to evaluate the Italian Industry interest in medium-large scale production of enhanced CZT detectors has been performed by an Italian Consortium. The R&D investment aims at providing in-house source of high quality solid state spectrometers for Space Astrophysics applications. As a possible spin-off industrial applications to Gamma-ray devices for non-destructive inspections in medical, commercial and security fields have been considered by ASI. The short term programme mainly consists of developing proprietary procedures for 2-3" CZT crystals growth, including bonding and contact philosophy, and a newly designed low-power electronics readout chain. The prototype design and breadboarding is based on a fast signal AD conversion with the target in order to perform a new run for an already existing low-power (ASIC. The prototype also provides digital photon energy reconstruction with particular care for multiple events and polarimetry evaluations. Scientific requirement evaluations for Space Astrophysics Satellite applications have been carried out in parallel, targeted to contribute to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Announcement of Opportunity. Detailed accommodation studies are undergoing, as part of this programme, to size a "Large area arcsecond angular resolution Imager" for the Gamma Ray Imager satellite (Knödlseder et al., this conference).and a new Gamma-ray Wide Field Camera for the "EDGE" proposal (Piro et al., this conference). Finally, an extended market study for cost analysis evaluation in view of the foreseen massive detector production has been performed.

  3. Development of wide-band GRB detectors and the GRB monitor for the CALET Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakahira, Satoshi; Sugita, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Torii, Shoji

    Many previous observations revealed radiations from GRBs to be widely emitted in electromagnetic energy band form less than a keV to over a GeV range, and peak-energies of νFν spectra to be distributed rather more widely than expected before. Those includes soft events explored by Ginga, BeppoSAX and HETE-2, and delayed GeV emissions and additional hard continuum detected by EGRET. It is very important to have a GRB monitor in space to be sensitive to photons in continuously wide energy range. We are developing wide-band GRB detectors utilizing several kinds of scintillator and X-ray CCD for future space missions. One of these detectors is that proposed as a GRB Monitor for the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) mission that was selected for Phase A/B studies as a next experiment for JEM-EF of ISS. The GRB Monitor (GBM) is a part of this experiment to extend scientific products achieved by CALET which can detect gamma-rays in a range from about 20MeV to TeV by itself and is potentially sensitive to hard radiations from GRBs. GBM is designed as multiple scintillation counters made of BGO and LaBr3 (Ce) to detect GRBs in a few keV to about 20MeV range alone, and to cover the energy band continuously up-to TeV region together with the CALET's main instruments, Imaging Calorimeter (IMC) and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC); one can expect sensitive range of nine orders of magnitude for GRBs inside the IMC's FOV of about 1.8 str. We present current status of our study including preliminary experimental results for LaBr3 (Ce) using a proton accelerator, and the design and expected ability of CALET-GBM.

  4. Development of opto-mechanical tools and procedures for the new generation of RICH-detectors at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Laub, M; Ullaland, O

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is focused on development of opto-mechanical tools and procedures, which would contribute to the achievement of the best possible performance of new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. On the base of requirements, given by the physics objective of the LHCb detector, and an analysis of the detector opto-mechanical system, specifications of individual opto-mechanical components were determined. Spherical mirrors, planar mirrors and mirror adjustable mounts were the components of interest. Next, their parameters to be characterised were defined. Possible measurement methods were studied and relevant set ups based on suitable methods were developed. Meanwhile, available modern metrology technologies, like laser operated instruments or digital image processing, were applied with an attempt to innovate them and to increase their achievable performance limits. When applicable, the set ups were automated in order to make the measurements fast and reliable. An optical laboratory, devoted to the charac...

  5. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, E.N., E-mail: Eva.Gimenez@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Astromskas, V. [University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e{sup −} collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system. - Highlights: • A high atomic number (CdTe sensor based) photon-counting detector was developed. • Polarization effects affected the image were minimized by regularly refreshing the bias voltage and stabilizing the temperature. • Good spatial resolution and image quality was achieved following this procedure.

  6. Development of a cost efficient methodology to perform allocation of flammable and toxic gas detectors applying CFD tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Rafael Brod; Rocha, Gean Felipe Almeida [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nalvarte, Gladys Augusta Zevallos [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Novik (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    This paper is aimed to present a computational procedure for flammable and toxic gas detector allocation and quantification developed by DNV. The proposed methodology applies Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as operational and safety characteristics of the analyzed region to assess the optimal number of toxic and flammable gas detectors and their optimal location. A probabilistic approach is also used when applying the DNV software ThorEXPRESSLite, following NORSOK Z013 Annex G and presented in HUSER et al. 2000 and HUSER et al. 2001, when the flammable gas detectors are assessed. A DNV developed program, DetLoc, is used to run in an iterative way the procedure described above leading to an automatic calculation of the gas detectors location and number. The main advantage of the methodology presented above is the independence of human interaction in the gas detector allocation leading to a more precise and free of human judgment allocation. Thus, a reproducible allocation is generated when comparing several different analyses and a global criteria appliance is guaranteed through different regions in the same project. A case study is presented applying the proposed methodology. (author)

  7. Development of CdZnTe X-ray detectors at DSRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pamelen, M.A.J.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan

    2000-01-01

    at DSRI. With the advent of the Danish Micro Satellite program it was, however, recognised that this type of detector is very well suited for two proposed missions (eXCALIBur, AXO). The research at DSRI has so far been concentrated on the spectroscopic properties of the CZT detector. At DSRI we have...

  8. Luminosity measurement at ATLAS-Development, construction and test of scintillating fibre prototype detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ask, S. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Barrillon, P. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Braem, A. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Cheiklali, C. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Efthymiopoulos, I. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Fournier, D. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Taille, C. de la [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Di Girolamo, B. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Grafstrom, P. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Joram, C. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: christian.joram@cern.ch; Haguenauer, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Hedberg, V. [University of Lund (Sweden); Lavigne, B. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Maio, A. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Mapelli, A. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Mjoernmark, U. [University of Lund (Sweden); Puzo, P. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Rijssenbeek, M. [Stony Brook University, New York (United States); Santos, J. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Saraiva, J.G. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Stenzel, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Thioye, M. [Stony Brook University, New York (United States); Valladolid, E. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Vorobel, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fibre tracking detector which is proposed for the precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under {mu}rad angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibres read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of a beam test experiment at DESY. The excellent detector performance established in this test validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement.

  9. Luminosity Measurement at ATLAS Development, Construction and Test of Scintillating Fibre Prototype Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ask, S; Braem, André; Cheiklali, C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fournier, D; de La Taille, C; Di Girolamo, B; Grafström, P; Joram, C; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hedberg, V; Lavigne, B; Maio, A; Mapelli, A; Mjörnmark, U; Puzo, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Stenzel, H; Thioye, M; Valladolid, E; Vorobel, V

    2006-01-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fibre tracking detector which is proposed for the precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under $\\mu$rad angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibres read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of a beam test experiment at DESY. The excellent detector performance established in this test validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement.

  10. Development of a detector (ALFA) to measure the absolute LHC luminosity at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Ask, S; Barrillon, P; Blanchot, G; Blin, S; Braem, André; Cheiklali, C; de La Taille, C; Di Girolamo, B; Efthymiopoulos, I; Faustino, J; Fournier, D; Franz, S; Grafström, P; Gurriana, L; Haguenauer, M; Hedberg, V; Heller, M; Hoffmann, S; Iwanski, W; Joram, C; Kocnar, A; Lavigne, B; Lundberg, B; Maio, A; Maneira, M J P; Marques, C; Mjörnmark, U; Conde-Muíño, P; Puzo, P; Rijssenbeeck, M; Santos, J P; Saraiva, J G; Seguin-Moreau, N; Soares, S; Stenzel, H; Thioye, M; Valladolid-Gallego, E; Vorobel, V; 10th ICATPP Conference on Astroparticle, Particle, Space Physics, Detectors and Medical Physics Applications

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration plans to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at Interaction Point 1 by measuring the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles ($\\mu rad$). A scintillating fibre tracker system called ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is proposed for this measurement. Detector modules will be placed above and below the LHC beam axis in roman pot units at a distance of 240 m on each side of the ATLAS interaction point. They allow the detectors to approach the beam axis to millimeter distance. Overlap detectors also based on the scintillating fibre technology, will measure the precise relative position of the two detector modules. Results obtained during beam tests at DESY and at CERN validate the detectors design and demonstrate the achievable resolution. We also report about radiation hardness studies of the scintillating fibres to estimate the lifetime of the ALFA system at different operating conditions of the LHC.

  11. Development and Characterization of 6Li-doped Liquid Scintillator Detectors for PROSPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaison, Jeremy; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    PROSPECT, the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum experiment, is a phased reactor antineutrino experiment designed to search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos via short-baseline neutrino oscillations and to make a precision measurement of the 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum. A multi-ton, optically segmented detector will be deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to measure the reactor spectrum at baselines ranging from 7-12m. A two-segment detector prototype with 50 liters of active liquid scintillator target has been built to verify the detector design and to benchmark its performance. In this presentation, we will summarize the performance of this detector prototype and describe the optical and energy calibration of the segmented PROSPECT detectors.

  12. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  13. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  14. Development and implementation of a new trigger and data acquisition system for the HADES detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Jan

    2012-11-16

    One of the crucial points of instrumentation in modern nuclear and particle physics is the setup of data acquisition systems (DAQ). In collisions of heavy ions, particles of special interest for research are often produced at very low rates resulting in the need for high event rates and a fast data acquisition. Additionally, the identification and precise tracking of particles requires fast and highly granular detectors. Both requirements result in very high data rates that have to be transported within the detector read-out system: Typical experiments produce data at rates of 200 to 1,000 MByte/s. The structure of the trigger and read-out systems of such experiments is quite similar: A central instance generates a signal that triggers read-out of all sub-systems. The signals from each detector system are then processed and digitized by front-end electronics before they are transported to a computing farm where data is analyzed and prepared for long-term storage. Some systems introduce additional steps (high level triggers) in this process to select only special types of events to reduce the amount of data to be processed later. The main focus of this work is put on the development of a new data acquisition system for the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer HADES located at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. Fully operational since 2002, its front-end electronics and data transport system were subject to a major upgrade program. The goal was an increase of the event rate capabilities by a factor of more than 20 to reach event rates of 20 kHz in heavy ion collisions and more than 50 kHz in light collision systems. The new electronics are based on FPGA-equipped platforms distributed throughout the detector. Data is transported over optical fibers to reduce the amount of electromagnetic noise induced in the sensitive front-end electronics. Besides the high data rates of up to 500 MByte/s at the design event rate of 20 kHz, the

  15. Development of a stacked detector system for the x-ray range and its possible applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier; Meuris, Aline; Pürckhauer, Sabina; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanz, Thomas; Tenzer, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    We have constructed a stacked detector system operating in the X-ray range from 0.5 keV to 250 keV that consists of a Si-based 64×64 DePFET-Matrix in front of a CdTe hybrid detector called Caliste-64. The setup is operated under laboratory conditions that approximate the expected environment of a space-borne observatory. The DePFET detector is an active pixel matrix that provides high count-rate capabilities with a near Fanolimited spectral resolution at energies up to 15 keV. The Caliste-64 hard X-ray camera consists of a 1mm thick CdTe crystal combined with very compact integrated readout electronics, constituting a high performance spectro-imager with event-triggered time-tagging capability in the energy range between 2 keV and 200 keV. In this combined geometry the DePFET detector works as the Low Energy Detector (LED) while the Caliste-64 - as the High Energy Detector (HED) - detects predominantly the high energetic photons that have passed the LED. In addition to the individual optimization of both detectors, we use the setup to test and optimize the performance of the combined detector system. Side-effects like X-ray fluorescence photons, electrical crosstalk, and mutual heating have negative impacts on the data quality and will be investigated. Besides the primary application as a combined imaging detector system with high sensitivity across a broad energy range, additional applications become feasible. Via the analysis of coincident events in both detectors we can estimate the capabilities of the setup to be used as a Compton camera and as an X-ray polarimeter - both desirable functionalities for use in the lab as well as for future X-ray missions.

  16. Development of an high resolution neutron spectroscopy system using a diamond detector and a remote digital acquisition methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, Mario, E-mail: mario.pillon@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Andreoli, Fabrizio; Angelone, Maurizio [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Milocco, Alberto [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Cardarelli, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We studied the response of a diamond detector connected, to a prototype preamplifier developed by our group. •The response was studied for quasi mono-energetic neutron energies between 5 and 20.5 MeV. •About 50 m of coaxial cable was interposed between the detector and the preamplifier. •This technique was developed in order to have the electronics located far from the high radiation zone. •Such approach could be interesting for hash environment like the Radial Neutron Camera of ITER. -- Abstract: The need of performing high resolution fast neutron spectroscopy in a very harsh environment like that of the Radial Neutron Camera (RNC) of ITER, requires to develop new detectors and methodologies. Diamond detectors have been proved to be excellent candidates but the electronics needs a substantial improvement. Because of the high radiation level and the temperatures expected near the detector positions in the RNC, the electronics must be placed several meters away. A novel Fast Charge Amplifier (FCA) was developed that, connected to a diamond detector using several tens of meters of low capacitance coaxial cable, is able to produce fast output signals suitable to be processed by digital electronics. These fast output signals allow to operate at high count rates avoiding pile-up problems. This novel amplifier connected to a digitizer is here tested in the neutron energy range from 5 to 20.5 MeV using the mono-energetic neutrons produced by the Van de Graaff (VdG) accelerator of the EC-JRC-IRMM and by the PTB cyclotron. From the measurements the experimental response functions of the diamond detector at different neutron energies were obtained. The shape of the response functions have been compared with that predicted with a routine which was implemented for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with the scope to validate the calculations versus the experimental data. The goal is to develop a tool which allows to calculate the diamond detector response

  17. Development of a real-time steady state detector of a heat pump system to develop fault detection and diagnosis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Ho [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Identification of steady-state is the first step in developing a Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) system. In a complete FDD system, the steady-state detector will be included as a module in a self-learning algorithm which enables the working system's reference model to 'tune' itself to its particular installation. In this study, a steady-state detector of a residential air conditioner based on moving windows was designed. Seven representing measurements were selected as key features for steady-state detection. The optimized moving window size and the feature thresholds was suggested through startup transient test and no-fault steady-state test. Performance of the steady-state detector was verified during indoor load change test. From the research, the general methodology to design a moving window steady-state detector was provided for vapor compression applications.

  18. Evaluation and development of X-ray detectors for dosimetry; Evaluierung und Entwicklung von Roentgendetektoren fuer die Dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnel, Michael

    2012-03-28

    This thesis presents the development and evaluation of a new personal dosemeter, based on the technology of energy-resolving pixelated photon-counting X-ray detectors. The basis of the development is a detailed study of the Timepix detector. The main focus is on the investigation of the energy resolving properties of the Timepix detector in counting mode and in the spectroscopic time-over-threshold mode. The approach for the production of fluorescence radiation for the detector calibration, necessary for the experiments, is presented. By using Monte Carlo simulations the spectral distribution of the resulting fluorescence spectra in dependence on the fluorescence material, the used primary X-ray radiation and the arrangement of the laboratory setup is discussed. Besides the actual fluorescence lines, the simulated calibration spectra also contain the background of scattered primary X-ray photons and fluorescence radiation contributions from parts of the experimental setup. Furthermore, the simulated spectra exhibit the corrected intensity conditions of the fluorescence emissions of the K- and L-shell. These calibration spectra permit a better match of measurements and simulations than the simplified fluorescence spectra used so far. For the detector calibration in counting mode, accelerated energy calibration methods are introduced. From measuring energy deposition spectra, the energy resolution of single pixels and the energy resolution of the complete detector could be determined by the application of a global energy calibration. It was shown that the influence of the threshold dispersion broadens the energy resolution of the single pixels, depending on the given energy deposition. The resulting energy resolution of the whole pixel matrix is thereby reduced. The negative effect of the threshold dispersion can be eliminated by the application of a single-pixel calibration. The relative energy resolution of the Timepix detector operated in the counting mode can

  19. Development of neutron-monitor detector using liquid organic scintillator coupled with 6Li + ZnS(Ag) Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    A phoswitch-type detector has been developed for monitoring neutron doses in high-energy accelerator facilities. The detector is composed of a liquid organic scintillator (BC501A) coupled with ZnS(Ag) sheets doped with 6Li. The dose from neutrons with energies above 1 MeV is evaluated from the light output spectrum of the BC501A by applying the G-function, which relates the spectrum to the neutron dose directly. The dose from lower energy neutrons, on the other hand, is estimated from the number of scintillations emitted from the ZnS(Ag) sheets. Characteristics of the phoswitch-type detector were studied experimentally in some neutron fields. It was found from the experiments that the detector has an excellent property of pulse-shape discrimination between the scintillations of BC501A and the ZnS(Ag) sheets. The experimental results also indicate that the detector is capable of reproducing doses from thermal neutrons as well as neutrons with energies from one to several tens of megaelectronvolts (MeV).

  20. Development of a modular CdTe detector plane for gamma-ray burst detection below 100 keV

    OpenAIRE

    Ehanno, M.; Amoros, C.; Barret, D.; Lacombe, K.; Pons, R.; Rouaix, G.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Bardoux, A.; Penquer, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development of an innovative CdTe detector plane (DPIX) optimized for the detection and localization of gamma-ray bursts in the X-ray band (below 100 keV). DPIX is part of an R&D program funded by the French Space Agency (CNES). DPIX builds upon the heritage of the ISGRI instrument, currently operating with great success on the ESA INTEGRAL mission. DPIX is an assembly of 200 elementary modules (XRDPIX) equipped with 32 CdTe Schottky detectors (4x4 mm2, 1 mm thickness) produc...