WorldWideScience

Sample records for jwst detector characterization

  1. Characterizing Rosetta Stone Exoplanets with JWST Transit Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Clampin, Mark; Seager, Sara; Valenti, Jeff A.; Mountain, Matt; JWST Telescope Scientist GTO Team

    2017-06-01

    JWST will for the first time provide for spectroscopic (R > 100) observation of systems hosting transiting exoplanets over the critical wavelength range from 0.6 to 28.5 microns. Our team will take advantage of JWST's spectral coverage and resolution to characterize a small number of exoplanets in exquisite detail. We plan to focus our efforts on single representative members of the hot-Jupiter, warm-Neptune, and temperate-Earth populations in both transmission and emission over the full wavelength range of JWST. Our JWST observations will hopefully become 'Rosetta Stones' that will serve as benchmarks for further observations of planets within each representative population and a lasting legacy of the JWST mission. Here we will describe our observational plan and how we turned our science goals into an implemented Cycle 1 JWST program.

  2. CHARACTERIZING TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES WITH JWST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Luther, Kyle, E-mail: tom.greene@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We explore how well spectra from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with atmospheres that are clear, cloudy, or of high mean molecular weight (HMMW). Next we simulate the λ = 1–11 μm transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single-transit or single-eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}) can be constrained. We find that λ = 1–2.5 μm transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar-composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or HMMW atmospheres will often require full 1–11 μm spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high F{sub p} and high F{sub p}/F{sub *}. Strong temperature inversions in the solar-composition hot-Jupiter atmosphere should be detectable with 1–2.5+ μm emission spectra, and 1–5+ μm emission spectra will constrain the temperature–pressure profiles of warm planets. Transmission spectra over 1–5+ μm will constrain [Fe/H] values to better than 0.5 dex for the clear atmospheres of the hot and warm planets studied. Carbon-to-oxygen ratios can be constrained to better than a factor of 2 in some systems. We expect that these results will provide useful predictions of the scientific value of single-event JWST spectra until its on-orbit performance is known.

  3. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Rauscher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST’s four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a “Detector Degradation Failure Review Board” (DD-FRB to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB “Executive Summaries” that: (1 determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2 defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  4. SCASim: A Flexible and Reusable Detector Simulator for the MIRI instrument of the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, S.; Morin, J.; Gastaud, R.; Azzollini, R.; Bouchet, P.; Chaintreuil, S.; Lahuis, F.; Littlejohns, O.; Nehme, C.; Pye, J.

    2012-09-01

    The JWST Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) operates in the 5-28μm wavelength range and can be configured for imaging, coronographic imaging, long-slit, low-resolution spectroscopy or medium resolution spectroscopy with an integral field unit. SCASim is one of a suite of simulators which operate together to simulate all the different modes of the instrument. These simulators are essential for the efficient operation of MIRI; allowing more accurate planning of MIRI observations on sky or during the pre-launch testing of the instrument. The data generated by the simulators are essential for testing the data pipeline software. The simulators not only need to reproduce the behaviour of the instrument faithfully, they also need to be adaptable so that information learned about the instrument during the pre-launch testing and in-orbit commissioning can be fed back into the simulation. SCASim simulates the behaviour of the MIRI detectors, taking into account cosmetic effects, quantum efficiency, shot noise, dark current, read noise, amplifier layout, cosmic ray hits, etc... The software has benefited from three major design choices. First, the development of a suite of MIRI simulators, rather than single simulator, has allowed MIRI simulators to be developed in parallel by different teams, with each simulator able to concentrate on one particular area. SCASim provides a facility common to all the other simulators and saves duplication of effort. Second, SCASim has a Python-based object-oriented design which makes it easier to adapt as new information about the instrument is learned during testing. Third, all simulator parameters are maintained in external files, rather than being hard coded in the software. These design choices have made SCASim highly reusable. In its present form it can be used to simulate any JWST detector, and it can be adapted for future instruments with similar, photon-counting detectors.

  5. The MEarth Project: Finding the Best Targets for Atmospheric Characterization with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta-Thompson, Z.

    2014-04-01

    If we want to directly observe the radius, orbit, mass, and atmosphere of a small, cool, habitable exoplanet, our best opportunity is to find such a planet transiting a small, cool, nearby M dwarf star. The MEarth Project is an ongoing all-sky survey for Earth-like planets transiting the closest, smallest M dwarfs in the Galaxy. MEarth aims to find good targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST and the next generation of enormous ground-based telescopes. This poster provides a status update on the MEarth Project, including the progress we've made over the past five years with 8 telescopes in the Northern hemisphere and promising early results from our new installation of 8 more telescopes in the Southern hemisphere.

  6. Wavefront-Error Performance Characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Science Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES). In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing (also known as phase retrieval), and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) plate scale measurements made using a Pseudo-Nonredundant Mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil geometry predictions as a function of SI and field point, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse translation diversity sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a sub-aperture is translated andor rotated across the exit pupil of the system.Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also describes the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis of focus-sweep data, used to establish the

  7. Characterization of Czochralski silicon detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Luukka, Panja-Riina

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmented detectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It is shown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher than that of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or Diffusion Oxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 × 1017 cm−3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting ...

  8. Characterization of Czochralski Silicon Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Luukka, Panja-Riina; Haerkoenen, Jaakko

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmenteddetectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It isshown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher thanthat of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or DiffusionOxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 x1017 cm-3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting alter...

  9. Method applied for the HPGe detector characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, Nicolas; Monestier, Mathieu; Saurel, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry is a passive non destructive assay most commonly used to identify and quantify the radionuclides present in the complex huge objects such as nuclear waste packages. The treatment of spectra from the measurement of nuclear waste is performed in two steps: the first step is to extract the raw data from the spectra (energies and net photoelectric absorption peaks areas) and the second step is to determine the detection efficiency of the measured scene. The establishment by numerical modeling of the detection efficiency of the measured scene requires numerical modeling of both the measuring device (in this case a hyper pure germanium detector HPGe) and numerical modeling of the measured object. Numerical detector modeling is also called diode characterization, and has a spatial response equivalent to these of the real HPGe detector. This characterization is essential for the quantification of complex and non reproducible huge objects for which the detection efficiency can not be determined empirically. The Nuclear Measurement and Valuation Laboratory (LMNE) at the Atomic Energy Commission Valduc (CEA Valduc) has developed a new methodology for characterizing the HPGe detector. It has been tested experimentally with a real diode present in the laboratory (P-type planar detector). The characterization obtained with this methodology is similar to these of a real HPGe detector with an uncertainty approaching 5 percents. It is valid for a distance ranging from 10 cm to 150 cm, an angle ranging from 0 to 90 degrees and energy range from 53 keV to 1112 keV. The energy range is obtained with a source of Barium-133 and a source of Europium-152. The continuity of the detection efficiency curve is checked between the two sources with an uncertainty less than 2 percents. In addition, this methodology can be extrapolated to any type of detector crystal geometry (planar). (authors)

  10. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  11. Characterization of the CMS Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Weihua

    2002-01-01

    In 2005 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will start the pp collisions at a high luminosity and at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. The primary goal of the experimental programme is the search of the Higgs boson(s) and the supersymmetric particles. The programme is also proposed to detect a range of diverse signatures in order to provide guidance for future physics. The pixel detector system makes up the innermost part of the CMS experiment, which is one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC. The main tasks of the system are vertex detection and flavor tagging. The high luminosity and the high particle multiplicity as well as the small bunch spacing at the LHC impose great challenges on the pixel detectors: radiation hardness of sensors and electronics, fast signal processing and a high granularity are the essential requirements. This thesis concentrates on the study of the suitability of two test stands, which are implemented to characterize the CMS pixel detectors: one is con-cerned with test puls...

  12. GEO 600 online detector characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, R; Babak, S; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T

    2005-01-01

    A world-wide network of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is currently operational. The detectors in the network are still in their commissioning phase and are expected to achieve their design sensitivity over the next year or so. Each detector is a complex instrument involving many optical, mechanical and electronic subsystems and each subsystem is a source of noise at the output of the detector. Therefore, in addition to recording the main gravitational wave data channel at the output of the interferometer, the state of each detector subsystem is monitored and recorded. The analysis of these subsidiary data serves a dual purpose: first, it helps us to identify the primary sources of noise which could then be either removed altogether or reduced substantially and second, it helps us in vetoing spurious signals at the output of the interferometer. However, since these subsidiary data are both large in volume (1 MB s -1 ) as well as complex in nature, it is not possible to look at all these data manually. We require an online monitoring and analysis tool which can process all the data channels for various noise artefacts such as transients, drifting of narrowband noise sources, noise couplings between data channels etc, and summarize the results of the analysis in a manner that can be accessed and interpreted conveniently. In this paper we describe the GEO 600 online detector characterization system (GODCS), which is the tool that is being used to monitor the output of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector situated near Hanover in Germany. We describe the various algorithms that we use and how the results of several algorithms can be combined to make meaningful statements about the state of the detector. We also give implementation details such as the software architecture and the storage and retrieval of the output of GODCS. This paper will be useful to researchers in the area of gravitational wave astronomy as a record of the various analyses and

  13. Benchmarking GJ436b for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Stevenson, Kevin; Crossfield, Ian; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan; Showman, Adam; Lewis, Nikole; Line, Mike

    2017-10-01

    GJ436b is a slightly eccentric, Neptune size planet with an equilibrium temperature of approximately 770K, it is the only Neptune size planet with a thermal emission measurement. With the coming JWST GTO observations of it's emission spectrum, GJ436b will become a benchmark object of the population of Neptune-size planets that will be discovered by TESS and characterized by JWST in the coming years. The current set of 19 secondary eclipses observed by Spitzer points toward a metal-rich, well mixed, tidally heated atmosphere in disequilibrium chemistry. However, no self-consistent forward models are currently able to fit the dayside spectrum of the planet, whereas retrieval models lead to solutions that are inconsistent with the observed planet density. Clearly, some piece of the puzzle is missing to understand the atmospheric properties of this planet. Although the coming JWST observations will likely improve our understanding of this planet, it won't be able to break the degeneracies between metallicity, internal flux and energy redistribution. We propose to observe a full phase curve of GJ436b at 3.6 microns. We will obtain a measurement of the nightside flux of GJ436b at 3.6 microns. Combined with the already observed 8 microns phase curve, we will obtain the first low resolution spectrum of the nightside of a Neptune size exoplanet. By comparing the nightside flux at 3.6 and 8 microns, we will be able to place constraints on the tidal heating and the metallicity of GJ436b that will be complimentary to the the dayside spectrum that will be obtained with JWST. As seen with the example of hot Jupiters, for which much more data is available, measurements of the nightside spectrum is fundamental to understand the planet atmosphere as a whole and correctly interpret the dayside emission. As a consequence, the proposed observation is crucial for the interpretation of the coming JWST observations. As a secondary goal, our observation should be able to confirm the

  14. JWST Lifting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolleson, William

    2012-01-01

    A document describes designing, building, testing, and certifying a customized crane (Lifting Device LD) with a strong back (cradle) to facilitate the installation of long wall panels and short door panels for the GHe phase of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The LD controls are variable-frequency drive controls designed to be adjustable for very slow and very-short-distance movements throughout the installation. The LD has a lift beam with an electric actuator attached at the end. The actuator attaches to a rectangular strong back (cradle) for lifting the long wall panels and short door panels from a lower angle into the vertical position inside the chamber, and then rotating around the chamber for installation onto the existing ceiling and floor. The LD rotates 360 (in very small increments) in both clockwise and counterclockwise directions. Eight lifting pads are on the top ring with 2-in. (.5-cm) eye holes spaced evenly around the ring to allow for the device to be suspended by three crane hoists from the top of the chamber. The LD is operated by remote controls that allow for a single, slow mode for booming the load in and out, with slow and very slow modes for rotating the load.

  15. Characterization of BJT-based particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piemonte, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Dittongo, S.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Gregori, P.; Rachevskaia, I.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the static and dynamic behavior of BJT-based particle detectors realized on high-resistivity silicon. Several prototypes, featuring different doping profiles and geometries, have been fabricated at ITC-irst (Trento, Italy). These devices have been thoroughly characterized from the electrical viewpoint, and, in order to understand the fundamental parameters of the structure, device simulations have been performed, whose results are in very good agreement with experimental data. Preliminary functional measurements have been carried out by using a 109Cd source excitation

  16. Data acquisition and detector characterization of GEO600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetter, K; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Berukoff, S; Bose, S; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Cutler, C; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Dupuis, R; Freise, A; Grote, H; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hough, J; Lueck, H; Malec, M; Mohanty, S D; Mukherjee, S; Nagano, S; Papa, M A; Robertson, D; Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, B F; Sintes, A M; Strain, K A; Taylor, I J; Vecchio, A; Ward, H; Weiland, U; Willke, B; Woan, G

    2002-01-01

    The data acquisition system of the gravitational wave detector GEO600 is recording the first data now. Data from detector subsystems and environmental channels are being acquired. The data acquisition system is described and first results from the detector characterization work are being presented. We analysed environmental influences on the detector to determine noise propagation through the detector. Long-term monitoring allowed us to see long-timescale drifts in subsystems

  17. Quantitative Characterization of Phosphor Detector for Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baciero, A.; Zurro, B.; McCarthy, K. J.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments made to characterize phosphor screens with application as broadband radiation detectors, are described. Several radiation sources, covering the spectral range between the ultraviolet and X ray, were used. In addition, details are given of three original phosphor-screen-based detectors that were designed for use as broadband detectors in magnetically confined fusion devices. The first measurements obtained with these detectors in plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator device are presented together with the analysis performed. (Author)

  18. Characterization of HPGe detectors using Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, A., E-mail: Angelica.Hedman@foi.se [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-90182 Umeå (Sweden); Umeå University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, SE-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Bahar Gogani, J.; Granström, M. [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-90182 Umeå (Sweden); Johansson, L.; Andersson, J.S. [Umeå University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, SE-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Ramebäck, H. [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-90182 Umeå (Sweden); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, SE-41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-06-11

    Computed Tomography (CT) high-resolution imaging have been used to investigate if there is a significant change in the crystal-to-window distance, i.e. the air gap thickness, in a small n-type detector cooled to 77 K, and in a medium sized p-type HPGe detector when cooled to 100 K. The findings were compared to detector dimension data made available by the manufacturer. The air gap thickness increased by (0.38±0.07) mm for the n-type detector and by (0.40±0.15) mm for the p-type detector when the detectors were cooled to 77 resp. 100 K compared to at room temperature. Monte Carlo calculations indicate that these differences have a significant impact on the efficiency in close geometries (<5 cm). In the energy range of 40–700 keV with a source placed directly on endcap, the change in detector efficiency with temperature is 1.9–2.9% for the n-type detector and 0.3–2.1% for the p-type detector. The measured air gap thickness when cooling the detector was 1.1 mm thicker than manufacturer data for the n-type detector and 0.2 mm thicker for the p-type detector. In the energy range of 40–700 keV and with a source on endcap, this result in a change in detector efficiency of 5.2–7.1% for the n-type detector and 0.2–1.0% for the p-type detector, i.e. the detector efficiency is overestimated using data available by the manufacturer.

  19. Characterization of SOI monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Rengifo, P. L.; Soung Yee, L.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor for charged particle tracking was developed. This research is performed within the framework of an R&D project called TRAPPISTe (Tracking Particles for Physics Instrumentation in SOI Technology) whose aim is to evaluate the feasibility of developing a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) with Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. Two chips were fabricated: TRAPPISTe-1 and TRAPPISTe-2. TRAPPISTe-1 was produced at the WINFAB facility at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Belgium, in a 2 μm fully depleted (FD-SOI) CMOS process. TRAPPISTe-2 was fabricated with the LAPIS 0.2 μm FD-SOI CMOS process. The electrical characterization on single transistor test structures and of the electronic readout for the TRAPPISTe series of monolithic pixel detectors was carried out. The behavior of the prototypes’ electronics as a function of the back voltage was studied. Results showed that both readout circuits exhibited sensitivity to the back voltage. Despite this unwanted secondary effect, the responses of TRAPPISTe-2 amplifiers can be improved by a variation in the circuit parameters.

  20. Detector characterization for efficiency calibration in different measurement geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, M.; Dinescu, L.; Sima, O.

    2005-01-01

    In order to perform an accurate efficiency calibration for different measurement geometries a good knowledge of the detector characteristics is required. The Monte Carlo simulation program GESPECOR is applied. The detector characterization required for Monte Carlo simulation is achieved using the efficiency values obtained from measuring a point source. The point source was measured in two significant geometries: the source placed in a vertical plane containing the vertical symmetry axis of the detector and in a horizontal plane containing the centre of the active volume of the detector. The measurements were made using gamma spectrometry technique. (authors)

  1. Detecting First Supernovae with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regos, Eniko; FLARE

    2018-01-01

    We have applied for a JWST ERS First Transients Survey, FLARE to answer empirically how the Universe made its first stars. To quest the epoch of reionization we target what happened to these first stars by observing the most luminous events, supernovae. These transients provide direct constraints on star formation rates and the initial mass function.These very rare events can be reached by JWST at 27 mag AB in 2 micron and 4.4 micron over a field of 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year.The survey may detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts up to 10, pinpointing the redshift of first stars, a key scientific goal of JWST.We explore all models of star formation history (derived from UV luminosity densities and IR data), DTD, top heavy IMF of early, low metallicity stars, and normalizations to data of SN Ia, II rates (SNLS, CLASH, CANDELS, SDSS, SVISS), as well as SLSN (ROTSE, SNLS) to estimate the expected SN rates as function of redshift.Population synthesis of double degenerate and single degenerate scenarios of SN Ia shows that the shape of the DTD is rather insensitive to the assumptions (common envelope prescription and metallicities, or retention efficiency of accreted H to white dwarf core and mass transfer rate).Indeed GOODS High z SN Ia rates imply substantial delay in their progenitor model, and Hubble Higher z SN search constrains delay time distribution models as well.SLSN (I, II /H/ and extreme rare pulsational pair instability) are magnetars (ULGRB) in high local star formation rate, faint, low metallicity galaxies.

  2. Characterization of BEGe detectors in the HADES underground laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, Erica; Gerda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization of newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors, enriched in the isotope 76Ge. These detectors have been produced in the frame of the GERDA experiment. The aim of the characterization campaign consists in the determination of all the important operational parameters (active volume, dead layer thickness and uniformity, energy resolution, detector stability in time, quality of pulse shape discrimination). A protocol test procedure and devoted set-ups, partially automated, have been developed in view of the large number (∼ 25) of BEGe's detectors to be tested. The characterization is carried out in the HADES underground laboratory, located 225 m below ground (∼ 500 m water equivalent) in Mol, Belgium.

  3. Characterization of BEGe detectors in the HADES underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, Erica, E-mail: Erica.ANDREOTTI@ec.europa.eu [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization of newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors, enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. These detectors have been produced in the frame of the GERDA experiment. The aim of the characterization campaign consists in the determination of all the important operational parameters (active volume, dead layer thickness and uniformity, energy resolution, detector stability in time, quality of pulse shape discrimination). A protocol test procedure and devoted set-ups, partially automated, have been developed in view of the large number (∼25) of BEGe's detectors to be tested. The characterization is carried out in the HADES underground laboratory, located 225 m below ground (∼500m water equivalent) in Mol, Belgium.

  4. Characterizing transient noise in the LIGO detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, L. K.

    2018-05-01

    Data from the LIGO detectors typically contain many non-Gaussian noise transients which arise due to instrumental and environmental conditions. These non-Gaussian transients can be an issue for the modelled and unmodelled transient gravitational-wave searches, as they can mask or mimic a true signal. Data quality can change quite rapidly, making it imperative to track and find new sources of transient noise so that data are minimally contaminated. Several examples of transient noise and the tools used to track them are presented. These instances serve to highlight the diverse range of noise sources present at the LIGO detectors during their second observing run. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  5. Tutorial on X-ray photon counting detector characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in photon counting detection technology have led to significant research interest in X-ray imaging. As a tutorial level review, this paper covers a wide range of aspects related to X-ray photon counting detector characterization. The tutorial begins with a detailed description of the working principle and operating modes of a pixelated X-ray photon counting detector with basic architecture and detection mechanism. Currently available methods and techniques for charactering major aspects including energy response, noise floor, energy resolution, count rate performance (detector efficiency), and charge sharing effect of photon counting detectors are comprehensively reviewed. Other characterization aspects such as point spread function (PSF), line spread function (LSF), contrast transfer function (CTF), modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), bias voltage, radiation damage, and polarization effect are also remarked. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated photon counting detector is employed for part of the characterization demonstration and the results are presented. This review can serve as a tutorial for X-ray imaging researchers and investigators to understand, operate, characterize, and optimize photon counting detectors for a variety of applications.

  6. Dynamic MTF, an innovative test bench for detector characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Rossi; Raphaël, Lardière; Delmonte, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    PLEIADES HR are High Resolution satellites for Earth observation. Placed at 695km they reach a 0.7m spatial resolution. To allow such performances, the detectors are working in a TDI mode (Time and Delay Integration) which consists in a continuous charge transfer from one line to the consecutive one while the image is passing on the detector. The spatial resolution, one of the most important parameter to test, is characterized by the MTF (Modulation Transfer Function). Usually, detectors are tested in a staring mode. For a higher level of performances assessment, a dedicated bench has been set-up, allowing detectors' MTF characterization in the TDI mode. Accuracy and reproducibility are impressive, opening the door to new perspectives in term of HR imaging systems testing.

  7. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Sing, David K.; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; Line, Michael R.; Kreidberg, Laura; Desert, Jean-Michel; Wakeford, Hannah; Crouzet, Nicolas; Moses, Julianne I.; Benneke, Björn; Kempton, Eliza; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Parmentier, Vivien; Gibson, Neale; Schlawin, Everett; Fraine, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Transiting Exoplanet Community ERS Team

    2018-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope offers astronomers the opportunity to observe the composition, structure, and dynamics of transiting exoplanet atmospheres with unprecedented detail. However, such observations require very precise time-series spectroscopic monitoring of bright stars and present unique technical challenges. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST aims to help the community understand and overcome these technical challenges as early in the mission as possible, and to enable exciting scientific discoveries through the creation of public exoplanet atmosphere datasets. With observations of three hot Jupiters spanning a range of host star brightnesses, this program will exercise time-series modes with all four JWST instruments and cover a full suite of transiting planet characterization geometries (transits, eclipses, and phase curves). We designed the observational strategy through an open and transparent community effort, with contributions from an international collaboration of over 100 experts in exoplanet observations, theory, and instrumentation. Community engagement with the project will be centered around open Data Challenge activities using both simulated and real ERS data, for exoplanet scientists to cross-validate and improve their analysis tools and theoretical models. Recognizing that the scientific utility of JWST will be determined not only by its hardware and software but also by the community of people who use it, we take an intentional approach toward crafting an inclusive collaboration and encourage new participants to join our efforts.

  8. Parametric Characterization of TES Detectors Under DC Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Meng P.; Smith, Stephen James; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray integrated field unit (X-IFU) in European Space Agency's (ESA's) Athena mission will be the first high-resolution X-ray spectrometer in space using a large-format transition-edge sensor microcalorimeter array. Motivated by optimization of detector performance for X-IFU, we have conducted an extensive campaign of parametric characterization on transition-edge sensor (TES) detectors with nominal geometries and physical properties in order to establish sensitivity trends relative to magnetic field, dc bias on detectors, operating temperature, and to improve our understanding of detector behavior relative to its fundamental properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and transition temperature. These results were used for validation of a simple linear detector model in which a small perturbation can be introduced to one or multiple parameters to estimate the error budget for X-IFU. We will show here results of our parametric characterization of TES detectors and briefly discuss the comparison with the TES model.

  9. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  10. Characterization of CZT detectors for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Skogseide, Y

    2008-01-01

    The National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark is responsible for the selection and characterization of the CZT detector crystals for the X and gamma -ray instrument MXGS onboard ESA’s Atmospheric Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM) mission. The Modular X- and Gamma ray Sensor (MXGS) ...

  11. Characterization of silicon detectors through TCT at Delhi University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, G., E-mail: geetikajain.hep@gmail.com; Lalwani, K.; Dalal, R.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ranjan, K.

    2016-07-11

    Transient Current Technique (TCT) is one of the important methods to characterize silicon detectors and is based on the time evolution of the charge carriers generated when a laser light is shone on it. For red laser, charge is injected only to a small distance from the surface of the detector. For such a system, one of the charge carriers is collected faster than the readout time of the electronics and therefore, the effective signal at the electrodes is decided by the charge carriers that traverse throughout the active volume of the detector, giving insight to the electric field profile, drift velocity, effective doping density, etc. of the detector. Delhi University is actively involved in the silicon detector R&D and has recently installed a TCT setup consisting of a red laser system, a Faraday cage, a SMU (Source Measuring Unit), a bias tee, and an amplifier. Measurements on a few silicon pad detectors have been performed using the developed system, and the results have been found in good agreement with the CERN setup.

  12. Characterization of silicon detectors through TCT at Delhi University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, G.; Lalwani, K.; Dalal, R.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ranjan, K.

    2016-01-01

    Transient Current Technique (TCT) is one of the important methods to characterize silicon detectors and is based on the time evolution of the charge carriers generated when a laser light is shone on it. For red laser, charge is injected only to a small distance from the surface of the detector. For such a system, one of the charge carriers is collected faster than the readout time of the electronics and therefore, the effective signal at the electrodes is decided by the charge carriers that traverse throughout the active volume of the detector, giving insight to the electric field profile, drift velocity, effective doping density, etc. of the detector. Delhi University is actively involved in the silicon detector R&D and has recently installed a TCT setup consisting of a red laser system, a Faraday cage, a SMU (Source Measuring Unit), a bias tee, and an amplifier. Measurements on a few silicon pad detectors have been performed using the developed system, and the results have been found in good agreement with the CERN setup.

  13. Characterization of silicon detectors through TCT at Delhi University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, G.; Lalwani, K.; Dalal, R.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ranjan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Transient Current Technique (TCT) is one of the important methods to characterize silicon detectors and is based on the time evolution of the charge carriers generated when a laser light is shone on it. For red laser, charge is injected only to a small distance from the surface of the detector. For such a system, one of the charge carriers is collected faster than the readout time of the electronics and therefore, the effective signal at the electrodes is decided by the charge carriers that traverse throughout the active volume of the detector, giving insight to the electric field profile, drift velocity, effective doping density, etc. of the detector. Delhi University is actively involved in the silicon detector R&D and has recently installed a TCT setup consisting of a red laser system, a Faraday cage, a SMU (Source Measuring Unit), a bias tee, and an amplifier. Measurements on a few silicon pad detectors have been performed using the developed system, and the results have been found in good agreement with the CERN setup.

  14. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, S.; DeWitt, D.; MacDonald, L.; Hunter, W. C. J.; Van Leemput, K.; Miyaoka, R.

    2018-04-01

    PET detectors use signal multiplexing to reduce the total number of electronics channels needed to cover a given area. Using measured thin-beam calibration data, we tested a principal component based multiplexing scheme for scintillation detectors. The highly-multiplexed detector signal is no longer amenable to standard calibration methodologies. In this study we report results of a prototype multiplexing circuit, and present a new method for calibrating the detector module with multiplexed data. A 50 × 50 × 10 mm3 LYSO scintillation crystal was affixed to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depth-estimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge of the crystal. The positioned events followed the expected Beer–Lambert depth distribution. The proposed calibration and positioning method exhibited a scattered photon rejection rate that was a 55% improvement over the summed signal energy-windowing method.

  15. Performance characterization of the EarthCARE BBR Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, C.; Allard, M.; Pope, T.; Tremblay, B.; Williamson, F.; Julien, C.; Larouche, C.; Delderfield, J.; Parker, D.

    2017-11-01

    The Broadband Radiometer (BBR) is an instrument being developed for the ESA EarthCARE satellite. The BBR instrument objective is to provide measurements of the reflected short-wave (0.25-4.0 μm) and emitted long-wave (4.0-50 μm) top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiance over three along-track views (forward, nadir and backward). The instrument has three fixed telescopes, one for each view, each containing a broadband detector. The BBR instrument is led by SEA in the UK with RAL responsible for the BBR optics unit (OU) while EADS Astrium is the EarthCARE prime contractor. A detailed description of the instrument is provided in [1]. The BBR detectors consist in three dedicated assemblies under the responsibility of INO. The detectors development started in 2008 and led to the design and implementation of a new gold black deposition facility at INO [2], in parallel with the preliminary and detailed design phases of the detector assemblies. As of today, two breadboard models and one engineering model have been delivered to RAL. In the BBR OU each detector mechanically interfaces with the telescope and electrically with the front-end electronics (FEE). The detectors' development is now at the Critical Design Review (CDR) level. This paper first provides a description of the detector design along with its principles of operation. It further presents and discusses measurement and analysis results for the performance characterization of the engineering model in the context of the applicable requirements. Detector-level qualification planning is finally discussed.

  16. An Information-theoretic Approach to Optimize JWST Observations and Retrievals of Transiting Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake

    2017-01-01

    We provide an example of an analysis to explore the optimization of observations of transiting hot Jupiters with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to characterize their atmospheres based on a simple three-parameter forward model. We construct expansive forward model sets for 11 hot Jupiters, 10 of which are relatively well characterized, exploring a range of parameters such as equilibrium temperature and metallicity, as well as considering host stars over a wide range in brightness. We compute posterior distributions of our model parameters for each planet with all of the available JWST spectroscopic modes and several programs of combined observations and compute their effectiveness using the metric of estimated mutual information per degree of freedom. From these simulations, clear trends emerge that provide guidelines for designing a JWST observing program. We demonstrate that these guidelines apply over a wide range of planet parameters and target brightnesses for our simple forward model.

  17. AN INFORMATION-THEORETIC APPROACH TO OPTIMIZE JWST OBSERVATIONS AND RETRIEVALS OF TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Deming, Drake, E-mail: arhowe@umich.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ddeming@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We provide an example of an analysis to explore the optimization of observations of transiting hot Jupiters with the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) to characterize their atmospheres based on a simple three-parameter forward model. We construct expansive forward model sets for 11 hot Jupiters, 10 of which are relatively well characterized, exploring a range of parameters such as equilibrium temperature and metallicity, as well as considering host stars over a wide range in brightness. We compute posterior distributions of our model parameters for each planet with all of the available JWST spectroscopic modes and several programs of combined observations and compute their effectiveness using the metric of estimated mutual information per degree of freedom. From these simulations, clear trends emerge that provide guidelines for designing a JWST observing program. We demonstrate that these guidelines apply over a wide range of planet parameters and target brightnesses for our simple forward model.

  18. Calibration and Characterization of the UNCB and Nab Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeck, Bryan; UCNB Collaboration; Nab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The UCNB and Nab experiments are designed to produce precision measurements of the free neutron decay angular correlations B, a, and b. Measurements of B and a require a coincident detection of the proton and electron produced in neutron decay, while for b, which manifests as a subtle shift in the electron energy spectrum, energy resolution better than 3 keV is desired and excellent fidelity for energy reconstruction is required, including characterization of non-linearity to the 10-4 level. To this end, a thick segmented silicon detector with a 100 nm dead layer and a 100 cm active area has been extensively characterized at LANL. The thin dead layer allows protons accelerated to 30 keV to deposit energy above threshold in the active volume of the detector, and the paired amplifer chain, developed at LANL, has a risetime of approximately 40 ns. Comparison of simulation to experiment reveals a detector resolution better than σ = 2.5 keV. A complete characterization of the detector will be presented. This work has been supported by Grants from the US National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  19. Characterizing Subpixel Spatial Resolution of a Hybrid CMOS Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Evan; Burrows, Dave; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Hull, Samuel; Kern, Matthew; McQuaide, Maria; Wages, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    The detection of X-rays is a unique process relative to other wavelengths, and allows for some novel features that increase the scientific yield of a single observation. Unlike lower photon energies, X-rays liberate a large number of electrons from the silicon absorber array of the detector. This number is usually on the order of several hundred to a thousand for moderate-energy X-rays. These electrons tend to diffuse outward into what is referred to as the charge cloud. This cloud can then be picked up by several pixels, forming a specific pattern based on the exact incident location. By conducting the first ever “mesh experiment" on a hybrid CMOS detector (HCD), we have experimentally determined the charge cloud shape and used it to characterize responsivity of the detector with subpixel spatial resolution.

  20. Quantitative Characterization of Phosphor Detector for Fusion Plasmas; Caracterizacion Cuantitativa de Detectores Luminiscentes para Plasmas de Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciero, A; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J

    2004-07-01

    Experiments made to characterize phosphor screens with application as broadband radiation detectors, are described. Several radiation sources, covering the spectral range between the ultraviolet and X ray, were used. In addition, details are given of three original phosphor-screen-based detectors that were designed for use as broadband detectors in magnetically confined fusion devices. The first measurements obtained with these detectors in plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator device are presented together with the analysis performed. (Author)

  1. Prospects for Habitable World Detections Using James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake

    2010-01-01

    Doppler and transit surveys are finding extrasolar planets of ever smaller mass and radius, and are now sampling the domain of superEarths. Recent results from the Doppler surveys suggest that discovery of a transiting superEarth in the habitable zone of a lower main sequence star may be possible. We evaluate the prospects for an all-sky transit survey targeted to the brightest stars I that would find the most favorable cases for photometric and spectroscopic characterization using the James Webb Space Telescope. We use the proposed Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) as representative of an all-sky survey. We couple the simulated TESS yield to a sensitivity model for the MIRI and NIRSpec instruments on JWST. Our sensitivity model includes all currently known and anticipated sources of random and systematic error for these instruments. We focus on the TESS planets with radii between Earth and Neptune. Our simulations consider secondary eclipse filter photometry using JWST/MIRI, comparing the 11- and 15- micron bands to measure carbon dioxide absorption in superEarths, as well as JWST!NIRSpec spectroscopy of water absorption from 1.7-3.0 microns, and carbon dioxide absorption at 4.3 microns. We find that JWST will be capable of characterizing dozens of TESS superEarths with temperatures above the habitable range, using both MIRI and NIRspec. We project that TESS will discover about eight nearby habitable transiting superEarths, all orbiting lower main sequence stars. The principal sources of uncertainty in the prospects for JWST characterization of habitable superEarths are superEarth frequency and the nature of superEarth atmospheres. Based on our estimates of these uncertainties, we project that JWST will be able to measure the temperature, and identify molecular absorptions (water, carbon dioxide) in one to four nearby habitable TESS superEarths orbiting lower main sequence stars.

  2. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  4. UV--Visible observations with HST in the JWST North Ecliptic Pole Time-Domain Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rolf A.; Windhorst, Rogier; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Royle, Patricia; Hathi, Nimish; Jones, Victoria; Cohen, Seth; Ashcraft, Teresa; Willmer, Christopher; Conselice, Christopher; White, Cameron; Frye, Brenda; HST-GO-15278 team; and the Webb Medium Deep Fields IDS GTO team.

    2018-01-01

    We report the first results from a UV–Visible HST imaging survey of the JWST North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) Time-Domain Field (TDF). Using CVZ and near-CVZ opportunities we observed the first two out of nine tiles with WFC3/UVIS in F275W and with ACS/WFC in F435W and F606W. Over the course of the next 13 months, this survey is designed to provide near-contiguous 3-filter coverage of the central r ≤ 5‧ of this new community field for time-domain science with JWST. The JWST NEP TDF is located within JWST's northern Continuous Viewing Zone, will span ~14‧ in diameter (~10‧ with NIRISS coverage), is devoid of sources bright enough to saturate the NIRCam detectors, has low Galactic foreground extinction, and will be roughly circular in shape (initially sampled during Cycle 1 at 4 distinct orientations with JWST/NIRCam — the JWST “windmill”). NIRISS slitless grism spectroscopy will be taken in parallel, overlapping an alternate NIRCam orientation. This is the only region in the sky where JWST can observe a clean extragalactic deep survey field of this size at arbitrary cadence or at arbitrary orientation. This will crucially enable a wide range of new and exciting time-domain science, including high redshift transient searches and monitoring (e.g., SNe), variability studies from Active Galactic Nuclei to brown dwarf atmospheres, as well as proper motions of extreme scattered Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Objects, and of nearby Galactic brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, and ultracool white dwarfs. Ancillary data across the electromagnetic spectrum will exist for this field when JWST science operations commence in the second half of 2019. This includes deep (mAB ~ 26 mag) wide-field (~23‧×25‧) Ugriz photometry of this field and its surroundings from LBT/LBC and Subaru/HSC, JHK from MMT/MMIRS, VLA 3 GHz and VLBA 4.5 GHz radio observations, and Chandra/ACIS X-ray images. Proposals for (sub)mm observations and spectroscopy to mAB ~ 24 mag are pending.

  5. High Contrast Imaging of Exoplanets and Exoplanetary Systems with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Sasha; Skemer, Andrew; Biller, Beth; Baraffe, I.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bowler, B.; Carter, A.; Chen, C.; Choquet, E.; Currie, T.; Danielski, C.; Fortney, J.; Grady, C.; Greenbaum, A.; Hines, D.; Janson, M.; Kalas, P.; Kennedy, G.; Kraus, A.; Lagrange, A.; Liu, M.; Marley, M.; Marois, C.; Matthews, B.; Mawet, D.; Metchev, S.; Meyer, M.; Millar-Blanchaer, M.; Perrin, M.; Pueyo, L.; Quanz, S.; Rameau, J.; Rodigas, T.; Sallum, S.; Sargent, B.; Schlieder, J.; Schneider, G.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Tremblin, P.; Vigan, A.; Ygouf, M.

    2017-11-01

    JWST will transform our ability to characterize directly imaged planets and circumstellar debris disks, including the first spectroscopic characterization of directly imaged exoplanets at wavelengths beyond 5 microns, providing a powerful diagnostic of cloud particle properties, atmospheric structure, and composition. To lay the groundwork for these science goals, we propose a 39-hour ERS program to rapidly establish optimal strategies for JWST high contrast imaging. We will acquire: a) coronagraphic imaging of a newly discovered exoplanet companion, and a well-studied circumstellar debris disk with NIRCam & MIRI; b) spectroscopy of a wide separation planetary mass companion with NIRSPEC & MIRI; and c) deep aperture masking interferometry with NIRISS. Our primary goals are to: 1) generate representative datasets in modes to be commonly used by the exoplanet and disk imaging communities; 2) deliver science enabling products to empower a broad user base to develop successful future investigations; and 3) carry out breakthrough science by characterizing exoplanets for the first time over their full spectral range from 2-28 microns, and debris disk spectrophotometry out to 15 microns sampling the 3 micron water ice feature. Our team represents the majority of the community dedicated to exoplanet and disk imaging and has decades of experience with high contrast imaging algorithms and pipelines. We have developed a collaboration management plan and several organized working groups to ensure we can rapidly and effectively deliver high quality Science Enabling Products to the community.

  6. Characterization of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda M, L. de; Federico, C. A.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2014-08-01

    Air crews, as pilots and flight attendants, are subjected to cosmic ray doses which can be higher than the average doses on workers from the nuclear industry. The diversity of particles of high energies present in the radiation field on board of air crafts turns the determination of the incident dose difficult, and requires special care regarding dosimetric systems to be used in this kind of radiation field. The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA) in conjunction with the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP) are working on this subject since 2008. A prototype of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements was previously built and tested in flight and laboratory conditions. The detector is able of measuring a quantity known as absorbed dose (using passive dosimeters), which will subsequently be correlated to the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose received by air crews. In this context, a theoretical approach through Monte Carlo simulations with the computational codes MCNP5 and MCNPX was used to model and characterize the detector response at such experimental conditions. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between the absorbed doses measured and simulated, and its relationship with the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose for this detector. (author)

  7. Characterization of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda M, L. de; Federico, C. A.; Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Air crews, as pilots and flight attendants, are subjected to cosmic ray doses which can be higher than the average doses on workers from the nuclear industry. The diversity of particles of high energies present in the radiation field on board of air crafts turns the determination of the incident dose difficult, and requires special care regarding dosimetric systems to be used in this kind of radiation field. The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA) in conjunction with the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP) are working on this subject since 2008. A prototype of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements was previously built and tested in flight and laboratory conditions. The detector is able of measuring a quantity known as absorbed dose (using passive dosimeters), which will subsequently be correlated to the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose received by air crews. In this context, a theoretical approach through Monte Carlo simulations with the computational codes MCNP5 and MCNPX was used to model and characterize the detector response at such experimental conditions. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between the absorbed doses measured and simulated, and its relationship with the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose for this detector. (author)

  8. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, Stefano; Dewitt, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize...... and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge...... the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depthestimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution...

  9. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  10. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, B.

    2006-01-01

    γ-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple γ-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics. The results are

  11. Towards a data and detector characterization robot for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, S D

    2002-01-01

    A change of non-astrophysical origin in the detector state or in the statistical nature of data while an interferometer is in lock reflects an abnormality. The change can manifest itself in many forms: transients, drifts in noise power spectral density, change in cross correlation between channels, etc. We advance the idea of an algorithm for detecting such change points whose design goal is reliable performance, i.e. a known false alarm rate, even when statistically unmodelled data such as those from the physical environmental monitors are included. Reliability is important since following up on such change points could be fairly labour intensive. Such an algorithm need not be simply a collection of isolated independent monitors running in parallel. We present the first design steps towards building this detector characterization robot along with some preliminary results and outline some possibilities for the future.

  12. The UV attenuation in JWST target VV 191

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2017-08-01

    We aim to map the UV-near-IR attenuation curve along many sightlines within nearby disk galaxies to resolve a large fundamental uncertainty in galaxy evolution studies: the variance in the attenuation curve within an indivual galaxy disk on linear scales relatively blue elliptical beautifully backlights the outer disk of a foreground face-on spiral galaxy.Dither strategy:We opt for a 2-point dither in the case of the F336W observations (1 orbit) and a 3pt dither strategy for the F225W observations. The 9 orbits for the F225W observations are broken into three groupings of 3 orbits in the 3 dither pattern. This is to ensure correction of cosmics and detector artifacts. Our secondary aim is an HST/JWST image with good public outreach potential and our aim is to maximize image quality for this reason as well.

  13. A cryogenic thermal source for detector array characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward J.; Berman, Leah; Colazo, Felipe; DeGeorge, Martin; Helson, Kyle; Sagliocca, Marco

    2017-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and validation of a cryogenically compatible quasioptical thermal source for characterization of detector arrays. The source is constructed using a graphite-loaded epoxy mixture that is molded into a tiled pyramidal structure. The mold is fabricated using a hardened steel template produced via a wire electron discharge machining process. The absorptive mixture is bonded to a copper backplate enabling thermalization of the entire structure and measurement of the source temperature. Measurements indicate that the reflectance of the source is <0.001 across a spectral band extending from 75 to 330 GHz.

  14. Characterization of Multianode Photomultiplier Tubes for a Cherenkov Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninghoff, Morgen; Turisini, Matteo; Kim, Andrey; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Kubarovsky, Valery; Duquesne University Collaboration; Jefferson Lab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In the Fall of 2017, Jefferson Lab's CLAS12 (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer) detector is expecting the addition of a RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which will allow enhanced particle identification in the momentum range of 3 to 8 GeV/c. RICH detectors measure the velocity of charged particles through the detection of produced Cherenkov radiation and the reconstruction of the angle of emission. The emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by a triangular-shaped grid of 391 multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) made by Hamamatsu. The custom readout electronics consist of MAROC (multianode read out chip) boards controlled by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) boards, and adapters used to connect the MAROC boards and MAPMTs. The focus of this project is the characterization of the MAPMTs with the new front end electronics. To perform these tests, a black box setup with a picosecond diode laser was constructed with low and high voltage supplies. A highly automated procedure was developed to acquire data at different combinations of high voltage values, light intensities and readout electronics settings. Future work involves using the collected data in calibration procedures and analyzing that data to resolve the best location for each MAPMT. SULI, NSF.

  15. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors using Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Favian; Castro, Juan; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The silicon photomultiplier light detector has gained a lot of attention lately in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. Its popularity stems from its lower cost, compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and its excellent ability to distinguish a quantized number of photons. They are normally operated at room temperature and biased above their breakdown voltages. As such, they may also exhibit properties that may hinder their optimal operation which include a thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk from photons in nearby pixels. At this poster session, we describe our data analysis and our endeavor to characterize the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) detectors from Hamamatsu under different bias voltages and temperature conditions. Particularly, we describe our setup which uses cosmic rays to induce scintillation light delivered to the detector by wavelength shifting optical fibers and the use of a fast 1 GHz waveform sampler, the domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizer board. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  16. An X-ray gas position sensitive detector: construction and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.; Gabriel, A.; Gabriel, A.; Craievich, A.

    1988-01-01

    A linear x-ray gas position sensitive detector with delay line readout has been constructed. The detector is described, characterized and used for detecting x-ray diffraction patterns from polycrystals. (author) [pt

  17. Characterization of high impedance connecting links for Bolometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giachero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Gotti, C. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Maino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Pessina, G., E-mail: pessina@mib.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    High impedance connecting links and cables are tested at low frequency in terms of their parasitic impedance to ground and to neighboring connecting links. These parameters must be well characterized with detectors operated at low temperature, especially when the very front-end is at room temperature, which results in a long link. This is the case of the LUCIFER experiment, an array of crystals where every event of interest produces two signals, one composed of phonons, the other of photons. The parasitic impedance is usually considered to be the parallel combination of a resistance and a capacitance. We characterized both and found that from the static measurements the capacitance of the cable resulted much larger. On the basis of this result we optimized the measurement set-up and developed a model to account for this behavior.

  18. Characterization of detectors of neutrons from B+ZnS (Ag) as an alternative to 3He detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Juan A.; Suarez, Maria J.; Pujol, Luis; Lorente, Alfredo; Gallego, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the progress made in the design of prototypes for dynamic detection of neutron detectors based on scintillation of B + ZnS (Ag), which can replace existing 3 He detectors for the detection of illicit traffic of radioactive material and special nuclear material. These detectors B + ZnS (Ag) can be used, together with gamma detectors, PVT and NaI (Tl) also developed in the UPM. Two neutron detectors of different shapes and sizes were characterized using two neutron sources of 241 Am + Be. Were determined depth, overall efficiency, intrinsic efficiency and limit of detection. The results of these tests allow to verify that: 1) two cylindrical detectors B + ZnS (Ag) of 5x68 cm, or 4x15x132 cm rectangular detector can replace the cylindrical detector of 5x180 cm 3 He currently employed in the arcades. 2) the dynamic detection limit obtained is less than 20000 neutrons per second, when the sample becomes 2 m to 2m/s, with a probability of having no false positive or negative of the 99.99% 3) digital electronics eliminates interference from gamma emissions samples when their dose rate in the neutron detector is 65 μSv/h in less than factor 10 - 8, and keeps its detection limit and 4) two cylindrical detectors with two moderators of different thickness, of 25 to 50 mm of high density polyethylene, allow to measure the average energy of the neutrons

  19. Extrasolar Planets Observed with JWST and the ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, L. Drake

    2010-01-01

    The advent of cryogenic space-borne infrared observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope has lead to a revolution in the study of planets and planetary systems orbiting sun-like stars. Already Spitzer has characterized the emergent infrared spectra of close-in giant exoplanets using transit and eclipse techniques. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to extend these studies to superEarth exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars in the near solar neighborhood. The forthcoming ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will playa key role in these studies, being especially valuable for spectroscopy at higher spectral resolving powers where large photon fluxes are needed. The culmination of this work within the next two decades will be the detection and spectral characterization of the major molecular constituents in the atmosphere of a habitable superEarth orbiting a nearby lower main sequence star.

  20. Emerging Technologies and Outreach with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Kenney, Jessica; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), NASA’s next great observatory launching in October 2018, required a dozen new technologies to develop. How will we maintain the prestige and cultural impact of Hubble as the torch passes to Webb? Emerging technologies such as augmented and virtual reality bring the viewer into the data and the concept in previously unimaginable immersive detail. Adoption of mobile devices has expanded access to information for wide swaths of the public. Software like Worldwide Telescope to hardware like the Occulus Rift are providing new avenues for learning. If we develop materials properly tailored to this medium, we can reach more diverse audiences than ever before. STScI is pioneering some tools related to JWST for showcasing at AAS, and in local events, which I highlight here.

  1. Leveraging Emerging Technologies in Outreach for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Green, Joel D.; Smith, Louis Chad; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Gough, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is NASA’s next great observatory, launching in October 2018. How will we maintain the prestige and cultural impact of the Hubble Space Telescope as the torch passes to Webb? Emerging technologies such as augmented (AR) and virtual reality (VR) bring the viewer into the data and introduce the telescope in previously unimaginable immersive detail. Adoption of mobile devices, many of which easily support AR and VR, has expanded access to information for wide swaths of the public. From software like Worldwide Telescope to hardware like the HTC Vive, immersive environments are providing new avenues for learning. If we develop materials properly tailored to these media, we can reach more diverse audiences than ever before. STScI is piloting tools related to JWST to showcase at DPS, and in local events, which I highlight here.

  2. Status of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Dunn, Jamie; Kimble, Randy A.; Lambros, Scott; Lundquist, Ray; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Van Campen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is the science instrument payload of the JWST. It is one of three system elements that comprise the JWST space vehicle. It consists of four science sensors, a fine guidance sensor, and nine other subsystems that support them. At 1.4 metric tons, it comprises approximately 20% of the JWST mass. The ISIM is currently at 100% integration and has completed 2 of 3 planned element-level space simulation tests. The ISIM is on schedule to be delivered for integration with the Optical Telescope Element during 2015. In this poster, we present an overview of the ISIM and its status.

  3. Development and characterization of the lead iodide semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Icimone Braga de

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for purification and growth of PbI 2 crystal as well as for its characterization as a room temperature radiation detector was developed in this work. Commercial salts were purified using the zone refining method and, for the purified material growth, the Bridgman method was used. To calculate the purification efficiency, studies of the decrease impurities concentrations were made in the salts and in three sections of the materials purified, using the neutron activation analysis technique. The results showed that the impurities segregate preferentially in the ingot final section. A significant decrease of the impurities concentration in function of the purification pass number was observed. The grown crystals presented good crystalline quality according to the results of the X-ray diffraction analysis. To evaluate the crystal as a semiconductor detector, measurements of dark leakage current, resistivity and the response of ( 241 Am) alpha particle and ( 241 Am, 57 Co, 133 Ba and 137 Cs) gamma rays were carried out. The radiation response is strongly dependent on the crystals purity. The crystals purified with 500 passes exhibited energy resolution of 10% for 241 Am alpha particle and the gamma rays resolution was compatible with the literature. The photosensibility of the PbI 2 crystal found in the wavelength from 400 to 600 nm range suggests an another application at this crystal as a photodetector to be coupled to scintillators. (author)

  4. Characterization of large volume HPGe detectors. Part II: Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, Bart; Reiter, Peter; Pascovici, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Measurements on a 12-fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356keV γ-rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and digital signal processing electronics

  5. Characterization of 3D-DDTC detectors on p-type substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Betta, G -F Dalla; Bosisio, Luciano; Darbo, Giovanni; Gabos, Paolo; Gemme, Claudia; Koehler, Michael; La Rosa, Alessandro; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pernegger, Heinz; Piemonte, Claudio; Povoli, Marco; Rachevskaia, Irina; Ronchin, Sabina; Wiik, Liv; Zoboli, Aanrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    We report on the electrical and functional characterization of 3D Double-side, Double-Type-Column (3D- DDTC) detectors fabricated on p-type substrates. Results relevant to detectors in the diode, strip and pixel configurations are presented, and demonstrate a clear improvement in the charge collection performance compared to the first prototypes of these detectors.

  6. Prospects for Detecting Thermal Emission from Terrestrial Exoplanets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidberg, Laura

    2018-01-01

    A plethora of nearby, terrestrial exoplanets has been discovered recently by ground-based surveys. Excitingly, some of these are in the habitable zones of their host stars, and may be hospitable for life. However, all the planets orbit small, cool stars and have considerably different irradiation environments from the Earth, making them vulnerable to atmospheric escape, erosion and collapse. Atmosphere characterization is therefore critical to assessing the planets' habitability. I will discuss possible JWST thermal emission measurements to determine the atmospheric properties of nearby terrestrial planets. I will focus on prospects for detecting physically motivated atmospheres for planets orbiting LHS 1140, GJ 1132, and TRAPPIST-1. I will also discuss the potential for using phase curve observations to determine whether an atmosphere has survived on the non-transiting planet Proxima b.

  7. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Spectroscopy of Anticipated TESS Planets and Selected Super-Earths Discovered from K2 and Ground-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana; Albert, Loic; Deming, Drake

    2017-01-01

    The 2018 launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), coupled with the 2017 launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), heralds a new era in Exoplanet Science, with TESS projected to detect over one thousand transiting sub-Neptune-sized planets (Ricker et al, 2014), and JWST offering unprecedented spectroscopic capabilities. Sullivan et al (2015) used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the properties of the planets that TESS is likely to detect, and published a catalog of 962 simulated TESS planets. Prior to TESS launch, the re-scoped Kepler K2 mission and ground-based surveys such as MEarth continue to seek nearby Earth-like exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf host stars. The exoplanet community will undoubtedly employ JWST for atmospheric characterization follow-up studies of promising exoplanets, but the targeted planets for these studies must be chosen wisely to maximize JWST science return. The goal of this project is to estimate the capabilities of JWST’s Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS)—operating with the GR700XD grism in Single Object Slitless Spectrography (SOSS) mode—during observations of exoplanets transiting their host stars. We compare results obtained for the simulated TESS planets, confirmed K2-discovered super-Earths, and exoplanets discovered using ground-based surveys. By determining the target planet characteristics that result in the most favorable JWST observing conditions, we can optimize the choice of target planets in future JWST follow-on atmospheric characterization studies.

  8. Observing the Spectra of MEarth and TRAPPIST Planets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Caroline; Kreidberg, Laura; Rustamkulov, Zafar; Robinson, Tyler D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-10-01

    During the past two years, nine planets close to Earth in radius have been discovered around nearby M dwarfs cooler than 3300 K. These planets include the 7 planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system and two planets discovered by the MEarth survey, GJ 1132b and LHS 1140b (Dittmann et al. 2017; Berta-Thompson et al. 2015; Gillon et al. 2017). These planets are the smallest planets discovered to date that will be amenable to atmospheric characterization with JWST. They span equilibrium temperatures from ˜130 K to >500 K, and radii from 0.7 to 1.43 Earth radii. Some of these planets orbit as distances potentially amenable to surface liquid water, though the actual surface temperatures will depend strongly on the albedo of the planet and the thickness and composition of its atmosphere. The stars they orbit also vary in activity levels, from the quiet LHS 1140b host star to the more active TRAPPIST-1 host star. This set of planets will form the testbed for our first chance to study the diversity of atmospheres around Earth-sized planets. Here, we will present model spectra of these 9 planets, varying the composition and the surface pressure of the atmosphere. We base our elemental compositions on three outcomes of planetary atmosphere evolution in our own solar system: Earth, Titan, and Venus. We calculate the molecular compositions in chemical equilibrium. We present both thermal emission spectra and transmission spectra for each of these objects, and make predictions for the observability of these spectra with different instrument modes with JWST.

  9. A Figure-of-Merit for Beta Cell Detector Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Brian W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In order to decrease the minimum detectable activities (MDAs) of beta-gamma radioxenon detectors, it is important to increase the ability to resolve the individual isotopes. One proposed method for doing this is to increase the energy resolution of the beta cell through the use of silicon detectors. While silicon detectors can improve the energy resolution, it is accompanied with a decrease in detection efficiency compared to plastic scintillator beta cells. Due to the uncertainty on the impact of the competing variables, we have developed a figure-of-merit (FOM) capable of determining the impact of detector parameters on the MDAs. By utilizing the FOM to analyze different detectors, we are able to directly compare current and future detectors and estimate their impact on the radioxenon MDAs.

  10. Transit Recovery of Kepler-167e: Providing JWST with an Unprecedented Jupiter-analog Exoplanet Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalba, Paul; Muirhead, Philip; Tamburo, Patrick

    2018-05-01

    The Kepler Mission has uncovered a handful of long-period transiting exoplanets that orbit in the cold outer reaches of their systems, despite their low transit probabilities. Recent work suggests that cold gas giant exoplanet atmospheres are amenable to transmission spectroscopy (the analysis of the transit depth versus wavelength) enabling novel tests of planetary formation and evolution theories. Of particular scientific interest is Kepler-167e, a low-eccentricity Jupiter-analog exoplanet with a 1,071-day orbital period residing well beyond the snow-line. Transmission spectroscopy of Kepler-167e from JWST can reveal the composition of this planet's atmosphere, constrain its heavy-element abundance, and identify atmospheric photochemical processes. JWST characterization also enables unprecedented direct comparison with Jupiter and Saturn, which show a striking diversity in physical properties that is best investigated through comparative exoplanetology. Since Kepler only observed two transits of Kepler-167e, it is not known if this exoplanet exhibits transit timing variations (TTVs). About half of Kepler's long-period exoplanets have TTVs of up to 40 hours. Such a large uncertainty jeopardizes attempts to characterize the atmosphere of this unique Jovian exoplanet with JWST. To mitigate this risk, the upcoming third transit of Kepler-167e must be observed to test for TTVs. We propose a simple 10-hour, single-channel observation to capture ingress or egress of the next transit of Kepler-167e in December 2018. In the absence of TTVs, our observation will reduce the ephemeris uncertainty from an unknown value to approximately 3 minutes, thereby removing the risk in future transit observations with JWST. The excellent photometric precision of Spitzer is sufficient to identify the transit of Kepler-167e. Given the timing and nature of this program, Spitzer is the only observatory--on the ground or in space--that can make this pivotal observation.

  11. HEROICA: A fast screening facility for the characterization of germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, Erica [Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    In the course of 2012, a facility for the fast screening of germanium detectors called HEROICA (Hades Experimental Research Of Intrinsic Crystal Appliances) has been installed at the HADES underground laboratory in the premises of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN, in Mol (Belgium). The facility allows performing a complete characterization of the critical germanium detectors' operational parameters with a rate of about two detectors per week.

  12. Micro controller based system for characterizing gas detector operating parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vaishali M.; Verma, Amit K.; Anilkumar, S.; Babu, D.A.R.; Sharma, D.N.; Harikumar, M.

    2011-01-01

    The estimation and analysis of radioactivity levels in samples from environment and from various stages of nuclear fuel cycle operations has become a matter of concern for the implementation of radiological safety procedures. Gas filled/ flow detectors play crucial role in achieving this objective. Since these detectors need high voltage for their operation, the operating characteristics of each detector for optimum performance has to be determined before incorporating into the systems. The operating voltages of these detectors are ranging from few hundred volts to few kilo volts. Present paper describes the design of microcontroller based system to control two HV modules (Electron tubes make: PS2001/12P) independently and acquire data from different gas filled radiation detectors simultaneously. The system uses Philips 80C552 microcontroller based Single Board Computer (SBC). The inbuilt DAC and ADC of microcontroller were used to control HV from 0-2000 with less than ± 1 %, error 1000V. The starting HV, HV step size, decision making intelligence to terminate HV increment (for preset plateau slope) and data acquisition (for preset time), data acquisition time etc., can be programmed. Nearly 200 detectors data (20 data points per detector) can be stored and transferred to PC on request. Data collected by the system for LND 719 GM detectors with starting voltage from 500 V, HV step size of 24 V and 100 seconds counting time to find out the plateau length. The plateau slope and length obtained with this system for LND 719 GM detectors are 3-5%/100V and ∼ 150V respectively. (author)

  13. Characterization of CdZnTe ambient temperature detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, A.

    1994-09-01

    A great deal of interest has been generated in the use of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for ambient temperature detection of radionuclides. The addition of zinc to CdTe provides several benefits that enhance the materials operational characteristics at ambient temperature. Recent movement in the industry is to produce larger volume detectors using CdZnTe without much known about the effects of larger geometry on performance. The purpose of this study is to get an idea of the relationship of detector performance to both area and thickness variations

  14. Experimental Characterization of Space Charge in IZIP Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, T; /UC, Berkeley; Pyle, M.; /Stanford U.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Serfass, B.; /UC, Berkeley; Kamaev, O.; /Queen' s U., Kingston; Hertel, S.; Leman, S.W.; /MIT; Brink, P.; /SLAC; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U.; Sadoulet, B.; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-12

    Interleaved ionization electrode geometries offer the possibility of efficient rejection of near-surface events. The CDMS collaboration has recently implemented this interleaved approach for the charge and phonon readout for our germanium detectors. During a recent engineering run, the detectors were found to lose ionization stability quickly. This paper summarizes studies done in order to determine the underlying cause of the instability, as well as possible running modes that maintain stability without unacceptable loss of livetime. Additionally, results are shown for the new version IZIP mask which attempts to improve the overall stability of the detectors.

  15. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombigit, L., E-mail: lojius@nm.gov.my; Yussup, N., E-mail: nolida@nm.gov.my; Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M. [Instrumentation Group, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  16. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombigit, L.; Yussup, N.; Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume

  17. Characterization of an in-vacuum PILATUS 1M detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernecke, Jan; Gollwitzer, Christian; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael

    2014-05-01

    A dedicated in-vacuum X-ray detector based on the hybrid pixel PILATUS 1M detector has been installed at the four-crystal monochromator beamline of the PTB at the electron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin, Germany. Owing to its windowless operation, the detector can be used in the entire photon energy range of the beamline from 10 keV down to 1.75 keV for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments and anomalous SAXS at absorption edges of light elements. The radiometric and geometric properties of the detector such as quantum efficiency, pixel pitch and module alignment have been determined with low uncertainties. The first grazing-incidence SAXS results demonstrate the superior resolution in momentum transfer achievable at low photon energies.

  18. Spent-fuel characterization with small CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra, 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)]. E-mail: Reinhard.Berndt@jrc.it; Mortreau, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra, 21020 Ispra (Va) (Italy)

    2006-08-01

    CdTe detectors may be utilised as miniature instruments for the measurement of gamma spectra in safeguards applications [R. Arlt, V. Gryshchuk, P. Sumah, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 428 (1999) 127]. This is applicable for measurements both to fresh fuel and irradiated nuclear fuel. The spectrum analysis, however, is more complicated than with Ge detectors. Some reasons are: the peaks are asymmetric, the peak/Compton ratio is low, peak parameters depend on the count rate and on the properties of individual detector crystals. We developed a spectrum-unfolding code for spectra obtained with CdTe detectors. The code makes use of a series of pattern spectra of the individual instrument. It is applied to fission-product spectra and allows the coarse characterisation of the spent fuel in safeguards inspections.

  19. Spent-fuel characterization with small CZT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2006-01-01

    CdTe detectors may be utilised as miniature instruments for the measurement of gamma spectra in safeguards applications [R. Arlt, V. Gryshchuk, P. Sumah, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 428 (1999) 127]. This is applicable for measurements both to fresh fuel and irradiated nuclear fuel. The spectrum analysis, however, is more complicated than with Ge detectors. Some reasons are: the peaks are asymmetric, the peak/Compton ratio is low, peak parameters depend on the count rate and on the properties of individual detector crystals. We developed a spectrum-unfolding code for spectra obtained with CdTe detectors. The code makes use of a series of pattern spectra of the individual instrument. It is applied to fission-product spectra and allows the coarse characterisation of the spent fuel in safeguards inspections

  20. Characterization procedures for double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, N.L. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Frautschi, M.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Hoeferkamp, M.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Seidel, S.C. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.

    1995-08-15

    Since double-sided silicon microstrip detectors are still evolving technologically and are not yet commercially available, they require extensive electrical evaluation by the user to ensure they were manufactured to specifications. In addition, measurements must be performed to determine detector operating conditions. Procedures for measuring the following quantities are described: - Leakage current, - Depletion voltage, - Bias resistance, - Interstrip resistance, - Coupling capacitance, - Coupling capacitor breakdown voltage. (orig.).

  1. Characterization procedures for double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, N.L.; Frautschi, M.A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Seidel, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    Since double-sided silicon microstrip detectors are still evolving technologically and are not yet commercially available, they require extensive electrical evaluation by the user to ensure they were manufactured to specifications. In addition, measurements must be performed to determine detector operating conditions. Procedures for measuring the following quantities are described: - Leakage current, - Depletion voltage, - Bias resistance, - Interstrip resistance, - Coupling capacitance, - Coupling capacitor breakdown voltage. (orig.)

  2. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Losel, Philipp Jonathan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resisitve strip Micromegas detectors behave discharge tolerant. They have been tested extensively as smaller detectors of about 10 x 10 cm$^2$ in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100\\,kHz/cm$^2$ and above. Tracking resolutions well below 100\\,$\\mu$m have been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3\\,m$^2$ in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1\\,m$^2$ detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 $\\mu$m was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Facility (CRF) using two 4 $\\times$ 2.2 m$^2$ large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. Segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6\\,mm x 95\\,mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by 11 95\\,mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips.\\\\ This allows for mapping of homogenity in pulse height and efficiency, deter...

  3. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00389527; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors are discharge tolerant. They have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10 x 10 cm$^2$ in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm$^2$ and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 $\\mu$m has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m$^2$ in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m$^2$ detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 $\\mu$m was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4 $\\times$ 2.2 m$^2$ large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm x 93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, d...

  4. Characterization of Si pixel detectors of different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Gregori, P.; Linsalata, S.; Novelli, M. E-mail: marzia.novelli@pi.infn.it; Piemonte, C.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Zorzi, N.; Zucca, S

    2004-02-01

    Tests on silicon pixel detector in the mammographic energy range have shown good imaging performances so, in order to improve the efficiency in this energy range, we have designed thicker detectors of the p{sup +}/n type. The detectors have been fabricated by ITC-IRST (Trento, Italy) in high resistivity silicon substrates (300 and 525 {mu}m thick). A TCAD simulation work has been carried out to optimize the electric field distribution and to enhance the breakdown voltage. Very low leakage current and high breakdown voltage characteristics have been measured on detectors in preliminary on-wafer tests. After that, detectors have been bump-bonded to a dedicated VLSI electronic chips, realizing an assembly. Choosing the best set-up condition and using a standard mammographic tube, we have acquired a large area image (8x8 cm{sup 2}) of the RMI 156 phantom, recommended for mammographic quality checks. In order to cover the whole surface, we have acquired different images translating the phantom over the assembly. We present some selected results for these assemblies both for the electrical characteristics and for the imaging performances.

  5. Characterization of Si pixel detectors of different thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Gregori, P.; Linsalata, S.; Novelli, M.; Piemonte, C.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Zorzi, N.; Zucca, S.

    2004-01-01

    Tests on silicon pixel detector in the mammographic energy range have shown good imaging performances so, in order to improve the efficiency in this energy range, we have designed thicker detectors of the p + /n type. The detectors have been fabricated by ITC-IRST (Trento, Italy) in high resistivity silicon substrates (300 and 525 μm thick). A TCAD simulation work has been carried out to optimize the electric field distribution and to enhance the breakdown voltage. Very low leakage current and high breakdown voltage characteristics have been measured on detectors in preliminary on-wafer tests. After that, detectors have been bump-bonded to a dedicated VLSI electronic chips, realizing an assembly. Choosing the best set-up condition and using a standard mammographic tube, we have acquired a large area image (8x8 cm 2 ) of the RMI 156 phantom, recommended for mammographic quality checks. In order to cover the whole surface, we have acquired different images translating the phantom over the assembly. We present some selected results for these assemblies both for the electrical characteristics and for the imaging performances

  6. Position-sensitive silicon strip detector characterization using particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Maenpaeae, Teppo

    2012-01-01

    Silicon strip detectors are fast, cost-effective and have an excellent spatial resolution.They are widely used in many high-energy physics experiments. Modern high energyphysics experiments impose harsh operation conditions on the detectors, e.g., of LHCexperiments. The high radiation doses cause the detectors to eventually fail as a resultof excessive radiation damage. This has led to a need to study radiation tolerance usingvarious techniques. At the same time, a need to operate sensors approaching the endtheir lifetimes has arisen.The goal of this work is to demonstrate that novel detectors can survive the environment that is foreseen for future high-energy physics experiments. To reach this goal,measurement apparatuses are built. The devices are then used to measure the propertiesof irradiated detectors. The measurement data are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn.Three measurement apparatuses built as a part of this work are described: two telescopes measuring the tracks of the beam of a particle acceler...

  7. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  8. Experimental characterization of semiconductor-based thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Bortot, D.; Pola, A.; Introini, M.V.; Lorenzoli, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN—Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sacco, D. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); INAIL—DIT, Via di Fontana Candida 1, 00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Buonomo, B. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Palomba, M.; Grossi, A. [ENEA Triga RC-1C.R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00060 S. Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy)

    2015-04-21

    In the framework of NESCOFI@BTF and NEURAPID projects, active thermal neutron detectors were manufactured by depositing appropriate thickness of {sup 6}LiF on commercially available windowless p–i–n diodes. Detectors with different radiator thickness, ranging from 5 to 62 μm, were manufactured by evaporation-based deposition technique and exposed to known values of thermal neutron fluence in two thermal neutron facilities exhibiting different irradiation geometries. The following properties of the detector response were investigated and presented in this work: thickness dependence, impact of parasitic effects (photons and epithermal neutrons), linearity, isotropy, and radiation damage following exposure to large fluence (in the order of 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2})

  9. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  10. Production, characterization and operation of {sup 76}Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Bode, T.; Budjas, D.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Lazzaro, A.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Allardt, M.; Barros, N.; Domula, A.; Lehnert, B.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A.M.; Belyaev, S.T.; Lebedev, V.I.; Zhukov, S.V. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M.; D' Andrea, V.; Ioannucci, L.; Junker, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Macolino, C.; Nisi, S.; Zavarise, P. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, Assergi (Italy); Barabanov, I.; Bezrukov, L.; Gurentsov, V.; Inzhechik, L.V.; Kazalov, V.; Kuzminov, V.V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Yanovich, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baudis, L.; Benato, G.; Walter, M. [Physik Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauer, C.; Heisel, M.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Kirsch, A.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Salathe, M.; Schreiner, J.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Strecker, H.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Caldwell, A.; Liao, H.Y.; Majorovits, B.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulz, O.; Vanhoefer, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bellotti, E.; Pessina, G. [Universita Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Belogurov, S.; Kornoukhov, V.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bettini, A.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Hemmer, S.; Sada, C.; Von Sturm, K. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Borowicz, D. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Kochetov, O.; Nemchenok, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Shevchik, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cattadori, C.; Gotti, C. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Chernogorov, A.; Demidova, E.V.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Vasenko, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Grabmayr, P.; Hegai, A.; Jochum, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schuetz, A.K. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Frodyma, N.; Misiaszek, M.; Pelczar, K.; Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Hult, M.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Lippi, I.; Stanco, L.; Ur, C.A. [INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano (Italy); Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of the experiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new {sup 76}Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)- type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in GERDA during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the {sup 76}Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of GERDA Phase II. (orig.)

  11. Production, characterization and operation of {sup 76}Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M. [Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Allardt, M. [Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A. M. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, Assergi (Italy); and others

    2015-02-03

    The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of theexperiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new {sup 76}Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)-type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in Gerda during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the {sup 76}Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of Gerda Phase II.

  12. Production, characterization and operation of Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Misiaszek, M.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Ur, C. A.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-02-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array ( Gerda) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay () of Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of theexperiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)-type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in Gerda during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of Gerda Phase II.

  13. Characterization of a dose verification system dedicated to radiotherapy treatments based on a silicon detector multi-strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocca, A.; Cortes Giraldo, M. A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Espino, J. M.; Aranas, R.; Abou Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Quesada, J. M.; Vega-Leal, A. P.; Perez Neto, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the characterization of a silicon detector multi-strips (SSSSD: Single Sided Silicon Strip Detector), developed by the company Micron Semiconductors Ltd. for use as a verification system for radiotherapy treatments.

  14. Preparation of plastic scintillator detectors and physicochemical parameter characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, M.M.; Mesquita, C.H. de.

    1988-10-01

    The development of plastic scintillators for use in the nuclear radiation detection is described. The detectors were fabricated by the polymerization of styrene with organic fluors. The organic fluors used were PPO (1,4 diphenyl-oxazol) and POPOP 1,4-di-2-(5-phenyl-oxazolil) - benzene in proportions of 0,5 and 0,05% respectively. Physicochemical parameters related to the quality of this detector are investigated at this laboratory. The evaluation of its fluorescence characteristics, density, melting softening, refractive index, molecular weight, gamma and alpha spectrometry characteristics and finally the comparative pulse height analysis indicate that the plastic scintillator produced at this laboratory is comparable with others already described. (author)

  15. Characterization of different options of trackers in OPERA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moret, Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    Neutrinos were postulated by Pauli during the thirties. These spin-half and massless particles helped to solve the β decay problems. Their study started in the fifties and work is still going on nowadays. This study was lengthy due the difficulty to detect neutrinos and also to a 'strange' phenomenon: we always detect less neutrinos than expected for solar and atmospheric neutrinos. This phenomenon can be explained by oscillation between massive neutrino states. The OPERA project is intended to directly proved this oscillation. To this aim, a ν μ beam is produced at CERN and pointed to Gran-Sasso (Italy), 732 km away. The detector is optimised to reveal the tau neutrino coming from ν μ → ν τ oscillation. This detector of 30 meters length with 2,000 tonnes of target will be built with more than 200,000 bricks of lead and emulsion. Taus are observed after scanning of the emulsions. The bricks must be localized into the wall and this localization is possible with a tracker located downstream of each target wall. The present work was devoted to the determination of the best tracker for OPERA. Three options were studied and a tracker made of plastic scintillator slabs has been chosen. It allows obtaining an efficiency of the localization of the vertex wall of around 80% and an efficiency of the localization of the brick inside the wall of around 80%. As photo detector we have studies HPD with a self-triggerable readout. HPDs have displayed an excellent resolution, a cross talk lower than 2% and a uniformity higher then 98%. A DAQ based on Ethernet was proposed and accepted by the collaboration. In this option, each photon detector is node of the network and can be accessed in a web browser. A prototype with plastic oscillator, a HPD with an self triggerable readout and a DAQ based on Ethernet were built and validated during beam tests. (author)

  16. Reactor neutrinos study: integration and characterization of the Nucifer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiot, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The major advances done in the understanding of neutrinos properties and in detector technology have opened the door to a new discipline: the Applied Antineutrino Physics. Indeed, this particle has the great advantage to carry information from its emission place without perturbation. Because neutrinos are inextricably linked to nuclear processes, new applications are in nuclear safeguards. In this context, the Nucifer project aims to test a small electron-antineutrino detector to be installed a few 10 meters from a reactor core for monitoring its thermal power and for testing the sensitivity to the plutonium content. Moreover, recent re-analysis of previous short-distance reactor-neutrino experiments shows a significant discrepancy between measured and expected neutrino count rates. Among the various hypotheses a new phenomenon as the existence of a fourth sterile neutrino can explain this anomaly. To be able to count neutrinos and get the corresponding energy spectrum, the detection is based on the inverse beta decay in about 850 kg of doped liquid scintillator. The experimental challenge is to operate such a small detector in a high background place, due to the closeness with the surface and the reactor radiations. The detector is now finished and data taking has begun at the Osiris research reactor in Saclay since April 2012. Sadly, unexpected low liquid attenuation length and high gamma background level prevented us to highlight neutrinos. We are now waiting for a liquid change and a new lead wall to study reactor monitoring and to test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. (author) [fr

  17. Design, characterization and beam test performance of different silicon microstrip detector geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catacchini, E.; Ciampolini, L.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.

    1998-01-01

    During the last few years a large number of silicon microstrip detectors has been especially designed and tested in order to study and optimize the performances of the tracking devices to be used in the forward-backward part of the CMS (technical proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-38 LHCC/Pl, 15 December 1994) experiment. Both single and double sided silicon detectors of a trapezoidal ('wedge') shape and with different strip configurations, including prototypes produced with double metal technology, were characterized in the laboratory and tested using high-energy beams. Furthermore, due to the high-radiation environment where the detectors should operate, particular care was devoted to the study of the characteristics of heavily irradiated detectors. The main results of detector performances (charge response, signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution etc.) will be reviewed and discussed. (author)

  18. Methods for radiation detection and characterization using a multiple detector probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas William; Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2014-11-04

    Apparatuses, methods, and systems relating to radiological characterization of environments are disclosed. Multi-detector probes with a plurality of detectors in a common housing may be used to substantially concurrently detect a plurality of different radiation activities and types. Multiple multi-detector probes may be used in a down-hole environment to substantially concurrently detect radioactive activity and contents of a buried waste container. Software may process, analyze, and integrate the data from the different multi-detector probes and the different detector types therein to provide source location and integrated analysis as to the source types and activity in the measured environment. Further, the integrated data may be used to compensate for differential density effects and the effects of radiation shielding materials within the volume being measured.

  19. Instrumentation for characterizing materials and composed semiconductors for ionizing radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, Arquimedes J.A.; Leite, Adolfo M.B.; Nazzre, Fabio V.B.; Santos, Luiz A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the development of instrumentation for characterizing some type of ionizing radiation detectors. Those detectors are being manufactured by the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory at CRCN/Recife and can be used both on photon beam and with particles. Such detectors consist of semiconductor material in the form of films generated by oxide growing or by means of semiconductor material deposition in a substrate. Those materials can be made of metals, semi-metals, composites or semiconductor polymers. Prior to expose those detectors to ionizing radiation, it must be physically and electrically characterized. In this intention it was developed an electromechanical system. An electrical circuit was built to measure the signal from the detector and another circuit to control the movement of four probes (4-points technique) by using a stepper motor and the micro stepping technique avoiding damage to the detector. This system can be of interest to researchers that work with a sort of semiconductor materials in the form of thin film and in nanotechnological processes aiming the design of radiation ionizing detectors. (author)

  20. Characterization of 3D-stc detectors fabricated at ITC-irst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Bruzzi, Mara; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Piemonte, Claudio; Pozza, Alberto; Ronchin, Sabina; Tosi, Carlo; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    3D silicon radiation detectors offer many advantages over planar detectors, including improved radiation tolerance and faster charge collection time. We proposed a new 3D architecture (referred to as 3D-stc), which features columnar electrodes of one doping type only, thus, allowing a considerable simplification of the manufacturing process. In this paper, we report selected results from the electrical characterization of 3D diodes fabricated with this technology, along with preliminary results on the charge collection efficiency of these devices

  1. Integrated Modeling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project: Structural Analysis Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John; Mosier, Mark; Howard, Joe; Hyde, Tupper; Parrish, Keith; Ha, Kong; Liu, Frank; McGinnis, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs about structural analysis activities and integrated modeling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The topics include: 1) JWST Overview; 2) Observatory Structural Models; 3) Integrated Performance Analysis; and 4) Future Work and Challenges.

  2. Evaluation of slow shutdown system flux detectors in Point Lepreau Generating Station - I: dynamic response characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V.N.P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Comeau, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); McKay, J.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    CANDU reactors are protected against reactor overpower by two independent shutdown systems: Shut Down System 1 and 2 (SDS1 and SDS2). At the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS), the shutdown systems can be actuated by measurements of the neutron flux by Platinum-clad Inconel In-Core Flux Detectors (ICFDs). These detectors have a complex dynamic behaviour, characterized by 'prompt' and 'delayed' components with respect to immediate changes in the in-core neutron flux. The dynamic response components need to be determined accurately in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the detectors for actuating the shutdown systems. The amplitudes of the prompt and the delayed components of individual detectors were estimated over a period of several years by comparison of archived detector response data with the computed local neutron flux evolution for SDS1 and SDS2 reactor trips. This was achieved by custom-designed algorithms. The results of this analysis show that the dynamic response of the detectors changes with irradiation, with the SDS2 detectors having 'prompt' signal components that decreased significantly with irradiation. Some general conclusions about detector aging effects are also drawn. (author)

  3. JWST Wavefront Sensing and Control: Operations Plans, Demonstrations, and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall; Acton, D. Scott; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Knight, J. Scott; Myers, Carey; Stark, Chris; JWST Wavefront Sensing & Control Team

    2018-01-01

    After JWST launches and unfolds in space, its telescope optics will be aligned through a complex series of wavefront sensing and control (WFSC) steps to achieve diffraction-limited performance. This iterative process will comprise about half of the observatory commissioning time (~ 3 out of 6 months). We summarize the JWST WFSC process, schedule, and expectations for achieved performance, and discuss our team’s activities to prepare for an effective & efficient telescope commissioning. During the recently-completed OTIS cryo test at NASA JSC, WFSC demonstrations showed the flight-like operation of the entire JWST active optics and WFSC system from end to end, including all hardware and software components. In parallel, the same test data were processed through the JWST Mission Operations Center at STScI to demonstrate the readiness of ground system components there (such as the flight operations system, data pipelines, archives, etc). Moreover, using the Astronomer’s Proposal Tool (APT), the entire telescope commissioning program has been implemented, reviewed, and is ready for execution. Between now and launch our teams will continue preparations for JWST commissioning, including further rehearsals and testing, to ensure a successful alignment of JWST’s telescope optics.

  4. Phase-Retrieval Uncertainty Estimation and Algorithm Comparison for the JWST-ISIM Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval, the process of determining the exitpupil wavefront of an optical instrument from image-plane intensity measurements, is the baseline methodology for characterizing the wavefront for the suite of science instruments (SIs) in the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST is a large, infrared space telescope with a 6.5-meter diameter primary mirror. JWST is currently NASA's flagship mission and will be the premier space observatory of the next decade. ISIM contains four optical benches with nine unique instruments, including redundancies. ISIM was characterized at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD in a series of cryogenic vacuum tests using a telescope simulator. During these tests, phase-retrieval algorithms were used to characterize the instruments. The objective of this paper is to describe the Monte-Carlo simulations that were used to establish uncertainties (i.e., error bars) for the wavefronts of the various instruments in ISIM. Multiple retrieval algorithms were used in the analysis of ISIM phase-retrieval focus-sweep data, including an iterativetransform algorithm and a nonlinear optimization algorithm. These algorithms emphasize the recovery of numerous optical parameters, including low-order wavefront composition described by Zernike polynomial terms and high-order wavefront described by a point-by-point map, location of instrument best focus, focal ratio, exit-pupil amplitude, the morphology of any extended object, and optical jitter. The secondary objective of this paper is to report on the relative accuracies of these algorithms for the ISIM instrument tests, and a comparison of their computational complexity and their performance on central and graphical processing unit clusters. From a phase-retrieval perspective, the ISIM test campaign includes a variety of source illumination bandwidths, various image-plane sampling criteria above and below the Nyquist- Shannon

  5. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  6. Characterization and selection of CZT detector modules for HEX experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadawale, S.V.; Purohit, S.; Shanmugam, M.; Acharya, Y.B.; Goswami, J.N.; Sudhakar, M.; Sreekumar, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of characterization of a large sample of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector modules planned to be used for the HEX (High Energy X-ray spectrometer) experiment onboard India's first mission to the Moon, Chandrayaan-1. We procured forty modules from Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd. and carried out a detailed characterization of each module at various temperatures and selected final nine detector modules for the flight model of HEX. Here we present the results of the characterization of all modules and the selection procedure for the HEX flight detector modules. These modules show 5-6% energy resolution (at 122 keV, for best 90% of pixels) at room temperature which is improved to ∼4% when these modules are cooled to sub-0 deg. C temperature. The gain and energy resolution were stable during the long duration tests.

  7. HST PanCET Program: A Cloudy Atmosphere for the Promising JWST Target WASP-101b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Mandell, A. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stevenson, K. B.; Lewis, N. K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sing, D. K.; Evans, T. [Astrophysics Group, Physics Building, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); López-Morales, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Marley, M. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-5, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kataria, T. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ballester, G. E. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1541 E Univ. Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Barstow, J. [Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ben-Jaffel, L. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UMR 7095 and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Paris 6, 98 bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bourrier, V.; Ehrenreich, D. [Observatoire de l’Université de Genève, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Buchhave, L. A. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Niels Bohr Institute and Natural History Museum, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); García Muñoz, A., E-mail: hannah.wakeford@nasa.gov [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2017-01-20

    We present results from the first observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Panchromatic Comparative Exoplanet Treasury program for WASP-101b, a highly inflated hot Jupiter and one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) Early Release Science (ERS) program. From a single HST Wide Field Camera 3 observation, we find that the near-infrared transmission spectrum of WASP-101b contains no significant H{sub 2}O absorption features and we rule out a clear atmosphere at 13 σ . Therefore, WASP-101b is not an optimum target for a JWST ERS program aimed at observing strong molecular transmission features. We compare WASP-101b to the well-studied and nearly identical hot Jupiter WASP-31b. These twin planets show similar temperature–pressure profiles and atmospheric features in the near-infrared. We suggest exoplanets in the same parameter space as WASP-101b and WASP-31b will also exhibit cloudy transmission spectral features. For future HST exoplanet studies, our analysis also suggests that a lower count limit needs to be exceeded per pixel on the detector in order to avoid unwanted instrumental systematics.

  8. Optimal Strategies for Probing Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Line, Michael

    2018-01-01

    It is imperative that the exoplanet community determines the feasibility and the resources needed to yield high fidelity atmospheric compositions from terrestrial exoplanets. In particular, LHS 1140b and the TRAPPIST-1 system, already slated for observations by JWST’s Guaranteed Time Observers, will be the first two terrestrial planets observed by JWST. I will discuss optimal observing strategies for observing these two systems, focusing on the NIRSpec Prism (1-5μm) and the combination of NIRISS SOSS (1-2.7μm) and NIRSpec G395H (3-5μm). I will also introduce currently unsupported JWST readmodes that have the potential to greatly increase the precision on our atmospheric spectra. Lastly, I will use information content theory to compute the expected confidence interval on the retrieved abundances of key molecular species and temperature profiles as a function of JWST observing cycles.

  9. Characterization of a alpha particle detector CR-39 exposed to a source of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maino, Leandro Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    In this project, the main goal is the characterization of a alpha particle detector CR-39 exposed to a source of radio. Three detectors were exposed to a source of radium and then chemically treated for different periods. This way, we could analyze these samples and collect the information needed to verify that at least one of the chemical attack, there has been a separation of the energies alpha particles incident with distinct peaks, thus characterizing the CR-39 as alpha spectrometer in the range 2.5 to 6.3 MeV . (author)

  10. Fabrication and characterization of a 3D Positive ion detector and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Pitchaikannu; Sureka, Chandrasekaran Senbagavadivoo

    2017-11-01

    There is a growing interest to experimentally evaluate the track structure induced by ionizing particles in order to characterize the radiobiological quality of ionizing radiation for applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. To do so, a novel positive ion detector based on the multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) technology has been proposed previously, which works under the principle of ion induced impact ionization. Based on this, an upgraded 3D positive ion detector was fabricated in order to improve its efficiency and use it for various applications. To improve the efficiency of the detector, cathodes with different insulators (Bakelite plate and Steatite Ceramics) and conducting layers (ITO, FTO, and Gold coated cathode) were studied under various gaseous media (methane, nitrogen, and air) using Am-241, Co-60, Co-57, Na-22, Cs-137, and Ba-133 sources. From this study, it is confirmed that the novel 3D positive ion detector that has been upgraded using gold as strip material, tungsten (87%) coated copper (13%) as the core wire, gold coated ceramic as cathode, and thickness of 3.483 mm showed 9.2% efficiency under methane medium at 0.9 Torr pressure using an Am-241 source. It is also confirmed that when the conductivity of the cathode and thickness of the detector is increased, the performance of the detector is improved significantly. Further, the scope of the detector to use in the field of radiation protection, radiation dosimetry, gamma spectrometry, radiation biology, and oncology are reported here.

  11. Conception and characterization of a virtual coplanar grid for a 11×11 pixelated CZT detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espagnet, Romain; Frezza, Andrea [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics and Cancer Research Center, Université Laval, Quebec city, QC, Canada G1R 0A6 (Canada); Martin, Jean-Pierre; Hamel, Louis-André [Department of Physics, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Montréal QC, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Després, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.despres@phy.ulaval.ca [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics and Cancer Research Center, Université Laval, Quebec city, QC, Canada G1R 0A6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology and Research Center of CHU de Québec - Université Laval, Quebec city, QC Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2017-07-11

    Due to the low mobility of holes in CZT, commercially available detectors with a relatively large volume typically use a pixelated anode structure. They are mostly used in imaging applications and often require a dense electronic readout scheme. These large volume detectors are also interesting for high-sensitivity applications and a CZT-based blood gamma counter was developed from a 20×20×15 mm{sup 3} crystal available commercially and having a 11×11 pixelated readout scheme. A method is proposed here to reduce the number of channels required to use the crystal in a high-sensitivity counting application, dedicated to pharmacokinetic modelling in PET and SPECT. Inspired by a classic coplanar anode, an implementation of a virtual coplanar grid was done by connecting the 121 pixels of the detector to form intercalated bands. The layout, the front-end electronics and the characterization of the detector in this 2-channel anode geometry is presented. The coefficients required to compensate for electron trapping in CZT were determined experimentally to improve the performance. The resulting virtual coplanar detector has an intrinsic efficiency of 34% and an energy resolution of 8% at 662 keV. The detector's response was linear between 80 keV and 1372 keV. This suggests that large CZT crystals offer an excellent alternative to scintillation detectors for some applications, especially those where high-sensitivity and compactness are required.

  12. Optical characterization of wide-gap detector-grade semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshazly, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Wide bandgap semiconductors are being widely investigated because they have the potential to satisfy the stringent material requirements of high resolution, room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers. In particular, Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd 1-x Zn x Te, x∼0.1) and Thallium Bromide (Tl Br), due to their combination of high resistivity, high atomic number and good electron mobility, have became very promising candidates for use in X- and gamma-ray detectors operating at room temperature. In this study, carrier trapping times were measured in CZT and Tl Br as a function of temperature and material quality. Carrier lifetimes and tellurium inclusion densities were measured in detector-grade Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals grown by the High Pressure Bridgman method and Modified Bridgman method. Excess carriers were produced in the material using a pulsed YAG laser with a 1064 nm wavelength and 7 ns pulse width. Infrared microscopy was used to measure the tellurium defect densities in CZT crystals. The electronic decay was optically measured at room temperature. Spatial mapping of lifetimes and defect densities in CZT was performed to determine the relationship between defect density and electronic decay. A significant and strong correlation was found between the volume fraction of tellurium inclusions and the carrier trapping time. Carrier trapping times and tellurium inclusions were measured in CZT in the temperature range from 300 K to 110 K and the results were analyzed using a theoretical trapping model. Spatial mapping of carrier trapping times and defect densities in CZT was performed to determine the relationship between defect density and electronic decay. While a strong correlation between trapping time and defect density of tellurium inclusions was observed, there was no significant change in the trap energy. Carrier trapping times were measured in detector grade thallium bromide (Tl Br) and compared with the results for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) in

  13. Laser and beta source setup characterization of 3D-DDTC detectors fabricated at FBK-irst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoboli, A. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)], E-mail: zoboli@disi.unitn.it; Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dip. di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Trieste, I-34127, Trieste (Italy); Eckert, S.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U. [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    We report on the functional characterization of the first batch of 3D Double-Sided Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) detectors fabricated at FBK, Trento. This detector concept represents the evolution of the previous 3D-STC detectors towards full 3D detectors, and is expected to achieve a performance which is comparable to standard 3D detectors, but with a simpler fabrication process. Measurements were performed on detectors in the microstrip configuration coupled to the ATLAS ABCD3T binary readout. This paper reports spatially resolved signal efficiency tests made with a pulsed infrared laser setup and charge collection efficiency tests made with a Beta source.

  14. Laser and beta source setup characterization of 3D-DDTC detectors fabricated at FBK-irst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoboli, A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Eckert, S.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U.; Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the functional characterization of the first batch of 3D Double-Sided Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) detectors fabricated at FBK, Trento. This detector concept represents the evolution of the previous 3D-STC detectors towards full 3D detectors, and is expected to achieve a performance which is comparable to standard 3D detectors, but with a simpler fabrication process. Measurements were performed on detectors in the microstrip configuration coupled to the ATLAS ABCD3T binary readout. This paper reports spatially resolved signal efficiency tests made with a pulsed infrared laser setup and charge collection efficiency tests made with a Beta source.

  15. Charge collection characterization of a 3D silicon radiation detector by using 3D simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliopuska, J; Orava, R

    2007-01-01

    In 3D detectors, the electrodes are processed within the bulk of the sensor material. Therefore, the signal charge is collected independently of the wafer thickness and the collection process is faster due to shorter distances between the charge collection electrodes as compared to a planar detector structure. In this paper, 3D simulations are used to assess the performance of a 3D detector structure in terms of charge sharing, efficiency and speed of charge collection, surface charge, location of the primary interaction and the bias voltage. The measured current pulse is proposed to be delayed due to the resistance–capacitance (RC) product induced by the variation of the serial resistance of the pixel electrode depending on the depth of the primary interaction. Extensive simulations are carried out to characterize the 3D detector structures and to verify the proposed explanation for the delay of the current pulse. A method for testing the hypothesis experimentally is suggested.

  16. Characterization of a scintillating lithium glass ultra-cold neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, B.; Rebenitsch, L.A.; Hansen-Romu, S.; Mammei, R.; Martin, J.W. [University of Winnipeg, Department of Physics, Winnipeg (Canada); Lauss, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Lindner, T. [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); University of Winnipeg, Department of Physics, Winnipeg (Canada); Pierre, E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Osaka University, Research Centre for Nuclear Physics, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    A {sup 6}Li-glass-based scintillation detector developed for the TRIUMF neutron electric dipole moment experiment was characterized using the ultra-cold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The data acquisition system for this detector was demonstrated to perform well at rejecting backgrounds. An estimate of the absolute efficiency of background rejection of 99.7±0.1% is made. For variable ultra-cold neutron rate (varying from < 1 kHz to approx. 100 kHz per channel) and background rate seen at the Paul Scherrer Institute, we estimate that the absolute detector efficiency is 89.7{sup +1.3}{sub -1.9}%. Finally a comparison with a commercial Cascade detector was performed for a specific setup at the West-2 beamline of the ultra-cold neutron source at PSI. (orig.)

  17. Spitzer/JWST Cross Calibration: IRAC Observations of Potential Calibrators for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Sean J.; Gordon, Karl D.; Lowrance, Patrick; Ingalls, James G.; Glaccum, William J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; E Krick, Jessica; Laine, Seppo J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hora, Joseph L.; Bohlin, Ralph

    2017-06-01

    We present observations at 3.6 and 4.5 microns using IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope of a set of main sequence A stars and white dwarfs that are potential calibrators across the JWST instrument suite. The stars range from brightnesses of 4.4 to 15 mag in K band. The calibration observations use a similar redundancy to the observing strategy for the IRAC primary calibrators (Reach et al. 2005) and the photometry is obtained using identical methods and instrumental photometric corrections as those applied to the IRAC primary calibrators (Carey et al. 2009). The resulting photometry is then compared to the predictions based on spectra from the CALSPEC Calibration Database (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/observatory/crds/calspec.html) and the IRAC bandpasses. These observations are part of an ongoing collaboration between IPAC and STScI investigating absolute calibration in the infrared.

  18. Standard practice for manufacturing characterization of digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the evaluation of Digital Detector Arrays (DDAs), and assures that one common standard exists for quantitative comparison of DDAs so that an appropriate DDA is selected to meet NDT requirements. 1.2 This practice is intended for use by manufacturers or integrators of DDAs to provide quantitative results of DDA characteristics for NDT user or purchaser consumption. Some of these tests require specialized test phantoms to assure consistency among results among suppliers or manufacturers. These tests are not intended for users to complete, nor are they intended for long term stability tracking and lifetime measurements. However, they may be used for this purpose, if so desired. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropr...

  19. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A., E-mail: ali.benmoussa@stce.be [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Saito, T. [Department of Environment and Energy, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Yagiyama-Kasumi-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8577 (Japan); Averin, S. [Fryazino Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 141190 Square Vvedenski 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Berger, G. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Kroth, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Gottwald, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal–semiconductor–metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3–6 pA/cm{sup 2}). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  20. AN IMAGE-PLANE ALGORITHM FOR JWST'S NON-REDUNDANT APERTURE MASK DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. [Johns Hopkins University Department of Physics and Astronomy 3400 North Charles, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lacour, Sylvestre [LESIA, CNRS/UMR-8109, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-01-10

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilities and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90%-95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 μm. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of closure phase, σ{sub CP} (a proxy for binary point source contrast). If σ{sub CP} < 10{sup –4} radians—a contrast ratio of 10 mag—young accreting gas giant planets (e.g., in the nearby Taurus star-forming region) could be imaged with JWST NIRISS. We show the feasibility of using NIRISS' NRM with the sub-Nyquist sampled F277W, which would enable some exoplanet chemistry characterization. In the presence of small piston errors, the dominant sources of closure phase error (depending on pixel sampling, and filter bandwidth) are flat field errors and unmodeled variations in intra-pixel sensitivity. The in-flight stability of NIRISS will determine how well these errors can be calibrated by observing a point source. Our results help develop efficient observing strategies for space-based NRM.

  1. A Cryogenic Detector Characterization Facility in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at the Technical University of Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenkämper, A.; Defay, X.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Kinast, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Lindner, E.; Mancuso, M.; Mondragón, E.; Münster, A.; Ortmann, T.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S.; Strauss, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Physics Department of the Technical University of Munich operates a shallow underground detector laboratory in Garching, Germany. It provides ˜ 160 {m^2} of laboratory space which is shielded from cosmic radiation by ˜ 6 m of gravel and soil, corresponding to a shielding of ˜ 15 {m.w.e.} . The laboratory also houses a cleanroom equipped with work- and wetbenches, a chemical fumehood as well as a spin-coater and a mask-aligner for photolithographic processing of semiconductor detectors. Furthermore, the shallow underground laboratory runs two high-purity germanium detector screening stations, a liquid argon cryostat and a ^3 He-^4 He dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of ≤ 12-14 mK . The infrastructure provided by the shallow laboratory is particularly relevant for the characterization of CaWO_4 target crystals for the CRESST-III experiment, detector fabrication and assembly for rare event searches. Future applications of the laboratory include detector development in the framework of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments (ν -cleus) and studying its potential as a site to search for MeV-scale dark matter with gram-scale cryogenic detectors.

  2. Design and performance of a 50mK rapid turnaround detector characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Michael L.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Panek, John; Shirron, Peter J.; Staguhn, Johannes G.

    2006-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory will require arrays of detectors with thousands of background-limited elements sensitive to wavelengths from ∼50μm to ∼3mm. Because of the low power levels present in space with cryogenic telescopes, these detectors will likely operate at temperatures below 100mK. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8x32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50mK in under 6h, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. The system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests

  3. Characterization of the exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector for small field applications in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, C.; Lindsay, C.; Beaudry, J.; Penner, C.; Strgar, V.; Lee, R.; Duzenli, C.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate dosimetry in small field proton therapy is challenging, particularly for applications such as ocular therapy, and suitable detectors for this purpose are sought. The Exradin W1 plastic scintillating fibre detector is known to out-perform most other detectors for determining relative dose factors for small megavoltage photon beams used in radiotherapy but its potential in small proton beams has been relatively unexplored in the literature. The 1 mm diameter cylindrical geometry and near water equivalence of the W1 makes it an attractive alternative to other detectors. This study examines the dosimetric performance of the W1 in a 74 MeV proton therapy beam with particular focus on detector response characteristics relevant to relative dose measurement in small fields suitable for ocular therapy. Quenching of the scintillation signal is characterized and demonstrated not to impede relative dose measurements at a fixed depth. The background cable-only (Čerenkov and radio-fluorescence) signal is 4 orders of magnitude less than the scintillation signal, greatly simplifying relative dose measurements. Comparison with other detectors and Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the W1 is useful for measuring relative dose factors for field sizes down to 5 mm diameter and shallow spread out Bragg peaks down to 6 mm in depth.

  4. Planning JWST NIRSpec MSA spectroscopy using NIRCam pre-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kassin, Susan A.; Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Reid, I. N.; Blair, William P.; Keyes, Charles D.; Soderblom, D. R.; Peña-Guerrero, Maria A.

    2016-07-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the work-horse spectrograph at 1-5microns for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). A showcase observing mode of NIRSpec is the multi-object spectroscopy with the Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs), which consist of a quarter million tiny configurable shutters that are 0. ''20×0. ''46 in size. The NIRSpec MSA shutters can be opened in adjacent rows to create flexible and positionable spectroscopy slits on prime science targets of interest. Because of the very small shutter width, the NIRSpec MSA spectral data quality will benefit significantly from accurate astrometric knowledge of the positions of planned science sources. Images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have the optimal relative astrometric accuracy for planning NIRSpec observations of 5-10 milli-arcseconds (mas). However, some science fields of interest might have no HST images, galactic fields can have moderate proper motions at the 5mas level or greater, and extragalactic images with HST may have inadequate source information at NIRSpec wavelengths beyond 2 microns. Thus, optimal NIRSpec spectroscopy planning may require pre-imaging observations with the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on JWST to accurately establish source positions for alignment with the NIRSpec MSAs. We describe operational philosophies and programmatic considerations for acquiring JWST NIRCam pre-image observations for NIRSpec MSA spectroscopic planning within the same JWST observing Cycle.

  5. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency

  6. HEROICA: a test facility for the characterization of BEGe detectors for the Gerda experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Raphael [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The Gerda experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. It uses bare, enriched Germanium diodes that are operated in liquid argon. Currently, Phase I is running at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. For Phase II, ∝20 kg of Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge at 86% level will be additionally deployed. These detectors allow for advanced pulse shape discrimination techniques, to suppress the background, which will be necessary to reach the goal of Phase II with a background index of 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the Region of Interest. The HEROICA project aims for acceptance tests and the characterization of the BEGe detectors. In this talk, the infrastructure of the Belgian HADES underground test facility, as well as the full test protocol for the characterization campaign of the enrBEGe detectors, is described. This test protocol includes the determination of important detector parameters, such as energy resolution, depletion voltage, dead-layer thickness and uniformity, active volume, as well as pulse shape discrimination parameters.

  7. Use of GEANT4 vs. MCNPX for the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ende, B.M. van der; Atanackovic, J.; Erlandson, A.; Bentoumi, G.

    2016-06-01

    This work compares GEANT4 with MCNPX in the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector. The neutron energy ranges simulated in this work (0.025 eV to 20 MeV) are the traditional domain of MCNP simulations. This paper addresses the question, how well can GEANT4 and MCNPX be employed for detailed thermal neutron detector characterization? To answer this, GEANT4 and MCNPX have been employed to simulate detector response to a {sup 252}Cf energy spectrum point source, as well as to simulate mono-energetic parallel beam source geometries. The {sup 252}Cf energy spectrum simulation results demonstrate agreement in detector count rate within 3% between the two packages, with the MCNPX results being generally closer to experiment than are those from GEANT4. The mono-energetic source simulations demonstrate agreement in detector response within 5% between the two packages for all neutron energies, and within 1% for neutron energies between 100 eV and 5 MeV. Cross-checks between the two types of simulations using ISO-8529 {sup 252}Cf energy bins demonstrates that MCNPX results are more self-consistent than are GEANT4 results, by 3–4%.

  8. Assembly, characterization, and operation of large-scale TES detector arrays for ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine Goodwin

    2016-01-01

    The Polarization-sensitive Receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACTPol) is designed to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on small angular scales. Measurements of the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies have produced arguably the most important cosmological data to date, establishing the LambdaCDM model and providing the best constraints on most of its parameters. To detect the very small fluctuations in the CMB signal across the sky, ACTPol uses feedhorn-coupled Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) detectors. A TES is a superconducting thin film operated in the transition region between the superconducting and normal states, where it functions as a highly sensitive resistive thermometer. In this thesis, aspects of the assembly, characterization, and in-field operation of the ACTPol TES detector arrays are discussed. First, a novel microfabrication process for producing high-density superconducting aluminum/polyimide flexible circuitry (flex) designed to connect large-scale detector arrays to the first stage of readout is presented. The flex is used in parts of the third ACTPol array and is currently being produced for use in the AdvACT detector arrays, which will begin to replace the ACTPol arrays in 2016. Next, we describe methods and results for the in-lab and on-telescope characterization of the detectors in the third ACTPol array. Finally, we describe the ACTPol TES R(T,I) transition shapes and how they affect the detector calibration and operation. Methods for measuring the exact detector calibration and re-biasing functions, taking into account the R(T,I) transition shape, are presented.

  9. Development and characterization of the lead iodide semiconductor detector; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao do detector semicondutor de iodeto de chumbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Icimone Braga de

    2001-07-01

    A methodology for purification and growth of PbI{sub 2} crystal as well as for its characterization as a room temperature radiation detector was developed in this work. Commercial salts were purified using the zone refining method and, for the purified material growth, the Bridgman method was used. To calculate the purification efficiency, studies of the decrease impurities concentrations were made in the salts and in three sections of the materials purified, using the neutron activation analysis technique. The results showed that the impurities segregate preferentially in the ingot final section. A significant decrease of the impurities concentration in function of the purification pass number was observed. The grown crystals presented good crystalline quality according to the results of the X-ray diffraction analysis. To evaluate the crystal as a semiconductor detector, measurements of dark leakage current, resistivity and the response of ({sup 241}Am) alpha particle and ({sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs) gamma rays were carried out. The radiation response is strongly dependent on the crystals purity. The crystals purified with 500 passes exhibited energy resolution of 10% for {sup 241} Am alpha particle and the gamma rays resolution was compatible with the literature. The photosensibility of the PbI{sub 2} crystal found in the wavelength from 400 to 600 nm range suggests an another application at this crystal as a photodetector to be coupled to scintillators. (author)

  10. The GOTTHARD charge integrating readout detector: design and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzanica, A; Bergamaschi, A; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Henrich, B; Johnson, I; Valeria, R; Schmitt, B; Xintian, S; Graafsma, H; Lohmann, M

    2012-01-01

    A charge integrating readout ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) for silicon strip sensors has been developed at PSI in collaboration with DESY. The goal of the project is to provide a charge integrating readout system able to cope with the pulsed beam of XFEL machines and at the same time to retain the high dynamic range and single photon resolution performances typical for photon counting systems. The ASIC, designed in IBM 130 nm CMOS technology, takes advantage of its three gain stages with automatic stage selection to achieve a dynamic range of 10000 12 keV photons and a noise better than 300 e.n.c.. The 4 analog outputs of the ASIC are optimized for speed, allowing frame rates higher than 1 MHz, without compromises on linearity and noise performances. This work presents the design features of the ASIC, and reports the characterization results of the chip itself.

  11. Characterization of oxygen dimer-enriched silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Boisvert, V; Moll, M; Murin, L I; Pintilie, I

    2005-01-01

    Various types of silicon material and silicon p+n diodes have been treated to increase the concentration of the oxygen dimer (O2i) defect. This was done by exposing the bulk material and the diodes to 6 MeV electrons at a temperature of about 350 °C. FTIR spectroscopy has been performed on the processed material confirming the formation of oxygen dimer defects in Czochralski silicon pieces. We also show results from TSC characterization on processed diodes. Finally, we investigated the influence of the dimer enrichment process on the depletion voltage of silicon diodes and performed 24 GeV/c proton irradiations to study the evolution of the macroscopic diode characteristics as a function of fluence.

  12. Technical characterization of five x-ray detectors for paediatric radiography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N. W.; Smet, M.; Hofmans, M.; Pauwels, H.; De Clercq, T.; Bosmans, H.

    2017-12-01

    Physical image quality of five x-ray detectors used in the paediatric imaging department is characterized with the aim of establishing the range/scope of imaging performance provided by these detectors for neonatal imaging. Two computed radiography (CR) detectors (MD4.0 powder imaging plate (PIP) and HD5.0 needle imaging plate (NIP), Agfa HealthCare NV, B-2640 Mortsel, Belgium) and three flat panel detectors (FPD) (the Agfa DX-D35C and DX-D45C and the DRX-2530C (Carestream Health Inc., Rochester, NY 14608, USA)) were assessed. Physical image quality was characterized using the detector metrics given by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1) to measure modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using the IEC-specified beam qualities of RQA3 and RQA5. The DQE was evaluated at the normal operating detector air kerma (DAK) level, defined at 2.5 µGy for all detectors, and at factors of 1/3.2 and 3.2 times the normal level. MTF curves for the different detectors were similar at both RQA3 and RQA5 energies; the average spatial frequency for the 50% point (MTF0.5) at RQA3 was 1.26 mm-1, with a range from 1.20 mm-1 to 1.37 mm-1. The DQE of the NIP CR compared to the PIP CR was notably greater and similar to that for the FPD devices. At RQA3, average DQE for the FPD and NIP (at 0.5 mm-1 2.5 µGy) was 0.57 compared to 0.26 for the PIP CR. At the RQA5 energy, the DRX-2530C and the DX-D45C had the highest DQE (~0.6 at 0.5 mm-1 2.5 µGy). Noise separation analysis using the polynomial model showed higher electronic noise for the DX-D35C and DRX-2530C detectors; this explains the reduced DQE seen at 0.7 µGy/image. The NIP CR detector offers notably improved DQE performance compared to the PIP CR system and a value similar to the DQE for FPD devices at the RQA3 energy.

  13. High-speed crystal detection and characterization using a fast-readout detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishima, Jun; Owen, Robin L; Axford, Danny; Shepherd, Emma; Winter, Graeme; Levik, Karl; Gibbons, Paul; Ashton, Alun; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2010-09-01

    A novel raster-scanning method combining continuous sample translation with the fast readout of a Pilatus P6M detector has been developed on microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. This fast grid-scan tool allows the rapid evaluation of large sample volumes without the need to increase the beam size at the sample through changes in beamline hardware. A slow version is available for slow-readout detectors. Examples of grid-scan use in centring optically invisible samples and in detecting and characterizing numerous microcrystals on a mesh-like holder illustrate the most common applications of the grid scan now in routine use on I24.

  14. Characterization of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) detector to search for rare events in cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, S.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Sara, Swapan; Syam, D.

    2015-01-01

    A particular brand of commercially available plastic, identified as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been used as a Nuclear Track Detector (NTD) to detect heavy charged particles. It was found that PET has a much higher detection threshold compared to other commercially available NTDs, making PET particularly suitable for detecting rare events in cosmic rays. To characterize and calibrate PET, systemetic studies were carried out using ions from various accelerators in India and Europe. Results of those studies have shown that PET can be effectively used as a charge particle detector with good energy and charge resolution. (author)

  15. Characterization and determination of efficiency of GM detectors for KCl standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyal, M.R.; Thilagam, L.; Mohapatra, D.K.

    2018-01-01

    Characterization of Geiger Muller (GM) based beta counters are carried out to determine the main parameters such as plateau slope and efficiency for various slit locations 1 to 10, that are available to keep the sources at different distances away from the detector. Additionally, the disc shaped potassium chloride (KCl) beta standards of various 40 K activities are prepared with variable mass and estimated for the efficiencies of GM tube detectors. The activity of 40K, the counts per second and the efficiency of GM tubes are studied as a function of mass of KCl standards

  16. HVCMOS 35v1 Detector Characterization Using an IR eTCT Setup

    CERN Document Server

    Laroche, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Silicon detectors are exposed to very high fluences (in excess of 1E16 particles*cm-2) in experiments like ATLAS and CMS, so it is paramount that their behavior is understood even after irradiation. To that end, irradiated prototype HVCMOS detectors were characterized using eTCT and IV curves. It was found that acceptor removal via irradiation increased the size of the charge collection region. At sufficient fluences, trap introduction became the dominant effect, and the charge collection region shrinks again.

  17. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  18. Multi-Detector Analysis System for Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Edward Lawrence; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Cole, Jerald Donald; Drigert, Mark William; Jewell, James Keith; Egger, Ann Elizabeth; Cordes, Gail Adele

    1999-09-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) program at INEEL is developing a system to characterize SNF for fissile mass, radiation source term, and fissile isotopic content. The system is based on the integration of the Fission Assay Tomography System (FATS) and the Gamma-Neutron Analysis Technique (GNAT) developed under programs supported by the DOE Office of Non-proliferation and National Security. Both FATS and GNAT were developed as separate systems to provide information on the location of special nuclear material in weapons configuration (FATS role), and to measure isotopic ratios of fissile material to determine if the material was from a weapon (GNAT role). FATS is capable of not only determining the presence and location of fissile material but also the quantity of fissile material present to within 50%. GNAT determines the ratios of the fissile and fissionable material by coincidence methods that allow the two prompt (immediately) produced fission fragments to be identified. Therefore, from the combination of FATS and GNAT, MDAS is able to measure the fissile material, radiation source term, and fissile isotopics content.

  19. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdit, M.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2017-09-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm2. Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 106 incident photons.s-1.mm-2.

  20. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  1. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-07-02

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  2. Characterization of LiF-based soft X-ray imaging detectors by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfigli, F; Gaudio, P; Lupelli, I; Nichelatti, E; Richetta, M; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2010-01-01

    X-ray microscopy represents a powerful tool to obtain images of samples with very high spatial resolution. The main limitation of this technique is represented by the poor spatial resolution of standard imaging detectors. We proposed an innovative high-performance X-ray imaging detector based on the visible photoluminescence of colour centres in lithium fluoride. In this work, a confocal microscope in fluorescence mode was used to characterize LiF-based imaging detectors measuring CC integrated visible fluorescence signals of LiF crystals and films (grown on several kinds of substrates) irradiated by soft X-rays produced by a laser plasma source in different exposure conditions. The results are compared with the CC photoluminescence spectra measured on the same samples and discussed.

  3. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-01-01

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm 2 Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  4. Status of the laboratory infrastructure for detector calibration and characterization at the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, N.; Ballak, K.-E.; Dietze, T.; Ekmedzič, M.; Hauf, S.; Januschek, F.; Kaukher, A.; Kuster, M.; Lang, P. M.; Münnich, A.; Schmitt, R.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Turcato, M.

    2016-12-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL.EU) will provide unprecedented peak brilliance and ultra-short and spatially coherent X-ray pulses in an energy range of 0.25 to 25 keV . The pulse timing structure is unique with a burst of 2700 pulses of 100 fs length at a temporal distance of 220 ns followed by a 99.4 ms gap. To make optimal use of this timing structure and energy range a great variety of detectors are being developed for use at XFEL.EU, including 2D X-ray imaging cameras that are able to detect images at a rate of 4.5 MHz, provide dynamic ranges up to 105 photons per pulse per pixel under different operating conditions and covering a large range of angular resolution \\cite{requirements,Markus}. In order to characterize, commission and calibrate this variety of detectors and for testing of detector prototypes the XFEL.EU detector group is building up an X-ray test laboratory that allows testing of detectors with X-ray photons under conditions that are as similar to the future beam line conditions at the XFEL.EU as is possible with laboratory sources [1]. A total of four test environments provide the infrastructure for detector tests and calibration: two portable setups that utilize low power X-ray sources and radioactive isotopes, a test environment where a commercial high power X-ray generator is in use, and a pulsed X-ray/electron source which will provide pulses as short as 25 ns in XFEL.EU burst mode combined with target anodes of different materials. The status of the test environments, three of which are already in use while one is in commissioning phase, will be presented as well as first results from performance tests and characterization of the sources.

  5. Characterization system for Germanium detectors dedicated to gamma spectroscopy applied to nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccaz, J.; Portella, C.; Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-07-01

    CEA-Valduc produces some radioactive waste (mainly alpha emitters). Legislation requires producers to sort their waste by activity and type of isotopes, and to package them in order to forward them to the appropriate reprocessing or storage facility. Our lab LMDE (laboratory for measurements on nuclear wastes and valuation) is in charge of the characterization of the majority of waste produced by CEA-Valduc. Among non-destructive methods to characterize a radioactive object, gamma-spectroscopy is one of the most efficient. We present to this conference the method we use to characterize nuclear waste and the system we developed to characterize our germanium detectors. The goal of this system is to obtain reliable numerical models of our detectors and calculate their efficiency curves. Measurements are necessary to checks models and improve them. These measurements are made on a bench using pinpoint sources ({sup 133}Ba, {sup 152}Eu) from 60 keV to 1500 keV, with distances from 'on contact' to a few meters from the diode and variable angles between the source and the detector axis. We have demonstrated that we are able to obtain efficiency curves

  6. Development and characterization of a neutron detector based on a lithium glass–polymer composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Kukharev, V.; Foster, A.; Meddeb, A. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Trivelpiece, C. [Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ounaies, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jovanovic, I., E-mail: ijovanovic@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-06-11

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a neutron scintillation detector based on a Li-glass–polymer composite that utilizes a combination of pulse height and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) to achieve high gamma rejection. In contrast to fast neutron detection in a PSD medium, we combine two scintillating materials that do not possess inherent neutron/gamma PSD properties to achieve effective PSD/pulse height discrimination in a composite material. Unlike recoil-based fast neutron detection, neutron/gamma discrimination can be robust even at low neutron energies due to the high Q-value neutron capture on {sup 6}Li. A cylindrical detector with a 5.05 cm diameter and 5.08 cm height was fabricated from scintillating 1 mm diameter Li-glass rods and scintillating polyvinyltoluene. The intrinsic efficiency for incident fission neutrons from {sup 252}Cf and gamma rejection of the detector were measured to be 0.33% and less than 10{sup −8}, respectively. These results demonstrate the high selectivity of the detector for neutrons and provide motivation for prototyping larger detectors optimized for specific applications, such as detection and event-by-event spectrometry of neutrons produced by fission.

  7. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morelli, D.; Imme, G.; Catalano, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy); Aranzulla, M. [Istituto Nazionale Geofisica e Vulcanologia - Sezione di Catania, piazza Roma, 2- 95127 Catania (Italy); Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Mangano, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2011-12-13

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a {sup 241}Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  8. Characterization of the polymer Durolon as a solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliesi, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The polymer Durolon has been characterized as a solid state nuclear track detector. In these detectors a track, resulting from the damages in its molecular structure, induced by a heavy charged particle, is the testimony of the passage of the particle through the polymer. In order to characterize the Durolon the track diameter, track production rate, light transmission through the polymer and the critical angle of incidence of the particle have been studied. The main objective of such studies was to provide the necessary subsidies to understand the information registered. The damages have been induced by alpha particles from the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li, by irradiating a boron screen in a thermal neutron field from an experimental facility installed in the beam-hole 08 of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The study of the parameters have been performed by using a digital system developed in the present work. Its use has provided a higher quality and quickness regarding data acquisition and data analysis as well as the opportunity to quantify several other parameters regarding the imaging formation theory in solid state nuclear track detectors. The characteristics of the Durolon have been compared with the ones of two other detectors Makrofol-E and Makrofol-DE and have demonstrated its potentiality to use. (author)

  9. Characterization of a diamond detector to be used as neutron yield monitor during the in-vessel calibration of JET neutron detectors in preparation of the DT experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, Mario; Angelone, Maurizio; Batistoni, Paola; Loreti, Stefano; Milocco, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A diamond detector has been characterized for use as neutron yield monitor of a portable 14 MeV neutron generator. • The system will be used for the 14 MeV calibration of JET neutron detector. • The results and the performances of the monitor are very satisfactory in term of accuracy and reliability. - Abstract: A new Deuterium-Tritium (DT) campaign is planned at JET. An accurate calibration for the 14 MeV neutron yield monitors is necessary. In order to perform the calibration a 14 MeV Neutron Generator with suitable intensity (∼10 8 n/s) will be used. Due to the intensity change during the Neutron Generator lifetime it would be necessary to monitor continuously the neutron emission intensity during the calibration using a compact detector attached to it. A high quality diamond detector has been chosen as one of the monitors. This detector has been fully characterized at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator facility. The characterization procedure and the resulting 14 MeV neutron response of the detector are described in this paper together with the obtained uncertainties.

  10. Characterization and analysis of NaI(Tl) and BGO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    There have been many studies concerning the performance characteristics of NaI(Tl) and BGO scintillating crystals, most of which generate data by algorithms rather than from experimentation. Those studies which do deal with collected data, however, usually test only a few detecting units. It was, therefore, the purpose of this project to develop a characterization method and to characterize a large number of scintillators of various sizes and histories as well as to create a performance profile based on the data collected. The energy ranges at which the detectors show relatively good resolution % and photo peak efficiency was also desired for future reference. Enough statistical data was collected and analyzed so that a differentiation between those detectors which perform well and those that do not can be made

  11. Design and Characterization of the VMM1 ASIC for Micropattern Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Fried, J; Li, S; Nambiar, N; Polychronakos, V; Vernon, E

    2013-01-01

    We present here the measurements of the first prototype VMM1 ASIC designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 130 nm CMOS and fabricated in spring 2012. The 64-channel ASIC features a novel design for use with several types of micropattern gas detectors. The data driven system measures peak amplitude and timing information in tracking mode and first channel hit address in trigger mode. Several programmable gain and integration times allows the flexibility to work with Micromegas, Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs), and Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. The IC design architecture and features will be presented along with measurements characterizing the performance of the VMM1 such as noise, linearity of the response, time walk, and calibration range. The concept for use with Micromegas in ATLAS Upgrade will also be covered including characterization under test beam conditions.

  12. Design and characterization of integrated front-end transistors in a micro-strip detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simi, G.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Dittongo, S.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Gregori, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Morganti, M.; U. Pignatel, G.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Speziali, V.; Zorzi, N.

    2002-01-01

    We present the developments in a research program aimed at the realization of silicon micro-strip detectors with front-end electronics integrated in a high resistivity substrate to be used in high-energy physics, space and medical/industrial imaging applications. We report on the fabrication process developed at IRST (Trento, Italy), the characterization of the basic wafer parameters and measurements of the relevant working characteristics of the integrated transistors and related test structures

  13. Performance characterization of compressed sensing positron emission tomography detectors and data acquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Ming; Grant, Alexander M.; Lee, Brian J.; Kim, Ealgoo; Hong, KeyJo; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-08-01

    In the field of information theory, compressed sensing (CS) had been developed to recover signals at a lower sampling rate than suggested by the Nyquist-Shannon theorem, provided the signals have a sparse representation with respect to some base. CS has recently emerged as a method to multiplex PET detector readouts thanks to the sparse nature of 511 keV photon interactions in a typical PET study. We have shown in our previous numerical studies that, at the same multiplexing ratio, CS achieves higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to Anger and cross-strip multiplexing. In addition, unlike Anger logic, multiplexing by CS preserves the capability to resolve multi-hit events, in which multiple pixels are triggered within the resolving time of the detector. In this work, we characterized the time, energy and intrinsic spatial resolution of two CS detectors and a data acquisition system we have developed for a PET insert system for simultaneous PET/MRI. The CS detector comprises a 2× 4 mosaic of 4× 4 arrays of 3.2× 3.2× 20 mm3 lutetium-yttrium orthosilicate crystals coupled one-to-one to eight 4× 4 silicon photomultiplier arrays. The total number of 128 pixels is multiplexed down to 16 readout channels by CS. The energy, coincidence time and intrinsic spatial resolution achieved by two CS detectors were 15.4+/- 0.1 % FWHM at 511 keV, 4.5 ns FWHM and 2.3 mm FWHM, respectively. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the sources of time jitter that limit the time resolution of the current system, which provides guidance for potential system design improvements. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of compressed sensing as a promising multiplexing method for PET detectors.

  14. Advancing Absolute Calibration for JWST and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, George; Bohlin, Ralph; Boyajian, Tabetha; Carey, Sean; Casagrande, Luca; Deustua, Susana; Gordon, Karl; Kraemer, Kathleen; Marengo, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Su, Kate; Sloan, Greg; Volk, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    We propose to exploit the unique optical stability of the Spitzer telescope, along with that of IRAC, to (1) transfer the accurate absolute calibration obtained with MSX on very bright stars directly to two reference stars within the dynamic range of the JWST imagers (and of other modern instrumentation); (2) establish a second accurate absolute calibration based on the absolutely calibrated spectrum of the sun, transferred onto the astronomical system via alpha Cen A; and (3) provide accurate infrared measurements for the 11 (of 15) highest priority stars with no such data but with accurate interferometrically measured diameters, allowing us to optimize determinations of effective temperatures using the infrared flux method and thus to extend the accurate absolute calibration spectrally. This program is integral to plans for an accurate absolute calibration of JWST and will also provide a valuable Spitzer legacy.

  15. TRL-6 for JWST Wavefront Sensing and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Smith, Scott; Aronstein, David; Shiri, Ron; Lyon, Rick; Hayden, Bill; Bowers, Chuck; Acton, D. Scott; Shields, Duncan; hide

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Technology Readiness Level (TRL)-6 is documented for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) subsystem. The WFSC subsystem is needed to align the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after all deployments have occurred, and achieves that requirement through a robust commissioning sequence consisting of unique commissioning algorithms, all of which are part of the WFSC algorithm suite. This paper identifies the technology need, algorithm heritage, describes the finished TRL-6 design platform, and summarizes the TRL-6 test results and compliance. Additionally, the performance requirements needed to satisfy JWST science goals as well as the criterion that relate to the TRL-6 Testbed Telescope (TBT) performance requirements are discussed

  16. Characterization of a CLYC detector and validation of the Monte Carlo Simulation by measurement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Smith, Martin B.; Koslowsky, Martin R. [Bubble Technology Industries Inc., Chalk River (Canada); Kwak, Sung Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation And Control (KINAC), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim Gee Hyun [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Simultaneous detection of neutrons and gamma rays have become much more practicable, by taking advantage of good gamma-ray discrimination properties using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique. Recently, we introduced a commercial CLYC system in Korea, and performed an initial characterization and simulation studies for the CLYC detector system to provide references for the future implementation of the dual-mode scintillator system in various studies and applications. We evaluated a CLYC detector with 95% 6Li enrichment using various gamma-ray sources and a 252Cf neutron source, with validation of our Monte Carlo simulation results via measurement experiments. Absolute full-energy peak efficiency values were calculated for gamma-ray sources and neutron source using MCNP6 and compared with measurement experiments of the calibration sources. In addition, behavioral characteristics of neutrons were validated by comparing simulations and experiments on neutron moderation with various polyethylene (PE) moderator thicknesses. Both results showed good agreements in overall characteristics of the gamma and neutron detection efficiencies, with consistent ⁓20% discrepancy. Furthermore, moderation of neutrons emitted from {sup 252}Cf showed similarities between the simulation and the experiment, in terms of their relative ratios depending on the thickness of the PE moderator. A CLYC detector system was characterized for its energy resolution and detection efficiency, and Monte Carlo simulations on the detector system was validated experimentally. Validation of the simulation results in overall trend of the CLYC detector behavior will provide the fundamental basis and validity of follow-up Monte Carlo simulation studies for the development of our dual-particle imager using a rotational modulation collimator.

  17. Simbol-X: Synergies with JWST, ALMA and Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, R.

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the synergies between Simbol-X and three among the major astronomical facilities that, in the next decade, will be operative in the infrared-millimeter spectral range, namely JWST, Herschel and ALMA. I first provide a brief overview of the main features and observing capabilities offered by these facilities. Then I will discuss a few research fields (mostly extragalactic) that will geatly benefit of the joint exploitation of Simbol-X and these IR-mm observatories.

  18. Astrophysics in the Next Decade: JWST and Concurrent Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Thronson, Harley A; Tielens, Alexander; The James Webb Space Telescope and Concurrent Facilities

    2009-01-01

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), planned for operation in about five years, will have the capability to investigate – and answer – some of the most challenging questions in astronomy. Although motivated and designed to study the very early Universe, the performance of the observatory’s instruments over a very wide wavelength range will allow the world’s scientific community unequaled ability to study cosmic phenomena as diverse as small bodies in the Solar System and the formation of galaxies. As part of preparation to use JWST, a conference was held in Tucson, Arizona in 2007 that brought together astronomers from around the world to discuss the mission, other major facilities that will operate in the coming decade, and major scientific goals for them. This book is a compilation of those presentations by some of the leading researchers from all branches of astronomy. This book also includes a "pre-history" of JWST, describing the lengthy process and some of the key individuals that initiat...

  19. Synergy with HST and JWST Data Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gretchen; Space Telescope Data Management Team

    2014-01-01

    The data processing and archive systems for the JWST will contain a petabyte of science data and the best news is that users will have fast access to the latest calibrations through a variety of new services. With a synergistic approach currently underway with the STScI science operations between the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope data management subsystems (DMS), operational verification is right around the corner. Next year the HST archive will provide scientists on-demand fully calibrated data products via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), which takes advantage of an upgraded DMS. This enhanced system, developed jointly with the JWST DMS is based on a new CONDOR distributed processing system capable of reprocessing data using a prioritization queue which runs in the background. A Calibration Reference Data System manages the latest optimal configuration for each scientific instrument pipeline. Science users will be able to search and discover the growing MAST archive calibrated datasets from these missions along with the other multiple mission holdings both local to MAST and available through the Virtual Observatory. JWST data systems will build upon the successes and lessons learned from the HST legacy and move us forward into the next generation of multi-wavelength archive research.

  20. Characterization and quality control of avalanche photodiode arrays for the Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Conceicao; Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Luyten, Joan; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rato, Pedro; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) prototype being developed in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN. This device is a dedicated PET camera for mammography, based on LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals, Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) and a fast, low-noise electronics readout system, designed to examine both the breast and the axillary lymph node areas, and aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The prototype has two planar detector heads, each composed of 96 detector modules. The Clear-PEM detector module is composed of a matrix of 32 identical 2x2x20 mm 3 LYSO:Ce crystals read at both ends by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays (4x8) for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) capability. The APD arrays were characterized by the measurement of gain and dark current as a function of bias voltage, under controlled temperature conditions. Two independent setups were used. The full set of 398 APD arrays followed a well-defined quality control (QC) protocol, aiming at the rejection of arrays not complying within defined specifications. From a total of 398 arrays, only 2 (0.5%) were rejected, reassuring the trust in these detectors for prototype assembly and future developments

  1. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil); Almazan, H.; Buck, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Appel, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Baussan, E.; Brugière, T. [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Bekman, I. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Bezerra, T.J.C. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 44307 Nantes (France); Bezrukov, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Blucher, E. [The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Busenitz, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Cabrera, A. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Camilleri, L.; Carr, R. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cerrada, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, CIEMAT, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Chauveau, E. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Chimenti, P., E-mail: hgomez@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP, 09210-580 (Brazil); and others

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −4} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10{sup −5} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α {sub T} = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  2. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, T.; Almazan, H.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Brugière, T.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.; Corpace, O.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Dawson, J. V.; Dhooghe, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Franco, D.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Givaudan, A.; Gögger-Neff, M.; Gómez, H.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M.; Hara, T.; Haser, J.; Hellwig, D.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Kale, K.; Kampmann, P.; Kaneda, M.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C.; Laserre, T.; Lastoria, C.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H.; Lindner, M.; López-Castaño, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Maeda, J.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Minotti, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Navas-Nicolás, D.; Novella, P.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Onillon, A.; Oralbaev, A.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I.; Pronost, G.; Reinhold, B.; Rybolt, B.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Sharankova, R.; Sibille, V.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, P.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Veyssiere, C.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wurm, M.; Yang, G.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ~120 and ~300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10-4 cm-2s-1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10-5 cm-2s-1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of αT = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  3. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos; Almazan, H.; Buck, C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Brugière, T.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T.J.C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.

    2017-01-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10 −4 cm −2 s −1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10 −5 cm −2 s −1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α T = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  4. Development and characterization of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohrs, Robert

    2008-09-15

    For the future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) a vertex detector of unprecedented performance is needed to fully exploit its physics potential. By incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted sensor substrate the DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) sensor combines radiation detection and in-pixel amplification. For the operation at a linear collider the excellent noise performance of DEPFET pixels allows building very thin detectors with a high spatial resolution and a low power consumption. With this thesis a prototype system consisting of a 64 x 128 pixels sensor, dedicated steering and readout ASICs and a data acquisition board has been developed and successfully operated in the laboratory and under realistic conditions in beam test environments at DESY and CERN. A DEPFET matrix has been successfully read out using the on-chip zero-suppression of the readout chip CURO 2. The results of the system characterization and beam test results are presented. (orig.)

  5. Characterization and TCAD modelling of termination structures for silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittongo, S.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Ciacchi, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gregori, P.; Piemonte, C.; Rachevskaia, I.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently proposed a novel junction termination structure for silicon radiation detectors, featuring all-p-type multiguard and scribe-line implants, with metal field-plates completely covering the gap between the implanted rings. The structure is intended for detector long-term stability enhancement even in adverse ambient conditions and for fabrication-process simplification. A thorough static characterization, including stability measurements in varying humidity conditions, has been carried out on a variety of samples fabricated at ITC-irst. Comparisons with diodes featuring an n-type implant along the border - or no edge structure at all - have been performed. The new structures show stable behaviour at relatively high bias (∼200 V), also in the presence of wide humidity changes (1-90%). A good qualitative agreement has been obtained between experimental results and simulation predictions, allowing to gain deep insight into the physical behaviour of the device

  6. Characterization of CdTe and (CdZn)Te detectors with different metal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekárek, J.; Belas, E.; Grill, R.; Uxa, Å.; James, R. B.

    2013-09-01

    In the present work we studied an influence of different types of surface etching and surface passivation of high resistivity CdZnTe-based semiconductor detector material. The aim was to find the optimal conditions to improve the properties of metal-semiconductor contact. The main effort was to reduce the leakage current and thus get better X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum, i.e. to create a detector operating at room temperature based on this semiconductor material with sufficient energy resolution and the maximum charge collection efficiency. Individual surface treatments were characterized by I-V characteristics, spectral analysis and by determination of the profile of the internal electric field.

  7. Development and characterization of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohrs, Robert

    2008-09-01

    For the future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) a vertex detector of unprecedented performance is needed to fully exploit its physics potential. By incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted sensor substrate the DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) sensor combines radiation detection and in-pixel amplification. For the operation at a linear collider the excellent noise performance of DEPFET pixels allows building very thin detectors with a high spatial resolution and a low power consumption. With this thesis a prototype system consisting of a 64 x 128 pixels sensor, dedicated steering and readout ASICs and a data acquisition board has been developed and successfully operated in the laboratory and under realistic conditions in beam test environments at DESY and CERN. A DEPFET matrix has been successfully read out using the on-chip zero-suppression of the readout chip CURO 2. The results of the system characterization and beam test results are presented. (orig.)

  8. The BEAST II Experiment at Belle II. Characterization of the commissioning detector system for SuperKEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlburg, Patrick; Eyring, Andreas; Filimonov, Viacheslav; Krueger, Hans; Mari, Laura; Marinas, Carlos; Pohl, David-Leon; Wermes, Norbert; Dingfelder, Jochen [University of Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Before the upgraded vertex detector for the Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan will be installed, a dedicated detector system for machine commissioning (BEAST II) will be employed. One of its main objectives is to measure and characterize the different background types in order to ensure a safe environment before the installation of the actual silicon detector systems close to the interaction point. FANGS, a detector system at BEAST II, based on ATLAS-IBL front-end electronics and planar silicon sensors is currently being developed for this purpose. The unique feature of this detector system is the high energy resolution achieved by using an external FPGA clock to sample the time-over-threshold signal, while keeping the excellent timing properties. The complete detector system is presented in this talk.

  9. Characterizing multi-photon quantum interference with practical light sources and threshold single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Álvaro; Wang, Wenyuan; Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos

    2018-04-01

    The experimental characterization of multi-photon quantum interference effects in optical networks is essential in many applications of photonic quantum technologies, which include quantum computing and quantum communication as two prominent examples. However, such characterization often requires technologies which are beyond our current experimental capabilities, and today's methods suffer from errors due to the use of imperfect sources and photodetectors. In this paper, we introduce a simple experimental technique to characterize multi-photon quantum interference by means of practical laser sources and threshold single-photon detectors. Our technique is based on well-known methods in quantum cryptography which use decoy settings to tightly estimate the statistics provided by perfect devices. As an illustration of its practicality, we use this technique to obtain a tight estimation of both the generalized Hong‑Ou‑Mandel dip in a beamsplitter with six input photons and the three-photon coincidence probability at the output of a tritter.

  10. EXPLORING BIASES OF ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVALS IN SIMULATED JWST TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF HOT JUPITERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Venot, O.; Lagage, P.-O.

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST , exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1 σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  11. EXPLORING BIASES OF ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVALS IN SIMULATED JWST TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E6BT London (United Kingdom); Venot, O. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lagage, P.-O., E-mail: m.rocchetto@ucl.ac.uk [Irfu, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-9119 Gif-sur Yvette (France)

    2016-12-10

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST , exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1 σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  12. Characterization of 1600 Hamamatsu 16-anode photomultipliers for the MINOS Far detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Day, J.; Eilerts, S.; Fuqua, S.; Guillen, A.; Kordosky, M.; Lang, M.; Liu, J.; Opaska, W.; Proga, M.; Vahle, P.; Winbow, A.; Drake, G.; Thomas, J.; Andreopoulos, C.; Saoulidou, N.; Stamoulis, P.; Tzanakos, G.; Zois, M.; Weber, A.; Michael, D.

    2005-01-01

    We are reporting results of the characterization of over 1600 multi-anode R5900-00-M16 photomultipliers manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., and installed in the MINOS Far detector. We have conducted extensive tests of the uniformity of gain and collection efficiency of individual anodes, the cross-talk among all 16 channels, the dark noise, and the linearity of response. In our studies we used a blue light-emitting diode to illuminate phototubes through 1.2 mm diameter optical fibers. In this paper, we present summaries of the main characteristics of the tested photomultipliers

  13. Design, construction, characterization, and use of a detector to measure time of flight of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, A. C.; Felix, J.

    2017-01-01

    In the study of cosmic rays, measurements of time of flight and momentum have been used to identify incident particles from its physical properties, like mass. In this document we present the design, construction, characterization, and operation of a detector to measure time of flight of cosmic rays. The device is comprised of three small plates of plastic scintillator arranged in vertical straight line, coupled to one photomultiplier tube. The analogical output has been connected to a data acquisition system to obtain the number of digital pulses per millisecond. We present details of design, construction, operation, and preliminary results.

  14. Characterization of large volume CdZnTe detectors with a quad-grid structure for the COBRA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatsch, Katja [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: COBRA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The COBRA experiment uses room temperature semiconductor detectors made of Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride, which contains several double beta isotopes, to search for neutrinoless double beta-decay. To compensate for poor hole transport in CdZnTe the detectors are equipped with a coplanar grid (CPG) instead of a planar anode. Currently, a demonstrator setup consisting of 64 1 cm{sup 3} CPG-detectors is in operation at the LNGS in Italy to prove the concept and to determine the long-term stability of the detectors and the instrumentation. For a future large scale experiment it is planned to use larger CdZnTe detectors with a volume of 6 cm{sup 3}, because of the better surface-to-volume ratio and the higher full energy detection efficiency. This will also reduce the background contribution of surface contaminations. Before the installation at the LNGS the new detector design is validated and studied in detail. This talk presents a laboratory experiment for the characterization with γ-radiation of 6 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe quad-grid detectors. The anode of such a detector is divided into four sub-CPGs. The characterization routine consists of the determination of the optimal working point and two-dimensional spatially resolved scans with a highly collimated γ-source.

  15. Characterization studies of Silicon Photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Cortinovis, Daniele; Doroud, Katayoun; Garutti, Erika; Lecoq, Paul; Liu, Zheng; Martinez, Rosana; Paganoni, Marco; Pizzichemi, Marco; Silenzi, Alessandro; Xu, Chen; Zvolský, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and en...

  16. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurdit, M.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Verger, L.; Brambilla, A.; Radisson, P.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm 2 . Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 10 6 incident photons.s −1 .mm −2 .

  17. Test set up description and performances for HAWAII-2RG detector characterization at ESTEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; ter Haar, J.; de Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Butler, B.; Smit, H.; van der Luijt, C.; Martin, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the frame work of the European Space Agency's Cosmic Vision program, the Euclid mission has the objective to map the geometry of the Dark Universe. Galaxies and clusters of galaxies will be observed in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths by an imaging and spectroscopic channel. For the Near Infrared Spectrometer instrument (NISP), the state-of-the-art HAWAII-2RG detectors will be used, associated with the SIDECAR ASIC readout electronic which will perform the image frame acquisitions. To characterize and validate the performance of these detectors, a test bench has been designed, tested and validated. This publication describes the pre-tests performed to build the set up dedicated to dark current measurements and tests requiring reasonably uniform light levels (such as for conversion gain measurements). Successful cryogenic and vacuum tests on commercial LEDs and photodiodes are shown. An optimized feed through in stainless steel with a V-groove to pot the flex cable connecting the SIDECAR ASIC to the room temperature board (JADE2) has been designed and tested. The test set up for quantum efficiency measurements consisting of a lamp, a monochromator, an integrating sphere and set of cold filters, and which is currently under construction will ensure a uniform illumination across the detector with variations lower than 2%. A dedicated spot projector for intra-pixel measurements has been designed and built to reach a spot diameter of 5 μm at 920nm with 2nm of bandwidth [1].

  18. Initial characterization of a BGO-photodiode detector for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-11-01

    Spatial resolution in positron emission tomography is currently limited by the resolution of the detectors. This work presents the initial characterization of a detector design using small bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals individually coupled to silicon photodiodes (SPDs) for crystal identification, and coupled in groups to phototubes (PMTs) for coincidence timing. A 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm BGO crystal coupled only to an SPD can achieve a 511 keV photopeak resolution of 8.7% FWHM at -150 0 C, using a pulse peaking time of 10 μs. When two 3 mm x 3 mm x 15 mm BGO crystals are coupled individually to SPDs and also coupled to a common 14 mm diam PMT, the SPDs detect the 511 keV photopeak with a resolution of 30% FWHM at -76 0 C. In coincidence with an opposing 3 mm wide BGO crystal, the SPDs are able to identify the crystal of interaction with good signal-to-noise ratio, and the detector pair resolution is 2 mm FWHM. 32 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  19. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of responses and comparison of calibration factor for commercial MOSFET detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharanidharan, Ganesan; Manigandan, Durai; Devan, Krishnamurthy; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Gopishankar, Natanasabapathi; Ganesh, Tharmar; Joshi, Rakeshchander; Rath, Gourakishore; Velmurugan, Jagadeesan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2005-01-01

    A commercial metal oxide silicon field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter of model TN502-RD has been characterized for its linearity, reproducibility, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, and angular dependency for Cobalt-60 (60Co), 6-MV, and 15-MV beam energies. The performance of the MOSFET clearly shows that it is highly reproducible, independent of field size and dose rate. Furthermore, MOSFET has a very high degree of linearity, with r-value>0.9 for all 3 energies. The calibration factor for 2 similar MOSFET detectors of model TN502-RD were also estimated and compared for all 3 energies. The calibration factor between the 2 similar MOSFET detectors shows a variation of about 1.8% for 60Co and 15 MV, and for 6 MV it shows variation of about 2.5%, indicating that calibration should be done whenever a new MOSFET is used. However, the detector shows considerable angular dependency of about 8.8% variation. This may be due to the variation in radiation sensitivity between flat and bubble sides of the MOSFET, and indicates that positional care must be taken while using MOSFET for stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetric applications.

  1. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  2. Development of a serial powering scheme and a versatile characterization system for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filimonov, Viacheslav

    2017-08-15

    In order to increase the probability of new discoveries the LHC will be upgraded to the HL-LHC. The upgrade of the ATLAS detector is an essential part of this program. The entire ATLAS tracking system will be replaced by an all-silicon detector called Inner Tracker (ITk) which should be able to withstand the increased luminosity of 5 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The work presented in this thesis is focused on the ATLAS ITk pixel detector upgrade. Advanced silicon pixel detectors will be an essential part of the ITk pixel detector where they will be used for tracking and vertexing. Characterization of the pixel detectors is one of the required tasks for a successful ATLAS tracker upgrade. Therefore, the work presented in this thesis includes the development of a versatile and modular test system for advanced silicon pixel detectors for the HL-LHC. The performance of the system is verified. Single and quad FE-I4 modules functionalities are characterized with the developed system. The reduction of the material budget of the ATLAS ITk pixel detector is essential for a successful operation at high luminosity. Therefore, a low mass, efficient power distribution scheme to power detector modules (serial powering scheme) is investigated as well in the framework of this thesis. A serially powered pixel detector prototype is built with all the components that are needed for current distribution, data transmission, sensor biasing, bypassing and redundancy in order to prove the feasibility of implementing the serial powering scheme in the ITk. Detailed investigations of the electrical performance of the detector prototype equipped with FE-I4 quad modules are made with the help of the developed readout system.

  3. Development of a serial powering scheme and a versatile characterization system for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filimonov, Viacheslav

    2017-08-01

    In order to increase the probability of new discoveries the LHC will be upgraded to the HL-LHC. The upgrade of the ATLAS detector is an essential part of this program. The entire ATLAS tracking system will be replaced by an all-silicon detector called Inner Tracker (ITk) which should be able to withstand the increased luminosity of 5 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . The work presented in this thesis is focused on the ATLAS ITk pixel detector upgrade. Advanced silicon pixel detectors will be an essential part of the ITk pixel detector where they will be used for tracking and vertexing. Characterization of the pixel detectors is one of the required tasks for a successful ATLAS tracker upgrade. Therefore, the work presented in this thesis includes the development of a versatile and modular test system for advanced silicon pixel detectors for the HL-LHC. The performance of the system is verified. Single and quad FE-I4 modules functionalities are characterized with the developed system. The reduction of the material budget of the ATLAS ITk pixel detector is essential for a successful operation at high luminosity. Therefore, a low mass, efficient power distribution scheme to power detector modules (serial powering scheme) is investigated as well in the framework of this thesis. A serially powered pixel detector prototype is built with all the components that are needed for current distribution, data transmission, sensor biasing, bypassing and redundancy in order to prove the feasibility of implementing the serial powering scheme in the ITk. Detailed investigations of the electrical performance of the detector prototype equipped with FE-I4 quad modules are made with the help of the developed readout system.

  4. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Fix, Brian J.; Smith, Jerel A.; Brown, William D.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Martz, Harry E.

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are +/- 0.4 and +/- 0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 +/- 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer's quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9 % (typical) and 12 % (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10 % at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher energy (>60 keV) photons into a lower-energy ( 60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is

  5. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fix, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, W. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are ±0.4 and ±0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 ± 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer’s quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9% (typical) and 12% (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of about 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10% at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher-energy (> 60 keV) photons into a lower-energy (~60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a PTFE cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is reconstructed using Abel inversion

  6. Gravity Spy: integrating advanced LIGO detector characterization, machine learning, and citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, M; Coughlin, S; Bahaadini, S; Besler, E; Rohani, N; Allen, S; Cabero, M; Crowston, K; Katsaggelos, A K; Larson, S L; Lee, T K; Lintott, C; Littenberg, T B; Lundgren, A; Østerlund, C; Smith, J R; Trouille, L; Kalogera, V

    2018-01-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) has initiated a new field of astronomy by providing an alternative means of sensing the universe. The extreme sensitivity required to make such detections is achieved through exquisite isolation of all sensitive components of LIGO from non-gravitational-wave disturbances. Nonetheless, LIGO is still susceptible to a variety of instrumental and environmental sources of noise that contaminate the data. Of particular concern are noise features known as glitches, which are transient and non-Gaussian in their nature, and occur at a high enough rate so that accidental coincidence between the two LIGO detectors is non-negligible. Glitches come in a wide range of time-frequency-amplitude morphologies, with new morphologies appearing as the detector evolves. Since they can obscure or mimic true gravitational-wave signals, a robust characterization of glitches is paramount in the effort to achieve the gravitational-wave detection rates that are predicted by the design sensitivity of LIGO. This proves a daunting task for members of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration alone due to the sheer amount of data. In this paper we describe an innovative project that combines crowdsourcing with machine learning to aid in the challenging task of categorizing all of the glitches recorded by the LIGO detectors. Through the Zooniverse platform, we engage and recruit volunteers from the public to categorize images of time-frequency representations of glitches into pre-identified morphological classes and to discover new classes that appear as the detectors evolve. In addition, machine learning algorithms are used to categorize images after being trained on human-classified examples of the morphological classes. Leveraging the strengths of both classification methods, we create a combined method with the aim of improving the efficiency and accuracy of each individual

  7. Gravity Spy: integrating advanced LIGO detector characterization, machine learning, and citizen science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevin, M; Coughlin, S; Larson, S L; Trouille, L; Kalogera, V; Bahaadini, S; Besler, E; Rohani, N; Katsaggelos, A K; Allen, S; Cabero, M; Lundgren, A; Crowston, K; Østerlund, C; Lee, T K; Lintott, C; Littenberg, T B; Smith, J R

    2017-01-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) has initiated a new field of astronomy by providing an alternative means of sensing the universe. The extreme sensitivity required to make such detections is achieved through exquisite isolation of all sensitive components of LIGO from non-gravitational-wave disturbances. Nonetheless, LIGO is still susceptible to a variety of instrumental and environmental sources of noise that contaminate the data. Of particular concern are noise features known as glitches , which are transient and non-Gaussian in their nature, and occur at a high enough rate so that accidental coincidence between the two LIGO detectors is non-negligible. Glitches come in a wide range of time-frequency-amplitude morphologies, with new morphologies appearing as the detector evolves. Since they can obscure or mimic true gravitational-wave signals, a robust characterization of glitches is paramount in the effort to achieve the gravitational-wave detection rates that are predicted by the design sensitivity of LIGO. This proves a daunting task for members of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration alone due to the sheer amount of data. In this paper we describe an innovative project that combines crowdsourcing with machine learning to aid in the challenging task of categorizing all of the glitches recorded by the LIGO detectors. Through the Zooniverse platform, we engage and recruit volunteers from the public to categorize images of time-frequency representations of glitches into pre-identified morphological classes and to discover new classes that appear as the detectors evolve. In addition, machine learning algorithms are used to categorize images after being trained on human-classified examples of the morphological classes. Leveraging the strengths of both classification methods, we create a combined method with the aim of improving the efficiency and accuracy of each individual

  8. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  9. X-ray Hybrid CMOS Detectors : Recent progress in development and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Burrows, David N.

    2017-08-01

    PennState high energy astronomy laboratory has been working on the development and characterization of Hybrid CMOS Detectors (HCDs) for last few years in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS). HCDs are preferred over X-ray CCDs due to their higher and flexible read out rate, radiation hardness and low power which make them more suitable for next generation large area X-ray telescopic missions. An H2RG detector with 36 micron pixel pitch and 18 micron ROIC, has been selected for a sounding rocket flight in 2018. The H2RG detector provides ~2.5 % energy resolution at 5.9 keV and ~7 e- read noise when coupled to a cryo-SIDECAR. We could also detect a clear Oxygen line (~0.5 keV) from the detector implying a lower energy threshold of ~0.3 keV. Further improvement in the energy resolution and read noise is currently under progress. We have been working on the characterization of small pixel HCDs (12.5 micron pixel; smallest pixel HCDs developed so far) which is important for the development of next generation high resolution X-ray spectroscopic instrument based on HCDs. Event recognition in HCDs is another exciting prospect which have been successfully shown to work with a 64 X 64 pixel prototype SPEEDSTAR-EXD which use comparators at each pixel to read out only those pixels having detectable signal, thereby providing an order of magnitude improvement in the read out rate. Currently, we are working on the development of a large area SPEEDSTAR-EXD array for the development of a full fledged instrument. HCDs due to their fast read out, can also be explored as a large FOV instrument to study GRB afterglows and variability and spectroscopic study of other astrophysical transients. In this context, we are characterizing a Lobster-HCD system at multiple energies and multiple off-axis angles for future rocket or CubeSate experiments. In this presentation, I will briefly present these new developments and experiments with HCDs and the analysis techniques.

  10. Characterization inconsistencies in CdTe and CZT gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1994-10-01

    In the past few years, significant developments in cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor materials have taken place with respect to both quality and yield. Many of the more recent developments have occurred in the area of CZT crystal growth. This has resulted in an explosion of interest in the use of these materials in ambient temperature gamma-ray detectors. Most, if not all, of the manufacturers of CdTe and CZT have acquired government funding to continue research in development and applications, indicating the importance of these improvements in material quality. We have examined many detectors, along with the accompanying manufacturer's data, and it has become apparent that a clear standard does not exist by which each manufacturer characterizes the performance of their material. Result is a wide variety of performance claims that have no basis for comparison and normally cannot be readily reproduced. This paper first supports our observations and then proposes a standard that all manufacturers and users of these materials may use for characterization

  11. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  12. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  13. Deciphering the Hot Giant Atmospheres Orbiting Nearby Extrasolar Systems with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin Badhan, Mahmuda; Batalha, Natasha; Deming, Drake; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; HEBRARD, Eric; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Unique and exotic planets give us an opportunity to understand how planetary systems form and evolve over their lifetime, by placing our own planetary system in the context of the vastly different extrasolar systems that are being continually discovered by present space missions. With orbital separations that are less than one-tenth of the Mercury-Sun distance, these close-in planets provide us with valuable insights about the host stellar atmosphere and planetary atmospheres subjected to their enormous stellar insolation. Observed spectroscopic signatures reveal all spectrally active species in a planet, along with information about its thermal structure and dynamics, allowing us to characterize the planet's atmosphere. NASA's upcoming missions will give us the high-resolution spectra necessary to constrain the atmospheric properties with unprecedented accuracy. However, to interpret the observed signals from exoplanetary transit events with any certainty, we need reliable atmospheric retrieval tools that can model the expected observables adequately. In my work thus far, I have built a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) convergence scheme, with an analytical radiative equilibrium formulation for the thermal structures, within the NEMESIS atmospheric modeling tool, to allow sufficient (and efficient) exploration of the parameter space. I also augmented the opacity tables to improve the speed and reliability of retrieval models. I then utilized this upgraded version to infer the pressure-temperature (P-T) structures and volume-mixing ratios (VMRs) of major gas species in hot Jupiter dayside atmospheres, from their emission spectra. I have employed a parameterized thermal structure to retrieve plausible P-T profiles, along with altitude-invariant VMRs. Here I show my retrieval results on published datasets of HD189733b, and compare them with both medium and high spectral resolution JWST/NIRSPEC simulations. In preparation for the upcoming JWST mission, my current work

  14. LabVIEW-based control and acquisition system for the dosimetric characterization of a silicon strip detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovejero, M C; Pérez Vega-Leal, A; Gallardo, M I; Espino, J M; Selva, A; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Arráns, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new data acquisition, control, and analysis software system written in LabVIEW. This system has been designed to obtain the dosimetry of a silicon strip detector in polyethylene. It allows the full automation of the experiments and data analysis required for the dosimetric characterization of silicon detectors. It becomes a useful tool that can be applied in the daily routine check of a beam accelerator.

  15. Characterization of new a-Si:H detectors fabricated from amorphous silicon deposited at high rate by helium enhanced PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochet, T.; Ilie, A.; Foulon, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the characterization of new detectors fabricated from a-Si:H films deposited at high rates through the dilution of SiH 4 in helium. Rates of up to ten times (5.5 micrometer/h) that of the standard technique are obtained, allowing for the feasible fabrication of detectors having thickness up to 100 micrometers. The electrical characteristics (depletion voltage, residual space charge density) of the helium diluted material, have been investigated and compared to that of the standard material. The response of detectors, made from both materials, to 5.5 MeV alpha particles are compared. 6 figs., 5 tabs., 13 refs

  16. Use of SRIM and Garfield with Geant4 for the characterization of a hybrid 10B/3He neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ende, B. M.; Rand, E. T.; Erlandson, A.; Li, L.

    2018-06-01

    This paper describes a method for more complete neutron detector characterization using Geant4's Monte Carlo methods for characterizing overall detector response rate and Garfield interfaced with SRIM for the simulation of the detector's raw pulses, as applied to a hybrid 10B/3He detector. The Geant4 models characterizing the detector's interaction with a 252Cf point source and parallel beams of mono-energetic neutrons (assuming ISO 8529 reference energy values) compare and agree well with calibrated 252Cf measurements to within 6.4%. Validated Geant4 model outputs serve as input to Garfield+SRIM calculations to provide meaningful pulse height spectra. Modifications to Garfield for this work were necessary to account for simultaneous tracking of electrons resulting from proton and triton reaction products from a single 3He neutron capture event, and it was further necessary to interface Garfield with the energy loss, range, and straggling calculations provided by SRIM. Individual raw pulses generated by Garfield+SRIM are also observed to agree well with experimentally measured raw pulses from the detector.

  17. Bringing the Science of JWST to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background, particularly in the area of spectroscopy. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. Webbtelescope.org, the public hub for scientific information related to JWST, is now open. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing outreach programs: for example, partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; partnering with musicians and artists to link science and art. Augmented reality apps showcase NASA’s telescopes in a format usable by anyone with a smartphone, and visuals from increasingly affordable 3D VR technologies.

  18. JWST-MIRI spectrometer main optics design and main results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ramón; Schoenmaker, Ton; Kroes, Gabby; Oudenhuysen, Ad; Jager, Rieks; Venema, Lars

    2017-11-01

    MIRI ('Mid InfraRed Instrument') is the combined imager and integral field spectrometer for the 5-29 micron wavelength range under development for the James Webb Space Telescope JWST. The flight acceptance tests of the Spectrometer Main Optics flight models (SMO), part of the MIRI spectrometer, are completed in the summer of 2008 and the system is delivered to the MIRI-JWST consortium. The two SMO arms contain 14 mirrors and form the MIRI optical system together with 12 selectable gratings on grating wheels. The entire system operates at a temperature of 7 Kelvin and is designed on the basis of a 'no adjustments' philosophy. This means that the optical alignment precision depends strongly on the design, tolerance analysis and detailed knowledge of the manufacturing process. Because in principle no corrections are needed after assembly, continuous tracking of the alignment performance during the design and manufacturing phases is important. The flight hardware is inspected with respect to performance parameters like alignment and image quality. The stability of these parameters is investigated after exposure to various vibration levels and successive cryogenic cool downs. This paper describes the philosophy behind the acceptance tests, the chosen test strategy and reports the results of these tests. In addition the paper covers the design of the optical test setup, focusing on the simulation of the optical interfaces of the SMO. Also the relation to the SMO qualification and verification program is addressed.

  19. JWST Associations overview: automated generation of combined products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexov, Anastasia; Swade, Daryl; Bushouse, Howard; Diaz, Rosa; Eisenhamer, Jonathan; Hack, Warren; Kyprianou, Mark; Levay, Karen; Rahmani, Christopher; Swam, Mike; Valenti, Jeff

    2018-01-01

    We are presenting the design of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Data Management System (DMS) automated processing of Associations. An Association captures the relationship between exposures and higher level data products, such as combined mosaics created from dithered and tiled observations. The astronomer’s intent is captured within the Proposal Planning System (PPS) and provided to DMS as candidate associations. These candidates are converted into Association Pools and Association Generator Tables that serve as input to automated processing which create the combined data products. Association Pools are generated to capture a list of exposures that could potentially form associations and provide relevant information about those exposures. The Association Generator using definitions on groupings creates one or more Association Tables from a single input Association Pool. Each Association Table defines a set of exposures to be combined and the ruleset of the combination to be performed; the calibration software creates Associated data products based on these input tables. The initial design produces automated Associations within a proposal. Additionally this JWST overall design is conducive to eventually produce Associations for observations from multiple proposals, similar to the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA).

  20. Characterization of the diamond detector for commissioning the Eclipse Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Guilherme A.; Cardoso, Domingos de O.; Fontes, Gladson S.; Instituto Militar de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    Diamond detectors are an option in the commissioning of linear accelerators, especially in small field measurements due to characteristics such as: small sensitive volume (0.004mm 3 ) and low energy dependence, desirable attributes for PDP measurements, output factors and profiles. The purpose of this study was to characterize PTW microDiamond 60019 diamond detector in relation to linearity, dependencies: energy, directional and with dose rate; Besides comparing measurements of PDP, output factors and profiles with some ionization and diode chambers. We also analyzed two models of the Eclipse planning system, performed with data from the commissioning of a TrueBeam accelerator obtained with the CC13 camera and with the diamond. Linearity deviations less than 0.5% were obtained in the range of 50cGy to 20Gy for energies of 6,10 and 15MV. Variations smaller than 0.5% for energy dependence and dose rate and angular dependence less than 0.5% in the axial and polar directions were observed. In the small-field output factors the diamond presented higher relative readings to the chambers: CC13, PintPoint3D and CC01 and similar to the diode. In the PDP it showed superiority in the definition of the buildup and surface regions. In the small field profiles it was shown a better definition of the penumbra in relation to the ionization chambers and in relation to the diode was equivalent, being superior in the tail region of large fields. In both models of Eclipse there were no significant differences for 1%3mm gamma analysis for PDP and profiles, although the diamond presented smaller mean gamma errors. The Collimator Backscatter Factors (CBSF) analysis for the two sets of measures showed differences mainly for small fields. The results of this study indicate that the diamond detector is one of the most versatile on the market in different commissioning situations, especially for small field measurements. (author)

  1. Characterization of a pixelated CdTe Timepix detector operated in ToT mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billoud, T.; Leroy, C.; Papadatos, C.; Roux, J.S.; Pichotka, M.; Pospisil, S.

    2017-01-01

    A 1 mm thick CdTe sensor bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode has been characterized in view of possible applications in particle and medical physics. The CdTe sensor layer was segmented into 256 × 256 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 55  μm. This CdTe Timepix device, of ohmic contact type, has been exposed to alpha-particles and photons from an 241 Am source, photons from a 137 Cs source, and protons of different energies (0.8–10 MeV) delivered by the University of Montreal Tandem Accelerator. The device was irradiated on the negatively biased backside electrode. An X-ray per-pixel calibration commonly used for this type of detector was done and its accuracy and resolution were assessed and compared to those of a 300  μm thick silicon Timepix device. The electron mobility-lifetime product (μ e τ e ) of CdTe for protons of low energy has been obtained from the Hecht equation. Possible polarization effects have been also investigated. Finally, information about the homogeneity of the detector was obtained from X-ray irradiation.

  2. Characterization of commercial MOSFET detectors and their feasibility for in-vivo HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phurailatpam, Reena; Upreti, Rituraj; Nojin Paul, Siji; Jamema, Swamidas V; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the use of MOSFET as an vivo dosimeter for the application of Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy treatments. MOSFET was characterized for dose linearity in the range of 50-1000 cGy, depth dose dependence from 2 to 7 cm, angular dependence. Signal fading was checked for two weeks. Dose linearity was found to be within 2% in the dose range (50-1000 cGy). The response varied within 8.07% for detector-source distance of 2-7 cm. The response of MOSFET with the epoxy side facing the source (0 degree) is the highest and the lowest response was observed at 90 and 270 degrees. Signal was stable during the study period. The detector showed high dose linearity and insignificant fading. But due to angular and depth dependence, care should be taken and corrections must be applied for clinical dosimetry. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of 150μm thick epitaxial silicon detectors from different producers after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Moll, M.; Haerkoenen, J.; Kronberger, M.; Trummer, J.; Rodeghiero, P.

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial (EPI) silicon has recently been investigated for the development of radiation tolerant detectors for future high-luminosity HEP experiments. A study of 150μm thick EPI silicon diodes irradiated with 24GeV/c protons up to a fluence of 3x10 15 p/cm 2 has been performed by means of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements, investigations with the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and standard CV/IV characterizations. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of radiation damage as well as the influence of the wafer processing on the material performance by comparing diodes from different manufacturers. The changes of CCE, full depletion voltage and leakage current as a function of fluence are reported. While the generation of leakage current due to irradiation is similar in all investigated series of detectors, a difference in the effective doping concentration can be observed after irradiation. In the CCE measurements an anomalous drop in performance was found even for diodes exposed to very low fluences (5x10 13 p/cm 2 ) in all measured series. This result was confirmed for one series of diodes in TCT measurements with an infrared laser. TCT measurements with a red laser showed no type inversion up to fluences of 3x10 15 p/cm 2 for n-type devices whereas p-type diodes undergo type inversion from p- to n-type for fluences higher than ∼2x10 14 p/cm 2

  4. Electrical characterization of CdTe pixel detectors with Al Schottky anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turturici, A.A.; Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pixelated Schottky Al/p-CdTe/Pt detectors are very attractive devices for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging, even though they suffer from bias-induced time instability (polarization). In this work, we present the results of the electrical characterization of a (4×4) pixelated Schottky Al/p-CdTe/Pt detector. Current–voltage (I–V) characteristics and current transients were investigated at different temperatures. The results show deep levels that play a dominant role in the charge transport mechanism. The conduction mechanism is dominated by the space charge limited current (SCLC) both under forward bias and at high reverse bias. Schottky barrier height of the Al/CdTe contact was estimated by using the thermionic-field emission model at low reverse bias voltages. Activation energy of the deep levels was measured through the analysis of the reverse current transients at different temperatures. Finally, we employed an analytical method to determine the density and the energy distribution of the traps from SCLC current–voltage characteristics

  5. Characterization of 150 $\\mu$m thick epitaxial silicon detectors from different producers after proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hoedlmoser, H; Haerkoenen, J; Kronberger, M; Trummer, J; Rodeghiero, P

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial (EPI) silicon has recently been investigated for the development of radiation tolerant detectors for future high-luminosity HEP experiments. A study of 150 mm thick EPI silicon diodes irradiated with 24GeV=c protons up to a fluence of 3 1015 p=cm2 has been performed by means of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements, investigations with the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and standard CV=IV characterizations. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of radiation damage as well as the influence of the wafer processing on the material performance by comparing diodes from different manufacturers. The changes of CCE, full depletion voltage and leakage current as a function of fluence are reported. While the generation of leakage current due to irradiation is similar in all investigated series of detectors, a difference in the effective doping concentration can be observed after irradiation. In the CCE measurements an anomalous drop in performance was found even for diodes exposed to ...

  6. CBM experiment. Characterization studies of the detector modules for silicon tracking syste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Panasenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The double-sided silicon microstrip detector prototypes with 50 μm pitch developed together with CiS, Germany, have been characterized in a 2.4 GeV/c proton beam at COSY, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Data analyses including reconstruction of 1-strip and 2-strip clusters have been performed. We have done the study of charge sharing in the interstrip gap. In particular it was found that there is a charge loss of less than 10 % in the interstrip gap. The calculated signal-to-noise ratio is around 19 for the p-side of the sensor and it is sufficient for hit reconstruction. Also the charge sharing function which allows more precise determination of the hit position in silicon sensor, have been reconstructed.

  7. A new technique of characterization of intrapixel response dedicated to astronomical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchazo, C.; Viale, T.; Boulade, O.; Druart, G.; Moreau, V.; Mugnier, L.; Dubrueil, D.; Derelle, S.; Ronayette, S.; Guérineau, N.; Berthé, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a new technique of characterization of the intra-pixel sensitivity variations (IPSVs) of astronomical detectors. The IPSV is the spatial variation of the pixel response function (PRF). In the case of under-sampled instruments for high quality imaging and accurate photometry, IPSV can contribute to the instrument global error and it should be considered carefully. Our measurement technique is based in the Fourier transform (FT) approach. It consists into the sampling of the pixel transfer function (PTF) by projecting high-resolution periodic patterns onto the whole sensor without classic optics but using the self-imaging property (the Talbot effect) of a continuously self imaging grating (CSIG) illuminated by a plane wave. The PRF is determined by computing the inverse FT. Our measurement technique permits to determine the PRF with a resolution of pixel/10 (10 times Nyquist frequency)

  8. Renal stone characterization using high resolution imaging mode on a photon counting detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, A.; Gutjahr, R.; Henning, A.; Kappler, S.; Halaweish, A.; Abdurakhimova, D.; Peterson, Z.; Montoya, J.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    In addition to the standard-resolution (SR) acquisition mode, a high-resolution (HR) mode is available on a research photon-counting-detector (PCD) whole-body CT system. In the HR mode each detector consists of a 2x2 array of 0.225 mm x 0.225 mm subpixel elements. This is in contrast to the SR mode that consists of a 4x4 array of the same subelements, and results in 0.25 mm isotropic resolution at iso-center for the HR mode. In this study, we quantified ex vivo the capabilities of the HR mode to characterize renal stones in terms of morphology and mineral composition. Forty pure stones - 10 uric acid (UA), 10 cystine (CYS), 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and 10 apatite (APA) - and 14 mixed stones were placed in a 20 cm water phantom and scanned in HR mode, at radiation dose matched to that of routine dual-energy stone exams. Data from micro CT provided a reference for the quantification of morphology and mineral composition of the mixed stones. The area under the ROC curve was 1.0 for discriminating UA from CYS, 0.89 for CYS vs COM and 0.84 for COM vs APA. The root mean square error (RMSE) of the percent UA in mixed stones was 11.0% with a medium-sharp kernel and 15.6% with the sharpest kernel. The HR showed qualitatively accurate characterization of stone morphology relative to micro CT.

  9. Characterization of gaseous detectors at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility: GEM performance in presence of high background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097588

    Muon detection is an efficient tool to recognize interesting physics events over the high background rate expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The muon systems of the LHC experiments are based on gaseous ionization detectors. In view of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade program, the increasing of background radiation could affect the gaseous detector performance, especially decreasing the efficiency and shortening the lifetime through ageing processes. The effects of charge multiplication, materials and gas composition on the ageing of gaseous detectors have been studied for decades, but the future upgrade of LHC requires additional studies on this topic. At the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++), a radioactive source of cesium-137 with an activity of 14 TBq is used to reproduce reasonably well the expected background radiation at HL-LHC. A muon beam has been made available to study detector performance. The characterization of the beam trigger will be discussed in the present w...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of n-on-n silicon pixel detectors compatible with the Medipix2 readout chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorzi, N. [ITC-irst, Divisione Microsistemi, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)]. E-mail: zorzi@itc.it; Bisogni, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and Sezione INFN, Via Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Boscardin, M. [ITC-irst, Divisione Microsistemi, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Informatica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Gregori, P. [ITC-irst, Divisione Microsistemi, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Novelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and Sezione INFN, Via Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Piemonte, C. [ITC-irst, Divisione Microsistemi, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Quattrocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and Sezione INFN, Via Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ronchin, S. [ITC-irst, Divisione Microsistemi, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Rosso, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and Sezione INFN, Via Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Pixel detectors for mammographic applications have been fabricated at ITC-irst on 800 {mu}m thick silicon wafers adopting a double side n{sup +}-on-n fabrication technology. The activity aims at increasing the X-ray detection efficiency in the energy range of interest minimizing the risk of electrical discharges in hybrid systems operating at high voltages. The detectors, having a layout compatible with the Medipix2 photon counting chip, feature two different design solutions for the p-isolation between neighboring n{sup +}-pixels. We report on the characterization of the fabrication process and on preliminary results of electrical measurements on full detectors and pixel test structures. In particular, we found that the detectors can be reliably operated above the full depletion voltage regardless of the isolation design, that however, impacts the performances in terms of current-voltage characteristics, single pixel currents, inter-pixel resistances and inter-pixel capacitances.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of n-on-n silicon pixel detectors compatible with the Medipix2 readout chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorzi, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gregori, P.; Novelli, M.; Piemonte, C.; Quattrocchi, M.; Ronchin, S.; Rosso, V.

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for mammographic applications have been fabricated at ITC-irst on 800 μm thick silicon wafers adopting a double side n + -on-n fabrication technology. The activity aims at increasing the X-ray detection efficiency in the energy range of interest minimizing the risk of electrical discharges in hybrid systems operating at high voltages. The detectors, having a layout compatible with the Medipix2 photon counting chip, feature two different design solutions for the p-isolation between neighboring n + -pixels. We report on the characterization of the fabrication process and on preliminary results of electrical measurements on full detectors and pixel test structures. In particular, we found that the detectors can be reliably operated above the full depletion voltage regardless of the isolation design, that however, impacts the performances in terms of current-voltage characteristics, single pixel currents, inter-pixel resistances and inter-pixel capacitances

  12. A simple methodology for characterization of germanium coaxial detectors by using Monte Carlo simulation and evolutionary algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.G.; Rubiano, J.G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Gil, J.M.; Rodríguez, R.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    The determination in a sample of the activity concentration of a specific radionuclide by gamma spectrometry needs to know the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) for the energy of interest. The difficulties related to the experimental calibration make it advisable to have alternative methods for FEPE determination, such as the simulation of the transport of photons in the crystal by the Monte Carlo method, which requires an accurate knowledge of the characteristics and geometry of the detector. The characterization process is mainly carried out by Canberra Industries Inc. using proprietary techniques and methodologies developed by that company. It is a costly procedure (due to shipping and to the cost of the process itself) and for some research laboratories an alternative in situ procedure can be very useful. The main goal of this paper is to find an alternative to this costly characterization process, by establishing a method for optimizing the parameters of characterizing the detector, through a computational procedure which could be reproduced at a standard research lab. This method consists in the determination of the detector geometric parameters by using Monte Carlo simulation in parallel with an optimization process, based on evolutionary algorithms, starting from a set of reference FEPEs determined experimentally or computationally. The proposed method has proven to be effective and simple to implement. It provides a set of characterization parameters which it has been successfully validated for different source-detector geometries, and also for a wide range of environmental samples and certified materials. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing an HPGe spectrometer has been developed. • Detector characterized using as reference photopeak efficiencies obtained experimentally or by Monte Carlo calibration. • The characterization obtained has been validated for samples with different geometries and composition. • Good agreement

  13. The AGN-Star Formation Connection: Future Prospects with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Barro, Guillermo; Bonato, Matteo; Kocevski, Dale D.; Pérez-González, Pablo; Rieke, George H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucia; Sajina, Anna; Grogin, Norman A.; Mantha, Kameswara Bharadwaj; Pandya, Viraj; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Santini, Paola

    2017-11-01

    The bulk of the stellar growth over cosmic time is dominated by IR-luminous galaxies at cosmic noon (z=1{--}2), many of which harbor a hidden active galactic nucleus (AGN). We use state-of-the-art infrared color diagnostics, combining Spitzer and Herschel observations, to separate dust-obscured AGNs from dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the CANDELS and COSMOS surveys. We calculate 24 μm counts of SFGs, AGN/star-forming “Composites,” and AGNs. AGNs and Composites dominate the counts above 0.8 mJy at 24 μm, and Composites form at least 25% of an IR sample even to faint detection limits. We develop methods to use the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on JWST to identify dust-obscured AGNs and Composite galaxies from z˜ 1{--}2. With the sensitivity and spacing of MIRI filters, we will detect >4 times as many AGN hosts as with Spitzer/IRAC criteria. Any star formation rates based on the 7.7 μm PAH feature (likely to be applied to MIRI photometry) must be corrected for the contribution of the AGN, or the star formation rate will be overestimated by ˜35% for cases where the AGN provides half the IR luminosity and ˜50% when the AGN accounts for 90% of the luminosity. Finally, we demonstrate that our MIRI color technique can select AGNs with an Eddington ratio of {λ }{Edd}˜ 0.01 and will identify AGN hosts with a higher specific star formation rate than X-ray techniques alone. JWST/MIRI will enable critical steps forward in identifying and understanding dust-obscured AGNs and the link to their host galaxies.

  14. Gravity Spy - Integrating LIGO detector characterization, citizen science, and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Michael; Gravity Spy

    2016-06-01

    On September 14th 2015, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) made the first direct observation of gravitational waves and opened a new field of observational astronomy. However, being the most complicated and sensitve experiment ever undertaken in gravitational physics, aLIGO is susceptible to various sources of environmental and instrumental noise that hinder the search for more gravitational waves.Of particular concern are transient, non-Gaussian noise features known as glitches. Glitches can mimic true astrophysical gravitational waves, occur at a high enough frequency to be coherent between the two detectors, and generally worsen aLIGO's detection capabilities. The proper classification and charaterization of glitches is paramount in optimizing aLIGO's ability to detect gravitational waves. However, teaching computers to identify and morphologically classify these artifacts is exceedingly difficult.Human intuition has proven to be a useful tool in classifcation probelms such as this. Gravity Spy is an innovative, interdisciplinary project hosted by Zooniverse that combines aLIGO detector characterization, citizen science, machine learning, and social science. In this project, citizen scientists and computers will work together in a sybiotic relationship that leverages human pattern recognition and the ability of machine learning to process large amounts of data systematically: volunteers classify triggers from the aLIGO data steam that are constantly updated as aLIGO takes in new data, and these classifications are used to train machine learning algorithms which proceed to classify the bulk of aLIGO data and feed questionable glithces back to the users.In this talk, I will discuss the workflow and initial results of the Gravity Spy project with regard to aLIGO's future observing runs and highlight the potential of such citizen science projects in promoting nascent fields such as gravitational wave astrophysics.

  15. A new technique of characterization of the intra-pixel response of astronomical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchazo, C.; Boulade, O.; Moreau, V.; Dubreuil, D.; Ronayette, S.; Berthe, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a new technique of characterization of the Intra-Pixel Sensitivity Variations (IPSVs) of astronomical detectors. The IPSV is the spatial variation of the sensitivity within a pixel and it was demonstrated that this variation can contribute to the instrument global error. Then IPSV has not to be neglected especially in the case of under-sampled instruments for high quality imaging and accurate photometry. The common approaches to measure the IPSV consist in determining the pixel response function (PRF) by scanning an optical probe through the detector. These approaches require high-aperture optics, high precision mechanical devices and are time consuming. The original approach we will present in this paper consists in projecting high-resolution periodic patterns onto the whole sensor without classic optics but using the self-imaging property (the Talbot effect) of a Continuously Self Imaging Grating (CSIG) illuminated by a plane wave. This paper describes the test bench and its design rules. The methodology of the measurement is also presented. Two measurement procedures are available: global and local. In the global procedure, the mean PRF corresponding to the whole Focal Plane Array (FPA) or a sub-area of the FPA is evaluated. The results obtained applying this procedure on e2v CCD 204 are presented and discussed in detail. In the local procedure, a CSIG is moved in front of each pixel and a pixel PRF is reconstructed by resolving the inverse problem. The local procedure is presented and validated by simulations. (authors)

  16. SiPMs characterization and selection for the DUNE far detector photon detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Maricic, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) together with the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) hosted at the Fermilab will provide a unique, world-leading program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of neutrino physics and astrophysics. CP violation in neutrino flavor mixing is one of its most important potential discoveries. Additionally, the experiment will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure the neutrino mixing parameters which may potentially reveal new fundamental symmetries of nature. Moreover, the DUNE is also designed for the observation of nucleon decay and supernova burst neutrinos. The photon detection (PD) system in the DUNE far detector provides trigger for cosmic backgrounds, enhances supernova burst trigger efficiency and improves the energy resolution of the detector. The DUNE adopts the technology of liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) that requires the PD sensors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), to be carefully chosen to not only work properly in LAr temperature, but also meet certain specifications for the life of the experiment. A comprehensive testing of SiPMs in cryostat is necessary since the datasheet provided by the manufactures in the market does not cover this temperature regime. This paper gives the detailed characterization results of SenSL C-Series 60035 SiPMs, including gain, dark count rate (DCR), cross-talk and after-pulse rate. Characteristic studies on SiPMs from other vendors are also discussed in order to avoid any potential problems associated with using a single source. Moreover, the results of the ongoing mechanical durability tests are shown for the current candidate, SenSL B/C-Series 60035 SiPMs.

  17. Observing outer planet satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science justification and observational requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  18. Multi-wire detector characterization for daily quality control on IMRT; Caracterizacao de um detector planar de multiplos fios para controle de qualidade diario de tratamentos com IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Vilma A.; Watanabe, Erika Y.; Santos, Gabriela R.; Menegussi, Gisela, E-mail: vilmaferrari@uol.com.br [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo (ICESP), SP (Brazil). Setor de Radioterapia

    2012-08-15

    Several dosimetry devices are being developed for quality control of radiation treatments using modern techniques as, for example, the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). The main function of these devices are to daily quality control of treatments of patients submitted to IMRT technique. The aim of this study is to characterize a type of planar multi-wire detector - DAVID (PTW) - for use in clinical practice. It was evaluated the influence of the system in the radiation beam by measuring the absorption factors and surface dose. We also analyzed the dose-linearity, reproducibility, the dependence with the dose rate and the angle of the linac head. Small errors in the position of the multi-leaf were inserted to evaluate the sensitivity of the system. The results showed that the detector can absorb up to 6.7% of the dose, depending of the energy beam and the field size. A significant increase in surface dose was observed, indicating that individual analysis is necessary for each patient. The system showed good reproducibility, linear response with dose, low dependence with dose rate and low dependence with the angle of the linac head. When small errors were inserted in the position of the multi-leaf, the system was able to detect them. Thus, the detector DAVID proved to be suitable for daily verification of IMRT treatments. (author)

  19. Experimental characterization and Monte Carlo simulation of Si(Li) detector efficiency by radioactive sources and PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesradi, M. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert-Curien, UMR 7178 CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Elanique, A. [Departement de Physique, FS/BP 8106, Universite Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Nourreddine, A. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert-Curien, UMR 7178 CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: abdelmjid.nourreddine@ires.in2p3.fr; Pape, A.; Raiser, D.; Sellam, A. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert-Curien, UMR 7178 CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-06-15

    This work relates to the study and characterization of the response function of an X-ray spectrometry system. The intrinsic efficiency of a Si(Li) detector has been simulated with the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and GEANT4 in the photon energy range of 2.6-59.5 keV. After finding it necessary to take a radiograph of the detector inside its cryostat to learn the correct dimensions, agreement within 10% between the simulations and experimental measurements with several point-like sources and PIXE results was obtained.

  20. Field study of alpha characterization of a D ampersand D site using long-range alpha detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Koster, J.E.; MacArthur, D.W.; Sprouse, L.L.; Stout, D.; Vaccarella, J.A.; Vu, T.Q.

    1994-01-01

    A successful and cost-effective D ampersand D effort relies upon an accurate, real-time, in situ, and non-destructive method of characterization of contamination both before and after the decontamination process. Detector systems based on long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technology meet these criteria. Currently, LANL is in the process of investigating, designing, or building various surface monitors, various pipe monitors, and glove-box monitors. This paper describes the field studies conducted using detectors based on LRAD technology

  1. Characterization of a large-format, fine-pitch CdZnTe pixel detector for the HEFT balloon-Borne experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C. M. Hubert; Cook, Walter R.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Lin, Jiao Y. Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a large-format CdZnTe pixel detector with custom, low-noise ASIC readout, for astrophysical applications. In particular, this detector is targeted for use in the High-Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT), a balloon-borne experiment with focusing optics for 20-70 keV. The detector is a 24 X 44 pixel array of 498-µm pitch. As a focal plane detector, uniformity from pixel to pixel is very desirable. In this paper, we present the characterization of some detector properties for the ...

  2. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Aktar Chowdhury

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP adorned graphene oxide (GO nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW−1. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  3. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Farzana Aktar [Experimental Physics Division, Atomic Energy Centre, 4, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mohammad Abul [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Uchida, Koji; Tamura, Takahiro; Sugawa, Kosuke; Mochida, Tomoaki; Otsuki, Joe [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Mohiuddin, Tariq [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman); Boby, Monny Akter [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Alam, Mohammad Sahabul, E-mail: msalam@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering & King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) adorned graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR) radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW{sup −1}. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  4. Assembly and Characterization of Resistive Plate Chambers in India for the CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084269

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is a general purpose detector being operated at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. The RE4 upgrade project was envisaged to improve the Level-1 trigger efficiency in the forward region, when LHC would run at its full designed energy and luminosity after the first Long Shutdown (LS-1, 2013-2014). About 200 RPCs were built for the upgrade at three assembly sites in India, CERN and Ghent. India contributed to 50, RE4/2 RPCs along with 200 Cu-cooling units for the entire upgrade for which the assembly and characterization of RPCs was carried out jointly by Nuclear Physics Division-BARC and Panjab University-Chandigarh. The gas-gaps after their arrival from KODEL, South Korea, underwent mechanical tests for leak and popped spacers, followed by electrical tests for long term monitoring of leakage currents. After the assembly, each RPC was evaluated for its efficiency, cluster size, noise and strip profiles. The Cu-cooling units build at BARC were also tested acc...

  5. Noise characterization of silicon strip detectors-comparison of sensors with and without integrated jfet source-follower.

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, Gabriele

    Noise is often the main factor limiting the performance of detector systems. In this work a detailed study of the noise contributions in different types of silicon microstrip sensors is carried on. We investigate three sensors with double-sided readout fabricated by different suppliers for the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC, in addition to detectors including an integrated JFET Source-Follower as a first signal conditioning stage. The latter have been designed as an attempt at improving the performance when very long strips, obtained by gangling together several sensors, are required. After a description of the strip sensors and of their operation, the “static” characterization measurements performed on them (current and capacitance versus voltage and/or frequency) are illustrated and interpreted. Numerical device simulation has been employed as an aid in interpreting some of the measurement results. The commonly used models for expressing the noise of the detector-amplifier system in terms of its relev...

  6. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.-S.; Park, H.-S.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Kim, H.-J.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.

    2016-01-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R 2 >0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types

  7. Beyond JWST: Science Drivers for the Next Great UVOIR Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumlinson, Jason; Seager, Sara; Dalcanton, Julianne; Postman, Marc; Aigrain, Suzanne; battel, Steven; Brandt, W. Niel; Conroy, Charlie; Feinberg, Lee; Gezari, Suvi; Guyon, Olivier; Harris, Walter M.; Hirata, Chris; Mather, John C.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    We report on the AURA 'Beyond JWST' committee's considerations and conclusions regarding the science case for the development of a large UVOIR observatory, to be launched following JWST and WFIRST-AFTA. We find that a space-based UVOIR telescope of 10 meters or more in aperture will uniquely enable a wide range of transformational science investigations by itself and in tandem with ground-based OIR and radio facilities in its era. The chief goal of this facility is to assess the possibility of life beyond our Solar System by discovering Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of their host stars, via direct imaging, and by searching spectroscopically for biosignature gases in the atmospheres of the best exo-Earth candidates. The large aperture and mission architecture required to characterize the atmospheres of a significant number of potentially life-bearing planets will also transform studies of the galaxies and stars that led up to them. At 10 meters or larger, the telescope will spatially resolve scales of 100 AU everywhere in the Milky Way, 0.1 parsec everywhere in the Local Group, and 100 parsec everywhere in the observable Universe. This unprecedented spatial resolution over large fields, with stable optics and low backgrounds, will allow astronomers to follow, in high definition, the formation and evolution of the star forming regions inside galaxies over the past 10 Gyr, to robustly determine the complete star formation histories in every galaxy within the local volume (to 10 Mpc), and to track the motions of virtually any star in the Milky Way. High spectral resolution and multi-object spectroscopy in the UV will enable revolutionary new studies of gas flows in galaxies, bodies in the outer solar system, and the evolution of the most massive stars. We present these compelling science drivers and their associated observational requirements here; we summarize the technology requirements for high angular resolution, sensitivity, wavefront stability

  8. SU-F-BRE-02: Characterization of a New Commercial Single Crystal Diamond Detector in Photon, Electron and Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Y; Das, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Diamond detectors even with superior characteristics have become obsolete due to poor design, selection of crystal and cost. Recently, microDiamond using synthetic single crystal diamond detector (SCDD) is commercially available which is characterized in various radiation beams in this study. Methods: The characteristics of a commercial SCDD model 60019 (PTW) to a 6- and 15-MV photon beams, 6- and 20-MeV electron beams, and 208 MeV proton beams were investigated and compared to the pre-characterized detectors: TN31010 (0.125 cm 3 ) and TN30006 (pinpoint) ionization chambers (PTW), EDGE detector (Sun Nuclear Corp), and SFD Stereotactic Dosimetry Diode Detector (IBA). The depth-dose and profiles data were collected for various field sizes and depths. The dose linearity and dose rate dependency were also evaluated. To evaluate the effects of the preirradiation, the diamond detector which had not been irradiated on the day was set up in the water tank and the response to 100 MU was measured every 20 s. The temperature dependency was tested for the range of 4–60 °C. Angular dependency was evaluated in water phantom by rotating the SCDD. Results: For all radiation types and field sizes, the depth-dose data of the diamond chamber showed identical curve to those of ionization chambers. The profile of the diamond detector was very similar to those of the Edge and SFD detectors, although the 0.125 cm 3 and pinpoint chambers showed averaging effects in the penumbrae region. The temperature dependency was within 0.7% in the range of 4–41°C. A dose of 900 cGy and 1200 cGy were needed to stabilize the chamber to the level within 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The type 60019 SCDD detector showed suitable characteristics for depth-dose and profile measurements for wide range of field sizes. However, at least 1000 cGy of pre-irradiation is needed for accurate measurements

  9. The Building Blocks for JWST I and T (Integrations and Test) to Operations - From Simulator to Flight Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatig, Curtis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Wasiak, Francis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project s building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  10. Non-invasive characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip detectors using pulsed infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of roughly 1300 double sided silicon micro-strip detectors of 3 different dimensions. For the quality assurance of prototype micro-strip detectors a non-invasive detector charaterization is developed. The test system is using a pulsed infrared laser for charge injection and characterization, called Laser Test System (LTS). The system is aimed to develop a set of characterization procedures which are non-invasive (non-destructive) in nature and could be used for quality assurances of several silicon micro-strip detectors in an efficient, reliable and reproducible way. The procedures developed (as reported here) uses the LTS to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype detector modules which are tested with the LTS so far have 1024 strips with a pitch of 58 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm, wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with a duration of ≈ 10 ns and power ≈ 5 mW of the laser pulse is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensor produces ≈ 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. The laser scans different prototype sensors and various non-invasive techniques to determine characteristics of the detector modules for the quality assurance is reported.

  11. Development and Characterization of Diamond and 3D-Silicon Pixel Detectors with ATLAS-Pixel Readout Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10^16 particles per cm^2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 × 50 um^2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm^2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 × 6 cm^2). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection ...

  12. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  13. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10 16 particles per cm 2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 μm 2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm 2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm 2 ). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  14. ATLAS-TPX: a two-layer pixel detector setup for neutron detection and radiation field characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, B.; Caicedo, I.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.; Leroy, C.

    2016-01-01

    A two-layer pixel detector setup (ATLAS-TPX), designed for thermal and fast neutron detection and radiation field characterization is presented. It consists of two segmented silicon detectors (256 × 256 pixels, pixel pitch 55 μm, thicknesses 300 μm and 500 μm) facing each other. To enhance the neutron detection efficiency a set of converter layers is inserted in between these detectors. The pixelation and the two-layer design allow a discrimination of neutrons against γs by pattern recognition and against charged particles by using the coincidence and anticoincidence information. The neutron conversion and detection efficiencies are measured in a thermal neutron field and fast neutron fields with energies up to 600 MeV. A Geant4 simulation model is presented, which is validated against the measured detector responses. The reliability of the coincidence and anticoincidence technique is demonstrated and possible applications of the detector setup are briefly outlined.

  15. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  16. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  17. Study and characterization of arrays of detectors for dosimetric verification of radiotherapy, analysis of business solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago Arias, A.; Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Gomez Rodriguez, F.; Gonzalez Castano, D. M.; Pardo Montero, J.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the detector arrays developed by different business houses to the demand for devices that speed up the verification process. Will analyze the effect of spatial response of individual detectors in the measurement of dose distributions, modeling the same and analyzing the ability of the arrays to detect variations in a treatment yield.

  18. Characterizing the response of a scintillator-based detector to single electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, Xiahan; LeBeau, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the response of a high angle annular dark field scintillator-based detector to single electrons. We demonstrate that care must be taken when determining the single electron intensity as significant discrepancies can occur when quantifying STEM images with different methods. To account for the detector response, we first image the detector using very low beam currents (∼8 fA), and subsequently model the interval between consecutive single electrons events. We find that single electrons striking the detector present a wide distribution of intensities, which we show is not described by a simple function. Further, we present a method to accurately account for the electrons within the incident probe when conducting quantitative imaging. The role detector settings play on determining the single electron intensity is also explored. Finally, we extend our analysis to describe the response of the detector to multiple electron events within the dwell interval of each pixel. - Highlights: • We show that the statistical description of single electron response of scintillator based detectors can be measured using a combination of small beam currents and short dwell times. • The average intensity from the probability distribution function can be used to normalize STEM images regardless of beam current and contrast settings. • We obtain consistent QSTEM normalization results from the single electron method and the conventional detector scan method.

  19. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of surface barrier detector from commercial silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Julio Batista Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    In this work it was developed radiation detectors silicon surface barrier that were capable of detecting the presence of gamma radiation from a low energy of iodine-125 seeds used in brachytherapy treatments. >From commercial silicon substrates detectors were developed, one sequence left of chemical treatments to the surfaces of these substrates with the intention of minimizing the possible noise generated, validation of the samples obtained as diodes, ensuring detector characteristics and effective use as detector for Iodine-125 radioactive sources with energy of about 25 keV and Americium-251 with energy on the order of 59 keV. Finished performing the analysis of the obtained energy spectra and so it was possible to observe the ability of these detectors to measure the energy from these seeds. (author)

  1. Characterization of X3 Silicon Detectors for the ELISSA Array at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnevskaya, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Choudhury, D.; Cognata, M. La; Constantin, P.; Filipescu, D. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Guardo, G. L.; Lattuada, D.; Matei, C.; Rotaru, A.; Spitaleri, C.; State, A.; Xu, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Position-sensitive silicon strip detectors represent one of the best solutions for the detection of charged particles as they provide good energy and position resolution over a large range of energies. A silicon array coupled with the gamma beams at the ELI-NP facility would allow measuring photodissociation reactions of interest for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on heavy nuclei intervening in the p-process. Forty X3 detectors for our ELISSA (ELI-NP Silicon Strip Detectors Array) project have been recently purchased and tested. We investigated several specifications, such as leakage currents, depletion voltage, and detector stability under vacuum. The energy and position resolution, and ballistic deficit were measured and analyzed. This paper presents the main results of our extensive testing. The measured energy resolution for the X3 detectors is better than results published for similar arrays (ANASEN or ORRUBA).

  2. Characterization of dual layer phoswich detector performance for small animal PET using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Choi, Yong; Cho, Gyuseong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2004-01-01

    A positron emission tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging should have high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and dual layer scintillators have been developed for this purpose. In this study, simulations were performed to optimize the order and the length of each crystal of a dual layer phoswich detector, and to evaluate the possibility of measuring signals from each layer of the phoswich detector. A simulation tool GATE was used to estimate the sensitivity and resolution of a small PET scanner. The proposed scanner is based on dual layer phoswich detector modules arranged in a ring of 10 cm diameter. Each module is composed of 8 x 8 arrays of phoswich detectors consisting of LSO and LuYAP with a 2 mm x 2 mm sensitive area coupled to a Hamamatsu R7600-00-M64 PSPMT. The length of the front layer of the phoswich detector varied from 0 to 10 mm at 1 mm intervals, and the total length (LSO + LuYAP) was fixed at 20 mm. The order of the crystal layers of the phoswich detector was also changed. Radial resolutions were kept below 3.4 mm and 3.7 mm over 8 cm FOV, and sensitivities were 7.4% and 8.0% for LSO 5 mm-LuYAP 15 mm, and LuYAP 6 mm-LSO 14 mm phoswich detectors, respectively. Whereas, high and uniform resolutions were achieved by using the LSO front layer, higher sensitivities were obtained by changing the crystal order. The feasibilities for applying crystal identification methods to phoswich detectors consisting of LSO and LuYAP were investigated using simulation and experimentally derived measurements of the light outputs from each layer of the phoswich detector. In this study, the optimal order and lengths of the dual layer phoswich detector were derived in order to achieve high sensitivity and high and uniform radial resolution

  3. Predicting the High Redshift Galaxy Population for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Zoey; Benson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will be launched in Oct 2018 with the goal of observing galaxies in the redshift range of z = 10 - 15. As redshift increases, the age of the Universe decreases, allowing us to study objects formed only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. This will provide a valuable opportunity to test and improve current galaxy formation theory by comparing predictions for mass, luminosity, and number density to the observed data. We have made testable predictions with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model Galacticus. The code uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to determine viable sets of model parameters that match current astronomical data. The resulting constrained model was then set to match the specifications of the JWST Ultra Deep Field Imaging Survey. Predictions utilizing up to 100 viable parameter sets were calculated, allowing us to assess the uncertainty in current theoretical expectations. We predict that the planned UDF will be able to observe a significant number of objects past redshift z > 9 but nothing at redshift z > 11. In order to detect these faint objects at redshifts z = 11-15 we need to increase exposure time by at least a factor of 1.66.

  4. Characterization of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector for dosimetry in spatially fractionated synchrotron x-ray fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Jayde, E-mail: Jayde.Livingstone@synchrotron.org.au; Häusermann, Daniel [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Stevenson, Andrew W. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO Manufacturing, Clayton South, Victoria 3169 (Australia); Butler, Duncan J. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Adam, Jean-François [Equipe d’accueil Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Médicale, Université Grenoble Alpes, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility - ID17, Grenoble 38043, France and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Modern radiotherapy modalities often use small or nonstandard fields to ensure highly localized and precise dose delivery, challenging conventional clinical dosimetry protocols. The emergence of preclinical spatially fractionated synchrotron radiotherapies with high dose-rate, sub-millimetric parallel kilovoltage x-ray beams, has pushed clinical dosimetry to its limit. A commercially available synthetic single crystal diamond detector designed for small field dosimetry has been characterized to assess its potential as a dosimeter for synchrotron microbeam and minibeam radiotherapy. Methods: Experiments were carried out using a synthetic diamond detector on the imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. The energy dependence of the detector was characterized by cross-referencing with a calibrated ionization chamber in monoenergetic beams in the energy range 30–120 keV. The dose-rate dependence was measured in the range 1–700 Gy/s. Dosimetric quantities were measured in filtered white beams, with a weighted mean energy of 95 keV, in broadbeam and spatially fractionated geometries, and compared to reference dosimeters. Results: The detector exhibits an energy dependence; however, beam quality correction factors (k{sub Q}) have been measured for energies in the range 30–120 keV. The k{sub Q} factor for the weighted mean energy of the IMBL radiotherapy spectrum, 95 keV, is 1.05 ± 0.09. The detector response is independent of dose-rate in the range 1–700 Gy/s. The percentage depth dose curves measured by the diamond detector were compared to ionization chambers and agreed to within 2%. Profile measurements of microbeam and minibeam arrays were performed. The beams are well resolved and the full width at halfmaximum agrees with the nominal width of the beams. The peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR) calculated from the profiles at various depths in water agrees within experimental error with PVDR calculations from Gafchromic film data

  5. Characterization of the diamond detector for commissioning the Eclipse Planning System; Caracterizacao do detector de diamante para comissionamento do Sistema de Planejamento Eclipse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, Guilherme A.; Cardoso, Domingos de O.; Fontes, Gladson S., E-mail: pavanguilherme@gmail.com [Grupo COI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear SE7

    2017-11-01

    Diamond detectors are an option in the commissioning of linear accelerators, especially in small field measurements due to characteristics such as: small sensitive volume (0.004mm{sup 3}) and low energy dependence, desirable attributes for PDP measurements, output factors and profiles. The purpose of this study was to characterize PTW microDiamond 60019 diamond detector in relation to linearity, dependencies: energy, directional and with dose rate; Besides comparing measurements of PDP, output factors and profiles with some ionization and diode chambers. We also analyzed two models of the Eclipse planning system, performed with data from the commissioning of a TrueBeam accelerator obtained with the CC13 camera and with the diamond. Linearity deviations less than 0.5% were obtained in the range of 50cGy to 20Gy for energies of 6,10 and 15MV. Variations smaller than 0.5% for energy dependence and dose rate and angular dependence less than 0.5% in the axial and polar directions were observed. In the small-field output factors the diamond presented higher relative readings to the chambers: CC13, PintPoint3D and CC01 and similar to the diode. In the PDP it showed superiority in the definition of the buildup and surface regions. In the small field profiles it was shown a better definition of the penumbra in relation to the ionization chambers and in relation to the diode was equivalent, being superior in the tail region of large fields. In both models of Eclipse there were no significant differences for 1%3mm gamma analysis for PDP and profiles, although the diamond presented smaller mean gamma errors. The Collimator Backscatter Factors (CBSF) analysis for the two sets of measures showed differences mainly for small fields. The results of this study indicate that the diamond detector is one of the most versatile on the market in different commissioning situations, especially for small field measurements. (author)

  6. Calibration results using highly aberrated images for aligning the JWST instruments to the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Acton, D. Scott; Gallagher, Ben B.; Knight, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Jurling, Alden S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project is an international collaboration led by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD. JWST is NASA's flagship observatory that will operate nearly a million miles away from Earth at the L2 Lagrange point. JWST's optical design is a three-mirror anastigmat with four main optical components; 1) the eighteen Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA), 2) a single Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA), 3) an Aft-Optics Subsystem (AOS) consisting of a Tertiary Mirror and Fine Steering Mirror, and 4) an Integrated Science Instrument Module consisting of the various instruments for JWST. JWST's optical system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of alignment capability and risk with the PMSAs and SMA having rigid body motion available on-orbit just for alignment purposes. However, the Aft-Optics Subsystem (AOS) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are essentially fixed optical subsystems within JWST, and therefore the cryogenic alignment of the AOS to the ISIM is critical to the optical performance and mission success of JWST. In support of this cryogenic alignment of the AOS to ISIM, an array of fiber optic sources, known as the AOS Source Plate Assembly (ASPA), are placed near the intermediate image location of JWST (between the secondary and tertiary mirrors) during thermal vacuum ground-test operations. The AOS produces images of the ASPA fiber optic sources at the JWST focal surface location, where they are captured by the various science instruments. In this manner, the AOS provides an optical yardstick by which the instruments within ISIM can evaluate their relative positions to and the alignment of the AOS to ISIM can be quantified. However, since the ASPA is located at the intermediate image location of the JWST three-mirror anastigmat design, the images of these fiber optic sources produced by the AOS are highly aberrated with approximately 2-3μm RMS wavefront error consisting

  7. Spectral characterization of plastic scintillation detector response as a function of magnetic field strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiele, E.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Ankerhold, U.; Culberson, W.; DeWerd, L.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize intensity and spectral response changes in a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) as a function of magnetic field strength. Spectra measurements as a function of magnetic field strength were performed using an optical spectrometer. The response of both a PSD and PMMA fiber were investigated to isolate the changes in response from the scintillator and the noise signal as a function of magnetic field strength. All irradiations were performed in water at a photon beam energy of 6 MV. Magnetic field strengths of (0, ±0.35, ±0.70, ±1.05, and  ±1.40) T were investigated. Four noise subtraction techniques were investigated to evaluate the impact on the resulting noise-subtracted scintillator response with magnetic field strength. The noise subtraction methods included direct spectral subtraction, the spectral method, and variants thereof. The PMMA fiber exhibited changes in response of up to 50% with magnetic field strength due to the directional light emission from \\breve{C} erenkov radiation. The PSD showed increases in response of up to 10% when not corrected for the noise signal, which agrees with previous investigations of scintillator response in magnetic fields. Decreases in the \\breve{C} erenkov light ratio with negative field strength were observed with a maximum change at  ‑1.40 T of 3.2% compared to 0 T. The change in the noise-subtracted PSD response as a function of magnetic field strength varied with the noise subtraction technique used. Even after noise subtraction, the PSD exhibited changes in response of up to 5.5% over the four noise subtraction methods investigated.

  8. Characterization of a pulsed mode high voltage power supply for nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazali, A B; Ahmad, T S; Abdullah, N A

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the characterization of a pulsed mode high voltage power supply (HVPS) using LT1073 chip. The pulsed modulated signal generated from this chip is amplified using a step-up ferrite core transformer of 1:20 turn ratio and then further multiplied and converted into DC high voltage output using a diode-capacitor arrangement. The circuit is powered by a 9V alkaline battery but regulated at 5V supply. It was found that the output for this setup is 520V, 87 μA with 10% load regulation. This output is suitable to operate a pancake-type GM detector, typically model LND 7317 where the plateau is from 475V to 675V. It was also found that when a β-source with intensity of 120 cps is used, the power consumption of the circuit is 5 V, 10.1 mA only. When the battery was left 'on' for 40 hours continuously, the battery's voltage has dropped to 6.9V, meaning that the 5V supply as well as 520V output is still maintained. It is noted that the minimum output voltage of 475V has reached when the regulated supply has reduced to 4.6V and consequently the 9V battery dropped to 6.5V, and this had happened after approximately 3 days of continuous operation. The power efficiency for this circuitry was found to be 89.5%. This result has far better in performance since the commercial portable equipment of this type has normally specified that not less than 8 hours continuous operation only. On the circuit design for this power supply, it was found that the enveloped frequency is 133 Hz with approximately 50% duty cycle. The modulated frequency during 'on' state was found to be 256 KHz in which the majority of power consumption is required.

  9. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic ∼< 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm–1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  10. Reliable Transport over SpaceWire for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Focal Plane Electronics (FPE) Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Glenn; Schnurr, Richard; Dailey, Christopher; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin

    2003-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) faces difficult technical and budgetary challenges to overcome before it is scheduled launch in 2010. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), shares these challenges. The major challenge addressed in this paper is the data network used to collect, process, compresses and store Infrared data. A total of 114 Mbps of raw information must be collected from 19 sources and delivered to the two redundant data processing units across a twenty meter deployed thermally restricted interface. Further data must be transferred to the solid-state recorder and the spacecraft. The JWST detectors are kept at cryogenic temperatures to obtain the sensitivity necessary to measure faint energy sources. The Focal Plane Electronics (FPE) that sample the detector, generate packets from the samples, and transmit these packets to the processing electronics must dissipate little power in order to help keep the detectors at these cold temperatures. Separating the low powered front-end electronics from the higher-powered processing electronics, and using a simple high-speed protocol to transmit the detector data minimize the power dissipation near the detectors. Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) drivers were considered an obvious choice for physical layer because of their high speed and low power. The mechanical restriction on the number cables across the thermal interface force the Image packets to be concentrated upon two high-speed links. These links connect the many image packet sources, Focal Plane Electronics (FPE), located near the cryogenic detectors to the processing electronics on the spacecraft structure. From 12 to 10,000 seconds of raw data are processed to make up an image, various algorithms integrate the pixel data Loss of commands to configure the detectors as well as the loss of science data itself may cause inefficiency in the use of the telescope that are unacceptable given the high cost of the observatory. This

  11. Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program: Evaluation of Transiting Exoplanet WASP-63b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Brian; Cubillos, Patricio; Bruno, Giovanni; Lewis, Nikole K.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Wakeford, Hannah; Blecic, Jasmina; Burrows, Adam Seth; Deming, Drake; Heng, Kevin; Line, Michael R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Transiting Exoplanet Early Release Science Community

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ``A Preparatory Program to Identify the Single Best Transiting Exoplanet for JWST Early Release Science" for WASP-63b, one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. A large collaboration of transiting exoplanet scientists identified a set of ``community targets" which meet a certain set of criteria for ecliptic latitude, period, host star brightness, well constrained orbital parameters, and strength of spectroscopic features. WASP-63b was one of the targets identified as a potential candidate for the ERS program. It is presented as an inflated planet with a large signal. It will be accessible to JWST approximately six months after the planned start of Cycle 1/ERS in April 2019 making it an ideal candidate should there be any delays in the JWST timetable. Here, we observe WASP-63b to evaluate its suitability as the best target to test the capabilities of JWST. Ideally, a clear atmosphere will be best suited for bench marking the instruments ability to detect spectroscopic features. We can use the strength of the water absorption feature at 1.4 μm as a way to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes. The results of atmospheric retrieval are presented along with a discussion on the suitability of WASP-63b as the best target to be observed during the ERS Program.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of surface barrier detector from commercial silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Fabio Eduardo da; Silva, Julio Batista Rodrigues da

    2015-01-01

    This work used 5 silicon substrates, n-type with resistivity between 500-20,000 Ω.cm, with 12 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness, from Wacker - Chemitronic, Germany. To produce the surface barrier detectors, the substrates were first cleaned, then, they were etched with HNO 3 solution. After this, a deposition of suitable materials on the crystal was made, to produce the desired population inversion of the crystal characteristics. The substrates received a 10 mm diameter gold contact in one of the surfaces and a 5 mm diameter aluminum in the other. The curves I x V and the energy spectra for 28 keV and 59 keV, for each of the produced detectors, were measured. From the 5 substrates, 4 of them resulted in detectors and one did not present even diode characteristics. The results showed that the procedures used are suitable to produce detectors with this type of silicon substrates. (author)

  13. Characterization of the in-flight degradation of the INTEGRAL/SPI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonjou, V.; Roques, J.P.; Ballmoos, P. von; Jean, P.; Knodlseder, J.; Skinner, G.; Thevenin, A.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2005-01-01

    SPI is a high spectral resolution gamma ray telescope which was launched on 2002 October 17 on-board INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory). The SPI camera consists of 19 high-purity germanium detectors that cover an energy range of 20 keV-8 MeV with an energy resolution of 2-8 keV FWHM. We describe the methods used for the determination of the effects of radiation damage on the SPI detectors. Degradation rate and recovery by annealing are quantified. Using instrumental background lines due to radioisotopes from natural decay chains and from cosmic ray interactions, we found that the variations of detectors efficiency are low. Finally, the impact of the detector degradation on the energy calibration has been investigated

  14. Characterization and calibration of radiation-damaged double-sided silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, L. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Vogt, A., E-mail: andreas.vogt@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Hirsch, R.; Arnswald, K.; Hess, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Steinbach, T.; Warr, N.; Wolf, K. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Stahl, C.; Pietralla, N. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Limböck, T.; Meerholz, K. [Physikalische Chemie, Universität zu Köln, D-50939 Köln (Germany); Lutter, R. [Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-21

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSD) are commonly used for event-by-event identification of charged particles as well as the reconstruction of particle trajectories in nuclear physics experiments with stable and radioactive beams. Intersecting areas of both p- and n-doped front- and back-side segments form individual virtual pixel segments allowing for a high detector granularity. DSSSDs are employed in demanding experimental environments and have to withstand high count rates of impinging nuclei. The illumination of the detector is often not homogeneous. Consequently, radiation damage of the detector is distributed non-uniformly. Position-dependent incomplete charge collection due to radiation damage limits the performance and lifetime of the detectors, the response of different channels may vary drastically. Position-resolved charge-collection losses between front- and back-side segments are investigated in an in-beam experiment and by performing radioactive source measurements. A novel position-resolved calibration method based on mutual consistency of p-side and n-side charges yields a significant enhancement of the energy resolution and the performance of radiation-damaged parts of the detector.

  15. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  16. Probing the TRAPPIST-1 System with K2, JWST, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Rodrigo; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Agol, Eric; TRAPPIST-1 Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    I will discuss recent work I have done to characterize TRAPPIST-1, a nearby exoplanet system hosting seven terrestrial-size planets, three of which are in the habitable zone. In the first part of this talk, I will report on my efforts to constrain the orbital properties of the smallest and farthest out planet in the system, TRAPPIST-1h, from K2 data de-trended with my systematics correction pipeline, EVEREST. I will further discuss how the detection of TRAPPIST-1h with K2 confirmed the intricate resonant structure of the system, whose planets are all linked to their neighbors via three-body Laplace resonances. This is the longest known chain in any exoplanet system and holds important clues for the formation and migration of the TRAPPIST-1 planets. In the second part of this talk, I will discuss ongoing work to characterize the TRAPPIST-1 system via planet-planet occultations (PPOs), events during which one planet occults the disk of another, imparting a small photometric signal as its thermal or reflected light is blocked. Because of the extreme coplanarity of the system, PPOs should occur on average 1 - 2 times per day in TRAPPIST-1. I will discuss how the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely be able to detect PPOs in this system in the mid-infrared, and how these can be used to place exquisite constraints on the masses, eccentricities, and mutual inclinations of its planets. I will also show how photodynamical modeling of these events can eventually be used to reveal a planet's day/night temperature contrast, infer various atmospheric properties, and construct crude two-dimensional surface maps of alien worlds.

  17. Characterization of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2D imaging acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da

    2007-05-01

    The image acquisition methods applied to nuclear medicine and radiobiology are a valuable research study for determination of thyroid anatomy to seek disorders associated to follicular cells. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has also been used in problems related to radiation detection in order to map medical images since the improvement of data processing compatible with personnel computers (PC). This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array that could be coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD) through a fiber optic plate in order to map the follicles of thyroid gland. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits the application suggested here with spatial resolution of 10 μm and good detector efficiency. The methodology results are useful to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A source - detector simulation is performed by using a MCNP4B (Monte Carlo for Neutron Photon transport) general code considering different source energies, detector materials and geometries including pixel sizes and reflector types. The results demonstrate that by using MCNP4B code is possible to searching for useful parameters related to the systems used in nuclear medicine, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology studies to acquiring thyroid follicles images. (author)

  18. Characterization of a SiC MIS Schottky diode as RBS particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, I. R.; Pick, A. C.; Pereira, M. B.; Boudinov, H. I.

    2018-02-01

    A 4H-SiC Schottky diode was investigated as a particle detector for Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) experiment. The device was fabricated on a commercial 4H-SiC epitaxial n-type layer grown onto a 4H-SiC n+ type substrate wafer doped with nitrogen. Hafnium oxide with thickness of 1 nm was deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition and 10 nm of Ni were deposited by sputtering to form the Ni/HfO2/4H-SiC MIS Schottky structure. Current-Voltage curves with variable temperature were measured to extract the real Schottky Barrier Height (0.32 V) and ideality factor values (1.15). Reverse current and Capacitance-Voltage measurements were performed on the 4H-SiC detector and compared to a commercial Si barrier detector acquired from ORTEC. RBS data for four alpha energies (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 MeV) were collected from an Au/Si sample using the fabricated SiC and the commercial Si detectors simultaneously. The energy resolution for the fabricated detector was estimated to be between 75 and 80 keV.

  19. Characterization of 3 mm glass electrodes and development of RPC detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Ashok; Gaur, Ankit; Kumar, Purnendu; Hasbuddin, Md.; Mishra, Swati; Kumar, Praveen; Naimuddin, Md., E-mail: nayeem@cern.ch

    2015-02-21

    India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a multi-institutional facility, planned to be built up in South India. The INO facility will host a 51 kton magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector to study atmospheric muon neutrinos. Iron plates have been chosen as the target material whereas Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) have been chosen as the active detector element for the ICAL experiment. Due to the large number of RPCs needed (∼28,000 of 2 m×2 m in size) for ICAL experiment and for the long lifetime of the experiment, it is necessary to perform a detailed R and D such that each and every parameter of the detector performance can be optimized to improve the physics output. In this paper, we report on the detailed material and electrical properties studies for various types of glass electrodes available locally. We also report on the performance studies carried out on the RPCs made with these electrodes as well as the effect of gas composition and environmental temperature on the detector performance. We also lay emphasis on the usage of materials for RPC electrodes and the suitable environmental conditions applicable for operating the RPC detector for optimal physics output at INO-ICAL experiment.

  20. Characterization of CR 39 nuclear track detector for use as a radon/thoron dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaiya, S.

    1988-02-01

    For the estimation of radon, thoron and their short-lived daughter products in air radon diffusion chambers with passive α-track etch detectors have been used. The report describes the properties of CR 39 track etch detectors in particular with respect to the spectrometric detection of α-particles in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV using chemical and a combination of chemical-electrochemical etching technique. In order to optimize the etching conditions for an α-energy discrimination in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV, the ECE track size diameter and the track density have been investigated as a function of the chemical pre-etching time using three electrical field strengths. In a mixed α-spectrum the contributions of various α-particles with energies between 4.6 to 8.77 MeV have been determined experimentally in CR 39 and compared with the spectral measurement using a surface barrier detector and the same irradiation geometry. Beside CR 39 detectors etched chemically and electrochemically, in addition surface barrier detectors and a Monte Carlo calculation have been used to evaluate the α-energy spectrum for thoron and its daughter products emitted by α-decays in the air volume and the plate-out of daughters at the inner surface on the diffusion chamber. (orig./HP) [de

  1. System Definition of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Ray; Aymergen, Cagatay; VanCampen, Julie; Abell, James; Smith, Miles; Driggers, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) provides the critical functions and the environment for the four science instruments on JWST. This complex system development across many international organizations presents unique challenges and unique solutions. Here we describe how the requirement flow has been coordinated through the documentation system, how the tools and processes are used to minimize impact to the development of the affected interfaces, how the system design has matured, how the design review process operates, and how the system implementation is managed through reporting to ensure a truly world class scientific instrument compliment is created as the final product.

  2. DEPFET: A silicon pixel detector for future colliders. Fundamentals, characterization and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marinas Pardo, Carlos Manuel; Vos, Marcel Andre

    2011-01-01

    The future electron-positron colliders, either breaking the energy frontier (like ILC or CLIC) or the luminosity frontier (SuperKEKB), impose unprecedented constraints over the new generation of detectors that will be operated in those facilities. In particular, the vertex detectors must be designed for an efficient flavour tagging and excellent vertex reconstruction. To cope with these requirements, highly pixelated sensors with a fast readout, very low material budget and low power consumption must be developed. Although the combination of these factors is a substantial challenge, the DEPFET Collaboration has developed a new generation of sensors that can be operated in such a harsh environment. The DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) is a pixel sensor that combines detection and internal amplification at the same time. With such configuration, thin detectors with good signal-to-noise ratio and low power consumption can be produced. In this thesis, the optimization and performance of two gen...

  3. Characterization of saturation of CR-39 detector at high alpha-particle fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of saturation in the CR-39 detector reduces and limits its detection dynamic range; nevertheless, this range could be extended using spectroscopic techniques and by measuring the net bulk rate of the saturated CR-39 detector surface. CR-39 detectors were irradiated by 1.5 MeV high alpha-particle fluence varying from 0.06 × 108 to 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2 from Am-241 source; thereafter, they were etched in a 6.25N NaOH solution at a temperature of 70°C for different durations. Net bulk etch rate measurement of the 1.5 MeV alpha-irradiated CR-39 detector surface revealed that rate increases with increasing etching time and reaches its maximum value at the end of the alpha-particle range. It is also correlated with the alpha-particle fluence. The measurements of UV–Visible (UV–Vis absorbance at 500 and 600 nm reveal that the absorbance is linearly correlated with the fluence of alpha particles at the etching times of 2 and 4 hour. For extended etching times of 6, 10, and 14.5 hour, the absorbance is saturated for fluence values of 4.05 × 108, 5.30 × 108, and 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2. These new methods pave the way to extend the dynamic range of polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs in measurement of high fluence of heavy ions as well as in radiation dosimetry. Keywords: Alpha Particle, Bulk Etch Rate, CR-39 Detector, Saturated Regime, UV–Vis Spectroscopy

  4. Characterization of the thermoluminescent detectors LiF:Mg,Cu,P. Environmental dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, Ligia; Gregori, Beatriz N.; Papadopulos, Susana B.; Carelli, Jorge L.

    2005-01-01

    Studies on thermal-luminescent properties of the LiF:Mg detectors, Cu, P enrichment with Li-7 (99.93% of Li-7 and 0.07% of Li-6): optimization of the heating profile, loss of information, detection limit and doses and energy responses are presented in this work. Their performance is compared with LiF:Mg detectors, Mg, Ti enriched with Li-7 (99.93% of Li-7 and 0.07% Li-6), which are at present used for environmental dosimetry at the Physics Dosimetry Laboratory of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority [es

  5. Laser and alpha particle characterization of floating-base BJT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyzhnevyi, V.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Verzellesi, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the detection properties of existing prototypes of BJT detectors operated with floating base. We report about results of two functional tests. The charge-collection properties of BJT detectors were evaluated by means of a pulsed laser setup. The response to α-particles emitted from radioactive 241 Am source are also presented. Experimental results show that current gains of about 450 with response times in the order of 50 μs are preserved even in this non-standard operation mode, in spite of a non-optimized structure.

  6. Laser and alpha particle characterization of floating-base BJT detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyzhnevyi, V., E-mail: tyzhnevyi@disi.unitn.i [Universita di Trento and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste and INFN Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Universita di Trento and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Verzellesi, G. [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia and INFN Trento, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    In this work, we investigate the detection properties of existing prototypes of BJT detectors operated with floating base. We report about results of two functional tests. The charge-collection properties of BJT detectors were evaluated by means of a pulsed laser setup. The response to {alpha}-particles emitted from radioactive {sup 241}Am source are also presented. Experimental results show that current gains of about 450 with response times in the order of 50 {mu}s are preserved even in this non-standard operation mode, in spite of a non-optimized structure.

  7. Characterization of a glass GEM for sealed detectors application and reduction of charging-up effects

    CERN Document Server

    Erdal, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Apart from high energy physics experiments, there has been a great effort in recent years to incorporate MPGDs in many other applications i.e. medical treatments and imaging and home land security. However, MPGDs (as most gaseous detectors) are normally operated under a constant flushing of the gas. Their use thus turns them expensive since they rely on a constant gas supply and a suitable infrastructure, but most important is the loss of their portability. These reasons have pushed the community to search for other solutions, aiming for the development of sealed detectors. The demands for such is to be made out of low outgassing rate materials and possibly the use of only noble gas to avoid aging due to chemical activity of the ionized gas of the avalanche. The default material for GEM detectors - Polyimide (Kapton), is not suitable for a sealed detector because of its high outgassing rate, thus calling for new solutions. Moreover, GEMs, being essentially made out of an insulating material, pose a problem in...

  8. Model analysis and experimental characterization of a microstrip vertex detector for a e+e- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.P.

    1989-09-01

    This thesis is constituted by several topics, apparently weakly correlated, but that are all addressed to improve the performances of the ALEPH microvertex detector both in the present version and in the upgraded one with JFET-CMOS electronics. A wide program of computer simulations about the upgraded JFET-CMOS version of the read-out electronics have been carried out to test its working principle and radiation hardness measurements have been performed on the prototypes of the same electronics to test its capability to stand the radiation environment foreseen in ALEPH. Extensive calculations of the capacitances in a microstrip detector are presented and their influence on the detector, both from the point of view of its noise performances and of the capacitive charge division method, has been analyzed theoretically, both through analytic calculations and numerical simulations; experimental measurements on the same relevant capacitances are discussed. Strictly connected to this point a computer code simulating the interaction of a minimum ionizing particle with the detector has been written and algorithms to determine the interaction point have been studied. This code has been later inserted in the Monte Carlo program of ALEPH. A point not strictly connected to ALEPH and still treated here is the analysis of the noise of two JFET devices, that is however interesting not as much for the results themselves, as for the analysis technique used that brought to identify noise sources that are usually difficult to detect and neglected. (orig.)

  9. Preparation of High Purity CdTe for Nuclear Detector: Electrical and Nuclear Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiour, A.; Ayoub, M.; Hamié, A.; Fawaz, A.; Hage-ali, M.

    High purity crystal with controllable electrical properties, however, control of the electrical properties of CdTe has not yet been fully achieved. Using the refined Cd and Te as starting materials, extremely high-purity CdTe single crystals were prepared by the traditional vertical THM. The nature of the defects involved in the transitions was studied by analyzing the position of the energy levels by TSC method. The resolution of 4.2 keV (FWHM) confirms the high quality and stability of the detectors: TSC spectrum was in coherence with detectors spectrum with a horizontal plate between 0.2 and 0.6 eV. The enhancement in resolution of detectors with a full width at half- maximum (less than 0.31 meV), lead to confirm that the combination of vacuum distillation and zone refining was very effective to obtain more purified CdTe single crystals for photovoltaic or nuclear detectors with better physical properties.

  10. Nonclassicality and entanglement criteria for bipartite optical fields characterized by quadratic detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Arkhipov, I.I.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-15, č. článku 043845. ISSN 2469-9926 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : parametric down-conversion * photon statistic * bipartite optical fields * quadratic detectors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  11. The Hunt for Low-Mass Black Holes in the JWST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Jenna; Satyapal, Shobita; Abel, Nicholas; Ricci, Claudio; Gliozzi, Mario; Blecha, Laura; Secrest, Nathan

    2018-01-01

    Most, if not all, massive galaxies have a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun. While the properties of SMBHs and their host galaxies have been well-studied in massive galaxies, very few SMBHs have been found in galaxies with low masses and those with small bulges. This is a significant deficiency, because the study of this population allows us to gain an understanding of merger-free pathways to black hole growth, and to gain insight into the origin and growth of SMBH ‘seeds’, thought to have formed at high redshift. Most studies aimed at finding SMBHs have been conducted using optical spectroscopic studies, where active SMBHs (active galactic nuclei or AGNs) display distinctive optical emission lines indicative of accreting SMBHs. However, in low mass (dwarf) galaxies, the SMBHs will likely be less massive, and can be energetically weak and possibly deeply embedded in their host galaxies. As a result, the optical emission lines may be dominated by star formation regions, severely limiting the diagnostic power of optical surveys in finding and characterizing the properties of the AGN in dwarf galaxies. In such galaxies, infrared coronal lines provide a robust method of finding AGNs. Furthermore, as the black hole mass decreases, the Schwarzschild radius of the black hole decreases, and in response, the temperature of the surrounding accretion disk increases. The shape of the ionizing radiation spectral energy distribution therefore changes with black hole mass, which will affect the emission line spectrum from the surrounding gas. In this work, we investigate the diagnostic power of infrared coronal lines and the effect of black hole mass on the emission line spectra from AGNs, with a particular focus on the emission lines accessible by JWST.

  12. Information Content Analysis for Selection of Optimal JWST  Observing Modes for Transiting Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batalha, Natasha E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16802 (United States); Line, M. R., E-mail: neb149@psu.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85282 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) is nearing its launch date of 2018, and is expected to revolutionize our knowledge of exoplanet atmospheres. In order to specifically identify which observing modes will be most useful for characterizing a diverse range of exoplanetary atmospheres, we use an information content (IC) based approach commonly used in the studies of solar system atmospheres. We develop a system based upon these IC methods to trace the instrumental and atmospheric model phase space in order to identify which observing modes are best suited for particular classes of planets, focusing on transmission spectra. Specifically, the atmospheric parameter space we cover is T  = 600–1800 K, C/O = 0.55–1, [M/H] = 1–100 × Solar for an R  = 1.39 R{sub J}, M  = 0.59 M{sub J} planet orbiting a WASP-62-like star. We also explore the influence of a simplified opaque gray cloud on the IC. We find that obtaining broader wavelength coverage over multiple modes is preferred over higher precision in a single mode given the same amount of observing time. Regardless of the planet temperature and composition, the best modes for constraining terminator temperatures, C/O ratios, and metallicity are NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. If the target’s host star is dim enough such that the NIRSpec prism is applicable, then it can be used instead of NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. Lastly, observations that use more than two modes should be carefully analyzed because sometimes the addition of a third mode results in no gain of information. In these cases, higher precision in the original two modes is favorable.

  13. Device for characterization of fissile materials comprising at least a neutron detector embedded inside a scintillator for gamma radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, P.; Dherbey, J.R.; Bosser, R.; Berne, R.

    1989-01-01

    Fissile materials, for instance in radioactive wastes, are characterized by measurement of prompt and delayed neutrons and gamma radiation from induced fission by a neutron source. Gamma radiation is detected with a scintillation detector associated to a photomultiplier, the scintillation material is at the same time a moderator for thermalization of fast neutrons emitted by the neutron source and also of neutrons from spontaneous fission, (α, n) reactions and neutrons from induced fission in the fissile material. Preferentially the moderator is made of Altustipe (Plexiglas with anthracene as additive) [fr

  14. Design and characterization of radiation resistant integrated circuits for the LHC particle detectors using deep sub-micron CMOS technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anelli, Giovanni Maria

    2000-01-01

    The electronic circuits associated with the particle detectors of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have to work in a highly radioactive environment. This work proposes a methodology allowing the design of radiation resistant integrated circuits using the commercial sub-micron CMOS technology. This method uses the intrinsic radiation resistance of ultra-thin grid oxides, the technology of enclosed layout transistors (ELT), and the protection rings to avoid the radio-induced creation of leakage currents. In order to check the radiation tolerance level, several test structures have been designed and tested with different radiation sources. These tests have permitted to study the physical phenomena responsible for the damages induced by the radiations and the possible remedies. Then, the particular characteristics of ELT transistors and their influence on the design of complex integrated circuits has been explored. The modeling of the W/L ratio, the asymmetries (for instance in the output conductance) and the performance of ELT couplings have never been studied yet. The noise performance of the 0.25 μ CMOS technology, used in the design of several integrated circuits of the LHC detectors, has been characterized before and after irradiation. Finally, two integrated circuits designed using the proposed method are presented. The first one is an analogic memory and the other is a circuit used for the reading of the signals of one of the LHC detectors. Both circuits were irradiated and have endured very high doses practically without any sign of performance degradation. (J.S.)

  15. Design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished p+n-n+ silicon strip detectors for future HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Si detectors, in various configurations (strips and pixels), have been playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their excellent vertexing and high precision tracking information. In future HEP experiments like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN and the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the Si tracking detectors will be operated in a very harsh radiation environment, which leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors which in turn changes their electrical properties, i.e. change in the full depletion voltage, increase in the leakage current and decrease in the charge collection efficiency. In order to achieve the long term durability of Si-detectors in future HEP experiments, it is required to operate these detectors at very high reverse biases, beyond the full depletion voltage, thus requiring higher detector breakdown voltage. Delhi University (DU) is involved in the design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished ac-coupled, single sided, p+n-n+ Si strip detectors for future HEP experiments. The design has been optimized using a two-dimensional numerical device simulation program (TCAD-Silvaco). The Si strip detectors are fabricated with eight-layers mask process using the planar fabrication technology by Bharat Electronic Lab (BEL), India. Further an electrical characterization set-up is established at DU to ensure the quality performance of fabricated Si strip detectors and test structures. In this work measurement results on non irradiated Si Strip detectors and test structures with multi-guard-rings using Current Voltage (IV) and Capacitance Voltage (CV) characterization set-ups are discussed. The effect of various design parameters, for example guard-ring spacing, number of guard-rings and metal overhang on breakdown voltage of test structures have been studied.

  16. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, J.G., E-mail: jglezg2002@gmail.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Rubiano, J.G. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Estudios Ambientales y Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Winter, G. [Instituto Universitario de Sistemas Inteligentes y Aplicaciones Numéricas en la Ingeniería, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Estudios Ambientales y Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Bolivar, J.P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2017-06-21

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing HPGe detectors has been generalized. • The new version is usable for a wider range of sample geometries. • It starts from reference FEPEs obtained through a standard calibration procedure. • A model of an HPGe XtRa detector has been

  17. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.G.; Rubiano, J.G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing HPGe detectors has been generalized. • The new version is usable for a wider range of sample geometries. • It starts from reference FEPEs obtained through a standard calibration procedure. • A model of an HPGe XtRa detector has been

  18. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, J; Morin, O

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry

  19. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, J; Morin, O [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  20. Lessons from Coronagraphic Imaging with HST that may apply to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major capabilities offered by JWST is coronagraphic imaging from space, covering the near through mid-IR and optimized for study of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems. Planning for JWST has resulted in expectations for instrument performance, observation strategies and data reduction approaches. HST with 20 years of coronagraphic imaging offers some experience which may be useful to those planning for JWST. 1) Real astronomical sources do not necessarily conform to expectations. Debris disks may be accompanied by more distant material, and some systems may be conspicuous in scattered light when offering only modest IR excesses. Proto-planetary disks are not constantly illuminated, and thus a single epoch observation of the source may not be sufficient to reveal everything about it. 2) The early expectation with NICMOS was that shallow, 2-roll observations would reveal a wealth of debris disks imaged in scattered light, and that only a limited set of PSF observations would be required. Instead, building up a library of spatially resolved disks in scattered light has proven to require alternate observing strategies, is still on-going, and has taken far longer than expected. 3) A wealth of coronagraphic options with an instrument may not be scientifically informative, unless there is a similar time investment in acquisition of calibration data in support of the science observations. 4) Finally, no one anticipated what can be gleaned from coronagraphic imaging. We should expect similar, unexpected, and ultimately revolutionary discoveries with JWST.

  1. Development and characterization of semiconductor ion detectors for plasma diagnostics in the range over 0.3 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Hirata, M.; Kohagura, J.; Makino, K.; Kanke, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Tamano, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of plasma-ion-energy analyses in a wide-energy range from a few hundred eV to hundreds of keV, upgraded semiconductor detectors are newly fabricated and characterized using a test-ion-beam line from 0.3 to 12 keV. In particular, the detectable lowest-ion energy is drastically improved at least down to 0.3 keV; this energy is one to two orders-of-magnitude better than those for commercially available Si-surface-barrier diodes employed for previous plasma-ion diagnostics. A signal-to-noise ratio of two to three orders-of-magnitude better than that for usual metal-collector detectors is demonstrated for the compact-sized semiconductor along with the availability of the use under conditions of a good vacuum and a strong-magnetic field. Such characteristics are achieved due to the improving methods of the optimization of the thicknesses of a Si dead layer and a SiO2 layer, as well as the nitrogen-doping technique near the depletion layer along with minimizing impurity concentrations in Si. Such an upgraded capability of an extremely low-energy-ion detection with the low-noise characteristics enlarges research regimes of plasma-ion behavior using semiconductor detectors not only in the divertor regions of tokamaks but in wider spectra of open-field plasma devices including tandem mirrors. An application of the semiconductor ion detector for plasma-ion diagnostics is demonstrated in a specially designed ion-spectrometer structure.

  2. Effect of Anode Floating Voltage and its Applications in Characterizing Silicon Drift Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang-Guo, Wu; Hong-Ri, Li; Kun, Liang; Ru, Yang; De-Jun, Han; Xue-Lei, Cao; Huan-Yu, Wang; Jun-Ming, An; Xiong-Wei, Hu

    2009-01-01

    Anode Boating voltage is predicted and investigated for silicon drift detectors (SDDs) with an active area of 5 mm 2 fabricated by a double-side parallel technology. It is demonstrated that the anode Boating voltage increases with the increasing inner ring voltage, and is almost unchanged with the external ring voltage. The anode Boating voltage will not be affected by the back electrode biased voltage until it reaches the full-depleted voltage (−50 V) of the SDD. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the anode Boating voltage is equal to the sum of the inner ring voltage and the built-in potential between the p + inner ring and the n + anode. A fast checking method before detector encapsulation is proposed by employing the anode Boating voltage along with checking the leakage current, potential distribution and drift properties

  3. Design, fabrication and characterization of an a-Si:H-based UV detector for sunburn applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Khadijeh; Vygranenko, Yuriy; Sazonov, Andrei; Farrokh-Baroughi, Mahdi

    2006-12-01

    A thin-film a-Si:H pin detector was developed for selective detection of UVA (320-400 nm) radiation. In order for the fabrication technology to be transferable onto flexible substrates, all of the processing steps were conducted at temperatures less than 125 °C. The measured saturation current as low as 2 pA cm-2 and the ideality factor of 1.47 show that the pin diodes have a good quality i-layer as well as p-i and n-i interfaces. The film thicknesses were optimized to suppress the detector sensitivity in the visible spectral range, and the peak of spectral response was observed at 410 nm. The selectivity estimated from the ratio of the photocurrent generated by UVA absorption to the total photocurrent is 21%.

  4. Characterization and modelling of signal dynamics in 3D-DDTC detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoboli, A.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gabos, P.; Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years we have developed 3D detector technologies within a collaboration between INFN and FBK-irst aiming at a simplification of the fabrication technology with respect to the original 3D design. These detectors are the object of an increasing interest from the HEP community because of their intrinsic radiation hardness, making them appealing for innermost layers of tracking at the foreseen upgrades of the large hadron collider. In this paper we evaluate the signal shape in response to localized and uniform charge deposition both by solving Ramo's theorem and with the aid of TCAD simulations. Signals observed in 3D diodes, stimulated by lasers at different wavelengths, are compared with simulations results.

  5. Characterization and modelling of signal dynamics in 3D-DDTC detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoboli, A., E-mail: zoboli@disi.unitn.i [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Bosisio, L. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, e Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gabos, P. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    In the past few years we have developed 3D detector technologies within a collaboration between INFN and FBK-irst aiming at a simplification of the fabrication technology with respect to the original 3D design. These detectors are the object of an increasing interest from the HEP community because of their intrinsic radiation hardness, making them appealing for innermost layers of tracking at the foreseen upgrades of the large hadron collider. In this paper we evaluate the signal shape in response to localized and uniform charge deposition both by solving Ramo's theorem and with the aid of TCAD simulations. Signals observed in 3D diodes, stimulated by lasers at different wavelengths, are compared with simulations results.

  6. Characterization of hybrid self-powered neutron detector under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamichi, M. E-mail: masaru@oarai.jaeri.go.jp; Nagao, Y.; Yamamura, C.; Nakazawa, M.; Kawamura, H

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the irradiation behaviour of a blanket mock-up on in-pile functional test, it is necessary to measure the neutron flux change in the in-pile mock-up by a neutron detector, such as the self-powered neutron detector (SPND). With its small-sized emitter, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, SPND is an indispensable tool in order to measure the local neutron flux change. In the case of an in-pile functional test, it is necessary that response time is less than 1s and ratio of SPND output current is more than 0.3 of output current of SPND with Rh emitter. Therefore, a hybrid SPND with high sensitivity and fast response time was developed. This hybrid SPND used a hybrid emitter, i.e. Co cladded Pt-13%R000.

  7. Characterization of hybrid self-powered neutron detector under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamichi, M; Yamamura, C; Nakazawa, M; Kawamura, H

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the irradiation behaviour of a blanket mock-up on in-pile functional test, it is necessary to measure the neutron flux change in the in-pile mock-up by a neutron detector, such as the self-powered neutron detector (SPND). With its small-sized emitter, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, SPND is an indispensable tool in order to measure the local neutron flux change. In the case of an in-pile functional test, it is necessary that response time is less than 1s and ratio of SPND output current is more than 0.3 of output current of SPND with Rh emitter. Therefore, a hybrid SPND with high sensitivity and fast response time was developed. This hybrid SPND used a hybrid emitter, i.e. Co cladded Pt-13%Rh.

  8. Preparation of plastic scintillation detectors and characterization of physico-chemical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, M.M.; Mesquita, C.H. de

    1988-01-01

    The development of plastic scintillators for using in the nuclear radiation detection is described. The detectors were fabricated by the polymerization of styrene with organic fluors. The organic fluors used were PPO (1,4 difenil-oxazol) and POPOP 1,4-di-2-(5-fenil-oxazolil) benzene in proportions of 0,5 and 0,05% respectively. Physical-chemistry parameters related to the quality of this detector are investigated at this laboratory. The evaluation of its fluorescency characteristics, density, melting softening, refractive index, molecular weight, gama and alfa espectrometry characteristics and finally the comparative pulse height analysis indicate that the plastic scintillator produced at this laboratory is comparable with others already described. (author) [pt

  9. Characterization of a cylindrical plastic β-detector with Monte Carlo simulations of optical photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guadilla, V., E-mail: victor.guadilla@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen H-4026 (Hungary); Tain, J.L.; Agramunt, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Äystö, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Briz, J.A.; Cucoanes, A. [Subatech, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes, EMN, F-44307 Nantes (France); Eronen, T. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Estienne, M.; Fallot, M. [Subatech, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes, EMN, F-44307 Nantes (France); Fraile, L.M. [Universidad Complutense, Grupo de Física Nuclear, CEI Moncloa, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ganioğlu, E. [Department of Physics, Istanbul University, 34134 Istanbul (Turkey); Gelletly, W. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Jordan, D. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Koponen, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); and others

    2017-05-11

    In this work we report on the Monte Carlo study performed to understand and reproduce experimental measurements of a new plastic β-detector with cylindrical geometry. Since energy deposition simulations differ from the experimental measurements for such a geometry, we show how the simulation of production and transport of optical photons does allow one to obtain the shapes of the experimental spectra. Moreover, taking into account the computational effort associated with this kind of simulation, we develop a method to convert the simulations of energy deposited into light collected, depending only on the interaction point in the detector. This method represents a useful solution when extensive simulations have to be done, as in the case of the calculation of the response function of the spectrometer in a total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy analysis.

  10. Characterization of Compton-suppressed TIGRESS detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.S.; Galinski, N.; Ball, G.C.; Djongolov, M.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Hackman, G.; Orce, J.N.; Pearson, C.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S.J.; Drake, T.; Smalley, D.; Svensson, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape- Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) will consist of 12 large-volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors. Each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented Compton suppression shield. For performing discrete gamma-ray spectroscopy of light mass nuclei with TIGRESS, we need information about full energy peak efficiency, resolution and lineshape of full energy peaks for high energy gamma-rays. However, suitable radioactive sources having decay gamma-rays of energies greater than ∼ 3.5 MeV are not easily available. So the characteristics of gamma spectrometers at energies higher than 3.5 MeV are usually determined from simulation data. Predictions from GEANT4 simulations (experimentally validated from 0.3 to 3 MeV) indicate that TIGRESS will be capable for single 10 MeV gamma-rays of absolute detection efficiency of 1.5% for backward configuration of the array. It has been observed experimentally that simulation results work well up to certain energies and might deviate at higher energies. So, it is essential to check the validity of simulation results for energies above 3.3 MeV. We have investigated the high energy performance of seven TIGRESS detectors up to 8 MeV

  11. Objective image characterization of a spectral CT scanner with dual-layer detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, Orhan; Dhanantwari, Amar; Halliburton, Sandra; Wen, Gezheng; Utrup, Steven; Jordan, David

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a detector-based spectral CT system by obtaining objective reference data, evaluating attenuation response of iodine and accuracy of iodine quantification, and comparing conventional CT and virtual monoenergetic images in three common phantoms. Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for a tungsten wire and visual line pair targets were evaluated. Image noise power spectrum (NPS) and pixel standard deviation were calculated. MTF for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05 lp cm-1. NPS curves indicated that noise texture of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar to conventional images. Standard deviation measurements showed monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV. Mean CT number and CNR agreed with conventional images at 75 keV. Measured iodine concentration agreed with true concentration within 6% for inserts at the center of the phantom. Performance of monoenergetic images at detector based spectral CT is the same as, or better than, that of conventional images. Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a detector based platform represents the physical behaviour of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration.

  12. Contamination control requirements implementation for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), part 2: spacecraft, sunshield, observatory, and launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.; Schweiss, Andrea; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly; Woronowicz, Michael; Patel, Jignasha; Macias, Matthew; McGregor, R. Daniel; Farmer, Greg; Schmeitzky, Olivier; Jensen, Peter; Rumler, Peter; Romero, Beatriz; Breton, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    This paper will continue from Part 1 of JWST contamination control implementation. In addition to optics, instruments, and thermal vacuum testing, JWST also requires contamination control for a spacecraft that must be vented carefully in order to maintain solar array and thermal radiator thermal properties; a tennis court-sized sunshield made with 1-2 mil Kapton™ layers that must be manufactured and maintained clean; an observatory that must be integrated, stowed and transported to South America; and a rocket that typically launches commercial payloads without contamination sensitivity. An overview of plans developed to implement contamination control for the JWST spacecraft, sunshield, observatory and launch vehicle will be presented.

  13. A new detector system for low energy X-ray fluorescence coupled with soft X-ray microscopy: First tests and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianoncelli, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.gianoncelli@elettra.eu [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Bufon, Jernej [INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); University of Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, Trieste 34127 (Italy); Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi [Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, Como 22100 (Italy); INFN Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano 20133 (Italy); Altissimo, Matteo [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Bellutti, Pierluigi [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, Trento 38123 (Italy); Bertuccio, Giuseppe [Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, Como 22100 (Italy); INFN Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano 20133 (Italy); Borghes, Roberto [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Carrato, Sergio [University of Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, Trieste 34127 (Italy); Cautero, Giuseppe [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); Fabiani, Sergio [INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); Giacomini, Gabriele [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, Trento 38123 (Italy); Giuressi, Dario [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); Kourousias, George [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Menk, Ralf Hendrik [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale SS14, km 163.5, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, Trento 38123 (Italy); Rachevski, Alexandre [INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, Trieste 34149 (Italy); and others

    2016-04-21

    The last decades have witnessed substantial efforts in the development of several detector technologies for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications. In spite of the increasing trend towards performing, cost-effective and reliable XRF systems, detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy still remain a challenge, requiring further study, engineering and customization in order to yield effective and efficient systems. In this paper we report on the development, first characterization and tests of a novel multielement detector system based on low leakage current silicon drift detectors (SDD) coupled to ultra low noise custom CMOS preamplifiers for synchrotron-based low energy XRF. This new system exhibits the potential for improving the count rate by at least an order of magnitude resulting in ten-fold shorter dwell time at an energy resolution similar to that of single element silicon drift detectors.

  14. Fabrication, characterization and simulation of 4H-SiC Schottky diode alpha particle detectors for pyroprocessing actinide monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Timothy Richard

    Pyroprocessing is a method of using high-temperature molten salts and electric fields to separate and collect fuel isotopes of used nuclear fuel. It has been has been tested in the U.S. at Idaho National Laboratory as a key step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. One technical problem with the pyroprocessing method is a lack of knowledge regarding the actinide concentrations in the salt bath during operation, since on-line techniques for measuring these concentrations are not presently available. 4H-SiC Schottky diode detectors can potentially fulfill this need. Such detectors would operate in contact with the molten salt, and measure concentrations via alpha-particle spectroscopy. This work seeks to fabricate and characterize 4H-SiC Schottky diode detectors at high temperature, model the alpha particle spectrum expected in a molten salt, and model the operation of the detectors to confirm the physics of operation is as expected. In this work, 4H-SiC Schottky diode detectors were fabricated at OSU Nanotech West. After fabrication, these detectors were characterized using both I-V curves and Am-241 alpha-particle energy spectra. All measurements were made as a function of temperature, from room temperature up to 500°C. The average energy required to create an electron-hole pair was observed to decrease with an increase of temperature, due to a decrease of both the 4H-SiC bandgap and non-linear energy loss terms. Furthermore, the FWHM of the spectra was observed to be dependent on the leakage current at a certain temperature, and not dependent on the temperature itself. Secondly, the alpha particle energy spectrum in the pyroprocessing environment was modeled using SRIM. The molten salt was modeled in 3 different geometries, with or without a protective cover material on top of the detector. Due to the loss of alpha-particle energy in the molten salt itself, a high-energy alpha emitter may completely cover the spectrum from a lower-energy alpha emitter. Each of the

  15. Characterization and spice simulation of a single-sided, p+ on n silicon microstrip detector before and after low-energy photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiaguo; Klanner, Robert; Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, Detector Laboratory, University of Hamburg, Hamburg 22761 (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    As preparation for the development of silicon detectors for the harsh radiation environment at the European XFEL (up to 1 GGY 12 keV X-rays) p{sup +} on n silicon microstrip detectors were characterized as function of dose. The measurements, which include dark current, coupling capacitance, interstrip capacitance and interstrip resistance, are compared to a detailed SPICE model, so that the performance for particle detection can be estimated.

  16. Crystal growth and characterization of europium doped lithium strontium iodide scintillator as an ionizing radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, Samuel

    High performance detectors used in the detection of ionizing radiation is critical to nuclear nonproliferation applications and other radiation detectors applications. In this research we grew and tested Europium doped Lithium Strontium Iodide compound. A mixture of lithium iodide, strontium iodide and europium iodide was used as the starting materials for this research. Congruent melting and freezing temperature of the synthesized compound was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using a Setaram Labsys Evo DSC-DTA instrument. The melting temperatures were recorded at 390.35°C, 407.59°C and freezing temperature was recorded at 322.84°C from a graph of heat flow plotted against temperature. The synthesized material was used as the charge for the vertical Bridgeman growth, and a 6.5 cm and 7.7cm length boule were grown in a multi-zone transparent Mullen furnace. A scintillating detector of thickness 2.53mm was fabricated by mechanical lapping in mineral oil, and scintillating response and timing were obtained to a cesium source using CS-137 isotope. An energy resolution (FWHM over peak position) of 12.1% was observed for the 662keV full absorption peak. Optical absorption in the UV-Vis wavelength range was recorded for the grown crystal using a U-2900 UV/VIS Spectrophotometer. Absorption peaks were recorded at 194nm, 273nm, and 344nm from the absorbance spectrum, various optical parameters such as absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index, and optical loss were derived. The optical band gap energy was calculated using Tauc relation expression at 1.79eV.

  17. Design and characterization of the readout ASIC for the BESIII CGEM detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cossio, Fabio; Bugalho, Ricardo; Chai, Junying; Cheng, Weishuai; Da Rocha Rolo, Manuel Dionisio; Di Francesco, Agostino; Greco, Michela; Leng, Chongyang; Li, Huaishen; Maggiora, Marco; Marcello, Simonetta; Mignone, Marco; Rivetti, Angelo; Varela, Joao; Wheadon, Richard

    2018-01-01

    TIGER (Turin Integrated Gem Electronics for Readout) is a mixed-mode ASIC for the readout of signals from CGEM (Cylindrical Gas Electron Multiplier) detector in the upgraded inner tracker of the BESIII experiment, carried out at BEPCII in Beijing. The ASIC includes 64 channels, each of which features a dual-branch architecture optimized for timing and energy measurement. The input signal time-of-arrival and charge measurement is provided by low-power TDCs, based on analogue interpolation techniques, and Wilkinson ADCs, with a fully-digital output. The silicon results of TIGER first prototype are presented showing its full functionality.

  18. Characterization of an x-ray hybrid CMOS detector with low interpixel capacitive crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Burrows, David N.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of x-ray measurements on a hybrid CMOS detector that uses a H2RG ROIC and a unique bonding structure. The silicon absorber array has a 36{\\mu}m pixel size, and the readout array has a pitch of 18{\\mu}m; but only one readout circuit line is bonded to each 36x36{\\mu}m absorber pixel. This unique bonding structure gives the readout an effective pitch of 36{\\mu}m. We find the increased pitch between readout bonds significantly reduces the interpixel capacitance of the CMOS ...

  19. Characterization of neutron detector combined with NE213 and CaF{sub 2}(Eu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Sibata, Tokushi

    1996-07-01

    In this work, the property of the n-{gamma} discrimination and the response functions of the developed phoswich detector were measured with gamma rays from radioactive sources and neutrons from a Be+Cu target bombarded by protons from the RIKEN ring cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. The measured response functions were compared with Monte Carlo calculations. We also tested to measure a small amount of neutrons under the intense charged-particles mixed field which was realized in the RIKEN ring cyclotron for the space application. (J.P.N.)

  20. Growth, characterization and properties of CVD diamond films for applications as radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciorti, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the work is to give a picture of the current state of the art of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond. The interest is due to the capability to grow over large areas a material with physical properties suitable for an impressive number of applications. The authors focuses on the potential of diamond as a radiation detector and gets into details of the huge field that extends from the thermochemistry of the deposition process to the test of a diamond-based tracker with a fast readout electronics

  1. Characterization of Monoenergetic Low Energy Neutron Fields with the {mu}TPC Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C.; Lebreton, L.; Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J.; Grignon, C.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph (France)

    2011-12-13

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. We present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of such low energy neutron fields.

  2. Qualification and characterization of electronics of the fast neutron Hodoscope detectors using neutrons from CABRI core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirotta, S.; Guillot, J.; Chevalier, V.; Biard, B.

    2018-01-01

    The study of Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) is important to determine up to which limits nuclear fuels can withstand such accidents without clad failure. The CABRI International Program (CIP), conducted by IRSN under an OECD/NEA agreement, has been launched to perform representative RIA Integral Effect Tests (IET) on real irradiated fuel rods in prototypical Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) conditions. For this purpose, the CABRI experimental pulse reactor, operated by CEA in Cadarache, France, has been strongly renovated, and equipped with a pressurized water loop. The behavior of the test rod, located in that loop in the center of the driver core, is followed in real time during the power transients thanks to the hodoscope, a unique online fuel motion monitoring system, and one of the major distinctive features of CABRI. The hodoscope measures the fast neutrons emitted by the tested rod during the power pulse with a complete set of 153 Fission Chambers and 153 Proton Recoil Counters. During the CABRI facility renovation, the electronic chain of these detectors has been upgraded. In this paper, the performance of the new system is presented describing gain calibration methodology in order to get maximal Signal/Noise ratio for amplification modules, threshold tuning methodology for the discrimination modules (old and new ones), and linear detectors response limit versus different reactor powers for the whole electronic chain.

  3. Characterization of overwintering sites of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in natural landscapes using human surveyors and detector canines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-Hyung Lee

    Full Text Available Halyomorpha halys is an invasive species from Asia causing major economic losses in agricultural production in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Unlike other crop pests, H. halys is also well-known for nuisance problems in urban, suburban, and rural areas, as massive numbers of adults often invade human-made structures to overwinter inside protected environments. Research efforts have focused on populations in human-made structures while overwintering ecology of H. halys in natural landscapes is virtually unknown. We explored forested landscapes in the mid-Atlantic region to locate and characterize natural overwintering structures used by H. halys. We also evaluated the use of detector canines to locate overwintering H. halys to enhance the accuracy and efficiency of surveys. From these studies, we indentified shared characteristics of overwintering sites used by H. halys in natural landscapes. Overwintering H. halys were recovered from dry crevices in dead, standing trees with thick bark, particularly oak (Quercus spp. and locust (Robinia spp.; these characteristics were shared by 11.8% of all dead trees in surveyed landscapes. For trees with favorable characteristics, we sampled ∼20% of the total above-ground tree area and recovered 5.9 adults per tree from the trees with H. halys present. Two detector canines were successfully trained to recognize and detect the odor of adult H. halys yielding >84% accuracy in laboratory and semi-field trials. Detector canines also found overwintering H. halys under field conditions. In particular, overwintering H. halys were recovered only from dead trees that yielded positive indications from the canines and shared key tree characteristics established by human surveyors. The identified characteristics of natural overwintering sites of H. halys will serve as baseline information to establish crop economic risk levels posed by overwintering populations, and accordingly develop sustainable

  4. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  5. Characterization of photo-multiplier tube as ex-vessel radiation detector in tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee; An, YoungHwa; Park, Seungil; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2017-09-01

    Feasibility of using conventional photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) without a scintillator as an ex-vessel radiation detector in a tokamak environment is studied. Basic irradiation tests using standard gamma ray sources and a d-d neutron generator showed that the PMT is responding both to gamma photons and neutrons, possibly due to the direct generation of secondary electrons inside the PMT by the impingement of high energy photons. Because of the selective sensitivity of the PMT to hard x-ray and neutrons in ohmic and neutral beam injected plasmas, respectively, it is shown that the PMT with certain configuration can be utilized either to monitor the fluctuation in the fusion neutron generation rate or to study the behavior of runaway electrons in tokamaks.

  6. A {mu}TPC detector for the characterization of low energy neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C., E-mail: cedric.golabek@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Allaoua, A. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Grignon, C.; Guillaudin, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Lebreton, L., E-mail: lena.lebreton@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Mayet, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2012-06-21

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 8 keV up to 1 MeV. In this work we present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of these neutron fields.

  7. Measurement-based characterization of multipixel avalanche photodiodes for scintillating detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dziewiecki, M

    2012-01-01

    Multipixel avalanche photodiodes (MAPD) are recently gaining popularity in high energy physics experiments as an attractive replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which have been extensively used for many years as a part of various scintillating detectors. Their low price, small dimensions and another features facilitating their use (like mechanical shock resistance, magnetic field immunity or moderate supply voltage) make the MAPDs a good choice for commercial use as well, what is reflected in growing number of producers as well as MAPD models available on the market. This dissertation presents Author’s experience with MAPD measurements and modelling, gained during his work on the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) long-baseline neutrino experiment, carried out by an international collaboration in Japan. First, operation principle of the MAPD, definitions of various parameters and measurement methods are discussed. Then, a device for large-scale MAPD measurements and related data processing methods are described. Fina...

  8. Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron detector performance characterization & reactor power tracking capability experiments performed in ZED-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFontaine, M.W., E-mail: physics@execulink.com [LaFontaine Consulting, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Zeller, M.B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Nielsen, K. [Royal Military College of Canada, SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron flux detectors (SPDs), are typically used for flux monitoring and control applications in low temperature, test reactors such as the SLOWPOKE-2. A collaborative program between Atomic Energy of Canada, academia (Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC)) and industry (LaFontaine Consulting) was initiated to characterize the incore performance of a typical Cd-emitter SPD; and to obtain a definitive measure of the capability of the detector to track changes in reactor power in real time. Prior to starting the experiment proper, Chalk River Laboratories' ZED-2 was operated at low power (5 watts nominal) to verify the predicted moderator critical height. Test measurements were then performed with the vertical center of the SPD emitter positioned at the vertical mid-plane of the ZED-2 reactor core. Measurements were taken with the SPD located at lattice position L0 (near center), and repeated at lattice position P0 (in D{sub 2}O reflector). An ionization chamber (part of the ZED-2 control instrumentation) monitored reactor power at a position located on the south side of the outside wall of the reactor's calandria. These experiments facilitated measurement of the absolute thermal neutron sensitivity of the subject Cd-emitter SPD, and validated the power tracking capability of said SPD. Procedural details of the experiments, data, calculations and associated graphs, are presented and discussed. (author)

  9. Characterization, 1064 nm photon signals and background events of a tungsten TES detector for the ALPS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, J.; Doebrich, B.; Januschek, F.; Lindner, A.; Bastidon, N.; Horns, D.

    2015-02-01

    The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of 1064 nm, we achieved a background suppression of ∝10 -3 with a ∝ 50 % efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was 23 % with a dark count rate of 8.6.10 -3 s -1 . We observed that pile-up events of thermal photons are the main background component.

  10. Characterization of enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors and studies of numeric simulations for compact-binary coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekowsky, Larne

    Gravitational waves are a consequence of the general theory of relativity. Direct detection of such waves will provide a wealth of information about physics, astronomy, and cosmology. A worldwide effort is currently underway to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The global network of detectors includes the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which recently completed its sixth science run. A particularly promising source of gravitational waves is a binary system consisting of two neutron stars and/or black holes. As the objects orbit each other they emit gravitational radiation, lose energy, and spiral inwards. This produces a characteristic "chirp" signal for which we can search in the LIGO data. Currently this is done using matched-filter techniques, which correlate the detector data against analytic models of the emitted gravitational waves. Several choices must be made in constructing a search for signals from such binary coalescences. Any discrepancy between the signals and the models used will reduce the effectiveness of the matched filter. However, the analytic models are based on approximations which are not valid through the entire evolution of the binary. In recent years numerical relativity has had impressive success in simulating the final phases of the coalescence of binary black holes. While numerical relativity is too computationally expensive to use directly in the search, this progress has made it possible to perform realistic tests of the LIGO searches. The results of such tests can be used to improve the efficiency of searches. Conversely, noise in the LIGO and Virgo detectors can reduce the efficiency. This must be addressed by characterizing the quality of the data from the detectors, and removing from the analysis times that will be detrimental to the search. In this thesis we utilize recent results from numerical relativity to study both the degree to which analytic models match realistic waveforms

  11. The Impact of JWST Broadband Filter Choice on Photometric Redshift Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.

    2016-01-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6–5.0 μm and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at λ 5.0 μm. In this work we analyze...... the impact of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broadband filters (F070W to F770W), as well as having ancillary data at λ 0.6 μm, on the derived photometric redshifts (z phot) of a total of 5921 real and simulated galaxies, with known input redshifts z = 0–10....

  12. L-alanine detector characterization for dosimetry of small fields in SBRT with VMAT techniques; Caracterizacao do detector de L-alanina para dosimetria de campos pequenos em SBRT com a tecnica de VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Peres, Leonardo [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: sarahmazaro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    New radiotherapy treatment techniques have some problems such as: the dosimetric and geometric of the beam and small fields. Determination of the prescribed dose on the target volume in small fields is hampered due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium and steep dose gradient along the edges of fields. The choice of radiation better detector becomes important in the dosimetry of small fields. Alanine detector has been shown to be a good choice for measurements of high doses of radiation in small fields. This study aims to characterize the L-alanine detector through the dosimetric tests for SBRT in VMAT techniques. L-alanine response showed a strong linear correlation with the dose (R ² = 0.9865), with significant angles and dose rate dependencies (14%) and (15%) respectively, and minor with the small field size (maximum 4% deviation). (author)

  13. Observing the Atmospheres of Known Temperate Earth-sized Planets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Kreidberg, Laura; Rustamkulov, Zafar; Robinson, Tyler; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-12-01

    Nine transiting Earth-sized planets have recently been discovered around nearby late-M dwarfs, including the TRAPPIST-1 planets and two planets discovered by the MEarth survey, GJ 1132b and LHS 1140b. These planets are the smallest known planets that may have atmospheres amenable to detection with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We present model thermal emission and transmission spectra for each planet, varying composition and surface pressure of the atmosphere. We base elemental compositions on those of Earth, Titan, and Venus and calculate the molecular compositions assuming chemical equilibrium, which can strongly depend on temperature. Both thermal emission and transmission spectra are sensitive to the atmospheric composition; thermal emission spectra are sensitive to surface pressure and temperature. We predict the observability of each planet’s atmosphere with JWST. GJ 1132b and TRAPPIST-1b are excellent targets for emission spectroscopy with JWST/MIRI, requiring fewer than 10 eclipse observations. Emission photometry for TRAPPIST-1c requires 5-15 eclipses; LHS 1140b and TRAPPIST-1d, TRAPPIST-1e, and TRAPPIST-1f, which could possibly have surface liquid water, may be accessible with photometry. Seven of the nine planets are strong candidates for transmission spectroscopy measurements with JWST, although the number of transits required depends strongly on the planets’ actual masses. Using the measured masses, fewer than 20 transits are required for a 5σ detection of spectral features for GJ 1132b and six of the TRAPPIST-1 planets. Dedicated campaigns to measure the atmospheres of these nine planets will allow us, for the first time, to probe formation and evolution processes of terrestrial planetary atmospheres beyond our solar system.

  14. Strategies for Constraining the Atmospheres of Temperate Terrestrial Planets with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Line, Michael R.; Valenti, Jeff; Stevenson, Kevin

    2018-04-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is expected to discover dozens of temperate terrestrial planets orbiting M-dwarfs with atmospheres that could be followed up with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Currently, the TRAPPIST-1 system serves as a benchmark for determining the feasibility and resources required to yield atmospheric constraints. We assess these questions and leverage an information content analysis to determine observing strategies for yielding high-precision spectroscopy in transmission and emission. Our goal is to guide observing strategies of temperate terrestrial planets in preparation for the early JWST cycles. First, we explore JWST’s current capabilities and expected spectral precision for targets near the saturation limits of specific modes. In doing so, we highlight the enhanced capabilities of high-efficiency readout patterns that are being considered for implementation in Cycle 2. We propose a partial saturation strategy to increase the achievable precision of JWST's NIRSpec Prism. We show that JWST has the potential to detect the dominant absorbing gas in the atmospheres of temperate terrestrial planets by the 10th transit using transmission spectroscopy techniques in the near-infrared (NIR). We also show that stacking ⪆10 transmission spectroscopy observations is unlikely to yield significant improvements in determining atmospheric composition. For emission spectroscopy, we show that the MIRI Low Resolution Spectroscopy (LRS) is unlikely to provide robust constraints on the atmospheric composition of temperate terrestrial planets. Higher-precision emission spectroscopy at wavelengths longward of those accessible to MIRI LRS, as proposed in the Origins Space Telescope concept, could help improve the constraints on molecular abundances of temperate terrestrial planets orbiting M-dwarfs.

  15. Critical Science Instrument Alignment of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Scott O.; Kubalak, David A.; Gracey, Renee M.; Sabatke, Derek S.; Howard, Joseph M.; Telfer, Randal C.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the critical instrument alignment terms associated with the six-degree of freedom alignment of each the Science Instrument (SI) in the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), including focus, pupil shear, pupil clocking, and boresight. We present the test methods used during cryogenic-vacuum tests to directly measure the performance of each parameter, the requirements levied on each, and the impact of any violations of these requirements at the instrument and Observatory level.

  16. Nurturing The STEM Pipeline: Graduate Student Leadership In NIRCam's Ongoing E/PO Mission For JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlingman, Wayne M.; Stock, N.; Teske, J.; Tyler, K.; Biller, B.; Donley, J.; Hedden, A.; Knierman, K.; Young, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout Leaders is an education and public outreach (E/PO) program offered by the science team of the Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam) for NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Since 2003, astronomy graduate students have helped design and lead biannual "Train the Trainer” workshops for adults from the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), engaging these trainers in the process of scientific inquiry and equipping them to host astronomy-related activities at the troop level. These workshops have helped revise the national GSUSA badge curriculum and directly benefitted thousands of young girls of all ages, not only in general science and math education but also in specific astronomical and technological concepts relating to JWST. To date, nine graduate students have become members of NIRCam's E/PO team. They have developed curriculum and activities used to teach concepts in stellar nucleosynthesis, lookback time, galaxy classification, etc. They have also contributed to the overall strategic approach and helped lead more general activities in basic astronomy (night sky, phases of the Moon, the scale of the Solar System and beyond, stars, galaxies, telescopes, etc.) as well as JWST-specific research areas in extrasolar planetary systems and cosmology, to pave the way for girls and women to understand the first images from JWST. The resulting experience has empowered these students to propose and to develop their own E/PO programs after graduation as postdocs and young faculty. They also continue as part of NIRCam's growing worldwide network of 160 trainers teaching young women essential STEM-related concepts using astronomy, the night sky environment, applied math, engineering, and critical thinking. NIRCam and its E/PO program are funded by NASA under contract NAS5-02105.

  17. Aerogel Cherenkov detector for characterizing the intense flash x-ray source, Cygnus, spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y., E-mail: yhkim@lanl.gov; Herrmann, H. W.; McEvoy, A. M.; Young, C. S.; Hamilton, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schwellenbach, D. D.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Smith, A. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An aerogel Cherenkov detector is proposed to measure the X-ray energy spectrum from the Cygnus—intense flash X-ray source operated at the Nevada National Security Site. An array of aerogels set at a variety of thresholds between 1 and 3 MeV will be adequate to map out the bremsstrahlung X-ray production of the Cygnus, where the maximum energy of the spectrum is normally around 2.5 MeV. In addition to the Cherenkov radiation from aerogels, one possible competing light-production mechanism is optical transition radiation (OTR), which may be significant in aerogels due to the large number of transitions from SiO{sub 2} clusters to vacuum voids. To examine whether OTR is a problem, four aerogel samples were tested using a mono-energetic electron beam (varied in the range of 1–3 MeV) at NSTec Los Alamos Operations. It was demonstrated that aerogels can be used as a Cherenkov medium, where the rate of the light production is about two orders magnitude higher when the electron beam energy is above threshold.

  18. Characterization and Performance of Silicon n-in-p Pixel Detectors for the ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Weigell, Philipp; Gallrapp, Christian; La Rosa, Alessandro; Macchiolo, Anna; Nisius, Richard; Pernegger, Heinz; Richter, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The existing ATLAS Tracker will be at its functional limit for particle fluences of 10^15 neq/cm^2 (LHC). Thus for the upgrades at smaller radii like in the case of the planned Insertable B-Layer (IBL) and for increased LHC luminosities (super LHC) the development of new structures and materials which can cope with the resulting particle fluences is needed. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate for tracking detectors to achieve these goals, since they are radiation hard, cost efficient and are not type inverted after irradiation. A n-in-p pixel production based on a MPP/HLL design and performed by CiS (Erfurt, Germany) on 300 \\mu m thick Float-Zone material is characterised and the electrical properties of sensors and single chip modules (SCM) are presented, including noise, charge collection efficiencies, and measurements with MIPs as well as an 241Am source. The SCMs are built with sensors connected to the current the ATLAS read-out chip FE-I3. The characterisation has been performed with the ATL...

  19. Opto-structural characterization of gamma irradiated Bayfol polymer track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayel, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Zaki, M.F., E-mail: moha1016@yahoo.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Abu Zaabal, Cairo (Egypt); El Basaty, A.B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Hegazy, Tarek M. [Physics Department, College of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-11-15

    Bayfol CR 1-4 is one of polymeric solid state nuclear track detector which has numerous applications due to its outstanding optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In the present study, Bayfol polymer is irradiated with different doses of gamma rays ranging from 0 to 1000 KGy. The effects of gamma irradiations on the optical, structural and chemical properties of Bayfol were studied using Ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The UV–Vis spectra of irradiated samples show that the absorption edge is shifted towards longer wavelength comparing to pristine sample spectrum. This behavior indicates that there is a decrease in the band gap after irradiation. The maximum decrease in the band gap is about 0.8 eV. The XRD patterns of amorphous halo of pristine and irradiated samples show a fluctuation of integrated intensity of amorphous halo. This indicates a change in the structure due to gamma irradiation. In order to understand that structure change mechanism, we used the FTIR spectroscopy.

  20. Unveiling the First Black Holes With JWST:Multi-wavelength Spectral Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pacucci, Fabio; Ferrara, Andrea; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Ricarte, Angelo; Zackrisson, Erik; Cappelluti, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Growing supermassive black holes (˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ ) that power luminous z> 6 quasars from light seeds—the remnants of the first stars—within a Gyr of the Big Bang poses a timing challenge. The formation of massive black hole seeds via direct collapse with initial masses ˜ {10}4{--}{10}5 {M}⊙ alleviates this problem. Viable direct-collapse black hole formation sites, the satellite halos of star-forming galaxies, merge and acquire stars to produce a new, transient class of high-redshift objects, obese black hole galaxies (OBGs). The accretion luminosity outshines that of the stars in OBGs. We predict the multi-wavelength energy output of OBGs and growing Pop III remnants at z = 9 for standard and slim disk accretion, as well as high and low metallicities of the associated stellar population. We derive robust selection criteria for OBGs—a pre-selection to eliminate blue sources, followed by color-color cuts ([{F}090W-{F}220W]> 0;-0.3sift out OBGs from other bright, high- and low-redshift contaminants in the infrared. OBGs with predicted {M}{AB}< 25 are unambiguously detectable by the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), on the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For parameters explored here, growing Pop III remnants with predicted {M}{AB}< 30 will likely be undetectable by JWST. We demonstrate that JWST has the power to discriminate between initial seeding mechanisms.

  1. Probing the Dusty Stellar Populations of the Local Volume Galaxies with JWST /MIRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Olivia C.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Justtanont, Kay [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Glasse, Alistair [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-20

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) for the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) will revolutionize our understanding of infrared stellar populations in the Local Volume. Using the rich Spitzer -IRS spectroscopic data set and spectral classifications from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE)–Spectroscopic survey of more than 1000 objects in the Magellanic Clouds, the Grid of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch Star Model (grams), and the grid of YSO models by Robitaille et al., we calculate the expected flux densities and colors in the MIRI broadband filters for prominent infrared stellar populations. We use these fluxes to explore the JWST /MIRI colors and magnitudes for composite stellar population studies of Local Volume galaxies. MIRI color classification schemes are presented; these diagrams provide a powerful means of identifying young stellar objects, evolved stars, and extragalactic background galaxies in Local Volume galaxies with a high degree of confidence. Finally, we examine which filter combinations are best for selecting populations of sources based on their JWST colors.

  2. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, J. G.; Rubiano, J. G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A. G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M. A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs.

  3. A characterization of persistence at short times in the WFC3/IR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, M.; Bajaj, V.; Long, K.

    2018-05-01

    Persistence in the WFC3/IR detector appears to decay as a power law as a function of time elapsed since the end of a stimulus. In this report we study departures from the power law at times shorter than a few hundreds seconds after the stimulus. In order to have better short-time cadence, we use the Multiaccum (.ima) files, which trace the accumulated charge in the pixels as function of time, rather than the final pipeline products (.flt files), which instead report the electron rate estimated via a linear fit to the accumulated charge vs. time relation. We note that at short times after the stimulus, the absolute change in persistence is the strongest, thus a linear fit to the accumulated signal (the .flt values) can be a poor representation of the strongly varying persistence signal. The already observed power-law decay of the persistence signal, still holds at shorter times, with typical values of the power law index, gamma in [-0.8,-1] for stimuli that saturate the WFC3 pixels. To a good degree of approximation, a single power law is a good fit to the persistence signal decay from 100 to 5000 seconds. We also detect a tapering-off in the power-law decay at increasingly shorter times. This change in behavior is of the order of Delta Gamma 0.02 - 0.05 when comparing power-law fits performed to the persistence signal from 0 up to 250 seconds and from 0 up to 4000 seconds after the stimulus, indicating that persistence decays slightly more rapidly as time progresses. Our results may suggest that for even shorter times, not probed by our study, the WFC3 persistence signal might deviate from a single power-law model.

  4. Characterization of Harmonic Signal Acquisition with Parallel Dipole and Multipole Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2018-04-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is a powerful instrument for the study of complex biological samples due to its high resolution and mass measurement accuracy. However, the relatively long signal acquisition periods needed to achieve high resolution can serve to limit applications of FTICR-MS. The use of multiple pairs of detector electrodes enables detection of harmonic frequencies present at integer multiples of the fundamental cyclotron frequency, and the obtained resolving power for a given acquisition period increases linearly with the order of harmonic signal. However, harmonic signal detection also increases spectral complexity and presents challenges for interpretation. In the present work, ICR cells with independent dipole and harmonic detection electrodes and preamplifiers are demonstrated. A benefit of this approach is the ability to independently acquire fundamental and multiple harmonic signals in parallel using the same ions under identical conditions, enabling direct comparison of achieved performance as parameters are varied. Spectra from harmonic signals showed generally higher resolving power than spectra acquired with fundamental signals and equal signal duration. In addition, the maximum observed signal to noise (S/N) ratio from harmonic signals exceeded that of fundamental signals by 50 to 100%. Finally, parallel detection of fundamental and harmonic signals enables deconvolution of overlapping harmonic signals since observed fundamental frequencies can be used to unambiguously calculate all possible harmonic frequencies. Thus, the present application of parallel fundamental and harmonic signal acquisition offers a general approach to improve utilization of harmonic signals to yield high-resolution spectra with decreased acquisition time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10 14 n eq /cm 2 (n eq -neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the amplitude response on

  6. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} (n{sub eq}-neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the

  7. Characterization of paraffin based breast tissue equivalent phantom using a CdTe detector pulse height analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Solen; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    In this study, paraffin was selected as a base material and mixed with different amounts of CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and H 3 BO 3 compounds in order to mimic breast tissue. Slab phantoms were produced with suitable mixture ratios of the additives in the melted paraffin. Subsequently, these were characterized in terms of first half-value layer (HVL) in the mammographic X-ray range using a pulse-height spectroscopic analysis with a CdTe detector. Irradiations were performed in the energy range of 23-35 kV p under broad beam conditions from Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. X-ray spectra were acquired with a CdTe detector without and with phantom material interposition in increments of 1 cm thickness and then evaluated to obtain the transmission data. The net integral areas of the spectra for the slabs were used to plot the transmission curves and these curves were fitted to the Archer model function. The results obtained for the slabs were compared with those of standard mammographic phantoms such as CIRS BR series phantoms and polymethylmethacrylate plates (PMMA). From the evaluated transmission curves, the mass attenuation coefficients and HVLs of some mixtures are close to those of the commercially available standard mammography phantoms. Results indicated that when a suitable proportion of H 3 BO 3 and CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O is added to the paraffin, the resulting material may be a good candidate for a breast tissue equivalent phantom.

  8. Characterization of three types of plastic detectors containing PMMA for nuclear dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelmalek, Adel

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of the dosimeters Harwell PMMA is an essential procedure in industrial dosimetry. It comprises studies of stability in the short and medium term, calibration and fractionation of amounts. Measurements were taken in specific term of absorbance by using a spectrophotometer UV-Screw and a thickness gauge. The results obtained present the calibration curves of these sensors, the time of stability post-irradiation corresponding for the reading of the dosimeters as well as the effect of fractionation of amount on the response of the dosimeters. These results are based on a suitable metrological study of the realised experiments. (Author)

  9. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo Marques

    2008-01-01

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in 252C f(D 2 O), 252 Cf, 241 Am-B, 241 Am-Be and 238 Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  10. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karan, T [Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program.

  11. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karan, T; Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program

  12. Development of real time detector for fluorescent particles applied to pollutant transfers characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, C.

    1996-06-01

    The studies on aerosol transfer carried out in the field of staff protection and nuclear plants safety become more and more important. So techniques of pollutants simulation by specific tracers with the same aeraulic behaviour are an interesting tool in order to characterize their transfers. Resorting to aerosols tagged by a fluorescent dye allows to realize different studies in ventilation and filtration field. The feasibility of detection in real time for a particulate tracer is the main aim of this work. The need of such a technique is obvious because it can provide the specific aerosol behaviour. Furthermore, direct measurements in real time are required for model validation in calculation codes: they give the most realistic informations on interaction between contaminant and ventilation air flows. Up to now, the principle of fluorescent aerosol concentration measurement allows only an integral response in a delayed time, by means of sampling on filters and a fluorimetric analysis after a specific conditioning of these filters. In order to have the opportunity to detect in real time specific tracer, we have developed a new monitor able to count these particles on the following basis: fluorescent particles pass through a sampling nozzle up to a measurement chamber specially designed; sheath flow rate is defined to confine the test aerosol in the test aerosol in the sample flow rate at nozzle outlet; the interception of this stream by a highly focused laser beam allows aerosol detection and characterization particle by particle; the signature of a passing aerosol is the burst of photons that occurs when the fluoro-phore contained in the glycerol particle is excited by a light of adapted wavelength; these signals are transmitted to a photodetector by a patented optical arrangement. Then, an acquisition interfaced board connected to a computer, converts them into frequencies histograms. In the end, two kind of results could be provided simultaneously : the

  13. Galaxies in the Diffuse Baryon Field Approaching Reionization: A Joint Study with JWST, HST, and Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcoe, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Our team is conducting a dedicated survey for emission-line galaxies at 5 6 quasars, using JWST/NIRCAM's slitless grism in a 110 hour GTO allocation. We have acquired deep near-IR spectra of the QSOs, revealing multiple heavy-element absorption systems and probing the HI optical depth within each object's survey volume. These data will provide the first systematic view of the circumgalactic medium at z > 4, allowing us to study early metal enrichment, correlations of the intergalactic HI optical depth with galaxy density, and the environment of the quasar hosts. These fields generally do not have deep multicolor photometry that would facilitate selection of broadband dropout galaxies for future observation with JWST/NIRSPEC. However during long spectroscopic integrations with NIRCAM's long channel we will obtain deep JWST photometry in F115W and F200W, together with F356W for wavelength calibration. Here we request 30 orbits with HST/ACS to acquire deep optical photometry that (together with the JWST IR bands) will constrain SED models and enable dropout selection of fainter objects. For lower redshift objects the rest-UV ACS data will improve estimates of star formation rate and stellar mass. Within a Small-GO program scope we will obtain sensitivity similar to CANDELS-Deep in all six fields, and approximately double the size of our galaxy sample appropriate for JWST/NIRSPEC followup at redshifts approaching the reionization epoch.

  14. Characterization of Sphinx1 ASIC X-ray detector using photon counting and charge integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, A.; Arques, M.; Moro, J.-L.; Accensi, M.; Stanchina, S.; Dupont, B.; Rohr, P.; Sicard, G.; Tchagaspanian, M.; Verger, L.

    2018-01-01

    Sphinx1 is a novel pixel architecture adapted for X-ray imaging, it detects radiation by photon counting and charge integration. In photon counting mode, each photon is compensated by one or more counter-charges typically consisting of 100 electrons (e-) each. The number of counter-charges required gives a measure of the incoming photon energy, thus allowing spectrometric detection. Pixels can also detect radiation by integrating the charges deposited by all incoming photons during one image frame and converting this analog value into a digital response with a 100 electrons least significant bit (LSB), based on the counter-charge concept. A proof of concept test chip measuring 5 mm × 5 mm, with 200 μm × 200 μm pixels has been produced and characterized. This paper provides details on the architecture and the counter-charge design; it also describes the two modes of operation: photon counting and charge integration. The first performance measurements for this test chip are presented. Noise was found to be ~80 e-rms in photon counting mode with a power consumption of only 0.9 μW/pixel for the static analog part and 0.3 μW/pixel for the static digital part.

  15. Performance characterization of the Micromegas detector for the New Small Wheel upgrade and Development and improvement of the Muon Spectrometer Detector Control System in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349891

    The ATLAS, an abbreviation for A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS, detector is one of the two general purpose high luminosity experiments (along with CMS) that have been built for probing p-p and Pb-Pb or p-Pb collisions in the LHC. The muon spectrometer encircles the rest of the ATLAS detector subsystems defining the ATLAS overall dimensions. Its principle of operation is based on the magnetic deflection of muon tracks by a system of superconducting air-core toroid magnets providing high resolution muon momentum measurement. The upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer is primarily motivated by the high background radiation expected during Run-3 (2021) and ultimately at $\\mathcal{L}=7\\times 10^{34}\\,\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ in HL-LHC (2026). Owing to this the detectors that occupy the innermost muon station called Small Wheel (SW), MDT, CSC \\& TGC, will go beyond their design luminosity limit. In addition, the muon trigger rate will exceed the available bandwidth because of the fake endcap muon triggers ($90\\%$ is c...

  16. Characterization of the first true coaxial 18-fold segmented n-type prototype HPGe detector for the gerda project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Gutknecht, D.; Kroeninger, K.; Lampert, M.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Quirion, D.; Stelzer, F.; Wendling, P.

    2007-01-01

    The first true coaxial 18-fold segmented n-type HPGe prototype detector produced by Canberra-France for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay project was tested both at Canberra-France and at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Physik in Munich. The main characteristics of the detector are given and measurements concerning detector properties are described. A novel method to establish contacts between the crystal and a Kapton cable is presented

  17. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Transit Spectroscopy of Anticipated Tess Planets Compared to Select Discoveries from Space-based and Ground-based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana R.; Deming, Drake; Albert, Loic; Bouma, L. G.; Bean, Jacob; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2018-04-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will embark in 2018 on a 2 year wide-field survey mission, discovering over a thousand terrestrial, super-Earth and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets ({R}pl}≤slant 4 {R}\\oplus ) potentially suitable for follow-up observations using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This work aims to understand the suitability of anticipated TESS planet discoveries for atmospheric characterization by JWST’s Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) by employing a simulation tool to estimate the signal-to-noise (S/N) achievable in transmission spectroscopy. We applied this tool to Monte Carlo predictions of the TESS expected planet yield and then compared the S/N for anticipated TESS discoveries to our estimates of S/N for 18 known exoplanets. We analyzed the sensitivity of our results to planetary composition, cloud cover, and presence of an observational noise floor. We find that several hundred anticipated TESS discoveries with radii 1.5 {R}\\oplus R}pl}≤slant 2.5 {R}\\oplus will produce S/N higher than currently known exoplanets in this radius regime, such as K2-3b or K2-3c. In the terrestrial planet regime, we find that only a few anticipated TESS discoveries will result in higher S/N than currently known exoplanets, such as the TRAPPIST-1 planets, GJ1132b, and LHS1140b. However, we emphasize that this outcome is based upon Kepler-derived occurrence rates, and that co-planar compact multi-planet systems (e.g., TRAPPIST-1) may be under-represented in the predicted TESS planet yield. Finally, we apply our calculations to estimate the required magnitude of a JWST follow-up program devoted to mapping the transition region between hydrogen-dominated and high molecular weight atmospheres. We find that a modest observing program of between 60 and 100 hr of charged JWST time can define the nature of that transition (e.g., step function versus a power law).

  18. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachatkou, Anton; Marchal, Julien; Silfhout, Roelof van

    2014-01-01

    Position and size measurements of a micro-focused X-ray beam, using an X-ray beam imaging device based on a lensless camera that collects radiation scattered from a thin foil placed in the path of the beam at an oblique angle, are reported. Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed

  19. Characterization and performance of monolithic detector blocks with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout for PET imaging of the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rato Mendes, Pedro; Sarasola Martin, Iciar; Canadas, Mario; Garcia de Acilu, Paz; Cuypers, Robin; Perez, Jose Manuel; Willmott, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a human brain PET scanner prototype compatible with MRI based on monolithic scintillator crystals, APD matrices and a dedicated ASIC front-end readout. In this work we report on the performance of individual detector modules and on the operation of such modules in PET coincidence. Results will be presented on the individual characterization of detector blocks and its ASIC front-end readout, with measured energy resolutions of 13% full-width half-maximum (FWHM) at 511 keV and spatial resolutions of the order of 2 mm FWHM. First results on PET coincidence performance indicate spatial resolutions as good as 2.1 mm FWHM for SSRB/FBP reconstruction of tomographic data obtained using a simple PET demonstrator based on a pair of monolithic detector blocks with ASIC readout.

  20. Thermal Characterization and Optimization of the Pixel Module Support Structure for the Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094386; Feld, Lutz Werner

    2015-01-01

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) pixel detector is used in CMS for the vertex reconstruction of events in high-energy proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is planned for the future years that the LHC will deliver significantly higher instantaneous and integrated luminosities. Therefore, also the demands and requirements for the participating detectors rise. Thus the current CMS pixel detector will be replaced by the CMS Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector in the extended year-end technical stop in winter 2016/2017. As a vertex detector, the pixel detector is the innermost detector component and it is located at a short distance to the proton-proton interaction point. Therefore it has to cope with high particle hit rates and high irradiation. The heat produced due to power consumption has to be removed while using a low-mass detector design. The low-mass design of the Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector will be implemented by utilizing a new two-phase CO2 cooling concept and an ultra l...

  1. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  2. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  3. Characterization and first experimental application of space-resolving, energy-dispersive germanium detectors for the precision spectroscopy on heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, Uwe

    2009-02-01

    First the actual status of the research for the 1s Lamb shift on heaviest systems as well as studies on the polarization of the radiative recombination radiation into the K shell of uranium are presented. On this base future precision experiments at storage rings are discussed. then follows a survey presentation of the GSI accelerator facility. Especially the experimental storage ring ESR is described, at which the experiments mentioned above were performed. Then an introduction to the fundamental understanding of the physical processes in the detection of X-radiation in semiconductor detectors is given. The following chapter discusses the detection technique of the Compton polarimetry and some experimental concepts for this. Then by means of a 4 x 4 pixel Ge(i) detector system, by which for the first time the K-REC radiation from uranium was measured at the ESR, an overview about the Monte-Carlo software EGS4 is given, which was applied to the efficiency correction in the evaluation phase and for the estimation of the detector behaviour during the planning phase of the new detectors. A presentation of the 1D and 2D microstrip detector system as well as the performed laboratory measurements follows. The results for the characterization of the 2D microstrip detector system at the synchrotron-radiation source ESRF in view of its application with the FOCAL spectrometer are thereafter described. The results of first test measurement on the Compton polarimetry, which were also performed at the ESRF, are then presented. Finally first experimental results, which wer obtained by the novel planar structured Ge(i) detectors, are shown

  4. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  5. Characterization of the PILATUS photon-counting pixel detector for X-ray energies from 1.75 keV to 60 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, T; Brandstetter, S; Commichau, S; Hofer, P; Lüthi, B; Schneebeli, M; Schulze-Briese, C; Cibik, L; Krumrey, M; Marggraf, S; Müller, P; Wernecke, J

    2013-01-01

    The PILATUS detector module was characterized in the PTB laboratory at BESSY II comparing modules with 320 μm thick and newly developed 450 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon sensors. Measurements were carried out over a wide energy range, in-vacuum from 1.75 keV to 8.8 keV and in air from 8 keV to 60 keV. The quantum efficiency (QE) was measured as a function of energy and the spatial resolution was measured at several photon energies both in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from edge profile measurements and by directly measuring the point spread function (PSF) of a single pixel in a raster scan with a pinhole beam. Independent of the sensor thickness, the measured MTF and PSF come close to those for an ideal pixel detector with the pixel size of the PILATUS detector (172 × 172 μm 2 ). The measured QE follows the values predicted by calculation. Thicker sensors significantly enhance the QE of the PILATUS detectors for energies above 10 keV without impairing the spatial resolution and noise-free detection. In-vacuum operation of the PILATUS detector is possible at energies as low as 1.75 keV.

  6. Characterization of the PILATUS photon-counting pixel detector for X-ray energies from 1.75 keV to 60 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, T.; Brandstetter, S.; Cibik, L.; Commichau, S.; Hofer, P.; Krumrey, M.; Lüthi, B.; Marggraf, S.; Müller, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Wernecke, J.

    2013-03-01

    The PILATUS detector module was characterized in the PTB laboratory at BESSY II comparing modules with 320 μm thick and newly developed 450 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon sensors. Measurements were carried out over a wide energy range, in-vacuum from 1.75 keV to 8.8 keV and in air from 8 keV to 60 keV. The quantum efficiency (QE) was measured as a function of energy and the spatial resolution was measured at several photon energies both in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from edge profile measurements and by directly measuring the point spread function (PSF) of a single pixel in a raster scan with a pinhole beam. Independent of the sensor thickness, the measured MTF and PSF come close to those for an ideal pixel detector with the pixel size of the PILATUS detector (172 × 172 μm2). The measured QE follows the values predicted by calculation. Thicker sensors significantly enhance the QE of the PILATUS detectors for energies above 10 keV without impairing the spatial resolution and noise-free detection. In-vacuum operation of the PILATUS detector is possible at energies as low as 1.75 keV.

  7. Detector characterization and first coincidence tests of a Compton telescope based on LaBr3 crystals and SiPMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llosá, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Crespo, A.; Lacasta, C.; Rafecas, M.; Callier, S.; La Taille, C. de; Raux, L.

    2012-01-01

    A Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy consisting of several layers of continuous LaBr 3 crystals coupled to silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays is under development within the ENVISION project. In order to test the possibility of employing such detectors for the telescope, a detector head consisting of a continuous 16 mm×18 mm×5 mm LaBr 3 crystal coupled to a SiPM array has been assembled and characterized, employing the SPIROC1 ASIC as readout electronics. The best energy resolution obtained at 511 keV is 6.5% FWHM and the timing resolution is 3.1 ns FWHM. A position determination method for continuous crystals is being tested, with promising results. In addition, the detector has been operated in time coincidence with a second detector layer, to determine the coincidence capabilities of the system. The first tests are satisfactory, and encourage the development of larger detectors that will compose the telescope prototype.

  8. Simulating detectors dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustom, Ibrahim Farog Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear detectors are used in all aspects of nuclear measurements. All nuclear detectors are characterized by their dead time i.e. the time needed by a detector to recover from a previous incident. A detector dead time influences measurements taken by a detector and specially when measuring high decay rate (>) where is the detector dead time. Two models are usually used to correct for the dead time effect: the paralayzable and the non-paralayzable models. In the current work we use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to simulate radioactivity and the effect of dead time and the count rate of a detector with a dead time =5x10 - 5s assuming the non-paralayzable model. The simulation indicates that assuming a non -paralayzable model could be used to correct for decay rate measured by a detector. The reliability of the non-paralayzable model to correct the measured decay rate could be gauged using the Monte Carlo simulation. (Author)

  9. Recovering the Properties of High-redshift Galaxies with Different JWST Broadband Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations of the bulk of distant galaxies at the epoch of reionization. The recovery of their properties, such as age, color excess , specific star formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass, will mostly rely on spectral energy...... of these galaxy properties. We performed our tests on a sample of 1542 simulated galaxies, with known input properties, at z = 7–10. We found that, with only eight NIRCam broadbands, we can recover the galaxy age within 0.1 Gyr and the color excess within 0.06 mag for 70% of the galaxies. Additionally...

  10. Development and characterization of high-resolution neutron pixel detectors based on Timepix read-out chips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, F.; Žemlička, J.; Jakoubek, J.; Dudák, J.; Vavřík, D.; Koster, U.; Atkins, D.; Kaestner, A.; Šoltéš, J.; Viererbl, L.; Vacík, Jiří; Tomandl, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, DEC (2016), č. článku C12026. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron detector s * Pixalated detector s and associated VLSI electronics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  11. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  12. Characterization and performance of germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities for neutrino and dark matter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, A.K.; Singh, M.K.; Singh, L.; Kumar, G. Kiran; Lin, F.K.; Du, Q.; Jiang, H.; Liu, S.K.; Ma, J.L.; Sharma, V.; Wang, L.; Wu, Y.C.; Yang, L.T.; Zhao, W.; Agartioglu, M.; Asryan, G.; Chang, Y.Y.; Chen, J.H.; Chuang, Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium ionization detectors with sensitivities as low as 100 eV_e_e (electron-equivalent energy) open new windows for studies on neutrino and dark matter physics. The relevant physics subjects are summarized. The detectors have to measure physics signals whose amplitude is comparable to that of pedestal electronic noise. To fully exploit this new detector technique, various experimental issues including quenching factors, energy reconstruction and calibration, signal triggering and selection as well as evaluation of their associated efficiencies have to be attended. The efforts and results of a research program to address these challenges are presented.

  13. The James Webb STEM Innovation Project: Bringing JWST to the Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Harris, J.; Ryer, H.; Taylor, J.; Bishop, M.

    2012-01-01

    Building awareness of a NASA mission prior to launch and connecting that mission to the education community can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach has developed the James Webb STEM innovation Project (SIP) - an interdisciplinary project that focuses on the engineering aspects and potential scientific discoveries of JWST, while incorporating elements of project-based learning. Students in participating schools will use skills from multiple subject areas to research an aspect of the JWST's design or potential science and create models, illustrated essays, or technology-based projects to demonstrate their learning. Student projects will be showcased during special events at select venues in the project states - thus allowing parents and community members to also be benefactors of the project. Currently, the SIP is being piloted in New York, California, and Maryland. In addition, we will be implementing the SIP in partnership with NASA Explorer Schools in the states of New Mexico, Michigan, Texas, Tennessee, and Iowa.

  14. A Mid-IR Census of Dusty Supernovae From the Past Decade In Preparation for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Andrews, Jennifer; Arendt, Rick; Clayton, Geoff; Dwek, Eli; Filippenko, Alex; Johansson, Joel; Kelly, Patrick; Krafton, Kelsie; Marston, Tony; Mauerhan, Jon; Szalai, Tamas; Van Dyk, Schuyler

    2018-05-01

    Over the past decade, our team has shown that a surprising number of different supernova (SN) subclasses have members that exhibit mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from warm dust at late times (>100 days post-explosion). This work has used Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging to constrain the dust origin and heating mechanisms, but a number of questions still remain. How much dust can SNe IIP produce in their ejecta? What progenitor can produce such extreme mass-loss events required to form the large, dense, pre-existing dust shells observed in so many cases? Many of these SNe remain bright today, in some cases more than a decade after discovery. Continued mid-IR monitoring is necessary to answer these questions by measuring the full extent of either the newly formed dust mass or pre-existing dust shell. Furthermore, Spitzer observations of both old and new SNe will provide up to date flux estimates as we prepare for continued observations with JWST. This proposal will cap off nearly a decade of work and bridge the gap to the first few cycles of JWST.

  15. Characterization of Ni/SnPb-TiW/Pt Flip Chip Interconnections in Silicon Pixel Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Härkönen, Jaakko; Luukka, Panja-riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Haeggstrom, Edward; Kalliopuska, Juha; Vahanen, Sami; Kassamakov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary high energy physics experiments, silicon detectors are essential for recording the trajectory of new particles generated by multiple simultaneous collisions. Modern particle tracking systems may feature 100 million channels, or pixels, which need to be individually connected to read-out chains. Silicon pixel detectors are typically connected to readout chips by flip-chip bonding using solder bumps. High-quality electro-mechanical flip-chip interconnects minimizes the number of dead read-out channels in the particle tracking system. Furthermore, the detector modules must endure handling during installation and withstand heat generation and cooling during operation. Silicon pixel detector modules were constructed by flip-chip bonding 16 readout chips to a single sensor. Eutectic SnPb solder bumps were deposited on the readout chips and the sensor chips were coated with TiW/Pt thin film UBM (under bump metallization). The modules were assembled at Advacam Ltd, Finland. We studied the uniformity o...

  16. Characterization of MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of overexposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassinet, Céline; Huet, Christelle; Baumann, Marion; Etard, Cécile; Réhel, Jean-Luc; Boisserie, Gilbert; Debroas, Jacques; Aubert, Bernard; Clairand, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    As MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) detectors allow dose measurements in real time, the interest in these dosimeters is growing. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of commercially available TN-502RD-H MOSFET silicon detectors (Best Medical Canada, Ottawa, Canada) in order to use them for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of overexposure. Reproducibility of the measurements, dose rate dependence, and dose response of the MOSFET detectors have been studied with a Co source. Influence of the dose rate, frequency, and pulse duration on MOSFET responses has also been studied in pulsed x-ray fields. Finally, in order to validate the integrated dose given by MOSFET detectors, MOSFETs and TLDs (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) were fixed on an Alderson-Rando phantom in the conditions of an interventional neuroradiology procedure, and their responses have been compared. The results of this study show the suitability of MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of accident, provided a well-corrected energy dependence, a pulse duration equal to or higher than 10 ms, and an optimized contact between the detector and the skin of the patient are achieved.

  17. Characterization of imaging pixel detectors of Si and CdTe read out with the counting X-ray chip MPEC 2.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loecker, M.

    2007-04-01

    Single photon counting detectors with Si- and CdTe-sensors have been constructed and characterized. As readout chip the MPEC 2.3 is used which consists of 32 x 32 pixels with 200 x 200 μm 2 pixel size and which has a high count rate cabability (1 MHz per pixel) as well as a low noise performance (55 e - ). Measurements and simulations of the detector homogeneity are presented. It could be shown that the theoretical maximum of the homogeneity is reached (quantum limit). By means of the double threshold of the MPEC chip the image contrast can be enhanced which is demonstrated by measurement and simulation. Also, multi-chip-modules consisting of 4 MPEC chips and a single Si- or CdTe-sensor have been constructed and successfully operated. With these modules modulation-transfer-function measurements have been done showing a good spatial resolution of the detectors. In addition, multi-chip-modules according to the Sparse-CMOS concept have been built and tests characterizing the interconnection technologies have been performed

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a 32 x 32 array digital Si-PIN X-ray detector for a single photon counting image sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jungho; Kim, Jinyoung; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Jingoo; Lee, Songjun; Kim, Bonghoe; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young

    2010-01-01

    A Si-PIN X-ray detector for digital x-ray imaging with single photon counting capability has been fabricated and characterized. It consists of an array of 32 x 32 pixels with an area of 80 x 80 μm 2 . An extrinsic gettering process was performed to reduce the leakage current by removing the impurities and defects from the X-ray detector's Si substrate. Multiple guard-rings (MGRs) and metal filed plates (MFPs) techniques were adopted to reduce the leakage current and to improve the breakdown performance. The simulation verified that the breakdown voltage was improved with the MGRs and that the leakage current was significantly reduced with the MFPs. The electrical properties, such as the leakage current and the breakdown voltage, of the Si-PIN X-ray detector were characterized. The extrinsic gettering process played a significant role in reducing the leakage current, and a leakage current lower than 60 pA could be achieved at 100 V dc .

  19. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  20. Processing and first characterization of detectors made with high resistivity n- and p-type Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Bisello, D.; Borrello, L.; Borchi, E.; Boscardin, M.; Candelori, A.; Creanza, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; DePalma, M.; Dittongo, S.; Focardi, E.; Khomenkov, V.; Litovchenko, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Manna, N.; Menichelli, D.; Messineo, A.; Miglio, S.; Petasecca, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pignatel, G.U.; Radicci, V.; Ronchin, S.; Scaringella, M.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Tosi, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, manufacturing and first characterisation of pad diodes, test structures and microstrip detectors processed with high resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) p- and n-type Si. The pre-irradiation study on newly processed microstrip detectors and test structures show a good overall quality of the processed wafers. After irradiation with 24 GeV/c protons up to 4x10 14 cm -2 the characterisation of n-on-p and p-on-n MCz Si sensors with the C-V method show a decrease of the full depletion voltage and no space charge sign inversion. Microscopic characterisation has been performed to study the role of thermal donors in Czochralski Si. No evidence of thermal donor activation was observed in n-type MCz Si detectors if contact sintering was performed at a temperature lower than 380 deg. C and the final passivation oxide was omitted

  1. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  2. Practical Lessons From the First Decade of EPO Partnership Between NIRCam/JWST and the GSUSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Schlingman, W. M.; Higgins, M. L.

    2013-04-01

    Ten years ago the NIRCam science team proposed to conduct “Train the Trainer” workshops for adult leaders from all Girl Scout Councils in the U.S. with an aim to improving basic astronomy materials and to conveying mission-specific information about the science and technologies associated with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). To date we have conducted 20 workshops involving 225 adult leaders (41 U.S. states, Guam, Japan). During this time, the infrastructure of the GSUSA has evolved considerably, as has its approach to STEM education. Here we discuss how our ongoing workshops, educational activities, and our network of trained leaders have evolved to meet the continuing needs of girls and young women within the GSUSA's new framework of Journeys.

  3. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  4. Growth and characterization of materials for infrared detectors and nonlinear optical switches; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 2, 3, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Randolph E.; Baars, Jan W.

    Papers included in these proceedings are grouped under the topics of infrared material growth and characterization, infrared detector physics, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to interface demarcation in Bridgman-Stockbarger crystal growth of II-VI compounds, growth of CdTe-CdMnTe heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, and a photoconductivity decay method for determining the minority carrier lifetime of p-type HgCdTe. Consideration is also given to anodic oxides on HgZnTe, the characterization of anodic fluoride films on Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, optical response in high-temperature superconducting thin films, and pyroelectric linear array IR detectors with CCD multiplexer. Other papers are on structural and optical properties of melt-processed calcium aluminate fibers, the preparation and characterization of a new thermistor material for thermistor bolometer, and photoemission from quantum-confined structure of nonlinear optical materials. (For individual items see A93-26893 to A93-26895)

  5. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    OpenAIRE

    D. L. Fehl; G. A. Chandler; W. A. Stygar; R. E. Olson; C. L. Ruiz; J. J. Hohlfelder; L. P. Mix; F. Biggs; M. Berninger; P. O. Frederickson; R. Frederickson

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds) and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD) is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA), and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerato...

  6. Growth and characterization of In1-xGaxAs/InAs0.65Sb0.35 strained layer superlattice infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyawansa, G.; Duran, J. M.; Reyner, C. J.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Yoon, N.; Wasserman, D.; Scheihing, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    Type-II strained layer superlattices (SLS) are an active research topic in the infrared detector community and applications for SLS detectors continue to grow. SLS detector technology has already reached the commercial market due to improvements in material quality, device design, and device fabrication. Despite this progress, the optimal superlattice design has not been established, and at various times has been believed to be InAs/GaSb, InAs/InGaSb, or InAs/InAsSb. Building on these, we investigate the properties of a new mid-wave infrared SLS material: InGaAs/InAsSb SLS. The ternary InGaAs/InAsSb SLS has three main advantages over other SLS designs: greater support for strain compensation, enhanced absorption due to increased electron-hole wavefunction overlap, and improved vertical hole mobility due to reduced hole effective mass. Here, we compare three ternary SLSs, with approximately the same bandgap (0.240 eV at 150 K), comprised of Ga fractions of 5%, 10%, and 20% to a reference sample with 0% Ga. Enhanced absorption is both theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. Furthermore, the characteristics of ternary SLS infrared detectors based on an nBn architecture are reported and exhibit nearly state-of-the-art dark current performance with minimal growth optimization. We report standard material and device characterization information, including dark current and external quantum efficiency, and provide further analysis that indicates improved quantum efficiency and vertical hole mobility. Finally, a 320×256 focal plane array built based on the In0.8Ga0.2As/InAs0.65Sb0.35 SLS design is demonstrated with promising performance.

  7. SU-F-T-576: Characterization of Two Dimensional Liquid Filled Detector Array(SRS 1000) in High Precision Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, M [Apollo Speciality Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Manigandan, D [Fortis Cancer Institute, Mohali, Punjab (India); Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K [Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Vikraman, S [Jaypee Hospital – Radiation Onology, Noida, UTTAR PRADESH (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to characterize a two dimensional liquid filled detector array SRS 1000 for routine QA in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system. Methods: SRS 1000 consists of 977 liquid filled ionization chambers and is designed to be used in small field SRS/SBRT techniques. The detector array has got two different spacial resolutions. Till field size of 5.5×5.5 cm the spacial resolution is 2.5mm (center to center) and after that till field size of 11 × 11 cm the spacial resolution is 5mm. The size of the detector is 2.3 × 2.3 0.5 mm with a volume of .003 cc. The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system in which a LINAC is mounted on a robotic manipulator to deliver beams with a high sub millimeter accuracy. The SRS 1000’s MU linearity, stability, reproducibility in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system was measured and investigated. The output factors for fixed and IRIS collimators for all available collimators (5mm till 60 mm) was measured and compared with the measurement done with PTW pin-point ionization chamber. Results: The MU linearity was measured from 2 MU till 1000 MU for doserates in the range of 700cGy/min – 780 cGy/min and compared with the measurement done with pin point chamber The MU linearity was with in 3%. The detector arrays stability and reproducibility was excellent and was withinin 0.5% The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 2% when compared with the measurements with pinpoint chamber for both fixed and IRIS collimators with all available field sizes. Conclusion: We have characterised PTW 1000 SRS as a precise and accurate measurement tool for routine QA of Cyberknife Robotic radiosurgery system.

  8. SU-F-T-576: Characterization of Two Dimensional Liquid Filled Detector Array(SRS 1000) in High Precision Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumaran, M; Manigandan, D; Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K; Vikraman, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to characterize a two dimensional liquid filled detector array SRS 1000 for routine QA in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system. Methods: SRS 1000 consists of 977 liquid filled ionization chambers and is designed to be used in small field SRS/SBRT techniques. The detector array has got two different spacial resolutions. Till field size of 5.5×5.5 cm the spacial resolution is 2.5mm (center to center) and after that till field size of 11 × 11 cm the spacial resolution is 5mm. The size of the detector is 2.3 × 2.3 0.5 mm with a volume of .003 cc. The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system in which a LINAC is mounted on a robotic manipulator to deliver beams with a high sub millimeter accuracy. The SRS 1000’s MU linearity, stability, reproducibility in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system was measured and investigated. The output factors for fixed and IRIS collimators for all available collimators (5mm till 60 mm) was measured and compared with the measurement done with PTW pin-point ionization chamber. Results: The MU linearity was measured from 2 MU till 1000 MU for doserates in the range of 700cGy/min – 780 cGy/min and compared with the measurement done with pin point chamber The MU linearity was with in 3%. The detector arrays stability and reproducibility was excellent and was withinin 0.5% The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 2% when compared with the measurements with pinpoint chamber for both fixed and IRIS collimators with all available field sizes. Conclusion: We have characterised PTW 1000 SRS as a precise and accurate measurement tool for routine QA of Cyberknife Robotic radiosurgery system.

  9. Performance and Characterization of a Modular Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector System for Space-to-Earth Optical Communications Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian E.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2018-01-01

    Space-to-ground photon-counting optical communication links supporting high data rates over large distances require enhanced ground receiver sensitivity in order to reduce the mass and power burden on the spacecraft transmitter. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been demonstrated to offer superior performance in detection efficiency, timing resolution, and count rates over semiconductor photodetectors, and are a suitable technology for high photon efficiency links. Recently photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires have become commercially available, and we have assessed the characteristics and performance of one such commercial system as a candidate for potential utilization in ground receiver designs. The SNSPD system features independent channels which can be added modularly, and we analyze the scalability of the system to support different data rates, as well as consider coupling concepts and issues as the number of channels increases.

  10. Characterization of Si detectors, search for vertex and potentiality of detecting a light charged Higgs boson in the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estre, N.

    2004-01-01

    The CMS (compact muon solenoid) detector that will be set on the future LHC (large hadron collider) accelerator will enable us to continue our search for the Higgs boson as well as to look for any hint for a new physics beyond the standard model. CMS is composed of an efficient muon detector, an electromagnetic calorimeter and of a tracker with high spatial resolution, this tracker is the topic of this thesis. The tracker will allow an accurate reconstruction of charged-particles trajectories and the reconstruction of the primary interaction vertex. The tracker's technology is based on micro-strip Si detectors, tests performed with the SPS particle beam show that these detectors have an impact reconstruction efficiency greater than 98% and a piling-up rate limited to 6%. The spatial resolution concerning particle trajectories is about 45 μm for an interval of 183 μm between 2 strips. The simulation for the search for a light charged Higgs boson show that an excess of τν τ + bb-bar + qq-bar' events is possible to be observed for any value of tan(β) up to M A = 122 GeV/c 2 during the first year of operation and up to 136 GeV/c 2 afterwards. With the assumption that this event excess is due to the decay of charged Higgs bosons we can state that the assessment of its mass will be possible till m H = 150 GeV/c 2 with an accuracy of 15 GeV/c 2 . (A.C.)

  11. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D.; Krása, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, A.; Prokůpek, J.; Láska, L.; Mocek, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Rus, B.

    2011-05-01

    Multi-MeV beams of light ions have been produced using the 300 picosecond, kJ-class iodine laser, operating at the Prague Asterix Laser System facility in Prague. Real-time ion diagnostics have been performed by the use of various time-of-flight (TOF) detectors: ion collectors (ICs) with and without absorber thin films, new prototypes of single-crystal diamond and silicon carbide detectors, and an electrostatic ion mass spectrometer (IEA). In order to suppress the long photopeak induced by soft X-rays and to avoid the overlap with the signal from ultrafast particles, the ICs have been shielded with Al foil filters. The application of large-bandgap semiconductor detectors (>3 eV) ensured cutting of the plasma-emitted visible and soft-UV radiation and enhancing the sensitivity to the very fast proton/ion beams. Employing the IEA spectrometer, various ion species and charge states in the expanding laser-plasma have been determined. Processing of the experimental data based on the TOF technique, including estimation of the plasma fast proton maximum and peak energy, ion beam currents and total charge, total number of fast protons, as well as deconvolution processes, ion stopping power, and ion/photon transmission calculations for the different metallic filters used, are reported.

  12. Production and Electrical Characterization Tests of the ISL Detector and a Trigger Design for Higgs Boson Searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munar Ara, Antoni [Valencia U.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is structured as follows: Chapter 1. gives a brief review of the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model and the electroweak symmetry breaking. The Standard Model Higgs boson phenomenology at Tevatron energies is reviewed. Chapter 2. describes the upgraded Fermilab laboratory accelerator complex, and the upgraded CDF detector. Chapter 3. gives a brief overview of the more relevant aspects of the silicon detectors, and the ISL is described in detail. Chapter 4. describes the construction of the ISL ladders, the full custom testing setup (functionality tests, laser test, burn-in test and $\\beta$-source measurements), and the problems encountered during the ISL ladders construction. The procedures for ladder grading are also discussed. Chapter 5. describes the multilevel trigger system of the CDF detector, and the trigger primitives available at each level. The most relevant offine event observables are briefly discussed. In Chapter 6 the procedures to estimate the trigger rate and trigger effciency calculation are described. The particularities of triggering in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at high luminosities are discussed. Chapter 7. and Chapter 8. are dedicated to study an effcient trigger strategy for the $H + W/Z \\to b\\bar{b}jj$ channel and the $H + Z \\to b\\bar{b} \

  13. Validation of a high-performance size-exclusion chromatography method to determine and characterize β-glucans in beer wort using a triple-detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Ivan; Marconi, Ombretta; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Beer wort β-glucans are high-molecular-weight non-starch polysaccharides of that are great interest to the brewing industries. Because glucans can increase the viscosity of the solutions and form gels, hazes, and precipitates, they are often related to poor lautering performance and beer filtration problems. In this work, a simple and suitable method was developed to determine and characterize β-glucans in beer wort using size exclusion chromatography coupled with a triple-detector array, which is composed of a light scatterer, a viscometer, and a refractive-index detector. The method performances are comparable to the commercial reference method as result from the statistical validation and enable one to obtain interesting parameters of β-glucan in beer wort, such as the molecular weight averages, fraction description, hydrodynamic radius, intrinsic viscosity, polydispersity and Mark-Houwink parameters. This characterization can be useful in brewing science to understand filtration problems, which are not always explained through conventional analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set in full depletion. In a first step, Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is used to evaluate the soundness of this technique for interface traps characterization such as it may happen in bonded interfaces. Next, an analytical model is developed in details to give a better insight into the physics behind the TCT for interface layers. Further, this can be used as a simple tool to evidence what are the relevant parameters influencing the TCT signal and to set the basis for preliminary characterizations.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Cryo-Vacuum (CV) Test Campaign Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda; Whitehouse, Paul; Lui, Yan; Banks, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    JWST Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) has completed its system-level testing program at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In March 2016, ISIM was successfully delivered for integration with the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after the successful verification of the system through a series of three cryo-vacuum (CV) tests. The first test served as a risk reduction test; the second test provided the initial verification of the fully-integrated flight instruments; and the third test verified the system in its final flight configuration. The complexity of the mission has generated challenging requirements that demand highly reliable system performance and capabilities from the Space Environment Simulator (SES) vacuum chamber. As JWST progressed through its CV testing campaign, deficiencies in the test configuration and support equipment were uncovered from one test to the next. Subsequent upgrades and modifications were implemented to improve the facility support capabilities required to achieve test requirements. This paper: (1) provides an overview of the integrated mechanical and thermal facility systems required to achieve the objectives of JWST ISIM testing, (2) compares the overall facility performance and instrumentation results from the three ISIM CV tests, and (3) summarizes lessons learned from the ISIM testing campaign.

  16. Characterization of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescence detectors and high-sensitivity MCP-N thermoluminescent detectors in the 40-300 kVp energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yannick; Kuznetsova, Svetlana; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    To investigate empirically the energy dependence of the detector response of two in vivo luminescence detectors, LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) high-sensitivity TLDs and Al 2 O 3 :C OSLDs, in the 40-300-kVp energy range in the context of in vivo surface dose measurement. As these detectors become more prevalent in clinical and preclinical in vivo measurements, knowledge of the variation in the empirical dependence of the measured response of these detectors across a wide spectrum of beam qualities is important. We characterized a large range of beam qualities of three different kilovoltage x-ray units: an Xstrahl 300 Orthovoltage unit, a Precision x-Ray X-RAD 320ix biological irradiator, and a Varian On-Board Imaging x-ray unit. The dose to water was measured in air according to the AAPM's Task Group 61 protocol. The OSLDs and TLDs were irradiated under reference conditions on the surface of a water phantom to provide full backscatter conditions. To assess the change in sensitivity in the long term, we separated the in vivo dosimeters of each type into an experimental and a reference group. The experimental dosimeters were irradiated using the kilovoltage x-ray units at each beam quality used in this investigation, while the reference group received a constant 10 cGy irradiation at 6 MV from a Varian clinical linear accelerator. The individual calibration of each detector was verified in cycles where both groups received a 10 cGy irradiation at 6 MV. The nanoDot OSLDs were highly reproducible, with ±1.5% variation in response following >40 measurement cycles. The TLDs lost ~20% of their signal sensitivity over the course of the study. The relative light output per unit dose to water of the MCP-N TLDs did not vary with beam quality for beam qualities with effective energies <50 keV (~150 kVp/6 mm Al). At higher energies, they showed a reduced (~75-85%) light output per unit dose relative to 6 MV x rays. The nanoDot OSLDs exhibited a very strong (120

  17. Characterization of scintillator-based detectors for few-ten-keV high-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Jakob C., E-mail: jakob.larsson@biox.kth.se; Lundström, Ulf; Hertz, Hans M. [Biomedical and X-ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Albanova, Stockholm 10691 (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging in the few-ten-keV range is becoming increasingly important in several applications, such as small-animal imaging and phase-contrast imaging. The detector properties critically influence the quality of such imaging. Here the authors present a quantitative comparison of scintillator-based detectors for this energy range and at high spatial frequencies. Methods: The authors determine the modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency for Gadox, needle CsI, and structured CsI scintillators of different thicknesses and at different photon energies. An extended analysis of the NPS allows for direct measurements of the scintillator effective absorption efficiency and effective light yield as well as providing an alternative method to assess the underlying factors behind the detector properties. Results: There is a substantial difference in performance between the scintillators depending on the imaging task but in general, the CsI based scintillators perform better than the Gadox scintillators. At low energies (16 keV), a thin needle CsI scintillator has the best performance at all frequencies. At higher energies (28–38 keV), the thicker needle CsI scintillators and the structured CsI scintillator all have very good performance. The needle CsI scintillators have higher absorption efficiencies but the structured CsI scintillator has higher resolution. Conclusions: The choice of scintillator is greatly dependent on the imaging task. The presented comparison and methodology will assist the imaging scientist in optimizing their high-resolution few-ten-keV imaging system for best performance.

  18. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  19. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  20. Characterization of Low Noise TES Detectors Fabricated by D-RIE Process for SAFARI Short-Wavelength Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropanah, P.; Suzuki, T.; Hijmering, R. A.; Ridder, M. L.; Lindeman, M. A.; Gao, J.-R.; Hoevers, H.

    2014-08-01

    SRON is developing TES detectors based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer on a suspended SiN membrane for the short-wavelength band of the SAFARI instrument on SPICA mission. We have recently replaced the wet KOH etching of the Si substrate by deep reactive ion etching. The new process enables us to fabricate the detectors on the substrate and release the membrane at the very last step. Therefore the production of SAFARI large arrays (4343) on thin SiN membrane (250 nm) is feasible. It also makes it possible to realize narrow supporting SiN legs of 1 m, which are needed to meet SAFARI NEP requirements. Here we report the current-voltage characteristics, noise performance and impedance measurement of these devices. The measured results are then compared with the distributed leg model that takes into account the thermal fluctuation noise due to the SiN legs. We measured a dark NEP of 0.7 aW/, which is 1.6 times higher than the theoretically expected phonon noise.

  1. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization of Radiation Sources on UF Campus Using a Large Volume NaI Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Jesse A.; Gardiner, Hannah E.; Jordan, Kelly A.; Baciak, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental radiation surveys are important for applications such as safety and regulations. This is especially true for areas exposed to emissions from nuclear reactors, such as the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR). At the University of Florida, surveys are performed using the RSX-1 NaI detector, developed by Radiation Solutions Inc. The detector uses incoming gamma rays and an Advanced Digital Spectrometer module to produce a linear energy spectrum. These spectra can then be analyzed in real time with a personal computer using the built in software, RadAssist. We report on radiation levels around the University of Florida campus using two mobile detection platforms, car-borne and cart-borne. The car-borne surveys provide a larger, broader map of campus radiation levels. On the other hand, cart-borne surveys provide a more detailed radiation map because of its ability to reach places on campus cars cannot go. Throughout the survey data, there are consistent radon decay product energy peaks in addition to other sources such as medical I-131 found in a large crowd of people. Finally, we investigate further applications of this mobile detection platform, such as tracking the Ar-41 plume emitted from the UFTR and detection of potential environmental hazards.

  2. Charged corpuscular beam detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikawa, H; Nishikawa, Y

    1970-09-29

    The present invention relates to a charged particle beam detector which prevents transient phenomena disturbing the path and focusing of a charged particle beam travelling through a mounted axle. The present invention provides a charged particle beam detector capable of decreasing its reaction to the charge in energy of the charged particle beam even if the relative angle between the mounted axle and the scanner is unstable. The detector is characterized by mounting electrically conductive metal pieces of high melting point onto the face of a stepped, heat-resistant electric insulating material such that the pieces partially overlap each other and individually provide electric signals, whereby the detector is no longer affected by the beam. The thickness of the metal piece is selected so that an eddy current is not induced therein by an incident beam, thus the incident beam is not affected. The detector is capable of detecting a misaligned beam since the metal pieces partially overlap each other.

  3. Fuel rod leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention detects leaking fuel rods by means of a radiation detector that measures the concentration of xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) within each individual rod. A collimated detector that provides signals related to the energy of incident radiation is aligned with one of the ends of a fuel rod. A statistically significant sample of the gamma radiation (γ-rays) that characterize 133 Xe is accumulated through the detector. The data so accumulated indicates the presence of a concentration of 133 Xe appropriate to a sound fuel rod, or a significantly different concentration that reflects a leaking fuel rod

  4. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  5. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  6. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  7. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of perovskite semiconductor CsPbBr3 as a new candidate for y-ray detector(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Meng, Fang; Malliakas, Christos D.

    2016-09-01

    CsPbBr3 has direct band gap (orange color, 2.25 eV), high density (4.85 g/cm3), attenuation coefficient comparable to CZT, and high resistivity 10^9 ohm•cm. These fundamental physical properties of CsPbBr3well meet the requirements for gamma-ray detector materials. CsPbBr3 exhibits the carrier mobility-lifetime product in the order of 10^-4 cm2/V promising enough to be further developed for practical applications. The major challenge in the process to further enhance the detection performance is the carrier traps present at a deep level of the energy gap which should be minimized. We report the synthesis, purification, crystal growth and physical characterization of the CsPbBr3 crystals obtained by new processes we developed for highly pure materials with reduced carrier traps. The starting binary materials were prepared by reaction of Cs2CO3/HBr and Pb(ac)2/HBr in aqueous solution. Purification of materials was performed by sublimation, bromination with HBr gas, and filtration of molten materials. Large single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman and EelectroDynamic Gradient method and cut to the dimensions appropriate for assessment of the material for gamma-ray detector applications. All characterization including optical characteristics, charge transport properties, photoconductivity, and gamma-ray spectroscopy from the new single crystals of CsPbBr3 will be presented. In addition, the charge carrier traps profile has been studied for this compound by Deep-Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TSL), and Photoluminescence (PL) and will be presented.

  8. Characterization of HPGe gamma spectrometric detectors systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at the Colombian Geological Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, O., E-mail: osierra@sgc.gov.co; Parrado, G., E-mail: gparrado@sgc.gov.co; Cañón, Y.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Peña, M., E-mail: mlpena@sgc.gov.co; Orozco, J. [Colombian Geological Survey, Nuclear Affairs Technical Division, Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, Bogota D. C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    This paper presents the progress made by the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey (SGC in its Spanish acronym), towards the characterization of its gamma spectrometric systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), with the aim of introducing corrections to the measurements by variations in sample geometry. Characterization includes the empirical determination of the interaction point of gamma radiation inside the Germanium crystal, through the application of a linear model and the use of a fast Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software to estimate correction factors for differences in counting efficiency that arise from variations in sample density between samples and standards.

  9. Gamma spectrometric characterization of short cooling time nuclear spent fuels using hemispheric CdZnTe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, A; Szabó, J L; Arenas-Carrasco, J; Arlt, R; Dubreuil, A; Esmailpur-Kazerouni, K

    2000-01-01

    After years of cooling, nuclear spent fuel gamma emissions are mainly due to caesium isotopes which are emitters at 605, 662 and 796-801 keV. Extensive work has been done on such fuels using various CdTe or CdZnTe probes. When fuels have to be measured after short cooling time (during NPP outage) the spectrum is much more complex due to the important contributions of niobium and zirconium in the 700 keV range. For the first time in a nuclear power plant, four spent fuels of the Kozloduy VVER reactor no 4 were measured during outage, 37 days after shutdown of the reactor. In such conditions, good resolution is of particular interest, so a 20 mm sup 3 hemispheric crystal was used with a resolution better than 7 keV at 662 keV. This paper presents the experimental device and analyzes the results which show that CdZnTe commercially available detectors enabled us to perform a semi-quantitative determination of the burn-up after a short cooling time. In addition, it is discussed how a burn-up evolution code (CESAR)...

  10. Characterization of Silica Aerogel for the LHCb RICH Detector and Measurement of the Oscillation Parameter $\\Delta m_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, D L; Matteuzzi, C

    2005-01-01

    LHCb is the Large Hadron Collider experiment to precise measurements of CP violation and rare decays in the B meson sector. It is presently under construction at CERN, and it will start operations in 2007. In the Standard Model picture, CP violation naturally arises by the complex phase in the unitary 3x3 Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix which accounts for the quark mixing. Thanks both to the high bb cross section and to the high luminosity, the LHC collider will be by far the most copious source of B mesons. A large amount of data will be available and the consistency of the Standard Model will be definitively tested by measuring in several ways all the angles and all the sides of the Unitarity Triangle. These measurements will over-constrain the model and look for inconsistencies due to New Physics. The design of the detector has been optimized to match the kinematical structure of bb events produced in a proton-proton collision. One of the key aspects of LHCb is the identification of the particles pr...

  11. Volumetric analysis of coronary plaque characterization in patients with metabolic syndrome using 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kosuke; Ishii, Hideki; Amano, Tetasuya

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, where acute coronary syndrome significantly impacts on mortality and morbidity. In contrast, evidences have accumulated that the lipid-rich plaque might play a critical role in acute coronary syndrome. The study population consisted of 94 patients with suspected angina pectoris who underwent multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Of those, we identified 41 with MetS. In MDCT analysis, low-density plaque volume (LDPV) (42±28 vs 24±18 mm 3 , P=0.0003), moderate-density plaque volume (105±41 vs 82±33 mm(3), P=0.003), total plaque volume (164±70 vs 118±59 mm 3 ), P=0.0008) and %LDPV (24.2±10.0 vs 18.3±7.1%, P=0.01) were significantly increased in the MetS group compared to the non-MetS group. Multivariate linear regression analysis after adjusting for confounding variables revealed that MetS was significantly correlated with an increase in %LDPV (β=0.48, P=0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis for lipid-rich plaque after adjusting for confounding variables indicated that MetS was significantly associated with lipid-rich plaque (odds ratio: 5.99, 95% confidence intervals: 1.94-18.6, P=0.002). Patients with MetS were strongly related to having a lipid-rich composition in their coronary plaque, as detected by MDCT. (author)

  12. Collecting the Puzzle Pieces: Completing HST's UV+NIR Survey of the TRAPPIST-1 System ahead of JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien

    2017-08-01

    Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, our team has discovered 7 Earth-sized planets around the nearby Ultra-cool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. These planets are the first to be simultaneously Earth-sized, temperate, and amenable for in-depth atmospheric studies with space-based observatories (notably, JWST). TRAPPIST-1's system thus provides us with the first opportunity to probe the atmospheres of Earth-sized exoplanets and search for signs of habitability beyond our solar system, which will require spectral information from the UV to the IR to complete their atmospheric puzzles.We request 114 HST orbits to complete the UV+NIR survey of the 7 planets in preparation for their in-depth followup with JWST. The suggested low-density of the planets combined with their complex orbital resonance chain indicate that they migrated inward to their current positions and may harbor large water rich reservoir or leftover primordial H2 atmospheres. We have already ruled out the presence of clear H2 atmospheres for the 5 innermost planets using WFC3 and are requesting 16 WFC3 orbits to complete the TRAPPIST-1 NIR reconnaissance survey. Our primary request consists in 98 STIS orbits to complete the survey for extended H-exospheres around each of the planets. H-exospheres are the most accessible observables for volatile reservoirs, which have not been ruled out by our WFC3 observations. Exosphere detection is only amenable using HST unique capabilities in the UV and are pivotal to guide JWST's in-depth followup. The combined information from HST's UV and NIR observations will allow us put the first critical pieces of the atmospheric puzzle in place for these temperate earth-sized worlds.

  13. Design and Characterization of a Gradient-Transparent RF Copper Shield for PET Detector Modules in Hybrid MR-PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Trinchero, Riccardo; Ha, YongHyun; Finster, Felix; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the design and the characterization of a frequency-selective shield for positron emission tomography (PET) detector modules of hybrid magnetic resonance-PET scanners, where the shielding of the PET cassettes is located close to the observed object. The proposed shielding configuration is designed and optimized to guarantee a high shielding effectiveness (SE) of up to 60 dB for B1-fields at the Larmor frequency of 64 MHz, thus preventing interactions between the radio-frequency (RF) coil and PET electronics. On the other hand, the shield is transparent to the gradient fields with the consequence that eddy-current artifacts in the acquired EPI images are significantly reduced with respect to the standard solid-shield configuration. The frequency-selective behavior of the shield is characterized and validated via simulation studies with CST MICROWAVE STUDIO in the megahertz and kilohertz range. Bench measurements with an RF coil built in-house demonstrated the high SE at the Larmor frequency. Moreover, measurements on a 4-T human scanner confirmed the abolishment of eddy current artifact and also provided an understanding of where the eddy currents occur with respect to the sequence parameters. Simulations and measurements for the proposed shielding concept were compared with a solid copper shielding configuration.

  14. Inverter ratio failure detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  15. WE-FG-207B-11: Objective Image Characterization of Spectral CT with a Dual-Layer Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozguner, O; Halliburton, S; Dhanantwari, A; Utrup, S; Wen, G; Jordan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain objective reference data for the spectral performance on a dual-layer detector CT platform (IQon, Philips) and compare virtual monoenergetic to conventional CT images. Methods: Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol: helical acquisition at 120kVp, with CTDIvol=15mGy. Multiple modules (591, 515, 528) of a CATPHAN 600 phantom and a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were scanned. No modifications to the standard protocol were necessary to enable spectral imaging. Both conventional and virtual monoenergetic images were generated from acquired data. Noise characteristics were assessed through Noise Power Spectra (NPS) and pixel standard deviation from water phantom images. Spatial resolution was evaluated using Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire as well as resolution bars. Low-contrast detectability was studied using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of a low contrast object. Results: MTF curves of monoenergetic and conventional images were almost identical. MTF 50%, 10%, and 5% levels for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05lp/cm. These observations were verified by the resolution bars, which were clearly resolved at 7lp/cm but started blurring at 8lp/cm for this protocol in both conventional and 70 keV images. NPS curves indicated that, compared to conventional images, the noise power distribution of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar (i.e. noise texture is similar) but exhibit a low frequency peak at keVs higher and lower than 70 keV. Standard deviation measurements show monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV where it is slightly higher. CNR of monoenergetic images is mostly flat across keV values and is superior to that of conventional images. Conclusion: Values for standard image quality metrics are the same or better for monoenergetic images compared to conventional images. Results indicate virtual monoenergetic images can be used without

  16. WE-FG-207B-11: Objective Image Characterization of Spectral CT with a Dual-Layer Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozguner, O [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Halliburton, S; Dhanantwari, A; Utrup, S [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States); Wen, G [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Jordan, D [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain objective reference data for the spectral performance on a dual-layer detector CT platform (IQon, Philips) and compare virtual monoenergetic to conventional CT images. Methods: Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol: helical acquisition at 120kVp, with CTDIvol=15mGy. Multiple modules (591, 515, 528) of a CATPHAN 600 phantom and a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were scanned. No modifications to the standard protocol were necessary to enable spectral imaging. Both conventional and virtual monoenergetic images were generated from acquired data. Noise characteristics were assessed through Noise Power Spectra (NPS) and pixel standard deviation from water phantom images. Spatial resolution was evaluated using Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire as well as resolution bars. Low-contrast detectability was studied using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of a low contrast object. Results: MTF curves of monoenergetic and conventional images were almost identical. MTF 50%, 10%, and 5% levels for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05lp/cm. These observations were verified by the resolution bars, which were clearly resolved at 7lp/cm but started blurring at 8lp/cm for this protocol in both conventional and 70 keV images. NPS curves indicated that, compared to conventional images, the noise power distribution of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar (i.e. noise texture is similar) but exhibit a low frequency peak at keVs higher and lower than 70 keV. Standard deviation measurements show monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV where it is slightly higher. CNR of monoenergetic images is mostly flat across keV values and is superior to that of conventional images. Conclusion: Values for standard image quality metrics are the same or better for monoenergetic images compared to conventional images. Results indicate virtual monoenergetic images can be used without

  17. Design and characterization of a 64 channels ASIC front-end electronics for high-flux particle beam detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausti, F.; Mazza, G.; Attili, A.; Mazinani, M. Fadavi; Giordanengo, S.; Lavagno, M.; Manganaro, L.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Vignati, A.; Cirio, R.

    2017-09-01

    A new wide-input range 64-channels current-to-frequency converter ASIC has been developed and characterized for applications in beam monitoring of therapeutic particle beams. This chip, named TERA09, has been designed to extend the input current range, compared to the previous versions of the chip, for dealing with high-flux pulsed beams. A particular care was devoted in achieving a good conversion linearity over a wide bipolar input current range. Using a charge quantum of 200 fC, a linearity within ±2% for an input current range between 3 nA and 12 μA is obtained for individual channels, with a gain spread among the channels of about 3%. By connecting all the 64 channels of the chip to a common input, the current range can be increased 64 times preserving a linearity within ±3% in the range between and 20 μA and 750 μA.

  18. Characterization of a microDiamond detector in high-dose-per-pulse electron beams for intra operative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Tonnetti, A; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Pimpinella, M; Ciccotelli, A; De Stefano, S; Felici, G; Marangoni, F

    2015-12-01

    To characterize a synthetic diamond dosimeter (PTW Freiburg microDiamond 60019) in high dose-per-pulse electron beams produced by an Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) dedicated accelerator. The dosimetric properties of the microDiamond were assessed under 6, 8 and 9 MeV electron beams by a NOVAC11 mobile accelerator (Sordina IORT Technologies S.p.A.). The characterization was carried out with dose-per-pulse ranging from 26 to 105 mGy per pulse. The microDiamond performance was compared with an Advanced Markus ionization chamber and a PTW silicon diode E in terms of dose linearity, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, beam profiles and output factors. A good linearity of the microDiamond response was verified in the dose range from 0.2 Gy to 28 Gy. A sensitivity of 1.29 nC/Gy was measured under IORT electron beams, resulting within 1% with respect to the one obtained in reference condition under (60)Co gamma irradiation. PDD measurements were found in agreement with the ones by the reference dosimeters, with differences in R50 values below 0.3 mm. Profile measurements evidenced a high spatial resolution of the microDiamond, slightly worse than the one of the silicon diode. The penumbra widths measured by the microDiamond resulted approximately 0.5 mm larger than the ones by the Silicon diode. Output factors measured by the microDiamond were found within 2% with those obtained by the Advanced Markus down to 3 cm diameter field sizes. The microDiamond dosimeter was demonstrated to be suitable for precise dosimetry in IORT applications under high dose-per-pulse conditions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. filled neutron detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron trifluoride (BF3) proportional counters are used as detectors for thermal neutrons. They are characterized by high neutron sensitivity and good gamma discriminating properties. Most practical BF3 counters are filled with pure boron trifluoride gas enriched up to 96% 10B. But BF3 is not an ideal proportional counter ...

  20. Micro-scale characterization of a CMOS-based neutron detector for in-phantom measurements in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Nicolas; Higueret, Stephane; Husson, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The CMOS sensor AlphaRad has been designed at the IPHC Strasbourg for real-time monitoring of fast and thermal neutrons over a full energy spectrum. Completely integrated, highly transparent to photons and optimized for low power consumption, this sensor offers very interesting characteristics for the study of internal neutrons in radiation therapy with anthropomorphic phantoms. However, specific effects related to the CMOS metal substructure and to the charge collection process of low energy particles must be carefully estimated before being used for medical applications. We present a detailed characterization of the AlphaRad chip in the MeV energy range using proton and alpha micro-beam experiments performed at the AIFIRA facility (CENBG, Bordeaux). Two-dimensional maps of the charge collection were carried out on a micro-metric scale to be integrated into a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation of the system. The gamma rejection, as well as the fast and thermal neutrons separation, were studied using both simulation and experimental data. The results highlight the potential of a future system based on CMOS sensor for in-phantom neutron detection in radiation therapies.

  1. Characterization of GaSb/InAs type II infrared detectors at very long wavelengths: carrier scattering at defect clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchin, M. R.; Jaros, M.

    2003-06-01

    We report a systematic study into carrier scattering by isovalent defects within GaSb/InAs superlattices. The heterostructure system which we investigate has attracted recent interest as the active region of a photodetector for very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) (⩾12 μm) radiation. To achieve our objective, we employed models of the electronic band structure and scattering cross-section. We considered isolated, substitutional defects at each atom site throughout the unit cell in turn and found that the scattering magnitude generally follows the carrier envelope function, being greatest where the overlap of charge with the defect is highest. We scrutinized the contribution of lattice relaxation around defects to the overall scattering, by comparing calculations where this effect was, in turn, included and excluded. We identified some anomalous contributions of relaxation to both qualitative and quantitative features of the cross-section. Physical mechanisms to explain these effects must be arrived at in order to attain satisfactory characterization of these materials, highlighting the need for both microscopic models and further research. Additional modelling of islands of such defects indicated that the cross-section is proportional to the square of the number of constituent atoms, for both carrier types (holes and electrons) and each defect type. This article demonstrates important links between key growth issues and the dynamical properties of these novel semiconductor devices.

  2. The nuclear core of sun: theoretical perspectives and characterization of the scientific performances of the GOLF / SOHO experiment detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzitko, H.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the nuclear core of the sun. The first part is theoretical and concerns neutrino flux predictions. A precise description of the solar plasma is necessary to predict boron, beryllium and CNO cycle neutrinos. We treat here the nuclear reaction rates. They are mainly determined by the cross sections and the enhancement factors due to plasma particles, the co-called screening factors. We have discussed the various possible formalisms that could be used in stellar evolution and performed direct calculations of screened cross sections. We concluded that the screening prescriptions which have been used so far in stellar evolution should be replaced by the Mitler formalism. Next, we examine the cross section uncertainties and we show that it is possible to get a better agreement between theory and experiment. Discrepancies between the gallium experiments and the calculations suggest that we should go beyond the classical solar model. This has motivated our study on possible magnetic fields deeply buried in the solar core. We discuss here the influence of a magnetic pressure perturbation on solar evolution. In the experimental part of this work, we deal with the GOLF experiment, one of the three helio-seismological experiments on board the space probe SOHO. The purpose of this instrument is the study of the global oscillation modes in the frequency range 10 -7 to 6 10 -3 Hz with a sensitivity for frequencies higher than 2 10 -4 Hz of about 1 mm/s over 20 days of continuous integration at counting rates of 12 10 6 cs/s. One part of this work was devoted to the precise characterization of the photomultipliers and their associated electronics in order to select them according to their intrinsic performances. This step was followed by long duration tests of three weeks simulating as well as possible the flight conditions. We show that the detection chain effectively meets the stability requirements of around 10 -7 by velocity measurement. We also

  3. Time and Energy Characterization of a Neutron Time of Flight Detector Using a Novel Coincidence Method for Constraining Neutron Yield, Ion Temperature and Liner Density Measurements from MagLIF Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Jedediah D.

    The focus of this work is the characterization of a typical neutron time-of-flight (NTOF) detector that is fielded on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted at the Z-experimental facility with emphasis on the Magnetized Liner Fusion (MagLIF) concept. An NTOF detector consisting of EJ-228 scintillator and two independent photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), a Hamamatsu-mod 5 and Photek-PMT240, has been characterized in terms of the absolute time and energy response. The characterization was done by measuring single, neutron-induced events in the scintillator by measuring the alpha particle and neutron produced from the D-T reaction in kinematic coincidence. The results of these experiments provided the time dependent instrument response function and the detector sensitivity as a function of applied voltage covering the entire dynamic range of the detector. Historically, impulse response functions have been measured using various photon sources as surrogates for a neutron source. Thus, this measurement using a single hit neutron source results in the most accurate measured response function, which will improve the accuracy of impulse response corrections to the NTOF signals. While this detector has not yet been fielded on any MagLIF experiments, the development of a predictive capability was desired for transferring the measured detector response from the calibration geometry to the more complex Z geometry. As a proof-of-principle, a detailed model of the Z-machine was developed in MCNP6 to correct for geometry issues when transferring the calibration results from a light lab setting to the Z-environment. Representative values for the instrument response function and the sensitivity for the current detectors fielded on MagLIF experiments were convolved with the modeled results. These results were compared with data collected on three previous MagLIF experiments. The comparison shows the model results can be used to constrain three parameters that are

  4. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  5. Characterization and first experimental application of space-resolving, energy-dispersive germanium detectors for the precision spectroscopy on heavy ions; Charakterisierung und erster experimenteller Einsatz von ortsaufloesenden, energiedispersiven Germanium-Detektoren zur Praezisionsspektroskopie an schweren Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillmann, Uwe

    2009-02-15

    First the actual status of the research for the 1s Lamb shift on heaviest systems as well as studies on the polarization of the radiative recombination radiation into the K shell of uranium are presented. On this base future precision experiments at storage rings are discussed. then follows a survey presentation of the GSI accelerator facility. Especially the experimental storage ring ESR is described, at which the experiments mentioned above were performed. Then an introduction to the fundamental understanding of the physical processes in the detection of X-radiation in semiconductor detectors is given. The following chapter discusses the detection technique of the Compton polarimetry and some experimental concepts for this. Then by means of a 4 x 4 pixel Ge(i) detector system, by which for the first time the K-REC radiation from uranium was measured at the ESR, an overview about the Monte-Carlo software EGS4 is given, which was applied to the efficiency correction in the evaluation phase and for the estimation of the detector behaviour during the planning phase of the new detectors. A presentation of the 1D and 2D microstrip detector system as well as the performed laboratory measurements follows. The results for the characterization of the 2D microstrip detector system at the synchrotron-radiation source ESRF in view of its application with the FOCAL spectrometer are thereafter described. The results of first test measurement on the Compton polarimetry, which were also performed at the ESRF, are then presented. Finally first experimental results, which wer obtained by the novel planar structured Ge(i) detectors, are shown.

  6. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  7. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  8. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Transit Spectroscopy of Anticipated TESS Planets Compared to Select Discoveries from Space-Based and Ground-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana; Deming, Drake; Albert, Loic; Bouma, Luke; Bean, Jacob; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will embark in 2018 on a 2-year wide-field survey mission of most of the celestial sky, discovering over a thousand super-Earth and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets potentially suitable for follow-up observations using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Bouma et al. (2017) and Sullivan et al. (2015) used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the properties of the planetary systems that TESS is likely to detect, basing their simulations upon Kepler-derived planet occurrence rates and photometric performance models for the TESS cameras. We employed a JWST Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) simulation tool to estimate the signal-to-noise (S/N) that JWST/NIRISS will attain in transmission spectroscopy of these anticipated TESS discoveries, and we then compared the S/N for anticipated TESS discoveries to our estimates of S/N for 18 known exoplanets. We analyzed the sensitivity of our results to planetary composition, cloud cover, and presence of an observational noise floor. We find that only a few anticipated TESS discoveries in the terrestrial planet regime will result in better JWST/NIRISS S/N than currently known exoplanets, such as the TRAPPIST-1 planets, GJ1132b, or LHS1140b. However, we emphasize that this outcome is based upon Kepler-derived occurrence rates, and that co-planar compact systems (e.g. TRAPPIST-1) were not included in predicting the anticipated TESS planet yield. Furthermore, our results show that several hundred anticipated TESS discoveries in the super-Earth and sub-Neptune regime will produce S/N higher than currently known exoplanets such as K2-3b or K2-3c. We apply our results to estimate the scope of a JWST follow-up observation program devoted to mapping the transition region between high molecular weight and primordial planetary atmospheres.

  9. Characterization of trabecular bone plate-rod microarchitecture using multirow detector CT and the tensor scale: Algorithms, validation, and applications to pilot human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Punam K.; Liu, Yinxiao; Chen, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Letuchy, Elena M.; Xu, Ziyue; Amelon, Ryan E.; Burns, Trudy L.; Torner, James C.; Levy, Steven M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Osteoporosis is a common bone disease associated with increased risk of low-trauma fractures leading to substantial morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Clinically, osteoporosis is defined by low bone mineral density (BMD); however, increasing evidence suggests that trabecular bone (TB) microarchitectural quality is an important determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. A tensor scale based algorithm for in vivo characterization of TB plate-rod microarchitecture at the distal tibia using multirow detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is presented and its performance and applications are examined. Methods: The tensor scale characterizes individual TB on the continuum between a perfect plate and a perfect rod and computes their orientation using optimal ellipsoidal representation of local structures. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using computer-generated phantom images at a resolution and signal-to-noise ratio achievable in vivo. The robustness of the method was examined in terms of stability across a wide range of voxel sizes, repeat scan reproducibility, and correlation between TB measures derived by imaging human ankle specimens under ex vivo and in vivo conditions. Finally, the application of the method was evaluated in pilot human studies involving healthy young-adult volunteers (age: 19 to 21 yr; 51 females and 46 males) and patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (age: 19 to 21 yr; six males and six females). Results: An error of (3.2% ± 2.0%) (mean ± SD), computed as deviation from known measures of TB plate-width, was observed for computer-generated phantoms. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95 was observed for tensor scale TB measures in repeat MD-CT scans where the measures were averaged over a small volume of interest of 1.05 mm diameter with limited smoothing effects. The method was found to be highly stable at different voxel sizes with an error of (2.29% ± 1.56%) at an in vivo voxel size

  10. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  11. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  12. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  14. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  15. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Bertuccio, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Bertuccio@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco [University of Pavia, Department of Electrical Engineering, and National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-01-11

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD’s). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 µs to 6.6 µs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 µm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 µm×500 µm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 µs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between −0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 µW and 420 µW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD’s shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  16. Preliminary Characterization Tests of Detectors of on-Line Monitor Systems of the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-Therapy (CNAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkazem Ansarinejad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hadron-therapy is an effective technique used to treat tumors that are located between or nearby vital organs. The Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO has been realized as the first facility in Italy to treat very difficult tumors with protons and Carbon ions. The on-line monitor system for CNAO has been developed by the Department of Physics of the University of Torino and Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN. The monitoring system performs the on-line checking of the beam intensity, dimension, and beam position. Materials and Methods The monitor system is based on parallel plate ionization chambers and is composed of five ionization chambers with the anodes fully integrated or segmented in pixels or strips that are placed in two boxes. A series of measurements were performed that involve the background current and the detectors have been characterized by means of a series of preliminary testes in order to verify reproducibility and uniformity of the chambers using an X-ray source. Results The measured background currents for StripX, StripY and Pixel chambers are five orders of magnitude smaller than the nominal treatment current. The reproducibility error of chambers is less than 1%. The analysis of the uniformity showed that the monitor devices have a spread in gain that varies, but only about 2%. Conclusion The reproducibility and the uniformity values are considered as a good result, taking into account that the X-ray energy range is several orders of magnitude smaller than the particle energies used at CNAO.

  17. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  18. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  19. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  20. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  1. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  2. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  3. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  5. Preservation of Thermal Control Specular Gold Baffle Surface on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MonteedeGarcia, Kristina; Patel, Jignasha; Perry, Radford, III

    2010-01-01

    Extremely tight thermal control property degradation allowances on the vapor-deposited, gold-coated IEC baffle surface, made necessary by the cryogenic JWST Observatory operations, dictate tight contamination requirements on adjacent surfaces. Theoretical degradation in emittance with contaminant thickness was calculated. Maximum allowable source outgassing rates were calculated using worst case view factors from source to baffle surface. Tight requirements pushed the team to change the design of the adjacent surfaces to minimize the outgassing sources

  6. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  7. The JWST Extragalactic Mock Catalog: Modeling Galaxy Populations from the UV through the Near-IR over 13 Billion Years of Cosmic History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christina C.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Hainline, Kevin N.; Chevallard, Jacopo; Robertson, Brant E.; Charlot, Stephane; Endsley, Ryan; Stark, Daniel P.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Alberts, Stacey; Amorin, Ricardo; Arribas, Santiago; Baum, Stefi; Bunker, Andrew; Carniani, Stefano; Crandall, Sara; Egami, Eiichi; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ferruit, Pierre; Husemann, Bernd; Maseda, Michael V.; Maiolino, Roberto; Rawle, Timothy D.; Rieke, Marcia; Smit, Renske; Tacchella, Sandro; Willott, Chris J.

    2018-06-01

    We present an original phenomenological model to describe the evolution of galaxy number counts, morphologies, and spectral energy distributions across a wide range of redshifts (0.2colors, sizes, star formation, and chemical properties of the observed galaxy population. Unlike other existing approaches, our model includes a self-consistent treatment of stellar and photoionized gas emission and dust attenuation based on the BEAGLE tool. The mock galaxy catalogs generated with our new model can be used to simulate and optimize extragalactic surveys with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and to enable critical assessments of analysis procedures, interpretation tools, and measurement systematics for both photometric and spectroscopic data. As a first application of this work, we make predictions for the upcoming JWST Advanced Deep Extragalactic Survey (JADES), a joint program of the JWST/NIRCam and NIRSpec Guaranteed Time Observations teams. We show that JADES will detect, with NIRCam imaging, 1000s of galaxies at z ≳ 6, and 10s at z ≳ 10 at {m}{AB}≲ 30 (5σ) within the 236 arcmin2 of the survey. The JADES data will enable accurate constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function at z > 8, and resolve the current debate about the rate of evolution of galaxies at z ≳ 8. Ready-to-use mock catalogs and software to generate new realizations are publicly available as the JAdes extraGalactic Ultradeep Artificial Realizations (JAGUAR) package.

  8. Evaluation of prototype silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, J.; Hall, G.; Roe, S.; Lucas, A.

    1988-01-01

    Operating characteristics of several prototypes of silicon drift detectors are investigated. Detectors are made of unpolished silicon produced by the zone melting method and characterized by n-type conductivity and specific resistance of 3.6-4.6 kOhmxcm. The detectors comprise 40 parallel bands of 200 μm width and 1 cm length separated by 50 μm intervals. Data characterizing the potential distribution near anodes under the operating bias voltage, dependences of capacities and leakage as well as the detector space resolution

  9. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  10. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  11. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  12. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Paternoster, G.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A. [Str. Dip. di Matematica e Fisica dell' Universita di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, I-07100, Sassari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  13. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Olson, R. E.; Ruiz, C. L.; Hohlfelder, J. J.; Mix, L. P.; Biggs, F.; Berninger, M.; Frederickson, P. O.; Frederickson, R.

    2010-12-01

    An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds) and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD) is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA), and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerator performance. The unfold method, suitable for online analysis, arises naturally from general assumptions about the x-ray source and spectral properties of the channel responses; a priori constraints control the ill-posed nature of the inversion. The unfolded spectrum is not assumed to be Planckian. This study is divided into two consecutive papers. This paper considers three major issues: (a) Formulation of the unfold method.—The mathematical background, assumptions, and procedures leading to the algorithm are described: the spectral reconstruction Sunfold(E,t)—five histogram x-ray bins j over the x-ray interval, 137≤E≤2300eV at each time step t—depends on the shape and overlap of the calibrated channel responses and on the maximum electrical power delivered to the plasma. The x-ray flux Funfold is estimated as ∫Sunfold(E,t)dE. (b) Validation with simulations.—Tests of the unfold algorithm with known static and time-varying spectra are described. These spectra included—but were not limited to—Planckian spectra Sbb(E,T) (25≤T≤250eV), from which noise-free channel data were simulated and unfolded. For Planckian simulations with 125≤T≤250eV and typical responses, the binwise unfold values Sj and the corresponding binwise averages ⟨Sbb⟩j agreed to ˜20%, except where Sbb≪max⁡{Sbb}. Occasionally, unfold values Sj≲0 (artifacts) were encountered. The algorithm recovered ≳90% of the x-ray flux over the wider range, 75≤T≤250eV. For lower T, the

  14. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Fehl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerator performance. The unfold method, suitable for online analysis, arises naturally from general assumptions about the x-ray source and spectral properties of the channel responses; a priori constraints control the ill-posed nature of the inversion. The unfolded spectrum is not assumed to be Planckian. This study is divided into two consecutive papers. This paper considers three major issues: (a Formulation of the unfold method.—The mathematical background, assumptions, and procedures leading to the algorithm are described: the spectral reconstruction S_{unfold}(E,t—five histogram x-ray bins j over the x-ray interval, 137≤E≤2300  eV at each time step t—depends on the shape and overlap of the calibrated channel responses and on the maximum electrical power delivered to the plasma. The x-ray flux F_{unfold} is estimated as ∫S_{unfold}(E,tdE. (b Validation with simulations.—Tests of the unfold algorithm with known static and time-varying spectra are described. These spectra included—but were not limited to—Planckian spectra S_{bb}(E,T (25≤T≤250  eV, from which noise-free channel data were simulated and unfolded. For Planckian simulations with 125≤T≤250  eV and typical responses, the binwise unfold values S_{j} and the corresponding binwise averages ⟨S_{bb}⟩_{j} agreed to ∼20%, except where S_{bb}≪max⁡{S_{bb}}. Occasionally, unfold values S_{j}≲0 (artifacts were encountered. The algorithm recovered ≳90% of the x

  15. Standardizing Exoplanet Analysis with the Exoplanet Characterization Tool Kit (ExoCTK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Julia; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fraine, Jonathan D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Bruno, Giovanni; Filippazzo, Joe; Hill, Matthew; Batalha, Natasha; Wakeford, Hannah; Bushra, Rafia

    2018-06-01

    Exoplanet characterization depends critically on analysis tools, models, and spectral libraries that are constantly under development and have no single source nor sense of unified style or methods. The complexity of spectroscopic analysis and initial time commitment required to become competitive is prohibitive to new researchers entering the field, as well as a remaining obstacle for established groups hoping to contribute in a comparable manner to their peers. As a solution, we are developing an open-source, modular data analysis package in Python and a publicly facing web interface including tools that address atmospheric characterization, transit observation planning with JWST, JWST corongraphy simulations, limb darkening, forward modeling, and data reduction, as well as libraries of stellar, planet, and opacity models. The foundation of these software tools and libraries exist within pockets of the exoplanet community, but our project will gather these seedling tools and grow a robust, uniform, and well-maintained exoplanet characterization toolkit.

  16. Impact of clouds in the JWST and LUVOIR simulated transmission spectra of TRAPPIST-1 planets in the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Turbet, Martin; Mandell, Avi; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Arney, Giada; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2018-06-01

    M-dwarfs are the most common type of stars in our galaxy. Ultra-cool dwarfs (T Earth and frequent planetary transits.Atmospheric properties are major components of planet habitability. However, the detectability of gaseous features on rocky planets in the HZ may be severely impacted by the presence of clouds and/or hazes in their atmosphere. We have already seen this phenomenon in the “flat” transit transmission spectra of larger exoplanets such as GJ 1214b, WASP-31b, WASP-12b and HATP-12b.In this work, we use the LMDG global climate model to simulate several possibilities of atmospheres for TRAPPIST-1 e, f and 1g: 1) Archean Earth, 2) modern Earth and 3) CO2-dominated atmospheres. We also calculate synthetic transit spectra using the GSFC Planetary Spectrum Generator (PSG), and determine the number of transits needed to observe key spectral features for both JWST and future telescopes (ARIEL, LUVOIR, HabEx). We will identify differences in the spectra of cloudy vs non-cloudy, and determine how much information on spatial variability in atmosphere characteristics can be extracted from time-resolved transit and eclipse mapping. A particular attention will be given to the impact of the atmospheric variability when adding transit spectra, and how this may affect atmospheric parameter retrievals.

  17. Computational studies of BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salathe, Marco [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay within the active volume of germanium detectors. Simulations of the physical processes within such detectors are vital to gain a better understanding of the measurements. The simulation procedure follows three steps: First it calculates the electric potential, next it simulates the electron and hole drift within the germanium crystal and finally it generates a corresponding signal. The GERDA collaboration recently characterized newly produced Broad Energy Germanium Detectors (BEGe) in the HADES underground laboratory in Mol, Belgium. A new pulse shape simulation library was established to examine the results of these measurements. The library has also proven to be a very powerful tool for other applications such as detector optimisation studies. The pulse shape library is based on ADL 3.0 (B. Bruyneel, B. Birkenbach, http://www.ikp.uni-koeln.de/research/agata/download.php) and m3dcr (D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/MJ/m3dcr).

  18. Characterization of 1.2×1.2 mm2 silicon photomultipliers with Ce:LYSO, Ce:GAGG, and Pr:LuAG scintillation crystals as detector modules for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, N.; Sharma, R.; Ganka, T. R.; Schneider, F. R.; Paul, S.; Ziegler, S. I.

    2017-04-01

    The design of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is specially challenging since it should not compromise high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high count-rate capability, and good energy and time resolution. The geometrical design of the system alongside the characteristics of the individual PET detector modules contributes to the overall performance of the scanner. The detector performance is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the photo-detector and the scintillation crystal. Although silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have already proven to be promising photo-detectors for PET, their performance is highly influenced by micro-cell structure and production technology. Therefore, five types of SiPMs produced by KETEK with an active area size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm2 were characterized in this study. The SiPMs differed in the production technology and had micro-cell sizes of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μm. Performance of the SiPMs was evaluated in terms of their breakdown voltage, temperature sensitivity, dark count rate, and correlated noise probability. Subsequently, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR) of the SiPMs were measured with five types of crystals, including two Ce:LYSO, two Ce:GAGG, and one Pr:LuAG. Two crystals with a geometry of 1.5 × 1.5 × 6 mm3 were available from each type. The best CTR achieved was ~ 240 ps, which was obtained with the Ce:LYSO crystals coupled to the 50 μm SiPM produced with the trench technology. The best energy resolution for the 511 keV photo-peak was ~ 11% and was obtained with the same SiPM coupled to the Ce:GAGG crystals.

  19. Characterization of 1.2×1.2 mm2 silicon photomultipliers with Ce:LYSO, Ce:GAGG, and Pr:LuAG scintillation crystals as detector modules for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidvari, N.; Sharma, R.; Schneider, F.R.; Ziegler, S.I.; Ganka, T.R.; Paul, S.

    2017-01-01

    The design of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is specially challenging since it should not compromise high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high count-rate capability, and good energy and time resolution. The geometrical design of the system alongside the characteristics of the individual PET detector modules contributes to the overall performance of the scanner. The detector performance is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the photo-detector and the scintillation crystal. Although silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have already proven to be promising photo-detectors for PET, their performance is highly influenced by micro-cell structure and production technology. Therefore, five types of SiPMs produced by KETEK with an active area size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm 2 were characterized in this study. The SiPMs differed in the production technology and had micro-cell sizes of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μm. Performance of the SiPMs was evaluated in terms of their breakdown voltage, temperature sensitivity, dark count rate, and correlated noise probability. Subsequently, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR) of the SiPMs were measured with five types of crystals, including two Ce:LYSO, two Ce:GAGG, and one Pr:LuAG. Two crystals with a geometry of 1.5 × 1.5 × 6 mm 3 were available from each type. The best CTR achieved was ∼ 240 ps, which was obtained with the Ce:LYSO crystals coupled to the 50 μm SiPM produced with the trench technology. The best energy resolution for the 511 keV photo-peak was ∼ 11% and was obtained with the same SiPM coupled to the Ce:GAGG crystals.

  20. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  1. The Fabrication and Characterization of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky Diode Radiation Detectors with a Sensitive Area of up to 4 cm².

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-Yue; Wang, Ling; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jin-Liang; Zhang, Xian-Peng; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Jiang-Fu; Ouyang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ao; Huang, Run-Hua; Bai, Song

    2017-10-13

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors of an Ni/4H-SiC Schottky diode structure and with sensitive areas of 1-4 cm² were fabricated using high-quality lightly doped epitaxial 4H-SiC material, and were tested in the detection of alpha particles and pulsed X-rays/UV-light. A linear energy response to alpha particles ranging from 5.157 to 5.805 MeV was obtained. The detectors were proved to have a low dark current, a good energy resolution, and a high neutron/gamma discrimination for pulsed radiation, showing the advantages in charged particle detection and neutron detection in high-temperature and high-radiation environments.

  2. The Fabrication and Characterization of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky Diode Radiation Detectors with a Sensitive Area of up to 4 cm2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yue Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC detectors of an Ni/4H-SiC Schottky diode structure and with sensitive areas of 1–4 cm2 were fabricated using high-quality lightly doped epitaxial 4H-SiC material, and were tested in the detection of alpha particles and pulsed X-rays/UV-light. A linear energy response to alpha particles ranging from 5.157 to 5.805 MeV was obtained. The detectors were proved to have a low dark current, a good energy resolution, and a high neutron/gamma discrimination for pulsed radiation, showing the advantages in charged particle detection and neutron detection in high-temperature and high-radiation environments.

  3. Development of planar detectors with active edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Vianello, E.; Zorzi, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first batch of planar active edge sensors fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Trento, Italy) on the way to the development of full 3D detectors with active edges. The main design and technological aspects are reported, along with selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures.

  4. Development of ALICE microstrip detectors at IRST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gregori, P.; Rachevskaia, I.; Zorzi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of double-sided, AC-coupled, microstrip detectors oriented to the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE). The main design and processing issues are presented, together with some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and related test structures

  5. Development of planar detectors with active edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povoli, M., E-mail: povoli@disi.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Giacomini, G.; Vianello, E.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    We report on the first batch of planar active edge sensors fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Trento, Italy) on the way to the development of full 3D detectors with active edges. The main design and technological aspects are reported, along with selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures.

  6. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Finkenzeller, J.; Kiiehn, G.; Lichtenberg, W.

    1984-01-01

    In an exemplary embodiment, a flat radiation beam is detected having a common electrode disposed parallel to the beam plane at one side and a common support with a series of individual conductors providing electrodes opposite successive portions of the common electrode and lying in a plane also parallel to the beam plane. The beam may be fan-shaped and the individual electrodes may be aligned with respective ray paths separated by uniform angular increments in the beam plane. The individual conductors and the connection thereof to the exterior of the detector housing may be formed on an insulator which can be folded into a T-shape for leading the supply conductors for alternate individual conductors toward terminals at opposite sides of the chamber

  7. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  8. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.

    1979-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector consisting of two electrodes defining an ionization chamber permitting entry of smoke, a radioactive source to ionize gas in the chamber and a potential difference applied across the first and second electrodes to cause an ion current to flow is described. The current is affected by entry of smoke. An auxiliary electrode is positioned in the ionization chamber between the first and second electrodes, and it is arranged to maintain or create a potential difference between the first electrode and the auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode may be used for testing or for adjustment of sensitivity. A collector electrode divides the chamber into two regions with the auxiliary electrode in the outer sensing region. (U.K.)

  9. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A safe and reliable apparatus for detecting products of combustion and aerosols in the atmosphere was developed which uses a beta source. It is easy to adjust for optimum performance. The ionization detector comprises a double chamber; one of the chambers is the basic sensing chamber. The sensing chamber is ported to both the secondary chambers to account for slow ambient changes in the atmosphere outside of the chamber. The voltages from the ionization chamber are adjusted with electrodes in each chamber. The ionization chamber contains baffles to direct the air to be sensed as well as an electrostatic screen. A unique electronic circuit provides an inexpensive and reliable means for detecting the signal change which occurs in the ionization chamber. The decision level of the alarm circuit can be adjusted to allow for any desired sensitivity. (D.N.)

  10. Characterization of a cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors for "in vivo" entrance skin dose measurements in interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Maria Daniela; D'Andrea, Marco; Strigari, Lidia; D'Alessio, Daniela; Quagliani, Francesco; Santoni, Riccardo; Bosco, Alessia Lo

    2012-08-01

    During radiological interventional procedures (RIP) the skin of a patient under examination may undergo a prolonged x-ray exposure, receiving a dose as high as 5 Gy in a single session. This paper describes the use of the OneDose(TM) cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors to determine the entrance skin dose (ESD) at selected points during RIP. At first, some dosimetric characteristics of the detector, such as reproducibility, linearity, and fading, have been investigated using a C-arc as a source of radiation. The reference setting (RS) was: 80 kV energy, 40 cm × 40 cm field of view (FOV), current-time product of 50 mAs and source to skin distance (SSD) of 50 cm. A calibrated PMX III solid state detector was used as the reference detector and Gafchromic(®) films have been used as an independent dosimetric system to test the entire procedure. A calibration factor for the RS and correction factors as functions of tube voltage and FOV size have been determined. Reproducibility ranged from 4% at low doses (around 10 cGy as measured by the reference detector) to about 1% for high doses (around 2 Gy). The system response was found to be linear with respect to both dose measured with the PMX III and tube voltage. The fading test has shown that the maximum deviation from the optimal reading conditions (3 min after a single irradiation) was 9.1% corresponding to four irradiations in one hour read 3 min after the last exposure. The calibration factor in the RS has shown that the system response at the kV energy range is about four times larger than in the MV energy range. A fifth order and fourth order polynomial functions were found to provide correction factors for tube voltage and FOV size, respectively, in measurement settings different than the RS. ESDs measured with the system after applying the proper correction factors agreed within one standard deviation (SD) with the corresponding ESDs measured with the reference detector. The ESDs measured with

  11. Experimental characterization of a direct conversion amorphous selenium detector with thicker conversion layer for dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaduto, David A; Tousignant, Olivier; Zhao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced imaging is being investigated as a tool to identify and localize angiogenesis in the breast, a possible indicator of malignant tumors. This imaging technique requires that x-ray images are acquired at energies above the k-shell binding energy of an appropriate radiocontrast agent. Iodinated contrast agents are commonly used for vascular imaging, and require x-ray energies greater than 33 keV. Conventional direct conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat-panel imagers for digital mammography show suboptimal absorption efficiencies at these higher energies. We use spatial-frequency domain image quality metrics to evaluate the performance of a prototype direct conversion flat-panel imager with a thicker a-Se layer, specifically fabricated for dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast imaging. Imaging performance was evaluated in a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system. The spatial resolution, noise characteristics, detective quantum efficiency, and temporal performance of the detector were evaluated for dual-energy imaging for both conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT. The zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency of the prototype detector is improved by approximately 20% over the conventional detector for higher energy beams required for imaging with iodinated contrast agents. The effect of oblique entry of x-rays on spatial resolution does increase with increasing photoconductor thickness, specifically for the most oblique views of a DBT scan. Degradation of spatial resolution due to focal spot motion was also observed. Temporal performance was found to be comparable to conventional mammographic detectors. Increasing the a-Se thickness in direct conversion flat-panel imagers results in better performance for dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast imaging. The reduction in spatial resolution due to oblique entry of x-rays is appreciable in the most extreme clinically relevant cases, but may not profoundly

  12. Silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    1995-01-01

    An introduction to and an overview of function principles and properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is attempted. The paper is addressed to people interested in detector development but not already experts in the field of semiconductor detectors. (orig.)

  13. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.; Bachtel, Russell; Speed, John; O'Rear, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960 s to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and modifications were funded by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to remove dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink, and the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August of 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive modifications

  14. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Bronuzzi, J.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set ...

  15. Characterization of a detector chain using a FPGA-based time-to-digital converter to reconstruct the three-dimensional coordinates of single particles at high flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogrette, F.; Heurteau, D.; Chang, R.; Bouton, Q.; Westbrook, C. I.; Sellem, R.; Clément, D.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a novel FPGA-based time-to-digital converter and its implementation in a detection chain that records the coordinates of single particles along three dimensions. The detector is composed of micro-channel plates mounted on top of a cross delay line and connected to fast electronics. We demonstrate continuous recording of the timing signals from the cross delay line at rates up to 4.1 × 106 s-1 and three-dimensional reconstruction of the coordinates up to 3.2 × 106 particles per second. From the imaging of a calibrated structure we measure the in-plane resolution of the detector to be 140(20) μm at a flux of 3 × 105 particles per second. In addition, we analyze a method to estimate the resolution without placing any structure under vacuum, a significant practical improvement. While we use UV photons here, the results of this work apply to the detection of other kinds of particles.

  16. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de um sistema de monitoracao individual de neutrons tipo albedo de duas componentes usando detectores termoluminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcelo Marques

    2008-07-01

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in {sup 252C}f(D{sub 2}O), {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}Am-B, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 238}Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  17. Calibration of detector efficiency of neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hongsheng; He Xijun; Xu Rongkun; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    BF 3 neutron detector has been set up. Detector efficiency is calibrated by associated particle technique. It is about 3.17 x 10 -4 (1 +- 18%). Neutron yield of neutron generator per pulse (10 7 /pulse) is measured by using the detector

  18. Detectors for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, Tobias Andrew

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) will make measurements of the brightness temperature anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on degree to arcminute angular scales. The ACT observing site is located 5200 m near the top of Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. This thesis presents research on the detectors which capture the image of the CMB formed at ACT's focal plane. In the first chapter, the primary brightness temperature fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background are reviewed. In Chapter 2, a calculation shows how the CMB brightness is translated by ACT to an input power to the detectors. Chapter 3 describes the ACT detectors in detail and presents the response and sensitivity of the detectors to the input power computed in Chapter 2. Chapter 4 describes the detector fabrication at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Chapter 5 summarizes experiments which characterize the ACT detector performance.

  19. Development of innovative silicon radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, JuanPablo

    Silicon radiation detectors fabricated at the IMB-CNM (CSIC) Clean Room facilities using the most innovative techniques in detector technology are presented in this thesis. TCAD simulation comprises an important part in this work as becomes an essential tool to achieve exhaustive performance information of modelled detectors prior their fabrication and subsequent electrical characterization. Radiation tolerance is also investigated in this work using TCAD simulations through the potential and electric field distributions, leakage current and capacitance characteristics and the response of the detectors to the pass of different particles for charge collection efficiencies. Silicon detectors investigated in this thesis were developed for specific projects but also for applications in experiments which can benefit from their improved characteristics, as described in Chapter 1. Double-sided double type columns 3D (3D-DDTC) detectors have been developed under the NEWATLASPIXEL project in the framework of the CERN ...

  20. Signal generation in gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, A.

    1993-01-01

    This tutorial describes the generation of electrical signals in gas detectors. Ionization of the gas by the passage of charged particles generates these signals. Starting with the Bethe-Bloch equation, the treatment is a general introduction to the production of ion-pairs in gas devices. I continue with the characterization of the ionization as an electrical signal, and calculate the signal current in a simple example. Another example demonstrates the effect of space charge on the design of a detector. The AGS Booster ionization profile monitor is a model for this calculation

  1. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  3. Characterization of a quadrant diamond transmission X-ray detector including a precise determination of the mean electron-hole pair creation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keister, Jeffrey W; Cibik, Levent; Schreiber, Swenja; Krumrey, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Precise monitoring of the incoming photon flux is crucial for many experiments using synchrotron radiation. For photon energies above a few keV, thin semiconductor photodiodes can be operated in transmission for this purpose. Diamond is a particularly attractive material as a result of its low absorption. The responsivity of a state-of-the art diamond quadrant transmission detector has been determined, with relative uncertainties below 1% by direct calibration against an electrical substitution radiometer. From these data and the measured transmittance, the thickness of the involved layers as well as the mean electron-hole pair creation energy were determined, the latter with an unprecedented relative uncertainty of 1%. The linearity and X-ray scattering properties of the device are also described.

  4. Characterization of plastic nuclear track detectors on solid state, CR-39 and LR-115 and its possibilities application on thermal and fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo Delgado, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    This work is an study about the use feasibility of plastic nuclear track detectors, LR 115, II-B (of Eastmann Kodak Co) and CR-39 (of American Acrylics and Plastics), for thermal and fast neutron dosimetry, respectively. The LR-115 with converter (n, alpha) was exposed to thermal neutrons with energy of 0,046 e V, proceeding from nuclear reactor RECH-1 of Nuclear Energy Chilean Commission. The irradiated films were submited to a chemical etching with NaOH, plus a washing and brushing. The CR-39 with polyethylene irradiator, was exposed to fast neutrons proceeding of calibrated sources of Am-Se. The irradiated plates were submited to a chemical pre-etching with KOH and a electrochemical post-etching. (author)

  5. Top-seed solution growth and characterization of AlSb single crystals for gamma-ray detectors. Final report, 1 October 1994 - 30 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, A.F.; Becla, P.; Counterman, C.; DiFrancesco, J.; Landahl, G.; Morse, K.; Sanchez, J.

    1996-01-01

    The ultimate objective of the conducted research is to ascertain the potential of AlSb (in single crystal form) for application as γ-detector material operating at room temperature. To this end approaches to crystal growth were to be developed which permit control of growth parameters affecting critical application specific properties of AlSb. The research was focused on exploration of the effectiveness of the Czochralski method and on the development of methods and procedures leading to AlSb crystals with low free carrier concentration and a high mobility-lifetime product. Conventional melt growth of AlSb by the Czochralski technique (from stoichiometric charges) generally yielded material with high net carrier concentrations and low mobility-lifetime products. Significant improvement in crystal properties was achieved, when operating with non-stoichiometric melts, containing Sb in excess at levels of 3 to 10 mol%, further improvements were obtained when changing ambient argon pressure from atmospheric to 300 psi, and using high purity alumina crucibles which were inductively heated with a graphite susceptor CVD coated with silicon-carbide. Initial efforts to reduce evaporative loss of Sb through application of the LEC technique (liquid encapsulated Czochralski) with conventional encapsulants (B 2 O 3 , LiF, CaF 2 ) failed because of their interaction with the crucible and the AlSb melt. Compensation techniques (based on extrinsic doping) were found to lead to the desired reduction of free carriers in AlSb. Such material, however, exhibits a significant decrease of charge carrier mobility and lifetime. Early termination of this research program prevented optimization of critical materials properties in AlSb and precluded at this time a realistic assessment of the potential of this material for solid state detector applications

  6. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  7. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in Bai-Hu-Tang using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Fang; Tong, Wing-Sum; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Yip, Ka-Man; Li, Song-Lin; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Xu, Jun; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2017-10-01

    Bai-Hu-Tang (BHT), a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula used for clearing heat and promoting body fluid, consists of four traditional Chinese medicines, i.e., Gypsum Fibrosum (Shigao), Anemarrhenae Rhizoma (Zhimu), Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata cum Melle (Zhigancao), and nonglutinous rice (Jingmi). The chemical composition of BHT still remains largely elusive thus far. To qualitatively and quantitatively characterize secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in BHT, here a combination of analytical approaches using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector was developed and validated. A total of 42 secondary metabolites in BHT were tentatively or definitely identified, of which 10 major chemicals were quantified by the extracting ion mode of quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides in BHT were also characterized via sample pretreatment followed by sugar composition analysis. The quantitative results indicated that the determined chemicals accounted for 35.76% of the total extract of BHT, which demonstrated that the study could be instrumental in chemical dissection and quality control of BHT. The research deliverables not only laid the root for further chemical and biological evaluation of BHT, but also provided a comprehensive analytical strategy for chemical characterization of secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in traditional Chinese medicine formulas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in Bai-Hu-Tang using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fang Zhong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bai-Hu-Tang (BHT, a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formula used for clearing heat and promoting body fluid, consists of four traditional Chinese medicines, i.e., Gypsum Fibrosum (Shigao, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma (Zhimu, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata cum Melle (Zhigancao, and nonglutinous rice (Jingmi. The chemical composition of BHT still remains largely elusive thus far. To qualitatively and quantitatively characterize secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in BHT, here a combination of analytical approaches using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector was developed and validated. A total of 42 secondary metabolites in BHT were tentatively or definitely identified, of which 10 major chemicals were quantified by the extracting ion mode of quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides in BHT were also characterized via sample pretreatment followed by sugar composition analysis. The quantitative results indicated that the determined chemicals accounted for 35.76% of the total extract of BHT, which demonstrated that the study could be instrumental in chemical dissection and quality control of BHT. The research deliverables not only laid the root for further chemical and biological evaluation of BHT, but also provided a comprehensive analytical strategy for chemical characterization of secondary metabolites and carbohydrates in traditional Chinese medicine formulas.

  9. The GRANDE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Bond, R.; Coleman, L.; Rollefson, A.; Wold, D.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, H.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Wilson, C.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a detector facility which meets the requirements outlined above for a next-generation instrument. GRANDE (Gamma Ray and Neutrino DEtector) is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. (orig.)

  10. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  11. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Payload Transport Rail System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sam; Homan, Jonathan; Speed, John

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the "Great Observatories", scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describe the challenges of developing, integrating and modifying new payload rails capable of transporting payloads within the thermal vacuum chamber up to 65,000 pounds. Ambient and Cryogenic Operations required to configure for testing will be explained. Lastly review historical payload configurations stretching from the Apollo program era to current James Webb Space Telescope testing.

  12. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): IV. Overview and introduction of MATLAB based toolkits used to interface with optical design software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third paper investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written for use in MATLAB to interface with optical design software (CODE V, OSLO, and ZEMAX) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  13. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Liquid Nitrogen System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sammy; Homan, Jonathan; Montz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the “Great Observatories”, scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describes the steps performed in efforts to convert the existing the 60’s era Liquid Nitrogen System from a forced flow (pumped) process to a natural circulation (thermo-siphon) process. In addition, the paper will describe the dramatic conservation of liquid nitrogen to support the long duration thermal vacuum testing. Lastly, describe the simplistic and effective control system which results in zero to minimal human inputs during steady state conditions.

  14. Characterization of a new transmission detector for patient individualized online plan verification and its influence on 6MV X-ray beam characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoelking, Johannes; Sekar, Yuvaraj; Fleckenstein, Jens; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-11-01

    Online verification and 3D dose reconstruction on daily patient anatomy have the potential to improve treatment delivery, accuracy and safety. One possible implementation is to recalculate dose based on online fluence measurements with a transmission detector (TD) attached to the linac. This study provides a detailed analysis of the influence of a new TD on treatment beam characteristics. The influence of the new TD on surface dose was evaluated by measurements with an Advanced Markus Chamber (Adv-MC) in the build-up region. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, correction factors were determined to scale down the over-response of the Adv-MC close to the surface. To analyze the effects beyond d{sub max} percentage depth dose (PDD), lateral profiles and transmission measurements were performed. All measurements were carried out for various field sizes and different SSDs. Additionally, 5 IMRT-plans (head and neck, prostate, thorax) and 2 manually created test cases (3 x 3 cm{sup 2} fields with different dose levels, sweeping gap) were measured to investigate the influence of the TD on clinical treatment plans. To investigate the performance of the TD, dose linearity as well as dose rate dependency measurements were performed. With the TD inside the beam an increase in surface dose was observed depending on SSD and field size (maximum of +11%, SSD = 80 cm, field size = 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Beyond d{sub max} the influence of the TD on PDDs was below 1%. The measurements showed that the transmission factor depends slightly on the field size (0.893-0.921 for 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} to 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). However, the evaluation of clinical IMRT-plans measured with and without the TD showed good agreement after using a single transmission factor (γ{sub (2%/2mm)} > 97%, δ{sub ±3%} >95%). Furthermore, the response of TD was found to be linear and dose rate independent (maximum difference <0.5% compared to reference measurements). When placed in the path of the beam, the TD introduced

  15. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  16. Characterization of solid D{sub 2} as a source material for ultra cold neutrons (UCN) and development of a detector concept for the detection of protons from the neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Axel Reimer

    2008-12-09

    In the first part of this thesis, properties of the UCN-converter material solid deuterium (sD{sub 2}) are studied. A series of investigations of various sD{sub 2} crystals by means of optical spectroscopy and neutron scattering resulted in: (i) a freezing technique suitable for UCN sources (ii) an efficient method to achieve a high ortho concentration, (iii) a direct way to calculate the UCN production cross-section from the dynamic structure factor S(q, {omega}), (iv) the identification of six excitations responsible for UCN production (v) the interpretation of one excitation at E=12 meV as a multi-phonon process (vi) the discovery of an additional spin-dependent UCN loss mechanism at q=2.1A{sup -1} and E=1.8 meV. A complementary series of experiments was performed at the FRMII, testing the production of UCN with the studied sample preparation after different the characterization mentioned above. Besides establishing a technique for annealing sD{sub 2} crystals to improve the UCN production rate, an additional loss cross section ({sigma}{sub x}=8 barn at 4.5 K indirect proportional to the ortho concentration) was found. Based on these findings, a new conceptual layout of the miniD{sub 2} source was developed. In the second part, the diffuse scattering probability f and the loss probability per wall collision {mu} were measured for differently prepared UCN guides using the storageand the so called two-hole method. Electropolished, rough stainless steel and Al tubes with different coatings at temperature variation and surface conditions were measured. The third part deals with the development of a proton detector for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE, which is based on gravitational and magnetic UCN storage and counting of the protons from the decay. A concept for a large-area proton detector based on thin scintillation counters operating in cryogenic environment was developed based on simulations and experimental studies. In addition to the characterization

  17. Characterization of solid D2 as a source material for ultra cold neutrons (UCN) and development of a detector concept for the detection of protons from the neutron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Axel Reimer

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, properties of the UCN-converter material solid deuterium (sD 2 ) are studied. A series of investigations of various sD 2 crystals by means of optical spectroscopy and neutron scattering resulted in: (i) a freezing technique suitable for UCN sources (ii) an efficient method to achieve a high ortho concentration, (iii) a direct way to calculate the UCN production cross-section from the dynamic structure factor S(q, ω), (iv) the identification of six excitations responsible for UCN production (v) the interpretation of one excitation at E=12 meV as a multi-phonon process (vi) the discovery of an additional spin-dependent UCN loss mechanism at q=2.1A -1 and E=1.8 meV. A complementary series of experiments was performed at the FRMII, testing the production of UCN with the studied sample preparation after different the characterization mentioned above. Besides establishing a technique for annealing sD 2 crystals to improve the UCN production rate, an additional loss cross section (σ x =8 barn at 4.5 K indirect proportional to the ortho concentration) was found. Based on these findings, a new conceptual layout of the miniD 2 source was developed. In the second part, the diffuse scattering probability f and the loss probability per wall collision μ were measured for differently prepared UCN guides using the storageand the so called two-hole method. Electropolished, rough stainless steel and Al tubes with different coatings at temperature variation and surface conditions were measured. The third part deals with the development of a proton detector for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE, which is based on gravitational and magnetic UCN storage and counting of the protons from the decay. A concept for a large-area proton detector based on thin scintillation counters operating in cryogenic environment was developed based on simulations and experimental studies. In addition to the characterization of CsI(Tl) and CsI scintillators, a

  18. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  19. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passe, J.; Petitcolas, H.; Verdant, R.

    1975-01-01

    The self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) enable to measure continuously high fluxes of thermal neutrons. They are particularly suitable for power reactor cores because of their robustness. Description of two kinds of SPND's characterized by the electrical current production way is given here: the first SPND's which present a V, Ag or Rh emitter are sensitive enough but they offer a few minute delay time: the second SPND's which are depending on the gamma activation have a short delay time. The emitter is made of Co or Pt. In any case, the signal is linear with reaction rates. Finally, the applications are briefly repeated here: irradiation facility monitor in research reactors, and flux map and space instability control in power reactors [fr

  20. Ground Optical Lightning Detector (GOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John, Jr.; Simmons, David

    A photometer developed to characterize lightning from the ground is discussed. The detector and the electronic signal processing and data storage systems are presented along with field data measured by the system. The discussion will include improvements that will be incorporated to enhance the measurement of lightning and the data storage capability to record for many days without human involvement. Finally, the calibration of the GOLD system is presented.