WorldWideScience

Sample records for jv stairs db

  1. The JV Is Back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RICHARD; HOFFMANN

    2007-01-01

    With the upsurge in foreign investors wanting to set up joint ventures)JVs)in China,we examine the points to consider when taking this investment route. Contractual JVa vs.Equity JVa There are two types of JVs in China,the equity JV)EJV)and the cooperative JV,some-

  2. Crutches and children - stairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help your child take stairs safely. Taking Stairs with Crutches Teach your child to put his weight on the uninjured foot and leg when going up or down stairs. Walk behind your child when going up stairs, ...

  3. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    In short,the main areas of due diligence that need to be covered during the negotia- tion process with your proposed joint venture (JV)are as follows: Legal due diligence It is important to ensure a person is who they say they are and that all required licenses and documentation are in place.Converting a

  4. Origin of J-V Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Mengjin; Priya, Shashank; Zhu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on organometal halide perovskite have emerged in the past five years as excellent devices for harvesting solar energy. Some remaining challenges should be resolved to continue the momentum in their development. The photocurrent density-voltage (J-V) responses of the PSCs demonstrate anomalous dependence on the voltage scan direction/rate/range, voltage conditioning history, and device configuration. The hysteretic J-V behavior presents a challenge for determining the accurate power conversion efficiency of the PSCs. Here, we review the recent progress on the investigation of the origin(s) of J-V hysteresis behavior in PSCs. We discuss the impact of slow transient capacitive current, trapping and detrapping process, ion migrations, and ferroelectric polarization on the hysteresis behavior. The remaining issues and future research required toward the understanding of J-V hysteresis in PSCs will also be discussed.

  5. JV Task 92 - Alcoa/Retec SFE and SPME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Hawthorne

    2009-02-15

    This report summarizes the work performed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) under the U.S. Department of Energy Jointly Sponsored Research Program JV Task 92, which is a continuation of JV9. Successful studies performed in 1999 through the end of 2008 demonstrated the potential for using selective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method for measuring sediment pore water polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to mimic the bioavailability of PAHs from manufactured gas plant and aluminum smelter soils and sediments both in freshwater and saltwater locations. The studies that the EERC has performed with the commercial partners have continued to generate increased interest in both the regulatory communities and in the industries that have historically produced or utilized coal tar products. Both ASTM International and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have accepted the pore water method developed at the EERC as standard methods. The studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of our techniques in predicting bioavailability of PAHs from ca. 250 impacted and background field sediments and soils. The field demonstrations from the final years of the project continued to build the foundation data for acceptance of our methods by the regulatory communities. The JV92 studies provide the single largest database in the world that includes measures of PAH bioavailability along with biological end points. These studies clearly demonstrated that present regulatory paradigms based on equilibrium partitioning greatly overpredict bioavailability. These investigations also laid the foundation for present (non-JV) studies being applied to PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at EPA Superfund sites, investigations into PAH and PCB bioavailability at U.S Department of Defense sites, and the application of the techniques to investigating the bioavailability of chlorinated dioxins and furans from impacted

  6. Does a video displaying a stair climbing model increase stair use in a worksite setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Calster, L; Van Hoecke, A-S; Octaef, A; Boen, F

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of improving the visibility of the stairwell and of displaying a video with a stair climbing model on climbing and descending stair use in a worksite setting. Intervention study. Three consecutive one-week intervention phases were implemented: (1) the visibility of the stairs was improved by the attachment of pictograms that indicated the stairwell; (2) a video showing a stair climbing model was sent to the employees by email; and (3) the same video was displayed on a television screen at the point-of-choice (POC) between the stairs and the elevator. The interventions took place in two buildings. The implementation of the interventions varied between these buildings and the sequence was reversed. Improving the visibility of the stairs increased both stair climbing (+6%) and descending stair use (+7%) compared with baseline. Sending the video by email yielded no additional effect on stair use. By contrast, displaying the video at the POC increased stair climbing in both buildings by 12.5% on average. One week after the intervention, the positive effects on stair climbing remained in one of the buildings, but not in the other. These findings suggest that improving the visibility of the stairwell and displaying a stair climbing model on a screen at the POC can result in a short-term increase in both climbing and descending stair use. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modelling effects of stair width on rates of stair climbing in a train station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Frank F; Lewis, Amanda L; Griffin, Carl

    2008-09-01

    Commuters leaving a station often choose the stair as a quicker exit than the escalator. This paper models the effects of speed leaving the station and stair width on choice of the stairs or escalator. Aggregated data from previous studies (n=82,347) revealed a plateau at about 45% stair use as the number leaving each train rose. Subsequently, the time taken by passengers on the stairs and escalator was measured in a station in Birmingham, UK in 2007 (n=5848). The resulting transport rates (passengers s(-1)) for stairs and escalators at the average commuting traffic were used to estimate the effects of increases in stair width on choice of the stairs. Average transport rates were higher for the escalator (0.93+/-0.33 passengers s(-1)) than the stairs (0.58+/-0.24 passengers s(-1)). Modelling of the effects of transport rate with multiple regression suggested 40.1% of passengers would use the stairs, a figure close to the observed rate. Using similar calculations, a doubling of width of the stairs could result maximally in a 17.2% increase in stair use. Changes to the width of stairs could produce a permanent increase in lifestyle physical activity immune to the effects of time on healthy intentions.

  8. Promoting stair climbing: stair-riser banners are better than posters... sometimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olander, Ellinor K; Eves, Frank F; Puig-Ribera, Anna

    2008-04-01

    Stair-riser banners are twice as effective as posters in encouraging stair climbing in shopping centres. This study tested the effectiveness of stair-riser banners in an English train station in 2006-2007. The train station had a 39-step staircase and an adjacent escalator. Baseline observations (3.5 weeks) were followed by 10.5 weeks of a banner intervention supplemented with 3 weeks of a poster intervention. Both poster and banner featured the message 'Stair climbing burns more calories per minute than jogging. Take the stairs'. Ascending escalator and stair users (N=36,239) were coded for gender. Analyses, controlling for effects of gender and pedestrian traffic volume, revealed no significant change in stair climbing between baseline (40.6%) and the banner intervention (40.9%; p=0.98). Addition of the poster increased stair climbing (44.3%; OR=1.36, 95% CIs 1.16-1.60, pstair-riser banners had no effect, the poster intervention increased stair climbing. The high pedestrian volumes as the wave of disembarking passengers seek to leave the station would have obscured the visibility of the banner for many commuters. Thus stair-riser banners appear unsuitable point-of-choice prompts in stations where pedestrian traffic volume is high.

  9. Promoting workplace stair climbing: sometimes, not interfering is the best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åvitsland, Andreas; Solbraa, Ane Kristiansen; Riiser, Amund

    2017-01-01

    Stair climbing is a vigorous activity and can lead to several health benefits. Studies seeking to increase stair climbing in various public locations have shown positive effects, while results from similar studies conducted in the workplace are inconclusive. This study examined stair climbing in the workplace, and monitored effects from a single- and a combined intervention. Interventions were inspired by nudging, the libertarian method of influencing behavior. By quasi-experimental design, stair- and elevator traffic in two office buildings was monitored preceding-, during- and following interventions with stair leading footprints alone, and combined with stair-riser banners. Chi square tests were applied to determine differences between baseline and the subsequent periods. Web-based questionnaires were distributed after follow-up period. Elevators and stairs were used 45 237 times, of which 89.6% was stair use. Intervention site stair climbing at baseline (79.0%) was significantly reduced with footprints (-5.1%, p stair-riser banners (-5.7%, p stair climbing at the control site (94.2%) remained stable (p > 0.027). Stair climbing was significantly reduced during the intervention periods. Use of stair leading footprints alone, or combined with stair-riser banners in an attempt to influence stair climbing may be ineffective, or cause a negative reaction, when applied in a workplace with a pre-existing high amount of stair climbing.

  10. Effects of environmental changes in a stair climbing intervention: generalization to stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Oliver J; Eves, Frank F

    2007-01-01

    Visual improvements have been shown to encourage stair use in worksites independently of written prompts. This study examined whether visual modifications alone can influence behavior in a shopping mall. Climbing one flight of stairs, however, will not confer health benefits. Therefore, this study also assessed whether exposure to the intervention encouraged subsequent stair use. Interrupted time-series design. Escalators flanked by a staircase on either side. Ascending and descending pedestrians (N = 81,948). Following baseline monitoring, a colorful design was introduced on the stair risers of one staircase (the target staircase). A health promotion message was superimposed later on top. The intervention was visible only to ascending pedestrians. Thus, any rise in descending stair use would indicate increased intention to use stairs, which endured after initial exposure to the intervention. Observers inconspicuously coded pedestrians' means of ascent/descent and demographic characteristics. The design alone had no meaningful impact. Addition of the message, however, increased stair climbing at the target and nontarget staircases by 190% and 52%, respectively. The message also produced a modest increase in stair descent at the target (25%) and nontarget (9%) staircases. In public venues, a message component is critical to the success of interventions. In addition, it appears that exposure to an intervention can encourage pedestrians to use stairs on a subsequent occasion.

  11. Promoting stair climbing: intervention effects generalize to a subsequent stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Oliver J; Eves, Frank F

    2007-01-01

    Studies report a significant increase in stair use when message prompts are introduced at the "point of choice" between stairs and escalators. Climbing one set of stairs, however, will not confer meaningful health dividends. Therefore, this study examined whether exposure to point of choice prompts also encouraged individuals to climb the next set of stairs that they encountered. Interrupted time-series design. Two separate stair/escalator pairings within a U.K. shopping mall (the "intervention" site and the "generalization" site), separated by a 25-m long atrium. Subjects. Ascending pedestrians (intervention site n = 29,713; generalization site n = 47,553). Two weeks of baseline monitoring were followed by a 13-week intervention in which banners carrying health promotion messages were introduced at the intervention site only. At both sites observers inconspicuously recorded pedestrians' methods of ascent, along with their gender, age, ethnicity, and baggage. Banners increased stair climbing at the intervention site by 161%. Results also suggested a simultaneous increase of up to 143% at the generalization site, where no prompt was in place. At both sites stair use remained significantly elevated 5 weeks after the banners were removed. It appears that exposure to point of choice prompts can encourage pedestrians to climb stairs when they are encountered in a subsequent setting. Consequently stair-climbing interventions are likely to engage the public in more physical activity than previously realized.

  12. SENSORY EVALUATION OF HUBBARD JV CHICKENS MEAT AFTER PROPOLIS APPLICATION IN THEIR DIET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Hascík; Jozef Garlík; Ibrahim Omer Elamin Elimam; Vladimíra Knazovická; Juraj Cubon; Miroslav Krocko

    2014-01-01

      In this experiment, propolis extract was applied in the diet of Hubbard JV broiler chickens and we tested its influence on the sensory quality of breast and thigh muscles prepared by baking at 200...

  13. How and when infants learn to climb stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah E; Theuring, Carolin; Adolph, Karen E

    2007-02-01

    Seven hundred and thirty-two parents reported when and how their infants learned to climb stairs. Children typically mastered stair ascent (mean age=10.97 months) several months after crawling onset and several weeks prior to descent (mean age=12.53 months). Most infants (94%) crawled upstairs the first time they ascended independently. Most infants (76%) turned around and backed at initial descent. Other descent strategies included scooting down sitting, walking, and sliding down face first. Children with stairs in their home were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, devise backing as a descent strategy, and be explicitly taught to descend by their parents than children without stairs in their home. However, all infants learned to descend stairs at the same age, regardless of the presence of stairs in their home. Parents' teaching strategies and infants' access to stairs worked together to constrain development and to influence the acquisition of stair climbing milestones.

  14. Use of stairs in a hospital increased by a sign near the stairs or the elevator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, ST; Stoopendaal, J; Kleefstra, N; Meyboom-de Jong, B; Bilo, HJG

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether signs encouraging taking the stairs or discouraging taking the elevator lead to an increasing number of patients taking the stairs instead of the elevator in a hospital. Design. Interventional study. Method. During a period of 6 weeks in the period October-December

  15. Evaluation of stair climbing in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoğlu, Rüstem; Unver, Bayram; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2015-01-01

    Stair climbing is an important but neglected aspect of independent living. Clinicians should pay attention to the ability to negotiate stairs in elderly and disabled patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of age, gender, medication use, cognitive status, lower extremity pathology and pain on the activities of stair negotiation in the elderly population in Turkish society. Volunteer elderly people (254) were included the study. Participants were assessed in terms of their medication use, cognitive status, lower extremity pathology and pain and the activity of climbing the stairs. Significant differences were found on the activities of stair negotiation between the elderly with and without lower extremity pathology, with and without lower extremity pain, with and without medication use (pstair climbing (r= 0.24, pstair climbing is affected by age, medication use, the presence of lower extremity pathology and pain. We consider that this information will be helpful for planning an appropriate and effective rehabilitation programme for elderly people for decreasing their risk of falling and increasing their independence level during their activities of daily living.

  16. Comparative Effect of Forward and Backward Stair Climbing on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olagbegi

    Forward stair climbing (FSC) is associated with cardiovascular fitness benefits, but the .... Step benches (male = 40cm high, 28cm wide; female = ... The cardiovascular endurance index was then estimated ..... Effects of stair climbing vs run.

  17. Characterization of ankle function during stair ambulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Deanna H.; Lelas, Jennifer L.; Della Croce, Ugo; Herr, Hugh; Bonato, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ankle joint during level walking, stair ascent, and stair descent to determine models for use in the design of prosthetic and orthotic systems. Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk (1) across a level walkway, (2) up, and (3) down an instrumented stairway. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were analyzed to obtain ankle biomechanics during the stance phase of each task. Each stance phase was broken down into sub-phases based on the power traje...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890... wheelchair. (a) Identification. A stair-climbing wheelchair is a device with wheels that is intended for... to climb stairs by means of two endless belt tracks that are lowered from under the chair and...

  19. Stair performance in people aged 75 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2004-04-01

    To examine specific behaviors used by older adults while ascending and descending stairs and to assess the relationships between confidence and stair performance. Cross-sectional. Center for Locomotion Studies, The Pennsylvania State University. Sixteen male (mean age=82.7, range= 77-89) and 16 female (mean age=82.2, range=77-87) community-dwelling adults. A stair self-efficacy (SSE) test was created to assess individuals' confidence in their safety on stairs. Observational stair performance measures, measures of walking speed on stairs, and the total SSE score were examined for differences due to sex, and the relationships between SSE and specific stair behaviors were assessed. There was a significant relationship between SSE and the safety precautions taken during stair negotiation. Those with lower SSE were more likely to ascend and descend the stairs at a slower speed, use the handrail to a greater extent, and position themselves closer to the rail. The women had lower domain-specific SSE and tended to use the handrail to a greater extent than men even though there were no sex differences in self-reported functional ability or general falls and mobility confidence. A small group of subjects exhibited characteristics of instability, particularly during stair descent, yet most of this group had high SSE scores and failed to use the handrail. It appears that confidence related to stair negotiation plays a major role in determining risk-taking propensity during stair use in older adults.

  20. Pedestrian speeds on stairs: an initial step for a simulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiyama, T.; Tyler, N.

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict a pedestrian’s walking speed on stairs from his/her characteristics of and those of the stairs, the relationship between the walking speed of a pedestrian on stairs and his/her characteristics, and the relationship between the pedestrians’ walking speeds on stairs and the stair-gradients were investigated. It is suggested that Leg Extensor Power shows a strong correlation to walking speeds of elderly people on stairs, the stair-gradient has a linear relationshi...

  1. Brief Intense Stair Climbing Improves Cardiorespiratory Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Mary K; Baglole, Jessica H; Martin, Brian J; Macinnis, Martin J; Gurd, Brendon J; Gibala, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) is a time-efficient strategy to improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF); however, most protocols have been studied in laboratory settings and require specialized equipment. We investigated the efficacy of brief intense stair climbing as a practical model of SIT to improve CRF. Two separate studies, each consisting of an acute and chronic phase, were conducted in a total of 31 sedentary women (age = 24 ± 10 yr, body mass index = 23 ± 4 kg·m). The acute phase of study 1 established that the mean HR, blood [lactate], and RPE were similar when participants (n = 8) performed an SIT protocol that involved 3 × 20-s "all-out" efforts of either continuously ascending stairs or cycling. The chronic phase demonstrated that CRF, as determined by peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak), increased by 12% or ~1 MET (8.27 ± 1.05 to 9.25 ± 1.01 METs, P = 0.002) when participants (n = 12) performed the 3 × 20-s stair climbing protocol 3 d·wk for 6 wk. The acute phase of study 2 established that HR and RPE were similar when participants (n = 11) performed three different stair climbing protocols: the 3 × 20-s continuous ascent model used in study 1 and two 3 × 60-s models of ascending and descending either one or two flights of stairs (P > 0.05). The chronic phase demonstrated that V˙O2peak increased by 7% (8.91 ± 1.30 to 9.51 ± 1.52 METs, P = 0.01) when the same group of participants performed the one-flight 3 × 60-s protocol 3 d·wk for 6 wk. The Cederholm index determined from an oral glucose tolerance test was 57 ± 17 and 64 ± 21 mg·L·mmol·mU·min before and after training, respectively (P = 0.056). Brief, intense stair climbing is a practical, time-efficient strategy to improve CRF in previously untrained women.

  2. Climbing Stairs, Handrail Use, and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stessman, J; Rottenberg, Y; Jacobs, J M

    2017-01-01

    Negotiating stairs is identified as a challenging task by older people, and using a handrail to climb stairs is a compensatory gait strategy to overcome mobility difficulties. We examine the association between handrail use to climb stairs at increasing ages, and long term survival. Data were collected by the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study, which is a prospective study of a representative sample from the 1920-1921 birth-cohort living in West Jerusalem. Comprehensive assessment at home in 1990, 1998, and 2005, at ages 70 (n=446), 78 (n=897), and 85 (n=1041) included direct questioning concerning handrail use for climbing stairs. Mortality data were collected from age 70-90. The frequency of handrail use to climb stairs at ages 70, 78, 85 years was 23.1% (n=103/446), 41.0% (n=368/897), and 86.7% (n=903/1041) respectively. Handrail use was associated throughout follow-up with a consistent pattern of negative demographic, functional and medical parameters. Between ages 70-78, 70-90, 78-85, 78-90, and 85-90, survival was significantly lower among subjects using a handrail, with unadjusted mortality Hazard Ratios of HR 1.57 (95%CI, 1.01-2.42), HR 1.65 (95%CI, 1.27-2.14), HR 1.78 (95%CI, 1.41-2.25), HR 1.71 (95%CI, 1.41-2.06), and HR 1.53 (95%CI, 1.01-2.33) respectively. HR's remained significant at all ages after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (gender, education, marital, and financial status), and common medical conditions (ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain), as well as between ages 78-85 and 78-90 after adjusting for functional covariables (self-rated health, physical activity, depression, BMI and ADL difficulties). Using a handrail to climb stairs is increasingly common with rising age, was associated with a negative profile of health parameters and is associated with subsequent mortality.

  3. Study of Movement Speeds Down Stairs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskins, Bryan L

    2013-01-01

    The Study of Movement Speeds Down Stairs closely examines forty-three unique case studies on movement patterns down stairwells. These studies include observations made during evacuation drills, others made during normal usage, interviews with people after fire evacuations, recommendations made from compiled studies, and detailed results from laboratory studies. The methodology used in each study for calculating density and movement speed, when known, are also presented, and this book identifies an additional seventeen variables linked to altering movement speeds. The Study of Movement Speeds Down Stairs is intended for researchers as a reference guide for evaluating pedestrian evacuation dynamics down stairwells. Practitioners working in a related field may also find this book invaluable.

  4. Control of a stair climbing wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Maniha Abdul Ghani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations into the control of a stair climbing wheelchair particularly for indoor usage. A virtual wheelchair model is developed using Visual Nastran software and linked with Matlab/Simulink for control purposes. The goals are to have a simple, compact and stable stairs climbing wheelchair in order to complete the ascending and descending tasks. The challenges are to ensure the wheelchair seat always stay at the upright position and to control both the front and rear wheel motors while climbing. PID control is used to provide appropriate torque to both front and rear wheels as well as at to the wheelchair seat during climbing. Results show that the wheelchair movement can be controlled smoothly and the seat maintained at the desired position with the adapted approach.

  5. Maintenance of the rate of stair use over a long-term period using a stair climbing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takuo; Katayama, Kunihiro; Kashiwa, Tomoyuki; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Sato, Atushi

    2014-01-01

    This study was a long-term survey of a stair climbing campaign that made use of point-of-choice prompts aimed at achieving exemplary behavior in citizens. The campaign began in September 2007 at the Kochi Prefectural Office. We monitored office workers who climbed the stairs or used the elevator in the prefectural office building, excluding weekends, from August 2007 through February 2009. Prompts were placed on the stair risers. A total of 59 days were monitored during the observation period. A questionnaire was distributed to 250 workers to examine the influence of the prompts following completion of the observation period. A total of 16,583 observations of the choice of workers to use the elevators or stairs were made during the observation period. The mean number of stair users was 281.0 ± 66.0 per day. Stair use increased significantly from 31.5 to 58.1% among women and from 26.3 to 62.4% among men during months 1-3 of the campaign. Stair use was maintained in more than 51% of women and 60% of men during the entire campaign period. The following response (valid records: 81) was given by 10% of the respondents regarding the use of stairs: "my use of stairs increased due to the message banners". The stair climbing campaign was effective for increasing stair use and was maintained over a long-term period. However, most office workers thought that their increased stair use was not due to prompts placed on risers; therefore, the reason for the increased stair use remains unclear.

  6. Worksite interventions to increase stair climbing; reasons for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Frank F; Webb, Oliver J

    2006-07-01

    Point-of-choice prompts to use the stairs rather than the escalator consistently increase physical activity at public access staircases such as those in shopping malls. More recently, exercise promoters have targeted stair climbing in the worksite. A review of interventions in worksites reveals little hard evidence of successful increases in stair climbing, though the increases in stair usage are encouraging. The contrast between the worksites and public access staircases, however, is not simply one of location. In a worksite, the choice is between the stairs and an elevator rather than an escalator. We reason that the availability of the elevator or the stairwell may be the major immediate determinant of stair climbing in worksites and dilute any possible effects of an intervention.

  7. Biomechanical Analyses of Stair-climbing while Dual-tasking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Tan, Chi Wei; Mukherjee, Mukul; Davidson, Austin J.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Stair-climbing while doing a concurrent task like talking or holding an object is a common activity of daily living which poses high risk for falls. While biomechanical analyses of overground walking during dual-tasking have been studied extensively, little is known on the biomechanics of stair-climbing while dual-tasking. We sought to determine the impact of performing a concurrent cognitive or motor task during stair-climbing. We hypothesized that a concurrent cognitive task will have a greater impact on stair climbing performance compared to a concurrent motor task and that this impact will be greater on a higher-level step. Ten healthy young adults performed 10 trials of stair-climbing each under four conditions: stair ascending only, stair ascending and performing subtraction of serial sevens from a three-digit number, stair ascending and carrying an empty opaque box and stair ascending, performing subtraction of serial sevens from a random three-digit number and carrying an empty opaque box. Kinematics (lower extremity joint angles and minimum toe clearance) and kinetics (ground reaction forces and joint moments and powers) data were collected. We found that a concurrent cognitive task impacted kinetics but not kinematics of stair-climbing. The effect of dual-tasking during stair ascent also seemed to vary based on the different phases of stair ascent stance and seem to have greater impact as one climbs higher. Overall, the results of the current study suggest that the association between the executive functioning and motor task (like gait) becomes stronger as the level of complexity of the motor task increases. PMID:25773590

  8. A Star-Wheel Stair-Climbing Wheelchair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; WU Bo; JIN Ai-min; JIANG Shi-hong; ZHENG Yu-fei; ZHANG Shuai

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve a wheelchair climb stairs function, this paper designs a star-wheel stair-climbing mechanism. Through the effect of the lock coupling, the star-wheel stair-climbing mechanism is formed to be fixed axis gear train or planetary gear train achieving flat-walking and stair-climbing functions. Crossing obstacle analysis obtains the maximum height and minimum width of obstacle which the wheelchair can cross. Stress-strain analysis in Solidworks simulation is performed to verify material strength.

  9. Effects of load carrying methods and stair slopes on physiological response and postures during stairs ascending and descending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsien-Yu; Liu, Bor-Shong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of load carrying methods, stair slopes and walking speeds on heart rate and walking postures. Nine participants climbed up and down stairs with various stair slopes (24°, 30° and 36°), walking speeds (72, 96, and 132 steps per minute), and using different load carrying methods (empty loads, backpack, and hand-held). The effects of these factors on heart rate, Borg-RPE and flexion angles of knee joints, hip joints and trunk angles were investigated. This study demonstrated that increased stair slopes and walking speed were associated with increased heart rate and RPE. The heart rate for empty loads subjects was lowest, followed by backpack load and hand-held load. Climbing stairs with larger inclination was associated with smaller knee joint flexion angle and larger trunk and hip joint flexion angle. In conclusion, it is easier for subjects to carry a load of the same weight up stairs by backpack than by hand. However, the stair slope should be less than 30°. Thus, the standard fixed stair slope (30° of stair slope) on recommended for riser height and tread depth are 160 mm (6.5 inches) and tread depth 280 mm (11 inches).

  10. Functional predictors of stair-climbing speed in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Martha R; O'Connell, Janelle K; Dorr, Melissa; Hardin, Robyn; Tumlinson, Allison B; Varner, Bria

    2014-01-01

    Falls on stairs are a common cause of injury and death among older adults. Although stair climbing is a component of some instruments that assess activities of daily living, normal speeds for safe stairway ambulation have not been established. Furthermore, little is known about which components of functional mobility are most highly associated with stair-climbing speed. The purposes of this study were to determine the range of normal stair-climbing speeds for ambulatory, community-dwelling older adults and identify which functional mobility tests could best explain this speed. Twenty men and 34 women older than 65 years completed 6 functional mobility tests, including timed heel rises, timed chair stands, functional reach, one-legged stance time (OLST), a timed step test (alternately touching a step 10 times), and self-selected gait speed. Participants were then timed as they ascended and descended a flight of 8 to 10 steps. Combined ascent-descent times were used to calculate stair-climbing speed in steps per second. Stepwise regression techniques determined the best functional predictors for stair-climbing speed. Participants ascended and descended stairs at an average speed of 1.3 steps per second; men tended to ambulate stairs more quickly than women. The best predictors of stair-climbing speed were usual gait speed and OLST (R = 0.79; P = .01), which explained 63% of the variance in stair-climbing speed. Our results were similar to others who reported stair-climbing speeds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7 steps per second for older adults. However, the 2 predictors identified in this study provide a simpler and more accurate model for estimating stair-climbing speed than has been previously reported. Further research is needed to determine whether this speed is sufficient for negotiating stairs in an emergency. In addition, further study is needed to determine which tests/measures best differentiate individuals who can and cannot independently climb a typical flight of

  11. Is stair negotiation measured appropriately in functional assessment scales?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M.B. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Mulley, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decline in mobility may result in problems with the negotiation of stairs, which can potentially be hazardous. In practice, stair negotiation is an important aspect of daily living and therefore needs to be assessed carefully. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature review to

  12. 29 CFR 1910.24 - Fixed industrial stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed industrial stairs. 1910.24 Section 1910.24 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.24 Fixed industrial stairs. (a) Application of requirements. This section contains specifications for the safe design and construction of...

  13. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madehkhaksar, F.; Egges, J.

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinatio

  14. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madehkhaksar, F.; Egges, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822779

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different

  15. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent.

  16. Musical stairs: the impact of audio feedback during stair-climbing physical therapies for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ajmal; Biddiss, Elaine

    2015-05-01

    Enhanced biofeedback during rehabilitation therapies has the potential to provide a therapeutic environment optimally designed for neuroplasticity. This study investigates the impact of audio feedback on the achievement of a targeted therapeutic goal, namely, use of reciprocal steps. Stair-climbing therapy sessions conducted with and without audio feedback were compared in a randomized AB/BA cross-over study design. Seventeen children, aged 4-7 years, with various diagnoses participated. Reports from the participants, therapists, and a blinded observer were collected to evaluate achievement of the therapeutic goal, motivation and enjoyment during the therapy sessions. Audio feedback resulted in a 5.7% increase (p = 0.007) in reciprocal steps. Levels of participant enjoyment increased significantly (p = 0.031) and motivation was reported by child participants and therapists to be greater when audio feedback was provided. These positive results indicate that audio feedback may influence the achievement of therapeutic goals and promote enjoyment and motivation in young patients engaged in rehabilitation therapies. This study lays the groundwork for future research to determine the long term effects of audio feedback on functional outcomes of therapy. Stair-climbing is an important mobility skill for promoting independence and activities of daily life and is a key component of rehabilitation therapies for physically disabled children. Provision of audio feedback during stair-climbing therapies for young children may increase their achievement of a targeted therapeutic goal (i.e., use of reciprocal steps). Children's motivation and enjoyment of the stair-climbing therapy was enhanced when audio feedback was provided.

  17. JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2009-03-30

    Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

  18. Choosing between stairs and escalators in China: The impact of location, height and pedestrian volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Zacharias

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Separating stairs and escalator is effective in increasing stair climbing in Beijing, accounting for 29% of the variance in stair climbing, compared with 43% in Montreal. As in the Montreal case, distance has less effect on stair use rate when descending. Overall, 25.4% of Beijingers opted for stairs when ascending compared with 20.3% of Montrealers, and for descending 32.8% and 31.1% respectively.

  19. A Kinect-sensor-based Tracked Robot for Exploring and Climbing Stairs

    OpenAIRE

    I-Hsum Li; Wei-Yen Wang; Chien-Kai Tseng

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the stair-climbing problem for a tracked robot. The tracked robot designed in this paper has the ability to explore stairs in an unknown indoor environment, climbing up and down the stairs, keeping balance while climbing, and successfully landing on the stair platform. Intelligent algorithms are proposed to explore and align stairs, and a fuzzy controller is introduced to stabilize the tracked robot’s movement during the exploration. An inexpensive Kinect depth sensor is...

  20. Research on Dynamics and Stability in the Stairs-Climbing of a Tracked Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the functional requirement of climbing up the stairs, the dynamics and stability during a tracked mobile robot's climbing of stairs is studied. First, from the analysis of its cross-country performance, the mechanical structure of the tracked mobile robot is designed and the hardware composition of its control system is given. Second, based on the analysis to its stairs-climbing process, the dynamical model of stairs-climbing is established by using the classical mechanics method. Next, the stability conditions for its stairs-climbing are determined and an evaluation method of its stairs-climbing stability is proposed, based on a mechanics analysis on the robot's backwards tumbling during the stairs-climbing process. Through simulation and experiments, the effectiveness of the dynamical model and the stability evaluation method of the tracked mobile robot in stairs-climbing is verified, which can provide design and analysis foundations for the tracked mobile robots' stairs-climbing.

  1. A Kinect-sensor-based Tracked Robot for Exploring and Climbing Stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsum Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the stair-climbing problem for a tracked robot. The tracked robot designed in this paper has the ability to explore stairs in an unknown indoor environment, climbing up and down the stairs, keeping balance while climbing, and successfully landing on the stair platform. Intelligent algorithms are proposed to explore and align stairs, and a fuzzy controller is introduced to stabilize the tracked robot's movement during the exploration. An inexpensive Kinect depth sensor is the only equipment needed for all the control modes. Finally, experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for climbing stairs.

  2. A Kinect-sensor-based Tracked Robot for Exploring and Climbing Stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsum Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the stair-climbing problem for a tracked robot. The tracked robot designed in this paper has the ability to explore stairs in an unknown indoor environment, climbing up and down the stairs, keeping balance while climbing, and successfully landing on the stair platform. Intelligent algorithms are proposed to explore and align stairs, and a fuzzy controller is introduced to stabilize the tracked robot’s movement during the exploration. An inexpensive Kinect depth sensor is the only equipment needed for all the control modes. Finally, experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for climbing stairs.

  3. 'Take the stairs instead of the escalator': effect of environmental prompts on community stair use and implications for a national 'Small Steps' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, M S; Weiss, L A; Lewis, R A; Pietrobelli, A; Heo, M; Faith, M S

    2006-02-01

    The US government initiated a national health campaign targeting 100 'small step' lifestyle changes to combat obesity. Small Step #67 advocates stair instead of escalator usage in public settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of motivational signs prompting stair use over escalator use on pedestrians' stair usage in commuter settings. Eight studies, testing the effects of motivational prompts on stair vs. escalator usage in public settings, were reviewed. Participant and study attributes were descriptively coded. Effect size was calculated as the change in percent units of stair users during the intervention phases vs. the baseline phase. The average study included approximately 45,000 observations that were recorded across an average of 15 weeks of intervention. The mean +/- SD change in percent units of stair users was 2.8% +/- 2.4% (P stairs/building, baseline stair use, and total intervention weeks predicted change in stair use, although the effects were clinically miniscule. In a hypothetical city intervention, we projected that a 2.8% increase in stair usage would result in a weight loss and/or weight gain prevention of 300 g/person/year among new stair users. In sum, point-of-decision motivational signs may help communities attain Small Step #67. However, the singular impact of this community intervention on correcting energy imbalance may be minimal, having slight impact itself on reducing the national obesity prevalence.

  4. The Trial of J.V. Stalin: Exercises in Critical and Moral Reasoning. Critical Geopedagogy No.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul F.

    The dissemination and synthesis of critical, but scattered, existing knowledge concerning the human costs of J.V. Stalin's once-acclaimed achievements are contained in this seed document. The document is primarily for teachers who are free to expand, contract, modify, or delete the seed suggestions provided according to the characteristics of…

  5. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  6. Is there any Proffitt in stair climbing? A headcount of studies testing for demographic differences in choice of stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Frank F

    2014-02-01

    The apparent slope of a hill, termed geographical slant perception, is overestimated in explicit awareness. Proffitt (2006) argued that overestimation allows individuals to manage their locomotor resources. Increasing age, fatigue, and wearing a heavy back pack will reduce the available resources and result in steeper reports for a particular hill. In contrast, Durgin and colleagues have proposed an alternative explanation for these effects based on experimental design-particularly, the potential effects of experimental demand. Proffitt's resource-based model would predict that pedestrians with reduced resources should avoid climbing a hill that would further deplete their resources if the opportunity arose. Within the built environment, stairs are the man-made equivalent of relatively steep hills (20°-30°). In many public access settings, pedestrians can avoid climbing the stairs by opting for an adjacent escalator. Observations of pedestrian behavior in shopping malls reveal that 94.5 % do so. This article summarizes the effects of demographic grouping on avoidance of stairs in public health research. Observations in shopping malls (n = 355,069) and travel contexts (n = 711,867) provide data consistent with Proffitt's resource model. Women, the old, and those carrying excess body weight or large bags avoid the stairs more than do their comparison groups. Discussion focuses on differences in physiology that may underlie avoidance of stair climbing in order to highlight the pedestrian behavior that psychology needs to explain.

  7. Research on Dynamics and Stability in the Stairs-climbing of a Tracked Mobile Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Weijun Tao; Yi Ou; Hutian Feng

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the functional requirement of climbing up the stairs, the dynamics and stability during a tracked mobile robot's climbing of stairs is studied. First, from the analysis of its cross-country performance, the mechanical structure of the tracked mobile robot is designed and the hardware composition of its control system is given. Second, based on the analysis to its stairs-climbing process, the dynamical model of stairs-climbing is established by using the classical mechanics method. N...

  8. Pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and bench stepping exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, Makoto; Aoki, Junichiro; Ishii, Kojiro; Takayama, Kohsaku; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and descending as well as during the performance of a bench stepping exercise. Ten healthy men participated in the present investigation. All subjects ascended and descended an 18 cm high public staircase, and performed a bench stepping exercise by using a 10, 20 and 30 cm high platforms, while wearing three different commercial pedometers (DW-800, YM, HJ- 700IT; OM, Lifecorder; KZ). In both situations, the stepping rate was controlled at 40, 50, 80, 100 and 120 steps·min(-1). The pedometer scores tended to underestimate the actual number of steps during stair climbing with a slower stepping rate and/or the lower height of a platform. During the stair ascending and descending and the bench stepping exercise using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min(-1), the magnitude of the measurement error was -3.8 ± 10. 8 % for KZ, -2.1 ± 9.8 % for YM and -11.0 ± 18.9 % for OM. These results indicate that the KZ and the YM can accurately assess the number of steps during stair climbing using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min(-1). Key pointsPedometers can assess the number of step accurately within an acceptable range of measurement error during the stair climbing activities at a stepping rate of 80 step·min(-1) or faster with 18 cm or higher stairs.

  9. Research on a Micro Flip Robot That Can Climb Stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro mobile robots (MMRs can operate in rugged, narrow or dangerous regions; thus, they are widely used in numerous areas including surveillance, rescue and exploration. In urban environments, stairs are common obstacles, ones that such robots find difficult to manoeuvre over. The authors analysed the research status of MMRs, particularly in terms of difficulties when performing stair climbing and present a novel type of MMR called the micro flip robot (MFRobot. A support arm subassembly was added to the centre of a wheeled chassis; using this structure, the MFRobot can climb stairs when a flipping mode is utilized. Based on this structure, the authors established a kinematic model of the stair-climbing process and analysed the force conditions for the key status, contributing to the existing knowledge of robot design. An MFRobot prototype was produced and the stair-climbing experiments, as well as experiments on manoeuvring through rubble regions and slope surfaces, were conducted. The results show that the MFRobot can rapidly climb common stairs and can easily manoeuvre through a rubble region. The maximum slope angle the robot can climb was shown to be about 35° for concrete and wooden slope surfaces. In the case where the robot needed to be equipped with sensors, particularly a camera, the camera was equipped on the support arm of robot. The MFRobot prototype weighs 2.5 kg and is easily transportable. This structure can resolve contradictions between portability and performance in terms of overcoming obstacles; in addition, operational effectiveness can be improved using this structure.

  10. Gaze shifts during dual-tasking stair descent

    OpenAIRE

    Miyasike-daSilva, Veronica; McIlroy, William E

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of vision in stair locomotion, young adults descended a seven-step staircase during unrestricted walking (CONTROL), and while performing a concurrent visual reaction time (RT) task displayed on a monitor. The monitor was located at either 3.5 m (HIGH) or 0.5 m (LOW) above ground level at the end of the stairway, which either restricted (HIGH) or facilitated (LOW) the view of the stairs in the lower field of view as participants walked downstairs. Downward gaze shifts (...

  11. Predicting the walking speed of pedestrians on stairs

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiyama, T.; Tyler, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework in which the behaviour of a pedestrian is predicted based on the characteristics of both the pedestrian and the facility the pedestrian uses. As an example of its application, we develop a model to predict the walking speed of a pedestrian on stairs. We examine the physiology and biomechanics of walking on stairs, and then develop a model that predicts walking speed based on the weight and leg extensor power of the pedestrian, and the gradient of the stai...

  12. An Oil Droplet That Spontaneously Climbs up Stairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumino, Y.; Magome, N.; Yoshikawa, K.

    It has been reported that an oil droplet on a glass surface moves spontaneously in an oil-water system. This motion of an oil droplet can be understood as the spreading of a reactive droplet, which is induced by the interfacial tension gradient at the glass surface. In this paper, we focus on the spontaneous motion of an oil droplet climbing up stairs. We found that an oil droplet tends to move up the stairs rather than to step down. We describe some of the mechanisms of this unique behavior.

  13. Identification of stair climbing ability levels in community-dwelling older adults based on the geometric mean of stair ascent and descent speed: The GeMSS classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayagoitia, Ruth E; Harding, John; Kitchen, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to develop a quantitative approach to identify three stair-climbing ability levels of older adults: no, somewhat and considerable difficulty. Timed-up-and-go test, six-minute-walk test, and Berg balance scale were used for statistical comparison to a new stair climbing ability classifier based on the geometric mean of stair speeds (GeMSS) in ascent and descent on a flight of eight stairs with a 28° pitch in the housing unit where the participants, 28 (16 women) urban older adults (62-94 years), lived. Ordinal logistic regression revealed the thresholds between the three ability levels for each functional test were more stringent than thresholds found in the literature to classify walking ability levels. Though a small study, the intermediate classifier shows promise of early identification of difficulties with stairs, in order to make timely preventative interventions. Further studies are necessary to obtain scaling factors for stairs with other pitches.

  14. Climbing stairs after outpatient rehabilitation for a lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Fred A; Rommers, Gerardus M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2013-08-01

    To study the necessity and ability to climb stairs in persons after a lower-limb amputation (LLA) and the relation of this ability with personal and clinical variables. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Persons with an LLA (N=155; mean age ± SD, 64.1 ± 11.2y; 73% men). Not applicable. The necessity to climb stairs was assessed with the Prosthetic Profile of the Amputee. Several indicators of the ability to climb stairs were assessed including: (1) independence in climbing stairs with a handrail and (2) without a handrail, according to the Locomotor Capabilities Index; (3) numbers of floors actually climbed, according to a rating scale; and (4) limitations in climbing stairs, according to the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire (range, 0-100, with higher scores indicating less limitations). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between the ability to climb stairs and personal and clinical variables. Of the participants, 47% had to climb stairs. The ability to climb stairs was: (1) 62% independently climbed stairs with a handrail and (2) 21% without a handrail; (3) 32% didn't climb any stairs, 34% climbed half a floor or 1 floor, and 34% climbed ≥ 2 floors; (4) the median sum score (interquartile range) of the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire was 38 (19-63), indicating marked limitations. Older participants and women were less able to climb stairs with and without a handrail. A considerable number of persons with an LLA have to climb stairs in their home environment. Many of them, especially older participants and women, are particularly hampered in their ability to climb stairs. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of Low Cost Stair Climbing Robot Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino Jeyabalaji C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of the wheel, Man has sought to reduce effort to get things done easily. Ultimately, it has resulted in the invention of the Robot, an Engineering Marvel. Up until now, the biggest factor that hampers wide proliferation of robots is locomotion and maneuverability. They are not dynamic enough to conform even to the most commonplace terrain such as stairs. To overcome this, we are proposing a stair climbing robot that looks a lot like the human leg and can adjust itself according to the height of the step. But, we are currently developing a unit to carry payload of about 4 Kg. The automatic adjustment in the robot according to the height of the stair is done by connecting an Android device that has an application programmed in OpenCV with an Arduino in Host mode. The Android Device uses it camera to calculate the height of the stair and sends it to the Arduino for further calculation. This design employs an Arduino Mega ADK 2560 board to control the robot and other home fabricated custom PCB to interface it with the Arduino Board. The bot is powered by Li-Ion batteries and Servo motors.

  16. Neuromuscular function during stair descent in meniscectomized patients and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Roos, Ewa M; Aagaard, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differences in knee range of motion (ROM), movement speed, ground reaction forces (GRF) profile, neuromuscular activity, and muscle coactivation during the transition between stair descent and level walking in meniscectomized patients at high risk of knee...

  17. Stair-Walking Performance in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Yun Shieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Most individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID demonstrate problems in learning and movement coordination. Consequently, they usually have difficulties in activities such as standing, walking, and stair climbing. To monitor the physical impairments of these children, regular gross motor evaluation is crucial. Straight-line level walking is the most frequently used test of their mobility. However, numerous studies have found that unless the children have multiple disabilities, no significant differences can be found between the children with ID and typically-developed children in this test. Stair climbing presents more challenges than level walking because it is associated with numerous physical factors, including lower extremity strength, cardiopulmonary endurance, vision, balance, and fear of falling. Limited ability in those factors is one of the most vital markers for children with ID. In this paper, we propose a sensor-based approach for measuring stair-walking performance, both upstairs and downstairs, for adolescents with ID. Particularly, we address the problem of sensor calibration to ensure measurement accuracy. In total, 62 participants aged 15 to 21 years, namely 32 typically-developed (TD adolescents, 20 adolescents with ID, and 10 adolescents with multiple disabilities (MD, participated. The experimental results showed that stair-walking is more sensitive than straight-line level walking in capturing gait characteristics for adolescents with ID.

  18. PEDOMETER ACCURACY DURING STAIR CLIMBING AND BENCH STEPPING EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Tanaka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and descending as well as during the performance of a bench stepping exercise. Ten healthy men participated in the present investigation. All subjects ascended and descended an 18 cm high public staircase, and performed a bench stepping exercise by using a 10, 20 and 30 cm high platforms, while wearing three different commercial pedometers (DW-800, YM, HJ- 700IT; OM, Lifecorder; KZ. In both situations, the stepping rate was controlled at 40, 50, 80, 100 and 120 steps·min-1. The pedometer scores tended to underestimate the actual number of steps during stair climbing with a slower stepping rate and/or the lower height of a platform. During the stair ascending and descending and the bench stepping exercise using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min-1, the magnitude of the measurement error was -3.8 ± 10. 8 % for KZ, -2.1 ± 9.8 % for YM and -11.0 ± 18.9 % for OM. These results indicate that the KZ and the YM can accurately assess the number of steps during stair climbing using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min-1

  19. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  20. Stair climbing is more detrimental to the cement in hip replacement than walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jan; Verdonschot, Nico; Huiskes, Rik

    2002-12-01

    Stair climbing may be detrimental to cemented total hip arthroplasties, because it subjects the reconstruction to high torsional loads. The current study investigated how stair climbing contributes to damage accumulation in the cement around a femoral stem compared with walking, taking into account the different frequencies of these activities during patient functioning. In finite element analyses, the damage accumulation process in the cement mantle around a Lubinus SPII stem was simulated for three different loading histories: (1) isolated walking, representative for patients who climb no stairs; (2) isolated stair climbing; (3) alternating walking and stair climbing in a ratio of nine to one cycles, representative for patients who climb many stairs. Relative to isolated walking, isolated stair climbing increased the amount of cement damage by a factor of 6. Inclusion of 10% stair climbing cycles in the loading history increased the amount of damage by 47% relative to isolated walking. Stair climbing produced damage along the entire stem, whereas isolated walking produced damage proximomedially and around the tip only. This study confirmed that stair climbing is more risky for failure of cemented femoral stems than walking. A few stair climbing cycles during daily patient functioning increases the amount of cement damage dramatically.

  1. Quantum dot size dependent J-V characteristics in heterojunction ZnO/PbS quantum dot solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianbo; Luther, Joseph M; Semonin, Octavi E; Ellingson, Randy J; Nozik, Arthur J; Beard, Matthew C

    2011-03-01

    The current-voltage (J-V) characteristics of ZnO/PbS quantum dot (QD) solar cells show a QD size-dependent behavior resulting from a Schottky junction that forms at the back metal electrode opposing the desirable diode formed between the ZnO and PbS QD layers. We study a QD size-dependent roll-over effect that refers to the saturation of photocurrent in forward bias and crossover effect which occurs when the light and dark J-V curves intersect. We model the J-V characteristics with a main diode formed between the n-type ZnO nanocrystal (NC) layer and p-type PbS QD layer in series with a leaky Schottky-diode formed between PbS QD layer and metal contact. We show how the characteristics of the two diodes depend on QD size, metal work function, and PbS QD layer thickness, and we discuss how the presence of the back diode complicates finding an optimal layer thickness. Finally, we present Kelvin probe measurements to determine the Fermi level of the QD layers and discuss band alignment, Fermi-level pinning, and the V(oc) within these devices.

  2. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Hodgin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPrevious research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. Few studies, however, have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly-valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally-healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body-size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred and sixty-seven students (51% male enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their transportation choices at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants’ choice of floor climbing method (stairs or elevator was recorded and they were administered an internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror (OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.96, males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13 – 0.85, those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71

  3. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, Katie L; Graham, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one's personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their "transportation choices" at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants' choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.99), those

  4. SENSORY EVALUATION OF HUBBARD JV CHICKENS MEAT AFTER PROPOLIS APPLICATION IN THEIR DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Haščík

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, propolis extract was applied in the diet of Hubbard JV broiler chickens and we tested its influence on the sensory quality of breast and thigh muscles prepared by baking at 200 °C for 60 minutes, followed by final baking for 10-15 minutes. Five groups were created: one control (C and four experimental (I, II, III, IV groups. Each group consisted of 100 chickens. Fattening lasted 42 days. Chickens were fed by ad libitum system. The identical starter feed mixture were administered till the 21st day of age. From the 22nd to 42nd day of age, chickens were fed by growth feed mixture in all groups. Feed mixtures were made without antibiotics and coccidiostats. Propolis extract was added to experimental groups at doses of 150 mg.kg-1 (I, 450 mg.kg-1 (II, 600 mg.kg-1 (III and 800 mg.kg-1 (IV. Breast and thigh muscles of 60 chickens from each group were prepared by baking and were anonymously assessed by six-member committee, which evaluated the smell, taste, juiciness and tenderness of meat in five-point scale. No significant differences (P ≥ 0.05 were found in smell, taste, juiciness and tenderness of breast and thigh muscles between the control and experimental groups. Sensory quality of chicken meat is one of the most important links for its use in food chain. The results of experiment confirmed, that propolis extract in those quantities can be applied in chicken nutrition, because sensory quality of chicken meat has not been worsen after its application.

  5. MEAT PERFORMANCE OF CHICKENS HUBBARD JV AFTER APPLICATION OF PROPOLIS EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Haščík

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Influence of propolis extract on meat performance of chickens’ hybrid combination Hubbard JV was evaluated in this experiment. The feed mixture has been made without addition antibiotic preparation and coccidiostats. However, propolis extract was added to the feed mixtures of experimental groups during the whole fattening period in followed amounts: 150 mg kg-1 (1st experimental group – E1 and 450 mg kg-1 (2nd experimental group – E2. Fattening lasted 42 days. Live body weight increased by 7.63 g in E1 and by 14.13 g in E2 compared with control group (1507.37 g. Carcass body weight was higher in experimental groups (1022.37 g – E1 and 1019.75 g – E2 compared with control group (1005.12 g. The weight of giblets was lower in experimental groups (117.79 g – E1 and 117.16 g – E2 compared with control group (119.06 g. The carcass yield of chickens was higher in E1 (75.27% compared with control group (74.92%, Carcass yield of chickens was higher in E1 (75.27% compared with control group (74.92% but E2 (74.76% was lowest. and there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05 among the groups. Propolis extract did not influence the meat performance. Slight increase of live body, resp. of carcass body weight at the end of fattening can have a positive effect on the overall economics of chicken meat production.Based on the results, propolis extract is available supplement for chickens fattening.

  6. A review of stairway falls and stair negotiation: Lessons learned and future needs to reduce injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jesse V

    2016-09-01

    Stairways are a common location for falls, and they result in a disproportionate risk of death or severe injury. Stairway falls are a significant problem across the lifespan and are often coincident with risky behaviors during stair use. The mechanics of successful stair negotiation for healthy young and older adults have been well described. These studies imply that current stair design does not offer an optimal universal design to meet the needs of older adults or people with health conditions. In addition, impaired stair negotiation associates with more than impaired strength, including functional impairments of cognitive load, sensory function and central motor coordination. Identification of behavioral strategies or stairway environments that assist or hinder recovery from a loss of balance on stairs remains incomplete. Therefore, future studies should investigate the mechanisms of balance recovery on stairs as well as the effectiveness of environmental interventions to mitigate stairway falls and injuries. Potential areas for evaluation may include modifying stair dimensions, surfaces, handrails, visual cues, and removing distractors of attention. Studies should also evaluate combinatorial interventions on person-related factors, such as behavioral interventions to decrease risky behaviors during stair use as well as interventions on cognitive, sensory, and motor functions relevant to stair use. Moreover, future studies should take advantage of new technologies to record stair use outside the laboratory in order to identify people or locations at risk for stairway falls. Such studies would inform the potential for broad-spectrum programs that decrease the risk of stairway falls and injuries.

  7. Stair-Climbing Capacity as a Marker of Improvement Following Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Houle-Péloquin, Marilyn; Sauvageau, Benoit; Lalande-Gauthier, Mélina; Poirier, Claude

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potential and safety of a stair-climbing test as a tool to monitor improvement following pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Stair-climbing capacity was assessed in 139 patients with COPD before and after a comprehensive 8-week PR program, which included stair-climbing training. Stair-climbing capacity was assessed as the total number of flights of stairs climbed without stopping. A constant work rate endurance test (CET) was also performed before and after PR. Change in stair-climbing after PR (Δstairs) was compared and correlated to the change in endurance time (ΔCET) and, for 40 patients, to the change in COPD assessment test (ΔCAT) score. Most patients had moderate to severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 54% ± 20% predicted). Stair-climbing capacity, endurance time, and CAT score improved after PR (2.8 ± 1.4 vs 8.3 ± 3.3 flights, 408 ± 272 vs 717 ± 415 seconds, and 20.0 ± 6.4 vs 17.6 ± 6.6 units, respectively; P value for all stair-climbing. Stair-climbing is responsive to training in patients with COPD and is correlated to the change in CAT score following PR. Although the test requires further standardization, it could eventually be used as a simple and safe way to assess improvement following interventions in COPD.

  8. Self-reported difficulty in climbing up or down stairs in nondisabled elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe; Wang, Cuiling; Xue, Xiaonan; Holtzer, Roee

    2008-01-01

    To examine clinical and functional correlates of self-reported difficulty in climbing up or climbing down stairs in older adults. Cross-sectional survey. Community sample. Older adults (N=310; mean age, 79.7 y; 62% women), without disability or dementia. Not applicable. Clinical and functional status as well as activity limitations (able to perform activities of daily living [ADLs] with some difficulty). Of the 310 subjects, 140 reported difficulties in climbing up and 83 in climbing down stairs (59 both). Self-reported difficulty in climbing up stairs was associated with hypertension, arthritis, and depressive symptoms. Difficulty in climbing up stairs was also associated with poor balance and grip strength as well as neurologic gait abnormalities. Subjects with difficulty climbing down stairs had more falls. Both activities were associated with leg claudication, fear of falling, non-neurologic gait abnormalities, and slow gait. Examined individually, self-reported difficulty climbing down stairs captured a wider spectrum of ADL limitations than climbing up stairs. However, combined difficulty in both phases of stair climbing had a stronger association with activity limitations (vs no difficulty; odds ratio, 6.58; 95% confidence interval, 3.35-12.91) than difficulty in any one phase alone. Self-reported difficulty in climbing up and down stairs revealed commonalities as well as differences in related clinical correlates. Difficulty in both climbing up and down stairs should be separately assessed to better capture clinical and functional status in older adults.

  9. Promoting physical activity in a low socioeconomic area: results from an intervention targeting stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jacquelyn; Lyon, Katie; Webb, Oliver J; Eves, Frank F; Ryan, Cormac G

    2011-05-01

    To compare rates of stair climbing in a high and low socioeconomic (SE) area, and to assess the efficacy of a stair climbing intervention in each area. From March to May 2009 ascending stair/escalator choices (N=20,315) were observed in two underground train stations located in a high, and low, SE area of Glasgow. Baseline observations preceded a 4-week intervention in which posters, promoting stair choice, were installed. Follow-up observations were collected 1 week after poster removal. Baseline stair climbing rates were 12.2% and 7.1% at the high and low SE stations, respectively. Overall, pedestrians at the high SE station were around twice as likely to climb the stairs as those at the low SE station (odds ratio [OR] = 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.70-2.15). Across sites, the rate of stair climbing was higher during the intervention relative to baseline (OR = 1.48, CI = 1.34-1.63) and remained elevated at follow-up (OR = 1.24, CI = 1.11-1.39). Absolute increase in stair climbing was similar at both stations (high SE, +4.7%; low SE, +4.5%), indicating equivalent poster effects in each area. Pedestrians in lower SE areas appear less likely to climb stairs than pedestrians in high SE areas. Nevertheless, a stair climbing intervention was equally effective in both areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A wheelchair with lever propulsion control for climbing up and down stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kai; Eguchi, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes a novel stair-climbing wheelchair based on lever propulsion control using the human upper body. Wheelchairs are widely used as supporting locomotion devices for people with acquired lower limb disabilities. However, steps and stairs are critical obstacles to locomotion, which restrict their activities when using wheelchairs. Previous research focused on power-assisted, stair-climbing wheelchairs, which were large and heavy due to its large actuators and mechanisms. In the previous research, we proposed a wheelchair with lever propulsion mechanism and presented its feasibility of climbing up the stairs. The developed stair-climbing wheelchair consists of manual wheels with casters for planar locomotion and a rotary-leg mechanism based on lever propulsion that is capable of climbing up stairs. The wheelchair also has a passive mechanism powered by gas springs for posture transition to shift the user's center of gravity between the desired positions for planar locomotion and stair-climbing. In this paper, we present an advanced study on both climbing up and going down using lever propulsion control by the user's upper body motion. For climbing down the stairs, we reassembled one-way clutches used for the rotary-leg mechanism to help a user climb down the stairs through lever operation. We also equipped the wheelchair with sufficient torque dampers. The frontal wheels were fixed while climbing down the stairs to ensure safety. Relevant experiments were then performed to investigate its performance and verify that the wheelchair users can operate the proposed lever propulsion mechanism.

  11. Gait event detection during stair walking using a rate gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formento, Paola Catalfamo; Acevedo, Ruben; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2014-01-01

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. These applications often require detection of the initial contact (IC) of the foot with the floor and/or final contact or foot off (FO) from the floor during outdoor walking. Previous investigations have reported the use of a single gyroscope placed on the shank for detection of IC and FO on level ground and incline walking. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects ascending and descending a set of stairs. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The absolute mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than 45 ms for IC and better than 135 ms for FO for both activities. Detection success was over 93%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of a gyroscope for gait event detection when walking up and down stairs.

  12. Gait Event Detection during Stair Walking Using a Rate Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formento, Paola Catalfamo; Acevedo, Ruben; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2014-01-01

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. These applications often require detection of the initial contact (IC) of the foot with the floor and/or final contact or foot off (FO) from the floor during outdoor walking. Previous investigations have reported the use of a single gyroscope placed on the shank for detection of IC and FO on level ground and incline walking. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects ascending and descending a set of stairs. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The absolute mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than 45 ms for IC and better than 135 ms for FO for both activities. Detection success was over 93%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of a gyroscope for gait event detection when walking up and down stairs. PMID:24651724

  13. Gaze shifts during dual-tasking stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasike-daSilva, Veronica; McIlroy, William E

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role of vision in stair locomotion, young adults descended a seven-step staircase during unrestricted walking (CONTROL), and while performing a concurrent visual reaction time (RT) task displayed on a monitor. The monitor was located at either 3.5 m (HIGH) or 0.5 m (LOW) above ground level at the end of the stairway, which either restricted (HIGH) or facilitated (LOW) the view of the stairs in the lower field of view as participants walked downstairs. Downward gaze shifts (recorded with an eye tracker) and gait speed were significantly reduced in HIGH and LOW compared with CONTROL. Gaze and locomotor behaviour were not different between HIGH and LOW. However, inter-individual variability increased in HIGH, in which participants combined different response characteristics including slower walking, handrail use, downward gaze, and/or increasing RTs. The fastest RTs occurred in the midsteps (non-transition steps). While gait and visual task performance were not statistically different prior to the top and bottom transition steps, gaze behaviour and RT were more variable prior to transition steps in HIGH. This study demonstrated that, in the presence of a visual task, people do not look down as often when walking downstairs and require minimum adjustments provided that the view of the stairs is available in the lower field of view. The middle of the stairs seems to require less from executive function, whereas visual attention appears a requirement to detect the last transition via gaze shifts or peripheral vision.

  14. Research on Centroid Position for Stairs Climbing Stability of Search and Rescue Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Guo; Aiguo Song; Jiatong Bao; Huatao Zhang; Hongru Tang

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents the relationship between the stability of stairs climbing and the centroid position of the search and rescue robot. The robot system is considered as a mass point-plane model and the kinematics features are analyzed to find the relationship between centroid position and the maximal pitch angle of stairs the robot could climb up. A computable function about this relationship is given in this paper. During the stairs climbing, there is a maximal stability-keeping angle dep...

  15. Direct Analysis of JV-Curves Applied to an Outdoor-Degrading CdTe Module (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D; Kurtz, S.; Ulbrich, C.; Gerber, A.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present the application of a phenomenological four parameter equation to fit and analyze regularly measured current density-voltage JV curves of a CdTe module during 2.5 years of outdoor operation. The parameters are physically meaningful, i.e. the short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc and differential resistances Rsc, and Roc. For the chosen module, the fill factor FF degradation overweighs the degradation of Jsc and Voc. Interestingly, with outdoor exposure, not only the conductance at short circuit, Gsc, increases but also the Gsc(Jsc)-dependence. This is well explained with an increase in voltage dependent charge carrier collection in CdTe.

  16. Choosing between stairs and escalators in China: The impact of location, height and pedestrian volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, John; Tang, Boshen

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research examines whether Beijing residents are more or less likely than Montréal residents to avoid stair climbing, by replicating a study in Montréal, Canada that measured the impacts of distance between stairs and escalator, height between floors and pedestrian volume on stair climbing rate. Method 15 stairways, 14 up-escalators and 13 down-escalators were selected in 13 publicly accessible settings in Beijing. Distance between the bottom or top of nearest stair and escalator combinations varied from 2.1 m to 114.1 m with height between floors varying from 3.3 m to 21.7 m. Simultaneous counts were conducted on stair and escalator pairs, for a total of 37,081 counted individuals. Results In the ascent model, pedestrian volume accounted for 16.3% of variance in stair climbing, 16.4% when height was added and 45.1% when distance was added. In the descent model, 40.9% of variance was explained by pedestrian volume, 41.5% when height was added and 45.5% when distance was added. Conclusion Separating stairs and escalator is effective in increasing stair climbing in Beijing, accounting for 29% of the variance in stair climbing, compared with 43% in Montreal. As in the Montreal case, distance has less effect on stair use rate when descending. Overall, 25.4% of Beijingers opted for stairs when ascending compared with 20.3% of Montrealers, and for descending 32.8% and 31.1% respectively. PMID:26844113

  17. Time in the stair-climbing test as a predictor of thoracotomy postoperative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozin, Alexandre Ricardo Pepe; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Arruda, Karine Aparecida; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria

    2013-04-01

    The stair-climbing test as measured in meters or number of steps has been proposed to predict the risk of postoperative complications. The study objective was to determine whether the stair-climbing time can predict the risk of postoperative complications. Patients aged more than 18 years with a recommendation of thoracotomy for lung resection were included in the study. Spirometry was performed according to the criteria by the American Thoracic Society. The stair-climbing test was performed on shaded stairs with a total of 12.16 m in height, and the stair-climbing time in seconds elapsed during the climb of the total height was measured. The accuracy test was applied to obtain stair-climbing time predictive values, and the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated. Variables were tested for association with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications using the Student t test for independent populations, the Mann-Whitney test, and the chi-square or Fisher exact test. Logistic regression analysis was performed. Ninety-eight patients were evaluated. Of these, 27 showed postoperative complications. Differences were found between the groups for age and attributes obtained from the stair-climbing test. The cutoff point for stair-climbing time obtained from the receiver operating characteristic curve was 37.5 seconds. No differences were found between the groups for forced expiratory volume in 1 second. In the logistic regression, stair-climbing time was the only variable associated with postoperative complications, suggesting that the risk of postoperative complications increases with increased stair-climbing time. The only variable showing association with complications, according to multivariate analysis, was stair-climbing time. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute Effects of Walking Exercise on Stair Negotiation in Sedentary and Physically Active Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunzler, M.R.; Rocha, E.S. da; Bobbert, M.F.; Duysens, J.; Carpes, F.P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In negotiating stairs, low foot clearance increases the risk of tripping and a fall. Foot clearance may be related to physical fitness, which differs between active and sedentary participants, and be acutely affected by exercise. Impaired stair negotiation could be an acute response to

  19. 78 FR 39649 - Physical Medicine Devices; Reclassification of Stair-Climbing Wheelchairs; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... of Stair-Climbing Wheelchairs; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed... appeared in the Federal Register of June 12, 2013 (78 FR 35173). The document proposed to reclassify stair-climbing wheelchairs. The document was published with typographical errors in the DATES section of the...

  20. Stair climbing is more detrimental to the cement in hip replacement than walking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Huiskes, R.

    2002-01-01

    Stair climbing may be detrimental to cemented total hip arthroplasties, because it subjects the reconstruction to high torsional loads. The current study investigated how stair climbing contributes to damage accumulation in the cement around a femoral stem compared with walking, taking into account

  1. Does perceived steepness deter stair climbing when an alternative is available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Frank F; Thorpe, Susannah K S; Lewis, Amanda; Taylor-Covill, Guy A H

    2014-06-01

    Perception of hill slant is exaggerated in explicit awareness. Proffitt (Perspectives on Psychological Science 1:110-122, 2006) argued that explicit perception of the slant of a climb allows individuals to plan locomotion in keeping with their available locomotor resources, yet no behavioral evidence supports this contention. Pedestrians in a built environment can often avoid climbing stairs, the man-made equivalent of steep hills, by choosing an adjacent escalator. Stair climbing is avoided more by women, the old, and the overweight than by their comparators. Two studies tested perceived steepness of the stairs as a cue that promotes this avoidance. In the first study, participants estimated the steepness of a staircase in a train station (n = 269). Sex, age, height, and weight were recorded. Women, older individuals, and those who were heavier and shorter reported the staircase as steeper than did their comparison groups. In a follow-up study in a shopping mall, pedestrians were recruited from those who chose the stairs and those who avoided them, with the samples stratified for sex, age, and weight status. Participants (n = 229) estimated the steepness of a life-sized image of the stairs they had just encountered, presented on the wall of a vacant shop in the mall. Pedestrians who avoided stair climbing by choosing the escalator reported the stairs as steeper even when demographic differences were controlled. Perceived steepness may to be a contextual cue that pedestrians use to avoid stair climbing when an alternative is available.

  2. Research on Centroid Position for Stairs Climbing Stability of Search and Rescue Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the relationship between the stability of stairs climbing and the centroid position of the search and rescue robot. The robot system is considered as a mass point- plane model and the kinematics features are analyzed to find the relationship between centroid position and the maximal pitch angle of stairs the robot could climb up. A computable function about this relationship is given in this paper. During the stairs climbing, there is a maximal stability-keeping angle depends on the centroid position and the pitch angle of stairs, and the numerical formula is developed about the relationship between the maximal stability-keeping angle and the centroid position and pitch angle of stairs. The experiment demonstrates the trustworthy and correction of the method in the paper.

  3. Research on Centroid Position for Stairs Climbing Stability of Search and Rescue Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the relationship between the stability of stairs climbing and the centroid position of the search and rescue robot. The robot system is considered as a mass point-plane model and the kinematics features are analyzed to find the relationship between centroid position and the maximal pitch angle of stairs the robot could climb up. A computable function about this relationship is given in this paper. During the stairs climbing, there is a maximal stability-keeping angle depends on the centroid position and the pitch angle of stairs, and the numerical formula is developed about the relationship between the maximal stability-keeping angle and the centroid position and pitch angle of stairs. The experiment demonstrates the trustworthy and correction of the method in the paper.

  4. Frontal joint dynamics when initiating stair ascent from a walk versus a stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Yentes, Jennifer M; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2012-02-02

    Ascending stairs is a challenging activity of daily living for many populations. Frontal plane joint dynamics are critical to understand the mechanisms involved in stair ascension as they contribute to both propulsion and medio-lateral stability. However, previous research is limited to understanding these dynamics while initiating stair ascent from a stand. We investigated if initiating stair ascent from a walk with a comfortable self-selected speed could affect the frontal plane lower-extremity joint moments and powers as compared to initiating stair ascent from a stand and if this difference would exist at consecutive ipsilateral steps on the stairs. Kinematics data using a 3-D motion capture system and kinetics data using two force platforms on the first and third stair treads were recorded simultaneously as ten healthy young adults ascended a custom-built staircase. Data were collected from two starting conditions of stair ascent, from a walk (speed: 1.42 ± 0.21 m/s) and from a stand. Results showed that subjects generated greater peak knee abductor moment and greater peak hip abductor moment when initiating stair ascent from a walk. Greater peak joint moments and powers at all joints were also seen while ascending the second ipsilateral step. Particularly, greater peak hip abductor moment was needed to avoid contact of the contralateral limb with the intermediate step by counteracting the pelvic drop on the contralateral side. This could be important for therapists using stair climbing as a testing/training tool to evaluate hip strength in individuals with documented frontal plane abnormalities (i.e. knee and hip osteoarthritis, ACL injury). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy cost of stair climbing and descending on the college alumnus questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, D R; Vachon, J A; Kirkland, A O; Howley, E T; Duncan, G E; Johnson, K R

    1997-09-01

    In calculating the physical activity index (PAI) on the college alumnus questionnaire, it is assumed that 8 kcal are expended for every 20 steps climbed. This value is equal to an energy cost of 0.40 kcal.step-1. Since it is assumed that subjects climb and descend an equal number of stairs, the total value reflects the energy cost of stepping up (estimated at 0.30 kcal.step-1) and stepping down (estimated at 0.10 kcal.step-1). However, these values appear to be based on theoretical calculations rather than empirical observation. The purpose of this study was to quantify the energy cost of stair climbing and stair descending by measuring oxygen uptake. Twenty subjects performed continuous stair-climbing and stair-descending on an escalator at a stepping rate of 70 step.min-1. Heart rate was monitored by telemetry, and oxygen uptake was measured by the Douglas bag technique from 5 to 7 min. Results showed that the gross energy cost of stair climbing is 8.6 METs, and that of stair descending is 2.9 METs. Thus, for a 70-kg person the gross caloric costs of ascending stairs (0.15 kcal.step-1) and descending stairs (0.05 kcal.step-1) are one-half of the values previously assumed. In conclusion, the algorithm for calculating PAI on the college alumnus questionnaire should be modified to reflect a total cost of 0.20 kcal for going up and down one step. Even more precise estimates can be obtained by adjusting for body weight (going up and down one flight of stairs requires 1.63 MET.min).

  6. Oiled seabird rescue at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, 1968-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, H.R.

    1997-01-01

    Records of oiled and injured seabirds at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, were collated from the daily log at the Reserve for the period 1968-1995. These records serve to demonstrate that oil spills and chronic oiling have occurred frequently in this area, just south of San Francisco. Common Murres (Uria aalge) were the most frequently-oiled species rescued at the Reserve. Greater efforts should be made by wildlife rehabilitators to collate large volumes of past data (prior to the early 1990s) on oiled and injured seabirds for similar documentation of large or moderate oil spills (including undocumented or poorly-known spills), chronic oiling from small spills, and injuries from other sources.

  7. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed.

  8. Dimensional analysis and ground reaction forces for stair climbing: effects of age and task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucco, Matteo; Cesari, Paola

    2009-02-01

    Altered perception-action capability is often associated with falls and diminished self-efficacy in older people. This study evaluated and compared perception-action capability in stair-climbing performance of 18 healthy volunteers assigned to two age groups (mean age, 26.3+/-4.3 years and 66.4+/-4.7 years, respectively). The experimental set-up included 14 stairs (50 cm wide, 60 cm deep, riser height 35-90 cm) positioned at the edge of a force platform. The task was to climb the stair with the greatest riser height subjects thought they could climb without outside support or use of hands. Dimensional and dynamic data were collected and analyzed to reveal the invariant relationships that sustain action preparation and execution. All subjects chose the same proportion between stair height and distance covered before mounting the stair, as expressed by the invariant angle (alpha). While the geometric invariant relationship was picked up as a visual guide prior to action, there was a dynamic invariance in the forces applied during actual execution. To establish whether the invariance still held in extreme cases, two perturbed conditions were introduced in which stair distances were changed, forcing subjects to execute a foot-strike, either very far from or near to the stair, before climbing it, so as to reveal any significant adaptations the climber would undertake to avoid slips or falls. Older and younger subjects applied appropriate visual and motor guidance by scaling their motor capabilities to the environmental dimensions.

  9. Step It UP: a multicomponent intervention to increase stair use in a university residence building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Erin Kaye; Young, Deborah Rohm

    2011-01-01

    Examine the effects of a multicomponent intervention on stair usage. Nonrandomized controlled intervention. Two multistory university dormitories. Total of 5711 direct observations of university dormitory residents. The 2-week "Step It UP" intervention used poster prompts and fun/competitive challenges with incentives to encourage residents to take the stairs instead of the elevators. Ascending stair and elevator use was directly observed and coded for gender at high traffic times in intervention and control dormitories for 14 nonconsecutive hours over 1 week each at baseline, midintervention, and 1 week postintervention. The proportions of ascending stair and elevator users were compared using χ(2) analyses. Baseline stair use was equal between intervention and control dormitories (24.9% and 27.8%, respectively; χ(2)[1, N  =  1849]  =  .08; p  =  .77). Stair use significantly increased from baseline in the intervention dormitory to 33.24% (χ(2)[1, N  =  2192]  =  18.44; p university dormitory relative to the control but was unable to sustain the increase when prompts were removed. Campaigns to sustain stair use are needed. Formative assessment is required to determine what combinations of components may yield the most cost-effective approach for future interventions.

  10. Stair design in the United States and obesity: the need for a change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Ishak A; Mansi, Nardine; Shaker, Hayam; Banks, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance of healthy body weight is a function of total energy expenditure including household and workplace activity. Light to moderate physical activity has been found to be effective in motivating sedentary and obese individuals, and is at least as effective as structured exercise in lowering weight in some studies. Stair use offers a promising intervention for increasing physical activity, because it involves a lifestyle choice that must be made (people must get to their destination), and it requires no personal financial cost. Stairs in United States buildings are frequently hidden from entrances with small signs denoting their location, mainly in connection to fire exits. Using the stairs is usually seen as a way of escaping from fires rather than as a recommended daily activity. To comply with State Fire Marshal regulations, stairs are usually guarded by heavy, spring doors, without air conditioning, and are noncarpeted. In this article, several suggestions to change the architectural design in buildings to be more physical activity-friendly are discussed. Such changes would make stairs attractive, safe, and readily accessible. Local and state authorities may also allow incentives for such designs to compensate for their additional costs. Moreover, standard national building codes that incorporate health concerns should be devised. Stair use at work and in living places has the potential to increase physical activity and decrease obesity. Changing stair design to encourage their use requires a series of interventions both architecturally and legislatively to create physical environments that support active lifestyles.

  11. The muscle activation patterns of lower limb during stair climbing at different backpack load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yali, Han; Aiguo, Song; Haitao, Gao; Songqing, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Stair climbing under backpack load condition is a challenging task. Understanding muscle activation patterns of lower limb during stair climbing with load furthers our understanding of the factors involved in joint pathology and the effects of treatment. At the same time, stair climbing under backpack load requires adjustments of muscle activations and increases joint moment compared to level walking, which with muscle activation patterns are altered as a result of using an assistive technology, such as a wearable exoskeleton leg for human walking power augmentation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze lower limb muscles during stair climbing under different backpack load. Nine healthy volunteers ascended a four-step staircase at different backpack load (0 kg, 10 kg, 20 kg, 30 kg). Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from four lower limb muscles (gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, hamstring, rectus femoris). The results showed that muscle activation amplitudes of lower limb increase with increasing load during stair climbing, the maximum RMS of gastrocnemius are greater than tibialis anterior, hamstring and rectus femoris whether stair climbing or level walking under the same load condition. However, the maximum RMS of hamstring are smaller than gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and rectus femoris. The study of muscle activation under different backpack load during stair climbing can be used to design biomechanism and explore intelligent control based on EMG for a wearable exoskeleton leg for human walking power augmentation.

  12. APPLICATIONS OF STAIR MATRICES AND THEIR GENERALIZATIONS TO ITERATIVE METHODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xin-hui; SHEN Hai-long; LI Chang-jun

    2006-01-01

    Stair matrices and their generalizations are introduced. The definitions and some properties of the matrices were first given by Lu Hao. This class of matrices provide bases of matrix splittings for iterative methods. The remarkable feature of iterative methods based on the new class of matrices is that the methods are easily implemented for parallel computation. In particular, a generalization of the accelerated overrelaxation method (GAOR) is introduced. Some theories of the AOR method are extended to the generalized method to include a wide class of matrices. The convergence of the new method is derived for Hermitian positive definite matrices. Finally, some examples are given in order to show the superiority of the new method.

  13. THz generation using a reflective stair-step echelon

    CERN Document Server

    Ofori-Okai, Benjamin K; Huang, W Ronny; Nelson, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method for THz generation in lithium niobate using a reflective stair-step echelon structure. The echelon produces a discretely tilted pulse front with less angular dispersion compared to a high groove-density grating. The THz output was characterized using both a 1-lens and 3-lens imaging system to set the tilt angle at room and cryogenic temperatures. Using broadband 800 nm pulses with a pulse energy of 0.95 mJ and a pulse duration of 70 fs (24 nm FWHM bandwidth, 39 fs transform limited width), we produced THz pulses with field strengths as high as 500 kV/cm and pulse energies as high as 3.1 $\\mu$J. The highest conversion efficiency we obtained was 0.33%. In addition, we find that the echelon is easily implemented into an experimental setup for quick alignment and optimization.

  14. Evacuation of children - movement on stairs and on Horizontal Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larusdottir, Aldis Run; Dederichs, Anne

    2012-01-01

    in full scale evacuation experiments where two age groups 0-2 years and 3-6 years were analyzed separately. It was found that flow through doors, walking speeds and densities were age-dependent and differed strongly from the data in existing literature. The results showed higher walking speeds in spiral...... stairs when the children were familiar with the evacuation path. Higher person densities and faster flow through doors were obtained among the children than found in the current literature on adults. Children in the younger age group were generally slower than the older children. The children walked......Little is known on the evacuation characteristics of children. Current literature on evacuation is based mostly on studies on adults. The aim of this study is to investigate the movement of children during evacuation, focusing on flow, densities and walking. Ten Danish daycare centers participated...

  15. A Concept Of Modification And Simulation Studies Of A Mechatronic Stair Transporter For The Disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wudarczyk Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of existing stair climber with its passenger was built and its operation was analysed through simulations. A modification of the stair climber has been developed on a basis of the simulation studies. The modification depends on equipping the device with additional controllable mechanism the function of which is to change the position of the passenger’s centre of gravity. Comparative simulation studies were carried out for the standard version and the modified version of the stair transporter in a system for the dynamic.

  16. Musical Stairs: A motivational therapy tool for children with disabilities featuring automated detection of stair-climbing gait events via inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ajmal; Biddiss, Elaine

    2017-02-01

    Stair-climbing is a key component of rehabilitation therapies for children with physical disabilities. This paper reports on the design of a system, Musical Stairs, to provide auditory feedback during stair-climbing therapies. Musical Stairs is composed of two foot-mounted inertial sensors, a step detection algorithm, and an auditory feedback response. In Phase 1, we establish its clinical feasibility via a Wizard-of-Oz AB/BA cross-over design with 17 children, aged 4-6 years, having diverse diagnoses and gait abilities. Self-, therapist- and blinded-observer reports indicated increased motivation with auditory feedback. Phase 2 describes the construction of a database comprised of synchronized video and inertial data associated with 1568 steps up and down stairs completed by 26 children aged 4-6 years with diverse diagnoses and gait. Lastly, in Phase 3, data from 18 children in the database were used to train a rule-based step detection algorithm based on local minima in the acceleration profile and the foot's swing angle. A step detection rate of 96% [SD=3%] and false positive rate of 6% [SD=5%] were achieved with an independent test set (n=8). Recommendations for future development and evaluation are discussed. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of hybrid orthosis for standing, walking, and stair climbing after spinal cord injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobetic, Rudi; To, Curtis S; Schnellenberger, John R; Audu, Musa L; Bulea, Thomas C; Gaudio, Richard; Pinault, Gilles; Tashman, Scott; Triolo, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    ...) to facilitate standing, walking, and stair climbing after spinal cord injury (SCI). The orthotic components consist of electromechanical joints that lock and unlock automatically to provide upright stability and free movement powered by FES...

  18. Stair descending exercise using a novel automatic escalator: effects on muscle performance and health-related parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Panayiotou, George; Kyparos, Antonios; Patikas, Dimitrios; Grivas, Gerasimos V; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2013-01-01

    A novel automatic escalator was designed, constructed and used in the present investigation. The aim of the present investigation was to compare the effect of two repeated sessions of stair descending versus stair ascending exercise on muscle performance and health-related parameters in young healthy men. Twenty males participated and were randomly divided into two equal-sized groups: a stair descending group (muscle-damaging group) and a stair ascending group (non-muscle-damaging group). Each group performed two sessions of stair descending or stair ascending exercise on the automatic escalator while a three week period was elapsed between the two exercise sessions. Indices of muscle function, insulin sensitivity, blood lipid profile and redox status were assessed before and immediately after, as well as at day 2 and day 4 after both exercise sessions. It was found that the first bout of stair descending exercise caused muscle damage, induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress as well as affected positively blood lipid profile. However, after the second bout of stair descending exercise the alterations in all parameters were diminished or abolished. On the other hand, the stair ascending exercise induced only minor effects on muscle function and health-related parameters after both exercise bouts. The results of the present investigation indicate that stair descending exercise seems to be a promising way of exercise that can provoke positive effects on blood lipid profile and antioxidant status.

  19. Anticipatory kinematics and muscle activity preceding transitions from level-ground walking to stair ascent and descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Joshua; Fey, Nicholas P; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-02-29

    The majority of fall-related accidents are during stair ambulation-occurring commonly at the top and bottom stairs of each flight, locations in which individuals are transitioning to stairs. Little is known about how individuals adjust their biomechanics in anticipation of walking-stair transitions. We identified the anticipatory stride mechanics of nine able-bodied individuals as they approached transitions from level ground walking to stair ascent and descent. Unlike prior investigations of stair ambulation, we analyzed two consecutive "anticipation" strides preceding the transitions strides to stairs, and tested a comprehensive set of kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) data from both the leading and trailing legs. Subjects completed ten trials of baseline overground walking and ten trials of walking to stair ascent and descent. Deviations relative to baseline were assessed. Significant changes in mechanics and EMG occurred in the earliest anticipation strides analyzed for both ascent and descent transitions. For stair descent, these changes were consistent with observed reductions in walking speed, which occurred in all anticipation strides tested. For stair ascent, subjects maintained their speed until the swing phase of the latest anticipation stride, and changes were found that would normally be observed for decreasing speed. Given the timing and nature of the observed changes, this study has implications for enhancing intent recognition systems and evaluating fall-prone or disabled individuals, by testing their abilities to sense upcoming transitions and decelerate during locomotion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Robot-assisted practice of gait and stair climbing in nonambulatory stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Hesse, MD; Christopher Tomelleri, PhD; Anita Bardeleben, MA; Cordula Werner, MA; Andreas Waldner, MD

    2012-01-01

    A novel gait robot enabled nonambulatory patients the repetitive practice of gait and stair climbing. Thirty nonambulatory patients with subacute stroke were allocated to two groups. During 60 min sessions every workday for 4 weeks, the experimental group received 30 min of robot training and 30 min of physiotherapy and the control group received 60 min of physiotherapy. The primary variable was gait and stair climbing ability (Functional Ambulation Categories [FAC] score 0–5); secondary vari...

  1. Does perceived steepness deter stair climbing when an alternative is available?

    OpenAIRE

    Eves, Frank F.; Thorpe, Susannah K. S.; Lewis, Amanda; Taylor-Covill, Guy A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Perception of hill slant is exaggerated in explicit awareness. Proffitt (Perspectives on Psychological Science 1:110–122, 2006) argued that explicit perception of the slant of a climb allows individuals to plan locomotion in keeping with their available locomotor resources, yet no behavioral evidence supports this contention. Pedestrians in a built environment can often avoid climbing stairs, the man-made equivalent of steep hills, by choosing an adjacent escalator. Stair climbing is avoided ...

  2. Stair descending exercise increases muscle strength in elderly males with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Anastasios A; Panayiotou, George; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Kyparos, Antonios; Mademli, Lida; Grivas, Gerasimos V; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2013-03-08

    Previous studies from our group have shown that "pure" eccentric exercise performed on an isokinetic dynamometer can induce health-promoting effects that may improve quality of life. In order to investigate whether the benefits of "pure" eccentric exercise can be transferred to daily activities, a new and friendlier way to perform eccentric exercise had to be invented. To this end, we have proceeded to the design and construction of an automatic escalator, offering both stair descending (eccentric-biased) and stair ascending (concentric-biased) exercise. Twelve elderly males (60-70 yr) with chronic heart failure participated in the present study. Participants carried out six weeks of stair descending or ascending training on the novel SmartEscalator device. Muscle damage and performance indices were evaluated before and at day 2 post exercise at the first and sixth week of training. Both training regimes increased, albeit not significantly in some cases, eccentric, concentric and isometric torque. After six weeks of stair descending exercise, eccentric, concentric and isometric peak torque increased 12.3%, 7.7% and 8.8%, respectively, whereas after stair ascending exercise eccentric, concentric and isometric peak torque increased 7.1%, 9.6% and 5.9%, respectively. Stair descending exercise appears to be a pleasant and mild activity that can be easily followed by the elderly. Compared to the more demanding stair ascending exercise, changes in muscle strength are similar or even greater. Elderly or people with impaired endurance wishing to increase their muscle strength may be benefited by participating in activities with strong eccentric component, such as stair descending.

  3. The Use of Point-of-Decision Prompts to Increase Stair Climbing in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alan Sloan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a significant contributor to worldwide mortality and morbidity associated with non-communicable diseases. An excellent avenue to incorporate lifestyle physical activity into regular routine is to encourage the use of stairs during daily commutes. We evaluated the effectiveness of point-of-decision prompts (PODPs in promoting the use of stairs instead of the escalators in a Singapore Mass Rapid Transit (MRT station. We measured the number of stair climbers before the PODPs were put up, during the 4 weeks that they were in use, and 2 weeks after they were removed. Measurements at a no intervention control site were additionally taken. The use of stair-riser banners was associated with an increase in the number of people using the stairs by a factor of 1.49 (95% CI 1.34–1.64. After the banners were removed, the number of stair climbers at the experimental station dropped to slightly below baseline levels. The Singapore MRT serves a diverse multi-ethnic population with an average daily ridership of over 2 million and 88 stations island-wide. An increase of physical activity among these MRT commuters would have a large impact at the population level. Our findings can be translated into part of the national strategy to encourage an active lifestyle in Singaporeans.

  4. Foot clearance strategy for step-over-step stair climbing in transfemoral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamasaki, Nobuya; Ogata, Toru

    2014-08-01

    Stair ascent is a particularly challenging task for transfemoral amputees. The aim of this clinical note was to describe the kinematic features of foot clearance in transfemoral amputee who can ascend stairs using a step-over-step strategy. The marker trajectories of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (Mt1) and clearance height were measured in two transfemoral amputees who could (TF1) and could not (TF2) climb stairs using a step-over-step strategy. The Mt1 marker trajectories of the TF1 moved backward in the early swing phase, and the trajectory followed an off-centered parabolic arc to achieve a similar clearance height as able-bodied subjects. TF2 could not climb the stairs without tripping in each step. An effective compensatory strategy to avoid tripping during stair climbing may be to use the hip joint for a backward extension and rapid flexion of the prosthetic leg during the early swing phase. The foot clearance strategy in transfemoral amputees who can climb stairs using a step-over-step strategy will help us better understand adaptive prosthetic control and thus develop more effective gait rehabilitation programs. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  5. Predicting postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications by a test of stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Nawal; Fatimi, Saulat; Salahuddin, Nawal; Huda, Shehzad; Islam, Mohammad; Shafquat, Azam

    2005-12-01

    To assess whether a test of stair climbing ability could be used to predict the risk of developing postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Cohort study. The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. The duration of the study was from December 2003 to December 2004. This study was carried out on consecutive, adult patients presenting for elective thoracic or abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. Pre-operatively, patients were asked to climb a standard staircase. Number of steps climbed was recorded. Those unable to climb stairs due to debilitating cardiac, pulmonary or rheumatologic disease were categorized as 0 stairs climbed. Outcome variables were postoperative cardiopulmonary complications or mortality. Period of follow-up was until hospital discharge. Seventy-eight patients were enrolled, 59 (75.6%) climbed 1 flight of stairs, 19 (24.3%) climbed climb 1 flight and 40% in those patients who climbed climbed climb at least 1 flight of stairs, was calculated to be 1.8 (95% CI 0.7 - 4.6). Stair climbing can be a useful pre-operative tool to predict the risk of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications.

  6. The use of point-of-decision prompts to increase stair climbing in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Robert Alan; Haaland, Benjamin Adam; Leung, Carol; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk

    2013-01-07

    Physical inactivity is a significant contributor to worldwide mortality and morbidity associated with non-communicable diseases. An excellent avenue to incorporate lifestyle physical activity into regular routine is to encourage the use of stairs during daily commutes. We evaluated the effectiveness of point-of-decision prompts (PODPs) in promoting the use of stairs instead of the escalators in a Singapore Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) station. We measured the number of stair climbers before the PODPs were put up, during the 4 weeks that they were in use, and 2 weeks after they were removed. Measurements at a no intervention control site were additionally taken. The use of stair-riser banners was associated with an increase in the number of people using the stairs by a factor of 1.49 (95% CI 1.34-1.64). After the banners were removed, the number of stair climbers at the experimental station dropped to slightly below baseline levels. The Singapore MRT serves a diverse multi-ethnic population with an average daily ridership of over 2 million and 88 stations island-wide. An increase of physical activity among these MRT commuters would have a large impact at the population level. Our findings can be translated into part of the national strategy to encourage an active lifestyle in Singaporeans.

  7. Evaluation of a stair-climbing power wheelchair in 25 people with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, Isabelle; Guillon, Bruno; Fermanian, Christophe; Pouillot, Sophie; Even-Schneider, Alexia; Boyer, François; Ruquet, Maria; Aegerter, Philippe; Dizien, Olivier; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    To compare the performance of a power wheelchair with stair-climbing capability (TopChair) and a conventional power wheelchair (Storm3). A single-center, open-label study. A physical medicine and rehabilitation hospital. Patients (N=25) who required power wheelchairs because of severe impairments affecting the upper and lower limbs. Indoor and outdoor driving trials with both devices. Curb-clearing and stair-climbing with TopChair. Trial duration and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) tool; number of failures during driving trials and ability to climb curbs and stairs. All 25 participants successfully completed the outdoor and indoor trials with both wheelchairs. Although differences in times to trial completion were statistically significant, they were less than 10%. QUEST scores were significantly better with the Storm3 than the TopChair for weight (P=.001), dimension (P=.006), and effectiveness (P=.04). Of the 25 participants, 23 cleared a 20-cm curb without help, and 20 climbed up and down 6 steps. Most participants felt these specific capabilities of the TopChair--for example, curb clearing and stair climbing-were easy to use (22/25 for curb, 21/25 for stairs) and helpful (24/25 and 23/25). A few participants felt insecure (4/25 and 6/25, respectively). The TopChair is a promising mobility device that enables stair and curb climbing and warrants further study.

  8. Proposition of stair climb of a drop using chemical wettability gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seerha, Prabh P. S.; Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup K.; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a passive technique for a drop to climb along the staircase textured surface using chemical wettability gradients. The stair structure, droplet configuration, and contact angle gradient are modeled using Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The stair climb efficiency of the droplet is found to be a function of wettability gradient strength. Using analytical balance of actuation and resistive forces across droplets, physical reasons behind stair climbing are established and influencing parameters are identified. Evolution of the droplet shape along with the advancing and the receding contact angles is presented from where instantaneous actuation and hysteresis forces are calculated. Using history of Lagrangian particles, circulation at the foot of stairs and progressing development of the advancing drop front are monitored. Higher efficiency in stair climbing in the case of a bigger sized drop than smaller one is obtained from simulation results and realized from force balance. Difficulty in climbing steeper stairs is also demonstrated to delineate the effect of gravitational pull against the actuation force due to the wettability gradient.

  9. Abduction-adduction moments at the knee during stair ascent and descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalk, D L; Duncan, J A; Vaughan, C L

    1996-03-01

    To examine the relative magnitude of the knee abduction-adduction moments during stair climbing, ten normal subjects (average weight 660 N, leg length 0.962 m, height 1.74 m) were studied during repeated trials of stair ascent and descent. Data were collected using a four-camera video system and two forces plates incorporated within a flight of three stairs. The inverse dynamics approach was used to calculate internal moments at the knee, and these moments were normalized in magnitude (to percent body weight and leg length) and time (percent stance). The primary findings were: (1) knee joint moments were similar in shape and magnitude for the first and second steps during both stair ascent and descent; (2) the abduction knee moments, although comparable in magnitude (25-45 Nm), were statistically smaller than the extension moments (60-85 Nm) for stair ascent and descent; and (3) the moment patterns were exclusively abductor throughout stance, indicating that the ground reaction vector always passed medial to the knee joint center. Although the knee abduction-adduction moment is not in the primary plane of motion, its magnitude should not be ignored when trying to understand the stability and function of the knee during stair climbing.

  10. Does increasing step width alter knee biomechanics in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Zhang, Songning; Milner, Clare E; Klipple, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Research shows that one of the first complaints from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients is difficulty in stair ambulation due to knee pain. Increased step width (SW) has been shown to reduce first and second peak internal knee abduction moments, a surrogate variable for medial compartment knee joint loading, during stair descent in healthy older adults. This study investigates the effects of increased step width (SW) on knee biomechanics and knee pain in medial compartment knee OA patients during stair descent. Thirteen medial compartment knee OA patients were recruited for the study. A motion analysis system was used to obtain three-dimensional joint kinematics. An instrumented staircase was used to collect ground reaction forces (GRF). Participants performed stair descent trials at their self-selected speed using preferred, wide, and wider SW. Participants rated their knee pain levels after each SW condition. Increased SW had no effect on peak knee abduction moments and knee pain. Patients reported low levels of knee pain during all stair descent trials. The 2nd peak knee adduction angle and frontal plane GRF at time of 2nd peak abduction moment were reduced with increasing SW. The findings suggest that increases in SW may not influence knee loads in medial compartment knee OA patients afflicted with low levels of knee pain during stair descent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of inertial properties of transfemoral prosthesis on leg swing motion during stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Hobara, Hiroaki; Wada, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Stair ascent, especially the step-over-step gait, is a difficult motor task for people with transfemoral amputation. Our previous study demonstrated the effects of foot placement on the leg swing of able-bodied subjects. The study examined stair ascent with full-foot contact (FFC) and half-foot contact (HFC) as ambulation strategies. The results suggested that HFC causes the leg swing to have a greater inertial motion than FFC, as well as the applicability of the stair ascent strategy for transfemoral amputees with transfemoral prostheses without a motorized prosthetic knee joint. The present study investigated the effects of the inertial properties of a transfemoral prosthesis on leg motion during the stair ascent swing phase in simulation trials. The joint moment at the hip became smaller than that of an able-bodied subject. The peak values of the horizontal and vertical components of the joint reaction force were approximately the same as those of an able-bodied subject. These results suggest that a transfemoral prosthesis leg swing can be achieved with similar or smaller kinetic demand at the hip joint when half-foot contact on the stair steps is used as a stair ascent strategy. The mass had the largest effect of the inertial properties on the variability of the simulated kinetic parameters. The results of the present study may enhance prosthesis design with regard to the inertial properties and usability.

  12. Effect of one- vs. two-stair climb training on sprint power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kenten B; Brown, Lee E; Statler, Traci A; Noffal, Guillermo J; Bartolini, J Albert

    2014-11-01

    Although running stairs is often used in sport conditioning programs, at present, little research has examined the effect of stair climb training on sprint power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of running stairs either 1 stair (1S) or 2 stairs (2S) at a time on power. Fourteen male college track and field athletes were randomized into 3 groups; 1S, 2S, or control (C). All groups were pre- and posttested for 1S, 2S, and 40-m sprint split times. The 1S and 2S groups trained twice per week, for 4 weeks, performing 10 sets of climbing 68 total stairs with 2.5-minute rest between trials. The greatest power values (W) from pre- and poststairs and sprint splits were used for statistical analyses. There was a significant (p climb. The 1S group increased power for the 1S test (pre-1,492.89 ± 123.76; post-1,647.41 ± 73.65) with no change in the 2S test (pre-2,428.80 ± 414.81; post-2,430.32 ± 154.90), whereas the 2S group increased power for the 2S test (pre-2,343.73 ± 317.50; post-2,646.17 ± 305.43) with no change in the 1S test (pre-1,516.69 ± 210.64; post-1,529.38 ± 236.69). The C group showed no change in either stair test (1S: pre-1,403.35 ± 238.67, post-1,384.38 ± 153.32; 2S: pre-2,285.93 ± 345.03, post-2,261.85 ± 356.88). There were no significant interactions or main effects for any sprint split power (40 m: pre-5,337.13 ± 611.86, post-5,318.68 ± 586.24).Therefore, stair climb training either 1 or 2 at a time did not affect 40-m sprint split power but increased power for the specific stair training type. Coaches should choose the number of stairs that are similar in time and power output to sprint training.

  13. Stepping characteristics and Centre of Mass control during stair descent: Effects of age, fall risk and visual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Doerte; Johannsen, Leif; Hollands, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Stair edges provide important visual cues for appropriate foot placement on the stair and balance control during stair descent. Previous studies explored age-related changes in stepping performance and balance control during stair descent and included fit older adults. The present study investigates both age- and frailty-related changes to stepping parameters and Centre of Mass (COM) control during stair descent and how these measures are affected by visual factors. Older adults were split into two groups containing participants with the lowest (LROA, n=7) and highest (HROA, n=8) combined scores on tests of balance and confidence to negotiate stairs. Data were also collected from younger adult participants (YA, n=8). Kinematic data were collected from participants while they descended stairs under combinations of ambient light (bright and dimmed) and stair edge contrast conditions (high and low). A three (group) × two (illumination)×two (contrast) ANCOVA was performed with average stair walking speed as covariate. HROA cleared the stair edge vertically (p=0.001) and horizontally (pstair edge contrast led to reduced vertical COM acceleration variability in HROA (p=0.009) and increased distance between COM and anterior base of support (p=0.017) in LROA. YA increased horizontal foot clearance (p=0.011) when stair edge contrast was high. We conclude that the aforementioned differences in stepping behaviour shown by HROA may contribute towards an increased risk of tripping and that high stair edge contrast has a beneficial effect on balance control in older adults. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Autonomous stair-climbing with miniature jumping robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeter, Sascha A; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos

    2005-04-01

    The problem of vision-guided control of miniature mobile robots is investigated. Untethered mobile robots with small physical dimensions of around 10 cm or less do not permit powerful onboard computers because of size and power constraints. These challenges have, in the past, reduced the functionality of such devices to that of a complex remote control vehicle with fancy sensors. With the help of a computationally more powerful entity such as a larger companion robot, the control loop can be closed. Using the miniature robot's video transmission or that of an observer to localize it in the world, control commands can be computed and relayed to the inept robot. The result is a system that exhibits autonomous capabilities. The framework presented here solves the problem of climbing stairs with the miniature Scout robot. The robot's unique locomotion mode, the jump, is employed to hop one step at a time. Methods for externally tracking the Scout are developed. A large number of real-world experiments are conducted and the results discussed.

  15. Semantics and technologies in modern design of interior stairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhta, M.; Sokolov, A.; Pelevin, E.

    2015-10-01

    Use of metal in the design of interior stairs presents new features for shaping, and can be implemented using different technologies. The article discusses the features of design and production technologies of forged metal spiral staircase considering the image semantics based on the historical and cultural heritage. To achieve the objective was applied structural- semantic method (to identify the organization of structure and semantic features of the artistic image), engineering methods (to justify the construction of the object), anthropometry method and ergonomics (to provide usability), methods of comparative analysis (to reveale the features of the way the ladder in different periods of culture). According to the research results are as follows. Was revealed the semantics influence on the design of interior staircase that is based on the World Tree image. Also was suggested rational calculation of steps to ensure the required strength. And finally was presented technology, providing the realization of the artistic image. In the practical part of the work is presented version of forged staircase.

  16. Criterion-related validity of self-reported stair climbing in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueras-Fresnillo, Sara; Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Gasque, Pablo; Veiga, Oscar L; Martinez-Gomez, David

    2017-04-17

    Stair climbing is an activity of daily living that might contribute to increase levels of physical activity (PA). To date, there is no study examining the validity of climbing stairs assessed by self-report. The aim of this study was, therefore, to examine the validity of estimated stair climbing from one question included in a common questionnaire compared to a pattern-recognition activity monitor in older adults. A total of 138 older adults (94 women), aged 65-86 years (70.9 ± 4.7 years), from the IMPACT65 + study participated in this validity study. Estimates of stair climbing were obtained from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) PA questionnaire. An objective assessment of stair climbing was obtained with the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA) monitor. The correlation between both methods to assess stair climbing was fair (ρ = 0.22, p = 0.008 for PA energy expenditure and ρ = 0.26, p = 0.002 for duration). Mean differences between self-report and the IDEEA were 7.96 ± 10.52 vs. 9.88 ± 3.32 METs-min/day for PA energy expenditure, and 0.99 ± 1.32 vs. 1.79 ± 2.02 min/day for duration (both Wilcoxon test p stair climbing has modest validity to accurately rank old age participants, and underestimates both PAEE and its duration, as compared with an objectively measured method.

  17. Instant InnoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This book is a complete reference guide, designed to provide you with answers and solutions to all the common problems you encounter within InnoDB, helping you achieve higher performance and greater stability in your InnoDB databases.The ""InnoDB Quick Reference Guide"" features content for all skill levels of MySQL administrators, developers, and engineers.

  18. Mastering MariaDB

    CERN Document Server

    Razzoli, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended for intermediate users who want to learn how to administrate a MariaDB server or a set of servers. It is aimed at MariaDB users, and hence working knowledge of MariaDB is a prerequisite.

  19. Mobile and fixed bearing total knee prosthesis functional comparison during stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, F; Benedetti, M G; De Felice, R; Buzzi, R; Giannini, S; Aglietti, P

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the functional performance of the mobile bearing total knee replacement prosthesis as compared to the fixed bearing type total knee replacement prosthesis. Kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography data were gained from 10 patients with mobile bearing and 10 patients with a fixed bearing posterior stabilized Insall Burstein II total knee replacement during ascending and descending stairs. A control group of 10 normal subjects, matched by sex and age, was also analysed. No significant biomechanical differences in patients with different total knee replacement designs have been reported from level-walking studies. Slightly better performance of posterior retaining with respect to cruciate sacrificing total knee replacement designs have been claimed from stair climbing studies. Only one study has been conducted regarding mobile versus fixed bearing total knee replacement assessed by gait analysis. This study did not show any biomechanical differences between the two groups. Motion analysis was used to quantify the knee kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (right and left longissimus dorsi, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles) during stair ascent and descent. The mobile bearing group demonstrated a reduced knee extensor moment during stair climbing and descending, and a reduced knee adductor moment during stair climbing. When ascending stairs, most of the mobile bearing patients show a peak knee flexion and a peak knee flexion moment at the late stance phase during the double support period. This kinematic and kinetic pattern is absent in normal subject. Both mobile bearing and fixed bearing groups showed abnormal electromyography patterns in both descending and ascending. During stair climbing, the mobile bearing design demonstrates a different kinematic pattern to the fixed bearing total knee replacement. Lower limb compensatory mechanisms

  20. Does a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee affect stair ascent strategies in persons with transfemoral amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Wolf, Erik J; Scoville, Charles R; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    Stair ascent can be difficult for individuals with transfemoral amputation because of the loss of knee function. Most individuals with transfemoral amputation use either a step-to-step (nonreciprocal, advancing one stair at a time) or skip-step strategy (nonreciprocal, advancing two stairs at a time), rather than a step-over-step (reciprocal) strategy, because step-to-step and skip-step allow the leading intact limb to do the majority of work. A new microprocessor-controlled knee (Ottobock X2(®)) uses flexion/extension resistance to allow step-over-step stair ascent. We compared self-selected stair ascent strategies between conventional and X2(®) prosthetic knees, examined between-limb differences, and differentiated stair ascent mechanics between X2(®) users and individuals without amputation. We also determined which factors are associated with differences in knee position during initial contact and swing within X2(®) users. Fourteen individuals with transfemoral amputation participated in stair ascent sessions while using conventional and X2(®) knees. Ten individuals without amputation also completed a stair ascent session. Lower-extremity stair ascent joint angles, moment, and powers and ground reaction forces were calculated using inverse dynamics during self-selected strategy and cadence and controlled cadence using a step-over-step strategy. One individual with amputation self-selected a step-over-step strategy while using a conventional knee, while 10 individuals self-selected a step-over-step strategy while using X2(®) knees. Individuals with amputation used greater prosthetic knee flexion during initial contact (32.5°, p = 0.003) and swing (68.2°, p = 0.001) with higher intersubject variability while using X2(®) knees compared to conventional knees (initial contact: 1.6°, swing: 6.2°). The increased prosthetic knee flexion while using X2(®) knees normalized knee kinematics to individuals without amputation during swing (88.4°, p = 0.179) but

  1. Instant MongoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Amol

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. MongoDB Starter is a fast and practical guide designed to help you start developing high-performance and scalable applications using MongoDB.MongoDB Starter is ideal for developers who are new to MongoDB and who need a no-nonsense guide on how to start working with it. No knowledge of MongoDB is required to follow this book, but some knowledge of C++ would be helpful.

  2. Stairs or escalator? Using theories of persuasion and motivation to facilitate healthy decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Gaurav; Sheppes, Gal; Leslie, Sara; Gross, James J

    2014-12-01

    To encourage an increase in daily activity, researchers have tried a variety of health-related communications, but with mixed results. In the present research-using the stair escalator choice context-we examined predictions derived from the Heuristic Systematic Model (HSM), Self Determination Theory (SDT), and related theories. Specifically, we tested whether (as predicted by HSM) signs that encourage heuristic processing ("Take the Stairs") would have greatest impact when placed at the stair/escalator point of choice (when processing time is limited), whereas signs that encourage systematic processing ("Will You Take the Stairs?") would have greatest impact when placed at some distance from the point of choice (when processing time is less limited). We also tested whether (as predicted by SDT) messages promoting autonomy would be more likely to result in sustained motivated behavior (i.e., stair taking at subsequent uncued choice points) than messages that use commands. A series of studies involving more than 9,000 pedestrians provided support for these predictions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Acute Effects of Walking Exercise on Stair Negotiation in Sedentary and Physically Active Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzler, Marcos R; da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Bobbert, Maarten F; Duysens, Jacques; Carpes, Felipe P

    2017-07-01

    In negotiating stairs, low foot clearance increases the risk of tripping and a fall. Foot clearance may be related to physical fitness, which differs between active and sedentary participants, and be acutely affected by exercise. Impaired stair negotiation could be an acute response to exercise. Here we determined acute changes in foot clearances during stair walking in sedentary (n = 15) and physically active older adults (n = 15) after prolonged exercise. Kinematic data were acquired during negotiation with a 3-steps staircase while participants walked at preferred speed, before and after 30 min walking at preferred speed and using a treadmill. Foot clearances were compared before and after exercise and between the groups. Sedentary older adults presented larger (0.5 cm for lead and 2 cm for trail leg) toe clearances in ascent, smaller (0.7 cm) heel clearance in the leading foot in descent, and larger (1 cm) heel clearance in the trailing foot in descent than physically active. Sedentary older adults negotiate stairs in a slightly different way than active older adults, and 30 min walking at preferred speed does not affect clearance in stair negotiation.

  4. Stair-climbing capabilities of USU's T3 ODV mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. Reed; Wood, Carl G.

    2001-09-01

    A six-wheeled autonomous omni-directional vehicle (ODV) called T3 has been developed at Utah State University's (USU) Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS). This paper focuses on T3's ability to climb stairs using its unique configuration of 6 independently driven and steered wheels and active suspension height control. The ability of T3, or any similar vehicle, to climb stairs is greatly dependent on the chassis orientation relative to the stairs. Stability criteria is developed for any vehicle dimensions and orientation, on any staircase. All possible yaw and pitch angles on various staircases are evaluated to find vehicle orientations that will allow T3 to climb with the largest margin of stability. Different controller types are investigated for controlling vertical wheel movement with the objective of keeping all wheels in contact with the stairs, providing smooth load transfer between loaded and unloaded wheels, and maintaining optimum chassis pitch and roll angles. A controller is presented that uses feedback from wheel loading, vertical wheel position, and chassis orientation sensors. The implementation of the controller is described, and T3's stair climbing performance is presented and evaluated.

  5. [Forces acting on foot soles during stair climbing in healthy probands and in patients with coxarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidis, E; von der Decken, C B

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the contact forces acting on the sole of the foot of healthy persons and coxarthrosis patients climbing and descending stairs. The sole contact forces were determined using an experimental set-up comprising a stair construction provided with an integrated measuring step. In healthy subjects, the forces acting on the soles of the feet while climbing stairs were found to be 1.2 times their body weight. With regard to descending stairs, a distinction must be made between "hard" and "soft" walkers. In the case of "hard" walkers, the forces acting on the soles may be as much as 2.6 times body weight. These forces can be reduced by the wearing of shock-absorbing shoes. In coxarthrosis and prostheses-bearing patients, all movements are executed more slowly when climbing or descending stairs, so that only small dynamic forces arise. The greatest loads are about 1.2 times the patient's own weight. In these patients, an effective reduction by shockabsorbing footwear is not possible.

  6. The influence of poster prompts on stair use: The effects of setting, poster size and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Eves, Frank F.; Carroll, Douglas

    2001-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is evidence that poster prompts increase stair use. The present study was concerned with the effects of poster size, poster message, and setting on stair use. DESIGN: Using a quasi-experimental design, four observational studies were undertaken in which stair and escalator use were logged during 2-week baseline periods and 2-week intervention periods. METHODS: In the first two studies, observations were undertaken in two shopping centres (total N = 30,018) with the size of poster varying. In the other two studies (total N = 37,907), one in a shopping centre and one in a train station, two poster messages were tested in both sites. RESULTS: Pedestrian traffic volume was controlled for statistically. There were significant increases in stair use with A1- and A2-, but not A3-size posters. Overall, the two different poster messages were both effective in encouraging stair use. Interactions between gender and message setting, however, reflected the fact that the 'stay healthy, save time' poster had little impact on female shoppers but was highly effective for female commuters. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that developers of health-promotion posters pay attention to poster size. They also indicate that it is insufficient to segment audiences by gender without considering the setting and motivational context.

  7. Influence of step-height and body mass on gastrocnemius muscle fascicle behavior during stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjaard, M; Reeves, N D; van Dieën, J H; Baltzopoulos, V; Maganaris, C N

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the role of the ankle plantar flexor muscles in stair negotiation, we examined the effects of manipulation of kinematic and kinetic constraints on the behavior of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle during stair ascent. Ten subjects ascended a four-step staircase at four different step-heights (changing the kinematic constraints): standard (17 cm), 50% decreased, 50% increased and 75% increased. At the standard height, subjects also ascended the stairs wearing a weighted jacket, adding 20% of their body mass (changing the kinetic constraints). During stair ascent, kinematics and kinetics of the lower legs were determined using motion capture and ground reaction force measurements. The GM muscle fascicle length was measured during the task with ultrasonography. The amount of GM muscle fascicle shortening increased with step-height, coinciding with an increase in ankle joint moment. The increase in body mass resulted in an increased ankle joint moment, but the amount of GM muscle fascicle shortening during the lift-off phase did not increase, instead, the fascicles were shorter over the whole stride cycle. Increasing demands of stair ascent, by increasing step-height or body mass, requires higher joint moments. The increased ankle joint moment with increasing demands is, at least in part, produced by the increase in GM muscle fascicle shortening.

  8. Reliability of electromyography parameters during stair deambulation in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Ferraz Pazzinatto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliability is essential to all aspects of the measure, as it shows the quality of the information and allows rational conclusions with regard to the data. There has been controversial results regarding the reliability of electromyographic parameters assessed during stair ascent and descent in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Therefore, this study aims to determine the reliability of time and frequency domain electromyographic parameters on both gestures in women with PFPS. Thirty-one women with PFPS were selected to participate in this study. Data from vastus lateralis and medialis were collected during stair deambulation. The selected parameters were: automatic onset, median frequency bands of low, medium and high frequency. Reliability was determined by intraclass correlation coefficient and the standard error of measurement. The frequency domain variables have shown good reliability, with the stair ascent presenting the best rates. On the other hand, onset has proved to be inconsistent in all measures. Our findings suggest that stair ascent is more reliable than stair descent to evaluate subjects with PFPS in the most cases.

  9. Influences of exit and stair conditions on human evacuation in a dormitory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenjun; Li, Angui; Gao, Ran; Wang, Xiaowei

    2012-12-01

    Evacuation processes of students are investigated by experiment and simulation. The experiment is performed for students evacuating from a dormitory with an exit and stairs. FDS+Evac is proposed to simulate the exit and stair dynamics of occupant evacuation. Concerning the exit and stair widths, we put forward some useful standpoints. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted results and experimental results. With the increase of exit width, a significant stratification phenomenon will be found in flow rate. Stratification phenomenon is that two different stable flow rates will emerge during the evacuation. And the flow rate curve looks like a ladder. The larger the exit width, the earlier the stratification phenomenon appears. When exit width is more than 2.0 m, the flow rate of each exit width is divided into two stable stages, and the evacuation times show almost no change. The judgment that the existence of stairs causes flow stratification is reasonable. By changing the width of the stairs, we proved that judgment. The smaller the width of BC, the earlier the stratification appears. We found that scenario 5 is the most adverse circumstance. Those results are helpful in performance-based design of buildings.

  10. Are motivational signs to increase stair use a thing of the past? A multi-building study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Lina; Gale, Joanne; Chau, Josephine Y; Bauman, Adrian

    2017-03-06

    Issue addressed: Only half of Australia's adult population is sufficiently physical active. One method thought to increase incidental physical activity at work is the use of stair-promoting interventions. Stairs are readily available and stair climbing is considered vigorous physical activity. Motivational signs have been extensively and effectively trialled to increase stair use, but are they suitable for contemporary populations? Methods: Participants were occupants of three selected University of Sydney buildings using the elevators or stairs. Infrared people counters were installed to monitor stair and elevator use for 24 h/day during two baseline weeks, followed by two intervention weeks, where motivational and directional signs were placed at points of choice. Results: At baseline there was a large between-building variation in the change in stair to elevator proportion, where we observed a small increase in two buildings (81-84%, odds ratio (OR): 1.16 (1.09, 1.23), and 26-27%, OR: 1.09 (1.03, 1.15)), and a decrease (30-25%, OR: 0.75 (0.72, 0.77) in the third building. Conclusions: Differences in stair use among buildings could be due to building design and function. Motivational and directional signs to promote stair use showed small or nil effects. The future of interventions promoting stair use in occupational settings may need more interactive or personalised intervention methods. So what?: The implications of this study are that posters to promote stair use might be a thing of the past and this should be considered in future workplace health promotion efforts to increase physical activity. More novel and interactive methods using new media are recommended.

  11. Effects of stair task training on walking ability in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung; Choi, Jin-Uk

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of stair task training on gait abilities by conducting stair task training. In this training, step training is applied in various directions with hemiplegia patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six patients with stroke were selected on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria, and they were randomly divided into eighteen patients in the experimental group and eighteen patients in the control group via draw. [Results] In this study, the Dartfish program was used to measure gait capabilities. Experiment group showed a statistically significant improvement in the swing phase time of the affected lower extremity compared to control group. [Conclusion] It was found that the stair task training group had effective results in the swing phase time of the affected lower extremity compared with the group that applied weight support on the affected lower extremity and balance training. PMID:28265147

  12. Modeling of a stair-climbing wheelchair mechanism with high single-step capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Murray J; Ishimatsu, Takakazu

    2003-09-01

    In the field of providing mobility for the elderly and disabled, the aspect of dealing with stairs continues largely unresolved. This paper focuses on presenting the development of a stair-climbing wheelchair mechanism with high single-step capability. The mechanism is based on front and rear wheel clusters connected to the base (chair) via powered linkages so as to permit both autonomous stair ascent and descent in the forward direction, and high single-step functionality for such as direct entry to and from a van. Primary considerations were inherent stability, provision of a mechanism that is physically no larger than a standard powered wheelchair, aesthetics, and being based on readily available low-cost components.

  13. Automatic stair-climbing algorithm of the planetary wheel type mobile robot in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-01

    A mobile robot, named KAEROT, has been developed for inspection and maintenance operations in nuclear facilities. The main feature of locomotion system is the planetary wheel assembly with small wheels. This mechanism has been designed to be able to go over the stairs and obstacles with stability. This paper presents the inverse kinematic solution that is to be operated by remote control. The automatic stair climbing algorithm is also proposed. The proposed algorithms the moving paths of small wheels and calculates the angular velocity of 3 actuation wheels. The results of simulations and experiments are given for KAEROT performed on the irregular stairs in laboratory. It is shown that the proposed algorithm provides the lower inclination angle of the robot body and increases its stability during navigation. 14 figs., 16 refs. (Author).

  14. Do older people with visual impairment and living alone in a rural developing country report greater difficulty in managing stairs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairi, Noran N; Bulgiba, Awang; Peramalah, Devi; Mudla, Izzuna

    2013-01-01

    Managing stairs is a challenging activity of daily living (ADL) for older people. This study aims to examine the association between visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs among older people living alone and those living with others. A population-based cross sectional study was conducted in rural Malaysia from 2007 till 2008. Seven hundred and sixty five older people aged 60 years and over underwent eye examination for visual impairment. Visual acuity criteria were used to define visual impairment. Presenting visual acuity was assessed using a standard metric Snellen Chart of E type. Difficulty in managing stairs was measured according to a question drawn from the Barthel Index which asks "do you need help in climbing stairs". Overall, the prevalence of difficulty in managing stairs among older people in our population was 135 (18.3%, 95% CI 15.7-21.2). After adjusting for important confounders the odds ratio (OR) for visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs among older people living alone was 5.04 (95% CI 2.27, 10.62). Among older people living with others, the adjusted OR for visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs was 3.10 (95% CI 1.52, 6.80). In a sample of older people aged 60 years and over, those living alone with visual impairment had greater difficulty in managing stairs than those living with others. Identification of these groups of older people is useful for targeting interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physiological changes following a 12 week gym based stair-climbing, elliptical trainer and treadmill running program in females

    OpenAIRE

    EGANA, MIKEL

    2004-01-01

    PUBLISHED Despite the growing popularity of the elliptical trainer aerobic exercise modality the physiological changes induced following a training program using elliptical trainers remains unknown. Donne investigates the metabolic and cardiorespiratory improvements following a 12-week aerobic training program using elliptical trainer, treadmill or stair-climbing modalities. Findings reveal that in moderately active females similar physiological improvements were observed using stair-climb...

  16. Construct Validity and Test-Retest Reliability of the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire in Lower-Limb Amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    de Laat FA, Rommers GM, Geertzen JH, Roorda LD. Construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire in lower-limb amputees. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2010;91:1396-401. Objective: To investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Climbing Stairs

  17. Symptom-limited stair climbing as a predictor of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications after high-risk surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, M; Trayner, E; Dammann, O; Pinto-Plata, V; Celli, B

    2001-10-01

    Thoracotomy, sternotomy, and upper abdominal laparotomy are associated with high rate of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications (POCs). We hypothesized that symptom-limited stair climbing predicts POCs after high-risk surgery. A prospective evaluation of 83 patients undergoing thoracotomy, sternotomy, and upper abdominal laparotomy surgery. The 52 men and 31 women completed symptom-limited stair climbing. A separate investigator, blinded to the number of flights of stairs climbed, assessed 30-day actual outcomes for POCs, including pneumonia, atelectasis, mechanical ventilation for > 48 h, reintubation, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolus, and death within 30 days of surgery. The operations performed included 31 lobectomies, 6 wedge resections, 3 pneumonectomies, 3 substernal thymectomies, 1 substernal thyroidectomy, 23 colectomies, 3 laparotomies, 7 abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs, 5 esophagogastrectomies, and 1 nephrectomy. POCs occurred in 21 of 83 patients (25%) overall, in 9 of 44 patients undergoing thoracotomy/sternotomy (20%), and in 12 of 39 patients undergoing upper abdominal laparotomy (31%). Of those unable to climb one flight of stairs, 89% developed a POC. No patient able to climb the maximum of seven flights of stairs had a POC. The inability to climb two flights of stairs was associated with a positive predictive value of 82% for the development of a POC. The number of days in the hospital postoperatively decreased with a patient's increased ability to climb stairs. Symptom-limited stair climbing offers a simple, inexpensive means to predict POCs after high-risk surgery.

  18. Effects of Abdominal Hollowing During Stair Climbing on the Activations of Local Trunk Stabilizing Muscles: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah Young; Kim, Eun Hyuk; Cho, Yun Woo; Kwon, Sun Oh; Son, Su Min

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine using surface electromyography whether stair climbing with abdominal hollowing (AH) is better at facilitating local trunk muscle activity than stair climbing without AH. Methods Twenty healthy men with no history of low back pain participated in the study. Surface electrodes were attached to the multifidus (MF), lumbar erector spinae, thoracic erector spinae, transverse abdominus - internal oblique abdominals (TrA-IO), external oblique abdominals (EO), and the rectus abdominis. Amplitudes of electromyographic signals were measured during stair climbing. Study participants performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) for each muscle in various positions to normalize the surface electromyography data. Results AH during stair climbing resulted in significant increases in normalized MVCs in both MFs and TrA-IOs (pstair climbing with AH as compared with stair climbing without AH. Especially, right TrA-IO/EO and left TrA-IO/EO were significantly increased (pStair climbing with AH activates local trunk stabilizing muscles better than stair climbing without AH. The findings suggest that AH during stair climbing contributes to trunk muscle activation and trunk stabilization. PMID:24466515

  19. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Wilken, Jason M; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Neptune, Richard R; Silverman, Anne K

    2014-10-17

    Individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation have a greater risk of falling compared to able-bodied individuals, and falling on stairs can lead to serious injuries. Individuals with transtibial amputations have lost ankle plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance. Recently, powered prostheses have been designed to provide active ankle power generation with the goal of restoring biological ankle function. However, the effects of using a powered prosthesis on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum to evaluate dynamic balance in individuals with a transtibial amputation using powered and passive prostheses relative to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent and descent. Ground reaction forces, external moment arms, and joint powers were also investigated to interpret the angular momentum results. A key result was that individuals with an amputation had a larger range of sagittal-plane angular momentum during prosthetic limb stance compared to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent. There were no significant differences in the frontal, transverse, or sagittal-plane ranges of angular momentum or maximum magnitude of the angular momentum vector between the passive and powered prostheses during stair ascent or descent. These results indicate that individuals with an amputation have altered angular momentum trajectories during stair walking compared to able-bodied individuals, which may contribute to an increased fall risk. The results also suggest that a powered prosthesis provides no distinct advantage over a passive prosthesis in maintaining dynamic balance during stair walking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Egges, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinations, a topic about which little is understood. We examined how secondary cognitive and manual tasks interfere with stair gait when a person concurrently performed tasks at different levels of complexity. Gait kinematic data and secondary task performance measures were obtained from fifteen healthy young males while ascending and descending a four-step staircase at three inclinations (17.7°, 29.4°, and 41.5°) as well as level walking. They performed a cognitive task, 'backward digit recall', a manual task, 'carrying a cup of water' and a combination of the two tasks. Gait performance and dynamic stability were assessed by gait speed and whole body center of mass (COM) range of motion in the medial-lateral direction, respectively. No significant effect of the gait task on the cognitive task performance was observed. In contrast, stair walking adversely affected the performance of the manual task compared to level walking. Overall, more difficult postural and secondary tasks resulted in a decrease in gait speed and variation in COM displacement within normal range. Results suggest that COM displacement and gait alterations might be adopted to enhance the stability, and optimize the secondary task performance while walking under challenging circumstances. Our findings are useful for balance and gait evaluation, and for future falls prediction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Trunk and lower limb biomechanics during stair climbing in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Connor A; Hatfield, Gillian L; Gilbart, Michael K; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is a pathomechanical hip condition leading to pain and impaired physical function. It has been shown that those with femoroacetabular impingement exhibit altered gait characteristics during level walking and stair climbing, and decreased muscle force production during isometric muscle contractions. However, no studies to-date have looked at trunk kinematics or muscle activation during dynamic movements such as stair climbing in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical outcomes (trunk and lower limb kinematics as well as lower limb kinetics and muscle activation) during stair climbing in those with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement. Trunk, hip, knee and ankle kinematics, as well as hip, knee and ankle kinetics and muscle activity of nine lower limb muscles were collected during stair climbing for 20 people with clinical and radiographic femoroacetabular impingement and compared to 20 age- and sex-matched pain-free individuals. Those with femoroacetabular impingement ascended the stairs slower (effect size=0.82), had significantly increased peak trunk forward flexion angles (effect size=0.99) and external hip flexion moments (effect size=0.94) and had decreased peak external knee flexion moments (effect size=0.90) compared to the control group. Findings from this study indicate that while those with and without femoroacetabular impingement exhibit many biomechanical similarities when ascending stairs, differences in trunk forward flexion and joint kinetics indicate some important differences. Further longitudinal research is required to elucidate the cause of these differences as well as the clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements for baby walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Gregory B; Leland, Elizabeth W

    2008-01-01

    Based on estimates from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were about 25,000 baby walker-related injuries treated annually in U.S. hospital emergency departments during the early 1990s. This amounted to about 8 injuries for every 1000 baby walkers in use. Most injuries resulted from falls down stairs. After CPSC initiated a regulatory proceeding in 1994, the CPSC staff worked with industry to address the stair-fall hazard. This cooperative effort resulted in requirements designed to prevent stair-fall injuries that became effective in 1997 as part of a revised voluntary safety standard. This study presents a retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements. The benefits were defined as the reduction in the costs of injuries resulting from the use of the safer walkers. The costs were defined as the additional resource costs associated with making baby walkers safer. The study found that the stair-fall requirements were highly effective in reducing the risk of stair-fall injury, and that the benefits of the requirements substantially exceeded the costs. The expected net benefits (i.e., benefits minus costs) amounted to an average of about $169 per walker, over the walker's expected product life. Given current U.S. sales of about 600,000 baby walkers annually, the present value of the expected net benefits associated with 1 year's production amounts to over $100 million annually. A sensitivity analysis showed that the major findings were robust with respect to variations in underlying assumptions.

  3. Planning paths through a spatial hierarchy - Eliminating stair-stepping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Marc G.

    1989-01-01

    Stair-stepping effects are a result of the loss of spatial continuity resulting from the decomposition of space into a grid. This paper presents a path planning algorithm which eliminates stair-stepping effects induced by the grid-based spatial representation. The algorithm exploits a hierarchical spatial model to efficiently plan paths for a mobile robot operating in dynamic domains. The spatial model and path planning algorithm map to a parallel machine, allowing the system to operate incrementally, thereby accounting for unexpected events in the operating space.

  4. Increased Difficulties in Managing Stairs in Visually Impaired Older Adults: A Community-Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Managing stairs is a challenging aspect of daily activities of living for older people. We assessed whether older adults with visual impairment (VI have greater difficulties of managing stairs in daily lives.The study was designed as a community-based cross-sectional study based on a Chinese cohort aged 60 years and older in rural China. Visual acuity (VA was measured in both eyes using a retro-illuminated Snellen chart with tumbling-E optotypes. VI (including blindness was defined as presenting VA of worse than 20/60 in either eye. Having any difficulties in managing stairs was self-reported based on a question drawn from the Barthel Index. Information on participants' socioeconomic status, lifestyle-related factors, diseases histories and medication intake was collected using a questionnaire.The Barthel Index, Activities of Daily Living questionnaire was completed by 4597 (99.7% participants including 2218 men and 2379 women. The age of the participants ranged from 60 to 93 years with a mean of 67.6 ± 6.3 years. In age and gender adjusted models, adults with VI had a higher likelihood of having difficulties in managing stairs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0, 3.7 compared with those without. The association of VI with the likelihood of having difficulties in managing stairs was stronger in older adults who lived alone (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 1.8, 4.5 compared with those who lived with other family members (OR = 2.0; 95%CI 1.3, 4.3. Compared with hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cognitive dysfunction, VI had the greatest impact on people's abilities of managing stairs.VI was associated with an increased likelihood of having difficulties in managing stairs, especially in those who lived alone. However, whether the finding could be extrapolated to other populations warrants further studies as different environmental exposures such as illumination and types of stairs may alter the association observed in this study.

  5. Braking and propulsive impulses in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome when walking up and down stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Camargo Saad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a prevalent clinical condition and it affects gait behavior. Braking and propulsive impulses are important biomechanical parameters obtained from ground reaction forces (GRF, which combine the amount of force applied over a period of time. The aim of this study was to evaluate these impulses while walking up and down stairs in healthy controls and PFPS individuals. The results did not reveal significant differences in braking and propulsive impulses between groups during these activities. Thus, the painful condition on a simple functional activity was insufficient to change the motor strategy to walking up or down the stairs.

  6. 78 FR 35173 - Physical Medicine Devices; Reclassification of Stair-Climbing Wheelchairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ...: Identification of patients who can effectively operate the device; and Instructions how to fit, modify, or...-climbing wheelchair. (a) Identification. A stair-climbing wheelchair is a device with wheels that is... the following: (i) Identification of patients who can effectively operate the device; and (ii...

  7. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations.

  8. Specific effects of a calorie-based intervention on stair climbing in overweight commuters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda L; Eves, Frank F

    2011-10-01

    Point-of-choice prompts consistently increase stair climbing; a greater increase in overweight than normal weight individuals was reported in a multi-component worksite campaign. The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of a multi-component campaign, on stair climbing, in a public access setting. In an interrupted-time-series-design, baseline observations (2 weeks) preceded a 2-week point-of-choice prompt. An additional message, positioned at the top of the climb for a further 6-week period, summarised the calorific consequences of a single ascent. Inconspicuous observers recorded traveller's methods of ascent, coded by sex and weight status, twice a week between 08:00 and 09:59. At baseline, the overweight chose stairs less than normal weight individuals. The multi-component campaign targeting weight control reversed this bias, increasing stair climbing only in overweight individuals. The specificity of the effect confirms the appeal of this lifestyle activity for the overweight. The discussion focuses on how intentions to control weight may be converted into behaviour.

  9. Climbing Stairs After Outpatient Rehabilitation for a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    Objective: To study the necessity and ability to climb stairs in persons after a lower-limb amputation (LLA) and the relation of this ability with personal and clinical variables. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Persons with an

  10. Robot-assisted practice of gait and stair climbing in nonambulatory stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Stefan; Tomelleri, Christopher; Bardeleben, Anita; Werner, Cordula; Waldner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A novel gait robot enabled nonambulatory patients the repetitive practice of gait and stair climbing. Thirty nonambulatory patients with subacute stroke were allocated to two groups. During 60 min sessions every workday for 4 weeks, the experimental group received 30 min of robot training and 30 min of physiotherapy and the control group received 60 min of physiotherapy. The primary variable was gait and stair climbing ability (Functional Ambulation Categories [FAC] score 0-5); secondary variables were gait velocity, Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), and leg strength and tone blindly assessed at onset, intervention end, and follow-up. Both groups were comparable at onset and functionally improved over time. The improvements were significantly larger in the experimental group with respect to the FAC, RMI, velocity, and leg strength during the intervention. The FAC gains (mean +/- standard deviation) were 2.4 +/- 1.2 (experimental group) and 1.2 +/- 1.5 (control group), p = 0.01. At the end of the intervention, seven experimental group patients and one control group patient had reached an FAC score of 5, indicating an ability to climb up and down one flight of stairs. At follow-up, this superior gait ability persisted. In conclusion, the therapy on the novel gait robot resulted in a superior gait and stair climbing ability in nonambulatory patients with subacute stroke; a higher training intensity was the most likely explanation. A large randomized controlled trial should follow.

  11. Promoting stair climbing in public-access settings: an audit of intervention opportunities in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Oliver J; Smith, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Introducing message prompts at the 'point-of-choice' (POC) between stairs and escalators increases stair choice in 'public-access' settings (e.g. malls). For nationwide campaigns, plentiful POCs appear needed. We audited the availability of POCs in public-access settings across England. Boundaries for 25 urban areas (population=6,829,874) were verified using Ordinance Survey maps, which showed all airports and train/tram stations. Malls and bus stations were identified from commercial listings and local authority web-pages. From September 2010-March 2011 two investigators visually inspected all venues (N=410), counting 'true' POCs and 'quasi' POCs (i.e. instances where stairs were visible from, but not adjacent to, escalators). 5% of venues had ≥1 true POC (quasi POC=3%). Aggregating across areas, there was a true and quasi POC for every 243,924 and 379,437 people, respectively. There were regional variations; one area had 10 true/quasi POCs, whilst 10/24 remaining areas had none. POCs were more common in airports (4/6 venues) than malls (11/85) and train stations (4/215). Although public-access POCs reach sizeable audiences, their availability in England is sporadic, precluding nationwide campaigns. Interventions should be considered locally, based on available POCs. Work/community venues (e.g. offices, hospitals), where pedestrians choose between stairs and elevators, may provide greater intervention opportunities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The metabolic and muscular differences between two stair-climbing strategies of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Jinger S; Aghazarian, Gary S; Rohrbach, Elizabeth A

    2010-09-01

    When climbing stairs, there are 2 practical strategies, contact each step with alternating feet (single) or contact every other step (double) with alternating feet. Our purpose was to evaluate the metabolic cost and muscular activity of these single and double stair-climbing strategies. We hypothesized that metabolic cost would not differ between the 2 strategies, because the subjects would complete the 2 protocols with a similar speed that would minimize cost. Likewise, we hypothesized that muscle activity during stance would not differ between the 2 stepping strategies. Twelve subjects completed baseline and experimental protocols. For the baseline protocol, the subjects walked up a stairwell with a single-step and a double-step strategy. For the experimental protocol, each subject walked on a treadmill inclined to the same degree as the stairs at the speed and step frequency determined from the baseline protocol. Every subject completed the baseline testing with a faster average speed during the double-step protocol. After mimicking each strategy with our experimental methods, we calculated that the double-step strategy would yield a greater use of metabolic energy, equal to approximately 1.0-1.3 kcalxkg-1xh-1, on average 70-90 additional kcalxh-1. This double-step strategy required a greater activity for propulsion during stance for the ankle and knee extensors. In summary, to maximize metabolic cost and muscular activity, we recommend a double-stair-climbing (skip a step) strategy.

  13. Stair ascent and descent biomechanical adaptations while using a custom ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Wilken, Jason M

    2016-09-06

    The ability to navigate stairs step-over-step is an important functional outcome following severe lower leg injury and is difficult for many patients. Ankle-foot orthoses, such as the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO), are often prescribed to improve function. This study compared stair climbing mechanics between IDEO users and able-bodied control participants. Thirteen IDEO users who sustained severe lower leg injury and 13 controls underwent biomechanical gait analysis. Participants ascended and descended a 16-step instrumented staircase without handrail use at a controlled cadence of 80 steps/min. Peak joint angles, moments, powers, and ground reaction forces, and integrated mechanical work were calculated. Independent t-tests with Bonferroni-Holm corrections were used to compare controls to IDEO and sound limbs. Reduced ankle range of motion on the IDEO limb resulted in compensatory strategies while ascending or descending stairs. During ascent, IDEO users had greater bilateral hip power during pull-up (pstair descent, when the IDEO limb had was trailing, it had less ankle dorsiflexion during controlled lowering (pweight acceptance (pclimb stairs step-over-step unassisted. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Climbing Stairs After Outpatient Rehabilitation for a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the necessity and ability to climb stairs in persons after a lower-limb amputation (LLA) and the relation of this ability with personal and clinical variables. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Persons with an

  15. In vitro effects on mobile polyethylene insert under highly demanding daily activities: stair climbing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Taddei, Paola; Tozzi, Silvia; Sudanese, Alessandra; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    ...?One set of the same total knee prosthesis (TKP), equal in design and size, was tested on a three-plus-one knee joint simulator for two million cycles using a highly demanding daily load waveform, replicating a stair-climbing movement...

  16. Stairs to Skałka. From Iconography of Martyrdom of Bishop Stanislaus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Węcławowicz

    2003-12-01

    flights of stairs or ladders leading to the gates from the site where the hired assassins mutilate the body of the Saint. Moreover, nearly in every depiction figures can be seen mounting the stairs towards the open gates. These figures as well as stairs or ladders or gates are not to be found in the texts of The Life o f the Saint because painted and graphic renderings have primarily moralizing aim. The archetype of ‘the stairs to Heaven’ is substantiated in the iconography of the Martyrdom as stairs to the church on Skałka. The interpretation of the stairs to Skałka can therefore be resented as follows: L i t e r a l l y , stairs to the gates are indeed stairs leading to the church ‘Na Skałce’. I n a n a l l e g o r i c a l interpretation, they are the Cross of Christ, who enabled the faithful to ascend to Redemption. A typological unity of steps on Jacob’s ladder and the Cross of Christ has frequently been raised in exegesis, and St. Stanislaus appears here, like every martyr, as alter Christus. In a t r o p o l o g i c a l interpretation, ascending stairs indicate aspiring towards perfection through mounting the steps of deeds. I n a n a n a g o g i c interpretation, these stairs lead to the gates of heavenly Jerusalem.

  17. Construct validity and test-retest reliability of the climbing stairs questionnaire in lower-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Fred A; Rommers, Gerardus M; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire, a patient-reported measure of activity limitations in climbing stairs, in lower-limb amputees. A cross-sectional study. Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Lower-limb amputees (N=172; mean +/- SD age, 65+/-12y; 71% men; 82% vascular cause) participated in the study; 33 participated in the reliability study. Not applicable. Construct validity was investigated by testing 10 hypotheses: limitations in climbing stairs according to the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire will be greater in lower-limb amputees who: (1) are older, (2) have a vascular cause of amputation, (3) have a bilateral amputation, (4) have a higher level of amputation, (5) have more comorbid conditions, (6) had their rehabilitation treatment in a nursing home, and (7) climb fewer flights of stairs. Furthermore, limitations in climbing stairs will be related positively to activity limitations according to: (8) the Locomotor Capabilities Index, (9) the Questionnaire Rising and Sitting down, and (10) the Walking Questionnaire. Construct validity was quantified by using the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed with a 3-week interval and quantified using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct validity (8 of 10 null hypotheses not rejected) and test-retest reliability were good (ICC=.79; 95% confidence interval, .57-.90). The Climbing Stairs Questionnaire has good construct validity and test-retest reliability in lower-limb amputees.

  18. Effects of increased step width on frontal plane knee biomechanics in healthy older adults during stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Zhang, Songning; Milner, Clare E; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Peak internal knee abduction moment is a common surrogate variable associated with medial compartment knee loading. Stair descent has been shown to yield a greater peak knee abduction moment compared to level-walking. Changes in step width (SW) may lead to changes in frontal plane lower extremity limb alignment in the frontal plane and alter peak knee abduction moment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increased SW on frontal plane knee biomechanics during stair descent in healthy older adults. Twenty healthy adults were recruited for the study. A motion analysis system was used to obtain three-dimensional lower limb kinematics during testing. An instrumented 3-step staircase with two additional customized wooden steps was used to collect ground reaction forces (GRF) data during stair descent trials. Participants performed five stair descent trials at their self-selected speed using preferred, wide (26% leg length), and wider (39% leg length) SW. The preferred normalized SW in older adults during stair descent was 20% of leg length. Wide and wider SW during stair descent reduced both first and second peak knee adduction angles and abduction moments compared to preferred SW in healthy adults. Increased SW reduced peak knee adduction angles and abduction moments. The reductions in knee abduction moments may have implications in reducing medial compartment knee loads during stair descent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing advanced locomotor recovery after total hip arthroplasty with the timed stair test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Marc; Malouin, Francine; Moffet, Hélène

    2003-11-01

    To assess advanced locomotor performance with the timed stair test (TST) and to determine if the level of performance of a group of women one year after hip replacement changed with the functional demands of the tasks. Comparison of the performance of two groups of women. General community. A convenient sample including 18 women who had had a total hip replacement 11 months earlier (patients) and 15 healthy age-matched women (comparison group). Three tests were administered: the 10-m walk test, the unloaded TST and the loaded TST (10 kg). The duration of each test was recorded and transformed into speed and the level of performance was assessed by calculating percentage deficit using corresponding values from the comparison group. The TST is made of four subtasks: (1) standing up and walking, (2) ascending stairs, (3) turning and descending stairs, (4) walking back, turning and sitting down. Significant differences in performance were found for all three tests with the patients showing a slower performance. The percentage deficits increased significantly from the less difficult (walking: 18%) to the more difficult conditions (unloaded TST: 23% and loaded TST: 28%), with the greatest deficits found during stair descent. Strong correlations were also found between walking deficits and TST deficits (loaded: r = 0.82; unloaded: r = 0.88). By combining mobility, walking and stair activities, the TST can be used to assess various components of advanced locomotor performance. The progressive level of difficulty of the TST subtasks as well as the addition of a load make it useful to detect subtle locomotor disabilities.

  20. Clinical and biomechanical factors which predict timed up and down stairs test performance in hemiparetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Zory, Raphael; Pradon, Didier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    The ability to ascend and descend a flight of stairs is considered as one of the best predictors of free-living activity and is correlated with domestic extrinsic activity in hemiparetic patients. However, the relationship between timed-stair performance and clinical and biomechanical parameters has never been studied this population. The aim of this study was to determine if performance on the Timed Up and Down Stairs (TUDS) test was related to clinical variables (maximal gait speed, strength and spasticity) and to biomechanical gait parameters (spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic gait parameters) in hemiparetic patients. Sixty hemiparetic patients performed the TUDS test, underwent 3D gait-analysis and a clinical assessment. Pearson's correlations and two stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were carried out to identify the parameters which were the most highly correlated with TUDS test performance among the clinical variables and gait parameters on the paretic side. Maximal walking speed on the 10-m walk test and strength of the ankle dorsiflexors were the clinical variables that were the most related to TUDS test performance (63% of variance explained). The percentage of single support phase on the paretic side was the biomechanical gait parameter which was the most related to TUDS test performance (58% of variance explained). The results of this study identified three parameters which predicted the performance to ascend and descend a flight of stairs as fast as possible in hemiparetic patients. Rehabilitation programs which aim to improve stair performance and independence in daily life activities should focus on these three parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance of women with fibromyalgia in walking up stairs while carrying a load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Collado-Mateo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain and other associated symptoms. It has a relevant impact on physical fitness and the ability to perform daily living tasks. The objective of the study was to analyze the step-by-step-performance and the trunk tilt of women with fibromyalgia in the 10-step stair climbing test compared with healthy controls. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Twelve women suffering from fibromyalgia and eight healthy controls were recruited from a local association. Participants were asked to climb 10 stairs without carrying a load and 10 stairs carrying a load of 5 kg in each hand. Mediolateral trunk tilt was assessed using the “Functional Assessment of Biomechanics (FAB” wireless motion capture device, and the time between steps was assessed via weight-bearing insoles. Results. Trunk tilt in the stair-climbing task carrying a load was significantly higher in women with fibromyalgia when compared to the healthy controls (2.31 (0.63 vs. 1.69 (0.51 respectively. The effect of carrying a load was significantly higher for women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy controls at the intermediate and final part of the task. Discussion. Trunk tilt during stair climbing while carrying a load was higher in women with FM, which could increase the risk of falling. Additionally, women with FM experienced a higher pace slowdown as a consequence of the load, which supports the need of including specific strength and resistance training to physical therapies for this population.

  2. Performance of women with fibromyalgia in walking up stairs while carrying a load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Adsuar, José C; Olivares, Pedro R; Dominguez-Muñoz, Francisco J; Maestre-Cascales, Cristina; Gusi, Narcis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain and other associated symptoms. It has a relevant impact on physical fitness and the ability to perform daily living tasks. The objective of the study was to analyze the step-by-step-performance and the trunk tilt of women with fibromyalgia in the 10-step stair climbing test compared with healthy controls. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Twelve women suffering from fibromyalgia and eight healthy controls were recruited from a local association. Participants were asked to climb 10 stairs without carrying a load and 10 stairs carrying a load of 5 kg in each hand. Mediolateral trunk tilt was assessed using the "Functional Assessment of Biomechanics (FAB)" wireless motion capture device, and the time between steps was assessed via weight-bearing insoles. Results. Trunk tilt in the stair-climbing task carrying a load was significantly higher in women with fibromyalgia when compared to the healthy controls (2.31 (0.63) vs. 1.69 (0.51) respectively). The effect of carrying a load was significantly higher for women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy controls at the intermediate and final part of the task. Discussion. Trunk tilt during stair climbing while carrying a load was higher in women with FM, which could increase the risk of falling. Additionally, women with FM experienced a higher pace slowdown as a consequence of the load, which supports the need of including specific strength and resistance training to physical therapies for this population.

  3. Quantifying stair gait stability in young and older adults, with modifications to insole hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Patrick J; Perry, Stephen D

    2014-07-01

    Stair gait falls are prevalent in older adults aged 65 years and older. Extrinsic variables such as changes to insole hardness are important factors that can compromise the balance control system and increase the incidence of falls, especially since age-related decline in the cutaneous sensation is common. Balance measurements such as the minimum center of mass/base of support (COM-BOS, termed 'stability margin') and COM-BOS medial/lateral range provide information about stability during stair gait. This study was conducted to investigate stair gait stability of young and older adults, with modifications to insole hardness. Twenty healthy adults (10 young adults, 10 older adults) were recruited (mean age = 23.1, SD 2.1; mean age = 73.2, SD 5.5) and instructed to descend a 4 step staircase, for a total of 40 trials. All participants wore similar canvas shoes of varying sizes, and corresponding insole hardnesses (barefoot, soft, medium, hard). Kinematic equipment utilized 12 infrared markers anteriorly placed on the individual to record COM motion and BOS location. The findings from the study demonstrated that older adults were less stable during stair descent. Consequently, insole conditions revealed that the barefoot condition may increase the likelihood of falls, as opposed to the other insole hardnesses (soft, medium and hard). These results suggest that older adults while barefoot are putting themselves at a great risk of falling during stair descent. Since age-related changes are inevitable and the preferred footwear of choice inside the home is bare feet, this is a crucial issue that should be addressed.

  4. Effects of obesity on the biomechanics of stair-walking in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberger, G; Richter, A; Schneider, M; Mündermann, A; Schwameder, H

    2011-05-01

    Anthropometric characteristics, particularly body mass, are important factors in the development and progression of varus/valgus angular deformities of the knee and have long-term implications including increased risk of osteoarthritis. However, information on how excessive body weight affects the biomechanics of dynamic activities in children is limited. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that during stair-walking lower extremity joint moments normalized to body mass in obese children are greater than those in normal-weight children. Eighteen obese children (10.5±1.5 years, 148±10cm, 56.6±8.4kg) and 17 normal-weight children (10.4±1.3 years, 143±9cm, 36.7±7.5kg) were recruited. A Vicon system and two AMTI force plates were used to record and analyze the kinematics and kinetics of ascending and descending stairs. Significant differences in spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters during ascending and descending stairs between obese and normal-weight children were detected. For stair ascent, greater hip abduction moments (+23%; p=0.001) and greater knee extension moments (+20%; p=0.008) were observed. For stair descent, smaller hip extension moment (-52%; p=0.031), and greater hip flexion moments (+25%; p=0.016) and knee extension moments (+15%, p=0.008) were observed for obese subjects. To date, it is unclear if and how the body may adapt to greater joint moments in obese children. Nevertheless, these differences in joint moments may contribute to a cumulative overloading of the joint through adolescence into adulthood, and potentially result in a greater risk of developing knee and hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance of women with fibromyalgia in walking up stairs while carrying a load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsuar, José C.; Olivares, Pedro R.; Dominguez-Muñoz, Francisco J.; Maestre-Cascales, Cristina; Gusi, Narcis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain and other associated symptoms. It has a relevant impact on physical fitness and the ability to perform daily living tasks. The objective of the study was to analyze the step-by-step-performance and the trunk tilt of women with fibromyalgia in the 10-step stair climbing test compared with healthy controls. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Twelve women suffering from fibromyalgia and eight healthy controls were recruited from a local association. Participants were asked to climb 10 stairs without carrying a load and 10 stairs carrying a load of 5 kg in each hand. Mediolateral trunk tilt was assessed using the “Functional Assessment of Biomechanics (FAB)” wireless motion capture device, and the time between steps was assessed via weight-bearing insoles. Results. Trunk tilt in the stair-climbing task carrying a load was significantly higher in women with fibromyalgia when compared to the healthy controls (2.31 (0.63) vs. 1.69 (0.51) respectively). The effect of carrying a load was significantly higher for women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy controls at the intermediate and final part of the task. Discussion. Trunk tilt during stair climbing while carrying a load was higher in women with FM, which could increase the risk of falling. Additionally, women with FM experienced a higher pace slowdown as a consequence of the load, which supports the need of including specific strength and resistance training to physical therapies for this population. PMID:26855878

  6. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis to assist level-ground and stair-descent gaits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel; Berniker, Max; Herr, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The human ankle varies impedance and delivers net positive work during the stance period of walking. In contrast, commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive during stance, causing many clinical problems for transtibial amputees, including non-symmetric gait patterns, higher gait metabolism, and poorer shock absorption. In this investigation, we develop and evaluate a myoelectric-driven, finite state controller for a powered ankle-foot prosthesis that modulates both impedance and power output during stance. The system employs both sensory inputs measured local to the external prosthesis, and myoelectric inputs measured from residual limb muscles. Using local prosthetic sensing, we first develop two finite state controllers to produce biomimetic movement patterns for level-ground and stair-descent gaits. We then employ myoelectric signals as control commands to manage the transition between these finite state controllers. To transition from level-ground to stairs, the amputee flexes the gastrocnemius muscle, triggering the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex at terminal swing, and initiating the stair-descent state machine algorithm. To transition back to level-ground walking, the amputee flexes the tibialis anterior muscle, triggering the ankle to remain dorsiflexed at terminal swing, and initiating the level-ground state machine algorithm. As a preliminary evaluation of clinical efficacy, we test the device on a transtibial amputee with both the proposed controller and a conventional passive-elastic control. We find that the amputee can robustly transition between the finite state controllers through direct muscle activation, allowing rapid transitioning from level-ground to stair walking patterns. Additionally, we find that the proposed finite state controllers result in a more biomimetic ankle response, producing net propulsive work during level-ground walking and greater shock absorption during stair descent. The results of this study highlight the

  7. Ability to negotiate stairs predicts free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Matar Abdullah; Dean, Catherine M; Ada, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Which clinical measures of walking performance best predict free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke? Cross-sectional observational study. 42 community-dwelling stroke survivors. Predictors were four clinical measures of walking performance (speed, automaticity, capacity, and stairs ability). The outcome of interest was free-living physical activity, measured as frequency (activity counts) and duration (time on feet), collected using an activity monitor called the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity. Time on feet was predicted by stairs ability alone (B 166, 95% CI 55 to 278) which accounted for 48% of the variance. Activity counts were also predicted by stairs ability alone (B 6486, 95% CI 2922 to 10 050) which accounted for 58% of the variance. The best predictor of free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke was stairs ability.

  8. The effects of gait time and trunk acceleration ratio during stair climbing in old-old adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Shil; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of gait time and trunk acceleration ratio in old-old adult females during stair climbing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five older adult females who were able to walk independently volunteered for this study and were categorized into two age groups (older adults or old-old adults). Gait time and trunk acceleration ratio were measured using an accelerometer during stair climbing. [Results] Gait time and trunk acceleration ratio when climbing stairs were significantly higher in the old-old age group than in the older adults group. [Conclusions] These findings suggest that old-old females have decreased upper trunk control. In addition, gait time and the trunk acceleration ratio during stair climbing are useful clinical markers for predicting function and balance control ability in old-old elderly populations.

  9. Use of a stair-step compensatory gain nutritional regimen to program the onset of puberty in beef heifers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardoso, R C; Alves, B R C; Prezotto, L D; Thorson, J F; Tedeschi, L O; Keisler, D H; Park, C S; Amstalden, M; Williams, G L

    2014-01-01

    It was hypothesized that metabolic programming of processes underlying puberty can be shifted temporally through the use of a stair-step compensatory growth model such that puberty is optimally timed...

  10. Scaling CouchDB

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    This practical guide offers a short course on scaling CouchDB to meet the capacity needs of your distributed application. Through a series of scenario-based examples, this book lets you explore several methods for creating a system that can accommodate growth and meet expected demand. In the process, you learn about several tools that can help you with replication, load balancing, clustering, and load testing and monitoring. Apply performance tips for tuning your databaseReplicate data, using Futon and CouchDB's RESTful interfaceDistribute CouchDB's workload through load balancingLearn option

  11. Factors associated with stair climbing ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitchelo, Tara; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) report ongoing limitations in climbing stairs, even after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise the available evidence of factors affecting stair climbing ability in patients with knee OA before and after TKA. A systematic search was conducted of common electronic databases. All English language abstracts where stair-climbing was assessed in patients with either knee OA or at least 6 months after TKA, and a relationship to any physical, psychological or demographic factors was reported. Thirteen studies were included in the final review, nine investigated a knee OA population, and four investigated a TKA population. For patients with knee OA there was consistent and convincing evidence that greater stair-climbing ability was related to stronger lower limb muscles and less knee pain. For patients with TKA there was much less research, and no conclusions could be reached. For people with knee OA there is evidence that some physical, demographic and psychosocial factors are related to stair-climbing ability. However, the evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce and needs more extensive research. Implications for Rehabilitation People with knee osteoarthritis experience difficulty when climbing stairs, and this remains challenging even after knee replacement. For people with knee osteoarthritis, a range of physical, demographic and psychosocial factors contribute to stair-climbing ability, however, evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce. Rehabilitation that is multi-faceted may be the best approach to improve stair-climbing in people with knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Autonomous Motivation Is Not Enough: The Role of Compensatory Health Beliefs for the Readiness to Change Stair and Elevator Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theda Radtke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs are beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated with a healthy behavior. In line with the CHBs model, the aim of this study was twofold. First, the study investigated the relationship between autonomous motivation and CHBs that physical inactivity can be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Second, the study focused on the associations between CHBs and readiness to use the stairs more often and stair and elevator use. Thus, a cross-sectional online questionnaire was designed that was filled out by 135 participants. Path analysis showed that individuals with stronger autonomous motivation to use the stairs strongly agreed that sedentary behavior could be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Moreover, CHBs were positively related to readiness to change behavior, but not to self-reported stair and elevator use. Even though future research is necessary to replicate these findings, autonomous motivation seems to have a positive impact on CHBs which, in turn, might boost an intended behavior change. Thus, promoting possible compensation of physical inactivity might foster the readiness to change the unhealthy behavior.

  13. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during level walking and stair climbing in subjects with triple arthrodesis or subtalar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Lan; Huang, Peng-Ju; Lin, Chii-Jen; Chen, Wen-Yi; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Cheng, Yuh-Min

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the kinematic and kinetic strategies used by patients with unilateral triple arthrodesis or subtalar fusion during level walking, stair ascent, stair descent and to determine the influence of these different conditions on kinematics and kinetics. Nine subjects with unilateral triple or subtalar fusion and five normal control subjects were recruited for this experiment. Temporal distance, kinematic and kinetic data were collected using a six camera 3-D motion analysis system and a custom fabricated set of stairs with five steps; the second and third steps were each instrumented with one force platform. During level walking, affected limbs lost all of the plantarflexion at the ankle joint during push-off and showed greater knee flexion angle during the same period of stance. During stair ascent, affected limbs showed a different movement pattern at the knee, a greater knee flexion angle during the whole stance phase and a near zero degree of plantarflexion angle during the forward continuance (FCN) phase. During descent, affected limbs showed a greater knee flexion angle during the whole stance phase and less ankle dorsiflexion angle during the same period of stance phase. At the ankle, peak moment and power values were significantly different between the affected side and the limbs of the control subjects during level walking in the push-off phase, stair ascent in the FCN phase, and stair descent in the weight acceptance (WA) phase, where the affected limbs had a lower plantarflexion moment and power values.

  14. The energy expenditure of stair climbing one step and two steps at a time: estimations from measures of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G; Watkins, David A R; Duggan, Brendan M

    2012-01-01

    Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min(-1), whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min(-1). These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured [Formula: see text] The present study findings indicate that (1) treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2) two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better.

  15. The energy expenditure of stair climbing one step and two steps at a time: estimations from measures of heart rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis G Halsey

    Full Text Available Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text] and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min(-1, whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min(-1. These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured [Formula: see text] The present study findings indicate that (1 treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2 two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better.

  16. Autonomous motivation is not enough: the role of compensatory health beliefs for the readiness to change stair and elevator use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Theda; Rackow, Pamela

    2014-11-28

    Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs) are beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated with a healthy behavior. In line with the CHBs model, the aim of this study was twofold. First, the study investigated the relationship between autonomous motivation and CHBs that physical inactivity can be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Second, the study focused on the associations between CHBs and readiness to use the stairs more often and stair and elevator use. Thus, a cross-sectional online questionnaire was designed that was filled out by 135 participants. Path analysis showed that individuals with stronger autonomous motivation to use the stairs strongly agreed that sedentary behavior could be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Moreover, CHBs were positively related to readiness to change behavior, but not to self-reported stair and elevator use. Even though future research is necessary to replicate these findings, autonomous motivation seems to have a positive impact on CHBs which, in turn, might boost an intended behavior change. Thus, promoting possible compensation of physical inactivity might foster the readiness to change the unhealthy behavior.

  17. nanoSTAIR: a new strategic proposal to impulse standardization in nanotechnology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Ipiña, J. M.; Salvi, O.; Hazebrouck, B.; Jovanovic, A.; Carre, F.; Saamanen, A.; Brouwer, D.; Schmitt, M.; Martin, S.

    2015-05-01

    Nanotechnology is considered one of the key technologies of the 21st century within Europe and a Key-Enabling Technology (KET) by Horizon 2020. Standardization has been identified in H2020 as one of the innovation-support measures by bridging the gap between research and the market, and helping the fast and easy transfer of research results to the European and international market. The development of new and improved standards requires high quality technical information, creating a fundamental interdependency between the standardization and research communities. In the frame of project nanoSTAIR (GA 319092), the present paper describes the European scenario on research and standardization in nanotechnology and presents a proposal of a European strategy (nanoSTAIR) to impulse direct “pipelines” between research and standardization. In addition, strategic actions focused on integration of standardization in the R&D projects, from the early stages of the design of a future business (Project Proposal), are also described.

  18. dbVar

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation. It accepts data from all species and includes clinical data. It can accept diverse types of events, including...

  19. dbSNP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — dbSNP is a database of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and multiple small-scale variations that include insertions/deletions, microsatellites, and...

  20. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the JV (Norway) and the BIPM, January to February 2015 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Sengebush, F.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Justervesenet (JV), Kjeller, Norway, was carried out from January to February 2015. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM4 (Z4) and BIPM5 (Z5), were transported by freight to JV and also back to BIPM. At JV, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at JV, withthe Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by JV, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at JV, UJV, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 28 January 2015. UJV - UBIPM = 0.23 mV; uc = 0.03 mV , at 1 V UJV - UBIPM = 0.63 mV; uc = 0.28 mV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at JV, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Avoiding Stair-Step Artifacts in Image Registration for GOES-R Navigation and Registration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Tan, Bin; Isaacson, Peter J.; De Luccia, Frank J.; Dellomo, John

    2016-01-01

    In developing software for independent verification and validation (IVV) of the Image Navigation and Registration (INR) capability for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), we have encountered an image registration artifact which limits the accuracy of image offset estimation at the subpixel scale using image correlation. Where the two images to be registered have the same pixel size, subpixel image registration preferentially selects registration values where the image pixel boundaries are close to lined up. Because of the shape of a curve plotting input displacement to estimated offset, we call this a stair-step artifact. When one image is at a higher resolution than the other, the stair-step artifact is minimized by correlating at the higher resolution. For validating ABI image navigation, GOES-R images are correlated with Landsat-based ground truth maps. To create the ground truth map, the Landsat image is first transformed to the perspective seen from the GOES-R satellite, and then is scaled to an appropriate pixel size. Minimizing processing time motivates choosing the map pixels to be the same size as the GOES-R pixels. At this pixel size image processing of the shift estimate is efficient, but the stair-step artifact is present. If the map pixel is very small, stair-step is not a problem, but image correlation is computation-intensive. This paper describes simulation-based selection of the scale for truth maps for registering GOES-R ABI images.

  2. The effects of stair gait training using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on stroke patients' dynamic balance ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, KyoChul; Park, Seung Hwan; Park, KwangYong

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine stroke patients' changes in dynamic balance ability through stair gait training where in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) was applied. [Subjects and Methods] In total 30 stroke patients participated in this experiment and were randomly and equally allocated to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received exercise treatment for 30 min and stair gait training where in PNF was applied for 30 min and the control group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ground gait training where in PNF was applied for 30 min. For the four weeks of the experiment, each group received training three times per week, for 30 min each time. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) values were measured and a time up and go (TUG) test and a functional reach test (FRT) were performed for a comparison before and after the experiment. [Results] According to the result of the stroke patients' balance performance through stair gait training, the BBS and FRT results significantly increased and the TUG test result significantly decreased in the experimental group. On the contrary, BBS and FRT results did not significantly increase and the TUG test result did not significantly decrease in the control group. According to the result of comparing differences between before and after training in each group, there was a significant change in the BBS result of the experimental group only. [Conclusions] In conclusion, the gait training group to which PNF was applied saw improvements in their balance ability, and a good result is expected when neurological disease patients receive stair gait training applying PNF.

  3. Interactive Gait Rehabilitation System with a Locomotion Interface for Training Patients to Climb Stairs

    OpenAIRE

    Yano, Hiroaki; Tamefusa, Shintaro; TANAKA, Naoki; Saito, Hideyuki; Iwata, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a gait rehabilitation system with a locomotion interface (LI) for training patients to climb stairs. The LI consists of two 2-DOF manipulators equipped with footpads. These can move the patient's feet while his or her body remains stationary. The footpads follow the prerecorded motion of the feet of healthy individuals. For gait training, the patient progresses sequentially through successively more advanced modes. In this study, two modes, the enforced...

  4. [Stair climbing test in prediction of postoperative complications after lung cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurauskas, Aleksas; Tikuisis, Renatas; Miliauskas, Povilas

    2002-01-01

    Preoperative physical state of a patient is very important for adaptation of the patient after lung resections. Purpose of this work is to evaluate an information factor of a stair-climbing test while predicting of postoperative complications after lung cancer surgery. Fifty two patients were examined, who passed lung surgery of different volume. The patients are distributed to two groups: I(st) group included the patients able to climb 1-44 footsteps (n=22/42.3%) and the II(nd) group included the patients able to climb more than 44 footsteps at a moderate speed without stopping for rest (n=30/57.7%). One flight of stairs made up to 22 footsteps with 15 cm of height each. Postoperative myocardial ischemia, disorders of heart rhythm, pneumonias, atelectasis, prolonged artificial ventilation of lungs, sanative bronchoscopy, duration of treatment, and cases of death were registered. It was established that postoperative cardiac and lung complications occurred in 17 patients (32.7%), two patients died (3.8%). Rate of complications between the patients of the I(st) and II(nd) group was 82.4 ir 17.6 percent. Postoperative course was normal for those patients (n=11) who were able to climb five or more flights of stairs. It was noticed that duration of postoperative period has an inverse proportion to a number of the climbed up footsteps. The stair-climbing test is a simple, safe, cheap and informative enough for prediction of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery.

  5. Performance of women with fibromyalgia in walking up stairs while carrying a load

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Collado-Mateo; Adsuar, José C; Pedro R. Olivares; Francisco J. Dominguez-Muñoz; Cristina Maestre-Cascales; Narcis Gusi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain and other associated symptoms. It has a relevant impact on physical fitness and the ability to perform daily living tasks. The objective of the study was to analyze the step-by-step-performance and the trunk tilt of women with fibromyalgia in the 10-step stair climbing test compared with healthy controls. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Twelve women suffering from fibromyalgia and eight healthy co...

  6. The energy expenditure of non-weight bearing crutch walking on the level and ascending stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan; Murphy, Alexandra; Murphy, David; Austin, Andy; Moran, Danielle; Cronin, Caitriona; Guinan, Emer; Hussey, Juliette

    2015-06-01

    Crutches are commonly prescribed to patients with lower limb dysfunction during rehabilitation to assist with mobility. The aim of this study was to determine the energy expenditure for non-weight bearing crutch walking on level ground and ascending stairs at a self selected speed in a healthy adult population. Thirty-one healthy male and female adults (mean±SD: age 21.6±1.2 years; height 170.8±10.8 cm; weight 70.8±11.4 kg) mobilised non-weight bearing with elbow crutches along a 30 m corridor and (with one crutch) up a flight of 13 stairs. Energy expenditure for each activity was measured by indirect calorimetry using the COSMED K4b(2) portable ergospirometry system. The established VO2 values were 16.4ml/kg/min for crutch walking on level ground and 17.85 ml/kg/min for stair climbing. Non-weight bearing crutch walking at a self selected speed on the level ground and up a flight of stairs resulted in a MET value of 4.57 and 5.06 respectively. The mean heart rate (HR) for crutch walking along the flat was 117.06±20.54 beats per minute (bpm), while the mean HR for ambulating upstairs with crutches was 113.91±19.32 bpm. The increased energy demands of non-weight bearing crutch walking should be considered by physical therapists when instructing patients on crutch use. Further investigation to determine the implications of these results in populations with chronic disease is warranted.

  7. Stairs instead of elevators at workplace: cardioprotective effects of a pragmatic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philippe; Kayser, Bengt; Kossovsky, Michel P; Sigaud, Philippe; Carballo, David; Keller, Pierre-F; Martin, Xavier Eric; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie; Pichard, Claude; Mach, François

    2010-10-01

    Population strategies to increase physical activity are an essential part of cardiovascular disease prevention. However, little data exist on lifestyle interventions that are easy to integrate into everyday life such as using stairs instead of elevators at the workplace. Pre and postintervention study. A 12-week promotional campaign for stair use consisting in posters and floor stickers at the point of choice between stairs and elevators at each hospital floor was organized in a university hospital building. In 77 selected employees with an inactive lifestyle, physical activity, aerobic fitness, anthropometrics, blood pressure, lipids, insulin sensitivity, and C-reactive protein were assessed at baseline, 12 weeks, and 6 months. During the intervention median daily number of ascended and descended one-story staircase units was 20.6/day (14.2-28.1) compared with 4.5/day (1.8-7.2) at baseline (Pweight (-0.7±2.6%), fat mass (-1.5±8.4%), diastolic blood pressure (-1.8±8.9%), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-3.0±13.5%). At 6 months, the median daily number of ascended and descended one-story staircase units had decreased to 7.2 (3.5-14.0). Benefits on estimated maximal aerobic capacity (+5.9±12.2%, P=0.001) and fat mass (-1.4±8.4%, P=0.038) persisted. Encouraging stair use at work is effective for improving fitness, body composition, blood pressure, and lipid profile in asymptomatic individuals with an inactive lifestyle and thus may be a simple way to significantly reduce cardiovascular disease risk at the population level.

  8. Volitional control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis during stair-ambulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kannape, Oliver; Herr, Hugh M.

    2014-01-01

    Although great advances have been made in the design and control of lower extremity prostheses, walking on different terrains, such as ramps or stairs, and transitioning between these terrains remains a major challenge for the field. In order to generalize biomimetic behaviour of active lower-limb prostheses top-down volitional control is required but has until recently been deemed unfeasible due to the difficulties involved in acquiring an adequate electromyographic (EMG) signal. In this stu...

  9. Musculo-skeletal loading conditions at the hip during walking and stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, M O; Bergmann, G; Deuretzbacher, G; Dürselen, L; Pohl, M; Claes, L; Haas, N P; Duda, G N

    2001-07-01

    Musculo-skeletal loading plays an important role in the primary stability of joint replacements and in the biological processes involved in fracture healing. However, current knowledge of musculo-skeletal loading is still limited. In the past, a number of musculo-skeletal models have been developed to estimate loading conditions at the hip. So far, a cycle-to-cycle validation of predicted musculo-skeletal loading by in vivo measurements has not been possible. The aim of this study was to determine the musculo-skeletal loading conditions during walking and climbing stairs for a number of patients and compare these findings to in vivo data. Following total hip arthroplasty, four patients underwent gait analysis during walking and stair climbing. An instrumented femoral prosthesis enabled simultaneous measurement of in vivo hip contact forces. On the basis of CT and X-ray data, individual musculo-skeletal models of the lower extremity were developed for each patient. Muscle and joint contact forces were calculated using an optimization algorithm. The calculated peak hip contact forces both over- and under-estimated the measured forces. They differed by a mean of 12% during walking and 14% during stair climbing. For the first time, a cycle-to-cycle validation of predicted musculo-skeletal loading was possible for walking and climbing stairs in several patients. In all cases, the comparison of in vivo measured and calculated hip contact forces showed good agreement.Thus, the authors consider the presented approach as a useful means to determine valid conditions for the analysis of prosthesis loading, bone modeling or remodeling processes around implants and fracture stability following internal fixation.

  10. Contributory factors to unsteadiness during walking up and down stairs in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsaker, Joseph C; Brown, Steven J; Bowling, Frank L; Cooper, Glen; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Boulton, Andrew J M; Reeves, Neil D

    2014-11-01

    Although patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are more likely to fall than age-matched controls, the underlying causative factors are not yet fully understood. This study examines the effects of diabetes and neuropathy on strength generation and muscle activation patterns during walking up and down stairs, with implications for fall risk. Sixty-three participants (21 patients with DPN, 21 diabetic controls, and 21 healthy controls) were examined while walking up and down a custom-built staircase. The speed of strength generation at the ankle and knee and muscle activation patterns of the ankle and knee extensor muscles were analyzed. Patients with neuropathy displayed significantly slower ankle and knee strength generation than healthy controls during stair ascent and descent (P walking up and down stairs. These changes, which are likely caused by altered activations of the extensor muscles, increase the likelihood of instability and may be important contributory factors for the increased risk of falling. Resistance exercise training may be a potential clinical intervention for improving these aspects and thereby potentially reducing fall risk. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Getting more people on the stairs: The impact of point-of-decision prompts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Olivier; Bazoche, Pascale; Teyssier, Sabrina

    2017-09-14

    Individuals rarely achieve investment activities characterised by up-front costs and delayed benefits. Point-of-decision prompts (PDPs) provide information about a better alternative or a deterrent to the behavioural standard at the moment the decision is made and may affect behaviour by helping individuals perform this type of investment activities. We conducted a field experiment to assess the effects of a PDP intervention that encourages taking the stairs rather than the escalator in three Paris (France) Metro stations for eight weeks from April to July 2014. In total, we followed up 205 individuals and the data show that PDPs have an immediate, albeit decaying, peaked effect on individuals' stair use, with a stronger effect when weak physical effort is made salient. However, the intervention did not change individuals' stair-use habits. In the best-case scenario, the effects last two weeks after the intervention ends. Our preferred explanation is that PDPs act as "cues" but people become accustomed to them and in the end no longer notice them. These findings suggest that a PDP intervention is not sufficient to modify individuals investment in activities with immediate costs and delayed benefits in the long-run. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of health-promoting posters placed on the platforms of two train stations in Copenhagen, Denmark, on the choice between taking the stairs or the escalators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine; Händel, M N; Nydal Jensen, Eva;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether posters placed on the platforms of two train stations in Copenhagen, promoting use of the stairs, would encourage people to use the stairs rather than the adjacent escalator. An additional purpose was to see if the effect of the interv......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether posters placed on the platforms of two train stations in Copenhagen, promoting use of the stairs, would encourage people to use the stairs rather than the adjacent escalator. An additional purpose was to see if the effect...... of the intervention was maintained for a week after the poster was removed. MEASUREMENTS: The number of people using stairs and escalators at Copenhagen Central Station and Østerport Train Station in Copenhagen was recorded before and during posters promoting stair use were placed on the platforms, and a week after...

  13. The effects of commuter pedestrian traffic on the use of stairs in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ross E; Bauman, Adrian E

    2011-01-01

    Most public health physical activity guidelines now encourage people to look for opportunities to accumulate physical activity throughout the day. Climbing stairs in lieu of riding escalators is a prime opportunity to make healthier choices that promote active living. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of pedestrian commuter traffic on choices to ride an escalator, walk up an escalator, or walk up adjacent stairs in a busy urban subway station at rush hour. A total of 9766 commuters were observed by two recorders for a 2.5-hour period during the morning rush hour over 8 weeks as to whether the commuters walked up stairs or rode an adjacent escalator in a subway station. The number of observations per 5-minute block was recorded, and an index of commuter traffic was computed. Demographic information and use of escalators/stairs were also recorded. An urban subway station with a two-flight staircase adjacent to an escalator. Adult commuters travelling to work during the morning rush hour. Physical activity choices were examined in relation to commuter traffic. Demographic information, such as age, race, and weight status, were also considered. A χ(2) analysis was used to examine differences in proportions across variables of interest. Means were compared by using multivariate analysis of variance, and confidence intervals were computed. During the least-heavy commuter traffic period, only 11.2% of commuters chose to walk up the stairs, whereas significantly more did so during moderate 18.7% and high 20.8% commuter traffic periods (χ(2)  =  61.8, p < .001). During low-traffic times, significantly more commuters (21.4%) walked up the escalators compared with moderate-traffic (18.0%) or high-traffic (18.3%) periods. African-American commuters passively rode the escalator more (68.2%) than white commuters (56.7%), and their patterns were less affected by commuter traffic (p < .05). Congestion in public places can have a significant effect

  14. MELCOR DB Construction for the Severe Accident Analysis DB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been constructing a severe accident analysis database (DB) under a National Nuclear R and D Program. In particular, an MAAP (commercial code being widely used in industries for integrated severe accident analysis) DB for many scenarios including a station blackout (SBO) has been completed. This paper shows the MELCOR DB construction process with examples of SBO scenarios, and the results will be used for a comparison with the MAAP DB

  15. Innovative gait robot for the repetitive practice of floor walking and stair climbing up and down in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Stefan; Waldner, Andreas; Tomelleri, Christopher

    2010-06-28

    Stair climbing up and down is an essential part of everyday's mobility. To enable wheelchair-dependent patients the repetitive practice of this task, a novel gait robot, G-EO-Systems (EO, Lat: I walk), based on the end-effector principle, has been designed. The trajectories of the foot plates are freely programmable enabling not only the practice of simulated floor walking but also stair climbing up and down. The article intended to compare lower limb muscle activation patterns of hemiparetic subjects during real floor walking and stairs climbing up, and during the corresponding simulated conditions on the machine, and secondly to demonstrate gait improvement on single case after training on the machine. The muscle activation pattern of seven lower limb muscles of six hemiparetic patients during free and simulated walking on the floor and stair climbing was measured via dynamic electromyography. A non-ambulatory, sub-acute stroke patient additionally trained on the G-EO-Systems every workday for five weeks. The muscle activation patterns were comparable during the real and simulated conditions, both on the floor and during stair climbing up. Minor differences, concerning the real and simulated floor walking conditions, were a delayed (prolonged) onset (duration) of the thigh muscle activation on the machine across all subjects. Concerning stair climbing conditions, the shank muscle activation was more phasic and timely correct in selected patients on the device. The severely affected subject regained walking and stair climbing ability. The G-EO-Systems is an interesting new option in gait rehabilitation after stroke. The lower limb muscle activation patterns were comparable, a training thus feasible, and the positive case report warrants further clinical studies.

  16. Innovative gait robot for the repetitive practice of floor walking and stair climbing up and down in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldner Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stair climbing up and down is an essential part of everyday's mobility. To enable wheelchair-dependent patients the repetitive practice of this task, a novel gait robot, G-EO-Systems (EO, Lat: I walk, based on the end-effector principle, has been designed. The trajectories of the foot plates are freely programmable enabling not only the practice of simulated floor walking but also stair climbing up and down. The article intended to compare lower limb muscle activation patterns of hemiparetic subjects during real floor walking and stairs climbing up, and during the corresponding simulated conditions on the machine, and secondly to demonstrate gait improvement on single case after training on the machine. Methods The muscle activation pattern of seven lower limb muscles of six hemiparetic patients during free and simulated walking on the floor and stair climbing was measured via dynamic electromyography. A non-ambulatory, sub-acute stroke patient additionally trained on the G-EO-Systems every workday for five weeks. Results The muscle activation patterns were comparable during the real and simulated conditions, both on the floor and during stair climbing up. Minor differences, concerning the real and simulated floor walking conditions, were a delayed (prolonged onset (duration of the thigh muscle activation on the machine across all subjects. Concerning stair climbing conditions, the shank muscle activation was more phasic and timely correct in selected patients on the device. The severely affected subject regained walking and stair climbing ability. Conclusions The G-EO-Systems is an interesting new option in gait rehabilitation after stroke. The lower limb muscle activation patterns were comparable, a training thus feasible, and the positive case report warrants further clinical studies.

  17. 直板楼梯与折板楼梯对框架结构刚度的不同影响%Analysis of the Different Impacts of Straight Board Stairs and Fold Board Stairs on Frame Structure Stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋鹏飞; 杨德健

    2011-01-01

    研究了直板楼梯和折板楼梯对框架结构刚度的不同影响,建立了独立框架单元和整体框架两种分析模型,分别比较了无楼梯、直板楼梯、缓台板布置在楼层处的折板楼梯和缓台板布置在中间平台处的折板楼梯四种情况在相同受力情况下横向和纵向的楼层水平位移,通过比较四种情况下楼层的水平位移,得到了三种不同形式的楼梯对框架结构刚度的影响,结果表明,缓台板布置在中间平台处的折板楼梯对整体框架结构刚度的影响比直板楼梯小.%This paper studies the different impacts of frame structure stiffness on straight board stairs and fold board stairs. It also constructs two analysis models of the independent framework unit and the overall framework. This paper analyzes the horizontal floor displacements of four kinds of frames in horizontal and vertical direction under the same force, which include frame without stairs, frame with straight stairs, frame with fold board stairs whose slow bedplate is located in the floor place, frame with fold board stairs whose slow bedplate is located in the middle platform. Through comparing the four displacements, this paper gets the impacts of the stairs with three different forms on frame structure stiffness. The result shows that the impact of fold board stairs whose slow bedplate is located in the middle platform on the whole frame structure is smaller than the impact of straight stairs.

  18. MongoDB high availability

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrabani, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This book has a perfect balance of concepts and their practical implementation along with solutions to make a highly available MongoDB server with clear instructions and guidance. If you are using MongoDB in a production environment and need a solution to make a highly available MongoDB server, this book is ideal for you. Familiarity with MongoDB is expected so that you understand the content of this book.

  19. Scaling MongoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorow, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Create a MongoDB cluster that will to grow to meet the needs of your application. With this short and concise book, you'll get guidelines for setting up and using clusters to store a large volume of data, and learn how to access the data efficiently. In the process, you'll understand how to make your application work with a distributed database system. Scaling MongoDB will help you: Set up a MongoDB cluster through shardingWork with a cluster to query and update dataOperate, monitor, and backup your clusterPlan your application to deal with outages By following the advice in this book, you'l

  20. Interface pressure in transtibial socket during ascent and descent on stairs and its effect on patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sadeeq; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Eshraghi, Arezoo; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Abd Razak, Nasrul Anwar Bin; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Bin

    2013-01-01

    Transtibial amputees encounter stairs and steps during their daily activities. The excessive pressure between residual limb/socket may reduce the walking capability of transtibial prosthetic users during ascent and descent on stairs. The purposes of the research were to evaluate the interface pressure between Dermo (shuttle lock) and Seal-In X5 (prosthetic valve) interface systems during stair ascent and descent, and to determine their satisfaction effects on users. Ten amputees with unilateral transtibial amputation participated in the study. Interface pressure was recorded with F-socket transducer (9811E) during stair ascent and descent at self-selected speed. Each participant filled in a questionnaire about satisfaction and problems encountered with the use of the two interface systems. The resultant mean peak pressure (kPa) was significantly lower for the Dermo interface system compared to that of the Seal-In X5 interface system at the anterior, posterior and medial regions during stair ascent (63.14 vs. 80.14, 63.14 vs. 90.44, 49.21 vs. 66.04, respectively) and descent (67.11 vs. 80.41, 64.12 vs. 88.24, 47.33 vs. 65.11, respectively). Significant statistical difference existed between the two interface systems in terms of satisfaction and problems encountered (Pstair negotiation. The qualitative survey also showed that the prosthesis users experienced fewer problems and increased satisfaction with the Dermo interface system. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Lumbar Disc Herniation on Musculoskeletal Loadings in the Spinal Region During Level Walking and Stair Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Shengzheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Zhou, Wenyu; Guan, Xinyu; Ji, Run; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Daiqi; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background People with low back pain (LBP) alter their motion patterns during level walking and stair climbing due to pain or fear. However, the alternations of load sharing during the two activities are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of LBP caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) on the muscle activities of 17 main trunk muscle groups and the intradiscal forces acting on the five lumbar discs. Material/Methods Twenty-six healthy adults and seven LDH patients were recruited to perform level walking and stair climbing in the Gait Analysis Laboratory. Eight optical markers were placed on the bony landmarks of the spinous process and pelvis, and the coordinates of these markers were captured during the two activities using motion capture system. The coordinates of the captured markers were applied to developed musculoskeletal model to calculate the kinetic variables. Results LDH patients demonstrated higher muscle activities in most trunk muscle groups during both level walking and stair climbing. There were decreases in anteroposterior shear forces on the discs in the pathological region and increases in the compressive forces on all the lumbar discs during level walking. The symmetry of mediolateral shear forces was worse in LDH patients than healthy adults during stair climbing. Conclusions LDH patients exhibited different kinetic alternations during level walking and stair climbing. However, both adaptive strategies added extra burdens to the trunk system and further increased the risk for development of LDH. PMID:28796755

  2. Differences in onset time between the vastus medialis and lateralis during stair stepping in individuals with genu varum or valgum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seol; Chung, Jun-Sub; Kong, Yong-Soo; Ko, Yu-Min; Park, Ji-Won

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the difference in onset time between the vastus medialis and lateralis according to knee alignment during stair ascent and descent to examine the effects of knee alignment on the quadriceps during stair stepping. [Subjects] Fifty-two adults (20 with genu varum, 12 with genu valgum, and 20 controls) were enrolled. Subjects with > 4 cm between the medial epicondyles of the knees were placed in the genu varum group, whereas subjects with > 4 cm between the medial malleolus of the ankle were placed in the genu valgum group. [Methods] Surface electromyography was used to measure the onset times of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis during stair ascent and descent. [Results] The vastus lateralis showed more delayed firing than the vastus medialis in the genu varum group, whereas vastus medialis firing was more delayed than vastus lateralis firing in the genu valgum group. Significant differences in onset time were detected between stair ascent and descent in the genu varum and valgum groups. [Conclusion] Genu varum and valgum affect quadriceps firing during stair stepping. Therefore, selective rehabilitation training of the quadriceps femoris should be considered to prevent pain or knee malalignment deformities.

  3. CottonDB Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jing; KOHEL Russell; HINZE Lori; FRELICHOWSKI James; XU Zhan-you; YU John Z; PERCY Richard

    2008-01-01

    @@ CottonDB (www.cottondb,org) was initiated in 1995.It is a database that contains genomic,genetic,and taxonomic information for cotton (Gossypium spp.).It serves both as an archival database and as a dynamic database,which incorporates new data and user resources.CottonDB is maintained at the Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center in College Station,TX.The project includes a website and database creating a repository of information for over 450,000 gene,EST,and conting sequences; genetic and physical map data; nearly 10,000 DNA primers; and 9,000 germplasm accessions.

  4. DB2 9 for Developers

    CERN Document Server

    Gunning, Philip K

    2008-01-01

    Written by an "in-the-trenches" consultant, this guide hails the newest version of DB2 as a major release, highlighting the large number of totally new features, most notably the addition of XML capabilities. Packed with the information DB2 developers and administrators need to know when implementing version 9, the discussion covers upgrading from prior releases of DB2, converting relational data to XML data, and how DB2 supports industry standard schemas. With detailed examples and useful scripts, users learn how to develop DB2 XML applications, design an XML database, and tune the

  5. Amazon SimpleDB LITE

    CERN Document Server

    Chaganti, Prabhakar

    2011-01-01

    This focused book is an extracted LITE version of Packt's full: Amazon SimpleDB Developer Guide. It concentrates on getting a grounding in the value of SimpleDB, and shows how to set up an AWS account, enable a SimpleDB service for the account, and install and set up libraries for Java, PHP, and Python. If you are a developer wanting to get to grips with a primer into SimpleDB, then this book is for you. You do not need to know anything about SimpleDB to read and learn from this book, and no basic knowledge is strictly necessary.

  6. Influence of symptom expectancies on stair-climbing performance in chronic fatigue syndrome: effect of study context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Marianne; Knoop, Hans; Nijs, Jo; Feskens, Remco; Meeus, Mira; Moorkens, Greta; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2013-06-01

    In patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), performance of physical activities may be affected by an anticipated increase in symptoms after these activities. Nijs et al. previously studied the influence of symptom expectancies and related psychological processes on the performance of an isolated physical activity [Nijs J, Meeus M, Heins M, Knoop H, Moorkens G, Bleijenberg G. Kinesiophobia, catastrophizing and anticipated symptoms before stair climbing in chronic fatigue syndrome: an experimental study. Disabil Rehabil 2012. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2011.641661 .]. We aimed to validate the previous findings in a larger group of patients in a different setting. We also extended the possible underlying psychological processes studied. In 49 CFS patients, we measured performance (duration and increase in heart rate) during self-paced climbing and descending of two floors of stairs. Before this task, patients rated experienced fatigue and anticipated fatigue after stair climbing. In addition, kinesiophobia, catastrophising and focusing on bodily symptoms were measured. Using correlational and regression analyses, we tested whether performance during stair climbing could be explained by experienced and anticipated fatigue and psychological factors. Longer duration of stair climbing correlated with higher anticipated fatigue, independently of sex, age, body mass index and fatigue before stair climbing. Focusing on bodily symptoms and fatigue-related catastrophising were related to anticipated fatigue. Symptom expectations affect the performance of physical activity in CFS patients, possibly through focusing on bodily symptoms and catastrophising. These findings partially contradict the findings of the previous study, which stresses the importance of study context in conducting this type of experiments (i.e., patient characteristics, instructions).

  7. Effect of Modulating Spin-Coating Rate of TiO2 Precursor for Mesoporous Layer on J-V Hysteresis of Solar Cells with Polar CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with the crystalline Si solar cells, the J-V characteristics of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells are different under forward and reverse scan, and the CH3NH3PbI3 film exhibits some polarization properties. To explore those performances of the mesoporous TiO2 layer based perovskite solar cells, we focus on the effect of modulating the spin-coating rate of the TiO2 precursor for mesoporous layer on J-V hysteresis of solar cells with the polar film by J-V curves, atomic force microscopy topographic images, and piezoresponse force microscopy phase images. Firstly, the AFM images illustrate that the polarization behaviors exist and the deformation scale is large at the corresponding position when the DC bias voltage increases. Secondly, it is suggested that the polar films which applied the positive DC biases voltage show a tendency to 0° phase angle, while the polar films which applied the negative DC biases voltage show a tendency to −180° phase angle. Thirdly, a weak polar hysteresis loop relation for CH3NH3PbI3 film was observed. Finally, the hysteresis index for the 1500 rpm mesostructured solar cell shows relatively low J-V hysteresis compared with the 3000 rpm mesostructured and the planar-structured solar cell. Our experimental results bring novel routes for reducing the hysteresis and investigating the polar nature for CH3NH3PbI3 material.

  8. New electronic white cane for stair case detection and recognition using ultrasonic sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonda Ammar Bouhamed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Blinds people need some aid to interact with their environment with more security. A new device is then proposed to enable them to see the world with their ears. Considering not only system requirements but also technology cost, we used, for the conception of our tool, ultrasonic sensors and one monocular camera to enable user being aware of the presence and nature of potential encountered obstacles. In this paper, we are involved in using only one ultrasonic sensor to detect stair-cases in electronic cane. In this context, no previous work has considered such a challenge. Aware that the performance of an object recognition system depends on both object representation and classification algorithms, we have used in our system, one representation of ultrasonic signal in frequency domain: spectrogram representation explaining how the spectral density of signal varies with time, spectrum representation showing the amplitudes as a function of the frequency, periodogram representation estimating the spectral density of signal. Several features, thus extracted from each representation, contribute in the classification process. Our system was evaluated on a set of ultrasonic signal where stair-cases occur with different shapes. Using a multiclass SVM approach, recognition rates of 82.4% has been achieved.

  9. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (pforces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  10. Sagittal plane joint kinetics during stair ascent in patients with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephanie L; Vanicek, Natalie; O'Brien, Thomas D

    2017-06-01

    Stair negotiation poses a substantial physical demand on the musculoskeletal system and this challenging task can place individuals at risk of falls. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can cause intermittent claudication (IC) pain in the calf and results in altered gait mechanics during level walking. However, whether those with PAD-IC adopt alternate strategies to climb stairs is unknown. Twelve participants with PAD-IC (six bilateral and six unilateral) and 10 healthy controls were recruited and instructed to ascend a five-step staircase whilst 3D kinematic data of the lower-limbs were recorded synchronously with kinetic data from force plates embedded into the staircase on steps two and three. Limbs from the unilateral group and both limbs from the bilateral claudicants were categorised as claudicating (N=18), asymptomatic (N=6) and control (N=10). Claudicants walked more slowly than healthy controls (trend; P=speed, irrespective of laterality of symptoms, indicates functional capacity was determined by the limitations of the claudicating limb. Reduced ankle power generation and angular velocity (despite adequate plantarflexor moment) implies velocity-dependent limitations existed in the calf. The lack of notable compensatory strategies indicates reliance on an impaired muscle group to accomplish this potentially hazardous task, highlighting the importance of maintaining plantarflexor strength and power in those with PAD-IC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A study on a wheel-based stair-climbing robot with a hopping mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Koki; Sakaguchi, Keisuke; Sudo, Takayuki; Bushida, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we propose a simple hopping mechanism using the vibration of a two-degree-of-freedom system for a wheel-based stair-climbing robot. The robot, consisting of two bodies connected by springs and a wire, hops by releasing energy stored in the springs and quickly travels using wheels mounted in its lower body. The trajectories of the bodies during hopping change in accordance with the design parameters, such as the reduced mass of the two bodies, the mass ratio between the upper and lower bodies, the spring constant, the control parameters such as the initial contraction of the spring and the wire tension. This property allows the robot to quickly and economically climb up and down stairs, leap over obstacles, and landing softly without complex control. In this paper, the characteristics of hopping motion for the design and control parameters are clarified by both numerical simulations and experiments. Furthermore, using the robot design based on the results the abilities to hop up and down a step, leap over a cable, and land softly are demonstrated.

  12. Successfully Climbing the "STAIRs": Surmounting Failed Translation of Experimental Ischemic Stroke Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Michael P; Bix, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    The Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) provided initial (in 1999) and updated (in 2009) recommendations with the goal of improving preclinical stroke therapy assessment and to increase the translational potential of experimental stroke treatments. It is important for preclinical stroke researchers to frequently consider and revisit these concepts, especially since promising experimental stroke treatments continue to fail in human clinical trials. Therefore, this paper will focus on considerations for several key aspects of preclinical stroke studies including the selection and execution of the animal stroke model, drug/experimental treatment administration, and outcome measures to improve experimental validity and translation potential. Specific points of interest discussed include the incorporation of human comorbid conditions and drugs, the benefits of defining a proposed mechanism of action, replication of results using multiple methods, using clinically relevant routes of administration and treatment time windows, and performing and reporting good experimental methods to reduce bias such as, as suggested by the updated STAIR recommendations, sample size calculations, randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, and appropriate inclusion/exclusion criteria. It is our hope that reviewing and revisiting these considerations will benefit researchers in their investigations of stroke therapies and increase the likelihood of translational success in the battle against stroke.

  13. Stair climbing test post-stroke: feasibility, convergent validity and metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modai, Galia; Sharon, Barak; Bar-Haim, S; Hutzler, Y

    2015-08-01

    The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and treadmill walk tests (TMW) are commonly used to assess post-stroke patients (PSP) aerobic capacity. However, these tests are not without their limitations (e.g. limited sensitivity to change and the use of external pacing). Therefore, there is a need for additional tools to assess PSP aerobic capacity. To establish the feasibility, convergent validity, and metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses of a stair climbing test (SC), among chronic PSP. Nineteen chronic PSP conducted SC, TMW, and 6 MWT. Metabolic (oxygen consumption - VO₂), cardiac (heart rate), and respiratory (ventilation volume, breathing frequency, and tidal volume) measures were established. Adverse events were documented. Correlations established the convergent validity of the SC test. A repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the participant's physiological responses at the end of the various tests. SC is feasible and safe, as all participants completed the test with no adverse events. The SC demonstrated convergent validity as numerous associations were found between SC and TMW, and 6 MWT. Metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses to the SC were significantly higher than these of the TMW and 6 MWT (e.g. VO₂= 13.43 ± 2.19, 11.01 ± 2.0, and 11.26 ± 1.87 ml/kg/min, respectively) (P stairs is a common community ambulation requirement. Therefore, it is appropriate to incorporate SC test in PSP testing battery.

  14. [Do the effects of posture change and climbing stairs on nasal patency differ in acoustic rhinometry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudziol, H; Stadeler, M

    2008-04-01

    Divergent results concerning nasal patency during positional body changes are found using acoustic rhinometry. Only small numbers of healthy subjects have been tested. The present study shall examine a larger number of healthy subjects providing a basis for later findings in sick nasal mucosa. 40 healthy subjects (20 female, 20 male; average age: 32.8+/-13.8 years) without any nasal and cardiovascular disease were examined. Using acoustic rhinometry, the total nasal volume (Vt) and the total minimum nasal cross-sectional area (Ft) were calculated from the collected data. Six measurements were made: in sedentary rest position, standing, lying dorsally, after standing up, after climbing stairs and in iteration in sedentary rest position. In healthy subjects, the total nasal volume (i. e. the nasal respiration space of the two nasal passages) did not change during standing and lying, after rapid standing up and in a repeat measurement 5 hours later. After climbing stairs, the nasal mucosa decongested significantly, chiefly dorsal to the isthmus nasi. The birhine partial volume (V2) increased by an average of 33 %. Positional changes have no effect on healthy nasal mucosa. Total nasal respiration is unaffected. The reaction of sick nasal mucosa must be established in future investigations.

  15. Stair climbing detection during daily physical activity using a miniature gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Brian; Najafi, Bijan; Paraschiv-Ionescu, Anisoara; Aminian, Kamiar

    2005-12-01

    A new method of monitoring physical activity that is able to detect walking upstairs using a miniature gyroscope attached to the shank is presented. Wavelet transformation, in conjunction with a simple kinematics model, was used to detect toe-off, heel-strike and foot-flat, as well cycles corresponding to stair ascent. To evaluate the system, three studies were performed. The method was first tested on 10 healthy young volunteer subjects in a gait laboratory where an ultrasonic motion system was used as a reference system. In the second study, the system was tested on three hospitalized elderly people to classify walking upstairs from walking downstairs and flat walking. In the third study, monitoring was performed on seven patients with peripheral vascular disease for 60min during their daily physical activity. The first study revealed a close relationship between the ambulatory and the reference systems. Compared to the reference system, the ambulatory system had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 98% and 97%, respectively. In the second study, the ambulatory system also showed a very high sensitivity (>94%) in identifying a 50 stairs ascent from walking on the flat and walking downstairs. Finally, compared with visual surveillance, we observed a relatively high accuracy in identifying 196 walking upstairs cycles through daily physical activity in the third study. Our results demonstrated a reliable technique of measuring walking upstairs during physical activity.

  16. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rasnick

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05. No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  17. The effect of school bag design and load on spinal posture during stair use by children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Youlian; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Li, Jing Xian

    2011-12-01

    Thirteen male children ascending and descending stairs with loads that equalled 0%, 10%, 15% and 20% of their body weight were the subject of our research: the boys were wearing an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag or a symmetrical double-strap backpack during our experiments with them. The maximum spinal tilt to the loading side and to the support side, and the range of spinal motions, were obtained by using a motion analysis system. Our results showed that symmetry of spinal posture was observed both when they ascended staircase with all loads and descended in a backpack. When carrying an athletic bag with 15% and 20% of their body weight while ascending the staircase, the lateral spinal tilt to the supporting side was significantly increased. We concluded that a symmetrical backpack with a load not exceeding 20% or an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag with a load not exceeding 10% should be recommended for school children in order to promote safer staircase use. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Children carrying heavy school bags may develop spinal problems. This study suggested that when they are using stairs, a symmetrical backpack with a load within 20% body weight is acceptable for them. When they are carrying an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag, the bag's weight should not exceed 10% of the body weight in order to avoid excessive spinal tilt.

  18. Construction and optical properties of infinite Cd and finite Cu molecules stairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Mao, Wutao; Shen, Zhi; Wang, Qinghong; Zhou, Qian

    2017-02-01

    Two coordination complexes, namely [(hpdq)(pta)Cd]n (1) and [(pptp)(pta)Cu2Cl] (2) have been synthesized by solvothermal method based on two polypyridyl ligands, 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis- (2-pyridyl)dipyrazino[2,3-f:2‧,3‧-h]quinoxaline) (hpdq), 4‧-(4- (3H-pyrrol-3-yl)phenyl)- 2,2‧:6‧,2″- terpyridine (pptp) and auxiliary ligand p-phthalic acid (pta), respectively. Single crystal x-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complexes 1 and 2 assembled based on distinct asymmetric unit comprising one and two respective polypyridyl ligands but one Cd(II) and two Cu(I)ions, respectively. Among them, The asymmetric units in 1 was extended to one dimensional chain via the link of auxiliary ligand pta, just like infinite layers of stairs that connected by cadmium ions as the node. While that in 2 to Zero dimensional tetranuclear structure via the link of auxiliary ligand pta, just like finite four layers of stairs that Copper ion as the node connection. Furthermore, solid fluorescence spectra properties of two complexes were also investigated, and the result shows the fluorescence intensity of complex 1 is stronger than that of the hpdq ligand, but the fluorescence intensity of complex 2 is weaker than that of the pptp ligand. CCDC number of 1and 2 are 1483301 and 1483302.

  19. Research on Dynamics and Stability in the Stairs-climbing of a Tracked Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the functional requirement of climbing up the stairs, the dynamics and stability during a tracked mobile robot’s climbing of stairs is studied. First, from the analysis of its cross‐country performance, the mechanical structure of the tracked mobile robot is designed and the hardware composition of its control system is given. Second, based on the analysis to its stairs‐climbing process, the dynamical model of stairs‐climbing is established by using the classical mechanics method. Next, the stability conditions for its stairs‐climbing are determined and an evaluation method of its stairs‐climbing stability is proposed, based on a mechanics analysis on the robot’s backwards tumbling during the stairs‐climbing process. Through simulation and experiments, the effectiveness of the dynamical model and the stability evaluation method of the tracked mobile robot in stairs‐climbing is verified, which can provide design and analysis foundations for the tracked mobile robots’ stairs‐climbing.

  20. RavenDB high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    RavenDB High Performance is comprehensive yet concise tutorial that developers can use to.This book is for developers & software architects who are designing systems in order to achieve high performance right from the start. A basic understanding of RavenDB is recommended, but not required. While the book focuses on advanced topics, it does not assume that the reader has a great deal of prior knowledge of working with RavenDB.

  1. MariaDB cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bartholomew, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A practical cookbook, filled with advanced recipes , and plenty of code and commands used for illustration,which will make your learning curve easy and quick.This book is for anyone who wants to learn more about databases in general or MariaDB in particular. Some familiarity with SQL databases is assumed, but the recipes are approachable to almost anyone with basic database skills.

  2. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs.

  3. An uphill struggle: effects of a point-of-choice stair climbing intervention in a non-English speaking population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Frank F; Masters, Rich S W

    2006-10-01

    Increases in lifestyle physical activity are a current public health target. Interventions that encourage pedestrians to choose the stairs rather than the escalator are uniformly successful in English speaking populations. Here we report the first test of a similar intervention in a non-English speaking sample, namely the Hong Kong Chinese. Travellers on the Mid-Levels escalator system in Hong Kong were encouraged to take the stairs for their health by a point-of-choice prompt with text in Chinese positioned at the junction between the stairs and the travelator. Gender, age, ethnic origin, and walking on the travelator were coded by observers. A 2 week intervention period followed 2 weeks of baseline monitoring with 57 801 choices coded. Specificity of the intervention was determined by contrasting effects in Asian and non-Asian travellers. There was no effect of the intervention on stair climbing and baseline rates (0.4%) were much lower than previous studies in Western populations (5.4%). Nonetheless, a modest increase in walking up the travelator, confined to the Asian population (OR = 1.12), confirmed that the intervention materials could change behaviour. It would be unwise to assume that lifestyle physical activity interventions have universal application. The contexts in which the behaviours occur, e.g. climate, may act as a barrier to successful behaviour change.

  4. The effects of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in individuals following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Munsang; Yoo, Junsang; Shin, Soonyoung; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-six stroke patients were divided randomly into the stepper exercise with visual feedback group (n = 13) or the stepper exercise group (n = 13). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received feedback through the mirror during exercise, while those in the control group performed the exercise without visual feedback; both groups exercised for the 30 min thrice per week for 6 weeks. The hip extensor and knee extensor strength, 10-m walking test results, and 11-step stair climbing test results were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The stepper exercise with visual feedback group showed significantly greater improvement for hip extensor strength and the 10-m walking test. The knee extensor strength and 11-step stair climbing in both groups showed significantly greater improvement after the intervention, but without any significant difference between groups. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicate that the stepper exercise with visual feedback can help improve the strength of the hip extensor and the 10-m walking test; the stepper exercise alone may also improve the knee extensor strength and stair climbing ability.

  5. Quetzal or not Quetzal, that is the question... . On the stairs of the Castillo monument in Chichen Itza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2002-11-01

    Some speculation will be presented about the hypothesis that states that the reflected sounds in the stairs of the Castillo building in Chichen Itza, Mexico, imitates the song of the quetzal bird. Some aspects of construction, both technical and social, are discussed as well as issues related with myth and fantasies.

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHJ619 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better... than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfully ga...er of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHF574 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f Hits to DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better... than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's succes...1 -3 Number of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHI754 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f Hits to DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better... than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's succes...1 -3 Number of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHF379 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available its to DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better... than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfu...3 Number of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better

  10. Dicty_cDB: SSM379 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available astall] WARNING: [000.000] Unable to open /db/DNA.DATA/b/est_rest3.seq.nsq [blastall] ERROR: [000.000] ReadDBOpenMHdrAndSeqFiles: fai...led to map files [blastall] WARNING: [000.000] Unable to open /db/DNA.DATA/b/est_re

  11. Dicty_cDB: SHL888 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es. 36 0.19 9 AV734847 |AV734847.1 Homo sapiens cDNA clone:cdAAGH02, 5'end, expressed in human pheochromoc...ytoma. 48 0.28 1 DB493756 |DB493756.1 Homo sapiens hypothalamus cDNA, RIKEN full-le

  12. The area under the disease progress stairs: calculation, advantage, and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Ivan; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-04-01

    The area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) is frequently used to combine multiple observations of disease progress into a single value. However, our analysis shows that this approach severely underestimates the effect of the first and last observation. To get a better estimate of disease progress, we have developed a new formula termed the area under the disease progress stairs (AUDPS). The AUDPS approach improves the estimation of disease progress by giving a weight closer to optimal to the first and last observations. Analysis of real data indicates that AUDPS outperforms AUDPC in most of the tested trials and may be less precise than AUDPC only when assessments in the first or last observations have a comparatively large variance. We propose using AUDPS and its standardized (sAUDPS) and relative (rAUDPS) forms when combining multiple observations from disease progress experiments into a single value.

  13. A multi-component stair climbing promotional campaign targeting calorific expenditure for worksites; a quasi-experimental study testing effects on behaviour, attitude and intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eves Frank F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of lifestyle physical activity is a current aim of health promotion, with increased stair climbing one public health target. While the workplace provides an opportunity for regular stair climbing, evidence for effectiveness of point-of-choice interventions is equivocal. This paper reports a new approach to worksite interventions, aimed at changing attitudes and, hence, behaviour. Methods Pre-testing of calorific expenditure messages used structured interviews with members of the public (n = 300. Effects of multi-component campaigns on stair climbing were tested with quasi-experimental, interrupted time-series designs. In one worksite, a main campaign poster outlining the amount of calorific expenditure obtainable from stair climbing and a conventional point-of-choice prompt were used (Poster alone site. In a second worksite, additional messages in the stairwell about calorific expenditure reinforced the main campaign (Poster + Stairwell messages site. The outcome variables were automated observations of stair and lift ascent (28,854 and descent (29,352 at baseline and for three weeks after the intervention was installed. Post-intervention questionnaires for employees at the worksites assessed responses to the campaign (n = 253. Analyses employed Analysis of Variance with follow-up Bonferroni t-tests (message pre-testing, logistic regression of stair ascent and descent (campaign testing, and Bonferroni t-tests and multiple regression (follow-up questionnaire. Results Pre-testing of messages based on calorific expenditure suggested they could motivate stair climbing if believed. The new campaign increased stair climbing, with greater effects at the Poster + Stairwell messages site (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.40-1.66 than Posters alone (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.15-1.34. Follow-up revealed higher agreement with two statements about calorific outcomes of stair climbing in the site where they

  14. A multi-component stair climbing promotional campaign targeting calorific expenditure for worksites; a quasi-experimental study testing effects on behaviour, attitude and intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulation of lifestyle physical activity is a current aim of health promotion, with increased stair climbing one public health target. While the workplace provides an opportunity for regular stair climbing, evidence for effectiveness of point-of-choice interventions is equivocal. This paper reports a new approach to worksite interventions, aimed at changing attitudes and, hence, behaviour. Methods Pre-testing of calorific expenditure messages used structured interviews with members of the public (n = 300). Effects of multi-component campaigns on stair climbing were tested with quasi-experimental, interrupted time-series designs. In one worksite, a main campaign poster outlining the amount of calorific expenditure obtainable from stair climbing and a conventional point-of-choice prompt were used (Poster alone site). In a second worksite, additional messages in the stairwell about calorific expenditure reinforced the main campaign (Poster + Stairwell messages site). The outcome variables were automated observations of stair and lift ascent (28,854) and descent (29,352) at baseline and for three weeks after the intervention was installed. Post-intervention questionnaires for employees at the worksites assessed responses to the campaign (n = 253). Analyses employed Analysis of Variance with follow-up Bonferroni t-tests (message pre-testing), logistic regression of stair ascent and descent (campaign testing), and Bonferroni t-tests and multiple regression (follow-up questionnaire). Results Pre-testing of messages based on calorific expenditure suggested they could motivate stair climbing if believed. The new campaign increased stair climbing, with greater effects at the Poster + Stairwell messages site (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.40-1.66) than Posters alone (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.15-1.34). Follow-up revealed higher agreement with two statements about calorific outcomes of stair climbing in the site where they were installed in

  15. Influence of Lower Extremity Muscle Size and Quality on Stair-Climb Performance in Career Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Craig R; Ryan, Eric D; Tweedell, Andrew J; Barnette, Timothy J; Wagoner, Chad W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of lower extremity muscular size and quality on stair-climb performance (SCP) in career firefighters. Forty-six male career firefighters (age = 37.0 ± 7.2 years; stature = 180.2 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 108.0 ± 19.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Panoramic ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were obtained to determine cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (EI) of each muscle. The CSA of each muscle was then summed together and normalized to body mass (CSA/BM [QCSA]). Additionally, EI was averaged across both muscles (QEI). Participants then performed a timed and weighted SCP assessment where they ascended and descended 26 stairs 4 times as quickly as possible while wearing a weighted vest (22.73 kg) to simulate the weight of their self-contained breathing apparatus and turnout gear. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among variables and the relative contributions of QCSA and QEI to SCP. Partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between QCSA and SCP and QEI and SCP while controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). The results indicated that QCSA and QEI were significantly related to SCP before (r = -0.492, p = 0.001; r = 0.363, p = 0.013, respectively) and after accounting for age and BMI (r = -0.324, p = 0.032; r = 0.413, p = 0.005, respectively). Both QCSA and QEI contributed significantly to the prediction of SCP (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that lower extremity muscle size and quality are important contributors to critical firefighting tasks, which have been shown to be improved with resistance training.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16142-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 232920 |pid:none) Mugil curema Ras (ras) mRNA, parti... 100 1e-19 (Q56JV3) RecName: Full=GTP-binding protein...Q414550 |pid:none) Suberites domuncula Rheb gene, com... 100 1e-19 FJ232920_1( FJ

  17. The BIOSIS data base: Evaluation of its indexes and the STRATBLDR, CHEMFILE, STAIRS and DIALOG systems for on-line searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, M.; Green, H. O.

    1977-01-01

    An IBM-developed program, STAIRS, was selected for performing a search on the BIOSIS file. The evaluation of the hardware and search systems and the strategies used are discussed. The searches are analyzed by type of end user.

  18. CNOOC, ALNG Ink JV Agreement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ China National offshore Oil Company Ltd (CNOOC Ltd), the nation's largest offshore oil and gas producer, said it has agreed with Australia LNG(ALNG)to establish a joint venture to develop natural gas in Australia.

  19. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Having critical management tools gives foreign investors the chance to maximize their investment, minimize their risk and develop a mutually profitable business with a Chinese partner. This concludes our series on this topic.

  20. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Joint ventures (JVs) are a marriage between businesses, and as in any marriage,both partners need to put time and effort intoit. Having conducted your due diligence,negotiated your investments, and agreed to

  1. Comparison between microprocessor-controlled ankle/foot and conventional prosthetic feet during stair negotiation in people with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vibhor; Gailey, Robert S; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; O'Toole, Christopher; Finnieston, Adam A

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to stance-phase dorsiflexion of conventional prosthetic feet, the microprocessor-controlled Proprio foot permits swing-phase dorsiflexion on stairs. The purpose of this study was to compare Symmetry in External Work (SEW) between a microprocessor-controlled foot and conventional prosthetic feet in two groups with unilateral transtibial amputation (Medicare Functional Classification Levels K-Level-2 and K-Level-3) during stair ascent and descent. Ten subjects were evaluated while wearing three conventional prosthetic feet- solid ankle cushion heel (SACH), stationary attachment flexible endoskeleton (SAFE), and Talux-and the Proprio foot using a study socket and were given a 10- to 14-day accommodation period with each foot. Ground reaction forces were collected using F-scan sensors during stair ascent and descent. The SEW between the intact and amputated limbs was calculated for each foot. During stair ascent, the Proprio foot resulted in a higher interlimb symmetry than conventional prosthetic feet, with significant differences between the Pro prio and SACH/SAFE feet. The swing-phase dorsiflexion appeared to promote greater interlimb symmetry because it facilitated forward motion of the body, resulting in a heel-to-toe center of pressure trajectory. During stair descent, all feet had low symmetry without significant differences between feet. The movement strategy used when descending stairs, which is to roll over the edge of a step, had a greater influence on symmetry than the dorsiflexion features of prosthetic feet.

  2. Crossover study of amputee stair ascent and descent biomechanics using Genium and C-Leg prostheses with comparison to non-amputee control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lura, Derek J; Wernke, Matthew W; Carey, Stephanie L; Kahle, Jason T; Miro, Rebecca M; Highsmith, M Jason

    2017-07-25

    This study was a randomized crossover of stair ambulation of Transfemoral Amputees (TFAs) using the Genium and C-Leg prosthetic knees. TFAs typically have difficulty ascending and descending stairs, limiting community mobility. The objective of this study was to determine the relative efficacy of the Genium and C-Leg prostheses for stair ascent and descent, and their absolute efficacy relative to non-amputees. Twenty TFAs, and five non-amputees participated in the study. TFAs were randomized to begin the study with the Genium or C-Leg prosthesis. Informed consent was obtained from all participants prior to data collection and the study was listed on clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01473662). After fitting, accommodation, and training, participants were asked to demonstrate their preferred gait pattern for stair ascent and descent and a step-over-step pattern if able. TFAs then switched prosthetic legs and repeated fitting, accommodation, training, and testing. An eight camera Vicon optical motion analysis system, and two AMTI force plates were used to track and analyze the participants' gait patterns, knee flexion angles, knee moment normalized by body weight, and swing time. For stair descent, no significant differences were found between prostheses. For stair ascent, Genium use resulted in: increased ability to use a step-over-step gait pattern (p=0.03), increased prosthetic side peak knee flexion (pstair ascent relative to the C-Leg, by enabling gait patterns that more closely resembled non-amputees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between microprocessor-controlled ankle/foot and conventional prosthetic feet during stair negotiation in people with unilateral transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Finnieston, CPO, LPO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to stance-phase dorsiflexion of conventional prosthetic feet, the microprocessor-controlled Proprio foot permits swing-phase dorsiflexion on stairs. The purpose of this study was to compare Symmetry in External Work (SEW between a microprocessor-controlled foot and conventional prosthetic feet in two groups with unilateral transtibial amputation (Medicare Functional Classification Levels K-Level-2 and K-Level-3 during stair ascent and descent. Ten subjects were evaluated while wearing three conventional prosthetic feet—solid ankle cushion heel (SACH, stationary attachment flexible endoskeleton (SAFE, and Talux-and the Proprio foot using a study socket and were given a 10- to 14-day accommodation period with each foot. Ground reaction forces were collected using F-scan sensors during stair ascent and descent. The SEW between the intact and amputated limbs was calculated for each foot. During stair ascent, the Proprio foot resulted in a higher interlimb symmetry than conventional prosthetic feet, with significant differences between the Proprio and SACH/SAFE feet. The swing-phase dorsiflexion appeared to promote greater interlimb symmetry because it facilitated forward motion of the body, resulting in a heel-to-toe center of pressure trajectory. During stair descent, all feet had low symmetry without significant differences between feet. The movement strategy used when descending stairs, which is to roll over the edge of a step, had a greater influence on symmetry than the dorsiflexion features of prosthetic fee

  4. Influence of restricted vision and knee joint range of motion on gait properties during level walking and stair ascent and descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ich

    2011-01-01

    Because elderly individuals experience marked declines in various physical functions (e.g., vision, joint function) simultaneously, it is difficult to clarify the individual effects of these functional declines on walking. However, by imposing vision and joint function restrictions on young men, the effects of these functional declines on walking can be clarified. The authors aimed to determine the effect of restricted vision and range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint on gait properties while walking and ascending or descending stairs. Fifteen healthy young adults performed level walking and stair ascent and descent during control, vision restriction, and knee joint ROM restriction conditions. During level walking, walking speed and step width decreased, and double support time increased significantly with vision and knee joint ROM restrictions. Stance time, step width, and walking angle increased only with knee joint ROM restriction. Stance time, swing time, and double support time were significantly longer in level walking, stair descent, and stair ascent, in that order. The effects of vision and knee joint ROM restrictions were significantly larger than the control conditions. In conclusion, vision and knee joint ROM restrictions affect gait during level walking and stair ascent and descent. This effect is marked in stair ascent with knee joint ROM restriction.

  5. MongoDB and PHP

    CERN Document Server

    Francia, Steve

    2012-01-01

    What would happen if you optimized a data store for the operations application developers actually use? You'd arrive at MongoDB, the reliable document-oriented database. With this concise guide, you'll learn how to build elegant database applications with MongoDB and PHP. Written by the Chief Solutions Architect at 10gen-the company that develops and supports this open source database-this book takes you through MongoDB basics such as queries, read-write operations, and administration, and then dives into MapReduce, sharding, and other advanced topics. Get out of the relational database rut,

  6. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints.

  7. Self-Adaptive Correction of Heading Direction in Stair Climbing for Tracked Mobile Robots Using Visual Servoing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Song, Aiguo; Song, Zimo; Liu, Yuqing; Jiang, Guohua; Zhao, Guopu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a heading direction correction algorithm for a tracked mobile robot. To save hardware resources as far as possible, the mobile robot’s wrist camera is used as the only sensor, which is rotated to face stairs. An ensemble heading deviation detector is proposed to help the mobile robot correct its heading direction. To improve the generalization ability, a multi-scale Gabor filter is used to process the input image previously. Final deviation result is acquired by applying the majority vote strategy on all the classifiers’ results. The experimental results show that our detector is able to enable the mobile robot to correct its heading direction adaptively while it is climbing the stairs.

  8. A new protocol from real joint motion data for wear simulation in total knee arthroplasty: stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Santina; Belvedere, Claudio; Jaber, Sami Abdel; Affatato, Saverio; D'Angeli, Valentina; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    In its normal lifespan, a knee prosthesis must bear highly demanding loading conditions, going beyond the sole activity of level walking required by ISO standard 14243. We have developed a protocol for in vitro wear simulation of stair climbing on a displacement controlled knee simulator. The flexion/extension angle, intra/extra rotation angle, and antero/posterior translation were obtained in patients by three-dimensional video-fluoroscopy. Axial load data were collected by gait analysis. Kinematics and load data revealed a good consistence across patients, in spite of the different prosthesis size. The protocol was then implemented and tested on a displacement controlled knee wear simulator, showing an accurate reproduction of stair climbing waveforms with a relative error lower than 5%.

  9. Circulatory responses to weight lifting, walking, and stair climbing in older males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, S J; McCartney, N; McKelvie, R S

    1996-02-01

    To compare the heart rate and intra-arterial blood pressure responses during weight lifting, horizontal and uphill walking, and stair climbing in older male subjects. We used intra-brachial artery catheterization to compare the arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) responses during 10 repetitions (approximately 40 s) of single-arm curl (SAC) and single-arm overhead military press (SAMP) (70% of the one repetition maximum-1RM); 12 repetitions (approximately 50 s) of single- (SLP) and double-leg press (DLP) weight-lifting exercises (80% of 1RM); 10 minutes of horizontal treadmill walking (T10) at 2.5 mph holding a 20-pound weight in minutes 4 to 6 (T10) and 30 pounds in minutes 8 to 10 (T10); 4 minutes of treadmill walking (T4) at 3.0 mph up an 8% incline; and 12 flights (192 steps) of stair climbing (STR) at 60 to 65 steps/minute on a Stiarmaster 6000 ergometer (approximately 3 minutes). McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Seventeen healthy males aged (mean +/- SE) 64.4 +/- 0.6 years. Continuous intra-arterial measurements of systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and heart rate and rate-pressure product. The peak values of HR, ABP and rate-pressure product (HR.BPs/1000;(RPP,10(3))) were not systematically ordered among the various activities. The lowest peak values for all variables were recorded during the initial 4 minutes of horizontal treadmill walking. The STR and T4 walking exercises elicited higher HRs (151 +/- 3.2 and 121 +/- 3.4 bpm) than the weight lifting (range from 100 +/- 4.8 (SAC) to 113 +/- 3.8 bpm (SAMP)), but the converse was true for diastolic pressure (range from 128 +/- 6.3 (SAC) to 151 +/- 4.8 mm Hg (SAMP) versus 101 +/- 2.5 (T4) to 118 +/- 3.4 mm Hg (T10) and mean arterial pressure (range from 145 +/- 4.5 (SAC) to 158 +/- 4.8 mm Hg (SAMP) versus 129 +/- 3.4 in T4 to 148 +/- 3.8 (T10) and 157 +/- 4.1 mm Hg (STR)). The peak systolic pressure was greatest in STR (271 +/- 9.6 mm Hg) followed by SAMP (261 +/- 9

  10. Dicty_cDB: SSI750 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P43331 SMALL NUCLEAR RIBONUCLEOPROTEIN SM D3 ;, mRNA sequence. 44 0.033 2 BE192240 |BE192240.2 db89d06.x1 Well...W:SMD3_HUMAN P43331 SMALL NUCLEAR RIBONUCLEOPROTEIN SM D3 ;, mRNA sequence. 44 0.034 2 BE506983 |BE506983.1 db89d06.y1 Well

  11. Validity of FitBit, Jawbone UP, Nike+ and other wearable devices for level and stair walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangjian; Xu, Junkai; Yu, Bo; Shull, Peter B

    2016-07-01

    Increased physical activity can provide numerous health benefits. The relationship between physical activity and health assumes reliable activity measurements including step count and distance traveled. This study assessed step count and distance accuracy for Nike+ FuelBand, Jawbone UP 24, Fitbit One, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Yamax CW-701, and Omron HJ-321 during level, upstairs, and downstairs walking in healthy adults. Forty subjects walked on flat ground (400m), upstairs (176 steps), and downstairs (176 steps), and a subset of 10 subjects performed treadmill walking trials to assess the influence of walking speed on accuracy. Activity monitor measured step count and distance values were compared with actual step count (determined from video recordings) and distance to determine accuracy. For level walking, step count errors in Yamax CW-701, Fitbit Zip, Fitbit One, Omron HJ-321, and Jawbone UP 24 were within 1% and distance errors in Fitbit Zip and Yamax CW-701 were within 5%. Garmin Vivofit and Omron HJ-321 were the most accurate in estimating step count for stairs with errors less than 4%. An important finding is that all activity monitors overestimated distance for stair walking by at least 45%. In general, there were not accuracy differences among activity monitors for stair walking. Accuracy did not change between moderate and fast walking speeds, though slow walking increased errors for some activity monitors. Nike+ FuelBand was the least accurate step count estimator during all walking tasks. Caution should be taken when interpreting step count and distance estimates for activities involving stairs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fixed-altitude stair-climbing test replacing the conventional symptom-limited test. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Rodríguez, María; Gómez, M Teresa; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Varela, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a patient's maximum capacity is comparable in 2 different stair-climbing tests, allowing the simplest to be used in clinical practice. Prospective, observational study of repeated measures on 33 consecutive patients scheduled for lung resection. Stair-climbing tests were: the standard test (climb to 27 m) and the alternative fixed-altitude test (climb to 12 m). In both cases, heart rate and oxygen saturation were monitored before and after the test. The power output of stair-climbing for each test (Watt1 for the standard and Watt2 for the fixed-altitude test) was calculated using the following equation: Power (watt)=weight (kg)*9.8*height (m)/time (sec). Concordance between tests was evaluated using a regression model and the residuals were plotted against Watt1. Finally, power output values were analyzed using a Bland-Altman plot. Twenty-one male and 12 female patients (mean age 63.2±11.2) completed both tests. Only 12 patients finished the standard test, while all finished the fixed-altitude test. Mean power output values were Watt1: 184.1±65 and Watt2: 214.5±75.1. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) in the linear regression was 0.67. No fixed bias was detected after plotting the residuals. The Bland-Altman plot showed that 32 out of 33 values were within 2 standard deviations of the differences between methods. The results of this study show a reasonable level of concordance between both stair-climbing tests. The standard test can be replaced by the fixed-altitude test up to 12 m. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Lower limb myalgias in a man who used to "climb the stairs": an atypical abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dognini, Giuseppina Patrizia; Cadeo, Gianluca; Dolcino, Luigi; Gilardoni, Lodovico; Stringhi, Enrico; Forloni, Franco

    2012-07-01

    Atypical presentation of emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm comprises a wide spectrum of symptoms. Lower limbs' involvement is infrequent, usually monolateral and with clear vascular features. We report the case of a 58-year-old patient who complained exclusively about symmetric lower limb myalgias without vascular features, after having repeatedly climbed the stairs of the school he worked in. The surprising final diagnosis was of rupturing abdominal aortic aneurysm; the patient was sent to emergency surgery and survived.

  14. Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy alters knee moments in multiple planes during walking and stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Kristyn M; Birmingham, Trevor B; Dunning, Cynthia E; Giffin, J Robert

    2015-07-01

    Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy is a surgical procedure intended to redistribute loads on the knee in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). The surgery may affect moments in multiple planes during ambulation, with potential beneficial or detrimental effects on joint loads. The objective of this study was to investigate three-dimensional external knee moments before and after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy during level walking and during stair ascent. Fourteen patients with varus alignment and osteoarthritis primarily affecting the medial compartment of the tibiofemoral joint were assessed. Three-dimensional motion analyses during level walking and stair ascent was evaluated using inverse dynamics before, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Mean changes at 12 months suggested decreases in the peak knee adduction, flexion and internal rotation moments, with standardized response means ranging from 0.15 to 2.54. These decreases were observed despite increases in speed. Changes in alignment were associated with changes in the adduction and internal rotation moments, but not the flexion moment. Both pre- and postoperatively, the peak knee adduction moment was significantly lower (p=0.001) during stair ascent than during level walking, while the flexion and internal rotation moments were significantly higher (pplanes of motion during ambulation, suggesting substantial alterations of the loads on the knee during ambulation.

  15. Synthesis of action variable for motor controllers of a mobile system with special wheels for movement on stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Krys

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a procedure of obtaining waveform of angular velocities for special segmented wheels required for smooth movement of a stair-climbing chassis on stairs. The waveform was determined for a specified velocity of the chassis using a dynamic contact analysis in the CAD system SolidWorks. The main part of the work was to verify whether real motors on a testing chassis are capable of producing the required angular velocity with its significant step changes. The values of angular velocities were sent to drive control units from a software control system of the chassis. The chassis was recorded during the movement on stairs on a video camera and the resulting video was then analyzed by a special single-purpose image processing algorithm, which detected key points in individual frames. Outcome of the algorithm are tables with positions and velocities of individual key points during time. Tests proved that with lower velocities it is possible to achieve very good results with the chassis moving almost steadily.

  16. The Walking Impairment Questionnaire Stair-Climbing Score predicts mortality in men and women with peripheral arterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Atul; Liu, Kiang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Criqui, Michael H.; Tian, Lu; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tao, Huimin; McDermott, Mary M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) measures self-reported walking distance, walking speed, and stair-climbing ability in men and women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We determined whether poorer WIQ scores are associated with higher all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in individuals with and without PAD. Methods 1048 men and women with and without PAD were identified from Chicago-area medical centers. Participants completed the WIQ at baseline and were followed for a median of 4.5 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to relate baseline WIQ scores with mortality, adjusting for age, sex, race, the ankle brachial index (ABI), comorbidities, and other covariates. Results 461 participants (44.0%) died during follow-up, including 158 deaths from cardiovascular disease. PAD participants in the lowest baseline quartile of the WIQ stair-climbing scores had higher all-cause mortality (HR = 1.70 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.08-2.66, p=0.02] and higher CVD mortality (HR = 3.11 [95% CI 1.30 – 7.47, p=0.01]) compared to those with the highest baseline WIQ stair climbing score. Among PAD participants there were no significant associations of lower baseline WIQ distance or speed scores with rates of all-cause mortality (p for trend = 0.20 and 0.07, respectively) or CVD mortality (p for trend = 0.51 and p for trend = 0.33, respectively). Among non-PAD participants there were no significant associations of lower baseline WIQ stair climbing, distance, or speed score with rates of all-cause mortality (p for trend = 0.94, 0.69, and 0.26, respectively) or CVD mortality (p for trend = 0.28, 0.68, and 0.78, respectively). Conclusions Among participants with PAD, lower WIQ stair climbing scores are associated with higher all-cause and CVD mortality, independently of the ABI and other covariates. PMID:22608041

  17. Development of a Stair-Step Multifrequency Synchronized Excitation Signal for Fast Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wideband excitation signal with finite prominent harmonic components is desirable for fast bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS measurements. This work introduces a simple method to synthesize and realize a type of periodical stair-step multifrequency synchronized (MFS signal. The Fourier series analysis shows that the p-order MFS signal f(p,t has constant 81.06% energy distributed equally on its p  2nth primary harmonics. The synthesis principle is described firstly and then two examples of the 4-order and 5-order MFS signals, f(4,t and f(5,t, are synthesized. The method to implement the MFS waveform based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA and a digital to analog converter (DAC is also presented. Both the number and the frequencies of the expected primary harmonics can be adjusted as needed. An impedance measurement experiment on a RC three-element equivalent model is performed, and results show acceptable precision, which validates the feasibility of the MFS excitation.

  18. Development of a Stair-Step Multifrequency Synchronized Excitation Signal for Fast Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, He; Du, Fangling; Sun, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Wideband excitation signal with finite prominent harmonic components is desirable for fast bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurements. This work introduces a simple method to synthesize and realize a type of periodical stair-step multifrequency synchronized (MFS) signal. The Fourier series analysis shows that the p-order MFS signal f(p, t) has constant 81.06% energy distributed equally on its p  2nth primary harmonics. The synthesis principle is described firstly and then two examples of the 4-order and 5-order MFS signals, f(4, t) and f(5, t), are synthesized. The method to implement the MFS waveform based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and a digital to analog converter (DAC) is also presented. Both the number and the frequencies of the expected primary harmonics can be adjusted as needed. An impedance measurement experiment on a RC three-element equivalent model is performed, and results show acceptable precision, which validates the feasibility of the MFS excitation. PMID:24701563

  19. Weight-bearing shifts of hemiparetic and healthy adults upon stepping on stairs of various heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Y; Dickstein, R; Resnik, S; Marcovitz, E

    2000-04-01

    To examine and compare the effect of stepping on stairs of various heights on lower extremity weight bearing in hemiparetic patients. Flieman Geriatric Rehabilitation Hospital, Haifa, Israel. Fifteen ambulatory hemiparetic patients following an acute cerebrovascular accident, and 16 age-matched healthy controls. Each subject was tested twice on two consecutive days in five weight-bearing positions which included level stance and stepping with either leg on 10-cm- and 17-cm-high steps. Data concerning weight distribution on the lower extremities were collected by two computerized forceplates. Weight borne by each foot expressed as percentage of overall body weight. In the attempted symmetrical level stance, the percentage of body weight borne by the paretic limb of the stroke patients was significantly lower than that of the nonparetic limb. Placing one foot on a step induced a weight shift to the foot placed on the floor regardless of step height. Weight shifting to the paretic limb was, however, significantly lower than to the nonparetic limb. Weight shifting to the nonparetic limb was significantly lower than to the corresponding limb of healthy individuals. Step height had no significant effect on weight distributions on the feet. Raising a foot on a step appears to be an appropriate strategy for weight shift training of stroke patients. Since weight shifting to both the paretic and nonparetic limb of stroke patients is impaired, treatment strategies should include training in weight shifting to both lower extremities.

  20. Effect of postexercise recovery procedures following strenuous stair-climb running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Elisa; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Beilby, John

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effects of hot/cold water immersion, static stretching, and no recovery (control) interventions on leg strength, rowing performance, and indicators of muscle soreness/damage in the 72 hours following strenuous stair-climb running. Club (n = 14) and elite (Sports Institute) (n = 6) rowers performed the training run on three separate occasions. After each run, participants completed a randomly assigned 15-minute recovery treatment, either hot/cold, static stretching, or control, which were repeated at 24 and 48 hours postrun. No significant strength or performance differences existed between the three recovery treatments for either group. Muscle soreness for both groups remained significantly elevated (p < 0.05) above baseline at 72 hours postrun. At 48-hours postrun serum creatine kinase levels had returned to baseline and at 72 hours postrun were below baseline in both groups. In conclusion, neither hot/cold nor static stretching accelerated recovery at 72 hours beyond that achieved by the control condition.

  1. Body physique and heart rate variability determine the occurrence of stair-step artefacts in 64-slice CT coronary angiography with prospective ECG-triggering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Lars; Herzog, Bernhard A; Burkhard, Nina; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Valenta, Ines; Gaemperli, Oliver; Wyss, Christophe A; Landmesser, Ulf; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the frequency and extent of stair-step artefacts in computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggering and to identify their determinants. One hundred and forty three consecutive patients (55 women, mean age 57 +/- 13 years) underwent 64-slice CTCA using prospective ECG-triggering. Occurrence of stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall and the coronary arteries was determined and maximum offset was measured. If stair-step artefacts occurred in both cases, a difference between thoracic wall and coronary artery offset of 0.6 mm or greater was attributed to additional motion of the heart. Mean effective radiation dose was 2.1 +/- 0.7 mSv (range 1.0-3.5 mSv). Eighty-nine patients (62%) had stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries (mean offset of 1.7 +/- 1.1 mm), while only 77 patients had thoracic wall stair-step artefacts (mean offset of 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm; significantly different, P < 0.001). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall were determined by BMI and weight (P < 0.01), while artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries were associated with heart rate variability (P < 0.05). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA with prospective ECG-triggering are determined by (a) motion of the entire patient during table travel, particularly in large patients and (b) by motion of the heart, particularly when heart rates are variable.

  2. PKCδ regulates hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin signaling in Lepr(db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Burrington, Christine M; Davenport, Samantha K; Johnson, Andrew K; Horsman, Melissa J; Chowdhry, Saleem; Greene, Michael W

    2014-08-08

    PKCδ has been linked to key pathophysiological features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Yet, our knowledge of PKCδ's role in NAFLD development and progression in obese models is limited. PKCδ(-/-)/Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice were generated to evaluate key pathophysiological features of NAFLD in mice. Hepatic histology, oxidative stress, apoptosis, gene expression, insulin signaling, and serum parameters were analyzed in Lepr(db)(/)(db) and PKCδ(-/-)/Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice. The absence of PKCδ did not abrogate the development of obesity in Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice. In contrast, serum triglyceride levels and epididymal white adipose tissue weight normalized to body weight were reduced in PKCδ(-/-)/Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice compared Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice. Analysis of insulin signaling in mice revealed that hepatic Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation were strongly stimulated by insulin in PKCδ(-/-)/Lepr(db)(/)(db) compared Lepr(db)(/)(db) mice. PKCδ may be involved in the development of obesity-associated NAFLD by regulating hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin signaling.

  3. Mibefradil reduces blood glucose concentration in db/db mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Numerous recent studies suggest that abnormal intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i is a common defect in diabetic animal models and patients. Abnormal calcium handling is an important mechanism in the defective pancreatic β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. T-type Ca2+ channel antagonists lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes, but the mechanism remains unknown. METHODS: We examined the effect of the Ca2+ channel antagonist mibefradil on blood glucose in male db/db mice and phenotypically normal heterozygous mice by intraperitoneal injection. RESULTS: Mibefradil (15 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d. caused a profound reduction of fasting blood glucose from 430.92±20.46 mg/dl to 285.20±5.74 mg/dl in three days. The hypoglycemic effect of mibefradil was reproduced by NNC 55-0396, a compound structurally similar to mibefradil but more selective for T-type Ca2+ channels, but not by the specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine. Mibefradil did not show such hypoglycemic effects in heterozygous animals. In addition, triglycerides, basal insulin and food intake were significantly decreased by mibefradil treatment in the db/db mice but not in the controls. Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining showed a significantly increased expression of T-type Ca2+ channel α-subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in liver and brain tissues from db/db mice compared to those from heterozygous animals. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these results suggest that T-type Ca2+ channels are potential therapeutic targets for antidiabetic drugs.

  4. Kinematic alterations of the lower limbs and pelvis during an ascending stairs task are associated with the degree of knee osteoarthritis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Glaucia Helena; Selistre, Luiz Fernando Approbato; Petrella, Marina; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) generally demonstrate great difficulty in ascending stairs. The strategies and compensations used by these individuals in stair activities have not been fully established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the joint kinematics of the pelvis, hip, knee and ankle throughout the gait cycle, in the sagittal and frontal planes, in individuals with mild and moderate knee OA, during an ascending stairs task. Thirty-one individuals with knee OA and 19 controls were subjected to clinical and radiographic analysis, divided into three groups: control, mild knee OA, and moderate knee OA. Participants answered a self-reported questionnaire, carried out performance-based tests, and their kinematic data were recorded during an ascending stairs task using an eight-camera Qualisys 3D-Motion analysis system. The individuals with moderate degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations in the pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle in the sagittal plane. The individuals with mild degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations of the hip in the frontal plane, and kinematic alterations of the ankle in the sagittal plane. The ascending stairs task allowed verification of meaningful information regarding gait strategies used by individuals with mild and moderate knee OA. The strategies of these two groups of individuals are different for this task, although more pronounced in individuals with moderate knee OA. The findings should be taken into account in the development of rehabilitation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-reported chair-rise ability relates to stair-climbing readiness of total knee arthroplasty patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Frost, Karen; Quesada, Peter; Angeli, Claudia; Swank, Ann; Topp, Robert; Malkani, Art L

    2007-01-01

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), physical therapists must evaluate patient readiness to safely begin stair-climbing. Physical therapists might find self-reported chair-rise ability useful in determining stair-climbing readiness of patients. We grouped 31 subjects who were at approximately 3.6 weeks post-TKA by chair-rise ability (group 1 = "Because of my knee, I can only rise from a chair if I use my hands and arms to assist," group 2 = "I have pain when rising from the seated position, but it does not affect my ability to rise from the seated position," and group 3 = "My knee does not affect my ability to rise from a chair"). Next, we determined time of stair-climbing ascent and descent, number of chair rises in 30 seconds, isokinetic quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle group strength, and self-reported knee function survey scores. Groups 3 and 2 descended stairs more quickly than group 1; group 3 displayed greater involved and noninvolved knee extensor torque per body weight than group 1 or 2 and had superior self-reported knee function scores than group 1. Patient perception of chair-rise ability at approximately 3.6 weeks post-TKA is useful in helping physical therapists determine patient readiness to safely begin stair-climbing.

  6. Timed Stair Climbing is the Single Strongest Predictor of Perioperative Complications in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sushanth; Contreras, Carlo M; Singletary, Brandon; Bradford, T Miller; Waldrop, Mary G; Mims, Andrew H; Smedley, W Andrew; Swords, Jacob A; Thomas N, Wang; Martin J, Heslin

    2016-01-01

    Background Current methods to predict patients' peri-operative morbidity utilize complex algorithms with multiple clinical variables focusing primarily on organ-specific compromise. The aim of the present study is to determine the value of a timed stair climb (SC) in predicting peri-operative complications for patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Study Design From March 2014 to July 2015, 362 patients attempted SC while being timed prior to undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Vital signs were measured before and after SC. Ninety day post-operative complications were assessed by the Accordion Severity Grading System. The prognostic value of SC was compared to the ACS NSQIP risk calculator. Results A total of 264 (97.4%) patients were able to complete SC. SC time directly correlated to changes in both mean arterial pressure and heart rate as an indicator of stress. An Accordion grade 2 or higher complication occurred in 84 (25%) patients. There were 8 mortalities (2.4%). Patients with slower SC times had an increased complication rate (P<0.0001). In multivariable analysis SC time was the single strongest predictor of complications (OR=1.029, P<0.0001), and no other clinical co-morbidity reached statistical significance. Receiver operative characteristic curves predicting post-operative morbidity by SC time was superior to that of the ACS risk calculator (AUC 0.81 vs. 0.62, P<0.0001). Additionally slower patients had a greater deviation from predicted length of hospital stay (P=0.034) Conclusions SC provides measurable stress, accurately predicts post-operative complications, and is easy to administer in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Larger patient populations with a diverse group of operations will be needed to further validate the use of SC in risk prediction models. PMID:26920993

  7. Designing ergonomic interventions for EMS workers, Part I: transporting patients down the stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Steven A; Conrad, Karen M; Reichelt, Paul A; Gacki-Smith, Jessica; Kohok, Aniruddha K

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to test ergonomic interventions aimed at reducing the magnitude of trunk muscle exertions in firefighters/paramedics (FFPs) providing emergency medical services (EMS) when transporting patients down the stairs. The interventions, developed using focus groups, were a footstrap to prevent the patient from sliding down on the backboard, a change in the handle configuration on the stairchair, and 2 devices, the "backboard wheeler" and a tank tread-like device (descent control system, DCS) for a stretcher, that change the backboard and stretcher carrying tasks into rolling and sliding tasks. Eleven two-person teams transported a 75 kg dummy with each intervention and its corresponding control condition down a flight of steps. Surface electromyographic (EMG) data were collected from 8 trunk muscles from each participant. Results showed that the backboard footstrap reduced the erector spinae (ERS) activity for the FFP in the "leader" role by 15 percent, on average. The change in handle configuration on the stairchair had no effect on the variables measured. The backboard wheeler reduced the ERS activity bilaterally in the FFP in the leader role and unilaterally for the FFP in the "follower" role, by 28 and 24 percent, respectively. The DCS reduced the 90th percentile ERS activity for both FFPs from 26 to 16 percent MVC, but increased the latissimus dorsi activity in the follower from 11 to 15 percent MVC. The DCS was the only intervention tested that resulted in a reduced rating of perceived exertion relative to the corresponding control condition. In summary, the hypotheses that the proposed interventions could reduce trunk muscle loading were supported for 3 of the 4 transport interventions tested.

  8. In vitro measurement of the restraining role of the anterior cruciate ligament during walking and stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A M; McLean, C

    2002-12-01

    The study aimed to test the hypothesis that the restraining role of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is significant during the activities of normal walking and stair ascent. The role of the ACL was determined from the effect of ACL excision on tibiofemoral displacement patterns measured in vitro for fresh-frozen knee specimens subjected to simulated knee kinetics of walking (n = 12) and stair ascent (n = 7). The knee kinetics were simulated using a newly developed dynamic simulator able to replicate the sagittal-plane knee kinetics with reasonable accuracy while ensuring unconstrained tibiofemoral kinematics. The displacements were measured using a calibrated six degree-of-freedom electromechanical goniometer. For the simulation of the walking cycle, two types of knee flexion/extension moment patterns were used: the more common "biphasic" pattern, and an extensor muscle force intensive pattern. For both of these patterns, the restraining role of the ACL to tibial anterior translation was found to be significant throughout the stance phase and in the terminal swing phase, when the knee angle was in the range of 4 degrees to 30 degrees. The effect of ACL excision was an increase in tibial anterior translation by 4 mm to 5 mm. For the stair ascent cycle, however, the restraining role of the ACL was significant only during the terminal stance phase, and not during the initial and middle segments of the phase. Although, in these segments, the knee moments were comparable to that in walking, the knee angle was in the range of 60 degrees to 70 degrees. These results have been shown to be consistent with available data on knee mechanics and ACL function measured under static loading conditions.

  9. Mechanical energy transfers across lower limb segments during stair ascent and descent in young and healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Alison C; Li, Qingguo; Yang, Shuozhi; Brouwer, Brenda

    2011-07-01

    Older adults present with altered movement patterns during stair negotiation although the extent to which modifications in pattern and speed influence mechanical efficiency is unknown. This study evaluated mechanical energy transfers attributed to active force production during stair negotiation in young and older adults to provide insight into age-related changes in mechanical efficiency. Secondary analysis on data obtained from 23 young (23.7±3.0 years) and 32 older adults (67.0±8.2 years) during self-paced stair ascent and descent was conducted. Mechanical energy expenditures (MEE) during concentric transfer, eccentric transfer and no-transfer phases were determined for the ankle, knee and hip power profiles in the sagittal plane. Mechanical energy compensations (MEC) were also determined at each joint. During ascent, MEEs were similar for young and older adults although older adults compensated ankle muscles to a lesser extent during concentric muscle action. Controlling for cadence eliminated this difference. During descent, older adults demonstrated lower energy expenditures at the ankle and hip and similar expenditures at the knee compared to young adults. Changes in joint MEE in the older group resulted in reduced energy compensation at the ankle during concentric and eccentric activity and at the knee during eccentric activity. These age-related differences in mechanical energy transfers and related adjustments in MEC were not a function of the slower cadence in older adults and suggest a loss in mechanical efficiency. These results provide a benchmark against which physical impairments in older adults may be explored.

  10. Fibonacci stairs and the Afraimovich-Pesin dimension for a stroboscopic section of a nonautonomous van der Pol oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Nadezhda I; Anishchenko, Vadim S

    2015-07-01

    Statistics of Poincaré recurrences is studied in the stroboscopic section of trajectories of a nonautonomous van der Pol oscillator in the framework of the global approach. It is shown that when the oscillator frequency and the frequency of the external force are irrationally related, the set obtained stroboscopically is equivalent to the circle map. For small values of the external amplitude, the Fibonacci stairs is constructed for the golden and silver ratios and its universal properties are confirmed. It is established that the Afraimovich-Pesin dimension for the map in the stroboscopic section is αc = 1 for Diophantine irrational rotation numbers.

  11. Optoelectronic Studies of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Solar Cells with Mesoporous TiO₂: Separation of Electronic and Chemical Charge Storage, Understanding Two Recombination Lifetimes, and the Evolution of Band Offsets during J-V Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Brian C; Barnes, Piers R F; Li, Xiaoe; Law, Chunhung; Palomares, Emilio; Marin-Beloqui, Jose M

    2015-04-22

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) cells of the design FTO/sTiO2/mpTiO2/MAPI/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au, where FTO is fluorine-doped tin oxide, sTiO2 indicates solid-TiO2, and mpTiO2 is mesoporous TiO2, are studied using transient photovoltage (TPV), differential capacitance, charge extraction, current interrupt, and chronophotoamperometry. We show that in mpTiO2/MAPI cells there are two kinds of extractable charge stored under operation: a capacitive electronic charge (∼0.2 μC/cm(2)) and another, larger charge (40 μC/cm(2)), possibly related to mobile ions. Transient photovoltage decays are strongly double exponential with two time constants that differ by a factor of ∼5, independent of bias light intensity. The fast decay (∼1 μs at 1 sun) is assigned to the predominant charge recombination pathway in the cell. We examine and reject the possibility that the fast decay is due to ferroelectric relaxation or to the bulk photovoltaic effect. Like many MAPI solar cells, the studied cells show significant J-V hysteresis. Capacitance vs open circuit voltage (V(oc)) data indicate that the hysteresis involves a change in internal potential gradients, likely a shift in band offset at the TiO2/MAPI interface. The TPV results show that the V(oc) hysteresis is not due to a change in recombination rate constant. Calculation of recombination flux at V(oc) suggests that the hysteresis is also not due to an increase in charge separation efficiency and that charge generation is not a function of applied bias. We also show that the J-V hysteresis is not a light driven effect but is caused by exposure to electrical bias, light or dark.

  12. 框架结构中楼梯的抗震设计分析%On anti-seismic design analysis of stairs in frame structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大斌; 张莉

    2012-01-01

    The paper undertakes the anti-seismic analysis of four stair forms of some frame structure, explores the changes at the stairs, the peri- od, the displacement, and the stress of the structure under the small earthquake, the middle and large earthquake, so as to provide the helpful reference for the stair design for the frame structure.%对某框架结构的四种不同楼梯形式进行了抗震分析,探讨了其在小震、中震及大震作用下楼梯及结构的周期、位移、受力等变化情况,为框架结构的楼梯设计提供了有益的参考。

  13. Astragaloside IV ameliorates renal injury in db/db mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huili; Wang, Wenjing; Han, Pengxun; Shao, Mumin; Song, Gaofeng; Du, Heng; Yi, Tiegang; Li, Shunmin

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a lethal complication of diabetes mellitus and a major type of chronic kidney disease. Dysregulation of the Akt pathway and its downstream cascades, including mTOR, NFκB, and Erk1/2, play a critical role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Astragaloside IV is a major component of Huangqi and exerts renal protection in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. The current study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of diet supplementation of AS-IV on renal injury in db/db mice, a type 2 diabetic mouse model. Results showed that administration of AS-IV reduced albuminuria, ameliorated changes in the glomerular and tubular pathology, and decreased urinary NAG, NGAL, and TGF-β1 in db/db mice. AS-IV also attenuated the diabetes-related activation of Akt/mTOR, NFκB, and Erk1/2 signaling pathways without causing any detectable hepatotoxicity. Collectively, these findings showed AS-IV to be beneficial to type 2 diabetic nephropathy, which might be associated with the inhibition of Akt/mTOR, NFκB and Erk1/2 signaling pathways.

  14. Dicty_cDB: SFK465 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available er of successful extensions: 462 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 wi...r of Hits to DB: 7,939,383 Number of extensions: 416863 Number of successful extensions: 21980 Number of sequences better

  15. Dicty_cDB: VFM414 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available extensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Nu...trix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 102105510 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHP866 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 1...845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of ...0.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfully gapped in prelim tes

  17. Dicty_cDB: SFK133 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sful extensions: 462 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gappin... DB: 7,939,383 Number of extensions: 416863 Number of successful extensions: 21980 Number of sequences better

  18. Dicty_cDB: SFK442 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Numbe...x: blastn matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better

  19. Dicty_cDB: SFK484 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better...ces: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 146 Length of

  20. Dicty_cDB: VSH547 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xtensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Num...x: blastn matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 102105510 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHL529 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better...Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query:

  2. Dicty_cDB: SFK265 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0.711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Numb...s found ****** Lambda K H 0.318 0.134 0.401 Gapped Lambda K H 0.267 0.0410 0.140 Matrix: BLOSUM62 Gap Penalt

  3. Dicty_cDB: SSL755 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available map 6245135-6357017 strain AX4, complete sequence. 36 0.082 9 CA982933 |CA982933.1 AGENCOURT_11279987 Wellc...e:XL094h21, 3' end, single read. 48 0.30 1 BE506694 |BE506694.1 db85g10.y1 Wellcome CRC pSK animal cap Xenop

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHK631 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 976...ambda K H 0.310 0.121 0.355 Gapped Lambda K H 0.267 0.0410 0.140 Matrix: BLOSUM62 Gap Penalties: Existence:

  5. Dicty_cDB: SSG859 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number...18 0.134 0.401 Gapped Lambda K H 0.267 0.0410 0.140 Matrix: BLOSUM62 Gap Penalties: Existence: 11, Extension

  6. Mesenteric resistance arteries in type 2 diabetic db/db mice undergo outward remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia M Souza-Smith

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Resistance vessel remodeling is controlled by myriad of hemodynamic and neurohormonal factors. This study characterized structural and molecular remodeling in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRAs in diabetic (db/db and control (Db/db mice. METHODS: Structural properties were assessed in isolated MRAs from 12 and 16 wk-old db/db and Db/db mice by pressure myography. Matrix regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot analysis. Mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric blood flow were measured in 12 wk-old mice by telemetry and a Doppler flow nanoprobe, respectively. RESULTS: Blood pressure was similar between groups. Lumen diameter and medial cross-sectional area were significantly increased in 16 wk-old db/db MRA compared to control, indicating outward hypertrophic remodeling. Moreover, wall stress and cross-sectional compliance were significantly larger in diabetic arteries. These remodeling indices were associated with increased expression of matrix regulatory proteins matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, MMP-12, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 in db/db arteries. Finally, superior mesenteric artery blood flow was increased by 46% in 12 wk-old db/db mice, a finding that preceded mesenteric resistance artery remodeling. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that flow-induced hemodynamic changes may supersede the local neurohormonal and metabolic milieu to culminate in hypertrophic outward remodeling of type 2 DM mesenteric resistance arteries.

  7. Mesenteric Resistance Arteries in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice Undergo Outward Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Katz, Paige S.; Trask, Aaron J.; Stewart, James A.; Lord, Kevin C.; Varner, Kurt J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resistance vessel remodeling is controlled by myriad of hemodynamic and neurohormonal factors. This study characterized structural and molecular remodeling in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRAs) in diabetic (db/db) and control (Db/db) mice. Methods Structural properties were assessed in isolated MRAs from 12 and 16 wk-old db/db and Db/db mice by pressure myography. Matrix regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot analysis. Mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric blood flow were measured in 12 wk-old mice by telemetry and a Doppler flow nanoprobe, respectively. Results Blood pressure was similar between groups. Lumen diameter and medial cross-sectional area were significantly increased in 16 wk-old db/db MRA compared to control, indicating outward hypertrophic remodeling. Moreover, wall stress and cross-sectional compliance were significantly larger in diabetic arteries. These remodeling indices were associated with increased expression of matrix regulatory proteins matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in db/db arteries. Finally, superior mesenteric artery blood flow was increased by 46% in 12 wk-old db/db mice, a finding that preceded mesenteric resistance artery remodeling. Conclusions These data suggest that flow-induced hemodynamic changes may supersede the local neurohormonal and metabolic milieu to culminate in hypertrophic outward remodeling of type 2 DM mesenteric resistance arteries. PMID:21829729

  8. Relationship between the inability to climb two flights of stairs and outcome after major non-cardiac surgery: implications for the pre-operative assessment of functional capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccard, B M

    2005-06-01

    Functional capacity is an integral component of the pre-operative evaluation of the cardiac patient for non-cardiac surgery. Stair climbing capacity has peri-operative prognostic importance. It may predict survival after lung resection and complications after major non-cardiac surgery. However, stair climbing cannot determine the aerobic metabolic capacity necessary to survive the peri-operative stress response. The potential benefits and current limitations of cardiopulmonary exercise testing to determine peri-operative aerobic capacity are discussed. Principles for the selection of an appropriate screening test of aerobic function are put forward.

  9. Effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low-back pain on trunk muscle activity during stair walking in healthy and recurrent low-back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    with recurrent mild to moderate LBP were included. All participants completed questionnaires on personal and functional status and Oswestry disability index scoring (ODI). The participants performed maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and series of 10 stair ascent and descent motor tasks, initiated...... contact and double stance) detected by the footswitch signals for both dominant and non-dominant leg in ascent and descent stair climbing. The raw EMG data were bandpass filtered (10-500 Hz), full-wave rectified, smoothed and normalized to MVC values. The mean Root-mean-Square (RMS) EMG of the 3 ascent...

  10. Long-term Tai Chi exercise increases body stability of the elderly during stair ascent under high and low illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qipeng; Zhou, Jingyi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Cui; Gu, Houxin; Mao, Dewei

    2017-09-07

    The effects of long-term Tai Chi exercise on body stability of the elderly during stair ascent under high and low illumination were investigated. Forty-five healthy elderly women were divided into three groups, namely, Tai Chi exercise group, brisk walking group and no-exercise control group. All the participants ascended a staircase, during which force platforms and a motion capture system collected the data. Under the high illumination, Tai Chi exercise participants exhibited higher loading rate and anteroposterior centre of pressure (COPap) displacement as well as a lower braking impulse than no-exercise group. Under the low illumination, Tai Chi exercise participants demonstrated higher COPap and mediolateral centre of pressure (COPml) displacements as well as lower braking and lateral impulses compared with no-exercise participants. The centre of mass (COM)ml sway in Tai Chi and no exercise participants were higher, the loading rates in Tai Chi and walking participants were higher, and the lateral impulse in no exercise participants was higher under low illumination than under high illumination. Thus, low illumination increases the risk of falling. Tai Chi participants increased their foot clearance, head inclination angle and COPap displacement under low illumination to increase their stability during stair ascent.

  11. Hip osteoarthritis: influence of work with heavy lifting, climbing stairs or ladders, or combining kneeling/squatting with heavy lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L K

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the evidence for an association between hip osteoarthritis (OA) and physical work demands. Systematic searches were made and epidemiological studies on hip OA and heavy lifting, including farming and construction work and climbing stairs, were reviewed for the period 1966-2007 inclusive. The quality of the studies was assessed and best-evidence syntheses of a causal relation between hip OA and physical demanding work have been made using specific criteria of the different degrees of evidence of causality. Limitations of the studies include few participants, use of different diagnostic criteria, and a poor description of the exposure. It is concluded that moderate to strong evidence was found for a relation between heavy lifting and hip OA. The burdens have to be at least 10-20 kg and the duration at least 10-20 years to give a clearly increased risk of hip OA. For farmers the risk of hip OA seems doubled after approximately 10 years of farming and the evidence is considered as moderate to strong. The evidence for a relation between hip OA for construction workers is limited and there is insufficient or no evidence that climbing stairs or ladders causes hip OA.

  12. Focusing and continuous separation of microparticles by insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) in stair-shaped microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Latifi, Hamid; Khashei, Hesamodin; Seresht, Mohsen Jamshidi

    2014-12-01

    Focusing and separation of microparticles in a complex mixture have had wide applications in chemistry, biology, medicine, etc. This work presents a numerical and experimental investigation on focusing and continuous separation of microparticles in a geometrically optimized arrangement of steps in the form of a staircase using insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) mechanism. First, a detailed finite element analysis was performed on important parameters in the focusing and separation of microparticles, such as geometry of stair-shaped microchannel, total voltage, and voltage difference applied to reservoirs. The optimum parameters obtained from numerical analysis were used for experimental work. Theoretically, predicted microparticle trajectories are in good agreement with experimentally observed ones. Experimental and numerical results show that the performance of focusing of microparticles enhances with growth of the total voltage (in a constant voltage difference) and decreases with voltage difference. The fabricated iDEP microchip enhances the performance of focusing and separation of microparticles due to its stair-shaped microchannel and therefore operates at low DC total applied voltages of 90-110 V.

  13. Diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy reveal different hip and ankle biomechanical strategies during stair descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja P. Picon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The progression of diabetes and the challenge of daily tasks may result in changes in biomechanical strategies. Descending stairs is a common task that patients have to deal with, however it still has not been properly studied in this population. OBJECTIVES: We describe and compare the net joint moments and kinematics of the lower limbs in diabetic individuals with and without peripheral neuropathy and healthy controls during stair descent. METHOD: Forty-two adults were assessed: control group (13, diabetic group (14, and neuropathic diabetic group (15. The flexor and extensor net moment peaks and joint angles of the hip, knee, and ankle were described and compared in terms of effect size and ANOVAs (p<0.05. RESULTS: Both diabetic groups presented greater dorsiflexion [large effect size] and a smaller hip extensor moment [large effect size] in the weight acceptance phase. In the propulsion phase, diabetics with and without neuropathy showed a greater hip flexor moment [large effect size] and smaller ankle extension [large effect size]. CONCLUSION: Diabetic patients, even without neuropathy, revealed poor eccentric control in the weight acceptance phase, and in the propulsion phase, they showed a different hip strategy, where they chose to take the leg off the ground using more flexion torque at the hip instead of using a proper ankle extension function.

  14. Cardiovascular health effects of internet-based encouragements to do daily workplace stair-walks: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars Louis; Sundstrup, Emil; Boysen, Marianne; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Persson, Roger

    2013-06-21

    Although the hazardous health effects of a sedentary lifestyle are well known, many adults struggle with regular physical activity. Simple and efficient encouragements for increased physical activity are needed. To determine the effect on cardiovascular health of email-based encouragements to do daily stair-walks at work together with colleagues among adults in sedentary occupations. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was performed at a large administrative company in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants were 160 office workers (125 women, 35 men; mean age 42 years, SD 10; sitting 89.5% of work time). At baseline, aerobic fitness was 37 mL/min/kg (SD 9), mean blood pressure was 118/79 mmHg (SD 14/9), and mean body mass index (BMI) was 23 kg/m(2) (SD 4). Participants were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to an email group receiving weekly email-based encouragements to walk the stairs for 10 minutes a day or to a control group receiving weekly reminders to continue their usual physical activities. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 10-week follow-up in aerobic fitness determined from a maximal cycle test. The examiner was blinded to group allocation. Adherence to the email encouragements was fairly high with 82.7% of the participants performing at least 3 sessions of 10-minute stair-walks per week (mean 3.3, SD 1.3). Mean heart rate reached 167 beats/min (SD 10) during stair-walks. In the intention-to-treat analysis, aerobic fitness increased 1.45 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.64-2.27) at 10-week follow-up in the email group compared with the control group. In participants with low aerobic fitness at baseline (n=56), aerobic fitness increased 1.89 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.53-3.24), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased 4.81 mmHg (95% CI 0.47-9.16) and 2.67 mmHg (95% CI 0.01-5.32), respectively, in the email group compared with the control group. Body weight decreased in the email group of those with low aerobic fitness compared with the control

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHD884 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1P3-1P8KB marine metagenome genomic clone 1061005829372 3', genomic survey...3-1P8KB marine metagenome genomic clone 1061001949010 3', genomic survey sequence. 48 0.074 1 DB745988 |DB74...1-01-2P2KB marine metagenome genomic clone 1061002566945 5', genomic survey sequence. 46 0.29 1 ER314627 |ER...314627.1 1092344130575 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-34-01-01-1P5-1P8KB marine metagenome genomic clone 1061001445481 3', genomic survey...obal-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1P3-1P8KB marine metagenome genomic clone 1061002047837 5', genomic survey s

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFL585 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP's gapped (non-prelim): 0 length of query: 130 length of database: 80,480,566 effective HSP length: 17 effective length of query...ences: 102105510 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query...: 130 Length of database: 101,790,757,118 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query: 10

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM760 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P's gapped (non-prelim): 0 length of query: 176 length of database: 80,480,566 effective HSP length: 17 effective length of query...n matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 102105510 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query...: 176 Length of database: 101,790,757,118 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query: 1

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSE362 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ter than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP'...mber of extensions: 746480 Number of successful extensions: 104742 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 L... of Hits to DB: 870 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 870 Number of successful extensions: 246 Number of sequences bet

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHI565 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available : 0 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better... than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfully gappe...772 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 121 Length of database: 95,242,211,685 Length a...of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 68,262,994 Number of extensions: 660

  20. Dicty_cDB: SSK760 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nstitute Human BAC Library) complete sequence. 46 0.48 1 BE189076 |BE189076.2 db68f12.x1 Wellcome CRC pSK eg...g Xenopus laevis cDNA clone IMAGE:3378191 3', mRNA sequence. 30 0.52 3 BI444834 |BI444834.1 daa94h07.x3 Well

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFK350 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mbda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits...**** Lambda K H 0.318 0.134 0.401 Gapped Lambda K H 0.267 0.0410 0.140 Matrix: BLOSUM62 Gap Penalties: Exi...stence: 11, Extension: 1 Number of Sequences: 3039690 Number of Hits to DB: 40,592,

  2. The influence of foot progression angle on the knee adduction moment during walking and stair climbing in pain free individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengtao; Axe, Michael J; Manal, Kurt

    2007-09-01

    The external knee adduction moment during walking and stair climbing has a characteristic double hump pattern. The magnitude of the adduction moment is associated with the development and progression of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). There is an inverse relationship between the magnitude of the second peak adduction moment and foot progression angle (FPA). Increasing FPA beyond a self-selected degree of toe-out may further reduce the magnitude of this moment for persons with knee OA. In this study, subjects with medial compartment knee OA walked and climbed stairs using their natural (i.e. self-selected) and an increased FPA (i.e. self-selected+15 degrees of additional toe-out). Increasing FPA did not change the magnitude of the first peak adduction moment but it did significantly decrease the second peak during walking. The first peak moment during stair ascent was significantly greater for the increased FPA condition, and a significant reduction was noted for the second peak. No significant differences were noted during stair descent. These results suggest that walking with a toe-out strategy may benefit persons with early stages of medial knee OA.

  3. The effects of container design and stair climbing on maximal acceptable lift weight, wrist posture, psychophysical, and physiological responses in wafer-handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H C; Wang, M J

    2001-12-01

    Despite the high level of automation in semiconductor manufacturing processes, many manual operations are still involved in the workplace. Due to inadequate human-machine interface design, stairs are frequently used to help operators perform wafer-handling tasks. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of climbing stairs and carrying wafer containers (pods) on psychophysical responses (maximal acceptable weight of lift--MAWL, and ratings of perceived exertion--RPE), physiological responses (oxygen consumption--VO2, and heart rate--HR), and wrist posture (ulnar and radial deviations). Each of 12 subjects (six males and six females) performed six sessions (3 climbing stairs x 2 pods types). The results indicate that climbing stairs had a significant influence on MAWL and VO2 (p<0.01). The type of pod effect on wrist posture was significant (p<0.01). Gender effect differences on MAWL, VO2 and wrist posture were also significant (p<0.05). Job design implications are discussed.

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05578-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available taurus cDNA 3', mRNA sequence. 44 5.0 1 ( DB873960 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm791... 4...4 5.0 1 ( DB870335 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm746... 44 5.0 ...1 ( DB865397 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm791... 44 5.0 1 ( DB861503 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter

  5. Getting started with MariaDB

    CERN Document Server

    Bartholomew, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A practical, hands-on, beginner-friendly guide to installing and using MariaDB.Getting Started with MariaDB is for anyone who wants to learn more about databases in general or MariaDB in particular. No prior database experience is required. It is assumed that you have basic knowledge of software installation, editing files with a text editor, and using the command line and terminal.

  6. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism.

  7. Knee extensor and flexor muscle power explains stair ascension time in patients with unilateral late-stage knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Anu M; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Manninen, Mikko; Heinonen, Ari; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the extent of asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor muscles, and to examine whether asymmetrical muscle deficits are associated with mobility limitations in persons with late-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional. Research laboratory. A clinical sample (N=56; age range, 50-75y) of eligible persons with late-stage knee OA awaiting knee replacement. Not applicable. Knee extensor and flexor power and torque assessed isokinetically; thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed by computed tomography; mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascension time; and pain assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. The asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor power and torque were between 18% and 29% (Pmuscle CSA, the asymmetrical deficit was 4% (Ppower deficits and weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the contralateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Moreover, weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the ipsilateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Greater knee pain in the OA joint was independently associated with slower stair ascending time in both models. The knee extensor and flexor muscle power of both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides and the pain in the OA knee were independently associated with stair ascension times. These results highlight the importance of assessing muscle power on both sides and knee pain in the prevention of mobility limitations in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CouchDB the definitive guide

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J; Slater, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Three of CouchDB's creators show you how to use this document-oriented database as a standalone application framework or with high-volume, distributed applications. With its simple model for storing, processing, and accessing data, CouchDB is ideal for web applications that handle huge amounts of loosely structured data. That alone would stretch the limits of a relational database, yet CouchDB offers an open source solution that's reliable, scales easily, and responds quickly. CouchDB works with self-contained data that has loose or ad-hoc connections. It's a model that fits many real-world

  9. Design of stair-climbing service robot%阶梯攀爬服务机器人设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李翠明; 龚俊; 杨萍; 陈剑

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at the problem of cargo handling on the low floors uninstalled the elevator ,a new kind of service robot is pro-posed ,which will be used for climbing stairs .The robot consists of steering part ,transformable wheel part ,gravity-center regulating part and underpan part .Based on CodeWarrior IDE as a robot software development platform is designed to control the robot , which is mainly composed of singlechips MC 9S12XS128.Finally,the detection system is studied emphatically .Its capability and effectiveness is tested by experiments such as climbing stairs ,traversing steps ect under the real circumstances .%为解决未安装电梯的低楼层货物搬运问题,设计了一种阶梯攀爬服务机器人样机,机器人由转向机构、变形轮、重心调节机构和底盘等组成。控制系统以飞思卡尔公司的16位单片机MC9S12XS128为控制器,以CodeWarrior IDE 软件作为机器人软件开发平台,并着重对检测系统进行研究。机器人在真实环境下进行了爬越台阶、楼梯等越障实验,验证了其越障能力和环境适应能力。

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01012-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available seq; ddbjhum22.seq; ddbjhum3.seq; ddbjhum4.seq; ddbjhum5.seq; ddbjhum6.seq; ddbjhum7.seq; ddbjhum8.seq; ddbjhum9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW....DATA/a/new_ddbjhum.seq; ddbjpri.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new...d3.seq; ddbjrod4.seq; ddbjrod5.seq; ddbjrod6.seq; ddbjrod7.seq; ddbjrod8.seq; ddbjrod9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA.../a/new_ddbjrod.seq; ddbjmam.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjmam.seq; ddbjvrt1.seq...; ddbjvrt2.seq; ddbjvrt3.seq; ddbjvrt4.seq; ddbjvrt5.seq; ddbjvrt6.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjvrt.seq;

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06177-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available jhum5.seq; ddbjhum6.seq; ddbjhum7.seq; ddbjhum8.seq; ddbjhum9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjhum.seq; ddbjp...ri1.seq; ddbjpri2.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjpri.seq; ddbjrod1.seq; ddbjrod1...rod7.seq; ddbjrod8.seq; ddbjrod9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjrod.seq; ddbjmam...1.seq; ddbjmam2.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjmam.seq; ddbjvrt1.seq; ddbjvrt2.seq; ddbjvrt3.seq; ddbjvrt4....seq; ddbjvrt5.seq; ddbjvrt6.seq; ddbjvrt7.seq; ddbjvrt8.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjvrt.seq; ddbjinv1.se

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03642-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 Cotton Lambda Zap Express Library Gossyp... 44 5.1 1 ( DB869360 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm736... 44 5.1 1 ( DB869335 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm...734... 44 5.1 1 ( DB864756 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm783... 44 5.1 1 ( DB860882 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunt...er' cDNA clone:hm736... 44 5.1 1 ( DB860855 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15580-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lone:VS... 50 0.31 1 ( DB918201 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_031_J12,... 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB918037 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_031_B19, 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB917576 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_029_M04, 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB917237 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip..._aB_028_M04, 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB914554 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_0...16_L17, 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB911920 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_003_N02, 5... 50 0.31 1 ( DB911747 ) Idiosepius

  14. 自助爬楼轮椅的稳定性分析%Stability analysis of a self-driving climbing-stair wheelchair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉兰; 吴永超; 马雍钧

    2011-01-01

    目的:分析本研究设计的自助爬楼轮椅的稳定性.方法:计算链条极限拉伸载倚,针对轮椅容易在楼梯上倾翻这一问题,从两个角度着重分析轮椅的稳定性:①分析履带的长度和宽度对轮椅在爬楼梯时重心位置变化的影响.②分析轮椅在楼梯上的受力.结果:链条的极限拉伸载荷为201.6kN.轮椅爬楼时重心位置可前后移动260mm.左右最大倾角可达32°.轮椅爬楼时沿楼梯方向最小总反力大于重力沿楼梯方向向下的分力.结论:自助爬楼轮椅设计时采用的32A型滚子链条能够满足链条的抗拉载荷要求,链条的结构稳定可靠.爬楼时重心位置可前后移动260mm,左右最大倾角可达32°,足够保汪轮椅爬楼时不发生侧翻.轮椅在楼梯上受楼梯的总反力大于重力沿楼梯向下的分力,能够保证轮椅不下滑,自助爬楼轮椅结构设计安全可靠.%Objective:To analyze the stability of a self-driving climbing-stair wheelchair designed in this study. Method: The ultimate tensile load of the chains was analyzed. For the problem of side-tumbling, the stability was analysed in two sides: (Dthe position of center of gravity of the wheelchair affected by length and width of the supporting frame was analysed. ·The friction force between the track and stair when climbing stairs was analysed.Result: The ultimate tensile load of the chains was 201.6kN.The position of center of gravity of the wheelchair could move 260mm and the tilt angle was 32°.Conclusion: Roller chain 32A can meet the requirement of tensile load, the structure of chain is reliable. The position of center of gravity of the wheelchair and the maximum tilt angle are enough to ensure the wheelchair not side-tumbling. The total force given by stairs along stairs is larger than the force of gravity down along the stairs which can ensure the stair not sliding down the stairs. The structure design of climbing-stair wheelchair is safe and reliable.

  15. Dicty_cDB: VSK261 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XXXXXXXXCCCNAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATAAAAAATAAAAA ATAAAAAAAGCAATTATTAATA sequence update 2001. 3.22 Translated Amino ...Seq.d/ 36 0.067 SSM263 (SSM263Q) /CSM/SS/SSM2-C/SSM263Q.Seq.d/ 36 0.067 own update 2003. 1.10 Homology vs DN...477258.1 603847884F1 CSEQRBN22 Gallus gallus cDNA clone ChEST839h22 5', mRNA sequence. 36 6.7 2 dna update 2... of Sequences: 3019103 Number of Hits to DB: 16,926,333 protein update 2009. 3.26 PSORT - 5' end seq. ID VSK

  16. Dicty_cDB: VSI483 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ATATAAATATATTAAAAAAAAAAXXXXXXXXXXCGNACG CG sequence update 2001. 3.22 Translated Amino Acid sequence nk*LIKY...VSI555Q) /CSM/VS/VSI5-C/VSI555Q.Seq.d/ 44 2e-04 own update 2009. 4. 4 Homology vs...8489804391 X1: 11 (21.8 bits) S2: 20 (40.1 bits) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA Project Home dna update 2009....Sequences: 3019103 Number of Hits to DB: 6,396,198 protein update 2009. 3.24 PSORT - 5' end seq. ID VSI483F

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHL120 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 0.711 1.31 Gapped Lambda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number... of Hits to DB: 484 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 484 Number of successful extensions: 10 Number... of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number... of HSP's successfully gapped in prelim test: 0 Number of HSP's that attempt...ed gapping in prelim test: 10 Number of HSP's gapped (non-prelim): 0 length of query: 133 length of database

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSI493 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 8 Number... of Sequences: 97611 Number of extensions: 8 Number of successful extensions: 5 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number... of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfully gapped in prelim test: 0 Number... of HSP's that attempted gapping in prelim test: 5 Number of HSP's gapped (non-prelim): ...logy vs DNA ***** No hits found ****** Lambda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 105743758 Number

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM786 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 4764 Number of Sequences: 97611 Number... of extensions: 4764 Number of successful extensions: 1588 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number... of HSP's better than 10.0 without gapping: 0 Number of HSP's successfully gapped in prelim test: 0 Number... of HSP's that attempted gapping in prelim test: 1588 Number of HSP's gapped (n...**** No hits found ****** Lambda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Matrix: blastn matrix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 102105510 Number

  20. Dicty_cDB: VSF561 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ambda K H 0.318 0.134 0.401 Gapped Lambda K H 0.267 0.0410 0.140 Matrix: BLOSUM62 Gap Penalties: Existence: ...vs CSM-cDNA ***** No hits found ****** Lambda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Gapped Lambda K H 1.37 0.711 1.31 Matrix: ...blastn matrix:1 -3 Gap Penalties: Existence: 5, Extension: 2 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of Sequences: 97

  1. IBM DB2 97 Advanced Administration Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Neagu, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    This cookbook has recipes written in a simple, easy to understand format, with lots of screenshots and insightful tips and hints. If you are a DB2 Database Administrator who wants to understand and get hands on with the underlying aspects of database administration, then this book is for you. This book assumes that you have a basic understanding of DB2 database concepts.

  2. Getting started with OrientDB

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoriero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial aimed at making you an OrientDB expert, through the use of practical examples, explained in a step-by-step format.Getting Started with OrientDB 1.3.0 is great for database designers, developers, and systems engineers. It is assumed that you are familiar with NoSQL concepts, Java, and networking principles.

  3. Effects of 2,000 kcal per week of walking and stair climbing on physical fitness and risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, A S; Casal, D; Jacobs, D

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that 8,368 kJ or 2000 kcal per week of moderate physical activity, including walking and stair climbing, can reduce risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The goal of this study was to assess the effects of this amount of these two activities on physical fitness and risk factors for CHD. Twenty-two healthy, slightly overweight, sedentary, normotensive, normolipemic men, age 22 to 44 years, were randomly assigned to an exercise or control group for 12 weeks followed by a 4-week washout period. The subjects then were crossed-over to the alternate group for an additional 12-week period. Exercise consisted of 5 days per week of supervised treadmill exercise plus stair climbing. Treadmill exercise consisted of walking for 45 minutes at 5.15 km per hour at 2% grade for a total of 19.3 km per week. Subjects also climbed 10 floors of stairs at a time at their own pace without prescribed target heart rates for a total of 50 floors per week. The estimated total weekly energy cost of the treadmill walking plus stair climbing was 8,368 kJ or 2,000 kcal. Mean observed heart rates were 55% and 82% of maximal heart rate during treadmill walking and stair climbing, respectively. Data from the two exercise periods and two control periods were pooled and compared by analysis of variance. Sixteen subjects completed all phases of the study. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) by the Bruce treadmill exercise protocol with metabolic gas measurements was below average for age at baseline, and was not significantly affected by 12 weeks of training. No significant changes were noted between groups in body weight or percent body fat (hydrostatic weighing), although there was a trend for loss of weight and fat with exercise training. Mean systolic blood pressure (119 mm Hg) was unchanged in both groups. However, diastolic blood pressure (72 mm Hg and 78 mm Hg for the treatment and control groups, respectively) showed an unexpected 6 mm Hg increase during the

  4. 一种星轮式爬楼梯电动轮椅设计%Design of a Star Wheel Power-Driven Stair-Climbing Wheelchair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王占礼; 孟祥雨; 陈延伟

    2012-01-01

    A three star wheels stairs-climbing electric wheelchair is designed.One of the star wheels is wheel motor.The three star wheels stairs-climbing device climbs up the obstacles,with the wheel motor driving on the ground, which realizes the organic combination of climb building and the electric wheelchair function.The Star wheel stair-climbing device is the key to it.The stair-climbing device and its walking mechanisms was designed by in梔epth study, with fully consideration of the requirements of structure,size and climb power,and security of the stair-climbing device.The results of analysis of performance of wheel chair show that stair-climbing wheel chair reaches the design requirements and has the advantages of safety, stability,simple operation and easy control.%设计了一款三星轮式爬楼梯电动轮椅,其中一个星轮为轮毂电机.采用三星轮机构实现爬楼越障,采用轮毂电机驱动轮椅平地行驶,实现了爬楼功能和电动轮椅功能的有机结合.爬升装置是爬楼梯轮椅的关键,在深入研究爬楼梯轮椅工作机理基础上,充分考虑爬楼梯轮椅爬升装置的结构和尺寸以及爬升功率、安全性等要求,在对爬升装置设计的同时还对轮椅行走环节进行了设计.经过性能分析,设计的爬楼梯轮椅达到了功能要求,并具有乘坐安全、爬楼梯稳定、控制容易以及操作简单等特点.

  5. Impaired Muscle Regeneration in Ob/ob and Db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Huong Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In obesity and type 2 diabetes, efficient skeletal muscle repair following injury may be required, not only for restoring muscle structure and function, but also for maintaining exercise capacity and insulin sensitivity. The hypothesis of this study was that muscle regeneration would be impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, which are common mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Muscle injury was produced by cardiotoxin injection, and regeneration was assessed by morphological and immunostaining techniques. Muscle regeneration was delayed in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not in a less severe model of insulin resistance – feeding a high-fat diet to wild-type mice. Angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and myoblast accumulation were also impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not the high-fat diet mice. The impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with impaired macrophage accumulation; macrophages have been shown previously to be required for efficient muscle regeneration. Impaired regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice could be due partly to the lack of leptin signaling, since leptin is expressed both in damaged muscle and in cultured muscle cells. In summary, impaired muscle regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice was associated with reduced macrophage accumulation, angiogenesis, and myoblast activity, and could have implications for insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle of obese and type 2 diabetic patients.

  6. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian A. Y. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. METHOD: A bank of movies featuring 30 boys with DMD performing functional activities was evaluated. Compensatory movements were assessed using the climbing up and going down stairs domain of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD; age in years; functional classification using the Vignos Scale (VS, and TA using a timer. Statistical analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation test. RESULTS: There is a moderate relationship between the climbing up stairs domain of the FES-DMD and age (r=0.53, p=0.004 and strong relationships with VS (r=0.72, p=0.001 and TA for this task (r=0.83, p<0.001. There were weak relationships between the going down stairs domain of the FES-DMD-going down stairs with age (r=0.40, p=0.032, VS (r=0.65, p=0.002 and TA for this task (r=0.40, p=0.034. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the evaluation of compensatory movements used when climbing up stairs can provide more relevant information about the evolution of the disease, although the activity of going down stairs should be investigated, with the aim of enriching guidance and strengthening accident prevention. Data from the FES-DMD, age, VS and TA can be used in a complementary way to formulate functional diagnoses. Longitudinal studies and with broader age groups may supplement this information.

  7. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lilian A. Y. Fernandes; Fátima A. Caromano; Assis,Silvana M. B.; Hukuda,Michele E.; Mariana C. Voos; CARVALHO, Eduardo V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA) of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). M...

  8. Hair loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SA, Stough DB, Rogers NE. Hair restoration. In: Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL, Schaffer JV, eds. Dermatology . 3rd ... Sinclair RD, El Shabrawi-Caelen L. Alopecias. In: Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL, Schaffer JV, eds. Dermatology . 3rd ...

  9. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    2014-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and video......- and abdominal muscle activity in healthy than in patients in most phases, but during descend transfer patients activity decreased. In LBP patients back extensor fatigue resulted in decreased muscular activity in the trunk muscles during stair stepping compared to healthy. Decreased duration of the motor tasks...... recording during 10 concurrent stair steps pre / post lumbar extensor muscle exhaustion. Duration of gait tasks were shorter in LBP patients generally and longer during load and shorter during transfer in descend stepping after back extensor fatigue. Back extensor fatigue resulted in higher back...

  10. Effects of an anterior ankle-foot orthosis on walking mobility in stroke patients: get up and go and stair walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung-Ling; Teng, Ya-Ling; Lou, Shu-Zon; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Fen-Fen; Yeung, Kwok-Tak

    2014-11-01

    To examine the effects of an anterior ankle-foot orthosis (AAFO) on walking mobility in stroke patients. Cross-sectional and repeated-measures study design. A university's neurologic rehabilitation department. Ambulant stroke patients (N=21). Not applicable. Walking mobility was measured by the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and the Timed Up and Down Stairs (TUDS) test. The paired t test was used to determine the difference between the mobility performances measured with and without the AAFO. There were significant differences between mobility performances with and without an AAFO in the TUG test (P=.038) and the TUDS test (P=.000). This study supports the effect of an AAFO on walking mobility in stroke patients. The findings demonstrate that stroke patients wearing an AAFO may ambulate with greater speed and safety on level surfaces and stairs. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure distribution at the stump/socket interface in transtibial amputees during walking on stairs, slope and non-flat road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Peng; Jia, Xiaohong; Suo, Shuangfu; Wang, Rencheng; Zhang, Ming

    2006-12-01

    Studies examining the stump/socket interface stresses have been restricted to unsupported stance and natural gait, i.e. walking at a comfortable speed on flat and straight walkway. However, the pressure behaviour as to the interface in unilateral transtibial amputees during walking on stairs, slope and non-flat road is unclear. Pressure distribution changes at multiple points, expressed as mean peak stump/socket interface pressure, mean pressure level over 90% of peak pressure, time in which pressure exceeded 90% of peak pressure and time-pressure integral at the period of sustained sub-maximal load, were measured during natural ambulating and walking on stairs, slope and non-flat road. Compared with natural gait, the mean peak pressure and sustained sub-maximal load increase notably over the patellar tendon during walking on stairs and non-flat road, and however decrease or change insignificantly at the patellar tendon on slope and over other measured areas in all conditions; moreover the time period of sustained sub-maximal load changes remarkably, except over the patellar tendon during walking up slope and over the popliteal area on non-flat road; finally, the time-pressure integral in the time period of sustained sub-maximal load changes considerably, except at the patellar tendon during walking up slope. The pressure characteristics during natural ambulating seem not to be highly predictive of what occurs in the conditions of walking on stairs, slope and non-flat road, which leads to significant increase in amplitude domain of tissue loading only at the patellar tendon, and however to remarkable changes in temporal sequences of tissue (un-)loading almost in all measured regions.

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01243-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available jhum7.seq; ddbjhum8.seq; ddbjhum9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjhum.seq; ddbjpri.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/n...d13.seq; ddbjrod2.seq; ddbjrod3.seq; ddbjrod4.seq; ddbjrod5.seq; ddbjrod6.seq; ddbjrod7.seq; ddbjrod8.seq; d...dbjrod9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjrod.seq; ddbjmam.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjmam.seq; ddbjvrt1.s...eq; ddbjvrt2.seq; ddbjvrt3.seq; ddbjvrt4.seq; ddbjvrt5.seq; ddbjvrt6.seq; /db/DDBJNEW....DATA/a/new_ddbjvrt.seq; ddbjinv1.seq; ddbjinv2.seq; ddbjinv3.seq; ddbjinv4.seq; ddbjinv5.seq; ddbjinv6.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14108-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available q; ddbjhum5.seq; ddbjhum6.seq; ddbjhum7.seq; ddbjhum8.seq; ddbjhum9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjhum.seq;...seq; ddbjrod7.seq; ddbjrod8.seq; ddbjrod9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjrod.seq; ddbjmam.seq; /db/DDBJNEW....DATA/a/new_ddbjmam.seq; ddbjvrt1.seq; ddbjvrt2.seq; ddbjvrt3.seq; ddbjvrt4.seq; ddbjvrt5.seq; ddbjvrt6.seq; /db/DDBJNEW....jinv4.seq; ddbjinv5.seq; ddbjinv6.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjinv.seq; ddbjpln1.seq; ddbjpln10.seq; ddbj... ddbjpln9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjpln.seq; ddbjbct1.seq; ddbjbct2.seq; ddbjbct3.seq; ddbjbct4.seq; d

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04482-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5.seq; ddbjhum6.seq; ddbjhum7.seq; ddbjhum8.seq; ddbjhum9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjhum.seq; ddbjpri1....seq; ddbjpri2.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjpri.seq; ddbjrod1.seq; ddbjrod10.se....seq; ddbjrod9.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjrod.seq; ddbjmam1.seq; ddbjmam2.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.... ddbjvrt6.seq; ddbjvrt7.seq; ddbjvrt8.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjvrt.seq; ddbjinv1.seq; ddbjinv2.seq; d...dbjinv3.seq; ddbjinv4.seq; ddbjinv5.seq; ddbjinv6.seq; ddbjinv7.seq; /db/DDBJNEW.DATA/a/new_ddbjinv.seq; ddb

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02361-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm799... 46 3.3 1 ( DB874581 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm797... 46 3.3 1 ( DB873827 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA cl...one:hm786... 46 3.3 1 ( DB870860 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm753... 46 3.3 1 ( DB870788 ...) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm752... 46 3.3 1 ( DB867028 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunt...er' cDNA clone:hm709... 46 3.3 1 ( DB865449 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA

  16. Repeated 3-minute stair climbing-descending exercise after a meal over 2 weeks increases serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol levels in people with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroto; Igaki, Makoto; Hatanaka, Yuki; Komatsu, Motoaki; Tanaka, Shin-Ichiro; Miki, Tetsuo; Matsuki, Yumika; Takaishi, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoglycemic effect of a postprandial exercise program using brief stair climbing-descending exercise in people with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects and Methods] Seven males with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes (age 68.0 ± 3.7 years) performed two sets of stair climbing-descending exercise 60 and 120 min after each meal for the first 2 weeks but not for the following 2 weeks. Each set of exercise comprised 3-min of continuous repetition of climbing briskly to the second floor followed by slow waking down to the first floor in their home. A rest period of 1–2 min was allowed between each set. [Results] Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol level was significantly higher by 11.5% at the end of the 2-week exercise period than at the baseline. By contrast, the 1,5-anhydroglucitol level at the end of the following 2-week period did not differ from the baseline value. Fasting blood glucose level and insulin resistance index at the end of the exercise period did not differ from the baseline value. [Conclusion] Repeated 3-min bouts of stair climbing-descending exercise after a meal may be a promising method for improving postprandial glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28210043

  17. Modeling, simulation and analysis of the evacuation process on stairs in a multi-floor classroom building of a primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhang; Li, Yi; Yu, Ping; Gong, Jianhua; Shen, Shen; Huang, Lin; Liang, Jianming

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have focused on the evacuation of multi-floor classroom buildings in a primary school, a process that differs from evacuations in other buildings. A stair-unit model was proposed to describe the spatial topology of twisting stairwells and to describe the spatial relationship between stairwells and floors. Based on the stair-unit model, a schedule-line model was proposed to calculate evacuation paths in stair-units; a modified algorithm to calculate pedestrian forces were proposed to describe the evacuee movements in stairwells; and a projection strategy was proposed to model the 3-dimensional evacuation process in multi-floor buildings. The simulated processes were compared with a real evacuation drill. The results showed that the simulated process achieved qualitative and quantitative consistencies with the real drill, proving the appropriateness of the proposed models and algorithms. Based on the validation, further simulations were conducted and a few rules for evacuations in stairwells were identified including rules governing the impact of the moment of entering a staircase, the number of students in a class, the stagger strategy, and the layout of grades on different floors on the time in stairwell and the total evacuation duration. The results can be used to mitigate the effects of a fire disaster, and the proposed models and algorithms can also be referenced by evacuation simulation for other multi-floor buildings such as residential buildings.

  18. Effects of mid-foot contact area ratio on lower body kinetics/kinematics in sagittal plane during stair descent in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkyu; Hong, Yoon No Gregory; Shin, Choongsoo S

    2016-07-01

    The mid-foot contact area relative to the total foot contact area can facilitate foot arch structure evaluation. A stair descent motion consistently provides initial fore-foot contact and utilizes the foot arch more actively for energy absorption. The purpose of this study was to compare ankle and knee joint angle, moment, and work in sagittal plane during stair descending between low and high Mid-Foot-Contact-Area (MFCA) ratio group. The twenty-two female subjects were tested and classified into two groups (high MFCA and low MFCA) using their static MFCA ratios. The ground reaction force (GRF) and kinematics of ankle and knee joints were measured while stair descending. During the period between initial contact and the first peak in vertical GRF (early absorption phase), ankle negative work for the low MFCA ratio group was 33% higher than that for the high MFCA ratio group (pcontact and peak dorsiflexion angle (early absorption phase+late absorption phase). The peak ankle dorsiflexion angle was smaller in the low MFCA ratio group (p<0.05). Our results suggest that strategy of energy absorption at the ankle and foot differs depending upon foot arch types classified by MFCA. The low MFCA ratio group seemed to absorb more impact energy using strain in the planar fascia during early absorption phase, whereas the high MFCA ratio group absorbed more impact energy using increased dorsiflexion during late absorption phase.

  19. Dicty_cDB: SSH704 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SS (Link to library) SSH704 (Link to dictyBase) ssh704 - - - SSH704P (Link to Original site) SSH704F 228 SSH...704Z 260 SSH704P 488 - - Show SSH704 Library SS (Link to library) Clone ID SSH704 (...Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID ssh704 NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictyc...db.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SS/SSH7-A/SSH704Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SSH704P... (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SSH704 (SSH704Q) /CSM/SS/SSH7-A/SSH704Q.Seq.d/ GGTGGTT

  20. MongoDB the definitive guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorow, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    How does MongoDB help you manage a huMONGOus amount of data collected through your web application? With this authoritative introduction, you'll learn the many advantages of using document-oriented databases, and discover why MongoDB is a reliable, high-performance system that allows for almost infinite horizontal scalability. Written by engineers from 10gen, the company that develops and supports this open source database, MongoDB: The Definitive Guide provides guidance for database developers, advanced configuration for system administrators, and an overview of the concepts and use cases f

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00805-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dult female blood fed... 44 8.2 1 ( EG594390 ) SSH-94 Common bean supression subtractive hybridi... 44 8.2 1 ( DB919135 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_034_E12, 5... 44 8.2 1 ( DB919106 ) Idiosepius paradoxu...s cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_034_D05, 5... 44 8.2 1 ( DB916651 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04578-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available clon... 42 4.6 1 ( DY887051 ) CeleSEQ2921 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (E... 42 4.6 1 ( DB919550 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_035_H22, 5... 42 4.6 1 ( DB919510 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip..._aB_035_G02, 5... 42 4.6 1 ( DB917576 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_02

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06579-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available opore... 46 0.61 1 ( BE189537 ) db66g05.x1 Wellcome CRC pSK egg Xenopus laevis cD...... 46 0.61 1 ( BE189318 ) db64a10.x1 Wellcome CRC pSK egg Xenopus laevis cD... 46 0.61 1 ( BE188809 ) db59h10.x1 Well

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U08185-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0b18, 5' end,... 44 1.7 2 ( DB870607 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm751... 38 2.0 2 ( AV995...Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm750... 38 2.1 2 ( DB868045 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' ...ratus clone R3-112B16, WO... 46 2.6 4 ( DB869433 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05180-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm791... 44 6.3 1 ( DB865465 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm791... 44 6.3 1 ( DB864300 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA cl...art li... 44 6.3 1 ( EB319027 ) CNSN01-F-008856-501 Normalized CNS library (juven... 44 6.3 1 ( DB874029 ) L

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15394-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .011 12 ( DB912555 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_006_L23, 5... 42 0.011 2 ( AU087262 ) Plasmodium...7590 ) Dictyostelium discoideum iplA gene for inositol 1... 34 0.012 5 ( DB911197 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDN...tis vinifera contig VV78X048242.8, whole genome... 52 0.016 4 ( DB918216 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:... Dictyostelium discoideum developmental protein DG... 34 0.049 5 ( DB915718 ) Idiosepius

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05475-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 46 1.3 1 ( DY594159 ) KIDNEYF042327N20 POSSUM_01-POSSUM-KIDNEY-2KB Tric... 46 1.3 1 ( DB871834 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm764... 46 1.3 1 ( DB870676 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm750... 46 1.3 1 ( DB864953 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm78..... 44 5.3 1 ( DN683050 ) CGX27-G02.x1d-t SHGC-CGX Gasterosteus aculeatus c... 44 5.3 1 ( DB874016 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter

  8. Validity of leptin receptor-deficiency (db/db) type 2 diabetes mellitus mice as a model of secondary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Le; You, Yong-Ke; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Zheng, Li-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chen, Hai-Yong; Yao, Dong; Lan, Hui-Yao; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validation of the leptin receptor-deficient mice model for secondary osteoporosis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at bone micro-architectural level. Thirty three 36-week old male mice were divided into four groups: normal control (db/m) (n = 7), leptin receptor-deficient T2DM (db/db) (n = 8), human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic normal control (crp/db/m) (n = 7), and human CRP transgenic T2DM (crp/db/db) (n = 11). Lumber vertebrae (L5) and bilateral lower limbs were scanned by micro-CT to analyze trabecular and cortical bone quality. Right femora were used for three-point bending to analyze the mechanical properties. Trabecular bone quality at L5 was better in db/db or crp/db/db group in terms of bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and separation (all p  0.05). Maximum loading and energy yield in mechanical test were similar among groups while the elastic modulus in db/db and crp/db/db significantly lower than db/m. The leptin-receptor mice is not a proper model for secondary osteoporosis associated with T2DM.

  9. Responsiveness of the domain climbing up and going down stairs of the Functional Evaluation scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Priscila S; Voos, Mariana C; Simões, Mariene S; Martini, Joyce; Monteiro, Carlos B M; Caromano, Fatima A

    2016-06-16

    To determine the responsiveness of the domain climbing up and going down stairs of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD-D3) in a one-year follow-up study. The study included 26 patients with DMD. Effect Size (ES) and Standardized Response Mean (SRM) described the scale's responsiveness. For climbing up stairs, ES showed that responsiveness was low in the three-month assessments (0.26; 0.35; 0.13; 0.17), low to moderate in the six-month assessments (0.58; 0.48; 0.33), moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.70; 0.68), and high in the 12-month assessment (0.88). SRM showed that responsiveness was low in the three-month assessments (0.29; 0.38; 0.18; and 0.19), low to moderate in the six-month assessments (0.59; 0.51; 0.36), moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.74 and 0.70), and high in the 12-month assessment (0.89). For going down stairs, ES showed that responsiveness was low in the three- and six-month assessments (0.16; 0.25; 0.09; 0.08 and 0.48; 0.35; 0.18, respectively), low to moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.59; 0.44), and moderate in the 12-month assessment (0.71). SRM showed that responsiveness was low in the three- and six-month assessments (0.25; 0.35; 0.12; 0.09 and 0.47; 0.38; 0.21, respectively), low to moderate in the nine-month assessment (0.62; 0.49), and moderate in the 12-month assessment (0.74). Climbing up stairs should be assessed at intervals of nine months or longer, when responsiveness is moderate to high. Going down stairs should be assessed annually because moderate responsiveness was observed in this period.

  10. Responsiveness of the domain climbing up and going down stairs of the Functional Evaluation scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a one-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila S. Albuquerque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the responsiveness of the domain climbing up and going down stairs of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD-D3 in a one-year follow-up study. Method: The study included 26 patients with DMD. Effect Size (ES and Standardized Response Mean (SRM described the scale’s responsiveness. Results: For climbing up stairs, ES showed that responsiveness was low in the three-month assessments (0.26; 0.35; 0.13; 0.17, low to moderate in the six-month assessments (0.58; 0.48; 0.33, moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.70; 0.68, and high in the 12-month assessment (0.88. SRM showed that responsiveness was low in the three-month assessments (0.29; 0.38; 0.18; and 0.19, low to moderate in the six-month assessments (0.59; 0.51; 0.36, moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.74 and 0.70, and high in the 12-month assessment (0.89. For going down stairs, ES showed that responsiveness was low in the three- and six-month assessments (0.16; 0.25; 0.09; 0.08 and 0.48; 0.35; 0.18, respectively, low to moderate in the nine-month assessments (0.59; 0.44, and moderate in the 12-month assessment (0.71. SRM showed that responsiveness was low in the three- and six-month assessments (0.25; 0.35; 0.12; 0.09 and 0.47; 0.38; 0.21, respectively, low to moderate in the nine-month assessment (0.62; 0.49, and moderate in the 12-month assessment (0.74. Conclusion: Climbing up stairs should be assessed at intervals of nine months or longer, when responsiveness is moderate to high. Going down stairs should be assessed annually because moderate responsiveness was observed in this period.

  11. High-Order Sliding Mode-Based Synchronous Control of a Novel Stair-Climbing Wheelchair Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanxiu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the attitude control of a novel stair-climbing wheelchair with inertial uncertainties and external disturbance torques, a new synchronous control method is proposed via combing high-order sliding mode control techniques with cross-coupling techniques. For this purpose, a proper controller is designed, which can improve the performance of the system under conditions of uncertainties and torque perturbations and also can guarantee the synchronization of the system. Firstly, a robust high-order sliding mode control law is designed to track the desired position trajectories effectively. Secondly, considering the coordination of the multiple joints, a high-order sliding mode synchronization controller is designed to reduce the synchronization errors and tracking errors based on the controller designed previously. Stability of the closed-loop system is proved by Lyapunov theory. The simulation is performed by MATLAB to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller. By comparing the simulation results of two controllers, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has better performance and stronger robustness.

  12. Extension of the clomiphene citrate stair-step protocol to gonadotropin treatment in women with clomiphene resistant polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Eran; Levran, David; Weissman, Ariel

    2017-04-28

    Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of direct initiation of gonadotropin ovarian stimulation without prior withdrawal bleeding in anovulatory clomiphene citrate (CC) resistant polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) patients. Eighteen PCOS patients underwent ovulation induction with CC using a stair-step regimen. Patients who failed to respond to the maximal dose of CC initiated gonadotropin stimulation without inducing withdrawal bleeding, using the chronic low dose regimen. The primary outcome measure was the time to ovulation from the beginning of CC treatment until the day of ovulatory trigger. This was compared with the time to ovulation calculated according to the traditional approach, which includes inducing progesterone withdrawal bleeding between each CC dose increment and before gonadotropin therapy. The time to ovulation in the study group was 67.0 ± 6.8 days. The estimated time to ovulation according to the traditional approach was approximately 110 days. The clinical pregnancy rate was 44% (8/18), and all pregnancies were singletons. One patient miscarried; hence the live birth rate was 38.9% (7/18). Direct initiation of gonadotropin therapy without prior induction of withdrawal bleeding in clomiphene resistant PCOS patients results in considerable reduction of the time to ovulation and is both safe and efficacious.

  13. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lilian A Y; Caromano, Fátima A; Assis, Silvana M B; Hukuda, Michele E; Voos, Mariana C; Carvalho, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA) of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A bank of movies featuring 30 boys with DMD performing functional activities was evaluated. Compensatory movements were assessed using the climbing up and going down stairs domain of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD); age in years; functional classification using the Vignos Scale (VS), and TA using a timer. Statistical analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation test. There is a moderate relationship between the climbing up stairs domain of the FES-DMD and age (r=0.53, p=0.004) and strong relationships with VS (r=0.72, p=0.001) and TA for this task (r=0.83, pstairs domain of the FES-DMD-going down stairs with age (r=0.40, p=0.032), VS (r=0.65, p=0.002) and TA for this task (r=0.40, p=0.034). These findings indicate that the evaluation of compensatory movements used when climbing up stairs can provide more relevant information about the evolution of the disease, although the activity of going down stairs should be investigated, with the aim of enriching guidance and strengthening accident prevention. Data from the FES-DMD, age, VS and TA can be used in a complementary way to formulate functional diagnoses. Longitudinal studies and with broader age groups may supplement this information.

  14. 多遇地震作用下板式楼梯与框架共同工作性能研究%Research on the collaborate performance of board type stairs and frame in frequent earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张然; 张新培; 田志鹏

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two five layers of reinforced concrete frame models of excluding stair and containing two type stair are established to do the frequent earthquake effect of elastic time history analysis according to the limitation of recent researchs, then we discuss the effect of the frame force resulted from the collaborate of board type stairs and frame, including the seismic response in each part of board type stairs. The conclusion shows that the frame force changes largely in the parts directly linking to board type stairs,the force in the beams, pillars and boards of the stairs increases obviously comparing with their static force, pull and pressure force of the stair board become larger.%针对目前地震作用下板式楼梯框架地震反应研究不足的现状,本文建立了不含楼梯和含两个板式楼梯的两个5层钢筋混凝土框架模型,并进行了多遇地震作用下的弹性时程分析,讨论了板式楼梯与框架共同工作时对框架梁柱内力的影响以及楼梯各构件的地震反应,结果表明,直接与楼梯构件连接的框架梁柱的内力受到较大影响,楼梯梁、梯柱以及梯板的内力绝对值相比静力计算的值有明显增大,梯板存在较大拉压力.

  15. The Research Applications of db/db Mouse%db/db小鼠的实验室应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴静; 王华旻; 李晶; 门秀丽

    2013-01-01

    The db/db mice are perfect animal models of type 2 diabetes which have been widely used. The phenotypes of severe obesity, hyperphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria are due to a spontaneous mutation of the leptin receptor ( Lepr) . The course of the disease is markedly influenced by genetic background, which is more serious in the C57BLKS/J background. And there are many other spontaneous mutations in different sites of Lepr, which produce a series of animal models of obesity, including db / db mice, db /db mice, dbpas/dbpas mice, Zucker fa/fa rats, and Koletsky fa/fa rats, etc. These rodents appear similar hyperphagia and severe obesity, but different levels of blood glucose, kidney damage and reproductive ability, providing profuse material to investigate the complex function of Lepr. Here we review the history of the discovery of the leptin signaling pathway, the abnormal phenotypes of db/db mice in metabolic, reproductive, immune, etc. Discuss their research applications, reproductive strategy , genotyping guideline, the phenotypic diversity of those animal models with Lepr spontaneous mutation and their mutation patterns, respectively.%db/db小鼠为广泛应用的2型糖尿病动物模型,由瘦素受体(leptin receptor,Lepr)的自发性突变引起极度肥胖、多食、消渴、多尿.其表型的严重程度受基因背景的影响,在C57BLKS/J背景下更严重.Lepr还在其它多个位点发生自发性突变,产生一系列肥胖动物,包括db3J/db3J小鼠、db5J/db5J小鼠、dbpas/dbpas小鼠、Zucker fa/fa大鼠和Koletsky fak/fak大鼠等.这些啮齿动物在食欲旺盛和严重肥胖方面表型相似,但在血糖、肾脏损伤及生殖能力等方面的表型不尽相同,为探讨Lepr的复杂功能提供了丰富的素材.本文将就瘦素信号通路的发现史,db/db小鼠在代谢、生殖、免疫等方面的异常表型,其实验室应用、繁殖与鉴定策略,其它自发性突变动物的表型差异及对应的Lepr突变模式等进行较全面的综述.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15437-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F-SAU3A-T3-M-P18.AB1 Blood stage Plasmodium ... 40 0.002 2 ( DB919709 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_...* SEQUENCI... 34 0.071 2 ( DB918224 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_031_K12, 5... 36 0.071 2 ( CV28

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09423-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o rerio genomic clone DKEY-124M2, genomic sur... 54 0.006 1 ( DB920051 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip..._aB_036_P20, 5... 54 0.006 1 ( DB919413 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_035_B18, 5... 54 0.006 1 (

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15891-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OSSUM_01-POSSUM-LIVER-2KB Tricho... 54 1e-21 7 ( DB919968 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_036_M01, ...84 6e-19 4 ( EY099278 ) CAZI24167.fwd CAZI Artemisia annua normalized lea... 50 8e-19 4 ( DB920027 ) Idiosepius

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14706-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 76 e-130 1 ( DB913693 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_014_D11, 5... 58 7e-17 3 ( CX081125 ) EHAAC72...4 Sea urchin larva cDNA library MPM... 64 7e-09 2 ( DB919037 ) Idiosepius paradox

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16123-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in gene, partial cds. 36 1.2 4 ( BV482695 ) rnq67c08.b1 Clint Pan troglodytes verus STS genom... 38 1.2 3 ( DB913696 ) Idiosepius....7 3 ( AY191013 ) Dictyostelium discoideum autophagy protein 6 (apg... 40 2.9 2 ( DB911467 ) Idiosepius para

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12325-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing_GS-30-02-01-1... 52 0.055 1 ( DY887210 ) CeleSEQ3135 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (E... 42 0.14 2 ( DB911478 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_002_H13, 5... 38 0.17 2 ( DB911959 ) Idiosepius

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15567-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DN100954 ) 1000348 MARC 4PIG Sus scrofa cDNA 5', mRNA sequence. 46 6.9 1 ( DB919136 ) Idiosepius paradoxus ...cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_034_E13, 5... 46 6.9 1 ( DB918741 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA,

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11897-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icus DNA, BAC clone: RNB1-279A02, 3'... 46 3.3 1 ( DB916884 ) Idiosepius paradoxu...s cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_027_L18, 5... 46 3.3 1 ( DB916498 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_026_I23, 5...

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06765-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 50 0.059 1 ( DC199146 ) Plasmodium berghei cDNA clone:LV009447, liver sta... 50 0.059 1 ( DB917901 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_030_L13, 5... 50 0.059 1 ( DB912130 ) Idiosepius

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09769-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Bluescript (... 50 0.13 1 ( DB874496 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm796... 50 0.13 1 ( DB86...2401 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm759... 50 0.13 1 ( AC175917

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16371-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6 0.64 2 ( BJ690967 ) Ptyochromis sp. 'redtail sheller' cDNA clone:no60... 46 0.64 2 ( DB871470 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...( DB867711 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:hm717... 46 1.0 2 ( AC145267 ) Mus musculus BAC clo

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03911-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12ST096_338113 Tall fescue, Festuca arun... 44 6e-08 4 ( DB872213 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter...' cDNA clone:hm769... 56 6e-08 2 ( DB866234 ) Lipochromis sp. 'matumbi hunter' cDNA clone:

  8. Improved insulin sensitivity and islet function after PPARdelta activation in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Wulff, Erik Max; Olsen, Grith Skytte; Sauerberg, Per; Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Ahrén, Bo

    2010-01-25

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. Several reports have shown that PPARdelta is involved in lipid metabolism, increasing fat oxidation and depleting lipid accumulation. Whether PPARdelta is involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism is not completely understood. In this study, we examined effects of long-term PPARdelta activation on glycemic control, islet function and insulin sensitivity in diabetic db/db mice. Male db/db mice were administered orally once daily with a selective and partial PPARdelta agonist (NNC 61-5920, 30 mg/kg) for eight weeks; control mice received vehicle. Fasting and non-fasting plasma glucose were reduced, reflected in reduced hemoglobinA(1c) (3.6+/-1.6% vs. 5.4+/-1.8 in db/db controls, Pdiabetic db/db mice. This suggests that activation of PPARdelta improves glucose metabolism and may therefore potentially be target for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Acarbose Accelerates Wound Healing via Akt/eNOS Signaling in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory wound is a dreaded complication of diabetes and is highly correlated with EPC dysfunction caused by hyperglycemia. Acarbose is a widely used oral glucose-lowering drug exclusively for T2DM. Previous studies have suggested the beneficial effect of acarbose on improving endothelial dysfunction in patients with T2DM. However, no data have been reported on the beneficial efficacy of acarbose in wound healing impairment caused by diabetes. We herein investigated whether acarbose could improve wound healing in T2DM db/db mice and the possible mechanisms involved. Acarbose hastened wound healing and enhanced angiogenesis, accompanied by increased circulating EPC number in db/db mice. In vitro, a reversed BM-EPC dysfunction was observed after the administration of acarbose in db/db mice, as reflected by tube formation assay. In addition, a significantly increased NO production was also witnessed in BM-EPCs from acarbose treated db/db mice, with decreased O2 levels. Akt inhibitor could abolish the beneficial effect of acarbose on high glucose induced EPC dysfunction in vitro, accompanied by reduced eNOS activation. Acarbose displayed potential effect in promoting wound healing and improving angiogenesis in T2DM mice, which was possibly related to the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  10. C57BL/KsJ-db/db-ApcMin/+ Mice Exhibit an Increased Incidence of Intestinal Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Hirose

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The numbers of obese people and diabetic patients are ever increasing. Obesity and diabetes are high-risk conditions for chronic diseases, including certain types of cancer, such as colorectal cancer (CRC. The aim of this study was to develop a novel animal model in order to clarify the pathobiology of CRC development in obese and diabetic patients. We developed an animal model of obesity and colorectal cancer by breeding the C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db mouse, an animal model of obesity and type II diabetes, and the C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ (Min/+ mouse, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis. At 15 weeks of age, the N9 backcross generation of C57BL/KsJ-db/db-ApcMin/+ (db/db-Min/+ mice developed an increased incidence and multiplicity of adenomas in the intestinal tract when compared to the db/m-Min/+ and m/m-Min/+ mice. Blood biochemical profile showed significant increases in insulin (8.3-fold to 11.7-fold, cholesterol (1.2-fold to 1.7-fold, and triglyceride (1.2-fold to 1.3-fold in the db/db-Min/+ mice, when compared to those of the db/m-Min/+ and m/m-Min/+ mice. Increases (1.4-fold to 2.6-fold in RNA levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, IRF-1R, and IGF-2 were also observed in the db/db-Min/+ mice. These results suggested that the IGFs, as well as hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia, promoted adenoma formation in the db/db-Min/+ mice. Our results thus suggested that the db/db-Min/+ mice should be invaluable for studies on the pathogenesis of CRC in obese and diabetes patients and the therapy and prevention of CRC in these patients.

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16254-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 222 3e-60 2 ( DB911423 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_002_E22, 5... 109 3e-60 4 ( EB681956 ) KP1...-59 5 ( DY333092 ) OB_MEa0009D11.r OB_MEa Ocimum basilicum cDNA clon... 139 4e-59 6 ( DB919840 ) Idiosepius ...8 3 ( AF351199 ) Dictyostelium sphaerocephalum 18S ribosomal RNA g... 214 7e-58 2 ( DB912577 ) Idiosepius pa...167 8e-57 5 ( DB915267 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_018_N03, 5... 115... tabacum vacuolar H+-ATPase B subunit mR... 88 2e-54 8 ( DB915413 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_0

  12. Zinc Prevents the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients. Zinc is an important essential trace metal, whose deficiency is associated with various chronic ailments, including vascular diseases. We assessed T2DM B6.BKS(D-Leprdb/J (db/db mice fed for six months on a normal diet containing three zinc levels (deficient, adequate, and supplemented, to explore the role of zinc in DCM development and progression. Cardiac function, reflected by ejection fraction, was significantly decreased, along with increased left ventricle mass and heart weight to tibial length ratio, in db/db mice. As a molecular cardiac hypertrophy marker, atrial natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly increased. Cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy were accompanied by significantly increased fibrotic (elevated collagen accumulation as well as transforming growth factor β and connective tissue growth factor levels and inflammatory (enhanced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, caspase recruitment domain family member 9, and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in the heart. All these diabetic effects were exacerbated by zinc deficiency, and not affected by zinc supplementation, respectively. Mechanistically, oxidative stress and damage, mirrored by the accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, was significantly increased along with significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidants (NQO-1 and catalase. This was also exacerbated by zinc deficiency in the db/db mouse heart. These results suggested that zinc deficiency promotes the development and progression of DCM in T2DM db/db mice. The exacerbated effects by zinc deficiency on the heart of db/db mice may be related to further suppression of Nrf2 expression and function.

  13. Legal-Ease:The JV Is Back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RICHARD; HOFFMANN

    2007-01-01

    Joint ventures (JVs) wer e the fir st business entity openedto for eigners and for a long time have been an unpopu-lar veh i c le for interna tional investors looking to Chinafor lower production costs or for market access. Yet recently, we noticed more

  14. Large JV Chemical Plant Kicks Off

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jie

    2002-01-01

    @@ Construction of one of the largest petrochemical joint venture projects in the country - and BP's largest project in China - kicked off in the Shanghai Chemical Industrial Park in late-March, 2002.

  15. Legal-Ease The JV Is Back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RICHARD; HOFFMANN

    2007-01-01

    With the upsurge in foreign investors wanting to set up joint ventures (JVs) in China, we examine the points to consider when taking this investment route. Registered capitalhow much is enough? So how much do you have to pay? Under the new Company Law,

  16. Translating the Dutch Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires into German and assessing their concurrent validity with VAS measures of pain and activities in daily living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Roberto SGM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires are three validated instruments to measure physical activity and limitations in daily living in patients with lower extremity disorders living at home of which no German equivalents are available. Our scope was to translate the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires into German and to verify its concurrent validity in the two domains pain and activities in daily living by comparing them with the corresponding measures on the Visual Analogue Scale. Methods We translated the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires according to published guidelines. Demographic data and validity were assessed in 52 consecutive patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the lower extremity. Information on age, duration of symptoms, type of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 and type of initiating event were obtained. We assessed the concurrent validity in the two domains pain and activities in daily living by comparing them with the corresponding measures on the Visual Analogue Scale. Results We found that variability in the German Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires was largely explained by measures of pain and activities in daily living on the Visual Analogue Scale. Conclusion Our study shows that the domains pain and activities in daily living are properly represented in the German versions of the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Raising and Sitting Questionnaires. We would like to propagate their use in clinical practice and research alike.

  17. Hip joint contact forces in normal subjects and subjects with total hip prostheses: walking and stair and ramp negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, B W; Nicol, A C

    2002-02-01

    To calculate the hip joint contact force in normal subjects and subjects with total hip replacements. An observational study of age matched normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements. Hip joint contact forces have been calculated using musculo-skeletal models and measured in vivo using instrumented hip prostheses. There are few examples of studies performed on subjects in the 40-60 year age range. This study characterises the forces in both normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements for these 'young' subjects. Motion analysis and force plate data were used as input to a three-dimensional model of the leg. Five male and six female normal subjects and five male subjects with hip prostheses were studied. Each subject was observed walking and negotiating stairs and a ramp. Hip joint contact forces in both thigh and pelvic-based co-ordinate systems are presented. Subjects cadence, speed and stride length are given. In general subjects with hip replacements exhibited lower hip joint contact forces than age matched normal subjects. It is suggested that this was the results of the lower speeds, stride lengths and cadences adopted by the subjects with hip replacements. The characterisation of hip joint contact forces provides essential information for prosthetic joint design and testing. The comparison of hip joint contact forces in normal subjects with those in subjects with prosthetic joints provides evidence of, not only actual use of joints, but also of possible levels of force that might be applied to hip prostheses if subjects returned to normal use.

  18. Ginsenoside Rb1 ameliorates liver fat accumulation by upregulating perilipin expression in adipose tissue of db/db obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xizhong Yu

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: G-Rb1 may improve insulin sensitivity in obese and diabetic db/db mice by reducing hepatic fat accumulation and suppressing adipocyte lipolysis; these effects may be mediated via the upregulation of perilipin expression in adipocytes.

  19. Protective effects of astragaloside IV on db/db mice with diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhi Ding

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a common diabetic eye disease which is well-known as the result of microvascular retinal changes. Although the potential biological functions of astragaloside IV (AS IV have long been described in traditional system of medicine, its protective effect on DR remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the function and mechanism of AS IV on type 2 diabetic db/db mice.Db/db mice were treated with AS IV (4.5 mg/kg or 9 mg/kg or physiological saline by oral gavage for 20 weeks along with db/m mice. In each group, retinal ganglion cell (RGC function was measured by pattern electroretinogram (ERG and apoptosis was determined by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. Blood and retina aldose reductase (AR activity were quantified by chemiluminescence analysis. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, NF-κB were determined by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of related downstream proteins were quantified by Label-based Mouse Antibody Array.Administration of AS IV significantly improved the amplitude in pattern ERG and reduced the apoptosis of RGCs.in db/db mice. Furthermore, downregulation of AR activity, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, NF-κB and related cytokine were observed in AS IV treatment group.Our study indicated that AS IV, as an inhibitor of AR, could prevent the activation of ERK1/2 phosporylation and NF-kB and further relieve the RGCs disfunction in db/db mice with DR. It has provided a basis for investigating the clinical efficacy of AR inhibitors in preventing DR.

  20. DBA2J db/db mice are susceptible to early albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis that correlate with systemic insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Pinto, Vanda; Stevenson, Kirsty; Worm, Jesper; Fink, Lisbeth N; Coward, Richard J M

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of kidney failure in the world. To understand important mechanisms underlying this condition, and to develop new therapies, good animal models are required. In mouse models of type 1 diabetes, the DBA/2J strain has been shown to be more susceptible to develop kidney disease than other common strains. We hypothesized this would also be the case in type 2 diabetes. We studied db/db and wild-type (wt) DBA/2J mice and compared these with the db/db BLKS/J mouse, which is currently the most widely used type 2 DN model. Mice were analyzed from age 6 to 12 wk for systemic insulin resistance, albuminuria, and glomerular histopathological and ultrastructural changes. Body weight and nonfasted blood glucose were increased by 8 wk in both genders, while systemic insulin resistance commenced by 6 wk in female and 8 wk in male db/db DBA/2J mice. The urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was closely linked to systemic insulin resistance in both sexes and was increased ~50-fold by 12 wk of age in the db/db DBA/2J cohort. Glomerulosclerosis, foot process effacement, and glomerular basement membrane thickening were observed at 12 wk of age in db/db DBA/2J mice. Compared with db/db BLKS/J mice, db/db DBA/2J mice had significantly increased levels of urinary ACR, but similar glomerular histopathological and ultrastructural changes. The db/db DBA/2J mouse is a robust model of early-stage albuminuric DN, and its levels of albuminuria correlate closely with systemic insulin resistance. This mouse model will be helpful in defining early mechanisms of DN and ultimately the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Getting started with LevelDB

    CERN Document Server

    Dent, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The book is a concise guide for using LevelDB. It explains database concepts and the use of C++, ranging from the basics all the way to high level topics in an easy to follow, step-by-step format.The book is meant for developers who want an embedded database for their applications. Experienced programmers can pick up on the sophisticated data mapping patterns and tuning tips.Getting Started with LevelDB requires a minimal background in programming in C++ or Objective-C for OS/X or iOS and familiarity with XCode. Therefore it teaches enough C++ to use LevelDB without presuming any C++ knowledge

  2. Effects of phlorizin on vascular complications in diabetes db/db mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Lin; YOU Bei-an; GAO Hai-qing; LI Bao-ying; YU Fei; PEI Fei

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic macrovascular complications are important causes of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and also one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).Phlorizin has been reported to be effective in reducing the blood glucose level in diabetic mellitus,while little is known about its effects on vascular complications.This study aimed to observe the effects of phlorizin on the aorta of diabetes db/db mice and explore its mechanism.Methods Diabetic db/db mice (n=16) and age-matched db/m mice (n=8) were divided into three groups:normal control group (CC group,db/m mice,n=8),untreated diabetic group (DM group,db/db mice,n=8) and diabetic group treated by phlorizin (DMT group,db/db mice,n=8).Phlorizin (20 mg/kg body weight) was given in normal saline solution intragastrically for 10 weeks.Animals were weighed weekly.At the 10th weekend,all mice were fasted overnight and then sacrificed.Fasting blood was collected,and the aortas were dissected.The blood samples were analyzed for fasting blood glucose (FBG),serum advanced glycation end products (AGEs),malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity,the aortic ultrastructure was studied.Results The weight and serum concentration of FBG,AGEs,and MDA in the DM group were higher than that in the CC group (P <0.01 ),and they were significantly lower in the DMT group (P <0.05).Serum SOD activity was lower than that in the CC group (P <0.01),and it is significantly higher in the DMT group (P <0.05).The severity of aorta damage in the DMT group was less than that in the DM group.Conclusions Phlorizin protected the db/db mice from diabetic macrovascular complications,attributed to the decreasing of blood glucose and AGEs level,and its antioxidant potential.This study may provide a new natural medicine for treating diabetic macrovascular complications.

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04683-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 ( DN523042 ) 1266489 MARC 7BOV Bos taurus cDNA 3', mRNA sequence. 46 1.9 1 ( DB916246 ) Idiosepius... paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_025_M24, 5... 46 1.9 1 ( DB916080 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDN...A, clone:Ip_aB_025_F18, 5... 46 1.9 1 ( DB916077 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_025_F15, 5... 46 1

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14844-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available um falciparum strain 3D7, chromosome 9; s... 44 0.012 9 ( DB911747 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_...003_E09, 5... 44 0.012 2 ( DB911920 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_003_N02, 5... 44 0.012 2 ( AC11... ) BB170019A20F12.5 Bee Brain Normalized/Subtracted ... 34 0.013 3 ( DB918201 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, c

  5. 楼梯对钢框架结构整体抗震影响的研究%Study on Impact of Stairs on Earthquake-resistant Performances of Steel Frames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾树华; 张俊峰

    2013-01-01

      楼梯作为结构的一种支撑,对结构的整体性能有着重要影响。以实际工程为背景,采用ETABS软件建立了考虑楼梯构件和不考虑楼梯构件两个钢框架模型,分析了在地震作用下楼梯构件对钢框架结构整体受力性能的影响。计算结果表明,楼梯构件作为一种支撑,具有较大的刚度,对结构的周期、振型、层剪力和层间位移都有很大的影响,必须合理布置楼梯,分析中应考虑其影响,设计中应加强重视。%The stairs ,as a support of the structure ,have an important impact on the overall performance of a structure . Here ,taking a project as background ,two steel frame models of considering the stair component or not are set up based on ETABS software ,and the impact of the stair component on the integral forced performance of steel frames is analyzed under seismic action .The results show that the stair component as a support has greater stiffness .It has a significant im-pact on the period ,mode ,floor shear ,and inter story drift of the structure .The stair arrangement must be reasonable . The impact of the stairs should be considered in analysis ,and should be more emphasised on design .

  6. Robot-Assisted End-Effector-Based Stair Climbing for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing: Feasibility, Reliability, and Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurological impairments can limit the implementation of conventional cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and cardiovascular training strategies. A promising approach to provoke cardiovascular stress while facilitating task-specific exercise in people with disabilities is feedback-controlled robot-assisted end-effector-based stair climbing (RASC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and repeatability of augmented RASC-based CPET in able-bodied subjects, with a view towards future research and applications in neurologically impaired populations. Methods Twenty able-bodied subjects performed a familiarisation session and 2 consecutive incremental CPETs using augmented RASC. Outcome measures focussed on standard cardiopulmonary performance parameters and on accuracy of work rate tracking (RMSEP−root mean square error). Criteria for feasibility were cardiopulmonary responsiveness and technical implementation. Relative and absolute test-retest reliability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation (CoV) were estimated to assess repeatability. Results All criteria for feasibility were achieved. Mean V′O2peak was 106±9% of predicted V′O2max and mean HRpeak was 99±3% of predicted HRmax. 95% of the subjects achieved at least 1 criterion for V′O2max, and the detection of the sub-maximal ventilatory thresholds was successful (ventilatory anaerobic threshold 100%, respiratory compensation point 90% of the subjects). Excellent reliability was found for peak cardiopulmonary outcome measures (ICC ≥ 0.890, SEM ≤ 0.60%, MDC ≤ 1.67%). Repeatability for the primary outcomes was good (CoV ≤ 0.12). Conclusions RASC-based CPET with feedback-guided exercise intensity demonstrated comparable or higher peak cardiopulmonary performance variables relative to

  7. Robot-Assisted End-Effector-Based Stair Climbing for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing: Feasibility, Reliability, and Repeatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Stoller

    Full Text Available Neurological impairments can limit the implementation of conventional cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and cardiovascular training strategies. A promising approach to provoke cardiovascular stress while facilitating task-specific exercise in people with disabilities is feedback-controlled robot-assisted end-effector-based stair climbing (RASC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and repeatability of augmented RASC-based CPET in able-bodied subjects, with a view towards future research and applications in neurologically impaired populations.Twenty able-bodied subjects performed a familiarisation session and 2 consecutive incremental CPETs using augmented RASC. Outcome measures focussed on standard cardiopulmonary performance parameters and on accuracy of work rate tracking (RMSEP-root mean square error. Criteria for feasibility were cardiopulmonary responsiveness and technical implementation. Relative and absolute test-retest reliability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, standard error of the measurement (SEM, and minimal detectable change (MDC. Mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation (CoV were estimated to assess repeatability.All criteria for feasibility were achieved. Mean V'O2peak was 106±9% of predicted V'O2max and mean HRpeak was 99±3% of predicted HRmax. 95% of the subjects achieved at least 1 criterion for V'O2max, and the detection of the sub-maximal ventilatory thresholds was successful (ventilatory anaerobic threshold 100%, respiratory compensation point 90% of the subjects. Excellent reliability was found for peak cardiopulmonary outcome measures (ICC ≥ 0.890, SEM ≤ 0.60%, MDC ≤ 1.67%. Repeatability for the primary outcomes was good (CoV ≤ 0.12.RASC-based CPET with feedback-guided exercise intensity demonstrated comparable or higher peak cardiopulmonary performance variables relative to predicted values, achieved the criteria for V'O2

  8. Robot-Assisted End-Effector-Based Stair Climbing for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing: Feasibility, Reliability, and Repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Neurological impairments can limit the implementation of conventional cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and cardiovascular training strategies. A promising approach to provoke cardiovascular stress while facilitating task-specific exercise in people with disabilities is feedback-controlled robot-assisted end-effector-based stair climbing (RASC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and repeatability of augmented RASC-based CPET in able-bodied subjects, with a view towards future research and applications in neurologically impaired populations. Twenty able-bodied subjects performed a familiarisation session and 2 consecutive incremental CPETs using augmented RASC. Outcome measures focussed on standard cardiopulmonary performance parameters and on accuracy of work rate tracking (RMSEP-root mean square error). Criteria for feasibility were cardiopulmonary responsiveness and technical implementation. Relative and absolute test-retest reliability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation (CoV) were estimated to assess repeatability. All criteria for feasibility were achieved. Mean V'O2peak was 106±9% of predicted V'O2max and mean HRpeak was 99±3% of predicted HRmax. 95% of the subjects achieved at least 1 criterion for V'O2max, and the detection of the sub-maximal ventilatory thresholds was successful (ventilatory anaerobic threshold 100%, respiratory compensation point 90% of the subjects). Excellent reliability was found for peak cardiopulmonary outcome measures (ICC ≥ 0.890, SEM ≤ 0.60%, MDC ≤ 1.67%). Repeatability for the primary outcomes was good (CoV ≤ 0.12). RASC-based CPET with feedback-guided exercise intensity demonstrated comparable or higher peak cardiopulmonary performance variables relative to predicted values, achieved the criteria for V'O2max

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16002-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:dds19d18, 5' ... 38 3.3 2 ( DB916077 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:..., 5' e... 46 3.6 2 ( EL906265 ) INIT2_11_B01.b1_A006 G5 trophont cDNA (INIT2) Ich... 46 3.6 2 ( DB916080 ) Idiosepius...tage Plasmodi... 42 4.3 3 ( EK576016 ) 1095521191381 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-32-01-01-1... 32 4.3 2 ( DB916246 ) Idiosepius...aculeatus ... 46 6.6 1 ( DN720777 ) CNB135-F10.x1d-t SHGC-CNB Gasterosteus aculeatus ... 46 6.6 1 ( DB915443 ) Idiosepius

  10. Effect of curcumin supplementation on blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose homeostasis related enzyme activities in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kwon-Il; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Yeo, Jiyoung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of curcumin on insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice and their age-matched lean non-diabetic db/+ mice. Both db/+ and db/db mice were fed with or without curcumin (0.02%, wt/wt) for 6 wks. Curcumin significantly lowered blood glucose and HbA 1c levels, and it suppressed body weight loss in db/db mice. Curcumin improved homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, and elevated the plasma insulin level in db/db mice. Hepatic glucokinase activity was significantly higher in the curcumin-supplemented db/db group than in the db/db group, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activities were significantly lower. In db/db mice, curcumin significantly lowered the hepatic activities of fatty acid synthase, beta-oxidation, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase, and acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase. Curcumin significantly lowered plasma free fatty acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations and increased the hepatic glycogen and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase in db/db mice. Curcumin normalized erythrocyte and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, gluthathione peroxidase) in db/db mice that resulted in a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation. However, curcumin showed no effect on the blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose regulating enzyme activities in db/+ mice. These results suggest that curcumin seemed to be a potential glucose-lowering agent and antioxidant in type 2 diabetic db/db mice, but had no affect in non-diabetic db/+ mice.

  11. Knee osteoarthritis: influence of work involving heavy lifting, kneeling, climbing stairs or ladders, or kneeling/squatting combined with heavy lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L K

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the evidence for an association between knee osteoarthritis (kneeOA) and physical work demands. Systematic searches were made, and epidemiological studies on kneeOA and heavy lifting, kneeling and climbing stairs published in 1966 to 2007 inclusive were reviewed. The quality of the studies was assessed and an overall evaluation of the degree of evidence of a causal relationship between kneeOA and physically demanding work was made, using specific criteria of the different degrees of evidence of causality. Limitations of the studies include few participants, use of different diagnostic criteria and a poor description of the exposure. It is concluded that moderate evidence was found for a relationship between kneeling, heavy lifting and kneeOA. For the combination of kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting the association seemed stronger than for kneeling/squatting or heavy lifting alone, but only a few studies were found concerning this relationship. Therefore the degree of evidence for a causal relationship was considered to be moderate. In the studies on the association between kneeOA and climbing stairs or ladders, there was an increased risk for kneeOA, but only a few studies were found and no dose-response relationship has been investigated. The evidence of a causal relationship is therefore considered to be limited.

  12. Measuring activity limitations in climbing stairs: development of a hierarchical scale for patients with lower-extremity disorders living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roorda, Leo D; Roebroeck, Marij E; van Tilburg, Theo; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Bouter, Lex M

    2004-06-01

    To develop a hierarchical scale that measures activity limitations in climbing stairs in patients with lower-extremity disorders living at home. Cross-sectional study with Mokken scale analysis of 15 dichotomous items. Outpatient clinics of secondary and tertiary care centers. Patients (N=759; mean age +/- standard deviation, 59.8+/-15.0y; 48% men) living at home, with different lower-extremity disorders: stroke, poliomyelitis, osteoarthritis, amputation, complex regional pain syndrome type I, and diabetic foot problems. Not applicable. (1) Fit of the monotone homogeneity model, indicating whether items can be used for measuring patients; (2) fit of the double monotonicity model, indicating invariant (hierarchical) item ordering; (3) intratest reliability, indicating repeatability of the sum score; and (4) differential item functioning, addressing the validity of comparisons between subgroups of patients. There was (1) good fit of the monotone homogeneity model (coefficient H=.50) for all items for all patients, and for subgroups defined by age, gender, and diagnosis; (2) good fit of the double monotonicity model (coefficient H(T)=.58); (3) good intratest reliability (coefficient rho=.90); and (4) no differential item functioning with respect to age and gender, but differential item functioning for 4 items in amputees compared with nonamputees. A hierarchical scale, with excellent scaling characteristics, has been developed for measuring activity limitations in climbing stairs in patients with lower-extremity disorders who live at home. However, measurements should be interpreted with caution when comparisons are made between patients with and without amputation.

  13. Canted antiferromagnetism in KNi3[PO3(F,OH)]2[PO2(OH)2]F2 with a stair-case Kagomé lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Chen; Ren, Wei-Jian; Huang, Ya-Xi; Pan, Yuanming; Mi, Jin-Xiao

    2017-10-01

    A new nickel phosphate KNi3[PO3(F,OH)]2[PO2(OH)2]F2 has been synthesized using a modified hydrothermal method. Structural characterizations show that it adopts a 3D framework structure with 2D layers of Ni octahedra in a stair-case Kagomé lattice. The Ni2 octahedron at the inversion center shares two trans-faces with Ni1 octahedra to form a linear trimer (Ni3O8F6) as the basic structural unit. The Ni-trimers are linked between themselves by sharing F-corners and to [PO3(F,OH)] tetrahedral groups by sharing O-corners to form 2D stair-case Kagomé layers, which are parallel to the (100) plane and are stacked along the a-axis. Successive Kagomé layers are combined together by [PO2(OH)2] tetrahedral groups and interstice cations K+. Magnetic measurements reveal that KNi3[PO3(F,OH)]2[PO2(OH)2]F2 exhibits a canted antiferromagnetic ordering with a ferromagnetic component at low temperatures.

  14. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate...... metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism....

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16170-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e R3-4012K8, WO... 44 0.31 5 ( DB915479 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_019_H19, 5... 44 0.32 2 ( B...lone: QflA-12636, 5' e... 44 0.34 2 ( DB915181 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_018_I21, 5... 44 0.3

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03772-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( AM437561 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X271076.15, whole genom... 38 0.011 4 ( DB917492 ) Idiosepius parado...11 5 ( DB917153 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_028_I04, 5... 40 0.011 2...EQUENCING IN PROGRESS... 38 0.010 6 ( AL356014 ) Arabidopsis thaliana DNA chromosome 3, BAC clone ... 44 0.0

  17. The db/db mouse, a model for diabetic dyslipidemia: molecular characterization and effects of Western diet feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K; Forte, T M; Taniguchi, S; Ishida, B Y; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2000-01-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia is a major factor contributing to the accelerated atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although several mouse models are available, the plasma lipoproteins in response to diet have not been fully characterized in these animals. In this study, we have characterized the plasma lipoproteins and related apolipoproteins, as well as the vascular lipases, in diabetes (db/db) mice and their nondiabetic controls (+/?) in the C57BL/KsJ strain. Within 6 weeks of age, db/db mice developed significant obesity, fasting hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia. By FPLC analysis, db/db mice showed a prominent peak in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) range that was absent in +/? mice, although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was the predominant species in both groups of animals. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in db/db mice was 28% of the level in +/? mice. Upon feeding a human-like 0.15% (wt/wt) cholesterol and 21% (wt/wt) fat "Western" diet, db/db mice developed elevated plasma cholesterol, accompanied by an exaggerated apolipoprotein E (apoE) response compared with +/? mice. FPLC analysis showed that the marked hypercholesterolemic response in db/db mice was the result of a massive increase in the LDL region, which overshadowed a moderate increase in HDL. We next isolated lipoproteins by ultracentrifugation and characterized them by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. With regular chow, db/db mice had almost exclusively small dense LDL with a peak size at 21.4 nm, as compared with 26.6 nm in nondiabetic controls. On the Western diet, the small dense LDLs persisted but larger particles also appeared in db/db mice, whereas the size distribution in +/? mice was unchanged by the diet. Our results suggest that db/db mice fed a Western diet have a plasma lipoprotein phenotype that shows some similarities to that in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and that db/db mice are a useful model to study the pathogenesis and treatment of

  18. Systemic immune modulation induced by alcoholic beverage intake in obese-diabetes (db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Jang, Ik-Soon; Park, Junsoo; Kim, Seol-Hee; Baek, So-Young; Go, Sung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Alcohol over-consumption is generally immunosuppressive. In this study, the effects of single or repetitive alcohol administration on the systemic immunity of db/db mice were observed to clarify the possible mechanisms for the increased susceptibility of obese individuals to alcohol-related immunological health problems. Alcohol (as a form of commercially available 20% distilled-alcoholic beverage) was orally administered one-time or seven times over 2 weeks to db/db mice and normal C57BL/6J mice. Immunologic alterations were analyzed by observation of body weight and animal activity, along with proportional changes of splenocytes for natural killer cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. Modulation of plasma cytokine level and immune-related genes were also ascertained by micro-bead assay and a microarray method, respectively. The immune micro-environment of db/db mice was an inflammatory state and adaptive cellular immunity was significantly suppressed. Low-dose alcohol administration reversed the immune response, decreasing inflammatory responses and the increment of adaptive immunity mainly related to CD4(+) T cells, but not CD8(+) T cells, to normal background levels. Systemic immune modulation due to alcohol administration in the obese-diabetic mouse model may be useful in the understanding of the induction mechanism, which will aid the development of therapeutics for related secondary diseases.

  19. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  20. Trepp = Stair / Eve Arpo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arpo, Eve

    2006-01-01

    Rakvere Vallimäe trepist. Laste vestlus trepil. Projekt: Kavakava. Autorid: Heidi Urb, Siiri Vallner. Trepi valem: Taavi Vallner. Insener: Marika Stokkeby. Projekt 2004, valmis 2005. Ill.: joonis, 7 värv. fotot

  1. Lepr(db/db Mice with senescence marker protein-30 knockout (Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- exhibit increases in small dense-LDL and severe fatty liver despite being fed a standard diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Kondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30 is a 34 kDa protein originally identified in rat liver that shows decreased levels with age. Several functional studies using SMP30 knockout (Smp30(Y/- mice established that SMP30 functions as an antioxidant and protects against apoptosis. To address the potential role of SMP30 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD pathogenesis, we established Smp30(Y/- mice on a Lepr(db/db background (Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice. RESEARCH DESIGN/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice were fed a standard diet (340 kcal/100 g, fat 5.6% for 16 weeks whereupon the lipid/lipoprotein profiles, hepatic expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were analyzed by HPLC, quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Changes in the liver at a histological level were also investigated. The amount of SMP30 mRNA and protein in livers was decreased in Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/+ mice compared with Lepr(db/+Smp30(Y/+ mice. Compared with Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/+ mice, 24 week old Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice showed: i increased small dense LDL-cho and decreased HDL-cho levels; ii fatty liver accompanied by numerous inflammatory cells and increased oxidative stress; iii decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation (PPARα and lipoprotein uptake (LDLR and VLDLR but increased CD36 levels; and iv increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. CONCLUSION: Our data strongly suggest that SMP30 is closely associated with NAFLD pathogenesis, and might be a possible therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  2. 水平地震力作用下框架结构中楼梯的内力分析%Analysis of the stress of stairs in frame structure with under horizontal earthquake action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘木禾; 张超

    2016-01-01

    SAP2000 software was used to build the model of concrete frame structure with monolithic cast-in-site stairs,and the modal analysis was carried out in order to analyze the stress distribution of the stairs. The analysis results show that stress concentration occurs on area of the platform boards around stair shaft,the beams on both sides of gang-boards,and four angular points of gang-boards in different direction under hor-izontal earthquake action. The effect of stairs on frame structure should be allowed for when conducting seismic design.%利用SAP2000软件,建立了带有现浇整体式楼梯的混凝土框架结构模型,并对模型进行了振型分解法计算,分析了楼梯的内力分布情况,分析结果表明:在双向水平地震力作用下,梯井附近的平台板、梯板两侧连梁的位置以及梯板的四个角点附近在不同方向上会发生明显的应力集中,因此,楼梯对框架结构的影响在结构设计中不应忽略。

  3. Full-thickness splinted skin wound healing models in db/db and heterozygous mice: implications for wound healing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Ae; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Covert, Jill; Dubielzig, Richard R; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; Schurr, Michael; Abbott, Nicholas L; McAnulty, Jonathan; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The excisional dorsal full-thickness skin wound model with or without splinting is widely utilized in wound healing studies using diabetic or normal mice. However, the effects of splinting on dermal wound healing have not been fully characterized, and there are limited data on the direct comparison of wound parameters in the splinted model between diabetic and normal mice. We compared full-thickness excisional dermal wound healing in db/db and heterozygous mice by investigating the effects of splinting, semi-occlusive dressing, and poly(ethylene glycol) treatment. Two 8-mm full-thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in db/db and heterozygous mice. Body weights, splint maintenance, wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, wound bed collagen deposition, and inflammation were compared between groups. Our results show that silicone splint application effectively reduced wound contraction in heterozygous and db/db mice. Splinted wounds, as opposed to nonsplinted wounds, exhibited no significant differences in wound closure between heterozygous and db/db mice. Finally, polyethylene glycol and the noncontact dressing had no significant effect on wound healing in heterozygous or db/db mice. We believe these findings will help investigators in selection of the appropriate wound model and data interpretation with fully defined parameters.

  4. IBM DB2 97 Advanced Application Developer Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saraswatipura, Mohankumar

    2012-01-01

    This cookbook has recipes written in a simple, easy to understand format with lots of screenshots and insightful tips and hints. If you are an IBM DB2 application developer who would like to exploit advanced features provided by DB2 to design and implement high quality applications, then this book is for you. This book assumes you have a basic understanding of the DB2 application development.

  5. The Application of the Transactions Control in DB2 with DB Query Analyzer%DB Query Analyzer中的事务管理在DB2中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马根峰

    2011-01-01

    事务控制是数据库应用系统中的关键技术之一,概述了事务控制的概念以及《DB Query Analyzer》中的事务控制,以一个具体的实例,给出了《DB Query Analyzer》中的事务控制在DB2中的使用方法.

  6. lexiDB:a scalable corpus database management system

    OpenAIRE

    Coole, Matt; Rayson, Paul Edward; Mariani, John Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    lexiDB is a scalable corpus database management system designed to fulfill corpus linguistics retrieval queries on multi-billion-word multiply-annotated corpora. It is based on a distributed architecture that allows the system to scale out to support ever larger text collections. This paper presents an overview of the architecture behind lexiDB as well as a demonstration of its functionality. We present lexiDB's performance metrics based on the AWS (Amazon Web Services) infrastructure with tw...

  7. 一种爬楼梯轮椅的运动分析%Kinematic Analysis of A New Kind of Stair-climbing Wheelchair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李占贤; 巩喜然

    2014-01-01

    提出了一种新型的兼具有担架功能的爬楼梯轮椅。简述了轮椅的结构,对该机构进行运动学建模,并对爬楼梯过程的腿部进行了运动分析。经建模分析验证了其机构的正确性及合理性。%This paper puts forward a new kind of wheelchair which can climb stair and transform into a stretcher .The paper briefly describes the structure of the wheelchair ,and gives the kinematic analysis of the leg motion .Through the modeling analysis ,we have proved its correctness and rationality .

  8. Effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low-back pain on trunk muscle activity during stair walking in healthy and recurrent low-back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the trunk muscle activity in healthy and recurrent low back pain (R-LBP) patients with no present pain during stair ascent and descent before and after unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain (LBP). Methods Twenty-five healthy controls and 25 pain-free R-LBP patients...... in m. rectus abdominis during all phases, with larger decrease during bilateral compared with unilateral pain (Ppain in the back muscles (P....04). Conclusions The impact of unilateral and bilateral experimental LBP on trunk muscle activity was different between healthy participants and R-LBP patients. Pain resulted in increased trunk muscle activity in healthy, while R-LBP patients decreased the back and increased the abdominal muscle activity. However...

  9. RavenDB 2.x beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tannir, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, example-driven Beginner's Guide format, there are plenty of step-by-step instructions and examples that are designed to help you get started with RavenDB. If you are a .NET developer, new to document-oriented databases, and you wish to learn how to build applications using NoSQL databases, then this book is for you. Experience with relational database systems will be helpful, but not necessary.

  10. Toward a clinical definition of early osteoarthritis: onset of patient-reported knee pain begins on stairs. Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Dube, Bright; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Tennant, Alan; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of osteoarthritis (OA) would increase the chances of effective intervention. We aimed to investigate which patient-reported activity is first associated with knee pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur first during activities requiring weight bearing and knee bending. Data were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a multicenter, longitudinal prospective observational cohort of people who have or are at high risk of OA. Participants completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; Likert scale) annually for up to 7 years. Rasch analysis was used to rank the WOMAC pain questions (activities) in order of affirmation as the pain score increased from 0. For each total WOMAC score category (0-20) we selected 25 individuals at random based on their maximum score across all visits. Fit to the Rasch model was assessed in this subset; stability of question ranking over successive visits was confirmed in the full OAI. WOMAC data on 4,673 people were included, with 491 selected for subset analysis. The subset data showed good fit to the Rasch model (χ(2) = 43.31, P = 0.332). In the full OAI, the "using stairs" question was the first to score points as the total pain score increased from 0 (baseline logit score ± 95% confidence interval -4.74 ± 0.07), then "walking" (-2.94 ± 0.07), "standing" (-2.65 ± 0.07), "lying/sitting" (-2.00 ± 0.08), and finally "in bed" (-1.32 ± 0.09). This ordering was consistent over successive visits. Knee pain is most likely to first appear during weight-bearing activities involving bending of the knee, such as using stairs. First appearance of this symptom may identify a group suitable for early intervention strategies. © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya, E-mail: jyli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Nan, Fa-Jun, E-mail: fjnan@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Li, Jia, E-mail: jli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  12. Bile acid sequestration reduces plasma glucose levels in db/db mice by increasing its metabolic clearance rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxi Meissner

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Bile acid sequestrants (BAS reduce plasma glucose levels in type II diabetics and in murine models of diabetes but the mechanism herein is unknown. We hypothesized that sequestrant-induced changes in hepatic glucose metabolism would underlie reduced plasma glucose levels. Therefore, in vivo glucose metabolism was assessed in db/db mice on and off BAS using tracer methodology. METHODS: Lean and diabetic db/db mice were treated with 2% (wt/wt in diet Colesevelam HCl (BAS for 2 weeks. Parameters of in vivo glucose metabolism were assessed by infusing [U-(13C]-glucose, [2-(13C]-glycerol, [1-(2H]-galactose and paracetamol for 6 hours, followed by mass isotopologue distribution analysis, and related to metabolic parameters as well as gene expression patterns. RESULTS: Compared to lean mice, db/db mice displayed an almost 3-fold lower metabolic clearance rate of glucose (p = 0.0001, a ∼300% increased glucokinase flux (p = 0.001 and a ∼200% increased total hepatic glucose production rate (p = 0.0002. BAS treatment increased glucose metabolic clearance rate by ∼37% but had no effects on glucokinase flux nor total hepatic or endogenous glucose production. Strikingly, BAS-treated db/db mice displayed reduced long-chain acylcarnitine content in skeletal muscle (p = 0.0317 but not in liver (p = 0.189. Unexpectedly, BAS treatment increased hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression 2-fold in lean mice (p = 0.030 and 3-fold in db/db mice (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: BAS induced plasma glucose lowering in db/db mice by increasing metabolic clearance rate of glucose in peripheral tissues, which coincided with decreased skeletal muscle long-chain acylcarnitine content.

  13. Probucol inhibited Nox2 expression and attenuated podocyte injury in type 2 diabetic nephropathy of db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangyu; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ping; Li, Detian

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of probucol on the progression of diabetic nephropathy and the underlying mechanism in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Eight weeks db/db mice were treated with regular diet or probucol-containing diet (1%) for 12 weeks. Non-diabetic db/m mice were used as controls. We examined body weight, blood glucose, and urinary albumin. At 20 weeks, experimental mice were sacrificed and their blood and kidneys were extracted for the analysis of blood chemistry, kidney histology, oxidative stress marker, and podocyte marker. As a result, 24 h urinary albumin excretions were reduced after probucol treatment. There were improvements of extracellular matrix accumulation and fibronectin and collagen IV deposition in glomeruli in the probucol-treated db/db mice. The reduction of nephrin and the loss of podocytes were effectively prevented by probucol in db/db mice. Furthermore, probucol significantly decreased the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), an index of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and down-regulated the expression of Nox2. Taken together, our findings support that probucol may have the potential to protect against type 2 diabetic nephropathy via amelioration of podocyte injury and reduction of oxidative stress.

  14. Comparison of gene expression changes induced by biguanides in db/db mice liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heishi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Koji; Ichihara, Junji; Ishikawa, Hironori; Kawamura, Takao; Kanaoka, Masaharu; Taiji, Mutsuo; Kimura, Toru

    2008-08-01

    Large-scale clinical studies have shown that the biguanide drug metformin, widely used for type 2 diabetes, to be very safe. By contrast, another biguanide, phenformin, has been withdrawn from major markets because of a high incidence of serious adverse effects. The difference in mode of action between the two biguanides remains unclear. To gain insight into the different modes of action of the two drugs, we performed global gene expression profiling using the livers of obese diabetic db/db mice after a single administration of phenformin or metformin at levels sufficient to cause a significant reduction in blood glucose level. Metformin induced modest expression changes, including G6pc in the liver as previously reported. By contrast, phenformin caused changes in expression level of many additional genes. We used a knowledge-based bioinformatic analysis to study the effects of phenformin. Differentially expressed genes identified in this study constitute a large gene network, which may be related to cell death, inflammation or wound response. Our results suggest that the two biguanides show a similar hypoglycemic effect in db/db mice, but phenformin induces a greater stress on the liver even a short time after a single administration. These findings provide a novel insight into the cause of the relatively high occurrence of serious adverse effect after phenformin treatment.

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04669-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 ( DB758584 ) Apis mellifera head cDNA, RIKEN full-length enric... 42 7.7 1 ( CU624043 ) Theobroma cacao, ...mRNA sequence (KZ0ABE13YJ12FM1). 42 7.7 1 ( CU591562 ) Theobroma cacao, mRNA sequ

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04158-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .9 1 ( DB911979 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_005_A09, 5... 44 8.9 1 ( CO418025 ) Mdfrt3032m24.y1.... 44 8.9 1 ( DN419404 ) LIB4215-059-R1-K1-H6 LIB4215 Canis lupus familiar... 44 8

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02962-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m gastrula/neurula pCMVS... 44 2.2 1 ( FF450896 ) G178P60133RE10.T0 Acorn worm gastrula/neurula pCM... 44 2....2 1 ( DB913305 ) Idiosepius paradoxus cDNA, clone:Ip_aB_013_B17, 5... 40 4.4 2 (

  18. Carnosine enhances diabetic wound healing in the db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansurudeen, Ishrath; Sunkari, Vivekananda Gupta; Grünler, Jacob; Peters, Verena; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Brismar, Kerstin; Forsberg, Elisabete Alcantara

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a progressive disorder with severe late complications. Normal wound healing involves a series of complex and well-orchestrated molecular events dictated by multiple factors. In diabetes, wound healing is grossly impaired due to defective, and dysregulated cellular and molecular events at all phases of wound healing resulting in chronic wounds that fail to heal. Carnosine, a dipeptide of alanine and histidine and an endogenous antioxidant is documented to accelerate healing of wounds and ulcers. However, not much is known about its role in wound healing in diabetes. Therefore, we studied the effect of carnosine in wound healing in db/db mice, a mice model of Type 2 DM. Six millimeter circular wounds were made in db/db mice and analyzed for wound healing every other day. Carnosine (100 mg/kg) was injected (I.P.) every day and also applied locally. Treatment with carnosine enhanced wound healing significantly, and wound tissue analysis showed increased expression of growth factors and cytokines genes involved in wound healing. In vitro studies with human dermal fibroblasts and microvascular-endothelial cells showed that carnosine increases cell viability in presence of high glucose. These effects, in addition to its known role as an antioxidant and a precursor for histamine synthesis, provide evidence for a possible therapeutic use of carnosine in diabetic wound healing.

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01479-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1_A034 Shoot tip pitch canker susce... 50 0.19 1 ( DB880069 ) Populus nigra mRNA,...19 1 ( BZ114256 ) CH230-255O15.TV CHORI-230 Segment 2 Rattus norveg... 50 0.19 1 ( DR016697 ) STRS1_11_D08.g

  20. Comparing MongoDB to SQL Server, Replicated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Azizi

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractParker et al [1] studied the performance difference between MongoDB and Microsoft SQL Server on basis of a number of insert, update and select scenarios. As the result of their study, they conclude that MongoDB has got a better performance when it comes to insert, update and simple

  1. PRISMA/DB: A Parallel Main-Memory Relational DBMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apers, Peter M.G.; Flokstra, Jan; van den Berg, Carel A.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Wilschut, A.N.; Kersten, Martin L.; van den Berg, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    PRISMA/DB, a full-fledged parallel, main memory relational database management system (DBMS) is described. PRISMA/DB's high performance is obtained by the use of parallelism for query processing and main memory storage of the entire database. A flexible architecture for experimenting with functional

  2. Klaim-DB: A Modeling Language for Distributed Database Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xi; Li, Ximeng; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto;

    2015-01-01

    We present the modelling language, Klaim-DB, for distributed database applications. Klaim-DB borrows the distributed nets of the coordination language Klaim but essentially re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases, and provides high-level language abstractions for the access and manip...

  3. Comparing MongoDB to SQL Server, Replicated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azizi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Parker et al [1] studied the performance difference between MongoDB and Microsoft SQL Server on basis of a number of insert, update and select scenarios. As the result of their study, they conclude that MongoDB has got a better performance when it comes to insert, update and simple queries. However,

  4. Database design and SQL for DB2

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, James

    2013-01-01

    Thorough and updated coverage of database design and SQL for DB2 are the focus of this guide for the relational database-management system used on IBM i computer systems. Suitable for classroom instruction or self-study, this book explains the most widely used database language and the way that language is implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Topics covered include database concepts, SQL inquiries, web applications, and database security, and the material is reinforced by numerous illustrations, examples, and exercises.

  5. Swietenia mahagony extract shows agonistic activity to PPARγ and gives ameliorative effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-dan LI; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG; Jun-hua CHEN; Qing CHEN; Guo-wei LI; Jing CHEN; Jian-min YUE; Min-li CHEN; Xiao-ping WANG; Jian-hua SHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To search the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists from Swietenia mahagony extract (SmE) and observe the possible ameliorative effects of SmE on diabetic db/db mice. Methods: The PPARγ agonistic activity of SmE was screened by yeast-two hybrid system. The blood glucose levels of diabetic db/db mice were measured using a blood glucose level monitor and the data were statistically analyzed by NDST8.8W software. Results: By using the clinical drug rosiglitazone as a positive control, it was found that the PPARγ agonistic activity of SmE at a concentration of 50 μg/L was approximately half that of 35.7 μg/L (0.1 μmol/L) of rosiglitazone. At the dose of 1000 mg/kg, SmE remark ably decreased the blood glucose concentration of db/db mice from (15.26±2.98) to (7.58±2.20) mmol/L, and reduced the blood glucose levels by 55.49% compared with the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: SmE shows agonistic activity to PPARγ and can ameliorate the blood glucose levels of diabetic db/db mice. SmE may be thus used as a potential agent for diabetes therapy.

  6. Neuronal histamine decreases fat accumulation and up-regulates UCP family in db/db obese mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To examine anti-obesity and-diabetic effects of neuronal histamine especially in leptin resistant states, we investigated the effects of chronic central treatment with histamine on lipid, glucose and energy metabolism of db/db obese mice, which are genetically leptin receptor mutated mice. Chronic centrally treatment with histamine (0.05 μmol*g-1 body weight*d-1 for 7 days) decreased body weight, food intake in db/db obese mice, and decreased body fat weight, serum concentration of glucose compared with pair-fed db/db obese mice. Neuronal histamine also suppressed ob mRNA in the white adipose tissue (WAT), serum leptin and increased UCPs mRNA expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and in WAT compared with pair-fed controls. These above effects of the histamine were attenuated in these mice with combination of targeted disruption of the histamine H1 receptor gene. In conclusion, neuronal histamine can regulate body fat deposition, serum glucose, leptin, BAT and WAT UCPs expression even in leptin insensitive db/db obese mice.

  7. 框架结构楼梯抗震解决方案及性能分析%Seismic resistance solving scheme and performance analysis of stairs of frame structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安永利

    2014-01-01

    Applying structural analysis software SAP2000,the paper analyzes seismic resistance performance four kinds of frame structures inclu-ding no possessing stairs,possessing stairs,setting sliding bearing and half-platform,and understands various solving schemes features and de-sign matters,with a view to provide some guidance.%利用结构分析软件SAP2000,对目前框架结构中楼梯的抗震解决方案按无楼梯、有楼梯、设滑动支座和半平台脱开主框架四种方式的抗震性能进行了分析,了解了不同解决方案的特点及设计注意的事项,以供参考。

  8. Diabetes (db/db mutation-induced endometrial epithelial lipoapoptosis: Ultrastructural and cytochemical analysis of reproductive tract atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garris David R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diabetes (db/db mutation in C57BL/KsJ mice promotes a progressive cytolipidemia within the endometrial epithelial (EE layer of the female reproductive tract which results in premature cellular and organ atrophy. The current studies focus on the ultrastructural and cytochemical changes which promote nuclear apoptosis and cytostructural disruption following the expression of endometrial hypercytolipidemia which promotes diabetes-associated organoinvolution and manifest infertility. Methods Control (normal:+/+ and diabetes (db/db genotype groups were prepared for high resolution light microscopic analysis of cytolipidemia and nuclear apoptosis (TUNEL-labeled 3'-DNA fragmentation indices and compared to the transmission electron (TEM microscopic analysis of endometrial tissue samples collected from 8–16 week-old groups. Results Compared to controls, db/db mutation expression induced a dramatic increase in EE cytolipid vacuole volume and density within the epithelial endometrial layer. TEM analysis revealed that cytolipid vacuole accumulations initially aggregated at the baso-polar regions of UEE cells in response to the systemic hyperglycemic/hypertriglyceridemic conditions which characterized the (db/db groups. Progressive cytoplasmic movement of the lipid pools into perinuclear compartments of affected EE cells induced nuclear isolation from organelles that were displaced towards peripheral cytoplasmic compartments. Cytochemical analysis of lipid vacuole accumulations indicated attraction towards, and incorporation within, the nuclear envelope of hyperlipidemic cells. Co-localization of nuclear apoptotic 3'-DNA fragments within identified hyperlipidemic EE cells was coincident with the cytochemical and ultrastructural identification of lipid penetration through the nuclear envelope in db/db mutants. Conclusion These results are the first cytochemical indication that the metabolic disturbances in db/db mutants which

  9. The Influence of the Steel Stairs Under the Seismic Performance Analysis of Steel Frame Structure%地震作用下钢楼梯对钢框架结构抗震性能影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高乐; 焦培培; 刘玲华

    2016-01-01

    随着钢结构在现代建筑的广泛应用,人们往往忽略了地震作用下钢结构楼梯在钢框架结构体系中的影响。为了探究钢楼梯对钢框架结构抗震性能的影响,本文利用大型有限元分析软件ETABS建立计算模型,选择主要的控制参数结构周期、位移角、底层剪力和楼梯受力作为研究对象。计算分析表明,钢结构楼梯对整体钢框架结构提供了一定的刚度,在地震作用下,应将钢楼梯的“释放效应”理念应用到未来钢结构抗震设计概念中,以此达到抗震性能设计要求。%As the steel structure is widely used in modern tall buildings, we are usually likely to neglect the influence of steel stairs on the aseismatic performance of steel structure. In or-der to detect the influence, this paper has set up a calculation model by ETABS, a mass finite element analysis software, and compared the force of stairs with some main control parameters such as structure period, displacement, angle and bottom shear. The results of analysis show that steel stairs have certain help to the stiffness of steel structure. Under the effect of earth-quakes, the resistance concept of steel stairs should be trans-formed into release effect concept which will be applied into the steel construction of future buildings to meet the need of aseis-matic performance.

  10. Stairs climbing test with pulse oximetry as predictor of early postoperative complications in functionally impaired patients with lung cancer and elective lung surgery: prospective trial of consecutive series of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Igor; Majerić-Kogler, Visnja; Plavec, Davor; Maloca, Ivana; Slobodnjak, Zoran

    2008-02-01

    To test the predictive value of stairs climbing test for the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)stairs climbing with pulse oximetry before the operation with the number of steps climbed and the time to complete the test recorded. Oxygen saturation and pulse rate were measured every 20 steps. Data on postoperative complications including oxygen use, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and early postoperative mortality were collected. Eighty-seven of 101 patients (86%) had at least one postoperative complication. The type of surgery was significantly associated with postoperative complications (25.5% patients with lobectomy had no early postoperative complications), while age, gender, smoking status, postoperative oxygenation, and artificial ventilation were not. There were more postoperative complications in more extensive and serious types of surgery (Pstairs climbing test produced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (-1%) and increase in pulse rate (by 10/min) for every 20 steps climbed. The stairs climbing test was predictive for postoperative complications only in lobectomy group, with the best predictive parameter being the quotient of oxygen saturation after 40 steps and test duration (positive likelihood ratio [LR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-3.38; negative LR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.76). In patients with other types of surgery the only significant predictive parameter for incident severe postoperative complications was the number of days on artificial ventilation (P=0.006). Stairs climbing test should be done in routine clinical practice as a standard test for risk assessment and prediction of the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients selected for elective surgery (lobectomy). Comparative to spirometry, it detects serious disorders in oxygen transport that are a baseline for a later development of cardiopulmonary postoperative

  11. 新型可爬梯式智能轮椅的研究和设计%Research and design of the new stair climbing intelligent wheelchair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓龙; 覃忠; 伍学明; 李成毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Study and design the new stair climbing intelligent wheelchair for the people who use wheel chair in order to be well handled in the face of the rugged road especially ladder and other obstacles. Methods: By means of research the status of the current ladder wheelchair at home and abroad, as well as market demand, the new ladder-type wheelchair parts and the drive system is based on the Y-type planetary gear, and use the AutoCAD software to draw model and analysis structure. Results: Main technical specification of the new stair climbing intelligent wheelchair as follows: speed adjustable controlled by Microprocesso, 1-10 km/h;carry weight:120 kg;maximum climbing angle:15 o;maximum climbing barrier altitude:25 cm;maximum climbing barrier width:25 cm;battery charging time:8 h. Conclusion:Main technical specifications of the system are satisfied with the national criterion.%目的:研究并设计一种新型可爬梯式智能轮椅,从而解决医院孕妇、母婴及各类需乘坐轮椅的患者在面对凹凸不平、路况复杂的道路上身旁无护理人员时不能自我处理的难题。方法:通过对目前国内、外爬梯式轮椅研究现状及市场的需求展开研究,以Y型行星轮作为可爬梯式轮椅行走部件以及驱动系统构建型轮椅结构,并用AutoCAD绘图软件建立模型进行结构分析。结果:新型可爬梯式轮椅达到的主要技术参数为:①微处理器控制,速度可调为1~10 km/h;②承重为120 kg;③最大爬坡角度为15 o左右;④最大越障高度为25 cm;⑤最大越沟宽度为25 cm;⑥充电时间为8h。结论:新型可爬梯式智能轮椅的系统主要技术指标能够满足电动轮椅的国家标准。

  12. Generalized Soft-and-Hard/DB Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Lindell, Ismo V

    2016-01-01

    A novel class of boundary conditions is introduced as a generalization of the previously defined class of soft-and-hard/DB (SHDB) boundary conditions. It is shown that the conditions for the generalized soft-and-hard/DB (GSHDB) boundary arise most naturally in a simple and straightforward manner by applying four-dimensional differential-form and dyadic formalism. At a given boundary surface, the GSHDB conditions are governed by two one-forms. In terms of Gibbsian 3D vector and dyadic algebra the GSHDB conditions are defined in terms of two vectors tangential to the boundary surface and two scalars. Considering plane-wave reflection from the GSHDB boundary, for two eigenpolarizations, the GSHDB boundary can be replaced by the PEC or PMC boundary. Special attention is paid to the problem of plane waves matched to the GSHDB boundary, defined by a 2D dispersion equation for the wave vector, making the reflection dyadic indeterminate. Examples of dispersion curves for various chosen parameters of the GSHDB boundar...

  13. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice.

  14. PPT-DB: the protein property prediction and testing database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, David S; Arndt, David; Berjanskii, Mark; Guo, An Chi; Shi, Yi; Shrivastava, Savita; Zhou, Jianjun; Zhou, You; Lin, Guohui

    2008-01-01

    The protein property prediction and testing database (PPT-DB) is a database housing nearly 30 carefully curated databases, each of which contains commonly predicted protein property information. These properties include both structural (i.e. secondary structure, contact order, disulfide pairing) and dynamic (i.e. order parameters, B-factors, folding rates) features that have been measured, derived or tabulated from a variety of sources. PPT-DB is designed to serve two purposes. First it is intended to serve as a centralized, up-to-date, freely downloadable and easily queried repository of predictable or 'derived' protein property data. In this role, PPT-DB can serve as a one-stop, fully standardized repository for developers to obtain the required training, testing and validation data needed for almost any kind of protein property prediction program they may wish to create. The second role that PPT-DB can play is as a tool for homology-based protein property prediction. Users may query PPT-DB with a sequence of interest and have a specific property predicted using a sequence similarity search against PPT-DB's extensive collection of proteins with known properties. PPT-DB exploits the well-known fact that protein structure and dynamic properties are highly conserved between homologous proteins. Predictions derived from PPT-DB's similarity searches are typically 85-95% correct (for categorical predictions, such as secondary structure) or exhibit correlations of >0.80 (for numeric predictions, such as accessible surface area). This performance is 10-20% better than what is typically obtained from standard 'ab initio' predictions. PPT-DB, its prediction utilities and all of its contents are available at http://www.pptdb.ca.

  15. Red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) intake decreases oxidative stress in obese diabetic (db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana D; Chew, Boon P; Atienza, Liezl M

    2017-07-15

    Red raspberry fruit intake was investigated on obese diabetic (db/db) mice for 8weeks. Animals fed isocaloric diets (5.3% freeze-dried raspberry, or control) were assessed for obesity-diabetes-disease risk biomarkers. Results showed that raspberry intake improved antioxidant status and lessened plasma interleukin (IL)-6 (0.3-fold of control, p0.05). Plasma levels of total cholesterol (T-CHL), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-CHL), and resistin were higher in the raspberry group. Overall, the enhanced detoxifying cell defenses exerted by raspberry intake might be due to its polyphenolics and fibre. This study demonstrates in vivo that raspberry intake, at a dose that can be achieved by human consumption, might protect against diabetes-induced oxidative stress.

  16. CouchDB NoSQL databáze

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor work deals with CouchDB database system. The main objective is to characterize the basic features and architecture of CouchDB and to show a practical example of how to work with that database system from two perspectives. To achieve that aim were studied official documents and other literature, providing a sufficient amount of information to write this. The contribution of this work lies in the fact that it serves as a guide for CouchDB, especially for Czech readers, because in ...

  17. Molecular signatures database (MSigDB) 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Subramanian, Aravind; Pinchback, Reid; Thorvaldsdóttir, Helga; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P

    2011-06-15

    Well-annotated gene sets representing the universe of the biological processes are critical for meaningful and insightful interpretation of large-scale genomic data. The Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) is one of the most widely used repositories of such sets. We report the availability of a new version of the database, MSigDB 3.0, with over 6700 gene sets, a complete revision of the collection of canonical pathways and experimental signatures from publications, enhanced annotations and upgrades to the web site. MSigDB is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.broadinstitute.org/msigdb.

  18. 楼梯对钢筋砼框架动力响应的影响分析%Analysis of the Influence of Stairs on the Dynamic Responses of Reinforced Concrete Frame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范萍萍; 赵永花

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the influence of stairs as an important system on the construction of the building. Two models are set up,one with stairs (BD2) and the other without stairs (BD1). By using time history analysis, four seismic waves recorded in II and HI sites are selected to simulate the dynamic responses of the structure of reinforced concrete frame when a strong earthquake occurs,and the accelerations and displacements of the top structure are compared as well. The results indicate that the influences of stairs are different on the dynamic responses of the reinforced concrete frame. They can be amplified or attenuated under different seismic waves. It is suggested that the influence of stairs should be considered in structural design and calculation.%楼梯作为建筑结构中重要的体系,设计方法对建筑结构有重要的影响,依据一栋钢筋混凝土框架结构建立了不带楼梯的模型(BD1)和带有楼梯的模型(BD2),选取Ⅱ、Ⅲ类场地4种地震波,采用时程分析法模拟了结构在8度大震时4种地震波作用下的动力响应,对比了顶层的加速度和位移响应.结果表明,楼梯对于钢筋混凝土框架动力响应的影响不同,在不同地震波作用下对结构响应既有放大作用也有加速衰减效果.建议在结构设计和计算过程中应该考虑楼梯对结构的作用.

  19. Spatial curved beam model and mechanical analysis of elliptical spiral stairs%椭圆旋转楼梯的空间曲梁模型与内力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周平槐; 张群力; 杨学林

    2012-01-01

    建筑中经常出现曲线型旋转楼梯,其内力分析较为复杂,国内少见这种楼梯的计算理论。结合实际工程,利用微分几何等数学方法,建立了椭圆旋转楼梯中心线为椭圆螺旋线、楼梯内外边线则为中心线主法矢上的等距线的数学模型的空间曲梁模型。基于楼梯的曲梁简化计算模型,同时选用了接近于实际作用的荷载等效作用曲线,推导出在单位力和均布荷载作用下梯梁上任一点的内力计算公式,并与有限元分析结果作了比较。分析表明,空间曲梁模型能较好地描述椭圆旋转楼梯的几何性质,公式推导和有限元分析所得的内力十分接近。其他旋转形式的楼梯,也可参考上述方法建立与其形状一致的数学模型以及内力分析,为设计提供依据。%There are many curve spiral stairs which inner forces are hard to analyze in buildings, and theories and methods of these stairs are rare domestically. Under the background of the project, the spatial curve beam differential model is established by mathematical method such as differential geometry and so on, which the center curve as elliptical helix, and the inside and outside edges as offset curves on the main normal vector of the center curve. The curve beam is modeled simply. After the equal load-curve is adopted, calculation formulas of inner forces under unit load and under vertical uniform load are obtained. Compared with the results of finite element methods ( FEM ) , it shows that mathematical modeling is in agreement with elliptical spiral stairs, the inner forces from formulations and FEM are similar. It can be reference for spiral stairs to establish the mathematical model and then analyze inner forces for design these stairs.

  20. 智能楼梯平地两用运货小车的设计%The Design of Dual Stair-flat Intelligent Freight Car

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯鹏; 石爱平; 刘进; 王钰恒

    2014-01-01

    本文设计了智能楼梯平地两用运货小车装置,以单片机为控制核心,利用角度传感器和速度传感器,采用行星轮系差动机构和摩擦棘轮结构,通过分析计算,对小车的机械结构和控制进行了设计。该小车可以自动上下楼,进行平地运动,具有防倒退和遥控功能,为货物在楼道内的运输带来了方便。%The Stair-flat amphibious intelligent freight car uses microcomputer as its control core . Using angle sensors and speed sensor , it adopted differential planetary gear train mechanism and friction ratchet wheel structure . After accurate analysis and calculation , we designed the mechanical structure and the control part of the car . The car could go downstairs and moving on land automatically, With the function of anti-backward and remote controlling , it's very convenient when transporting the goods in the passageway .

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00745-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erosum cDNA clone 6... 58 3e-04 1 ( CN216337 ) 30227 Suspension culture Solanum t...R, mRNA seque... 58 3e-04 1 ( AC233065 ) Solanum lycopersicum chromosome 9 clone C09SLe001... 58 3e-04 1 ( DN938633 ) 30227.2 Suspens...ion culture Solanum tuberosum cDNA... 58 3e-04 1 ( DB702841 ) Solanum lycopersicum

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13694-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available N142696 ) WOUND1_11_D06.g1_A002 Wounded leaves Sorghum bico... 42 0.001 2 ( DB861...0.001 2 ( CN143316 ) WOUND1_15_B04.g1_A002 Wounded leaves Sorghum bico... 42 0.00...ssue Osmerus mo... 42 0.001 2 ( CN150824 ) WOUND1_71_E05.g1_A002 Wounded leaves Sorghum bico... 42 0.001 2 (

  3. The PKD inhibitor CID755673 enhances cardiac function in diabetic db/db mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Venardos

    Full Text Available The development of diabetic cardiomyopathy is a key contributor to heart failure and mortality in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Current therapeutic interventions for T2D have limited impact on the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Clearly, new therapies are urgently needed. A potential therapeutic target is protein kinase D (PKD, which is activated by metabolic insults and implicated in the regulation of cardiac metabolism, contractility and hypertrophy. We therefore hypothesised that PKD inhibition would enhance cardiac function in T2D mice. We first validated the obese and T2D db/db mouse as a model of early stage diabetic cardiomyopathy, which was characterised by both diastolic and systolic dysfunction, without overt alterations in left ventricular morphology. These functional characteristics were also associated with increased PKD2 phosphorylation in the fed state and a gene expression signature characteristic of PKD activation. Acute administration of the PKD inhibitor CID755673 to normal mice reduced both PKD1 and 2 phosphorylation in a time and dose-dependent manner. Chronic CID755673 administration to T2D db/db mice for two weeks reduced expression of the gene expression signature of PKD activation, enhanced indices of both diastolic and systolic left ventricular function and was associated with reduced heart weight. These alterations in cardiac function were independent of changes in glucose homeostasis, insulin action and body composition. These findings suggest that PKD inhibition could be an effective strategy to enhance heart function in obese and diabetic patients and provide an impetus for further mechanistic investigations into the role of PKD in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  4. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in db/db Mice through the AMPK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Qing Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Salvianolic acid B (Sal B, a major polyphenolic compound of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been shown to possess potential antidiabetic activities. However, the action mechanism of SalB in type 2 diabetes has not been investigated extensively. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Sal B on diabetes-related metabolic changes in a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, as well as its potential molecular mechanism. Methods: Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were orally treated with Sal B (50 and 100 mg/kg or metformin (positive drug, 300 mg/kg for 6 weeks. Results: Both doses of Sal B significantly decreased fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, triglyceride and free fatty acid levels, reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and improved insulin intolerance in db/db mice. High dose Sal B also significantly improved glucose intolerance, increased hepatic glycolytic gene expression and muscle glycogen content, and ameliorated histopathological alterations of pancreas, similar to metformin. Sal B treatment resulted in increased phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK protein expression in skeletal muscle and liver, increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 and glycogen synthase protein expressions in skeletal muscle, and increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (p-ACC protein expressions in liver. Conclusion: Our data suggest that Sal B displays beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes at least in part via modulation of the AMPK pathway.

  5. Oral green tea catechins transiently lower plasma glucose concentrations in female db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Silvia; Schrader, Eva; Rimbach, Gerald; Wolffram, Siegfried

    2013-04-01

    Polyphenols, including green tea catechins, are secondary plant compounds often discussed in the context of health-promoting potential. Evidence for such effects is mainly derived from epidemiological and cell culture studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate antidiabetic, antiadipogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects at nonpharmacological doses in an obese diabetic mouse model that exerts early relevant clinical signs of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Female db/db mice received a flavonoid-poor diet either without additive, with rosiglitazone (RSG, 0.02 g/kg diet), or with green tea extract (low-dose green tea extract [LGTE] and high-dose green tea extract [HGTE], 0.1 and 1 g/kg diet). Food and water were freely available. The body weight was monitored weekly. Blood was sampled (12-h fasted) from the tail vein on day 28 and analyzed for glucose, cholesterol, triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids, insulin, adiponectin, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Blood glucose was also analyzed on day 14. Furthermore, sICAM-1 release was investigated in tumor necrosis factor alpha-stimulated EAhy926 cells. After 14 days, fasting glycemia was improved by RSG or HGTE supplementation compared to controls. However, at the end of the study (day 28), only RSG exhibited glucose-lowering effects and induced plasma adiponectin concentrations, paralleled by higher body weight gain and reduced periuterine fat pads compared to controls. However, only GTE treatment reduced sICAM-1 release in vitro and in vivo. Nonpharmacological HGTE supplementation in db/db mice caused (1) no adiponectin-inducing or antiadipogenic effects, (2) reduced sICAM-1 release, thereby potentially exerting anti-inflammatory effects in the progressive diabetic state, and (3) a transient improvement in glycemia.

  6. Impaired Corpus Cavernosum Relaxation Is Accompanied by Increased Oxidative Stress and Up-Regulation of the Rho-Kinase Pathway in Diabetic (Db/Db) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priviero, Fernanda B M; Toque, Haroldo A F; Nunes, Kenia Pedrosa; Priolli, Denise G; Teixeira, Cleber E; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Basal release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells modulates contractile activity in the corpus cavernosum via inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate nitric oxide bioavailability, oxidative stress and the Rho-kinase pathway in the relaxation of the corpus cavernosum of an obese and diabetic model of mice (db/db mice). We hypothesized that in db/db mice impaired relaxation induced by Rho-kinase inhibitor is accompanied by diminished NO bioavailability, increased oxidative stress and upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway. Cavernosal strips from male lean and non-diabetic db/+ and db/db mice were mounted in myographs and isometric force in response to Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was recorded. Enzyme activity and protein expression of oxidative stress markers and key molecules of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway were analyzed. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 concentration-dependently caused corpus cavernosum relaxation and inhibited cavernosal contractions. Nonetheless, a rightward shift in the curves obtained in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice was observed. Compared to db/+, this strain presented increased active RhoA, higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation stimulated by phenylephrine, and increased expression of ROKα and Rho-GEFs. Further, we observed normal expression of endothelial and neuronal NOS in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice. However, nitrate/nitrate (NOx) levels were diminished, suggesting decreased NO bioavailability. We measured the oxidant status and observed increased lipid peroxidation, with decreased SOD activity and expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that in db/db mice, upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway was accompanied by decreased NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress contributing to impaired relaxation of the corpus cavermosum of db/db mice.

  7. Impaired Corpus Cavernosum Relaxation Is Accompanied by Increased Oxidative Stress and Up-Regulation of the Rho-Kinase Pathway in Diabetic (Db/Db Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda B M Priviero

    Full Text Available Basal release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells modulates contractile activity in the corpus cavernosum via inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate nitric oxide bioavailability, oxidative stress and the Rho-kinase pathway in the relaxation of the corpus cavernosum of an obese and diabetic model of mice (db/db mice. We hypothesized that in db/db mice impaired relaxation induced by Rho-kinase inhibitor is accompanied by diminished NO bioavailability, increased oxidative stress and upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway. Cavernosal strips from male lean and non-diabetic db/+ and db/db mice were mounted in myographs and isometric force in response to Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was recorded. Enzyme activity and protein expression of oxidative stress markers and key molecules of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway were analyzed. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 concentration-dependently caused corpus cavernosum relaxation and inhibited cavernosal contractions. Nonetheless, a rightward shift in the curves obtained in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice was observed. Compared to db/+, this strain presented increased active RhoA, higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation stimulated by phenylephrine, and increased expression of ROKα and Rho-GEFs. Further, we observed normal expression of endothelial and neuronal NOS in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice. However, nitrate/nitrate (NOx levels were diminished, suggesting decreased NO bioavailability. We measured the oxidant status and observed increased lipid peroxidation, with decreased SOD activity and expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that in db/db mice, upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway was accompanied by decreased NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress contributing to impaired relaxation of the corpus cavermosum of db/db mice.

  8. The business value of DB2 for z/OS IBM DB2 analytics accelerator and optimizer

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, John; Li, Ruiping; Parekh, Surekha; Purcell, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first release of DB2, this book highlights the important milestones, capabilities, and impacts of the database management software for IBM's mainframe operating system. Special focus is given to IBM DB2 Analytics Accelerator, covering the key design and operational aspects that enable IBM DB2 for z/OS clients to benefit from faster performance, reduced CPU usage, and lower costs. The second half of the book discusses performance enhancements and cost-saving measures in the version 10 release and is rich with hints and tips for a successful upgrade. A spe

  9. SolveDB: Integrating Optimization Problem Solvers Into SQL Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world decision problems involve solving optimization problems based on data in an SQL database. Traditionally, solving such problems requires combining a DBMS with optimization software packages for each required class of problems (e.g. linear and constraint programming) -- leading...... to workflows that are cumbersome, complex, inefficient, and error-prone. In this paper, we present SolveDB - a DBMS for optimization applications. SolveDB supports solvers for different problem classes and offers seamless data management and optimization problem solving in a pure SQL-based setting. This allows...... for much simpler and more effective solutions of database-based optimization problems. SolveDB is based on the 3-level ANSI/SPARC architecture and allows formulating, solving, and analysing solutions of optimization problems using a single so-called solve query. SolveDB provides (1) an SQL-based syntax...

  10. StarDB: a large-scale DBMS for strings

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed

    2015-08-01

    Strings and applications using them are proliferating in science and business. Currently, strings are stored in file systems and processed using ad-hoc procedural code. Existing techniques are not flexible and cannot efficiently handle complex queries or large datasets. In this paper, we demonstrate StarDB, a distributed database system for analytics on strings. StarDB hides data and system complexities and allows users to focus on analytics. It uses a comprehensive set of parallel string operations and provides a declarative query language to solve complex queries. StarDB automatically tunes itself and runs with over 90% efficiency on supercomputers, public clouds, clusters, and workstations. We test StarDB using real datasets that are 2 orders of magnitude larger than the datasets reported by previous works.

  11. Eukaryotic Pathogen Database Resources (EuPathDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — EuPathDB Bioinformatics Resource Center for Biodefense and Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Diseases is a portal for accessing genomic-scale datasets associated with...

  12. Download - Plabrain DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...escription Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - Plabrain DB | LSDB Archive ...

  13. dbSNP: the NCBI database of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, S T; Ward, M H; Kholodov, M; Baker, J; Phan, L; Smigielski, E M; Sirotkin, K

    2001-01-01

    In response to a need for a general catalog of genome variation to address the large-scale sampling designs required by association studies, gene mapping and evolutionary biology, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has established the dbSNP database [S.T.Sherry, M.Ward and K. Sirotkin (1999) Genome Res., 9, 677-679]. Submissions to dbSNP will be integrated with other sources of information at NCBI such as GenBank, PubMed, LocusLink and the Human Genome Project data. The complete contents of dbSNP are available to the public at website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP. The complete contents of dbSNP can also be downloaded in multiple formats via anonymous FTP at ftp://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/snp/.

  14. GigaDB: announcing the GigaScience database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneddon Tam P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the launch of GigaScience journal, here we provide insight into the accompanying database GigaDB, which allows the integration of manuscript publication with supporting data and tools. Reinforcing and upholding GigaScience’s goals to promote open-data and reproducibility of research, GigaDB also aims to provide a home, when a suitable public repository does not exist, for the supporting data or tools featured in the journal and beyond.

  15. GigaDB: announcing the GigaScience database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Tam P; Li, Peter; Edmunds, Scott C

    2012-07-12

    With the launch of GigaScience journal, here we provide insight into the accompanying database GigaDB, which allows the integration of manuscript publication with supporting data and tools. Reinforcing and upholding GigaScience's goals to promote open-data and reproducibility of research, GigaDB also aims to provide a home, when a suitable public repository does not exist, for the supporting data or tools featured in the journal and beyond.

  16. DB2 10.1 fundamentals certification study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Roger E

    2014-01-01

    Beginning with an explanation of the certification process and working through fundamental exam objectives, this guide gives test-takers all they need to know to pass IBM's DB2 10.1 Fundamentals certification exam (Exam 610). All the subjects covered on the exam are included: planning, security, data concurrency, working with databases and database objects, working with data using SQL and XQuery, working with DB2 tables, views, and indexes-and more. The book concludes with an

  17. LocSigDB: a database of protein localization signals

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Simarjeet; Pandey, Sanjit; Srinivasan, Satish M; Mohammed, Akram; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    LocSigDB (http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/) is a manually curated database of experimental protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations; primarily in a eukaryotic cell with brief coverage of bacterial proteins. Proteins must be localized at their appropriate subcellular compartment to perform their desired function. Mislocalization of proteins to unintended locations is a causative factor for many human diseases; therefore, collection of known sorting signals will hel...

  18. LocSigDB: a database of protein localization signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Simarjeet; Pandey, Sanjit; Srinivasan, Satish M; Mohammed, Akram; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    LocSigDB (http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/) is a manually curated database of experimental protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations; primarily in a eukaryotic cell with brief coverage of bacterial proteins. Proteins must be localized at their appropriate subcellular compartment to perform their desired function. Mislocalization of proteins to unintended locations is a causative factor for many human diseases; therefore, collection of known sorting signals will help support many important areas of biomedical research. By performing an extensive literature study, we compiled a collection of 533 experimentally determined localization signals, along with the proteins that harbor such signals. Each signal in the LocSigDB is annotated with its localization, source, PubMed references and is linked to the proteins in UniProt database along with the organism information that contain the same amino acid pattern as the given signal. From LocSigDB webserver, users can download the whole database or browse/search for data using an intuitive query interface. To date, LocSigDB is the most comprehensive compendium of protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations. Database URL: http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/

  19. 上、下楼梯时认知任务介入对下肢协调性影响的研究%Effect of Intervention of Cognitive Tasks during Stair Negotiation on Lower Extremity Inter-joint Coordination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 王长生; 祝捷; 谷松; Reza Seyedi; Reza Zourmand; Susilo

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨上、下楼梯时附加认知任务,年龄差异(组间)及任务难度(组内)对步态时空及下肢关节协调参数的影响。方法:18位健康老年人为老年组,18位健康大学生为年轻组,各组内均为9男9女,依次接受认知任务测试、上、下楼测试(单任务)及上、下楼合并认知任务测试(双任务)。结果:认知任务方面,两种任务情境下各年龄组上楼回答次数皆显著多于下楼。步态参数方面,两种任务情境下年轻组相对于老年组,以及各年龄组在单任务情境下相对于双任务,皆呈现较短步行时间、较快步行频率、速度及较大步行长度的情形。下肢协调性方面,年轻组上楼过渡时摆动期的膝‐踝协调稳定度在双任务下较单任务差,而处于双任务情境下,年轻组上楼过程中支撑期的膝‐踝协调稳定度比老年组差;年轻组下楼过程中摆动期的髋‐膝协调稳定度在ST 和DT 中都比老年组差,老年组膝‐踝协调稳定度比年轻组差,下楼过渡时,年轻组支撑期髋‐膝协调稳定度在两种任务情境下皆比老年组差。结论:老年人和年轻人会根据任务难度来选择是否专注于认知任务上,此外年轻人因有足够下肢肌力控制而采取较大胆动作策略,导致其上下楼梯时下肢协调稳定度较差,而老年人则趋向选择较保守的策略来维持下肢关节协调稳定度。%Objective :The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aging and different conditions on cognitive performance ,spatiotemporal gait parameters and lower extremity inter‐joint coordination during stair negotiation .Method :18 healthy elderly adults (EA ) and 18 healthy young adults (YA ) were recruited in this study to perform a cognitive task on sitting posture .They also perform stair negotiation (single task ;ST ) and stair negotiation with cogni‐tive task (dual task ;DT

  20. Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) extract increases insulin sensitivity and regulates hepatic glucose in C57BL/Ksj-db/db mice

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chan Joo; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Han, Ji-Sook

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of jicama extract on hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Male C57BL/Ksj-db/db mice were divided into groups subsequently fed a regular diet (controls), or diet supplemented with jicama extract, and rosiglitazone. After 6 weeks, blood levels of glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were significantly lower in animals administered the jicama extract than the control group. Additionally, glucose and insulin tolerance tests...

  1. DB2 9 for Linux, Unix, and Windows database administration certification study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    In DB2 9 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows Database Administration Certification Study Guide, Roger E. Sanders-one of the world's leading DB2 authors and an active participant in the development of IBM's DB2 certification exams-covers everything a reader needs to know to pass the DB2 9 UDB DBA Certification Test (731).This comprehensive study guide steps you through all of the topics that are covered on the test, including server management, data placement, database access, analyzing DB2 activity, DB2 utilities, high availability, security, and much more. Each chapter contains an extensive set of p

  2. Pluronic L-81 ameliorates diabetic symptoms in db/db mice through transcriptional regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wo-Shing Au; Li-Wei Lu; Sidney Tam; Otis King Hung Ko; Billy KC Chow; Ming-Liang He; Samuel S Ng; Chung-Man Yeung; Ching-Chiu Liu; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie C Lin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To test whether oral L-81 treatment could improve the condition of mice with diabetes and to investigate how L-81 regulates microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity in the liver.METHODS: Genetically diabetic (db /db ) mice were fed on chow supplemented with or without L-81 for 4 wk. The body weight, plasma glucose level, plasma lipid profile, and adipocyte volume of the db /db mice were assessed after treatment. Toxicity of L-81 was also evaluated. To understand the molecular mechanism,HepG2 cells were treated with L-81 and the effects on apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and mRNA level of the MTP gene were assessed. RESULTS: Treatment of db /db mice with L-81 significantly reduced and nearly normalized their body weight, hyperphagia and polydipsia. L-81 also markedly decreased the fasting plasma glucose level, improved glucose tolerance, and attenuated the elevated levels of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride. At the effective dosage, little toxicity was observed. Treatment of HepG2 cells with L-81 not only inhibited apoB secretion, but also significantly decreased the mRNA level of the MTP gene. Similar to the action of insulin, L-81 exerted its effect on the MTP promoter. CONCLUSION: L-81 represents a promising candidate in the development of a selective insulin-mimetic molecule and an anti-diabetic agent.

  3. Anti-diabetic effect of amorphastilbol through PPARα/γ dual activation in db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woojung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kwon, Hak Cheol [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Amorphastilbol stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ. ► Amorphastilbol improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. ► There are no side effects, such as hepatomegaly, in amorphastilbol-treated mice. ► Amorphastilbol can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against T2DM. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered as desirable targets for metabolic syndrome treatments, even though their specific agonists have several side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. The effects of amorphastilbol (APH) on glucose- and lipid metabolism were investigated with in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte systems and in vivo db/db mice model. APH selectively stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ, which are able to enhance fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization. Furthermore, APH improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. More importantly, there are no significant side effects, such as weight gain or hepatomegaly, in APH-treated animals, implying that APH do not adversely affect liver or lipid metabolism. All our data suggest that APH can be used as potential therapeutic agents against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders, including obesity, by enhancing glucose and lipid metabolism.

  4. Pitavastatin suppresses diethylnitrosamine-induced liver preneoplasms in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochi Takahiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities, including inflammation and lipid accumulation in the liver, play a role in liver carcinogenesis. Adipocytokine imbalances, such as decreased serum adiponectin levels, are also involved in obesity-related liver tumorigenesis. In the present study, we examined the effects of pitavastatin - a drug used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia - on the development of diethylnitrosamine (DEN-induced liver preneoplastic lesions in C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db obese mice. Methods Male db/db mice were administered tap water containing 40 ppm DEN for 2 weeks and were subsequently fed a diet containing 1 ppm or 10 ppm pitavastatin for 14 weeks. Results At sacrifice, feeding with 10 ppm pitavastatin significantly inhibited the development of hepatic premalignant lesions, foci of cellular alteration, as compared to that in the untreated group by inducing apoptosis, but inhibiting cell proliferation. Pitavastatin improved liver steatosis and activated the AMPK-α protein in the liver. It also decreased free fatty acid and aminotransferases levels, while increasing adiponectin levels in the serum. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and the expression of TNF-α and interleukin-6 mRNAs in the liver were decreased by pitavastatin treatment, suggesting attenuation of the chronic inflammation induced by excess fat deposition. Conclusions Pitavastatin is effective in inhibiting the early phase of obesity-related liver tumorigenesis and, therefore, may be useful in the chemoprevention of liver cancer in obese individuals.

  5. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. {yields} DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. {yields} Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single {beta}-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  6. Qing-Hua Granule induces GLP-1 secretion via bitter taste receptor in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Xu, Jie; Hou, Ruifang; Jin, Xin; Wang, Jingyi; Yang, Na; Yang, Li; Liu, Li; Tao, Feng; Lu, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Qing-Hua Granule (QHG), the modified formulation of a classical Chinese prescription named Gegen Qinlian Decoction, was clinically employed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through regulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the potential mechanism is unknown. We investigate whether QHG induces GLP-1 secretion via activation of bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) pathway in the gastrointestinal tract of db/db mice. The db/db mice were intragastrically (i.g.) administered QHG (low/medium/high dose) once daily for 8 weeks. GLP-1 secretion was evaluated. The bitter receptor signaling pathway, which regulates GLP-1 secretion, including TAS2R5 (a subtype of TAS2R), α-gustducin (Gαgust), 1-phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate phosphodiesterase beta-2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5), was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The biochemical observations of ileum and pancreas tissue were detected histopathologically. Acquity Ultra Performance LCTM - Micromass ZQ 2000 (UPLC-MS) was used for the phytochemical analysis. QHG exhibited significant and dose-dependent effect on GLP-1 secretion in db/db mice, along with significant up-regulation of TAS2R5 mRNA level and activation of TAS2R pathway (ptaste receptor pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The idiosyncrasies of (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 MIMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sabari; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Padmanaban, E.; Mukhopadhyay, Chhanda

    2015-10-01

    In this present study we explore the mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) resulting from the combination of the BBIM(bis-benzimidazolium)-alkane systems with DB30C10 (Dibenzo-30-crown-10) in solvent acetonitrile. The (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 systems chosen for the study are (BBIM)DB30C10, (BBIM-methane)DB30C10, (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10. 1H NMR, 2D-NMR (COSY and NOESY), Monte Carlo calculations and HRMS have been done on the studied assemblies. Even though (BBIM)DB30C10 and (BBIM-methane)DB30C10 form normal threaded structures, in (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10 systems the respective axles are cradled inside the crown ether. That is, the axles BBIM-ethane, BBIM-propane and BBIM-butane are cradled inside the boat-like cavity of DB30C10.

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13178-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 152 Length of database: 95,242,211,685 Length adjustment: 22 Effectiv...e length of query: 130 Effective length of database: 93,199,600,587 Effective searc... of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 0 Effective length of query: 50 Effective length of database: 1,051,180,864 Effective... search space: 0 Effective search space used: 0 Neighboring words threshold: 12 Wind...h space: 12115948076310 Effective search space used: 12115948076310 X1: 11 (21.8

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01774-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query: 128 Effective length of database: 99,544,435,898 Effecti...ve search space: 12741687794944 Effective search space used: 12741687794944 X1: 11 ...ngth of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 0 Effective length of query: 50 Effective length of database: 1,051,180,864 Effect...ive search space: 0 Effective search space used: 0 Neigh...ts to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 150 Length of database: 101,790,757,118

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12651-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10616-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query: 113 Effective length of database: 93,199,600,587 Effect...ive search space: 10531554866331 Effective search space used: 10531554866331 X1: 11... Length of database: 1,040,966,779 Length adjustment: 19 Effective length of query: 26 Effective length of database: 980,085,364 Effe...ctive search space: 25482219464 Effective search space u...Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 135 Length of database: 95,242,211,68

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02245-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tive length of query: 110 Effective length of database: 99,544,435,898 Effective... search space: 10949887948780 Effective search space used: 10949887948780 X1: 11 (21...th of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 18 Effective length of query: 26 Effective length of database: 992,922,802 Effective... search space: 25815992852 Effective search space used: ...to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 132 Length of database: 101,790,757,118 Length adjustment: 22 Effec

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13173-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ective length of query: 86 Effective length of database: 93,199,600,587 Effective... search space: 8015165650482 Effective search space used: 8015165650482 X1: 11 (21.... Length of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 10 Effective length of query: 26 Effective length of d...atabase: 1,018,815,274 Effective search space: 26489197124 Effective search space...ts to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 108 Length of database: 95,242,211,685 Length adjustment: 22 Eff

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04414-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 44 8.6 1 ( DV547508 ) rbcmb0_000208 Chaetomium cupreum mycelium cDNA li... 44 8.6 1 ( DV547506 ) rbcmb0_...000206 Chaetomium cupreum mycelium cDNA li... 44 8.6 1 ( DV547503 ) rbcmb0_000203 Chaetomium cupreum mycel...ium cDNA li... 44 8.6 1 ( DV547502 ) rbcmb0_000202 Chaetomium cupreum mycelium cDNA... li... 44 8.6 1 ( DV547441 ) rbcmb0_000101 Chaetomium cupreum mycelium cDNA li... 44 8.6 1 ( DB915235 ) Idio

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04605-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 46 2.2 1 ( DB766622 ) Apis mellifera head cDNA, RIKEN full-length enric... 46 2.2 1 ( FG291142 ) 1108793330728 New World... Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG290464 ) 1108793321772 New World... Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG288754 ) 1108793276247 New World Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs ...C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG285961 ) 1108770710727 New World Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( CT030663 ) Mouse ..._142_D08_3APR2008_058 BN18DYSC Brassic... 44 8.7 1 ( FG286796 ) 1108770726415 New World

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13142-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uccessful extensions: 6 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 2 length of query: 114 length of database: 5,6...74,871 effective HSP length: 14 effective length of query: 100 effective length o...trix:1 -3 Number of Sequences: 92845959 Number of Hits to DB: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query...: 114 Length of database: 95,242,211,685 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query...SP's successfully gapped: 0 Length of query: 38 Length of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 12 Effective length of query

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13621-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f Sequences: 6905 Number of extensions: 0 Number of successful extensions: 0 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 length of query...: 133 length of database: 5,674,871 effective HSP length: 14 effective length of query...to DB: 3,568,583 Number of extensions: 17016 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query: 133 Le...ngth of database: 95,242,211,685 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of query:...extensions: 4 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's gapped: 4 Number of HSP's successfully gapped: 0 Length of quer

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14023-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06523-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tter than 10.0: 0 length of query: 316 length of database: 5,674,871 effective HSP length: 15 effective length of query...er of Hits to DB: 1,110,463 Number of extensions: 29607 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query...: 316 Length of database: 95,242,211,685 Length adjustment: 23 Effective length of query: 293 Effective l...ccessfully gapped: 0 Length of query: 105 Length of database: 1,040,966,779 Length adjustment: 73 Effective length of query

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02648-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f sequences better than 10.0: 0 length of query: 143 length of database: 5,674,871 effective HSP length: 15 effective length of query... 102105510 Number of Hits to DB: 1,243,602 Number of extensions: 63519 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Length of query...: 143 Length of database: 101,790,757,118 Length adjustment: 22 Effective length of quer...676559 Number of sequences better than 10.0: 0 Number of HSP's gapped: 0 Number of HSP's successfully gapped: 0 Length of query...: 47 Length of database: 1,051,180,864 Length adjustment: 20 Effective length of query: 2

  3. Coronary Arterioles in Type 2 Diabetic (db/db) Mice Undergo a Distinct Pattern of Remodeling Associated with Decreased Vessel Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paige S.; Trask, Aaron J.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Hutchinson, Kirk R.; Galantowicz, Maarten L.; Lord, Kevin C.; Stewart, James A.; Cismowski, Mary J.; Varner, Kurt J.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) on coronary arteriole remodeling. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms that underlie coronary arteriole structural remodeling in type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice. Methods and Results Passive structural properties of septal coronary arterioles isolated from 12- and 16-wk-old diabetic db/db and control mice were assessed by pressure myography. Coronary arterioles from 12-wk-old db/db mice were structurally similar to age-matched controls. By 16-wks of age, coronary wall thickness was increased in db/db arterioles (p < 0.01), while luminal diameter was reduced (Control: 118±5μm; db/db: 102±4μm, p < 0.05), augmenting the wall-to-lumen ratio by 58% (Control: 5.9±0.6; db/db: 9.5±0.4, p < 0.001). Inward hypertrophic remodeling was accompanied by a 56% decrease in elastic modulus (p < 0.05, indicating decreased vessel coronary wall stiffness) and a ~30% reduction in coronary flow reserve in diabetic mice. Interestingly, aortic pulse wave velocity and femoral artery incremental modulus were increased (p < 0.05) in db/db mice, indicating macrovascular stiffness. Molecular tissue analysis revealed increased elastin-to-collagen ratio in diabetic coronaries when compared to control and a decrease in the same ratio in the diabetic aortas. Conclusions These data show that coronary arterioles isolated from type 2 diabetic mice undergo inward hypertrophic remodeling associated with decreased stiffness and increased elastin-to-collagen ratio which results in a decreased coronary flow reserve. This study suggests that coronary microvessels undergo a different pattern of remodeling from macrovessels in type 2 DM. PMID:21744279

  4. InterProScan Result: DB670049 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DB670049 DB670049_2_ORF1 A67A4A4AD4AA3090 PANTHER PTHR11405:SF3 CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE...cess (GO:0006520)|Molecular Function: carboxyl- or carbamoyltransferase activity (GO:0016743) ...

  5. MannDB: A microbial annotation database for protein characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Lam, M; Smith, J; Zemla, A; Dyer, M; Kuczmarski, T; Vitalis, E; Slezak, T

    2006-05-19

    MannDB was created to meet a need for rapid, comprehensive automated protein sequence analyses to support selection of proteins suitable as targets for driving the development of reagents for pathogen or protein toxin detection. Because a large number of open-source tools were needed, it was necessary to produce a software system to scale the computations for whole-proteome analysis. Thus, we built a fully automated system for executing software tools and for storage, integration, and display of automated protein sequence analysis and annotation data. MannDB is a relational database that organizes data resulting from fully automated, high-throughput protein-sequence analyses using open-source tools. Types of analyses provided include predictions of cleavage, chemical properties, classification, features, functional assignment, post-translational modifications, motifs, antigenicity, and secondary structure. Proteomes (lists of hypothetical and known proteins) are downloaded and parsed from Genbank and then inserted into MannDB, and annotations from SwissProt are downloaded when identifiers are found in the Genbank entry or when identical sequences are identified. Currently 36 open-source tools are run against MannDB protein sequences either on local systems or by means of batch submission to external servers. In addition, BLAST against protein entries in MvirDB, our database of microbial virulence factors, is performed. A web client browser enables viewing of computational results and downloaded annotations, and a query tool enables structured and free-text search capabilities. When available, links to external databases, including MvirDB, are provided. MannDB contains whole-proteome analyses for at least one representative organism from each category of biological threat organism listed by APHIS, CDC, HHS, NIAID, USDA, USFDA, and WHO. MannDB comprises a large number of genomes and comprehensive protein sequence analyses representing organisms listed as high

  6. Antihyperglycemic and Antiobesity Effects of JAL2 on db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lonicera japonica Thunb. (LJT and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch. (RGL have been used traditionally as a herbal medicine in Korean medicine. Using LC/Q-TOF was performed to profile the two herbal medicines and the mixture of LJR and RGL (JAL2, ratio 1 : 1. We performed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and plasma GLP-1 and insulin secretion by multiplex assays to investigate antidiabetic effects of LJT, RGL, and JAL2 in db/db mice, the mice model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Also, the antiobesity-related factors such as plasma peptide YY (PYY, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and weight of liver, epididymal, and retroperitoneal fat tissue were investigated. Through the multiplex assay, it was found that JAL2 treatment more efficiently attenuated high levels of blood glucose by stimulating GLP-1 secretion and reduced LDL concentration and weight of liver and retroperitoneal fat tissue compared to LJT or RGL treated separately. These results suggest that the JAL2 has antidiabetes and antiobesity effects in T2DM mice model.

  7. NaoXinTong Inhibits the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Buchang NaoXinTong capsule (NXT is a Chinese Materia Medica standardized product extracted from 16 Chinese traditional medical herbs and widely used for treatment of patients with cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases in China. Formation of microaneurysms plays an important role in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated if  NXT can protect diabetic mice against the development of diabetic retinopathy. The db/db mice (~6 weeks old, a diabetic animal model, were divided into two groups and fed normal chow or plus NXT for 14 weeks. During the treatment, fasting blood glucose levels were monthly determined. After treatment, retinas were collected to determine retinal thickness, accumulation of carbohydrate macromolecules, and caspase-3 (CAS-3 expression. Our results demonstrate that administration of NXT decreased fasting blood glucose levels. Associated with the decreased glucose levels, NXT blocked the diabetes-induced shrink of multiple layers, such as photoreceptor layer and outer nuclear/plexiform layers, in the retina. NXT also inhibited the diabetes-induced expression of CAS-3 protein and mRNA, MMP-2/9 and TNFα mRNA, accumulation of carbohydrate macromolecules, and formation of acellular capillaries in the retina. Taken together, our study shows that NXT can inhibit the development of diabetic retinopathy and suggests a new potential application of NXT in clinic.

  8. Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Woojung; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kim, Yong Kee

    2012-08-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPARα/γ dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

  9. AphanoDB: a genomic resource for Aphanomyces pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wincker Patrick

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Oomycete genus Aphanomyces comprises devastating plant and animal pathogens. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of Aphanomyces species. In this study, we report on the development of a public database called AphanoDB which is dedicated to Aphanomyces genomic data. As a first step, a large collection of Expressed Sequence Tags was obtained from the legume pathogen A. euteiches, which was then processed and collected into AphanoDB. Description Two cDNA libraries of A. euteiches were created: one from mycelium growing on synthetic medium and one from mycelium grown in contact to root tissues of the model legume Medicago truncatula. From these libraries, 18,684 expressed sequence tags were obtained and assembled into 7,977 unigenes which were compared to public databases for annotation. Queries on AphanoDB allow the users to retrieve information for each unigene including similarity to known protein sequences, protein domains and Gene Ontology classification. Statistical analysis of EST frequency from the two different growth conditions was also added to the database. Conclusion AphanoDB is a public database with a user-friendly web interface. The sequence report pages are the main web interface which provides all annotation details for each unigene. These interactive sequence report pages are easily available through text, BLAST, Gene Ontology and expression profile search utilities. AphanoDB is available from URL: http://www.polebio.scsv.ups-tlse.fr/aphano/.

  10. IBM DB2信息管理解决方案概览

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ IBM信息管理产品可以分为数据库(DB2UDB/Informix),商业智能(DB2 OLAP和Intelligent Miner,Warehouse Manager,Redbrick),内容管理Content Management),DB2信息集成软件(Information Integrator)和DB2数据库工具五大类.

  11. Repin1 deficiency improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in db/db mice by reducing adipose tissue mass and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Anne; Hesselbarth, Nico; Gericke, Martin; Kern, Matthias; Dommel, Sebastian; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Klöting, Nora

    2016-09-09

    Replication initiator 1 (Repin1) is a zinc finger protein playing a role in insulin sensitivity, body fat mass and lipid metabolism by regulating the expression key genes of glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that introgression of a Repin1 deletion into db/db mice improves glucose metabolism in vivo. We generated a whole body Repin1 deficient db/db double knockout mouse (Rep1(-/-)x db/db) and systematically characterized the consequences of Repin1 deficiency on insulin sensitivity, glucose and lipid metabolism parameters and fat mass. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies revealed significantly improved insulin sensitivity in Rep1(-/-)x db/db mice, which are also characterized by lower HbA1c, lower body fat mass and reduced adipose tissue (AT) inflammation area. Our study provides evidence that loss of Repin1 in db/db mice improves insulin sensitivity and reduces chronic hyperglycemia most likely by reducing fat mass and AT inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Update History of This Database - dbQSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us dbQSNP Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/16 dbQSNP English archiv...e Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - dbQSNP | LSDB Archive ...

  13. Update History of This Database - DB-SPIRE | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us DB-SPIRE Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/16 DB-SPIRE English ar...ase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - DB-SPIRE | LSDB Archive ...

  14. Molecular signatures database (MSigDB) 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Subramanian, Aravind; Pinchback, Reid; Thorvaldsdóttir, Helga; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Well-annotated gene sets representing the universe of the biological processes are critical for meaningful and insightful interpretation of large-scale genomic data. The Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) is one of the most widely used repositories of such sets. Results: We report the availability of a new version of the database, MSigDB 3.0, with over 6700 gene sets, a complete revision of the collection of canonical pathways and experimental signatures from publications, enhanced annotations and upgrades to the web site. Availability and Implementation: MSigDB is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.broadinstitute.org/msigdb. Contact: gsea@broadinstitute.org PMID:21546393

  15. HieranoiDB: a database of orthologs inferred by Hieranoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduk, Mateusz; Riegler, Christian; Lemp, Oliver; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2017-01-01

    HieranoiDB (http://hieranoiDB.sbc.su.se) is a freely available on-line database for hierarchical groups of orthologs inferred by the Hieranoid algorithm. It infers orthologs at each node in a species guide tree with the InParanoid algorithm as it progresses from the leaves to the root. Here we present a database HieranoiDB with a web interface that makes it easy to search and visualize the output of Hieranoid, and to download it in various formats. Searching can be performed using protein description, identifier or sequence. In this first version, orthologs are available for the 66 Quest for Orthologs reference proteomes. The ortholog trees are shown graphically and interactively with marked speciation and duplication nodes that show the inferred evolutionary scenario, and allow for correct extraction of predicted orthologs from the Hieranoid trees. PMID:27742821

  16. XTalkDB: a database of signaling pathway crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Sarah A.; Teel, Joelle; Tegge, Allison N.; Bharadwaj, Aditya; Murali, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of signaling pathways and their crosstalk is a cornerstone of systems biology. Thousands of papers have been published on these topics. Surprisingly, there is no database that carefully and explicitly documents crosstalk between specific pairs of signaling pathways. We have developed XTalkDB (http://www.xtalkdb.org) to fill this very important gap. XTalkDB contains curated information for 650 pairs of pathways from over 1600 publications. In addition, the database reports the molecular components (e.g. proteins, hormones, microRNAs) that mediate crosstalk between a pair of pathways and the species and tissue in which the crosstalk was observed. The XTalkDB website provides an easy-to-use interface for scientists to browse crosstalk information by querying one or more pathways or molecules of interest. PMID:27899583

  17. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using a stair-shaped reflector arrangement and a single-ended scintillation light readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with the ability to encode depth-of-interaction (DOI) information allow us to simultaneously improve the spatial resolution and sensitivity of PET scanners. In this study, we propose a DOI PET detector based on a stair-pattern reflector arrangement inserted between pixelated crystals and a single-ended scintillation light readout. The main advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity; DOI information is decoded from a flood map and the data can be simply acquired by using a single-ended readout system. Another potential advantage is that the two-step DOI detectors can provide the largest peak position distance in a flood map because two-dimensional peak positions can be evenly distributed. We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation and obtained flood maps. Then, we conducted experimental studies using two-step DOI arrays of 5  ×  5 Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5:Ce crystals with a cross-section of 1.7  ×  1.7 mm2 and different detector configurations: an unpolished single-layer (US) array, a polished single-layer (PS) array and a polished stacked two-layer (PT) array. For each detector configuration, both air gaps and room-temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone gaps were tested. Detectors US and PT showed good peak separation in each scintillator with an average peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and distance-to-width ratio (DWR) of 2.09 and 1.53, respectively. Detector PSRTV showed lower PVR and DWR (1.65 and 1.34, respectively). The configuration of detector PTAir is preferable for the construction of time-of-flight-DOI detectors because timing resolution was degraded by only about 40 ps compared with that of a non-DOI detector. The performance of detectors USAir and PSRTV was lower than that of a non-DOI detector, and thus these designs are favorable when the manufacturing cost is more important than timing performance. The results demonstrate that the proposed DOI-encoding method is a promising candidate for PET

  18. ReadDB Provides Efficient Storage for Mapped Short Reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gifford David K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high-throughput sequencing has enabled sequencing based measurements of cellular function, with an individual measurement potentially consisting of more than 108 reads. While tools are available for aligning sets of reads to genomes and interpreting the results, fewer tools have been developed to address the storage and retrieval requirements of large collections of aligned datasets. We present ReadDB, a network accessible column store database system for aligned high-throughput read datasets. Results ReadDB stores collections of aligned read positions and provides a client interface to support visualization and analysis. ReadDB is implemented as a network server that responds to queries on genomic intervals in an experiment with either the set of contained reads or a histogram based interval summary. Tests on datasets ranging from 105 to 108 reads demonstrate that ReadDB performance is generally within a factor of two of local-storage based methods and often three to five times better than other network-based methods. Conclusions ReadDB is a high-performance foundation for ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analysis. The client-server model provides convenient access to compute cluster nodes or desktop visualization software without requiring a shared network filesystem or large amounts of local storage. The client code provides a simple interface for fast data access to visualization or analysis. ReadDB provides a new way to store genome-aligned reads for use in applications where read sequence and alignment mismatches are not needed.

  19. NGSmethDB 2017: enhanced methylomes and differential methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrón, Ricardo; Gómez-Martín, Cristina; Carpena, Pedro; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Barturen, Guillermo; Hackenberg, Michael; Oliver, José L

    2017-01-04

    The 2017 update of NGSmethDB stores whole genome methylomes generated from short-read data sets obtained by bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) technology. To generate high-quality methylomes, stringent quality controls were integrated with third-part software, adding also a two-step mapping process to exploit the advantages of the new genome assembly models. The samples were all profiled under constant parameter settings, thus enabling comparative downstream analyses. Besides a significant increase in the number of samples, NGSmethDB now includes two additional data-types, which are a valuable resource for the discovery of methylation epigenetic biomarkers: (i) differentially methylated single-cytosines; and (ii) methylation segments (i.e. genome regions of homogeneous methylation). The NGSmethDB back-end is now based on MongoDB, a NoSQL hierarchical database using JSON-formatted documents and dynamic schemas, thus accelerating sample comparative analyses. Besides conventional database dumps, track hubs were implemented, which improved database access, visualization in genome browsers and comparative analyses to third-part annotations. In addition, the database can be also accessed through a RESTful API. Lastly, a Python client and a multiplatform virtual machine allow for program-driven access from user desktop. This way, private methylation data can be compared to NGSmethDB without the need to upload them to public servers. Database website: http://bioinfo2.ugr.es/NGSmethDB. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. License - Plabrain DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Plabrain DB License to Use This Database Last updated : 2010/12/16 You may use this database in compliance w...se and the requirements you must follow in using this database.... The license for this database is specified in the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.1 Japan... . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database as follows: Plabrain DB © 2010.... The summary of the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.1 Japan is found here . With regard to this database